Los Angeles Valley College - Crown Yearbook (Valley Glen, CA)

 - Class of 1974

Page 66 of 120

 

Los Angeles Valley College - Crown Yearbook (Valley Glen, CA) online yearbook collection, 1974 Edition, Page 66 of 120
Page 66 of 120



Los Angeles Valley College - Crown Yearbook (Valley Glen, CA) online yearbook collection, 1974 Edition, Page 65
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Los Angeles Valley College - Crown Yearbook (Valley Glen, CA) online yearbook collection, 1974 Edition, Page 67
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Page 66 text:

: qxr, Hector Grillone portrayed the only "human" character in the "Folderol" cast. As the Mad Hatter, he paid special attention to create a half-animal, half-human character, through make-up. 6 5 By Vanessa Finan Illustrated by Ken Hively and lohn Rosenfield Super stars have their clothes shredded, politicians are drained of philosophical idealisms, and Clara Bella Chicken is plucked of her feathers. It is a rare occasion when after a theatrical performance an audience can lavish their love upon fabricated charac- ters and not be disillusioned by the per- sonality ofthe thespian behind the make- up. Theresa Candiclo, Clara Bella Chicken, was confronted with hugs and adoration from children who attended Valley Col- lege's Chilclren's Theater production of "Electric Folderolf' The cast competently retained their characters on stage and off and gave an admirable encore by social- izing with the audience after their per- formance-never once breaking the char- acter illusions they created on stage. The cost of an extra bag of feathers was A familiar face in "Folderol" was Dan Krecelberg's, as Marchibald 62 Hare.

Page 65 text:

Metamorphosis By Carolyn Ristuccia Illustrated by Robert Lachman and lohn Rosenfield The lanky lady is in character. With fluttering lashes and scarlet lips styled to cosmetic perfection, she studies her reflection in a nearby mirror. Backstage, Katie Nutting, one of the leads in Peter Parkin's November production of "You Can't Take It With You," resettles herself in a chair. Smoothing out the folds in her knee-length costume, Katie crosses her long legs and waits for the makeup man to add the finishing touches to her "aging face." The process of transforming a graceful 25-year-old into a flighty menopause victim requires a working knowledge of human physiognomy and technical facility with theatrical makeup. Metamorphized by the clever fingers of makeup artist Marsha McGinley, and a battery of bottles, sponges and pencils, Miss Nutting, playing the part of Penelope Sycamore, emerges as one affected by the symptoms of acute schizophrenia. Everything except the posture of her wiry frame appears rearranged. Nose, mouth, eyes, and chin exude the essence of middle-age delusion. The character of Mrs. Sycamore, a scatter- brained author of off-beat plays, comes to life. "Do you want me to do anything special?" twitters Mrs. Sycamore in a lisping falsetto. For the benefit of a photographer and the small group gathered around her, the comical actress breaks into a rather retarded rendition of "Tea for Two." Mike Ham, as Paul Sycamore, finds interest in the "whys and wherefores" of everything from Trotsky to fireworks. Grandfather Vanderhof, played by Steve Kaye, delights in the simple pleasures of life, such as snake hunting and dodging the internal Revenue Service. While she gives her impromptu performance, a nest of curls balanced precariously atop her '40's style Marcel fan "updo" of tortured tendrils lacquered into submissionj sways like a palm tree from side to side. Up close, Katie's face is a maze of artificial lines and shadows. The crow's feet, the deep furrows in her forehead, the creases around her mouth, do not create her character, they merely serve to illuminate. With makeup, the trying task of slipping into character is made a little easier. Lending itself as a sort of psychological slingshot, makeup may cement a bond of dramatic intimacy between the actor and his audience. Through its use, subtle nuances of character come clear on a screen of visual realism. Even the simplest gesture provides the actor with another opportunity to give added insight into his role. The batting of an eyelid, the drawing back of lips, the sporadic twitching of muscles are physical manifestations of the internal personality. When actor and makeup artist combine talents to blend the natural with the contrived elements of personality, life is injected into the veins of an otherwise one-dimensional charac- ter. Because those on the departmental production staff were successful in making these professional distinctions, quality made Valley's presentation of "You Can't Take It With You" one of the biggest successes of the theatrical year. 61



Page 67 text:

Fltillllltl' Ill' Illllll ? reimbursed a thousand-fold, and can materialize itself through the obvious en- joyment the children experienced through viewing the performance. The predominantly animal cast was infiltrated by one human character, the Mad Hatter, portrayed by Valley College Student Hector Grillone. Costuming and vivacious physical movement were what Crillone felt to be the prominent emphasis of Folderol's finished product. He explained Folderol's styling as being slapstick, with little free- dom being allotted to the audience's imaginative realm. Crillone explained that this technique is not necessarily a standard procedure in Children's Theater. He attri- buted pantomime as being the most effec- tive and descriptive method for visual communication, and credits children with having extraordinarily vivid imaginations. Working from memory and a previous character appearance sketch, Ken Barker way? Randy Sheriff, Talouse the Labrador Moose, gave Skllfufll' applies his makeup- an overpowering performance, and Ken Barker won the chiIdren's hearts with his performance as Maccabe Bee. l ii . 'll When relating his minority experiences with Folderol, Crillone said, "I felt left out because everybody elsewas an animal."All cast characters were held responsible for compiling individual interpretations of their animal characters on a physical level. Grillone found this task to be extremely difficult, for he attempted to present himself as part-human and part-animal in order to stabilize the continuity of the animal-dominated cast. " It was surprising to see that the adults enjoyed 'Electric Folderol' more than the kids," said Crillone. The boundless fantasy of Children's Theater reaches not only the adolescent mind but succeeds in tackling the intellec- tual and realistic mind. Perhaps you were among the gathering group of children and, as a result of social training, you forced yourself to go home without asking for one of Clara Bella Chicken's feathers. 63

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Los Angeles Valley College - Crown Yearbook (Valley Glen, CA) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

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