Gorham Normal School - Green and White Yearbook (Gorham, ME)

 - Class of 1960

Page 1 of 184

 

Gorham Normal School - Green and White Yearbook (Gorham, ME) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 184 of the 1960 volume:

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Hillcrest we wish to let you see how we, as college students, try to make the most of every advantage availa- ble to us. Our college is a growing one, dedicated to preparing and sending forth students who will face with eagerness and capability the challenge of educating the young citizens of our country. Here cooperation in work and fun makes the college years memorable and satisfying. We of the Hillcrest staff hope you will read and reread this 1960 edition with pleasure. lt is a good record of a good year. NINETEEN FIFTY-NINE-SIXTY VOL. 40 HILLCREST GORHAM STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE Gorham :: :: Maine . ,. W h, . Nw Q . , ,M 1-Ma,W'-'U-A KJ , 1 - 1, v .. K ,px Q45 'N' x -N 5-. , " W, , Wm ,X . 1h --Aft ' ll -my-qu-, . . -.. 0- stfui-,I .., Rl I A v ' , 1 M ,, li, 'L ' M H ' w V .' -'N W V 1 N . . h., ,' - -,,-...am -N 5. A X . f 1 r . ' V -" 4 . .W - 1. 4, - . X P ' " -fir ' .' Q . AQ I I x L ,VQ5 wax vlaqme, ' 3., , ,,-7"",-404-."1f f -""" - v'-f'4,.41a ' ' v , - - , . . + p'-'-,,:s-sl? ,' ' 1 ... . -L .J m.M.-.-f.54LfL- 5' , - vs-': .f5'Sg-58.13427 - - En. , ' .. ' W -mFi5"4- ' V -A un .- Qfw,m4, fg,..s. vu.. -3 1-I WWW ., aw -.nm-wiv. 'til 4: -Q ?"'4'3"a4K' -is V -I V 1 r M , 4 . 'viii - a- - ' X' 4 ' Q1 Q, -. N :wh it V 1. urn- L -.ww V ,w f,-2 vu... s... ,,,....,. 4--1""k"'i .adv . asain' 5 A.. x. 5. '1 4 K . f. X N H Ax '- V -."2l. 'W "fc'Q2'E-gg i ,Q , ,Q ' 1 . Y uv 1" Lfwff ' . . "Ph s v. 4 "4-1.3. ' - , 1- .SL ' ' , .""'A" 'Ax .' Wit W:-W HQQM as .95 llll jacuffy- .gfuclenf .cnirienclahila . 1 nm. " ' , " Al. , ,1 s , ,H at Y - sm, s t. 5 IL It is often the numerous little things a person does and says that endear him to his fellow man. With this thought in mind, we, the Senior class of 1960, respectfully dedicate this yearbook to Mr. James Whitten. As the class advisor for the past four years, Mr. Whitten has guided us skillfully through many difficult situations. From those of us whom he has helped to help ourselves, comes a tribute to his understanding and thoughtfulness. From others whose only contact with him has been in the classroom, comes a deep respect for his progressive ideas and his constructive philosophy. His readiness to advise, combined with his ability to devise, characterizes a distinc- tive personality. We thank you, Mr. Whitten, both for ourselves and for the many others who share our esteem for you. 4 Mrs. D. Dunton To Mr. Theodore Lunt, superintendent of ildings and grounds, the class of 1960 ex- ds its appreciation for immeasurable services. e shall remember you as the man with a ndred-and-one duties by whose punctuality could set a watch. he class of 1960 appreciates, more than rds can express, the privilege of sharing the st four years with Mrs. Dorothea Dunton, semother of Woodward Hall. he is loved by both men and women on pus, and to many she is a mother away m home. If one is only as old as one's heart, is but a youngster. Mrs. Lydia Paltsits, housemother of Andrews Hall, in two short years has gained the appreciation of the class of 1960 through her gift of understanding. We shall remember her for her generous heart and active mind. Mr. T. Lunt Mrs. L. Paltsits wifi ,aa if H X9 w ' " T my me, 'Q vig Jiwfwy .95 cpeagjkzigzg jogefker wi 6 Tr V T- Q L , EF,-x - X Z- - Zvi, r. .L 'T ' 1 S535 .,- -,f.M5Vf,ivg'tf 'Q' ,a-i,.1n75Q ' Milf gr-'Y4f'4sg,f'1.t jf -n 3 '-lie ' lt. 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M J xx l A Q 9 9 f x Q W- '2 ' si.: 5 Sfudmfg-Sfaff 'lftjorlfing owar a ommon goal! -Y." ,V VI 1 , 5 X41 FACULTY SENIORS UN DERCLASSMEN , I ACTIVITIES LITERARY and ART ATHLETICS ADVERTISING I3 TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE PAGE PAGE PAGE PAGE PAGE PAGE I I I I 4 76 84 36 42 64 4 w, f H , 935: ,. Hr -in gi, qi M M A-24? ww ' 1 7 X ,U '. ,ggi 5 ,ai Y . incur' i :Qu 52:35 1' Q .1 Q 5 4 x r ,, si 9, ,ff 'S .mg x w xy... .K L. a L Z QQ 5 5 1 Q , 3' fi vgmsz, . x W n ef n W X. UQ! gm- x if . f QS- -ff ciieuing a goal F ac fy x x . ' f 1 . x Mu, ,.. ..-, -44. ,Mx - .W A S - . 1, 1. Q. Q 11 , x x . . -., gf. - - X , .. , .. -If 1, nl. .J . A , . ,J .X-,I',. . .,,.,,. 1. ,vw A , ,. ,f ., . . . . ...W ' ,, '. : fl .. .,. '.,l ' ,A 'Af' 1 .I -Uv . -.V 3, F. - cy. -.t b " ' 5 -'.' .f K" 1' "Q .- wJ'.y:'. .As 5,,. 'lv ,I ' -J'.,. V - ..',-,QL .,g . vw- ,--.. ' -...N-l '. ',e'v."'2C"'fI-. , Q. ,,.. ..u...,. 4 5.-1".f, ,J ' rs V-,. .,,-g.sl.:" , ,. " - . ., f ., '."'. .. ' 'IFJ - .-L L, -y. . 5-11.5 - . .,,v- -, 1'- If . J...-Q ,X .h , ---.,--.. x .,,. P :wL+wQ-f - -A 3 ... -J- .4 -o. - , N. ', , 4- 4,-4, .1 Z., bd-..n!',, . -.L I,- N ' . ,. 5 ,..,.- V-,.., . l 4, IV.: , t . , N . I. .1 A - L ,,,.j.4,f U. . .. - - t ,l .. ' ,if-,1 ,,ffi, , f A ' .',- . Q - 'f .'. ' '- Fil' ., .. 'ffl'-4.3 . A 'D ,-' x.-:I A A-' Q-1' " - 4- Q , 3 - ' . f 5 5.1. - 1 ,fn P -:. Q5-lf: , 1 .. - 'v . - . " 1- '..- - . lr.. v,.g..u".-1' at ' ' ' ' . fN.':'-- , x' ' ' -:P . ' in . -13, -,Q -- .. ,. - X I :EMI 1,5 ,. V- ,, . I, , - 1 . ff N ij .x. - I, t.,..4,.- . .. .. .,, ,,, . ' r ..l , ,Q V- 4-,"l I -..."' 'Lu' Q -. . .1-A . - .J . ,. ,ja-. .xdclminid frafion Sfimufafora of :Ae nciuiring Wino! DR. FRANClS L. BAILEY Gorham, Maine President A.B. University of Michigan, A.M. Univer- sity of Michigan, PH.D. Columbia University. an efficient and forward-thinking administrative staff. Gorham State Teachers College is most fortunate in having administrators who within ten years plan to make this campus one of the most modern in the state. Always they put the welfare and happiness of the student body first and the result is the admiration and appreciation of the students for their administrators. D NE of the most imperative requirements of an up-and-coming college is Heading the executive department is our President, Dr. Francis L. Bailey, who is never too busy for the students' problems. He is actively interested in student . activities and willing at any time to give his personal attention to each individual. Fairness and utmost consideration characterize all his dealings with the students and faculty. Assisting Dr. Bailey is Mr. Ralph E. Duso, the business and plant manager. His duties include the supervision of all maintenance, repairs, and new con- struction. In addition to his regular duties, he makes it a point to become friends with the students and is always available for any needed help. 18 fkf 3' 3 Qf 'W i ig -wi .5 l J MR. RALPH E. DUSO DR. KENNETH BROOKS MR. ALLSTON SMITH Gorham, Maine Gorham, Maine South Portland, Maine Business and Plant Manager Dean of Instruction Registrar, Jr. High Ed., English B.Ed. Keene Teachers College, A.B. University of New Hamp- B.S. Boston University, M.S. Uni- M.A. New York University. shire, M.ED. Boston University: versity of Maine. D.ED. Boston University. Serving as registrar for our growing college is Mr. Alston Smith. His work involves three areas of the academic community: faculty, students, and adminis- tration. Though constantly busy, he can find time to be personally interested in all the college affairs. A new administrative position was introduced at Gorham this fall, that of dean of faculty, and it is a pleasure to have Dr. Kenneth Brooks capably filling it. It is to our leaders that Gorham State Teachers College owes a large debt, for their combined ingenuity has given us many of the privileges now enjoyed and will give us in the future an even better school of which we can be increasingly proud. 134 v, '51 urricu um fferd xlaerience jlzrou .gjfuclenf jean' in Q TUDENT teaching is generally considered to be the most exciting phase of the entire teacher-education program. It is the culmination of three years of study and preparation for the teaching profession. The purpose of student teaching is to provide each senior with an opportunity to experience all the requisites of teaching: preparing, planning, demonstrating, discussing, evalu- ating, guiding, counseling, reacting to the needs of girls and boys as well as those of the community, and associating with fellow teachers and administrators. For one-half year, student teaching is conducted in the Campus School and cooperating schools throughout the state. The grade levels and the supervis- ing teachers are carefully selected to meet the needs of the program. The principal, supervisors and superintendents of schools, in addition to the college faculty, provide encouragement and assistance along the way. Frequent visita- tions provide the link between the college and the student in terms of accom- plishment and evaluation. Closely related to student teaching is the role played by the placement office. lts director notifies all eligible candidates for teaching positions of avail- able openings and arranges for interviews where necessary. Through its efforts, students who have successfully completed their college requirements are intro- duced to their first positions. The success of this program has been insured by many dedicated and professionally-minded teachers and administrators who give their time and effort to make the teachers of tomorrow worthy members of the profession. 2 0 gps: , ,. f y tx l ,-f 2l"50l'lI'le DR. JOHN MITCHELL Gorham, Maine Professor and Chairman of Industrial Arts Department, Supervisor of Industrial Arts Student Teaching. B.S. Fitchburg State Teachers College: M.A. University of Minnesota: D.Ed. Penn- sylvania State University. MISS MILDRED PEABODY South Windham, Maine Reading, Primary Education, Student Teaching. B.S. Gorham State Teachers College: M.Ed. Boston University: University of Maine: University of New Hampshire. MISS EVELYN LITTLEFIELD Gorham, Maine Introduction to Teaching and Placement Consultant. B.S. Defiance College: M.S. Columbia Uni- versity: University of New Hampshire: Bos ton University. ulaeruifior MISS ETHELYN UPTON Milbridge, Maine Director of Student Teaching and Guiding Educational Experiences. B.S. Columbia University: M.A. Columbia University: Graduate Study Syracuse Uni- versity, Boston University, University of Maine. MRS. MELISSA COSTELLO Gorham, Maine Assistant Director of Student Teaching oncl Elementary and Junior High Education B.S. Gorham State Teachers College: M.Ed University of Maine: Post Graduate Work, University of Maine. 21 - , f , , A gi ,I ,I l I' gi. l 'X Q . I 4 S L? 4 an c in A S rm H. We 1 . . I ..,w.s:f.gg?fwg - :.- ' 7-gsm g t,:i.g:-M.t,..:.-F'-T' I A 'ill ,. , V W U? H Q52 Q-1-'2S"" ' 9 - WM. 'f .Wt ,S - ,gwi ' 'W . .. -I .. -, .. . , . ' 'I ww mm t ff? f ' W ii, 'ui in W. - it Q lm 3, R it 3 H 'L xi K viii-1-.f ,Y H ,, ,,, li: t 1 ft- 'X 'f1fiz',, f e g g ,t 1 it wwife' w fm. . .' , i tfswsw-f-V I Z1 if g,f'31,?g:i,-in .s ul - is f ex -L, I I Sf: 9' 'mf ,ww 'Vi x X ' , " " x , 'cyb- . i , ,f LAL .ldwudfhlenf jAI'0u eaff HE men's Physical Education Department at lil Gorham State Teachers College has a program of physical instruction which consists of an introduction to the fundamental skills of gymnastics, soccer, volleyball, football, and basketball. Likewise, our women's physical education is based on the same pattern as the men's department. Our advisors strive to promote physical growth and de- velopment through a variety of activities. ln addition, the department offers health instruc- tion which correlates very closely with the physical activities. In recent years the department has added courses in coaching and elementary physical education. Aims are directed toward the administration, management, and coaching of team sports. Children from the Campus School often participate in many of the ac- tivities planned and carried out by members of these courses. Programs of both freshmen and sophomores in- clude a health course which deals primarily with the basic health problems which any teacher may expect to meet in any classroom. 22., MISS DORIS FITZ Gorham, Maine Health and Physical Education lglcyfiicaf gialucafion B.S. Boston University: MEd Bos ton University. MR. RICHARD WESCOTT Gorham, Maine Health, Physical Eclucation, Dean of Men. B.A. Colby Collegey M.Ecl. Boston University. MR. RICHARD COSTELLO Gorham, Maine Health and Physical Education MISS JEANETTE GOODWIN Director of Athletics. Auburn, Maine B.S. University of Alabama: M.S. PIWYSICUI ECIUCUNUW University of illinoisg Springfield 5.5, Sqfgenf Cgllegei M Ed Spring College. field College. u Ili? :fr .gnclud fria Aff., The oldest of the specialized programs here on the Hill is the strong program in Industrial Arts Education which benefits many men each year. The Industrial Arts course here is a complete and thorough one, including the fields of electricity and electronics, transportation and general shops organi- zation, woodworking, mechanical drawing, metals, arts and design, and others of equal value and importance. Excellent courses in arts and crafts are offered to upperclassmen as electives. These courses are most valuable and are enioyed by all students taking them. With a well-qualified staff, it is little wonder that our Industrial Arts course' is so popular among the men. Students in this course are given the best possible training to make them assets to the state in this practical field. mis DR JOHN MITCHELL Gorham Maine Professor and Chairman of Industrial Arts Department MR. JOHN GREER Gorham, Maine Woodworking and Drafting B.S. Gorham State Teachers College: M.ED. Pennsylvania State University: University of Connecticut. MR. ARTHUR O. BERRY Westbrook, Maine BS Fitchburg State Teachers College MA Unl I versity of Minnesota D ED Pennsylvania State Mew 5 University B.S. Gorham State Teachers College: M.ED. Llnlllll xecufcn guafuafin :U ,,,. X-' 1 'tl 9' hlg'1k7,'5.gg H34 ze . - -A .tit-V .. f 4'iF:'2t -tix -5.3.5-nem,f,sf:-ss. 5:2 -1315.5 H, as s f "" " is--in-e-. -,f".f . -f-.,,1:qxo-ijt-1,1 i- " ' 1, A e.1f2'fwa:3 '3H5::': ,een .H ,. -.HTELEH v r -.-.EGL , 3.5 -if ,df , .Aj,A,.4. .: .. -,.,,.uL: - : mi 4' rw ..,. . 1, i! J fe" LQ. -..., - 34 Q J Z ....,. .v.. ai, intl- ff ev.. A.. ,i .le C... 1, , ma' ,gf , ,,-. ....-es.. l r- -.:..Z4ef- . . . , ,,.4 1 to w ,,.- me-.n .t T 1 w 9. J. ff.: ,. - , .gtg 1:-en.-e: . . t , f--1 '1..g,,.j-,...':.'5.g.-,,,,.g,, -'gr 3 'Vw '.j.3:gt:5-1 !,- 'f s,,g,,,44,:.-'.:'.-jg.-g I ' 'f ,511f.756ff:i,t.4'.:,:j.,'1.. 5' JL "' S- :w'.'I:-' ', 'f:r'f'iv'I72'f'1'fi' it , ' ' lf,.,i'ff..J1-:J u.'N '!'f"f't'1'i H-. if iiliiiiif 1 - ftfffftcffg rv'.::.',-4151.151 gl: .Y :,.'fs,:ff:G51rz,g:g .'.'gl'?5i1glJ:if. ' r 1 if y 1 I , -tg.: V 5 5. ..t.,,Nge: W.-tv - .,-.-, , ',...,, .' f -t .. tr.. . Qi. ,L H A A.sf:if'Yff5!?:1".3Ff15i!i51'. L " f:fIs:-.- -J J' iff 6 gl -J . the ,. V, ici. LI,-:gig v :MEL 5.5: L., , . --: v'::::-1047:-Q' --v--Q..-5 . -.- ,-. .. , ..-.... ., 1 , Y' 5.3.-:-e--f-:-n.-,:- - - V- 1, , , l ,. a. ..--...Q . .., .. ze ....,...,.,, ' 51254-"faNe1:Q4Izi-L.. : ,, f 3--. '1'Pz3E..-- Q31 ft-Aly ,I , ,rf Pennsylvania State University: University of Connecticut. MR. ALBERT BROWN Gorham, Maine Electricity B.S. Buffalo State Teachers College: M.A. University of Minnesota: Pennsylvania State University. MR. ELWOOD PADHAM Gorham, Maine Transportation B.S. Gorham State Teachers College: University of Maryland. . ,-J L,-ST "Z, 1 .L 'Q at 'Z ' 41" 'f"'L' 25 4 T ,- , e,...,t', ,Z W. 1.6 - ,.-- . -,Ss Q, L- Le 1'I'V. L11 Y , .- fm. , ,. ,... -ee., - -- -.-t . 1, 1 . , , ti f. H,g,..-3' 1 - ' '. ti ,sf 'l . 5, . f..,...e,. -.Q-1, Y 1 ..,i ,- fi" f He F' t ' t i , A' if ll l is in Q jl p, 1"1 1,5 -gt in P, ' rye.-A e U e Ola in ,ala r e c i a fi 0 n all Mnclergi fanalin . -t f. tt 5 .rl-1' ,rw - ,mtv t lwww v - w 1 tm ,tt tt ,wt-..1..,w.1ft wt t 23.5 5 M v ye , .M :fir 3575 .t , t' ' r 5, . it 1 ,,,, vw- ,aww ,it ,, fe- t lv tt si ' I i- 1..3:,-' ' ' id, HE music department is now in its 'Fourth year ll? of the new program for music maiors. The program is designed to prepare music super- visors who will have the necessary skills and experi- ence to teach all phases of music from the elementary grades through high school. The curriculum includes courses in music history, theory, vocal and instru- mental conducting, methods, and instrumental classes, as well as liberal arts and education courses. ln addition to the specialized program, the music department also offers music appreciation, funda- mentals, elementary and junior high methods, which are required courses for the general student body. Aesthetics and instrumental classes are oltered as electives. In the Spring of 1958 the State Board of Education approved Art Education to be instituted at Gorham State Teachers College as a maior course. Graduates of this course are certified by the State Department of Education to teach and supervise art in the ele- mentary and high schools of the state. Certain basic talents and minimum requirements are necessary for enrollment in the course to insure the best possible product at the end of the tour-year plan. E We are proud of our Music and Art Departments for, they are fine examples of the varied opportunities offered in the teaching profession. L .xdrf MR. SAMUEL BROCATO Gorham, Maine Art. Gorham Normal Schooly B.S. Rutgers Uni- versifyp M.S. Universify of Maine. MRS. GWEN SAWTELLE Gorham, Maine Art. B.S. University of Minnesofag M.A. George Peabody College 'For Teachers. MR. GIRARD CHAMBERLAND Gorham, Maine Music. B, of Music, Boston Universifyp M. of . I B U . . P U . . f MISS MIRIAM ANDREWS gxlsggowiogzlnvardnlverslfy I'llVef5Ify o Gorham, Maine Music. B.S. Columbia University: M.A. Columbia University: New England Conservaforyp Juilliard. MISS HELEN HEEL Gorham, Maine Music and Campus School. B.S. Gorham State Teachers Collegep M. of Music, University of Michigan. . Am! ufiic L, .44 ,. :J Y-'. FOG, efllfl M LQLU5 A broad and varied program of social studies is altered by most interesting faculty members, each of whom aims to give Gorham's prospective teachers a broad knowledge of the past and to alert them to the problems of the present The required courses lay a strong framework for basic understanding of other courses. The 'Freshmen are given a two-semester course in the history of civilization. The sophomores are required to take sociology, geography, and a two-semester course in United States history. The iunior required courses are economics and Maine history Correlating with the required subiects are varied electives from which to choose. Some of the electives are political, economic, and regional geography criminology, marriage, anthropology, colonial history, and others of equal interest and values The members of the department feel that wide reading and travel are essential to an understanding of the world today. Mr. Moberg and the N.A.T.A take the lead in promoting the latter. All members of the department take pride in the wide use made of magazines and books by the students of the college BSR-r X 4 X Q .AT EW 1' ,i i. .. :pm 1' -. ,,l"',, ii15Ei?2,,,'l,,i,,,. g-mwsqrgia.. se 5.-- ,- L Q: Y g . . - 1 Y ' u n ww: 1.13: . - . . f 'ttEi..'Xe5,'l' - I ., we Fl?f.,g.tT'1 M F 'M 1 , V- N .- I :5"g.g-49iJgll1lig"'ttf ef. 'EQI :h"' ' w , ' Sf: 54: gf , g'lll .f Www v ' - . ' ". ' 1 -- 'i " - 1. - I . 2-1 Fi ., iw'-,Vis 1 ti MISS ESTHER WOOD Blue Hill, Maine History. B.A. Colby College, M.A. Radcliffe Col- lege. ,fl MR. WENSEL MOBERG Gorham, Maine Geography. B.A. Clark University, M.A. Clark Unlver sity, University of Maine. MR. PAUL BARKER West Buxton, Maine Sociology and Economics. B.A. Wittenberg College, M.S. Emporio State Teachers College, B.D. Colgate- Rochester Divinity Schoolp Berlin Univer- sityp Tubingen University, Boston Univer- sity. MR. ALLEN PEASE Gorham, Maine Social Studies. B.A. Colby College, M.A. Ohio State Uni- versity, University of New Hampshire. MISS EDNA DICKEY Gorham, Maine Dean of Women, History. B.A. University of New Hampshirep M.A. University of New Hampshire, Syracuse University, Wesleyan University, Columbia University. 29 . ,WH ww is tml K., -i l, ocia .syfuclied 9? A , :aw ' . xxg- rainin in A 9 I UR college library, centrally located on the second floor of Corthell Hall, D consists of three rooms - the reading room, the periodical room, and the librarian's office, which also serves as the cataloging room. The main reading room houses the general collection of approximately twenty thousand books, microfilm reader, and card catalog. lt has a seating capacity of ninety. Open shelves provide 'Free access to all materials - books, current periodicals, bound periodicals, and the vertical file of pamphlets, pictures, and clippings. The college student who learns to use the library intelligently has acquired a skill which will be useful throughout his life. What is even more important, through books he may grow not only in knowledge but in wisdom and understanding. Psychology is a vital factor in the working knowledge of a teacher so we are fortunate to have such good courses in this subject at Gorham State Teachers College. Through the various phases of psychology the students learn how to better understand and deal with the classes and individuals who will be their future pupils. The value of college psychology courses will prove to be limitless in a teaching career. 30 lu - ut 1,yl:,W N54 X Q95 tt FMT? lgtggg, ,tlpw 1 126, ' t "' 6 uC6ltl0l'l Am! A CAM, ? 9? MR JAMES WHITTEN DR LINCOLN T FISH Gorham Mcnne Gorham Maine Hlstory and Education. Psychology and Mcuthemcutncs BA Colby College MA. University f BS Umversnty ofMc1me MA Umverslty Maine Boston University of Mmne Ed D Boston Unlverslty 0l'Yll9I'eAeI'l lil an The members ofthe English department at Gorham believe that an educated person, especially a teacher, should be articulate, acquainted with his cultural heritage, and appreciative of the insights and esthetic pleasures to be found in literature. The English program is, accordingly, designed to help the potential teacher to use language effectively and to 'Form the habit of reading widely and discriminatingly. Freshman English combines composition and the critical study of basic types of literature. lt is 'Followed in the sophomore year by a semester of English literature and one of American literature. A course in speech is required of seniors. ln addition, electives in literature, composition, and the teaching of English are offered. The mathematics department offers three types of courses: for general edu cation, for elective specialization, and for teaching procedures and concepts. The 'Freshman class is sectioned according to previous mathematical instruction so that each student may acquire a background of the nature and significance of mathematics, geared to his highest level of learning. Electives are offered in college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry, ditterential and integral calculus, and statistics. The nece-ssity for developing ability to think with numbers is recognized as an important objective of all teachers. 32 lf'P!W" MISS MARY PEABODY South Windham, Maine Mathematics. oston University: M.Ed. Bos iversityy University of Mclineg sity of New Hampshire. ,,, .,, . ,. .,.. wut ww tu uv -S. MR. WILLARD ARNOLD MISS ELIZABETH SAWYER MR. HAROLD NEUBERGER Gorham, Maine Seorsport, Maine P0l'llCll1d, Maine English, Literature, Biology, MGlhemGflCS, B.A. DePauw Universityg M.Ed. Bos- B-A- UY1iVeY5lfY of MUlnEi M.A. Bos- Physical Science Y tan Universityg M.A. University of ton Universityp Middlebury College. B-5- l0WU'We5l9YU" C0lle9e: M5- lowq, University of New Mexico: Research Fellow New York University Medi- cal School. nggalz .xdncl Wafkemaficd Q.. 'wil , If 1 MR STANLEY VINCENT Gorham, Mame English. B.A. Boston University: M.A. Colum- bio University. MRS. PEARL FICKETT Gorham, Maine B.A. University of Malnep Graduate Study University of Maine. 33 I iacouer , Q. -.-1.-. :ll Q 1 r 0 u V N important component in the education of any person in the twentieth AX century is science. It might even be said that any person who is ignorant of science can never claim to be truly educated. In an attempt to insure that our future teachers will be scientifically literate, this college requires that all freshmen have a year of biological science and that all sophomores have a year of physical science. The department is operating in a beautiful new building with excellent facilities. The courses now being taught offer superior advantages to the students because of more adequate space, smaller classes, improved facilities, and a more specialized faculty. Through the selected content of the courses an attempt is made to familiarize the student with the fundamental concepts of science, the scientific method, and laboratory techniques. In addition to the required courses, students may choose electives from the many offered. The science department hopes to expand its offering of electives in the near future to include other valuable courses included in the many fields of science. kann' V Fw--, L N H I I' v TQ! Kit T 11 M -1 1 "., ga. ' -4 - gt- f .fa ,V , lyk ll I I "P . lv 1 is l 7 1 qt il ll A -.1 , U si l a 5 ui Q n Q ,,, 1 I u K X ' ., n 3 g I I g tl T nw ' jfs A 2" ls V nes'-.Aff 1 l l.."'-K. ., S' , 34 V ' Q' ie- Y., 7 T ' 1 ' H If llql ' irrr . 13. T VA ...M . 1.5. S I., .,,, Wk T lt: l Wy 1 H im fm, . 1. , W aw . vgllugv ,nh , u X en.: X , T ' F-':E:4..g,f.1E... 133. -. -nib.. -f :J .. . .... ,- . -1' lg- . gp. .SN 5 ,Q . , QQ VPB' W A RS, , 11 ks , ut - . . .1-N" " tfwmvtftl if-Ja' .nil L V1 1 ' x Q . lumix' vi' gif' :lift I1 wiqali ,.--l w. 1' LLL: v. ..-:..N,N. 'u " -W .:--Q13-S l....lgq-.v.1t., '.,,,-99' .x. yy 1 ,N J H311-'..-l-l"t1..,.g..,,Q1-xffxcglh , I-. '-, lo ,HQ ity, 1-Evud, -nf Qs, W 5 Y ..- 'in 1i'sz:"Qz fx .Qs-'Q i 4 i W T l .N X x ti I 'Tl' 1- 1 Sv -4,1-. . -xt 4 gtg. v Y, - lx L 1 , 4 V, :har ,A -tit' il- I lwfltrg, , - .' T . I L ,,Ft: 'Ngiigllf - . .f 'I'- ,111L"'.-Q."l'7 R1 1 "' . T r.-.W 'S' ,UTI vvx:xL,.1i'5-Q, .b - 1-m...,hg'fQ.4g5 :.,.L . L, -1 lgg -gggtx .5X1.,.,'uA :h .Nl 'W'- " 'Yi 'E l. Q ' '77 ' 'RQK9' fx- ' "P H ' 'T - -tit gym ,.f 'vt' .1 S L' - T 'v '... . 'il' . I " s:.:: P t . "MN M . - I MR. ROBERT MILLER Gorham, Maine Geology and Biology. B.A. Colby College, University of Maine, Boston University. cience MR. EVERETT TUTTLE Gorham, Maine Physical Science and Chemistry. B.S. Bates College, M.S. University of Maine, Rutgers University. MR. GEORGE AYERS Gorham, Maine Science. B.A. University of Maine, M.A. Ohio State University. MR. HAROLD NEUBERGER Portland, Maine Biology, Mathematics, Physical Science. B.S. lowa-Wesleyan College, M.S. Biology, University of New Mexico, Research Fel- low New York University Medical School. DR. ELIZABETH KERR Falmouth Foreside, Maine Elementary Science Education, Biology. B.S. Marygrove College, M.A. T.C. Colum- bia University, Ed. D. T.C. Columbia University. MR. GEORGE BARKER Portland, Maine Biology. B.S. Gorham State Teachers College, M.S. Boston University, University of New Hampshire, Harvard University. ,-Ti gf -. E Z C-P E. .um H- .gl -. .yo . . P " ' l' ' i ww fr S MR. ALFRED GRANT qua?- Gorham Maine " B.S. Ed. Salem State Teachers College M.Ed. Boston University '. .1 Audio-visual Education N i , ii, Y ' 7 4 ' ' ' x, as V L 1 f . ' 5 vi f xlaerience 7WaLe. :Ae Half QI' HE Campus School is an integral part of the college. lf The members of the faculty not only have the respon- sibility of the development of their pupils but must also guide the college students who teach with them so thati each will develop his teaching potential to the highest degree. In the Campus School, the student teachers have the opportunity to put into practice the theories and methods they have learned in college classes. They work with the regular teachers for a semester of the senior year, first observing and then actually carrying some of the teaching load. Gradually they assume greater responsibility, make- necessary decisions, and take part in all types of activitie suitable for the children with whom they are working. Th task is not easy. It is a real challenge, but most of th student teachers accept it willingly and have an interestin and profitable experience. The Campus School children enioy their contacts wit the college. Great enthusiasm is expressed when group are invited to go to the gymnasium for organized physica activity or to the science building to view exhibits. Th college students are "trying out their wings," and th children are appreciative of their efforts. The Campus School faculty is conscious of a grea responsibility - the fruitful guidance of both children an college students - but is happy to accept the challenge an hopes to meet it effectively. MISS ALBERTA LITTLEJOHN Gorham, Maine Acting Principal of Campus School. B.S. Gorham State Teachers College: M.Ed. Boston Unlverslty. MR. DWIGHT WEBB Gorham, Maine Superintendent of Schools. MR DONALD J DOYLE B.S. Gorham State Teachers Collegep M.Ed. Gorham Maine University of Maine. ' Grade 6 B.S. Gorham State Teachers College: M.Ed. GWLIGUJ SCAOOK MISS HOPE BUTLER Ellsworth, Maine Grade 3. Ed.M. Bradford Junior Collegep Rhode Island College of Education. MRS. ANGELINE COLPITTS Y HOBART Gorham' Maine MRS. MARY BARKER ' B.S. State Teachers College, North Gm 9 3' Gfqde 2- Dakota: University of Mainep Uni- B.S. Gorham State Teachers College B.S. University of Maine. versity of Chile. University of Maine. ,X x . M .. xgf' ' .,.. MISS MARILYN FARRAR MRS. PERSIS HARDING Gorham Marne Windham, Maine Junior Primary Grade 3, BS Gorham State Teachers College Bos B.S. Ed. Gorham State Teachers College, ion University M.Ed. Boston University. MISS MADELINE LANCASTER Lee, Maine Grade 6. B 5 Gorham State Teachers College, M.Ed. University of Maine. MISS JOSEPHINE MATTHEWS Kennebunk, Maine Grade 5. B.S. Gorham State Teachers College, versity of Maine. MRS. ALBERTA HARMON Gorham, Maine Grade 6. B.S. Gorham State Teachers College, University of New Hampshire. alnld ua MR. ERWIN KlMBAl.l. Biddeford, Maine Uni- Grade 4. B.S. Ed. Gorham State Teachers Coll Lanrnn.-.-. inin , , 5 V . if J MISS NORA MALKSON MRS. JOYCE MILLER MRS. FAITH SAWYER Waite, Maine Gorham, Maine Gorham, Maine Grade 4- Grade 2 Grade 5. 5. C01Sflf1e Normal 5Cl'100li BOSTON Uni' B.S. Gorham State Teachers College. B.S.Gcrham State Teachers College. rsityp Farmington Normal School: San nancisco College. MRS. CAROLYN T. YOUNG Gorham, Maine Supervising Teacher Grade 2 B.S. Gorham State Teachers College, Graduate Work, University of New Hampshire. Selma! MRS. MURIEL STONE Gorham, Maine Grade l. . Farmington State Teachers iversity of Maine. MRS. ELEANOR WlGGlN Portland, Maine College: Grade 4. B.S. Connecticut Teachers College. ,wines E -if MRS. ANN SEARCY Portland, Maine Grade 'l. B.S. Gorham State Teachers College. l f. Lis l .fdicl jrom .gyfucfenfd Life at Gorham College wouldn't be complete without the presence of our competent staff members. ln the main office in Corthell Hall, the office personnel work constantly for the benefit of the students. The staff members in the respective dormitories, includ- ing the patient and helpful housemothers and matron, our efficient nurse, and the chefs, who keep us well fecl, are greatly appreciated by each and every student, for their invaluable service and assistance to all is limitless. The lounge, a favorite haunt of all students for study- ing or socializing, is capably operated for our comfort by the lounge staff and their student assistants. The task of supervising and maintaining the operation of the physical facilities at Gorham so that we may be warm, comfortable, and safe is a responsible and never- ending one. Deserving our appreciation for the way in which they perform this task on the Hill are our hard- working custodians. 40 MRS. ELECTA BROWN Bursar ,4m! MRS. CEl.lA GROSS Matron State Teachers college. MRS. DOROTHY BERRY Secretary Sfaff MRS. ALICE BOOTHBY Nurse 631 .' t' r 5 MRS. VIRGlNlA CHRISTENSEN Secretary MISS MADELINE WESCOTT Secretary K 1 MRS. GENICE JOHNSON Secretary wr-' Q? 15:11 ff ' 5:-yr MRS. LYDIA PALTSITS Housemoiher, Andrews MR. ROBERT SAMPLE Chef ' Jr- MR. ROGER BELANGER Chef .SEM MRS. DOROTHEA DUNTON Housemoiher, Woodward MRS. RUTH HOOPER MRS. IRENE STIGMAN Housemother, Robie 5TUdeM I-0Un9e .'.:' .', , ' 'Y' '., c.i"Lg' - .- . H". " is .. -.. ij MRS. MILDRED MURCHIE Studeni Lounge MRS. VIVIAN HEWETT Student lounge MR. GEORGE MITSMENN Custodion, Campus School MR. THEODORE LUNT Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds MR. HAROLD MOULTON Custodian 43 'ik sywgga' .F- Q eniord . LLA, fl w up ig., 4 2 fu , , Wg. fl, , ,f , 1 Q x ' X , 1 I x x x y o Q Q , ,. v 5 - V , . . :f- ef. , sg x w wg ,,,. i , 4 , , .nhl 1 4 U I x . 4 Q 5 A 155, N, L x , I . 1 1 ,.- '-. A 1 1 x . k s-' f . X , f .,v X 0 -. x - c 4 v XL ' ,N u.uQ'L 1 qu . X . , g H ' . N , -4 ' 1 . I X N :K 5 v . A Xxx . . 1 , 4 H- " u nfl A :' " A , ,,,.. as w :wr v K E , - .iff ELIZABETH ABBOTT Bar Harbor Kindergarten-Primary Intramural Sports l, 2, 3, 4j Canterbury Club 1, 2, 3, 4, S.E.A.M. 'l, 4, N.A.T.A. 2, 3, 4, House Committee 4. EARLENE MARY ANDY Augusta Junior High Amicitia Club 2, 3, 4: Intramural Sports 'l, 2, 3, S.E.A.M. l, 2, 3, 4, Newman Club lp Cheer- leader 35 The Observer 3. -,I EI? if eniora ti , J 1. s s-My V 555531 ' x X 1 ff MER , f -5 BRUCE A. ALLEN Portland Junior High 46 .W in V ' K, .. A ,gear it Le, :Mai ,Q .Ei 271253 gm tu A A5 .ste W I - .. V Ulu VI ELAINE JANET ABRAHAMSON Falmouth General Elementary A Cappella Chorus 1, 2, 35 S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 4, S.C.A. 'l, 2, House Committee 2. ELIZABETH JANE ARMSTRONG Falmouth Foreside General Elementary Commuters' Club 'l, 27 S.E.A.M. 'l, 2, 3, 4. , W I Caribou .lunlor Hugh Amlcma Club 'I 2 3 4 President 3 S.E.A.M 'I 4 Outing Club l WAA Counc1l2, 3 Treasurer 2 Student Council 'I 3 Secretary- Treasurer 3 Commencement Ball 3 Co-Chair- , man 3 S.E.A.M. 2, 3, fg rl l - IE: Qw- 'in-vim ,ig i if lf- 5733511 , ,591-VL 2 E! I9 I 37 --I ETHELYN M. BANKS Old Orchard Beach General Elementary 4. an--N "A . - i M I , ,- xg, 5 l A-, I 1 1960 'ni-I AUBREY E. BAIZLEY Scarborough Junior High Commuters' Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Intramural Sports 'I, 2, 3, 45 Mayor Candidate 37 S.E.A.M. I, 2, 525' f wiigilili.-lei ".' 3 4. - ' :1 L'-f fu'--r f--nt ' JEAN BALDWIN Nobleboro Junior High A Cappella Chorus 3, 4, Amicitia Club 'l, 2, 3, 4, Modern Dance Club 2, S.E.A.M. 2 3 S.C.A. 'I, 2, 35 Outing Club 'I, 2, 3, Orienta- tion Committee 4y House Committee 1, 2, 3: N.A.T.A. 2, 3, 4. JOAN M. BARDEN Gorham General Elementary Basketball 2, Dramatic Club 2, 3, S.E.A.M. 4, W.A.A. 2. GAYLE PATRICIA ARMSTRONG - tk:-f" 47 MARILYN ANN BATES Bath Junior High S.E.A.M. I, S.C.A. I, 2, Outing Club 'I, 2, W.A.A. I, 2, 3. NANCY KNIGHT BILLINGS Oak Bluffs, Mass. Kindergarten-Primary Band l, 2, Outing Club l, 2, Canterbury Club I, 2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer 2, W.A.A. Coun- cil 2, S.E.A.M. 4, Commencement Ball, Co- Chairman 3. eniord FRANK BENSON Bethel Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Phi Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, S.E,A.M. l, 2, 3, Varsity Club 2, 3, 4, Student Council 3, 4, I.A.C. 2, 3, Presi- dent 3, I.A.P.O. 2, 3, 4. 48 I EDWARD PHILIP BEAUDOIN Biddeford Junior High A Cappella Chorus 1, 2, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Soccer 2, 3, 4, Dramatic Club I, N.A.T.A. 2, Newman Club l, 2, 3, 4, Alph U Lambda Beta I, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, S.E.A.M. 'I, 4, Outing Club 2, Men's Chorus 2, Varsit Club 2, 3, 4, Student Council 'I. ERNESTINE ANN BLACK Waldoboro Junior High Y I Intramural Sports 'I, 2, 3, W.A.A. 2, 3, Dramatic Club l, S.C.A. 'I, 2, 4, Outing Club I. 1960 NANCY EDNA BOOTHBY Orono General Elementary Amicitia Club 2, 3, 4, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 37 S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 3, Outing Club 17 S.C.A. 1: The Observer 3g House Committee 37 S.C.A. ,M 1 rt, ,M sl"nlfJ'wg M, M1111 'll 1 Wt,-1. ,A I xwxxx W- u 1" sv ' tt N lt 1, W4 ,p ,M .rrr , W ,ft M ,,,, A M , 4ff:,::1 ,nt ,,,,w',,7yw3g use - ,- ,pw .tml ,,, ,H tm, tu ,ww VM 1 'gp'l1vWufm- l JOHN M. BRIDGES HENRY w. Bmc-cs York Livermore Falls lndusfflul AHS 11-,dusffiql Args Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Alpha Lambda Beta s.e.A.M. 4, Hillcrest 3, 4, 1.A.P.o. 3, 4. 2' 3' 4f 5'E'A-M- 'lf '-A-P-Q 2' 3' 4- 49 l 1 ANITA BOYNTON East Millinocket Kindergarten-Primary S.E.A.M. 4: Outing Cluln 3, S.C.A. 1, 2, 37 String Ensemble 17 Operettas 3. FRANCES BROWN Boothbay Harbor General Elementary S.C.A 1, 2, Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sophomore Show 2: S.E.A.M. 47 Riding Club 3, A.H.N.A. 4. jx" ' f fl fi-f , V K. i 1. ' V , l- , 1 1 ' . - 4 "1 K X ,., , 1 I -- 'Ll -v A X -Q 'K ' r PATRICIA ANN BROWN West Baldwin Music Education A Cappella Chorus 'l, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4, S.E.A.M. 4, S.C.A. 'l, 2, House Committee 2, Choristers 2, 3, M.E.N.C. I, 2, 3, 4, Histor- ian 2, President 3 RAYANN BURNHAM Falmouth Junior High A Cappella Chorus 'I, 2, 3, 4, Dramatic Club 1, S.E.A.M. l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Vice Presi- dent 3, President 4, S.C.A. 1, 2, House Com- mittee 3, N.A.T.A. 2, 3, Cheerleader 1, The Observer 3, Orientation Committee 4. I I E enior5 I tu. My, , W, ,Wm W. WI I W I GRANVILLE aumsrr Portland Junior High 50 wi'-fl" PHILIP E. BUTTERFIELD Westbrook Junior High Intramural Sports l, 2, 3, 4, Basketball 'I, 2, 3, 4, Co-Captain 4, Commuters' Club 'l, Var- sity Club l, 2, 3, 4, Alpha lambda Beta 'l, 2, 3, 4, Student Council 4, S.E.A,M. 4, Orien- tation Committee 3. MARY M. BURNS Portland Music Education A Cappella Chorus 'l, 2, 3, 4, Commuters' Club 'I, 2, S.E.A.M. 'l, 2, 3, Accompanist for Choristers 2, 3, 4, Music Maiors Club I, M.E,N.C. 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Accompanist for String Ensemble 'l, 2, Accompanist 'For Men's Glee Club 2. f ...... ,. , 7---277. JEANETTE MERINA CAPOZZA Portland General Elementary Commuters' Club 1, 2, S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4. CAROL ANN CHAPMAN Woldoboro General Elementary Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Basketball 1, 2, S.E.A.M. 3, 4, Dramatic Club 1, Outing Club 1, S.C.A. 1, 2, 3, House Committee 4. 5 , 5121 jm il L' it its M E f FQ, a Q 4u':"'f 1960 JEAN F. CARREAU Norway Junior High Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4, S.E.A.M. 1, 2, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. uv, 'twig A,- BRUCE C, CARLSON Springvale Junior High A Cappella Chorus 1, Intramural Sports 1, 2, Soccer 1, 2, Men's Glee Club 2, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 2, 3, Commuters' Club 4, Dramatic Club 1, 2, Treasurer 2, Alpha Lambda Beta 2, 3, 4, President 3, S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 4, Outing Club 2, 3, 4, Varsity Club 2, 3, 4, Student Council 2, 3, Vice President 3, G Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Recognition Day Committee 1, 2, Proctor 3. BARBARA GAI L CLARK Freeport Kindergarten-Primary Amicitia Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Art Club 1, Secre- tary 1, Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 4, S.E.A.M. 4, W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Sophomore Show 2, Harvest Boll 2, House Committee 2, Orienta- tion Committee 4. ti W5 ig-git ,SI1 7 1 ,Vikki if 1 Q Y llissu ,missing 51 enioni . X X I ,t X , I H 1-' , - I, , ,, 'E 'fl .. ,. 1 4-L I ' lg , t , '-1 1' Q ' A x LEONARD F. CLUKEY Dexter Junior- High Intramural Sports 'I, 2, 3, Alpha Lambda Beta 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3, S.E.A.M. 4. DAVID ELLSWORTH COOMBS PA D. South Portland UUNE COOKSON B'ddf cl Junior High Juriiorelgigh A Cappella Chorus 1, 2, Intramural Sports l , 1, 2, 3, 4, commuters' Club 2, 4, s.E.A.M. 4, 5'E'A'M 314' sk' Club 3' 4- S.C.A. 'I, Tennis 3, 4. 2 5 '1 I. ANNE MARIE WILLIAMS Phillips Kindergarten-Primary Amicitia Club 'I, 2, 3, Treasurer 3, Modern ! Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Wardrobe Mistress 3, S.E.A.M. 4, Hillcrest 4, Outing Club 2, S.C.A. 1, 2, House Committee 1, 2, Vice President 1, W.A.A. Council 3, Intramural Sports I, 2, 3, 4. DUANE E. DEAN Greenville Junction Industrial Arts Intramural Sports 'l, 2, 3, 4, Baseball I, Alpha lambda Beta 1, 2, 3, 4, S.E.A.M. 3, 4, Outing Club 1, 2, House Committee 'l, 2, Class Presi- dent I, l.A.P,O. 3, 4, Orientation Commit- tee 3. I 52 page 1 t Q 1 ,-mm' RENY DEMERS Sanford Junior High S.E.A.M. 45 Glee Club 3, 4, The Observer 3, Assistant to Managing Editor. LINDA A. FERRI Rockport Primary Education A Cappella Chorus 'I, 2, 3, Secretary 2, Ami- citia Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Modern Dance Club l, 2, 3, Vice President 2, President 3, S.E.A.M. 4, Outing Club lg House Committee l, 3, Vice President 3, Choristers 2, 3, Class Secretary, Orientation Committee 3. 1960 JOAN C. DURANCEAU Biddeford General Elementary Commuters' Club 2, 3, 47 S.E.A.M. 1, 2, New- man Club 'lg Outing Club 'l. 53 - . it ' t'w'g,': ' H in w ,ut .- K. rv' MARION HELEN DODGE Cumberland Center Junior High Intramural Sports lg Canterbury Club 'l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4, S.E.A.M. 4. BARBARA ANN FANCY Winthrop Kindergarten-Primary Art Club l, 2, 37 S.C.A. 'l, 27 S.E.A.M. 2, 47 Outing Club 2, W.A.A. 'l, 2, 3, 4, N.A.T.A. 'I, 2, 3, 4, Orientation Committee 3, 41 Sopho- more Show 2, Freshman Reception 2, 3. ,fir K, " - 'w t...' Ae- H l E-1.1: , ie ,4..i,Q23h 125: T5 'l me my wr - 'M S f V ,M . :N l H sez 1 tw r , 4. I CELIA CHRISTINA FLETCHER Auburn Kindergarten-Primary A Cappella Chorus I, 35 Amicitia Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3, President 2, Vice President 3, S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4, Hillcrest 3, Clubs and Activities Editor 3, Newman Club I, 2, 3, Correspond- ing Secretary I, Treasurer 2, Vice President 37 House Committee 2, 3, President 3, Student Council 3, N.A.T.A. 2, 3, Chairman 3, Choris- ters 3, Orientation Committee 3, 4, Recogni- tion Day Committee 2, 3. JOANNA FRECHETTE Norway Junior High W.A.A. I, 2, 3, 4, S.C.A. 1, 2, 3, S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4, Hillcrest 2, 3, Secretary 3, Activity Editor 3, Commencement Ball Committee 3, N.A.T.A. 2, 3, 4, House Committee 2, Outing Club I, 2, 3. ,,,, 1 ,W 1, W. ,Q ,.,m.e-,, ,f . fl' -aw' ,gag -Q-1 V: faith-fr. f I, '-turd' if - V, Y. ' lee ' 7 , mirage ww luwluux ef'weW,wt - mm, .mi eniord RICHARD F. FOSTER r--f-ex MARY JO FOLEY Kittery General Elementary S.E.A.M. I, 2, 3, 47 Outing Club 1, 3, S.C.A 1, 2, 3, 4, House Committee 37 Operetta 3 W.A.A. Ip Ski Club 3, 4. 1 I DONALD FRIEND Athens Blue Hill Industrial Arts lnduslrlul AHS Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4: Kappa Delta Phi lnlrfmural Spons lf 2' 3' 47 S'E'A-M' 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, s.e.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4, 0Uf'n9 Club If 21 5-C-A If Treasurer 2, I.A.C. 25 l.A.P.O. 3, 4 Secfefafv 25 Art Club 2' 54 Ci C il I VIRGINIA ALLISON GERRY Auburn General Elementary Intramural Sports l, 2, 3: W.A.A. 1, 2, 35 Band 'l, 2, 3, 4, Canterbury Club I, 2, 3, President 47 S.E.A.M. 'l, 2, 3, 4, Outing Club 'l, 2, 3: S.C.A. 27 N.A.T.A. 37 Ski Club 3, 4. JOHN GRIFFIN 1960 E 'hiv BEVERLY GRACA Wareham, Mass. Junior High Gorham S.E.A.M. 2, 4, Newman Club 'l, 2, 3, 4: House Junior High Committee 3, N.A.T.A. 2, 3, 4, Freshman Re- ception Committee 2, W.A.A. 3. 55 H Mi it M :ut ...,, mm '. ft' nr: ., ' 49 um' it , 'yu ' C' ' 'iw 4-' A I 'u -va:-:2"' JACQUELINE GUPTILL GILES Gorham Kindergarten-Primary S.E.A.M. 4. BENJAMIN GARDNER HALL Saco Junior High A Cappella Chorus 2, 3, Intramural Sports 2, 37 Baseball 2, Outing Club 2, Canterbury Club 2, Dramatic Club 25 N.A.T.A. 2, S.E.A.M. 2, 3, 4, Orientation Committee 3, 4, The Observ- er 3, 4, Entertainment Committee 3, Assembly Committee 3, 4. K.. . -- f' , ff -. H.. '. 'mv-I ,QE 5 " -' . F.. 1 , Q1 ' . - it l. iv W EUNICE ANN HALL South Portland General Elementary Commuters' Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Newman Club 1, 2. CAROLYN HATCH Portland General Elementary Basketball 2, Band 'I, 2, 3, 4, Modern Dance Club 2, Dramatic Club 2, 3, Treasurer 3, S.E.A.M. 2, 3, 4, S.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Outing Club 3, 4, N.A.T.A. 2, 3, House Committee 1. encora ARNOLD HARRISON Old Orchard Beach Junior High Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Soccer 4, Com- muters' Club 1, 2, Alpha Lambda Beta 1, 2, 3, 4, S.E.A.M. 4, Varsity Club 4, Campus Mayor 3, Track 2, 3, 4. 56 SYLVIA A. HAMILTON Berwick Junior High A Cappella Chorus 3, 4, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Modern Dance Club 2, 3, SEAM 3, 4, Outing Club 2, 3, S.C.A. 3, 4 C Secretary 3, Campus Queen Candidate 2 S.E.A.M. 4. gs ne: .... .tw Q ELLEN MARIE HAWKES Cumberland Center General Elementary -ef-:- rw- gl'-Tfe'f H 1 'QE GEORGE HILTON Waldoboro Junior High Intramural Sports 'l, 2, 3, 4, Soccer 4, Track 2, 3, S.E.A.M. 4, Alpha Lambda Beta 'I, 2, 3, 4. JOAN HODGKINS South Portland Junior High Intramural Sports 'l, 2, Commuters' Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Newman Club 'l, 2, 3, 4, Orientation Committee 3. 1960 REBECCA HODGKINS Southwest Harbor Kindergarten-Primary A Cappella Chorus 2, 3, Amicitia Club 'I, 2 3, 4, s.E.A.M. 2, 3, 4, s.c.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Class Secretary 1, Class Treasurer 4, Cheer- leader 1, 2, 3, Orientation Committee 3, 4, CAROL HODGKINS Fayette General Elementary Art Club I, 2, 3, S.C.A. 2, S.E.A.M, 2, 4, Outing Club 2, N.A.T.A. 3, Sophomore Class Show 2, Freshman Reception Committee 3, W.A.A. 3. DAVID HOPKINS Camden Junior High I-fi f f Yum, ., Harvest Ball 2, W.A.A. I, 2, 3, 4. 57 'mt IIHWI. -Nrwweh Qc"'i'?.,1 iF?: , , " : 1 --C 5 2 ' 5 we if 2 C ,fvne'g3?a--em?-.1.-.,,-1.3-z:Pr,3:..,. H ,gt 3 t,,,,, , ., r . is ,, P - 11, ll mfr? it i ,' ri -1 , W sl, wlhr, W ' N ll - ' E 5- eI'll0l'5 ff., 1 5 gy - ......,.... , T Hr 1" . IF A 1-,g ,I E E , ,V ',,.1'l:'.'K il S -'v YS- My :E if ff?-3 ,im I: M53 , ve MALCOLM E. HORR RICHARD l. HOWARD Portland South Portland lnduslllul AHS Industrial Arts 621:00 Lgngbcia Beta 'I, 2, 3, 4, l.A.C. 3: lrxr ?ig awww Y EEN 1: Canterbury Club 2, Vice President 25 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ,gill twig ,,m,,,1i,,fmfgm' muters' Club 2, Student Council l, 2, 35 Y mf 3 3252 ' m , isis: in ,Wi A erans Club 'I, 25 Mayor Candidate 3. LOIS ANN HUTCHINSON CLARANNE HUME RUTH INGERSON Mechanic Falls General Elementary S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 45 Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 45 S.C.A. 'l, 2, 47 House Committee 3, Orienta- tion Committee 4. 3-we fr sf XX 1 Millinocket Kindergarten-Primary A Cappella 2, 3, 45 S.C.A. 1, 2, 3, House in Committee lp Choristers 2, 3, 47 Down the Valley 3. 58 Gardiner Kindergarten-Primary Amicitia Club 2, 3, 45 Band 1, 27 S.E.A.M. 3, 4, Outing Club 'lp S.C,A. 'I, 2, 1, 2, 3, 45 Harvest Ball 25 W.A.A. 1, 2, 3 i 2 l E t 1 1 1960 DONNA C. JAMES HELEN CLARK JOHNSON Bangor Gorham Kindergarten-Primary General Elementary A Cappella Chorus 'I, 2, 3, 4, Modern Dance S.E.A.M. 2, 3, 4. Club I, 4, S.E.A.M. 3, 4, Outing Club 1, N.A.T.A. 3, W.A.A. 2, 3, Entertainment Com- mittee 4. BARBARA JOY P""'C"'d NANCY omz JoHNsoN Music Education Bailey Island A Cappella Chorus 1, 2, 3, Band 3, S.E.A.M. J - H' h 2, 3, 4, Chorisfers 2, 3, Music M.-tiers Club D , CI b 2. 'ggi M'94 O , CI b 2 EVERLY KE'T"' 1, M.E.N.C. 2, 3, 4, Accompanist for String rumah: U ' ' ' ' ' 7 Utmg 7 Poffland Ensemble 2 W.A.A. 1, Sophomore Class Show 2, Orlenta- K. d t P . ' tion Committee 2. In ergur en- nmqry iw" - wx,- Wfw,,,Www f' ' i !..,,' ,, 59 .re mf,-B... an qg ,,::E3fs.:n'.' V t. 1 cs :',,,,g-,.:4:- ' -. . - - - ' 'iigfsqwi-"' .aSim 'vu in ' r'1. ' DOROTHY KIDNEY Yarmouth Junior High Art Club 4, S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 4, S.C.A. 1, 2, 3, Bible Study Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Recognition for Scholastic Achievement 1, 2, 3, ELIZABETH KNOWLEN Westbrook Junior High Band 2, 37 S.E.A.M. 3, 4, Commuters' Club 17 Hillcrest 2, Outing Club 2, Orientation Com- mittee 2p Sophomore Class Show 2, Mayor Campaign 1, 2, 3. 0l'll0l'6 AUBREY E. KNOWLEN East Holden Industrial Arts Intramural Sports 1, Kappa Delta Phi 1, 2, 3, 4: S.E.A.M. 3, 4, Outing Club 1, S.C.A. 15 l.A.C. 1, House Committee 15 Sophomore Class Show 27 l.A.P.O. 3, 4. 60 MARJORlE D. KNIGHT Scarboro General Elementary S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4. ELIZABETH JANE LAPPIN Portland J General Elementary Commuters' Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Newman 1, 2, Outing Club 1, 2, 3, N.A.T.A. 1, 2 'E'-vs H ,,f'i5e?tfwQe:f.,g " , H ' 9332 .. ' W M E ,,ii,,,,,, ELIZABETH S LARGAY KATHRYN MARY LEIGH Bangor Auburn Junior Hug. Kindergarten-Primary Clu 2 3 4 Dramatic Club 1 2 Amicitia Club I, 2, 3, 4, S.E.A.M. 'l, 3, 41 2 3 4 Newman Club I 2 3 Outing Club 1, Cheerleader 2, House Com- mittee 35 N.A.T.A. 3, W.A.A. I, 2, 3, 4, Councilor 2. BERYLA N, McCOLLOR Union Kindergarten-Primary A Cappella Chorus l, 2, 3, 4, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Dramatic Club 1, 25 S.E.A.M. 'l, 2, 3, 41 S.C.A. 'l, 2, 3, W.A.A. Council 35 House Committee 1, 3, Treasurer 3, Orienta- tion Committee 3, 45 Choristers 1, 2, 3. l To ew . ....,. , .-YL , Y - f L: 'Q I En fb-v N143 X rhim If e4 I ,Qi Q an XNRQK' in N W N XE ? ,WN . :mf iw' ,QW-I mm ' 1, , M 'TZ Y-'-e x '4 we . mi'fi'f 1 ' ' . lf , if li W i 41. ,uw I Y. f' f A11 , gi if, , 7 g m'a..j.7'5,e,, W W x I. 2 -- iH,iii,,1'ei:Vg A iiilirgaww f-'.:5I"?-hx is -A " 1 ' " -- ii 4. l"xiiQi"1Xin A - ,- fir. . ', .4 ,I :':-it-':,-... -I - - . -1ffil'IgLl.:f-il ,'f'3z. '- 45' -I Ike 'A li ' "rw '+1Zf m.n.:f-:ff-3 :. I -Q . 1' 2 '. I 1 v. K Mg -.,,:5:::: 5: f ff 'iiiliiffiljiiistiiwvi " . Y f I ' ' : . ferent . rw sa " , 1 .1 v' -.-1Xv 1g '::w.i-..'w- -. -,1- n -,.- y 'll 13 rg, -QQ ,1 ,tv f . ,,vi'V,.-'-,- A tfea . 3. 933 I 5 -u 1' iivv ' ii klffrz-1 - '55, if' - , I 2l'll0l'5 New- WENDELL MCCOLLOR HUGH SIDNEY MCGAFFIN Solon Pittsfield Industrial Arts General Elementary Intramural Sports 'l, 25 Kappa Delta Phi 1, 'lrttrlamural Sports 'lp S.C.A. 2, Men's C u 2. 2, 3, 4, Chaplain 2, Vice President 3, S.E.A.M. 3, 47 l.A.C. 25 I.A.P.O. 3, 4, Chairman 37 Men's Glee Club 2, 3, 4, Class Vice President 27 Class President 3, Orientation Commit- tee 3. CARL MERRILL Bethel Industrial Arts Intramural Sports 'Ig Kappa Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, s.e.A,M. 1, 2, 3, 4, N.A.T.A. 2, 3, 4: I.A.P.O. 2, 3, 4. CARLENE ANN McHUGH Portland General Elementary Commuters' Club 'l, 2, 3, Newman Club 'l, 2. 62 E. LOUISE MERRILL North Bridgton Junior High Modern Dance Club lp S.E.A.M. 3, 4, man Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Orientation tee 4. H 55 I tr " ER H . B 5 ll 4 .. .YP as 'EW we --ff H W uhm E lk l'i.E.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4, S.C.A. I, 2, 3, 4, VIRGINIA MERRILL Auburn General Elementary Out- ng Club 'l, 2, 3, N.A.T.A. 2, Baileys' at :lame Committee 3, Freshman Reception Com- ittee 2. 'l JOAN EVON MITCHELL Pownal Kindergarten-Primary asketball 2, 5.E.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4, S.C.A. 1, ,,3,H w .,i5-wie ouse Cnmmittee 3, N.A.T.A. 3, 4. glillli' 1:7 Y 7:7 lil v My H M my 'H 41, 1960 GLENYS MAXINE MILLER Waldoboro General Elementary Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 3, 4, Outing Club I, 2, 3, S.C.A. I, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3, Green ancl White Way Co-Chair- man 2, 3. 63 I 14 tw ugg ft, KH' ?"'5if C. PATRICK MICHAUD Island Falls Music Education A Cappella Chorus 2, 3, 4, Vice President 2, Alpha lambda Beta 2, 3, 4, Newman Club Choir Director 4, House Committee Secretary 3, Class Treasurer 3, Orientation Committee 3, Aroostook State Teachers College 1, M.E.N.C. 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, Portland Sym- phony Orchestra 3, 4. ELAINE MURIEL MOORESIDE Berwick Kindergarten-Primary Art Club I, 5.E.A.M. 'lg S.C.A. l, 2, 3, 4. za? - iwiwlg, W A f ,Fifi Q: YUM bl- NELLIE LOUISE MORRELL Windham General Elementary Commuters' Club l, 2, 3, 4, S.E.A.M. 'l, 2, 3, 4, N.A.T.A. 'l, 2, 3, 4. ROGER IRWIN MORSE Eliot Junior High Alpha Lambda Beta 3, 4, S.E.A.M. 3, 47 Men's Glee Club 3. eniora EERE: M Helm! 712551253555 H R WW A , ., mill' FI' ' "Pi N ' ' tgubf-WH-w:,p:lt. -2 A it 1.13-sw, lg 4. 14 1 52, 'WA l YH if ' 2-Q 'f ggi R -. "M-'1:f ??'a1?PJ-.45 'B l 'if'-' S FRANK MORONG South Portland Junior High Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Commuters' Club 'l, 2, 3, 41 Mayor Campaign Manager 3. 64 m 1 1,1 it 1 w 1 1960 WFPHL-3 ROBERT NORWOOD THOMAS F. OHLUND Biddeford Mechanic Falls Junior High Junior High Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Phi Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Commuters' Club Treasurer 2, N.A.T.A. 1, Observer Business 2, 3, Alpha Lambda Beta 2, 3, 4, S.E.AM Manager 3. 4, Men's Glee Club 2, 3. ROBERT A. PETERSON Westbrook Junior High ntramural S orts 2 3, 4, Commuters' Club P r 1, 2, 3, 4, Alpha Lambda Beta 1, 2, 3, 4, Out- ng Club 1, 2, S.E.A.M. 4. ALBERT E. PACKARD Gorham Music Education A Cappella Chorus 4, Men's Glee Club 4, M.E.N.C. 4, B.A. from University of Maine. 65 PAULINE PEACOCK Old Orchard General Elementary S.E.A.M. 2, 3, 4. r eniora DORA PIERCE NANCY RUTH PLAISTED Wegfbrook Westbrook Kindergarten-Primary Klnd9"9U"fen'P"lmUl'Y Modern Dance Club 'li S.E.A.M. 4, .' Q: V::, 'E 5i,53QfQf'ff w. .1 I - I, .3 , , I, 1 Club 1, 2, 3, N.A.T.A. 2. Yi',j::zQJL.5:2 ,..- -fl - .., ,ighf-W L, L k"' P 1" 1 'H ?s , , at wi wt l' 'v H5325 v I ':if,, -I , f 191 ' ' MARY ALTHEA RAYNES Camden General Elementary Basketball 2, 3, 4, Dramatic Club 'l, 3, S.E.A.M. 47 5.C.A. 'l, 2, 3, 47 Outing Club 'l. :ftp vt" gf' mr. .lg 'Rig Q I M 'LM C. 1 fe if - iii!! " gg 5 I f f-i m.w..i i w ' fi ..j-.. if . fx- lux: JAMES L. POURAVELIS Lewiston Junior High lntramural Sports 'l, 2, 37 Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Baseball 'l, 2, 3, 4, Alpha Lambda Beta 2, 3, 4, S.E.A.M. 4, Varsity Club 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3, House Committee 2, 3, 4, President 3, Orientation Committee 3, 4, F.T.A. lp Intramural Sports Student Adviser 3. 66 MARION RAND East Lebanon Junior High A Cappella Chorus 1. -if ,ie 3, ..q I LUCIE ALICE RUGG Portland Junior High Cappella Chorus I, 2, 3, 4, Art Club 'I, 2, , 4, Secretary 3, S.E.A.M. 4, S.C.A. I, 2, 3, Planning Committee 3, House Committee 2, W.A.A. I, 2, 3, 4, Counselor 2, Vice President 37 Riding Club 2, 3, 4, Chapel Planning Com- mittee 3, 4, Baileys' at Home Co-Chairman 2, 4. 1960 G I I MARY LOU SMITH Bar Harbor Junior High BEVERLY MARGARET SEARFOSS Intramural Sports 'I, 2, 3, Canterbury Club Scottsdale, Arizona 1, 4. lireraieg 3g Igftlirriyrirnlt Dgfrre iluab General Elementary ,pramaxcu ,....,ncres, , Woman's Sports Editor, Outing Club I 2, 3, LnII?m:riguE:3rIEE:oIlleigiag CIA 4, House Committee 2,-N.A.T.A. 3. ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 5 N.A.T.A. 37 Fencing 3. 67 KATHLEEN MAHER RYDER Lewiston Kindergarten-Primary Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3, S.E,A.M. 4, New- man Club I, 2, 3 Cheerleader 3. BETSEY JO SPEAR Limestone Kindergarten-Primary Band I, 2, 37 Modern Dance Club I, S.E.A.M. 'I, 2, 3, 4, Librarian 35 S.C.A. 'I, 2, 3, 4, House Committee 21 N.A.T.A. 'I, 2, Orientation Committee 35 Riding Club 2. Q11 .EJ I J eniord JUDITH STACK Sebago lake Junior High Basketball 1, 2, 3, S.E.A.M. 45 Hillcrest 4, Z.CdA. 3, 4, House Committee 3, Softball 1 eggs? - Y ---4:'- ' 'fre '.'-- ell' af I4 A ' m -.f wi-in I: Z .hx J UDITH W. SWEETSER ggi, '1,g1f'3" ,ff I. JULIA MARY SWAN Springvole Junior High A Cappella Chorus 3, 4, Intramural 1, 2, 35 Band 1, Dramatic Club 17 3, 4, S.C.A. 1, 2, 35 House Committee Choristers 3, 45 Freshman Reception tee 2, 3, Co-Chairman 3. BRUCE THOMAS South Portland Junior High HENRY l.. THAYER Pownal Westbrook Junior High Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4, Baslcetball '13, Industrial Arts Modern Dance Club 3, S.C.A. 1, S.E.A.M. 3, 4: 3223 gui' 24:3Sf:pgml,Ie?f 2:52131 flu Outing Club 3- House Committee 3' N.A.T.A. . Y ' ' ' . . . S.E.A.M. 17 l.A.P.O. 3, 4. ,ll orienmHon'Commmee 3 ' President 47 Sports Publicity Director 3, . A 1 A A v or A A it f-f",..-U' - --. H, 1 ,J-5 , , ,V the 68 BRUCE H. THURLOW Scarborough Junior High ural Sports 1, 2, 3, Basketball 1, 2, Baseball 1, 2, 3, Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4, Kappa Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, S.E.A.M. 1, 4, Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4, House Committee 3, Class Vice President 4. MARY LOU WALSH Portland Junior High A Cappella Chorus 3, Basketball 1, 2, S.E.A.M. 4, Commuters' Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 2, Newman Club 1, N.A.T.A. 2. 1960 .V W' 1- 1 1f"19'f . C ' 1Q.ff""'1- f l 1- V f J. RICHARD VACHON Sabattus Junior High Art Club 3, S.E.A.M. 3, 4, Kappa Delta Phi 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Newman Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Orientation Committee 3, 4, Sophomore Class Show 2, University of Maine 1. 69 ui me N. , - if fl' sid' , CONSTANCE MAE TUCK West Lebanon General Elementary Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, S.E.A.M. 1, 2, 35 S.C.A. 1, 2, 3, House Committee 1, Vice Presi- dent 4, Class Secretary 4. HAROLD WARE Sebago lake Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3, Basketball 1, 2, Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Phi Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4, Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Student Council President 4, N.A.T.A. 4, Class Officer, Vice President 1, Orientation Committee 2. 'ft' I Q I DONALD WATERHOUSE Westbrook Industrial Arts Intramural Sports I, 2, 3, 45 Phi Sigma Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Sports Director 3, S.E.A.M. 25 JL I.A.C. 3, 4, l.A.P.O. , . CONSTANCE MILLS WHITMAN Scarboro Kindergarten-Primary Basketball 37 S.C.A. 'I, 2, 3, House Committee 'lp Cheerleader 'I, 2, Freshman Reception 2, Co-Chairman 2. 3 4 Ag F'Qn'IIWI E 2l'll0l'6 ry . ififfikz: I Tmiivuriff N km CAROLYN WHITCOMB Gorham Kindergarten-Primary Commuters' Club If S.E.A.M. 'l, 4, Club lp Queen Candidate 3. NANCY SPEAR wHrrLocK MARJORE HELEN WIGGN Na les North Berwick Junior High Junior High Basketball 'Ig Commuters' Club 'l, 2, 37 ilnhgingurj-I Iil5Tcr::s:'figji:gMeI1L3i, 47 N.A.T.A. 2, 3, The Observer 3, Secretary 3. CLu,f1ciI'4' ' 70 VERNA WOTTON Cushing Kindergarten-Primary Modern Dance Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Dramatic Club 1, 2, S.E.A.M. 2, 4, Outing Club l, 2, W.A.A. 1, 2, 3, 4, S.C.A. 'I, 2, 3, 4. -wi? - .-- ik. few, wr' gn-Lg in . mu W Y in in Tiger? we 3 in in .ui in Er' 1 ra.. xr M1 .J 7"'X 31' ,Q TP. ,, wifigs ix W 1j'..Q.'iigy ' HQ ' wit M . iffy in if? T Q ' wi 02145214 T , , , aw., fw- Qsfff T H ii, ii ii T ii' - E ggiiffil E " ' ' :iw T ssfegsyiaa RTE r it T, W 22 N1 " 'ii .. Sitting: R. Hodgkins, C. Tuck. Standing: B. Thurlow, B. Thomas. enior Bruce Thomas .... Bruce Thurlow .... Constance Tuck Rebecca Hodgkins icerd President Vice President . ....... Secretary Treasurer Maw Hi? T fy, On September 7, 1956, our class of two-hundred and twenty-six, the largest ever to enter Gorham State Teachers College, began our life on the Hill. Soon, with Orientation and Freshman Reception behind us, we held our first class meeting and elected officers for the year: president,4Michael Dean, vice president, Har- old Ware, secretary, Rebecca Hodgkins, and treasurer, Alan MacDougall. Our representatives for Student Council were Gail Armstrong and Bruce Thomas. Later in the year, Linda Johnson and Rebecca Hodgkins represented us as queen candidates for the March of Dimes and Winter Carnival. Returning as sophomores, we found freshmen whose puzzled expressions reminded us of how we must have looked the year before. Though it seemed as if it had been only yesterday that we, too, were becom- ing oriented to college life, we accepted our new role as upper classmen quite naturally. This year our class officers were president, Alan MacDougall, vice presi- dent, Wendell McCollor, secretary, Margaret Morrill, and treasurer, Elizabeth Largay. Elected to the Stu- dent Council were Bruce Carlson and Harold Ware. Patrick Michaud directed our very successful Sopho- more Show. In September, 1958, we of the class of 1960 re- turned and elected as our officers: Wendell McCollor, president, Harold Ware, vice president, Sylvia Hamil- ton, secretary, Patrick Michaud, treasurer. Chosen to nt. . eniora 1960 be our representatives on Student Council were Chris- tina Fletcher and Frank Benson. Arnold Harrison won the honor of serving as mayor of the campus, and Anne Williams and Carolyn Whitcomb represented our class in the Queen Pageant. Now this year our pathways separate into the world. We are no longer students, but teachers ready to go out to use the priceless gifts of knowledge and skill which devoted faculty members have helped us to acquire. Not one of us will forget Miss Edna Dickey and Mr. James Whitten, our class advisers. Words can- not sufficiently express our gratitude for the time and help they have given the Class of 1960. We are proud that every year our class members have been active in all organizations on the Hill and we hope we have made a worthwhile contribution to Gorham campus life. Leading us in the activities of this, our last year, are president, Bruce Thomas, vice president, Bruce Thurlow, secretary, Constance Tuck, and treasurer, Rebecca Hodgkins. Elected to Student Council were Philip Butterfield, Marjorie Wiggin, and Arnold Harrison. These have been four good years which we will long remember. Respectfully submitted, CONSTANCE TUCK 'l l .l ,W sa.--T A fy'-A .ai -if"-:Qs-eyfwg ,--L. ..A,- .-A i,.Q - I m ' 7 N 2 xf5F1F"""-- - 5 .4 -.L B- . .75 'V H Q .M 'Q""T' . "if -' Q-.-:QL 1 , gr 1. ii 15? . - 1 1, lf m -.1 41., . N 2 W 1 . V -, 1, , 1!,1!.w. ,111 L ,,,,, - 1 , V I , W . Y 11' ll1l"" S 1 - 1'l'5"l1 - ..' Q 1111, 1 1 :.u,,e1111 -.Ml I1 . . E. E I 1 1- V, ,,1 1 1 M. Q., 1 . --Q gf. :sH1l1111'1lM 1 1 3 .- .-2-9 7,1 is ,. - 1 1.11 1 ,M ,1,, 1 1 A '. , akin ...J 15 -..llr1- '-111.., '.1 - .1 -, - l,1llll""1lll ' 1,l'111,z11l11,u'li- - l 1 "l i ' 'll " , 1 1' ' -- ' 1 ' I 1 1.11 ' 1 sv ffl- 1. lil Rf , ef lflli lfgil' 1 '15 13.1 , " ' mash ln 'll 1 Q W 15 'LEW ' .E --a-been On The way to The dentist. ...cmclhesaid.. eniorgi ! x yi! Xe? Three exams, some period!! Me too!! 1960 , QQDXZX- V K Ml. 'Fe ,' I 4 1 X Taking Cl break. F1 3 5 X' X H - X , " X T ' .is 1 1 X, q M fi mr, M 1 XXX X ,XX WM My ,ww mv-XXMXQ ww "X 2, fX X X Kay n Xf my X+'XWX XX .LX X Asiziaw A A ' X ,NfgfwXX".'i'gXyXSi,.g'www, ' , vm E X H X 9 . Q I 15' pw X '. Y X X . X GX, fx 1, WW 'X v-'XXX KQIXWQ JE 'L 'V M ' H 'XWQ' ' W"W""MW W W Mtwwfi Wxgm -X" H X N IQXXXX X A XJ M- quid w 1 by ' X- Wfi ,X X A ew K , X-,X :V 1 . ' 1 ' . 1 "' 5 .X X E! 'br This is how. gp 'X X ' L' Milli V 5' I XX NW J' Rxffy iss,-H-Q: if M if- lf . ! - In S- I . We have fo read foo! M, ,X ,XXXX - XX rm, -X M ug N - M ' X' ,XE Y X- X 67 Luv 43'-'gg 'M 2 w 'Y "fav 6 X X ,galil X. XXX, X eff' ' 75 Hig h Society. Ml'l6!Ql'Cga5C5Ifl'lQI'L fi. X-, Ash 'X "5 ix. X W .1-if " 'P 'Q V lt A x ' , ' 3 I 'Q . , Ig.. 5 - , S 4 Y il! ,' A .4 . , BQ .-'f- '..,., .A .lf ,, -an. ,,1 g V .X Us". ' "'x ul.. ..s 1. s l .' , 8 Q--5. -. ' ' x - 5 . ,ls . 5.1.2 .,.l: 4- -' Q- , AL - .g - -5. . I ' rn- .l ' ' ., an . -. 1 9 '- 1' ff., .-. ... v V '15 . .Hr--Y-1: , .PLN 'nd' 5 . 53. ... .. '. '."'f' . xi . LAX r. . . w:.p.. . .W , , , ..:... N-,-ip n 1- QQ. ' uf-,At x- . ' -'Q ff". ' - 1' ...wo .s g. -.cw .H .. xl H. H-,-'-.7 f , Y Z.- rrp M X I er-K+. . fcf. .,-,.. 23 if 4 ' , H-.....-.x'4 ia' Y 1. r. , wx: 1, 2.4 3 'K -. .ar si Xu-fu .N ,fe-. ,.. ... N.: X . 'F K ' 'x'x'o x.. ...--:--- yu- . , J' UNI' 5. .. A.-' , 1 .Q' s E' .. N 1 ... hs A ' , L .A si ' X .7 '. :':"?' .Q - .Q . x.,.l . . x ' 9 ' .qs- Q g,N K . n . . xl, . ', I.. 4 :ga 1 X . A14 :P A.: ,.. f- S ' 21 ' ' ' ' . A , ,, ., ,. .. 4.5. , 2 . X.. 1 ' ... N .Vi ' ' J,'g..--'.1 . .,. jg . 4.s. 0.- M.. .K - ' . L'i.'.:'K"". ,rs 1 .- . .--49 , y.. J. 1 A uniora ' 1961 When September 1959 rolled around, we of the class of 1961 began to turn our thoughts from sum- mer employment to prospects of returning to the "Hill". lt hardly seemed possible that we were entering our iunior year for time had flown by so quickly. Some of our members were chosen to return to the campus early as upper-class advisers for Freshman Orientation. Even though were were exhausted at the end of the three days, we were very happy to have had the opportunity to serve in this capacity. On September 16, however, an air of expectancy arose over the campus as we waited for the other members of our class to arrive. After many hello's, much un- packing, and hurried stories of the summer, we began to notice that our class had again decreased in num- ber, chiefly because of marriage or transferring to other colleges. Thus the prophecy of orientation week- end our freshman year appears to be coming true. Early in the fall our first class meeting was held for the purpose of electing officers. Those elected were Donald Duplissie, president, Gerard Asselin, vice presi- dent, Priscilla Jenkins, secretary, and Sylvia Erickson, treasurer. Chosen as representatives to the Student Council were Elizabeth Costa and Jerry Fillmore. Al- ternates were Judy Fuller and Richard Langlois. The members of the class of 1961 are very active in the various organizations on campus. Not only are we well represented, but we hold many executive positions in them. Members of our class hold offices in - i TLP? H Ei 1-!:u'?.fff Class Omcers, left to Right: P. Jenkins, Secretary: S. Erickson, Treasurerp J. Asselin, Vice President, D. Duplessie, President. the three religious organizations, thus showing our spiritual interests. In the governing bodies on campus we have members on the Student Council, Women's House Committee, and Men's Government. We also appear to be literary-minded in that the editors of both college publications are members of the class of '61. Professionally, we are represented by leaders in both S.E.A.M. and in I.A.P.O. Male students in our class show their interest in brotherhood by the large memberships in fraternities. Major executive positions in each fraternity are held by iunior members. Other organizations in which we are well represented by many of our members holding positions as officers are Outing Club, A Cappella Chorus, N.A.T.A., Women's Athletic Association, Varsity "G" Club, Amicitia Club, Men's Glee Club, Industrial Arts Development Council, and the Art Club. We have enioyed the year even though it was an extremely busy one, and it is certain that in the years to come we will have many fond memories of the friends we have made and the experiences we have had. At the present time we are gazing longingly at the caps and gowns of the seniors, yet we are looking forward to next year when we will get practical ex- perience in our chosen profession. Respectfully submitted, PRISCILLA JENKINS Secretary Class Adviser: Mr. Costello. lmporta nt notices! ! ucv: ' 5 -' X TODAY fy 1 Somebody's ancestor. What shall I say? M Je Amazing - these electrons! 79 4 ki. A bit of culture!! .5591 ,....z. Class Officers, Left to Right: C. Williams, Secretary, D. Skillings, Treasurer, D. McCullough, President, J. Bernard, Vice President. Class Advisers: Mr. Pease and Mrs. Fickett. Sopkomorea The Class of 1962, under its new name of Sopho mores, arrived on the Hill full of ambition, enthusias and talent. Immediately our class took its part in mak ing the Freshman class feel more at home. At our first class meeting, Louis Lahar, president conducted the election of class officers. This year' class officers are president, David McCullough, vic president, Jay Bernard, secretary, Cynthia Williams and treasurer, Donna Skillings. Our new Student Council representatives wer George Stevenson, to serve a one-year term, an Lincoln Brown, a two-year term. Two members in ou class, Charles Douglas and James Skoglund, wer chosen by their respective fraternities to run as mayo candidates. Esther Lowell and Louis Lahar were chose as co-chairmen for the Harvest Ball. The highlight o the ball was having a member of the sophomore class James Skoglund, honored with the title of "Compu Mayor". We are very proud to have a large representatio from our class in all groups on the campus. In th Modern Dance Club, Linda Hussey is serving as presi dent, Virginan Munroe, vice president, Joan Nelson secretary, and Donna Skillings as treasurer. David Boi is president of the Commuters' Club. Sally Blaisdell i co-editor-in-chief of the Hillcrest. In Amicitia, Cynthi Williams is vice president, and Mary Tiner holds th office of secretary. Our class also serves in the religious life of th campus. Jay Bernard is president of the Newma Club and Julie Poulin secretary. In the Student Chris tian Association, David McCullough is serving as presi dent, with Lincoln Brown as vice president. Linda Hussey and Mary Marsh cheered our boys or to victory during basketball season. Several sopho more boys took an active interest in the sports eventll on the Hill. ' The sophomore class combined its efforts and tal ents and as a result, produced a most admirable sophomore show. We find our time at GSTC moving quite rapidly an we look back over the many wonderful memories ou first two years have brought us here. This gives ue even more reason to look forward to our final twg years at GSTC. l Respectfully submitted, CYNTHIA WILLIAMS Secretary 1962 ' 'L-'Qtr-1. N A push for c contrary Chevrolet Between class socializing , .ig l If E' J! 'M U There is always ci waiting line -'L ,1,.,,, . 1:-C..,q5. I , ., .- -1 3 inseam-rf? ,fi 1 . Q i . s i i Y i ,I ,,,,,,., Q4 i if Y wifi 1 W' i Boston bound for ci field trip pi , 3 1 X. , -, .1 ii' 'QW' H Wi H i W 'fir W-iivqgi ui ' im iikk 2 grzxixzgigx-f "f 'lk!u wi W yr, H u ,Ei ii :i 122 ii ' H .V ' , . N WY 4 ' W ii iw i 'if .... - Y H H " 1 -- 'P g X . ' We sfudy too i C' C7 'FW' Class Officers, Left to Right: .l. Ashe, Treasurer, G. Fish, Secretaryp M. Brandt, Vice President: D. Donnelly, President. Class Adviser: Mr, Barker. ll! . P25 l'l'l2I'l The campus of Gorham State Teachers College i especially beautiful in the fall. When we as freshme came here in September to begin our college educa tion, we were greeted by an impressive sight. Th contrast of the stately, old, ivy-leaguish buildings wit the new Woodward and Bailey Halls and the newl begun women's dormitory caused us to admire th progress of this, our future alma mater. Upon entering our dormitories, we were greeted b representatives of the college faculty, staff, and upper class student body. After being assigned our rooms we were led on an orientation and friend-makin tour of the campus by teams of congenial, capabl upperclassmen. This week of orientation was to re main a fond memory in the mindslof everyone asso ciated with it. Among our activities were the taking o standardized diagnostic tests, becoming familiar wit the various clubs and activities, dancing ancl playin games in Corthell Lounge and Robie Center, and fin ally enioying an evening of entertainment by our ow classmates. Remarkable talent was exhibited by th freshmen that evening. During that week, many ac quaintances and strong friends were made. One thing which impressed us was the unusua relationship between students and faculty. The war friendliness existing between them is truly a fine an advantageous attribute. Ideal weather for an out-of-doors biology lecture! 1963 This relationship may be due to the limited' size of the college or possibly to the fact that there is no age or edu- cation barrier between those of common interest and ambi- tions. Whatever the cause of this spirit, certainly it is something to be praised, held in high esteem, and perpetu- ated for many years to come. Many 'Freshmen have already taken advantage of and enioy Gorham State's many extra-curricular activities. The 'Freshman class is well represented in several athletic, musical, religious, literary, and professional organizations. College is the place for possible self-improvement, depend- ing upon one's own interest and personal application. The combined enioyment of the academic courses, extra- curricular activities, and atmosphere conducive to social and personal improvement is very important to everyone. Our first class meeting was held for the purpose of electing class officers. Those elected were Don Donnelly, president, Max Brandt, vice president, Gail Fish, secretary, Judy Ashe, treasurer. Later we elected Mr. George Barker our class advisor. So far at Gorham, many things have influenced the members of the freshman class and many more events will influence us further in our four years here. Yet, the fresh- men experiences are ones really to be remembered' and loved, for, in a sense, throughout our lives we'll always be "freshmen"! Respectfully submitted, GAIL FISH Sec reta ry me-?f'?e in 159' g 4 lm Fern projects are due. 83 l - 2 - 3 thrill! Musical talent!! if "lounge-lizards"? cfiuiiiea xi- 'i s- :- P ..- Q.. .u 'S 91'-4 A' Q x Auf' if .g- rflx- T... . N-.-KABA .safuclenf Counci First Row: E. Costa, M. Meggison, F. Bartlett, M. Wiggin. Second Row: L. Brown, P. Butterfield, G. Stevenson. President Harold Ware Vice President Mary Meggison Secretary-Treasurer Fred Bartlett Acting as a representative governing body for the students is the Student Council. This group is composed of eleven members: three olticers elected each spring by the entire student body and eight representatives of the four classes. The council has many annual duties consisting of allocating student activity money to the various organizations, being in charge of the Mayor Campaign and Harvest Ball, and sponsoring the Winter Carnival and Coronation Ball. Added to the social calendar this year was the conducting of an official Miss America local' pageant to choose Miss G.S.T.C. to represent Gorham in the Miss Maine Pageant. During the year many problems are put before the council by the students and faculty. At weekly meetings the members of the Council do their very best to see that a democratic solution for such problems is reached. 86 1 f V Q i E 5 L ! 5 1 5 agar amlaaign When the sun came up on one particular November Monday morning last fall, something unusual was in the air. Various groups of students at Gorham State Teachers College were to be seen busily working in trees, on the fire escapes, in windows, and in other strange places. And what's more, this had already been going on for several hours before daylight. The purpose for all this activity was Gorham's 1959 Mayor Campaign, which seemed to gain momentum day by day as the competition became keener. And in the end it proved to be one of the most colorful and intense campaigns fought on the Hill. Ag, Early Morning Rush li f ree Alpha Lambda Beta's Charlie Douglas was seen frequently lurking around the campus, portraying famous gangster, Al Capone. He was silently followed by his bodyguards and henchmen, dressed in black suits and carrying violin cases. Charles' dining room show was a tremendous success as gangland showed it could produce exciting entertainment. His enter- taining lounge and assembly programs, plus his many rallies, further increased the competition. Bill Griffin of Phi Sigma Pi, playing the part of a hard-working, rock-crushing iailbird, was easily rec- ognized wherever he went in his striped suit. His sincere manner and friendliness, while not contribut- ing to the role of a iailbird, couldn't help but get him votes. In the dining room his top-rate entertainment scored an instant hit with the audience. His backing at the assembly program and in the lounge further worried his opponents. Kappa Delta Phi's own Mr. Ziegfeld, Jimmy Skog lund, brought additional color to the campus through his winning campaign. He could be seen roaming the Hill in his swallow-tailed coat, top hat, and starched shirt, and carrying his silver-headed cane. At other times he would be spotted riding in his vintage con- vertible. Playing the part of Mr. Ziegfeld to the hilt, he brought original entertainment into his shows That, plus his genuine friendliness, humor, and witti- cisms, gained him the necessary votes to win campaign. Not to be overlooked are all the mayor campaign managers who did an outstanding job of backing their candidates. The following pages are a pictorial review of the 1959 Mayor Campaign .... Take Five l l lieu' giiiiffii ll .Twill H ll i ' l T. T. "'LI5lQ5i T iilfifzii GHZQJ .S,L0gKlll'l6! Mayor or Bust Preparations T il If ll If Ili t f me -t .. Q at tt 5 at ag - tVgEwi55 t 'gig , 3, , 1 ti ... t t v " M5 ug u , The Charleston? Ziff Griffin . ' Y Y " -53? H' , gg E, ' ' 432 ' ' 1 V -53 ' T r A! 5 sz ' HW "Wm"www-"lx w ,. m 5 , 3 ff? 5 ,-- 2 BHJL 4'-4-'- XGX v 3 L . fwWELQ5?w H ,ai:L EEWHRD Touche Roll out the Barrel JJ '1 1lH3-I ,,.., 4.25 V ,a...1.-7,,, REWARD 1 1. HILL' l Ckaljeri Ou? ad '-r Hula Hoop? Ah! ninuilil ,s2ff'wQ1":g?:"Hu ,ss "H" N 0 'L C i AQ fAv QTODI 91 Can you break a S20? The Campaign is On Discussion 9 ,, VW? W ii ii ii MTV M W wi . iiiihybggi-gw HH, X ,,..,.,, , I'0MI'lC! fAe Clfnld nigr -A 21 WG .gl .. ! Li ii'i" Y 92 Take cz Choice aflfedt Ba!! The Grand March When Whip-poor-wills Call .... The Throne Awaits 'x 'IP -f FH 1, 1. ' f - 1- 1 225 , , , , -117 'C . 7 amen 5 oufie ommiffee 1 'JESS 'nit f sl t .45 L. was ... . . 'A 4 7 esegieiiel . .if .si scazmi .HLA First Row: S. Eastman, B. Wood, C. Tuck, M. Dickinson, A. Emery, H. Morse, C. Chapman. Second Row: M. Raeside, L. Leavitt, M. Marsh, A. Wentworth, E. Hall, B. Dunton. Third Row: A. Hines, L. Smith, D. Skillings, G. Caron. President P. Dickinson Vice President C. Tuck Secretary A. Emery Treasurer H. Morse The Women's House Committee serves as the governing body of the two dormitories for women. Its aims are to govern wisely and to promote good citizenship. The committee consists of twenty-one members: four officers and representa- tives from each floor in both dormitories. Meetings are held every Wednesday evening, at seven o'clock. It is the responsibility of the committee to uphold the dormitory regulations and to render service whenever needed. This year's projects included purchasing various items for use in the dormi- tories and planning the annual teas. We are fortunate in having as our advisor, Miss Edna Dickey, Dean of Women, whose wisdom, understanding, and words of advice are sincerely appreciated. 94 9 ell 5 OUel'l'll'l'lel'lt '25 -sw First Row: R. Goodson, R. Powers, C. MacWhinnie, K. Roberts. Second Row: F. Bartlett, l. Brown, C. Clair. President C . MacWhinnie Secretary R. Powers The Men's Government of Woodward Hall serves as the governing body for the ninety-six men residents of this beautiful dormitory. Under the super- vision of our friendly and very capable house mother, Mrs. Dunton, Woodward Hall is a very happy and comfortable place in which to live. The Men's Government consists of a House Committee of eight members: the president of the house, a secretary, and two representatives from each floor. Serving in a supervisory capacity are the house mother, the dean of men, and three proctors, who keep order in the dormitory. At different times throughout the year the modern lounge of our dormitory has been open to the entire student body for such activities as dancing, watching television, and entertaining guests. 95 Introduction Underclassmen i creaf First Row: A. Williams, M. Wiggin, J. Aguiar, G. Asselin, S. Blaisdell, B. Wood, E. Nottage, S. Perkins. Second Row: V. Leary, D. Clancy, M. Lord, T. Merrill, G. Wilson, J. Bowden, P. Libby, J. Leveille, S. Lerman. Third Row: J. Stack, J. Chrissikos, J. Bernard, D. Bennett, R. Harvey, G. Oclencrantz, L. Leavitt. Co-Editors: Sally Blaisdell, Gerard Asselin Business Manager: Henry Briggs Jeanne Leveille Sheila Lerman Vance Keene Frank Chambers Curriculum Blanche Woods Clubs and Activities Dean Bennett Richard Harvey Advertising George Odencrantz Jude Bernard Dorothy Clancy Eleanor Nottage Seniors Lura Leavitt Margery Wiggin Judith Stack Ann Williams Faculty Judith Bowden Men's Sports John Chrissikos Advisors: Mr. Elwood Padham, Mr. Albert E. Brown Miss Elizabeth Sawyer 96 Paula Libby Barbara Guptill Antonia Merrill Virginia Leary Literary Janice Aguiar Women's Sports Stella Perkins Linda Smith Photographers William Griffin Harold Sanborn Everett Davis we Ugileflfel' , First Row: S. Brooks, M. Chesley, C. Holmes, B. Michaud, R. Langlois, I. Gilman, P. Haase, J. Buzzell. Second Row: H. Randall, J. Chrissikos, J. Douglas, M. O'Flynn, F. Chambers, P. Woods. Third Row: G. Wilson, M. Leighton, R. Reed, B. Hall, R. Haines, D. Richards, T. Ford. Editor-in-Chief-Richa rd La ng lois News Editor Bertram Michaud Managing Editor Priscilla Haase Women's Sports Meredith Raeside Men's Sports John Chrissikos Art Editor Cathy Holmes Business Manager George Stevenson Photographer Ronald Haines With a year's experience and a veteran stait, Gorham State's newspaper has made for itself a permanent place on the Hill. It has tried to maintain the basic functions of a good newspaper: reporting current events, interpreting news, giving service to its advertisers, and stimulating and entertaining its readers. We are very grateful to have two able advisors this year, Mr. Stanley Vincent and Mr. Allen Pease, who have given so much of their time and thought to see that The Observer meets high standards. This year, our staff numbers thirty-four, all of whom are trying hard to enable your newspaper to take a prominent place among college publications. 97 we .syfuclenf Ckria fin N, L' s 'ilu T ' llflf-:. . -' la ll ll l" .... , 'R H 'W' .1 fl .i,..g" 2 ' " " 347. 1 - 3' ' 'fi ee ' " Y I W Em W 5 .. Q... fa N '.jQ...,!g fl , 'M W A . . " ' ..' , ,, J... . 1. .. 1 ng? .l .. ,. ,...,,.. 11auSw,..sll'i:... 2 rising. ..h.vV... iq. . ,., is . r M ?w W? .. HH '. l.ll .i ,,' V llJ.ll"' N ww ..v,A. ,A.. A . W . W l I.. 2 55537253325 !5....eeQS..H 'M Hill? SS' V .., . ll First Row: P. Allen, F. Mello, J. Hurst, M. Raynes, J. Moulton, G. lrish, E. Gray, R. Littlefield, I. Saari S. Lettney, S. Kidder, S. Gallant, E. Gray, S. Fogg, G. Hatch, M. House, M. Dickinson, J. Fitzgerald B. Flagg, N. Soule, E. Long, L. Hussey. Second Row: J. Treworgy, T. Lombard, E. Lowe, E. Hardy, N. Viitala, E. Goff, J. Gregory, P. Jameson, D. McCullough, A. Emery, B. Wood, E. Hall, P. Hawkes, J. Fuller, S. Erickson, C. Hett, J. Abel. Third Row: J. Ash, J. Brooks, L. Day, A. Graves, B. Blackstone, D. Williams, N. Chandler, E. Eaton B. Frisbee, B. Mercer, K. Skillings, C. Moulton, G. Wilson, R. Jude, B. Wilson, M. Raeside, P. Jenkins Alexander, L. Smith, G. Bradbury, J. Mickalide, C. Webb, A. Hines, Y. Wilkinson J. Dunnells, S. Smith, C. Haskins, R. Collins, V. Merrill, J. Bowden, J. Simmons, Blaisdell, B. Wentworth, C. Libby, A. Wentworth, S. Hartford, S. Menchen, C. Hatch, C. Poulson, E. Snow, M. Meggison, B. Leach, C. Miller, J. Webster. D. Cockerille, K. Blanchard, N. Walls, C. Cushman, N. Dow, W. Kennedy, F. Jewett, C. Googins, J. Johnson, R. Livingston, C. Saunders, D. Harrington, A. 1 I M. Dudley, B. Clark, J. . I Fourth Row: J. Graves, L. Leavitt, K. Kisch, S. Berdeen, H. Bryant, B. Fifth Row: C. Torrey, Raynes, C. Ferden, S. Colby, N. Russ, C. Pillsbury. 98 Jsiociafion ' E: 'IF " '1'i'Uf'T:?'r x 'Q :E l 5 ' 1 President David McCullough Vice President Linwood Brown Secretary Alice Emery Treasurer Priscilla Jameson "Our lives are measured not in the length of our years, but in the deeds accomplished through faith in Christ." Our faith, as college students, is nourished and widened through various experiences. The experiences we engage in through religious organizations and activities enrich our lives and nourish our faith. To provide such experiences is one of the primary purposes of the S.C.A. This organization consisted of approximately 140 members this year, two- thirds of them were new members who were initiated at the second meeting, a most impressive candlelight service in Russell Hall. We were fortunate this year in having many excellent guest speakers at our regular Thursday night meetings. The topics discussed ranged in subject matter from Marriage to Voodooism. There were also student-conducted meetings in order to provide variety. The S.C.A. sponsors a number of outside activities for the entire campus to enioy. The Green and White Way, the annual tea at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Bailey, Open Lounge, Freshman Reception are among these social entertainments sponsored by one of the largest organizations on campus. Our year is usually brought to an end by the annual retreat at Ocean Park. 99 F O P25 Niall eC0l9il0l'l Dr. Fish and Margaret Chesley. The Freshman Reception was held on Thursday September 24. Prior to the receiving line, the fresh men, accompanied by their big sisters and brother assembled in the auditorium of Russell Hall. Ther Margaret Chesley, the student body representativel gave the freshmen very sound, helpful advice for th four busy years ahead. From her keen observation the freshmen were reminded not only that here the have an opportunity to improve character and t obtain a broad cultural background, but that th accomplishment of these things is up to them a individuals. Dr. Lincoln Fish of the faculty was guest speaker Developing the topic, "On Attending College," h advised his listeners to inspire their teachers, to rea voraciously, to seek a life philosophy, and to develo the art of conversation. After the program in the auditorium, the freshme were escorted through the receiving line by their bi brothers and sisters. There they met the administra tors, advisors of the Student Christian Association and the guest speaker. The evening was conclude with refreshments and a dance. Receiving Line. reen anal 'lfljlzife way On March 24 this year's Green and White Way, another of the activities sponsored annually by the Student Christian Association, took place. Tradi- tionally, this is a penny carnival, held in Russell Hall, at which each organization sponsors a booth. All proceeds go to the World University Service to aid foreign students. . .., , 1- ', mi ww Y. thin Q Here comes the wet sponge! 'Af V. ' ' ' i . ' E- it - , A Sharing a balloon? i ffl iii,, i l l X' I f' " In Q , I f.h,,u,r-3i,L.gg-- 'c M s ss r 33 .2.,-iJ Q 'S Sftzllil Aba Daba knows all. H1 'lvl Nr 1 -on , .. I 1, ef . mi., 8bUI'l'laI'l First Row: A. Miller, P. Haase, J. Poulin, M. Marsh, J. Bernard, M. O'Flynn, J. Aguiar, P. Forest, S. Eastman. Second Row: P. Brochu, M. Lord, D. O'Donnell, J. Pallotta, D. lessard, K. Gallant, M. Plunkett, G. Caron, M. Labossiere, T. Caron. Third Row: V. Monroe, D. Duplessie, J. Young, M. Brandt, R. Bernier, J. Veayo, R. Vachon, R. Martin, C. Douglas, A. Mathieu. President Jude A. Bernard Vice President Mary Marsh Secretary Joyce O'Flynn Treasurer Julie Poulin The Newman Club is a national organization 'formed for all Catholic students in non-sectarian colleges. The purpose of the club is to provide spiritual enrich- ment to its members while they are in college through a balanced program of religious, intellectual, and social activities. At Gorham the Newman Club meetings are held every Thursday night in Corthell Hall. The activities this year have included a series of discussions on pertinent topics, a workshop, outings to St. Joseph's College, visits to St. Louis' Home for Boys, and communion breakfasts. This year marked the initial appearance of the Newman Club Choir of ten to fifteen students, directed by Patrick Michaud, who sing every Sunday at the 9:30 Mass. Reverend Robert Roche, Chaplain, and Mr. Richard Costello serve as the advisors. The Newman Club owes them a great deal for their constant interest and effort. 102 alltefglll' First Row: A. Graves, J. Buzzell, V. Gerry, M. Dodge, J. Nelson. Second Row: D. Santerre, D. Burrows, K. Kisch, H. McBrian, H. Randall. President Judy Buzzell Vice-President Hilda Randall Secretary-Treasurer Helen McBrine The Canterbury Club is one of the three religious organizations on the Hill. It welcomes all Episcopal students and helps them grow spiritually as well as socially and intellectually while on campus. Regular prayer meetings, held on Tuesdays, are followed by discussions or by talks from guest speakers. Special services are held at Trinity Church in Portland. These may include a Corporate Communion and supper, with a speaker, discussion, or movie. We are ioined on these occasions by other members of Canterbury Clubs from surrounding colleges. One of the highlights of this year's meetings was the visitation of Regal Elisee, an Episcopalian priest from Haiti, who spoke to us on the Episcopal religion in his land. Of great help to us have been the Rev. Shirley Goodwin, Rector of Trinity Church in Portland, Rev. James Whittaker, Curate of Trinity, and Mr. James Bowman of the Gorham faculty. 103 Siu ., .1 , w, " 5 :rl ' ' LA 5iV'Eil H Qi," ll? 'x 1 ' l .sf .mg . .ss i .1 1-1 2" i . - I . . ., ,. . l ,J , ,As . ..-g t. fsgfrrjirr 4' H . We rr .. 4 A 4 ,. clenf gjclucafion Mociafion of maine .1 f., il .Ari .lil First Row: D. James, B. Searfoss, B. Spear, A. Williams, J. Sweetser, M. Wiggin, J. Stack, S. Kidder, S. Lettney, E. Chrissikos, J. Baldwin, D. Clancy, H. Morse, F. Brown. Second Row: J. Alberts, J. Simpson, E. Hall, J. Gregory, L. Brown, C. Tuck, R. Langlois, J. Skoglund, M. Marsh, L. Rugg, B. Woods, E. Nottage, R. Saunders. Third Row: L. Costa, J. Atwood, J. Nelson, J. Frechette, E. Black, J. Swan, Y. Gray, E. Hardy, G. Bradbury, A. Emery, N. Benner, C. Dolby, B. Frisbee, M. Dudley, W. Burnell, V. Gerry, M. Raynes, J. Fogg, G. Hatch, l. Saari, E. Long, J. Miller, M. Dickens. Fourth Row: M. Dickinson, S. Erickson, S. Perkins, E. Pettis, J. Nicholi, J.. Simmons, M. Dodge, J. Poulin, N. Desiardins, P. Jenkins, B. Townsend, L. Hutchinson, M. Meggison, J. Fowler, V. Merrill, N. Viitala, C. Chapman, B. Wentworth, L. Smith, M. Ratten, L. Swan, J. Graves, l. Smithson. Fifth Row: L. Leavitt, R. Haines, R. Vachon, T. Gray, R. Livingston, C. Ferden, B. Hall, D. Semmes, W. Hayes, D. Bennett, l. Craig, B. Chesley, N. Rust. President Rayann Burnham Vice President Richard Langlois Secretary Mary Marsh Treasurer James Skoglund SEAM is the Student Education Association of Maine. Student members of SEAM are also members of the Maine Teachers Association and the National Education Association. Our club, which consists of more than 200 members, meets twice a month. During the year we sponsor social activities such as dances, teas, and our annual movie-dance program during the Freshman Orientation Weekend. Delegates from SEAM participate in various state and New England con- ventions. This year at the state convention Gorham's chapter of SEAM will be host to SEAM members from most of the colleges in Maine. The purpose of our club is to impress upon the students, future teachers, the importance ot upholding the moral and ethical codes of the teaching pro- fession. With the able assistance and guidance of our advisor, Miss Mildred Peabody, we, as members of SEAM achieve this purpose. 104 rlfjjr. ill Worflr American rauefydadociafion ,BM 15 E 'T First Row: A. Mathieu, J. Baldwin, A. Miller, P. Kancevitch, R. Saunders, N. Smith, S. Hubbard. Second Row: S. Whitmore, M. Ratten, C. Haskins, L. Swan. Third Row: S. Menchen, R. Reed, R. Best, F. Bartlett, S. Smith. Chairmen P. Kancevitch, S. Menchen, M. Rotten Although we all worked hard last year, the club did not realize enough money to make our planned trip to Kentucky. This year we are working twice as hard and hope to reach our goal of one thousand dollars. Quite a number of members who have ioined the group have been a great asset to the money- making detail. Our proiects are quite varied and range from putting on benefit movies and dances to selling stationery, cards, Christmas wreaths, sandwiches, cider, fudge, and even to washing cars. Mr. Moberg and Mr. Miller help us greatly in the planning of activities and by acting as chaperons at our affairs. We greatly appreciate the support of the local merchants and of the student body, support which has given our treasury the needed boost that will put us over our quota. 105 Uufin First Row: J. Buzzell, J. Graves, E. Lowell, J. Albert, J. O'Flynn, D. Richards, l. Gilman, E. Goff, E. Hardy, D. Skillings, C. Small. Second Row: J. Ashe, L. Day, J. Dunnells, A. Hines, I. Saari, S. Cheney, R. Langlois, S. Gallant, J. Prowdy, R. Littlefield, H. Morse, M. Labossiere, L. Hussey. Third Row: T. Lombard, N. Chandler, J. Mickalide, D. Burrows, P. Pape, E. Talarico, C. Hooker, B. Wilson, A. Wentworth, B. Clark, J. Lembree, E. Snow, H. Patry, L. Barker, H. McBrine, E. Eaton. Fourth Row: J. Bowden, P. Shattuck, H. Bryant, J. Armstrongf W. Hazelton, 'R. Livingston, S. Hartford, B. Townsend, K. Kisch, C. Haskins, K. Paulson. I I President Donald Richards Vice President Joyce OFlynn Secretary Jane Albert Treasurer Louis Lambert The Outing Club, one of the more prominent and popular clubs at G.S.T.C., started the year off in full swing with plans to climb Mt. Washington. The program of activities for the year included square dances, splash and bowling parties, roller skating, a clam bake, and a trip to Cinerama in Boston. A beautiful trip to the Isles of Shoals brought the year to a happy close. The biggest campus event that the Outing Club sponsors is the Winter Carnival. Activities for this gala aFFair include a torch-light parade, snow sculpturing contests, the queen pageant, winter sport races, skiing, sliding, and skating. The climax of this glorious week is the Coronation Ball, with its crowning of the queen who rules over the remaining carnival events. 106 ,. ,Eve ,. .Sli A First Row: V. Gerry, S. Brooks, E. Gilman, W. Hazeltcn, J. Graves, E. Goff, J. Buzzell. Second Row: S. Reynolds, P. Woods, G. Wilson, B. Flagg, H. Morse, A. Hines. Third Row: J. Douglas, J. Armstrong, J. Yakawonis, K. Gallant, C. Haskins. President Wallis Hazleton Vice President Ralph Boynton Secretary Jean Graves Treasurer Irma Gilman The Ski Club was first started in 1949 by Don Hale. A group of ski enthusiasts got together in January of 1959 to reorganize the club. They elected the cluIo's next slate of officers: Wallace Hazleton, president, Ralph Boynton, vice president, Jean Graves, secretary, Irma Gilman, treasurer. A constitution was drawn up, the club was accepted by the school, and the skiers were on their way again. As soon as nature's necessary product lsnowl had arrived, the members were oft to Pleasant Mountain in Bridgton, Maine, for a thrilling time. For the non-skiers, who were interested in learning the sport, individual or group lessons were given at a low cost on the beginners' slope. For those who had mastered the art, there were long, steep, rolling hills to glide over all the way down the side of the mountain. Because the trips were all a great success, we're looking forward to many more. Perhaps during the coming season, we will be able to take in some trips to New Hampshire or Vermont. 107 66 f ? 77 o 0 0 o Clgeafli 1 'ckfi -Ii' . Y '75 I linda Mills - Miss Maine Edith Goff - Miss GSTC Mary Marsh - 1959 Winter Carnival Queen AU gs 8 6 3 Qmuww V finmwkwwh it ' 'W ' ul, 545 A An M -335 'gig .i ifigifig Lg. it V t tw ,tp ,,f " 9.-sf: -ECB n ', . AL ., lf: ,V infer arniua Snow! Snow! Snow! That seemed to be the unintentional although the appropriate theme for Gorham State Teachers College Winter Carnival. On Thursday, March 3, the carnival, an eagerly anticipated annual event, was officially opened with a torchlight parade, followed by a record hop. On Friday, which brought one of our fiercest winter storms of the year, voting was held throughout the day for Winter Carnival Queen. The candidates were as follows: freshmen, Betty Gallison and Donna Cockerille, sophomores, Brenda Wilson and Cindy Packardp juniors, Helen Morse and Betty Chesleyp seniors, Sylvia Hamilton and Carol Hodgkins. In the evening, basketball was on the program. The women students played the men, and the students chal- lenged the faculty. On Saturday the sun came out again and conditions for snow sculpturing were at their best. The theme was "Candy Land, U.S.A." Various organiza- tions labored throughout the day in competition for the Sculpturing Trophy. ln the evening the Coronation Ball was held, with music 'Furnished by our own dance band. The climax of the evening came with the announcement of the new queen. Quiet crept over the gym as Don Richards, master of cere- monies, opened the envelope which containd the name - Cindy Packard. Beaming radiantly amid the enthusiastic applause, she was crowned by Mary Marsh, last year's queen. On Sunday afternoon the snow sculptures were iudged. ln the 'Fraternities and the faculty presented a program of entertainment in Queen Cindy Packard presided and announced the snow sculpture Sigma Pi. The carnival was, indeed, a wonderful success. Praise must Regina Littlefield and Esther Lowell for their leadership and to the student com- mittees who worked with them to carry through a memorable program of events. evening the Russell Hall. winner, Phi be given to Front Row, Left to Right: D. Cockerille, B. Wilson, H. Morse, S. Hamilton. Back Row, Left to Right: M. Marsh, E. Gallison, L. Packard, B. Chesley, N. Boothby. lil 1 , Q, Q ?' Im l 'slim' I , . vi -,+v"' Ag- tv 5. , . is , f " , EEE5Wf: l l2XF2w5N 11 l' fm: i msc. - A ' w. 110 Q, f L. I could have danced all night. Grand March. Our Queen The Winner. C!2l'll GHC? First Row: P. Brochu, M. Topping, D. Skillings, L. Hussey, J. Nelson, V. Munroe, E. Chrissikos. Second Row: S. Jeffery, L. Brown, B. Leach, A. Williams, J. Simpson, E. Hardy, G. Caron, L. Bickford. Third Row: J. Ashe, S. Eastman, J. Poulin, D. James, S. Gallant, V. Wotton, A. Hines, Y. Wilkinson. Fourth Row: I.. Packard, B. Wilson, B. Blackstone, J. Armstrong, L. Barker, D. Williams, V. Gerry. President Linda Hussey Vice President Virginia Munroe Secretary Joan Nelson Treasurer Donna Skillings Wardrobe Mistress Mary Topping and Linda Brown On Monday and Wednesday afternoons the sounds of music and the cries of technique can be heard, for the thirty-two girls in Modern Dance Club are practicing. The girls under the excellent supervision of Miss Jeanette Goodwin, practice diligently in order to display their combined talents in the form of two major productions, one during the Christmas season and another in the spring. The dance workshop, for those who were not able to become active mem- bers of the Club itself, enables girls to become better acquainted with the regular routine and also to fill vacant places in the Dance Club. We, the members of the Modern Dance Club and of the Workshop, would like to thank Miss Goodwin for her never-ending interest, direction, encourage- ment, and patience. Without her the Club could never have attained the level of achievement and success which it has now reached. 'l'l2 J4,-f CM 5- ,ss9'."1 j .W .M ., mrsjegw .-ixx W' Cb First Row: H. Morse, L. Rugg, D. Semmes, J. Simpson, V. Keene, P. Stanley, E. Pacillo. Second Row: W. Burnell, C. Hett, J. McKay, F. Brown, E. Goff, B. Spiller, B. Flagg. Third Row: A. Nugent, S. Hartford, J. Yakawonis, R. Best, J. Armstrong. President Judy Simpson Vice President Don Semmes Secretary Carol Hamilton Treasurer Vance Keene The Art Club at GSTC welcomes all students who are interested in art in its various forms. The purpose of the organization is to provide an outlet and an opportunity for creating art objects in various media. Available for use are pastels, charcoal, watercolors, tempera, oils, clay, metals and crayons. Many students develop into really fine artists through this organization. In the art club all work together and try to help one another improve. Each year the Art Club sponsors a tea during National Art Week. Artists in the surrounding area lend their work for our exhibition, as do some members on our college faculty. To this tea, which is given in the lounge, eve-ryone is invited. In addition to the tea other types of programs of art are sponsored by the club. This year we have undertaken a new type of project, paying for lessons at the Portland School of Fine and Applied Arts for a very promising boy, some of whose work was exhibited at the tea last year. 113 ommufera , 1 1. 5 First Row: S. Berry, J. McCann, B. Lewis, M. LeClerc, D. Clancy, D. Bois, R. Saunders, N. Viitala, P. Fo rest, E. Nottage. Second Row: J. Piacentini, A. Merrill, J. Burke, M. Lord, J. MacDougal, R. Adams, S. Murray, P. Libby, F. Bryant, P. Briggs, V. Leary. Third Row: E. Pacillo, J. Leveille, M. Plunkett, D. O'Donnell, G. Maynard, N. Smith, J. Pallotta, S. Lerman, J. Amato. Fourth Row: R. Wescott, R. Sprague, C. Enman, P. Woodworth, P. Mallory. President David Bois Vice President Dorothy Clancy Secretary Mary Le Clerc Treasurer Robert Saunders This year the Commuters' Club is working hard towards a bigger and better membership than that of past years. The main purpose of the club is to bring the commuters into one organization in order to give them the opportunity to participate in campus projects and to enter into the college social life. The cIub's varied program includes bowling parties, skating parties, and "get-togethers" in the lounge. The club feels itself fortunate in having Dr. Fish as its faculty advisor. l'l4 ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE Front Row: Miss E. Sawyer, l. Rugg. Back Row: Mr. R. Duso, B. Hall, Mr. W. Moberg. The Entertainment Committee is composed of both students and faculty. The main function of this com- mittee is to bring to our campus cultural and educa- tional programs. Through the efforts of this organiza- tion, students have had the opportunity to see performers whom they could not have readily seen otherwise. gnferfainmenf an miemgfy ommiffee The committee on Assemblies, consisting of two students and three faculty members, has the respon- sibility of providing programs for the college assem- blies. The Tuesday programs, secular in nature, are varied to include talks by outside speakers, movies, demonstrations, and faculty and student presenta- tions. The Thursday programs, stressing the spiritual and ethical, bring speakers from the Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant clergy. Recently, with the reorganiza- tion of committees, the Committee for Assemblies has been merged with the Entertainment Committee. ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE H .---" fl... , First Row: Mr. A. Pease, N. Kenney, Mr. G. Barker. Second Row: F. Chambers, Miss H. Heel, J. Fillmore. .gncluri fria!.x4rfJ Counci .salt First Row: A. Colby, L. Turcotte, R. Harvey, E. Starbird, D. Bennett. Second Row: A. Brown, E. Padham, T. Gray. President Richard Harvey Vice President Donald Waterhouse Secretary-Treasurer Linwood Turcotte The Industrial Arts Council, a relatively new organization on the hill, has readily proven its value to students and faculty alike. Unique in both its organization and purpose, it is composed of two elected members of each class and two 'Faculty members. ln addition to clearing up departmental problems in the Industrial Arts program, it endeavors to develop a closer understanding and relationship on campus between the Industrial Arts and the academic departments. Besides its two main objectives the Council anticipates a development of greater eflficiency within the industrial arts program, an improvement in student- instructor relationship, and a means of providing better 'Facilities and main- tenance for the industrial arts curriculum. During the past year the Council with the help of the Junior Class l.A. students produced a film, Interpreting Industry Through The line Production Proiect. It is the aspiration of the members of this organization that in 'Future years it will be of increasing service to the college. 116 clu5friaf.x4rf5 pro eddiona Qrganizafion First Row: E. Starbird, K. Kozak, R. House, R. Harvey, F. Lee, B. Susbury, D. Tripp, T. Wilkerson, R. Lee Second Row: F. Henderson, R. Giles, R. Stewart, C. Cushman, R. Plaisted, G. Horn, C. Kinkade, A Downer, L. Turcotte, P. Fields, A. Colby, G. Paradis, P. Lapierre. Third Row: W. Hamm, L. Allen, F. Bartlett, R. Haines, D. McCullough, R. Langlois, B. Trundy, T. Gray R. Day, A. Conners, L. Francis, B. Bell, A. Brown, C. Horn, R. Reed, D. Bennett. Fourth Row: R. Boulton, J. Jackson, J. Pearson, R. Best, L. Baird, T. Huntress, S. Wilbur, R. Peabody, J. Laughton, T. Cochran, C. Ferden, J. Nye, C. Rankin, M. McFadden, W. Gillette. President Frank Lee Vice President Richard Harvey Secretary-Treasurer Robert Susbury The l.A.P.O. is active 'For its second year in bringing professional programs to Gorham College. The membership of this organization includes all industrial Arts students and faculty. One of its major goals, acquiring a greater understanding of the workings of industry, is being met through such programs as those on metal-finishing by Mr. J. L. Shields and on antique tools by Mr. D. R. Parker. The l.A.P.O. hopes that in the future the interest stimulated by the programs it has sponsored will continue to grow. l17 'f N D aiffil fr' V 1 . 1 i 222' f 1: weep ' rg' f' , N-4 First Row: K. Roberts, l. Brown, R. Powers, C. MacWhinnie, E. Davis, C. Clair, P. Butterfield. Second Row: A. Messer, J. Williams, D. Webb, R. Goodson, A. Harrison, R. Adams. Third Row: D. Mulherin, E. Pease, J. Griffin, P. Withee, C. Williams. President Clifford MacWhinnie Vice President Everett Davis Secretary-Treasurer Robert Powers The Varsity "G" Club is an organization made up exclusively of men who have earned at least one varsity letter in an intercollegiate sport. Over the past year the club has grown considerably. Perhaps this growth can be credited to the coming of a varsity soccer team to Gorham. Prospects are also bright for adding a varsity tennis team. The "G" Club sponsors the entire college intramural sports program. Included in this program are flag football, basketball, softball, volleyball, tennis and golf. The club awards trophies or medals to the champions of these various intramural activities. To round out the program the "G" Club presented several stimulating assemblies: a lecture given by Mr. John Winkin, head baseball coach at Colby College, and several films on various outstanding events in the sports field. ln the spring, usually around March, the club provides a banquet for all participants in varsity sports. On this occasion varsity letters and trophies are presented to the outstanding athletes. The Varsity "G" Club newsletter is put out at least four time a year. lt has become quite successful in keeping the Varsity "G" Club alumni in contact with sports on the hill. Under the guidance of our advisors, Mr. Richard Costello, and Mr. Richard Westcott, we hope to further improve and promote sports activities here on campus. 'l'l8 amen Zi .xdflzkfic Jddaociafion 3 fx CJ 1 First Row: S. Perkins, E. Lowell, M. Raeside, P. Kancevitch, J. Simpson, D. Williams, E. Hall. , , , . Brewer, P. Brochu. Second Row: H. Morse, I. Gilman 5. Menchen J. McKay M President Pat Kancevitch Vice President Judy Simpson Secretary Meredith Raeside Treasurer Donna Williams The W.A.A. promotes all women's athletic activity on the Hill. The organi- zation is designed to create student enthusiasm in the areas of athletics and to provide an opportunity for a release from studies. With the guidance of the council, a program is set up that has appeal to all those interested in sports. Fall finds the girls actively engaged in softball, badminton, and archery, while the coming of winterushers in snowshoeing, skiing, skating, volleyball, fencing, and basketball. At the first sign of spring, the tennis courts immediately come alive, and trampoline is added to the program to keep the girls busy on those muddy days! Each girl works toward a goal. Striving first for her numeral and letter, she reaches ultimate satisfaction by earning a white blazer, monogrammed with the W.A.S. emblem, an award requiring five hundred points. All awards are presented at the annual banquet in the spring. 119 .14 a orud First Row: E. Chrissikos, A. Graves, J. Graves, T. Caron, L. Bickford, J. Hurst, J. Atwood, J. Hardy, F. Mello, L. Day, B. Boyd, S. Letteney, A. Hines, J. Baldwin. Second Row: I. Gilman, P. Allen, S. Berry, N. Freeman, J. Bowden, J. McKay, E. Hall, D. Duplessie, B. Gallison, C. Austin, J. Swan, J. Fogg, S. Kitten, S. Smith, S. Santerre. Third Row: E. Costa, A. Mae, B. Guptill, A. Emery, Y. Gray, E. Eaton, C. Moulton, R. Collins, C. Coffey, J. Collins, J. Harvey, K. Gallant, P. Jenkins, E. Laughton, P. Stanley, M. Dickinson, G. Bradbury, C. Swett, N. Chandler, S. Erickson. Fourth Row: R. Sanders, J. Simmons, J. Fuller, K. Kisch, ,D. James, M. Moulton, P. Jameson, S. Blaisdell, C. Berdeen, B. Woods, L. Rugg, J. Gregory, J. Aguiar, E. Nottage, J. Armstrong, S. Menchen, A. Woodworth, P. Hawkes, S. Tukey, C. Libby. Fifth Row: M. Raeside, G. McCann, S. MacDonald, R. Martin, W. Kennedy, R. Sprague, W. Hazelton, C. Googins, R. Livingston, D. Semmes, S. Jewett, W. Hayes, D. Richards, N. Dow, P. Malory, J. Chrissikos, B. Leach. President Donald Duplessie Vice President Pat Brown Secretary-Treasurer Eleanor Hall One of the 'Foremost organizations on the hill is the A Cappella Chorus. Under the fine leadership of Miss Miriam Andrews, this group has done an excellent iob in adding greatly to the enioyment of college life. Though the organization, which is made up of about one hundred students, works under the handicap of meeting only once a week, on Friday during club period, it has achieved impressive results. Its maior presentations during the year have been the Christmas and Spring concerts. Other presentations have included their excellent program at the reception honoring the Maine State Grange in Portland and various assembly programs. We, the members of A Cappella Chorus, wish to thank Miss Andrews for all the help she has given and the patience which she has shown us throughout the year. These qualities and her proven professional ability have certainly helped make a chorus of which Gorham can well be proud. Clzoridferd .04 fd., . ,k First Row: J. Hardy, N. Freeman, J. Swan, S. Berry, S. Blaisdell, P. Hawkes, G. McCann, M. Raeside, c. swan, B. eupfill. Second Row: S. Santerre, E. Chrissikos, J. Hurst, C. Austin, L. Bickford, E. Gallsion, J. Atwood, P. Allen,- l.. Day, M. Eaton. Third Row: E. Eaton, E. Laughton, R. Collins, J. Simmons, K. Kisch, C. Libby, C. Pillsbury, S. Tukey, J. Harvey, A. Mae, N. Chandler. On most Monday or Wednesday afternoons around one o'clock, a visitor. to the third floor of Corthell Hall is likely to hear the Choristers diligently practicing. Twenty-five women students, especially chosen from the A Cappella Chorus for their musical ability and interest, make up this group. Although a relative newcomer to the hill, the organization, under the direction of Miss Miriam Andrews, has made a fine reputation for itself. The Choristers appear annually in both the Christmas and Spring Concerts. 'I2'l ix we al all -R . rv. F. F. ,1 First Row: C. Austin, V. Gerry, P. Kancevitch, C. Googins, R. Saunders, J. Aguiar, C. Coffey, A. Graves. Second Row: S. Santerre, W. Bernell, C. Moulton, R. MacGown, R. Norwood, A. Littlefield, R. Martin, B. Hanna, B. Lewis, S. Smith. Third Row: J. Shaw, W. Kennedy, M. MacGown, J. Johnson, J. Fillmore, C. Enman, M. Brandt, N. Dow, B. Hatch. President C. Googins Librarians P. Kancevitch, R. Saunders The band continued this year under the direction of Mr. Gerard Chamber- land and provided programs throughout the year: assemblies, basketball games, and Recognition Day. Along with the other musical organizations it took part in the Christmas and Spring concerts. Many music majors and interested freshmen have given the band a big boost this year, and we feel that the band has improved greatly with this help. A great deal of credit for the band's growth in both membership and perform- ance over the last three years goes to Mr. Chamberland. Even though at times rehearsal has not been very promising, he has stimulated us so that we have been able to take pride in the eventually smooth performance. 122 211,55 gk? 1 l 1 A A I self? L'i1.1r....."'.I- . . 3 F' t Row: C. Googins Caccompanistl, N. Russ, D. Duplessie, R. Dubois, F. Bartlett, J. Pearson, J. urs Fillmore D Best, W. Hayes, W. Hazelton, J. Chrissikos, S. MacDonald. M C ll h Second Row: F. Chambers, A. John, farrangementj, R. Sprague, G. Asselin, G. Horn, Jr., D. c u oug , W. Bruns, R. Giles, C. Horn. Third Row: P. Mallory, J. Demillo, F. Raines, R. Brooks, D. Semmes, R. Livingston, R. Nape. President G. Asselin Historian-Librarian J. Fillmore The members of the Men's Glee Club, under the capable direction of Mr. Gerard Chamberland, are a carefully chosen group selected on voice qualification and interest in musical participation. This group has made several appearances at assembly programs, on tele- vision, and in the surrounding communities. The spirit in which they take part on these occasions is always mirrored by the appreciation of their enthusiastic audience. The glee club rehearses twice weekly, and the result of this work is a sense of achievement in a field of aesthetics and of self-expression. In three short years the Men's Glee Club has made a considerable contribu- tion to the good relationship between the college and the community. 123 Y udic glclucafora Wafiona! Conference TQ ' r "'2i::j5 ill. i w, ...-.. VCL "lf" 'lilqlii' E ii i: ffffr tx 'ai L if f li. F5 Q0 1 ., Q ., sf 'I "1 L I 1 4' l X V7 ...E First Row: C. Swett, N. Freeman, J. Hurst, R. MacGown, A. Mae, C. Coffey, S. Hardy. Second Row: P. Allen, E. Eaton, C. Moulton, J. Shaw, C. Libby, C. Pillsbury, B. Guptill, C. Austin, L. Bickford. Third Row: R. Martin, M. MacGown, C. Googins, R. Livingston, J. Fillmore, M. Brandt, N. Dow, W. Kennedy. President Patricia Brown Vice President Margaret Morrill Secretary Athalie Mosher Treasurer Richard Brooks Historian Barbara Joy The primary purpose of our organization is to promote interest in music education both on the hill and in the community. In connection with its purpose, we have sponsored several assemblies this year. Following each of our monthly meetings there are interesting and varied programs. One of the outstanding programs of the year was at Christmas when a hundred-voice glee club from Buxton and its surrounding areas sang for our group. The addition of this year's talented 'Freshmen and the revisions in the music curriculum are signs of still greater progress to come. Many thanks go to our three music faculty members who have been a constant source of help to us. 124 ai micifia First Row: S. Erickson, P. Haase, M. Marsh, C. Williams, J. O'Flynn, M. Tiner, J. Gregory, C. Packard. S nd Row: V. Munroe, I. Gilman, M. Dickinson, E. Hardy, K. Skillings, M. Raeside, H. Morse. eco Third Row: A. Emery, I.. Brown, M. Meggison, B. Townsend, S. Tukey, E. Burke. President Margaret Joyce O'Flynn Vice President Cynthia Williams Secretary Jane Albert The Amicitia Club, as the name signifies, stands for friendship. Meetings are held twice a month on Monday evening. The club is composed of forty ' ls from all four classes the senior girls this year being active members. gir l , Freshman girls receive their bids in early spring and become active members immediately after their week of initiation and the formal banquet. During the process of initiation the pledges are given "big sisters" within the club. At the banquet, the "big sisters" accompany their pledges. Throughout the initia- tion, they are on hand to help the pledges. Our club sponsors several events including dances, teas, and fashion shows, such as the spring fashion show this year, having as its theme, "The Moon or Bust." Also during the Christmas season, donations are given to the needy families of Gorham. We are fortunate to have as our advisor, Mrs. Dorothea Dunton, who is always on hand with her helpful advice. We wish to express our gratitude to her and hope to have her as our advisor and friend for many years. 125 phi Sigma i First Row: J. Chrissikos, B. Spiller, D. Duplessie, F. Chambers, H. Dutil, R. Maines. Second Row: H. Small, B. Bruns, D. Semmes, V. Keene, B. Griffin, D. Waterhouse, R. Taylor, R. Penney, H. Ware. Third Row: B. Michaud, R. Gorman, G. Asselin, F. Benson. President Donald Duplessie Vice President Frank Chambers Secretary Bernard Spiller Treasurer Harvey Dutil Chaplain Robert Norwood In 1949 the fraternity called Omega Nu Epsilon was formed at Gorham, and in 'I955 it became a chapter of the national Phi Sigma Pi Fraternity. Omega was adopted as the chapter name. Phi Sigma Pi emphasizes high scholarship, close fellowship, and advance- ment of educational ideals. This year we have held our regular activities, which include the smoker, a party for our little brothers, professional and business meetings, the sponsoring of a candidate in the Mayor Campaign, and pledge week to initiate new mem- bers. We also sponsored an outing for underprivileged children, a bridge tournament, two assembly speakers, and two socials. Leadership in the fraternity is exemplified by the following: Our president, Donald Duplessie, is also president of the Junior Class and A Cappella Chorus, our vice president, Frank Chambers, is a member of the college entertainment committee, Gerard Asselin is vice president of the Junior Class, co-editor of the Hillcrest, and president of Men's Glee Club, Donald Semmes is vice president of the Art Club, Vance Keene is treasurer of the Art Club, Bertram Michaud is news editor of The Observer, John Chrissikos is sports editor for The Observer and Hillcrest, and Harold Ware is president of the Student Council. The fraternity has maintained its spirit and principles over the past year. The future holds promise of betterment, enlargement, and a greater fostering of fraternal ideals. 126 Shine Them Up! You Just Don't Know. ,470 .wa-fy Quclck Qucackl , . xi' ' f- , V V , W,,,,,L5,M,, W. 15 ' " H fF92:"' mmm '1 Q E Hey Sarge. - ,EW EH B ,, ,p. 7 Lame Duck. 'wg f ,--,, Lotus Flower Recifes aialaa leffa First Row: R. Langlois, R. Vachon, W. Stearns, D. Bennett, J. Skoglund, R. Susbury, B. Thurlow, R. Nape. Second Row: R. Haines, C. Williams, R. Ludwig, R. Plaisted, E. Richardson, A. Downer, D. Mahoney, N. Walls. Third Row: R. Steward, C. Sanders, L. Allen, G. Stevenson, R. Bernier, A. Brown, B. Coulthard, C. Cushman, B. Bell, D. Jellerson. Fourth Row: W. Hayes, W. Gillette, C. Rankin, C. Googins, R. Emery, J. Fillmore, F. Raynes, R. Harvey, G. Bangs. President Dean Bennett Vice President Wayne Stearns Secretary James Skoglund Treasurer Robert Susbury Chaplain Richard Harvey National Representative Lincoln Brown Kappa Delta Phi is a national fraternity dedicated to promoting higher educational standards. Iota chapter proposes to achieve these ends by rendering concrete service to this college and to the community. This year Kappa's activities included the sponsoring of clean-up cam- paigns during the fall and spring to improve the appearance of our campus and the preparation and maintenance of a skating rink for the enioyment of both college students and townspeople. During the year Kappa prepared and distributed to the student body and faculty an informative pamphlet entitled "Our Growing Campus," which included past history, expansion program, and offerings of our college. ln the field of social activities Kappa held a smoker, a hobo dance, spon- sored intra-mural teams, presented the annual Kabaret, and participated in fraternity night. ln the spring the annual banquet and outing were held for both old and new members. ln April, Kappa members attended the national convention, which was held in Bangor, Maine. This year the fraternity gathered material and prepared a ten-year history for the national yearbook of Kappa Delta Phi, which is printed once every ten years. Jerre Fillmore and Charles Sanders did a fine iob of managing Kappa's part in the Mayoralty Campaign, and after a closely fought contest Kappa's candidate, James Skoglund, was elected Mayor of the Campus. It is the belief of Kappa Delta Phi that participation in extra-curricular activities develops both leadership and cooperation and promotes a feeling of brotherhood - qualities which will aid the student in adapting himself to college life and which will contribute to his preparation for the teaching profession. Kappa sincerely desires to continue to be of service in the years to come. R Kubaret Kappa Style. Mission Assignments W Tx! P . 3 ' Why Worry? Your Guess. Don't Laugh, Phil vm. x' , f -mg 41,11 ' 5 ,is .fdflada olzamdcla ge fa First Row: C. Douglas, L. Lambert, R. Powers, C. MacWhinnie, P. Withee, J. Raymond, G. Horn. Second Row: T. Ford, L. Lahar, D. Richards, D. Mulherin, G. Odencrantz, R. Adams, C. Clair, F. Bartlett, M. Davis. Third Row: C. Calderwood, E. Pease, R. Best, S. Miller, R. Fish, D. Bois, P. Butterfield, E. Davis. Fourth Row: K. Roberts, R. Ellery, G. Hilton, C. Beckett, R. Goodson, A. Harrison, L. Bussey. President Cliff MacWhinnie Vice President Philip Withee Secretary John Raymond Treasurer Robert Powers Chaplain Richard Moreau The purpose of this organization is to promote a more brotherly relationship among its members, who shall be banded together in a brotherhood of loyalty, friendship, and good will. Since the fraternity was organized, it has shown continued success. Alpha's men this year, as in the past, have been active leaders and participants in campus programs. The fraternity was well represented in executive positions in various organizations. Those holding leadership posts were Cliff MacWhinnie, who was elected president of the Varsity "G" Club and of the men's government in Woodward Hall, Rob Powers, secretary-treasurer of the Varsity "G" Club and secretary of men's government in Woodward Hall, Everett Davis, vice president of Varsity "G" Clubp Fred' Bartlett, secretary of the Student Council, and Dave Bois, president of the Commuters' Club. In an exciting mayor campaign, Alpha's candidate, Charlie Douglas, was strongly supported by the fraternity. In the world of sports "Beta Men" excelled. Participating in soccer were Cliff MacWhinnie, Ed Beaudoin, Rob Powers, Dan Mulherin, Phil Withee, Ken Roberts, Arnold Harrison, Roger Goodson, Everett Davis, George Hilton, and George Odencrantz. Members of the basketball team were Phil Butterfield, Cliff MacWhinnie, Jim Pouravelis, Roger Goodson, Ken Roberts, and managers Rob Powers and Dan Mulherin. Baseball veterans expecting to see action this year are Charlie Clair, Phil Withee, Dan Mulherin, and' Jim Pouravelis, ,ln addition, Alpha teams may always be found on the intramural rosters. Social activities promoted by the fraternity include the Alpha Weekends and many other campus functions. The Alpha weekends have proved beneficial to the interests of both the fraternity and the student body in general. The Maroon and Gold hopes that it will be able to continue its high standards as a social organization promoting good' will and understanding. V3 r, 1 ,Q - M 1' ' - + l ri Q1 f 1 7,1 xx I WU me hw U ., '- i i Y, is 1: www, l Y ' ssffLssvzff1faseM A v Mum A A W N ..L,g? ww f 'L . 1 ,w!,,,,11' y 5 , -i"2f1.,. - 1 ul 'M , 1 11 1 - , M1 4. A i' . ' Up, Up You Fool. G ,L M f :T -..:J' Oh Yea! Stand Up How many feet do they have? N. ir Thclf's Rlghf Doctor glam, J llfljlzidffe llfulzife you warg 5' f 7 lm Everyfhing's working! Getting ready for the noon rush. A 1 Q, Q N , 1.-1 Y ,Ss I 4 1.-I! H M '4 ' a -ali' f fi V El 5 Those corners! 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Horeb's farm was rocky soil Between the hills. He tilled the earth Silently. And well. No schooling, yet His mind and corn stood tall. Dorothy Kidney, '60 TANAHTA Tanahta played an accordion under dark trees . . . A haunting melody of moon-song and tall white fire. Tanahta played an accordion Where sumac grew and straight grasses Reflected in the pool . . . And sometimes it seemed as if she held The very wind between her swaying hands, So soft it cried and breathed its tapered sob As if it knew Tanahta held it captive Beside a still, dark pond. Tanahta played a gypsy song . . . She stretched the plaintive voices Of far ocean and pine trees between her moving-hands And wood creatures stopped in moonlight To hear the mingled 'song . . . Star songs are what Tanahta played And slow long laughter from crystal waterfalls. And Tanahta played under dark trees . . . Until one forgot there were such things As clocks and trains . . . One was made up From tatters of moonlight . . Patches of black velvet . . When Tanahta played. Dorothy Kidney, '60 138 1 QEHQPJQ5 of g0l'Aa'l'Yl ORDEAL BY DISHES Working in the dishroom calls for speed, stamina, and steady nerves. With the first influx of dirty dishes from the dining room, you spring from your seat on the counter to begin your iob, realizing that you must not slacken your pace until your fifteen-to-twenty-minute task is completed. As the dishes are snatched from the counter in front of the window, where the waitresseshave deposited them, they are dropped into large metal trays having dividers to hold the dishes upright. The plates seem to roll into place without any effort from the skilled hands of the stacker. Now the trays of dishes are pushed around the corner of the counter, and all stuck-on food is detached by means of a forceful spray. Into the machine they go, emerging scalding hot to slide around the counter in front of an open window. As the cold air hits the hot dishes, steam, super- saturated with food molecules, threatens to dominate your senses. The sweat is standing out in beads on your forehead, as you transfer,the dishes to a large rolling service tray by grasping two or three dishes between the fingers of each hand and slinging them onto the stack. Your fingers smart from the intense heat of the newly-washed dishes until you think you cannot possibly touch any more. The dishes clashing as they strike against each other, the tension mounting by the minute, the spraying, surging action of George and Holbert, the two dish machines, the feeling that, if you don't hurry, the dishes will pile up on your counter and you'll be so far behind you'll never catch up - all these bring momentary frustration. Then, suddenly, it's over, and you can once again see across the room. Now you must roll the tray into the "old room,"where the dishes are stored. You are filled with anxiety as you hear the rumbling, clinking sound of the towering plates, stacked from two and a half to three feet high, when the tray is pushed over the threshold. As you lift the dishes onto the counter, you wish you hadn't taken the whole stack, and your pulse quickens until they are safely supported by the wooden structure. At last your work for the meal is over. As you hurry up the stairs, to get ready for the next class, your quivering nerves relax and you can breathe naturally again, satisfied with a iob well-done. Gladys Miller, '63 THE HILL Chilly early morning blackness shrouds the Hill. One by one a multitude of alarms buzz, rattle, and clang. Highlights appear in the East where rose-gold' clouds herald the coming dawn. The sound of clattering dishes shatters the brisk morning air. Punctually, the ponderous caravan arrives and labors up the drive, gears grinding, wheels whining, gravel spitting. Following the winding road around the campus, the cars finally come to a stop, all perfectly aligned like well-drilled platoons. The early sun sets the new snow agleam as muffled students scurry to their classes in classic, time-worn Corthell Hall or modern, fresh Bailey Hall. Stragglers make their usual last-minute dash from the dormitories. A gust of icy wind whips and tears at the harried students as they go from class to class. Tatters of white clouds sail along in the deep basin of azure as the sun slowly declines. The final buzzer rasps and students, freed from the routine of classes, retrace their steps. Scattering to the four winds, cars rattle down the Hill, friends saunter down the snowy walk toward the village. Shrill voices pierce the air as children storm the slopes with their sleds, graceful and colorfully clad figures glide and race over a measured square of frosty glass. The sun sets, touching the clouds with soft caress. Tall pines cast long, cool blue shadows over the pure, clean snow. Black trees are etched against the sky, mellow street lights glimmer against the blue-shadowed slopes. ln the dormitories lights blink on to chase the night's settling darkness. A raucous laugh rings out against the icy stillness as a iovial group descends the Hill. Shadowy figures stroll by, hand in hand, enclosed in a world apart. The moon floods the Hill with a pale ivory light. The glittering stars, seemingly near enough to touch, are brittle and delicate. Distant lights, twinkling and shimmer- ing, promise excitement, adventure. An ancient clock ticks off the hours and the darkness deepens. One by one, lights wink out until finally only the' solitary street lamps stand against the gloom that envelops the silent, peaceful Hill. 139 Janice Aguiar, '62 .Aff 'v f t W ., 45.1 . 21.1. V lxl: - 1 all I I g, 1 ' X "' li: ,l l ' ,jfllx ,,,., ,' f '. c- 1 . ' ,Trl , , . fhplbll x " . I . 1 . lf lf? 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H'--4, sg .- I-.gg -. 51.4, jg,-1 9. - ' I .V V' - V' V L' :M V. '+V 7? ,L ARCHERY F A L L VOLLEYBALL 144 QL. ' 9 TENNIS 0I'l'l,2I'l 5 6:50 .fdfkfefic fion BOWLING . sf ' ,V 1- '1 XF - 'Q fi 'IW if ,, 1 1 9 'f ggi , SKIING W I N T E R 145 TUMBLING if'-FWF P: O l9I'lIl V PREPARING Fon A I-nice l l LIFE SAVING INSTRUCTIONS Many women students find it an advantage to participate in a variety of sports throughout the year. In doing so, they expand their circle of friends, learn new sports, and gain ideas and methods of teaching them. This diversion twice a week is both beneficial and enjoyable. Experience in a variety of sports makes for versatility, a quality valuable for any teacher. 146 Kheerdaglera Left to Right: Mary Marsh, Donna Cockerille, Evelyn Talarico, Laurel Barker, Judy Shaw, Carol Hooker, linda Brown, and Linda Hussey. "You make the baskets, we'll make the noise!" was a cheer frequently heard during the successful 1959-1960 basketball season. There were many changes in the squad this year: new girls were added, new uniforms were worn, and new cheers were yelled - all in an attempt to lead the faithful basketball fans into cheering for the Hilltoppers. Freshmen were well represented on the squad with Laurel Barker, Barbara Clark, Donna Cockerille, Carol Hooker, and substitute Evelyn Talarico. Sopho- mores were Linda Hussey and Mary Marsh. Juniors were Linda Brown and head cheerleader Judy Shaw. The cheerleaders are grateful to Alpha Lamba Beta for sponsoring the "Tap Off", which aroused interest and enthusiasm for the Farmington-Gorham home game. 147 Splitting c 2" Board the Hard Wcly. eade . 5-lf PORTSMOUTH, N. H. Juclo gxkigifion JANUARY 14TH, 1960 SPONSORED BY WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION Z5. fh fu ff'--F5 Can I Try?? OOPS! ! in ' ,snr - T Y 5. , V. j1 " Z i"4.'3"f'f? . Y ,, , zs4.4gff, The Weaker Sex Shows Them Howl! 148 Tv ,, fi .. v,...K. , . ,,,.. -ft . 'T' lC 1 .,,n Am I 1 - 'cull' yi mf- ' ' N32 3 " mf T ni .W ' SED Z 5' , f ,K M Kwai- L ' . v wi ' 1,,. 4' W if 5- ,N ..,.' f...- ' , :Tk- ,fy 'N , : bf' - r 'MFE .i W P A. 4- A -f-N 4 Ni SL , , arc! wedco :WG " ' QQ,-' L94 . , K, A. J 1 we 45254 ww W w "effigy, rw .zu . V nv- is Q? , u um, 2 .f ' ""1'j3"'f--' mgffeg MM'-H52 ,.g K1 . , 1 . , ,L wp -P ' Q ' . 5 ' -wa: ,M .1 niififltu ' 'Q' 'Ai-'w ' :iii - V Q 1 5 .' , 1 Nmrjig , my Q 52' . :W Liv! ':".+1f.." 5, 5.23 Biff.- .L-: ,gif 5 ww., 1. ff. in ,,,. ..eL.s,i--M, M-,. . , xa2affq322wv.' , ,.-L - ,. U .Xu - 'Aff V. - M L5,j?gf,?L-,, ,11:n,' ' "' Ibfmagl-.Jq . 1-fswru M. - r i, 4, v , A lx,- ,f. First Row: H. Paradis, E. Beaudoin, B. Thurlow, C. MacWhinnie, B. Thomas, R. Powers, G. Odencrantz. Second Row: Coach Costello, E. Davis, A. Messer, D. Mulherin, L. Brown, K. Roberts, J. Williams, M. Sprague. Third Row: G. Sanborn, P. Withee, R. Goodson, D. Webb, A. Harrison, G. Hilton. OCCQI' Enthusiasm for the sport of soccer was high on the Hill this season. With many veterans returning from last year's squad, the feeling was that Gorham was to have its first winning season since the sport was introduced here three years ago. As it turned out, our GSTC booters compiled an 8-5-1 record in a schedule which included many hard-fought games. Furthermore, they were selected to play in the NAIA Eastern Tourney, which was held at New Bedford, Massachusetts. Here, even though they lost to Bridgewater, they represented Gorham College very well and received praise from the attending coaches and sports writers. The prospects for next year appear to be very good. Although the team will lose Bruce Thomas, Bruce Thurlow, and Ed Beaucloin through graduation, the versatility of the team as a whole will not be hurt. We wish the i960 GSTC soccer team much luck in their coming season. 150 INDIVIDUAL SCORING i wi tw 2 A t Player Games Goals Thomas 'I2 9 Brown 'I2 3 MacWhinnie 12 4 Beaudoin 12 1 Roberts 'I2 5 Stewart 12 4 Power 12 2 Goodson 'I2 'I 5 0 - OCCQI' OUJ1 U, of XCltll'l Cllfleif GSTC l-St. Francis O On September 15, GSTC opened its 1959 soccer season with an encouraging 'I-0 win over St. Francis College of Biddeford. The game-winning boot was scored at the 21:45 mark of the third period with Bruce Thomas doing the scoring. The game was featured with aggressive play from both sides and some good passing on the part of Gorham. Arnie Harrison, GSTC goalie, turned in 26 saves, he was playing in the first soccer game of his career. Other outstanding players for Gorham were Capt. Cliff MacWhinnie, Ken Roberts, Link Brown, and Dan Mulherin. R.l.C.E. 'I -GSTC 0 At Providence, on September 23, host Rhode Island College of Education gained its first win of the season as it nipped GSTC by a l-O margin. With about five minutes remaining in the second period, Tony Mancini of Rhode Island toed home the winning goal. Some truly great saves by Gorham goalie Harrison pre- vented the score from going any higher. This loss left Gorham with a 2-1 record for the season. GSTC I-Lyndon Vt. Teachers O At home, the Hilltoppers of GSTC continued their winning ways again as they nosed out a fairly strong Lyndon Teachers College team by the slim score of 'I-0. The win gave Gorham a 3-l record for the young season. The winning goal was kicked in by wingman Rob Powers with the assist going to Capt. Cliff Mac- Whinnie. Dan Mulherin, Ed Beaudoin, Bruce Thomas and goalie Arnie Harrison turned in outstanding per- formances for the home team. GSTC 3 - Keene 3 Keene - October 5 - Gorham State Teachers College and Keene Teachers battled to a 3-3 stand-still in a double overtime game. Keene scored all its goals in a four minute barrage during the fourth period. Scor- ing for Keene were Bill Springfield with two goals, and one by Bob Jepson. Gorham scored on goals by Ken Roberts, with two, and Bob Powers chipped in with a singleton. Bridgewater TC 3 -GSTC T CCNAIA EASTERN TOURNEYJ New Bedford - October 9 - Tourney favorite Bridgewater eliminated Gorham from the NAIA East- ern Tourney by a score of three to one. This put the Bay State team into the finals on October IO with the New Bedford team. The victors scored on a goal by Bill Gardula in period two, and also a goal in period four again by Gardula. The other goal for the Bay Staters was toed in by Bob Nagle. Gorham's lone point was scored by Bob Stewart. GSTC 2-Johnson Vt. TC l Gorham - October 16 - With three minutes left in the second overtime, Bruce Thomas kicked in the decid- ing goal which gave Gorham a 2-l win over Johnson. Seconds earlier Everett Davis launched a corner kick toward the goal area. Thomas headed it toward the goal but it was blocked. He then followed in the rebound and scored. MacWhinnie scored the other Hilltopper goal. Bruce Thurlow and Everett Davis starred for the winners. Gorham upped its record to 5-3-'l for the season. First Row: D. Vail, G. Pecoraro, R. Goodson, D. Donnelly, D. Fleurant, C. MacWhinnie, Coach Costello. Second Row: Manager L. Brown, J. Pouravelis, P. Butterfield, J. Griffin, K. Roberts, Statistician R. Powers. araify gaALefga! Under the capable direction of Coach Dick Costello, the varsity Hilltoppers added the record of another winning season to the basketball archives of Gorham State Teachers College. The Green and White ended the 1959-60 basketball wars with a record of 13-8 overall and 12-7 in conference play. They were in contention for a play-off berth up until the last week of the season. The final standings gave Gorham fifth place in the nineteen team league. This was a marked improvement over last year. Among the outstanding games that Gorham played were the two with Salem. For the first time in some years, the Hilltoppers came up with double wins over the Witches. Gorham also beat Plymouth in both games. However, a sad touch must be added to the otherwise rosy picture. The Farmington Teachers managed to split the season's series and killed the final chance GSTC had for post-season play-oi action. A pleasant surprise to our team was the play and the scoring of freshman Don Donnelly. Don led the team in total points, highest per game average, and highest foul shooting percentage. John Griffin again sparkled with his great all-around play and his consistency. Red Butterfield was great as a rebounder and playmaker, while Jimmy Pouravelis handled himself well as an able sixth man. Roger Goodson showed that he has the potential to develop into an outstanding star in the future contests. The varsity bench was quite strong with Ken Roberts, Red Fleurant, Cliff MacWhinnie and Dick Vail giving their valuable talent to help make Gorham a winner. Gene Pecoraro came off the bench in the early part of the season and added his long-range shooting -to Gorham's attack. 152 Front Row, Loft to Right: N. Lash, G. Sanborn, S. Wilbur, D. Vail, C. MacWhinnie. Second Row: B. Gordon, P. Bellavance, D. House, A. Legere, Manager I.. Brown. , unior araify The maior obiective of every iunior varsity basketball team' is to prepare its players for future varsity berths. Under the able direction of Coach Richard Wescott, this year's team gained' much experience in its many close and hard- fought games. Their record was not a winning one, but their play was unmistakably that of men out to win. Throughout the season, the team benefited from the dependability and team work of Dick Vail, Pop Legere, and Art Calkin. At midseason, Cliff MacWhinnie and Joe Connolly ioined the club and injected more spirit into the line-up. The iunior varsity split the season series with Farmington, beat Cheverus and Biddeford High Schools, and lost very close ones to the Plymouth J.V.'s, M.V.T.l., and University of Maine at Portland. 153 eaA0ni5.JL1li Aid One of Gorham's outstanding games was played with Salem in Russell Gym, with Gor- ham winning by a score of 91-87. The game was most interesting to watch and was featured by outstanding plays from both sides. Here are a few highlights worth mentioning. The top scorers in the game were all freshmen. Don Donnelly and Phil Washburn led the Hill- toppers with 31 and 21 points respectively. Bob Caruso was Salem's big gun with 30 points to his credit. The win was Gorham's first over the Witches on Russell Gym's floor since the 1954-55 season. In another key game played on Keene's "band- box" floor, the team from the Granite State pulled an upset win over the invading Gor- hamites. Coach Costello's Hilltoppers led at the half, but cold shooting for a few minutes of the second half enabled Keene to pull ahead and win. On the 8th of January, the Hilltoppers nipped the New Bedford Whalers by a score of 90-88. The game was one of the roughest to be played here for some time. Freshman Dick Vail's last second bucket from underneath was the clincher. John Griffin and Gene Pecoraro led the Gorham attack with 21 and 20 points respectively. ln Gorham's 96-77 win over Castleton, Gene Pecoraro continued his torrid shooting as he racked up 28 points. This total was his highest output since he donned the Green and White of the Hilltoppers. After two years of waiting, Gorham finally was on the long end of the scoring against Ply- mouth. The final score was 85-67 in favor of the Green and White of Gorham. The secret of Gorham's success was a tight 1-3-1 defense, and a red-hot shooting exhibition. The Hilltoppers ruffled the nets for a torrid 602 shooting aver- age in the first half, and cu cool 45? average in the second canto. Leading the scoring parade for Gorham were John Griffin with 25 points, and freshman sensation Don Donnelly with 20 tallies. Conference leader Worcester State Teachers rallied in the final five minutes to defeat Gorham by a score of 77-70. Don Donnelly led the Pine Tree Staters with a total of 31 points. This was the second time this season he has reached that number. Other double digit scorers for Gorham were Gene Pecoraro with 16 points and ,John Griffin with ten points. Gorham led with some five minutes left. Worcester profited by some Gorham mistakes and went on to win the game. On January the 16th, Gorham gained sweet revenge as they topped Keene State Teachers by the score of 88-78. This was Gorham's ninth straight win at home this season. Gorham made frequent mistakes, but always recovered when their margin started to decline. John Griffin and Gene Pecoraro each had 19 points to lead the Gorham attack. Some great second half shooting enabled Gor- ham to coast to a 70-59 victory over the Farm- ington Beavers at Farmington. Gorham crashed the nets for a hot 47? shooting average during the final canto. The game's top scorer was Don Donnelly with 27 points, seventeen of them in the telling 2nd half. The teams were tied at 29-all at the close of the first canto. The Hilltoppers more or less had to play good all-around ball, for John Griffin did not see action. Not only Donnelly but Roberts, Poura- velis, and playmaker Butterfield did outstanding jobs for Gorham. Gorham lost a close game on February 5th, as they were beaten in a double overtime game by Castleton. The score was 89-87, with the underdog Vermonters winning the game in the last few seconds on Mike Daley's iump shot from the foul line. The score at the half read Castle- ton 32 - Gorham 27. The second half proved to be one of the highest scoring halves a Gorham team has ever played. They piled up 60 points to Castleton's 57. The Hilltoppers offset their first half deficit and had a one point lead with a few seconds left in regulation time. Daley pumped in a foul shot that tied the score and sent the game into the overtime. The loss severely hurt the chances Gorham had of gaining a post-season tourney spot. The loss was the fourth by a close margin this year. Gorham's Vermont trip was not a complete failure as they did manage to beat Lyndon on the night following the Castleton disaster. By use ofa constant guard on Ray Brooks of Lyndon, the Hilltoppers were able to hold the Negro for- ward to 24 points. This may seem like a lot of points, but it must be remembered that Brooks scored 45 against us here at Gorham. Phil But- terfield kept a constant press on the Lyndon fiash. Gther outstanding feats turned in were Roger Goodson's 24 rebounds and the scoring of Don Donnelly and John Griffin. By winning, Gorham still had an outside shot at a post-season spot in the NETCC tourney. An encouraging 89-65 win over the Boston Teachers gave Gorham State a shot in the arm A toward a position in the post-season playoffs. The game started out rather sloppily, with the lead changing hands several times during the early minutes of play. Then the Hilltoppers, aided by the long-range bombing of Gene Pecoraro, pulled ahead to a 40-29 lead at the half. Gor- ham scoring was well-balanced with six men hitting double figures. Gene Pecoraro and Don Donnelly paced the attack with a total of 33 points scored between them. An unbelievable rally in the second half gave Gorham an 82-77 win over the Salem Witches. Trailing 43-36 at the conclusion of the first half, the Hilltoppers found themselves down 54-40 with about five minute gone in the second canto. At this point the reiuvenated Pine Tree Staters surprised everybody in the gym as they out- scored the host Witches 42-23 in the last fifteen minutes of the contest. Butterfield, Donnelly, Gritiin and Pouravelis were mainly responsible for Gorham's explosive spurt during the last five minutes as they all drew important fouls and converged on their free throw attempts. Tall tower Roger Goodson played an important part as he hauled down some key rebounds and scored nicely from underneath. The other men who saw action all contributed as Gorham dis- played its best team play of the season. The student body of GSTC was well repre- sented as some thirty souls made the trip down from the campus of Gorham. This helped our team to gain victory over our number one nemesis of past years. The double wins over Salem this year marked the first time in many moons that the Hilltoppers have swept the season's series over the Witches. 's 1959-60 BASKETBALL RECORD GORHAM STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE Tea m Boston STC Johnson STC Lyndon STC Rhode Island College Salem STC Keene STC New Bedford Tech Castleton STC Plymouth STC Worcester STC Keene STC Central Connecticut Farmington STC Castleton STC Lyndon STC Boston STC Salem STC Farmington STC Plymouth STC Suffolk University Bridgewater STC 1721 Total Total 1616 Ave Game 81.9 769 Record 13 wins 8 losses NETCC 12 wins 7 losses BASKETBALL STATISTICS 1959-60 Statistician Robert Powers Player FG FGA AVE. F Donnelly, Don 149 359 .415 74 Griffin, John 123 232 531 78 Pecoraro, Gene 115 273 .422 22 Washburn, Phil 25 57 438 15 Pouravelis, Jim 69 161 .428 65 Butterfield, Phil 67 108 629 63 Goodson, Roger 44 95 463 31 Roberts, Ken 43 87 494 12 MacWhinnie, Clif 7 22 .318 12 Legere, Armand 1 2 .500 1 Vail, Dick 5 9 .555 1 Fleurant, Dick 18 49 .366 13 Team 666 1454 .458 387 A WH -l FA 92 115 31 25 87 117 54 24 18 2 2 22 89 AVE. .772 .696 .742 .600 .747 .538 .574 .500 .666 .500 .500 .591 .657 AVE. - G 17.72 17.05 12.60 10.83 9.67 9.38 7.00 4.67 3.25 3.00 2.75 2.72 21 19 20 6 21 21 17 21 8 1 4 18 FG - Field Goals FGA - Field Goal Attempts Ave. - Shooting Percentage F - Fouls Made FA - Fouls Attempted Ave. - Foul Shooting Percentage TP - Total Points Ave. - Pointsfgame G - Games Played 157 -w ""f?i FFXFW uw: V Farmington Farmington New Britain New Britain Keene Keene Johnston Lyndon Lyndon Plymouth Plymouth Castleton 11 YM SQQJHA v First Row: H. Sanborn, B. Luca-s, C. Williams, C. Clair, D. Mitch, R. Stewart, D Mulherln C Pecoraro Second Row: Coach Costello, C. Sanders, J. Pouravelis, N. Walls, R. Foster P Withee B Thurlow H. Ware, Coach Wescott. Clif 2 A Cl 1959 SEASON'S RECORD 7 GSTC 9 'I6 GSTC 4 Clair C. 8 GSTC 7 8 GSTC 6 Foster, R. 'I GSTC 0 Lucas, B. 3 GSTC 2 Much, R. 15 GSTC 3 D 3 GSTC 0 Mulherm, D. 3 GSTC 2 Pecoraro, E. 14 GSTC L Pouravelis, J 6 GSTC 5 GSTC .H Sanborn, H. Totals: won-2, Lost- 10 5""'de's' C' Stewart, R. LEGEND Thurlow, B. AB - At Bat. Walls, N- R " Runs' Ware, H. H - Hits. , , RBI- Runs Batted In. w'II'qmS' C' BA - Batting Average. Withee, P- .9l'lfl'6ll'l'lUl'6l 5 wx T i F 1-1-V Na- . I IQ U E l 4 12' Y ""5-gf' WH ff -l ,K- I .li - ........ .l.. First Row: E. Pease, P. Withee, R. Fleurant, R. Peabody, C. Clair. Second Row: J. Amato, B. Carlson, J. Pouravelis, D. Richards, D. Bois. Third Row: R. Ellery. "BETA BEARS - INTRAMURAL KINGS" The title of intramural kings can proudly be claimed by the "Beta Bears," representing Alpha Lambda Beta fraternity. The "Bears" have won nearly every intramural championship in the last three semesters here at G.S.T.C. ln May of 1959, the "Bears" captured the intramural softball championship by overpowering their opponents. In an exciting game they beat the "Carlings' Kids" by a score of 13-12. The team was distinguished by the heavy hitting of Arnie Harrison and Phil Butterfield and the stout pitching of Don Richards. ln the fall semester, the "Bears," benefiting from the quarterbacking of Dick Fleurant and the running of Everett Davis, won the flag football title. Following the football play-oFfs came the volleyball tourney. Here the "Beta Bears" captured top honors for the third straight year. 159 Iii? fa ...ln F2 1 4, iii 'Ek ,Z i, 1, QW Y 3 l ,gang u 4 Z' fa. , Zia!! as 4 , , y ., . gasses. iill???3tiEif+l it A ' ,, lu t ' f gaalfefgaf ,Qnframura mlfljifclcafd U The intramural basketball champions this year were the "Wildcats," a team made up of commuters and dormitory students. The intramural program was set up with two leagues, the American League and the National League. The top three teams in each league were eligible to enter the play-offs for the championship. This year's representatives were the "Wildcats," the "Beta Bears," "Kappa Kittens," "l.A.'s" "Faculty," "Trotters." Competition was keen, and some of the outstanding games were: "Kappa Kittens" vs. "Beta Bears" "Faculty" vs. "Wildcats" "Wildcats" vs. "Beta Bears" The "Wildcats" played the "Bears" twice and won both games to gain the championship. ' ? 'l6'I .gg M B w ,, M, -M P U e r n ww ww w, ,,,, Wiz, Q, , ,, , H ff,wx 1 , 3 w ww . . w . 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'lm II t n .. .. .tu I ' l,:'55E4::l:tt:telmuttlitllllltttulnuiiiiit L, J Vt. a -,Q-llllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIII mm gpg' 5 E lv: A VV: .. -knannu nn -.-u.....,.-. HT -..., ,. nv W M t'- I Figigm!gglllllullllllllllllllll,ltllluutlulntlsms in ,,fg it 'gn uliir'-' 5312 'I if". ""ff1'1'!a 4' 'Wa H' T'T"'1L"-TH Q Y , Ui t ,N V , 4, , H R In 'Mat E" 3355! Iliiltllliif I P 1 g I Illlllllll . ilLr"ijlg,V'lt.mm!1Ihj!!f gtrlllljgl ---L 1 iw un ul:..,.,,,. . rv--- it M wg' w--- , pnllilliig N"1v"'ii-- tif- . I! n:IIIIIihAII I I ' 'M"'-4---hi' ..,,, V . 1 ' ., '---uh " - ..,., Lay' ml' 1. . ..,: temsummti..::mm........,. II mlllllllls .......'NQ:-..IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIlllllllllllti -'n.t....!Hll'l.f..f.f,N..Q Compliments of IN MAINE nvs F. N. CALDERWOOD PORTEOUS MITCHELL INC. and BRAUN CO. Bakers gf Northern New EngIand's Bread and Rong Largest Department Store For Any Occasion PonrLANn - MAINE Portland, Maine SP 3-7291 164 COLLEGE INN ICE CREAM SANDWICHES PIZZA - PIES B. Hodgkins B Carlson E Davis 8 School Street GORHAM, MAINE :: :: Tel. VE 5-1621 'I65 GORHAM I.G.A. FOOD LINER E Compliments of GORHAM HARDWARE Our plant is open for Inspection and Visitors are Cordially Invited OAKHURST DAIRY 364 Forest Ave., Portland, Me. Polarzone Foods, Inc Eoon CENTER 37 Elm Street, Gorham, Me. Frozen Food Lockers Gorham Savings Bank GORHAM -3- MAINE Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Telephone VErnon 4-9341 Burnham's Gulf Station 59 Main Street GORHAM - MAINE Ordering Heating Oils? Save as you Spend Free S. 8QH. Green Stamps 24 Hour Oil Burner Service DODGE OIL CO., INC. Telephone VE 4-6251 PHINNEY'S MOBIL STATION 93 Main Street GORHAM -:- MAINE Tel. VE 4-9521 Portland PRESS HERALD EVENING EXPRESS SUNDAY TELEGRAM A dTh B tl V' ws I1 C CS I1 IC an Duronceou, Nonc Whitoc , en Wayne steam David Tripp' Pecoraro, Aubrey Buize . ' y l k Ell ly Our plant is open for inspection and visitors are cordially invited. DAKHURST DAIRY 364 FOREST AVENUE PORTLAND, MAINE Main IN THE YEARS TO COME REMEMBER THE 3 R'S X ' X Rl .1""vi RGDIII ' The College Supply Store STATIONERY SUPPLIES SYSTEMS and School Streets Gorham, Maine 168 The Barden Drug Compan Nelson G. and Richard T. Borden, James R. Lyna, Registered Pharmacists PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 55 44,3-.rg 'K J. Sweetser, M. Wiggin, V. Warton, A. Williams, C. Tuck. SCHOOL SUPPLIES FEATURING SHEAFFER SNORKEL PENS HALLMARK CARDS GIFT WRAPPINGS "When you care enough to send the very best" Gifts Games Novelties Cameras Films Camera Supplies THE REXALL STORE 169 Master Craft jewelers CLARK coAl. 8g 95 chool Street Gorham LUMBER COMPANY R' W' CLARK' PNP' Fine Watch, Clock and Jewelry Building Materials, Coal 8. Wood Dupont Paints :z Fuel Oils Tel. VErnon 4-3501 - GORHAM, ME. Repairing Stanley Williams, Watchmaker and Prop. Peggy Jamieson, Sylvia Lettney, Shirley Kidder. Bill Griffin. Barrow's Greenhouses I FLORISTS OF DlSTlNCTlON 324 MAIN STREET - VErnon 4-2751 - GORHAM, MAINE Hannaford Bros. Co Portland 1, Maine COMPLETE FOOD SERVICE Servicing RED G WHITE STORES 171 BLUE ROCK QUARRY Q! 554 Crushed Stone GOOD FOOD you wma! Ready Mixed Concrete A Compliments of Blue Rock Mixture LOUIS RESTAURANT 58 MAIN ST. WESTBROOK ' and SODA SHOP UL 44551 GORHAM, MAINE -Q53 I' E- WGFCI l Ma Dunton WESTBROOK STAR LAUNDRY. INC. 1 Carpenter Street Westbrook, Maine MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF LAUNDERING 172 T. Wilkerson, T. Gray C. Rankin, B. Griffin, G. Odencrant I. Awww? PAPER MANUFACTURERS Mills ct: CUMBERLAND MILLS, MAINE GARDINER, MAINE 173 AUTHENTIC UNIVERSITY FASHIONS correctly styled apparel for college men and alumni - at reasonable prices - a reputation we have enjoyed for many years. A. H. BENOIT 8g CO. Monument Square :: :: Portland Also WESTBROOK - BRUNSWICK - LEwlsToN - BIDDEFORD 6 C 1 ll W if D. Duplessie, J. Chrissikos 174 LQRING STUDIOS FINE PGRTRAITS T eTT 515A CONGRESS STREET Telephone SPruce 2-0821 PORTLAND 3, - MAINE 175 Donald B. Tapper Representing L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY America's Finest Class Rings and TAYLOR PUBLISHING COMPANY A America's Finest Yearbooks Box 244, Cape Cottage Branch Portland, Maine J 'lx' :J , L 1, Lf V f V tk 4.1 LLL. Lf! QLX7 CU' gl' 1 . ,f ., , WV ,fy K' ,lu ff "9 ' . 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