Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH)

 - Class of 1926

Page 1 of 152

 

Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1926 Edition, Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 152 of the 1926 volume:

1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 - 1 Av 1' af-+L: ' J, ,J fu A ff T-1-1-E QLYMPI D Ll V 0 N o M ANNUAL OF CLASSES OF 1926 GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL CLEVELAND - OHIU The Builders All are architects of Fate, Working in these walls of Time, Some with massive deeds and great, Some with ornaments of rhyme. Nothing useless is, or low, Each thing in its place is best, And what seems but idle show Strengthens and supports the rest For the structure that we raise, Time is with materials filledg Our to-days and yesterdays Are the blocks with which we build Truly shape and fashion these, Leave no yawning gaps betweeng Think not, because no man sees, Such things will remain unseen. In the elder days of Art, Builders wrought with greatest care Each minute and unseen part, For the Gods see everywhere. Let us do our -work as well, Both the unseen and the seen, Make the house, where Gods may dwell Beautiful, entire, and clean. Else our lives are incomplete, Standing in these walls of Time, Broken stairways, where the feet Stumble as they seek to climb. Build to-day, then, strong and sure, With a firm and ample base, And ascending and secure Shall to-morrow find its place. Thus alone can we attain To those turrets, where the eye Sees the world as one vast plain, And one boundless reach of the sky -Henry Wadsworth Longfellow ' .f . Q- ff my J! i 1 f . C J ' if53Q'1'2mm mf 30 V ef 2' '1 it me A f'-QFH En , .4 9 "Q Q w ky ,, Ml jf fi Q if If f, W , , ,H r f 1 L. 5 'lumg ' r M 9 Y- Mlgaq nu -' - 1 Y o ,Q ""5 'w l rg , 1, ,a ,3" J "' 11 ' j Q w- CX - " 'L KX X , K.: ..,, Q' 1 , V 5 j,!'yIjg.af JA'-L Ml!! 1 y" l wx' 'sl MEX WI XP.-'fy 1 wwfn uf 4 1 'il ml ZF!! Q K 1711 Yip' K QNX " J W H W l II M 1 Z i V ' ' L- X ,f? my - Uv :Jai I QP: A 1 .N -5 1-my-Q5 5 u 'if-11 'Eiy? 5355 ETF--1 5 s 1 I 2'?!-" ': "1-" gs! 'ighq Q -me 54595-ff w:iE+G:mf. 5 U...--'-.:-I ilu.-n 1. 51H"L::1, :.j'-lltg :Qu Q f :v "er-tr-ME . 232, E'--. 5221:-alwaigmz... A . f.:a1E0ff:gz1,4 mafia, Um boom when - Q - 0 9 " 9 " 5056 Ugg dwell beautiful Q anlim ,ond clean. P ff 3 4 The Olymp1lad,CLASSES19 Behiratinn Un Mira. H. M. Rnarhaugh nur guihv aah hvlpvr, mr, hm' :Inna nf ilanuarg ninvtvrn hunhrvh tmvnig-mix, in happg anh apprniatiur rvmvmhraurr nf hm' unrraaing enhvaunr tnmarh nur mrlfarr ani! intvrrat, hu hvhiratv thin, nur Bnal rnntrihn- tinn in thr glurg nf Glvnnillr. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 5 Class of january .ef Nineteen Hundred and Twenty Six 6 TheOlyimpiad,CLASSES 19 GEORGE NELSON FAIRCHILDS ........................ .loc The tall, the wise, the reverend head. I ReHe-ctor Board fAssociate Editorj 3 House of Representativesg Class Presidentg Glee Cl-ubg Senior Sponsorg Honor Keyg Class Night Speaker. DAVID ABRAMS ................,.. . ........................ Dietz He lives to build, not to boast. , Annual Board ladvertisingl. HELEN M. CLINE .......................................... Jud Is she not more than painting can express? House of Representativesg Vice-President, Senior Sponsors, Vice Presidentg Kodak Club, Presidentg Torch Board, Assistant News Editorg Glee Clubg Military Sponsorg Hi-Pressg Dramatic Clubg "The Shepherd in the Distanceng Honor Key. HARRY ADLER .......................................... O'Hare Far off his coming shown. Glee Club. GEORGE FRIEDMAN .................................. Murphy Popularity is but a synonym for reputation. Class Treasurerg House of Representa- tives Glee Club, Business Managerg Choral Clubg Tennis, Managerg Reflector Boardg Senior Sponsor, Secretaryg Student Council, Vice Presidentg Honor Keyg Chairman Ring Committee. JoE AUERBACH ..............................,.................. I oe He was so envceediiig tall and strong He bore the skies upon his back. Drama Clubg Interclass Football, Captaing Varsity Basketball. ALFRED TUCKER .............................................. Al IC07'lf'Il7L6 befriends the bold. Swimming: Teamg Rifle Teamg Hi-Yg Class Secretaryg House of Representa- tivesg Chairman of 11A Class Entertain- ment Committeeg Civics Clubg Choral Clubg lst Lieut. R. O. T. C.g Wistgoma Club. ELEANOR M. BECKER ................................ Becky A good heart is worth gold. Sports Leagueg Volley Ballg Basketballg Glee Clubg Rooters' Clubg Senior Sponsorg Hikingg Girls' Band. DOROTHY GREGG ............................................ Dot How graceful pride can be, and how ma- jestic ease. Torch Board, Circulation Managerg Dra- matic Clubg House of Representativesg Secretary of 11A Classg Senior Sponsor, Treasurerg Chairman of Class Entertain- ment Committee. DONALD BELL ................................................ lion And gentle in his manner, he Does bold things in u quiet way. R. O. T. C. lst Lieut.g Senior Sponsor, Presidentg Fencing Clubg House of Repre- sentatives. LENVILLE HIGH SCHooL STELLA BENHAM .......................................... Stel Sl1e's pretty to walk with and witty to talk with. Reflector, Associate Editor, Dramatic Club, Secretary, Senior Sponsor, Secre- tary, House of Representatives, Civics Club, Student Hostess, Friendship Club, Class Entertainment Committee, Honor Key, Class Honor Roll, Commencement Program. ELLEN BIRCH .......................................... The better you know her, the better you like her. ESTHER M. BERGMAN ................................ Jakie I set myself a goal, to which, daily, I draw nearer. Reflector Board. MAURICE BIsHKoo ................................ Mawry I'm small but what of that, Poe held my own among the -men. Orchestra, Vice President, Band, Presi- dent, Torch Board, All High Band, All High Orchestra. GERTRUDE BERKOWITZ ................................ Gert By diligence she wins her way. Girls' Band, Drama Club. ELIZABETH H. BLOSSER .,............... ........ B etty Study silently. Kodak Klub, Civics Club, Senior Spon- sor, Annual Board, French Club. ELEANOR BEVINGTON .................................. Bevy She is liked by everyone. House of Representatives 112B and 12AJ, Senior Sponsor, Friendship Club, Annual Board. THERESA S. BRANTWEINER ........................ Trix Learning by study must be won, 'Twas never entailed from son to son. Kodak Klub, French Club, Sports League, Senior Sponsor, Annual Board, Honor Roll, Civics Club, Track, Commencement Program. ' ISABELLE BICKSIE ,....... .................................... I s In all thy hamours, whether grave or 'mel- low, Thou hast so milch mirth. about thee. Senior Sponsor. FRANK HERBERT BREMsoN ...,................ Uncle Our jovial star reign'd at his birth. ' I Interclass Basketball, Interclass Football, Senior Sponsor, L. R. V. Captain, R. O. T. C. Corporal. 3 The OlQjWtplCtd,CLASSES 19 JosEPH BoRs ................................................ Jab True ease in wniting comes from art, not 1 from chance. l R. 0. T. C. Captain, Track Team lSec- ' ond Teamb. , SYLVIA F. Col-IEN .................... . ................. Sunny A mind at peace with the world. Choral Club, Glee Club, Naturalist Clubg Girls' Civics Club, Dramatic Club, Sen- ior Sponsorg "Middie Maids". HAROLD BREMSON ..........4........................... Wits Inches do not make the -man. Interclass Footballg Interclass Basketball, Captain, Senior Sponsor, Student Coun- eil. MARGAliET CoMYNs ................ . .....,......... Marge I have mental joys, and mental health, Mental friends, and mental wealth. Sports League, Basketball, Volley Bally Senior Sponsor, Rooters' Club, Annual Board, Civics Club, Naturalist Club. SAM CHERTOFF ........................................ Sammy Joking decides great things, Stronger and better oft than earnest can. Second Team Basketball, Varsity Track, Interclass Football. ELEANOR DATTLEBAUM .............................. Ellie Sunshine and good hzinior all the world over. Glee Club, Choral Club, Civics Clubg Naturalists Clubg Senior Sponsor, "Joseph and His Brethren", 'tMinstrel Show", 'fMiddie Maids", "Hiawatha's Wedding Feast". EVELYN NORMA CHESNICK ...... ........ ........ E 1 -nie A loved, honored and much 'respected friend. Senior Sponsor. FLORENCE H. DAv1s .,.................................. Flo Oh-those incessant giggles. Senior Sponsor. EMMA COHEN ................,............................... Diligence is the mother of good fortune. LUCILLE R. DELANEY .............................. Cheerful and useful in all she does. LENVILLE HIGH SCHO JENNIE G. DREIFORT .................................... Jen I'hought is deeper than all speechg Feeling deeper than all thought. Friendship Clubg Girls' Civics Clubg An- nual Board. IsADoRE EPSTEIN .................................... Knowledge is power. Class Valedictoriang House of Representa- tivesg ReHector Boardg Annual Board French Club, Presidentg Naturalist Club Presidentg Senior Sponsorg Honor Key French Medals 41923, 19241. VROMAN DU FAIS .................................... Fuzzy He touched his harp, and nations heard, entranced. R. O. T. C. Officer Clerkg Drama Club. LENA EPSTEIN ........................... ......... L ee And she looked on wisely. WILLIAM DUNLAP .. ............. .... ..................... R e d A 'man he seems o cheer ul festerda' s , f f y y and confident tornorrows. SADIE FINEMAN .............................. S. R. F. X Oh, I am stabbed with laughter. House of Representatives Q3 termsb Councilg Senior Sponsor. ANNIE M. EDMOND ...................................... Sis Love, sweetness, goodness in her person shine. LILLIAN FLAHAVEN .............................. Blackie With disposition pleasant and friends galore. VFRA ENGELBRECHT .................................. Verie Good principles are my motto. Annual Boardg Reliector Boardg Glee Clubg Choral Clubg Kodak Klubg Friend- ship Clubg Naturalist Clubg Sports Leagueg Senior Sponsorg Girls' Civics Leagueg Honor Key. JACK CLAYTON FOOTE ............................ An ajfable and a courteous gentleman. Rifle Teamg Drama Clubg Omcer R. 0. T C.g Fencing Club. OL 9 Sports Leagueg Naturalist Clubg Student 10 Thr' Olymplad,CLASSES 1926 ROSINA FORD ........ ..... .......... ......................... E 1 1 ll With malice foufurd none, witlz charity for ull. Civics Club. HENRY W. H. GALLAGHFIR ........................ Hank I live in the crowds of jollity. Varsity Football. .I 1-:ANETTE FURMAN ...................................... Jen O, truth 'is easy and the light shines clear. Kodak Klub, Civics Club, Naturalist Clubg Annual Boardg Senior Sponsor. CARL S. GARRE'1"r ..............,.. ....... R ed N6"llf?7' IIIUH 'IUIIS f7'lflf'l'. Track, Lieut. R. O. T. C. SAMUEL B. FRANK .................................. Connie Ojficriozls, innocent, sincere, Of every friendless Hume, the friend. Orchestrag Annual Board lAdvertising Departmentjg Torch, Assistant Advertis- ing Manager, Chess Club, Hi-Press, Dra- matic Club. OLIVETTE GE1sLER ..........................,............. Ollie Precision, thou arf virtue. Sports League, Secretaryg Senior Spon- sorg Glee Clubg Basketballg Baseballg Hiking, "Middie Maids". HELEN FRAZINE ....... ........... .......................... S It ip Llfe 'is scriousg z'f's a respousilzility. Friendship Club, Civics Club. PEARL MC'DONAI.IJ GERSCHESKI .................. Poi! Her ltend tip-filled like fhf' petal of a flouicr. Entertainment Committee, Friendship Clubg Civics Club, Senior Sponsorg Re- flector Board. ELIZABETH FRENCH . .,........................... Frenclzy Of such u. merry, pleasing spirit. Senior Sponsor, Girls' Band, Student Hostess 5 Orchestra g Sports League 3 Friendship Club, Naturalist Club, Civics Clubg Drama Club. Tuoivms GEIISPACHER ........... ............,.. T omnzy Noble in cvery thought and deed. Reflector, Assistant Business Managerg f Orchestra. l E LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL E WILBUR GIBSON .............................., ........ I Joel Tlzouglll is the seal of action. E I l . f ELIZABETH Gooo .....................................4 Goodness is her izzherent trait. tives, Hi-Press Cluh. SEYMORE GINSBERG .........................,........ Seem The best work in the world is the work done in qmet. ANNA J. GORZYNSKI ......... .... ................... A I mg Come, pensive thought, with thee I'll wwe. Friendship Club, Girls' Civics Club. BIQLIIIQ ELAINE GOLDBERG ............... . ................ H A pleasing r:o111zte1za1ure is u silent com- nz f?lIdflt1'0?Z. Civics Club, Naturalists, Sports League, RUTH GOTTFRIED .,...................................... Ruth Just, womunly, and amiable. Glee Club, Typing' Awards, "Joseph and His Brethren". BEN GOLDBERG .............................,.......... Slwesy Il soft, meek, patient, liumlllv trrznquil spirit. Rosh: GOTTLOBER ...................................... Youth holds 'no society for grief. SADYI: C. GoI.Ds'rEIN .......................... . ......... Sud Her lzeurf is large enough for all mun- lewd. Glee Club, "Joseph and His Brethren." HARRISON GOULD .......................................... Jim- lflfhose f'1'esh.ness and strengtli have bra'1'cd ' many a storm. Track, Wrestling, Kodak Klub, Senior Sponsor. Torch Board, News Editor, Redector Board, Friendship Club, President, Sen- ior Sponsor, Junior House of Representa- The Olympiad, CLASSES 19 ROBERT MILTON GROTH ............................ Milt Emzobled by himself, by all approved. Annual Board, Cartoon Club, Vice Presi- dent, Reserve Football, Interclass Bas- I ketball, Fencing Club, Senior Sponsors. LILLIAN HOLLANDER ...................................... Lil Little, tiny, pretty, witty, olarliug, she. Torch Board, Rellector Board, Basketball Team, Senior Sponsor, Riile Team, Kodak Klub, Typing Awards, Sports League. ALICE R. HASKINS .................................... Sally A sweeter woman nc'er drew breath. Civics Club. WYLODINE Hoon ........................................ Willie In every gesture dignity and love. Friendship Club, Senior Sponsor. CHESTER S. HEIMLICH ................................ Chet The burden one lilies is cheerfully borne. Fencing' Club, Kodak Club, Naturalists Club, Radio Club, Senior Sponsor, R. O. T. C. Officer, Cartoon Club. HAZEL HORNER ............................................ Haze And all her paths are peace. Sports League, President, Senior Sponsor, Student Hostess, Hockey, Basketball, Baseball, Hiking, Volley Ball. ROY WII.I.lAM HENDERSON ......... ....... H eimy As merry as the day is long. Senior Sponsor, Track, Interclass Bas- ketball, Interclass Football, Radio Club, Kodak Klub. BEATRICE HORWITZ ........................................ Bee With the voice of mirth and the burst of wit. Senior Sponsor, Civics Club, Drama Club. PAUL MILLER HIXON ................................ P. M. I think of much to but leave it uizsaid. Senior Sponsor. JOSEPH E. HIIBER .......................................... Joe The fruit derived from labor is the sweet- est of pleasures. Orchestra. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 13 l ALLAN JACKSON .............................................. Al E Although strength should fail, the effort . will deserve p'ra.ise. Cartoon Club, Senior Sponsorg Track. i EDYVARD KOSKINEN .................................... Eddie The yields his study, nature was his boolc. Varsity Tennis 12 yearsl. EDNA JUERGENS .......................................... Dick She undertakes to prove by force Of argument .... .... .... .... .... ' ' Student Council, Treasurer, House of Representatives, Senior Sponsors, Presi- dent, Civics Club, President, Friendship Club, Vice President, Sports League, Treasurer, Reflector Boardg Torch Boardg Drama Club. HELEN KATOWITZ .................................... . ..... Hel The thought of you. is like the dusk at sea. Senior Sponsor, Naturalists Club. HYLA KANTER .................................... High-lou: She hath prosperous art When she will play with and discourse, And well she can persuade. French Club, Dramatic Club. EDWARD KREINRING .............................,.,.. Eddie Virtue, the strength and beauty of the soul, Is the best gift of heaven. MAURICE KAPLAN .,.................................. M orry They can conquer who believe they can. Track Team, N. E. O. T. A. Contest. SADIE G. KRITZER ........,....................,.......... Sally Gently to hear, kindly to judge. Naturalists Clubg Senior Sponsorg Dra- matic Club. RUTH KARP ................................................ Rufus Effort and care can do all things. Sports Leagrueg Naturalists Club, Civics Club. CLAYTON KULISH .................................. ...... C lay The gallant, young, and noble gentleman. Glee Club, Kodak Klubg Cartoon Clubg gienior Sponsor, Naturalist Clubg Radio ub. 14 The Olymprlad,CLASSES 19 E 5 EDITH MAY KULISH ................... , ................ Ede Her air, her manners, all who saw ad- mired. Senior Sponsorg Girls' Civics Clubg Writer of Class Song. Ross LEIBOWITZ ........................ Rosy O"Grady Wit to persuade and beauty to delight. Dramatic Clubg Civics Clubg Senior Spon- sor. RUTH VIRGINIA LANZI-:R .................... Shorty Every joy is gain, Arid gain 'ls gain, however small. Senior Sponsorg Civics Club, Secretary and Treasurerg Reflector Boardg Student Council. RUTH LEONHARD ............... ....... R ufus Quality 'not quantity. LILLIAN V. LAST .................................... Swede She may be "last" but not least. Senior Sponsorg Glee Club. GLENN LI-: PREVOST .............................. Frenchy By the work we know the worker. lst Lieut. R. O. T. C.g Radio Clubg Stu- dent Council. Rosn E. LRVINE .......................................... Rosy God's rarest blessing is a good woman. Naturalist Club. HARRY C. LEVIN ........,................................. Slim He hitchfd his wagon to a star. Annual Board. HARRY LEBOVITZ ......................... ............ Feed me knowledqe-I crave if. SAM LEVINE .................................................... Red One rises by one's own industry, LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 5 PEARL LIEDER ..................... . .................. Freckles ' Those about her from her shall read the perfect ways of honor. Civics Clubg Girls' Band. IDA RUTH MARSHALL ..............i...... .... ...,... T i ny A little body doth often harbor a great soul. Girls' Civics Club: Annual Boardg General Art Committee. ELEANOR LUMSDEN .,.............,................ Llllllllly Good health and good sense are two of life's greatest blessings. Girls' Basketball, Captaing Student Host- ess, Presidentg Hiking, Headg Hockeyg Senior Sponsorg House of Representativesg Class Entertainment Committeeg Girls' Civics Club, Entertainment Committee. GENEVIEVE MARTIN ............ ....,.. ..... . ............. . Happy-go-lucky night and day. Jolly and yet--she likes her own way. Choral Clubg Naturalist Clubg Glee Clubg "Middie Maids." RUTH IRENE MCALLISTER ........................ Babe The time has cozne to talk of many things. Student Hostessg Glee Club: Civics Club. RUTH MONTGOMERY ................,........,...... Monty A heart to pity and a hand fo bless. Glee Clubg Senior Sponsorg Refiector Boardg Rooters' Clubg 'Joseph and His Brfthrenn. AGNES fLAVADAJ MGMACKIN ................ Mickey Truth is within ourselves. Friendship Clubg Girls' Civics Club, Sec- retary. MARIE MoRAscA .......................................... Touts She has a soft and moving voice, Which pleads with eloquent melody, ARv1N W. MANN ............ ,............................. - flrfv A willing heart adds feather to the heel. Senior Sponsors, Secretaryg Kodak Klub: 11A House of Representativesg Track. DAVE MORCIENSTERN .........................,........ Dove He has the clever knack of making friends. Junior Interclass Basketballg Interclass Football. 16 TheOlympiad,CLAssEs 19 BESSIE NUDELMAN .................................... Betty Perseiverance keeps honor bright. Naturalists Club. LOUISE PANNETTA ........................................ Red A merry heart goes all the day. CARRIE UPPER ............................................ Chick You hear her laughing-you thinl: 8,1078 all fini. HAROLD PAPCKE ............................................ Pap I'1'e worked both hard and long. SAM OPPI-:R ..................... , ............. . .................. Op I"ve dom' my duly and Fife done no more. Senior Footballg Senior Basketball. MARY B. PARKER ............. A maiden lIl'l7f"l' bold, Of spirif so still and qniel. MARGARET OSTER ,...... ............................... I Vary With singing lips and bright gay eyes. BENJAMIN A. PEARIIMAN ................................ Al Kind hearfs are more than coroncfs. Senior Sponsor. EDWARD PALEY .......................................... Hawk He knew whufs what, and tl1at's as high As 'metaphysiz' wit can fly. RUTH L. PoN.sRY .................................... liuthy I hate nolzodyg I am in charity with the world. Glee Clubg Naturalists Clubg Senior Spon- sor. E I 1 mirth. GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 17 HENRY R. PORUS .................................... Heinie Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere. Varsity trackg Hare and Hound. FLORENCE MARCELLE RICKMAN ............ Fuzzy Thy honesty is a candle to thy merit. Senior Sponsorg Reflector Board. RUTH PORUS .............................................. Rootie To be just and kind and wise, There solid self enjoyment lies. Senior Sponsor. CLAYTON ROCK ................................ For ye have power, men say. Boys' Band. LOUIS PUETTE ................ . ........................... Louie His conversation does not show the minute hand, But he strikes the hour very correctly. Kodak Klub. DOROTHY ROSEN .......... ................... ..... ....... I J o t The most resplendent hair. Senior Sponsorg Torch Boardg Annual Boardg Typing Awards. SOPHIA F. RAM ...........,.. ......... S op-h She wears the rose Of youth upon her. Glee Club. GERTRUDE C. RosEN .................................... Bob A daughter of the gods, divinely tall. General Art Committeeg Civics Club. MILTON RABINOVITZ ...................................... Milt A friend is worth all hazards we can run. Boys' Glee Clubg Boys' Senior Sponsorsg Interclass Football. GEORGE A. ROSIN ............. . ...................... Chide him for faults and do it reuerently When you perceive his blood inclined to Reflector Boardg Senior Sponsorg R. O. T. C. Oificerg Glee Club. The Olympiad, C SSES 1926 BETTY B. ROTH ....................... ........ B of For her one person, It beggor'd all description. Reflector Board. LAURA EDITH RUPLE ...... , .....,............. ,..,lAlllI'l.!' Music is her soul. Band, President, Vice President, Secre- taryg Orchestrag Glee Clubg Choral Clubg Sfnior Sponsorg Friendship Club, Chair. Ring: Committeeg Drama Clubg Civics Clubg Minstrel Showg "Joseph and His Brethren", "Middie Maids", "Shepherd in the Distancf-"Q Accompanist for Class Solog Honor Key. NIORRIS ROTHENBERG ............. .....,... ........ Il I of-ry Tho music in my heart I bore, Long offer if was heard no more. Glee Club, Treasurer two years and man- ager one yearg Choral Club, Manager one year. MABEI, SARLEY ............................... .. ......... Moe With tl smile fha! glow'd Celestial rosy rod, Iore's proper hue. Hockey. C'HARI,Es ROTHNIAN ..............i............... ..Chucl.' Wit is the salt of conoorsatiovi, 'not ilu' feed. Interclass Basketballg lnterclass Football. ESTHER SARNIIVITZ .......................... ....... E ssey Thou host 11 pleusfmf presence. Glee Club. FRANCES ANN ROTTER ...................... F'I'l?7lCTIl0 If is the frrmquil people who ocoomplislz much. Senior Sponsorg Kodak Klubg Civics Clubg Basketball. MARVIN SCHANFARBER ..............,..... ....... I Marv They say the good die young. So I am ca.1'efu,l. Swimming' Teamg Senior Sponsorg House of Representativesg Class Entertainment Committeeg Class Nifrht Speaker. THELMA IsAI:ELI, RowE .....,...................... Tlzvl Hcaufy seen is Izeifer lost. Senior Sponsorg Glee Club, Presidentg Choral Clubg Rooters' Clubg "Minstrel Show", "Joseph and His Brethen", "Mid- die Maid", "Uproar Grand"g Class Solo- istg Civics Club. CATHERINE SCIVIRIIEDER ......,..................... Caddy She is good to those she loves. Civics Club. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL E FLORENCE SCHWARTZ ................................ Shine , Her eyes were deeper than the depth Of waters stilled at even. C Senior Sponsorg House of Representatives 11A and 12Ag Student Councilg Civics Clubg Dramatic Club. ELIZABETH SHARNOFF ................. . .............. Beth Gracious as sunshine, sweet as dew. French Clubg Senior Sponsorg Annual Board. SHIRLEY SCHWARTZ .............. ................. S adie Reading is culture. Civics Clubg Naturalists Clubg Senior Sponsor. SYLVIA DANA SHARWELI. ...........,.............,.. Syl And then the dimple on her chin. Civics Clubg Senior Sponsorg Drama Club. BETTY SEGEL .........T.......................................... She speaks, behaves, and acts just as she ought. ROSALINE SHIRLEY SHERR .......................... Roz Thou wert ll beautiful thought, and softly bodied forth. Senior Sponsorg Naturalists Clubg Dra- matic Club. MARION SESSANE .................................... May:-ce A true friend is forever a friend. Senior Sponsorg Civics Club. ROBERT T. SIECKER ............... ............ ...... I 3 ob I would get to the feel of things. Interclass Basketball. SADIE MIRIAM SHANMAN .... ....... S ally As frank as rain On cherry blossoms. Girls' Bandg Senior Sponsor. YETTA SILVERSTEIN ...................................... Yet Let knowledge grow from more to more. Senior Sponsorg House of Representatives two terms? g Class Honor Rollg Honor Keyg Annual Board, Editor-in-Chiefg Com- mencement Program. The Olympiad, C SSES 19 SAMUEL F. SINGER ...................................... Sam His worth is warrant for his welcome. Orchestrag Senior Sponsorg Interclass Basketball, Captaing R. 0. T. C. Corporal. CHARLES B. SPANGENBERG ...................... Spany We shall escape the uphill by never turn- ing back. Student Councilg Choral Clubg Glee Clubg R. O. T. C. Ofhcerg Class Speakerg House of Representativesg Wistgoma Club. FREDERICK SMITH ...................................... Fred In his duty, prompt at every call. Honor Roll. SARA LouIsE SPENCER ...................... S'pendm':I The reward of one duty is the power to :lo another. General Art Committee, Chairmang Girls' Bandg Drama Clubg "Shepherd in the Dis- tance"g Senior Sponsorg Student Hostessg Torch Boardg Hi-Press Clubg Glenville Naturalists Clubg Girls' Civics Cluhg Friendship Clubg Class Night Solo. JOSEPH SOEDER ................,.......,.... ........ J oe A 'way opens fo the willing. MARIE SPETRINO .,...................,.................,.. Mare To know her is to lore her. Torch Boardg Girls' Civics Club. ANNIE S. SoI.oMoN .................................. Kindness in wonzau shall win my love. Sports Leagueg Senior Sponsorg French Clubg Civics Clubg Class Honor Roll. HYMAN SPIKE ...... ....... ............................... S 1 nike Who nzipt reason with pleasure And wisdom with mirth. CERTRUDE LoUIsE SOMMERS ........,............... Lou A sweet girl graduate in her golden hair. Naturalist Clubg Drama Clubg Student Hostessg Senior Sponsor. FANNIE STERN ...............................,.... ...... F an A soul so fall of sunny mirth. Civics Club. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL DOROTHEA E. STOYE .................................... Dort The better you know her, the better you like her. Glee Clubg Reflector Board, Art Commit- teeg Annual Board, Art Committeeg Girls' Civics Club, Girls' Friendship Clubg Sen- ior Sponsor Sports League, Treasurer, Hiking, Hockeyg Basketballg Baseballg Girls' Rooters' Clubg Winner of Girls' Ath- letic UG". VIoI.A VVAVRO .......A.............,......i..... ...... For her heart is like the Seng Ever open, brave and free. Friendship Clubg Civics Club. l ' ic HOWARD SWAN s0N .......... .... ................. Consider his ways and be wise. DAVID G. WEINBERGER ........... ....... I Ju I-y VVit sparkled on his lips. House of Representativesg Senior Sponsorg Reflector Boardg Naturalists Club, Treas- urerg Boys' Civics Club. RUTH TIQATTNI-IR .... . .......................,......... Ruthie 'Tis the good reader that makes the good book. Dramatic Clubg Senior Sponsor. LYNETTE WEINBERGER ...........................i.... L1 un In her heart is the law of kindness. Reflector Board. FI.oIsI: TUCKER ......... ...........................,... W 'ecse I laughed and danced and talked and sang. Sports League, Vice Presidentg Senior Sponsorg Student Hostessg Glee Clubg Friendship Clubg Hikingg Annual Boardg Civics Clubg Hockey. BEATRICE WEINGART .................................... Hee Her fingers shame the 'ivory keys, They dance so light along. Senior Sponsor. RALPH WALTER ......... . ................................. , .... One can be a soldier without dying. Glee Clubg Band, Choral Clubg G. H. S. Band, Manager. MIIITON WEISENBERG .................................. Milt My music was a thing of the soul. Asst. Concert Master, All High Symphonyg President Glenville Orchestra, Student Leader Glenville Orchestra. 22 The Olympiad,CLASSES 19 GERTRUDE WEISS .....,.................................. Gerty Elegant as simplicity, and warm As ecstasy. Girls' Band. FRANCES WILLICK ...................................... Billy If nothing is delightful without love and jokes, then live in love and jokes. Friendship Clubg Civics Club. GIZELLA WEISS .............................................. Giz I have a heart with room for every joy. Torch Boardg Civics Clubg Senior Sponsor. RUSSELL J. WINDISCH ..........,. .... Windy Oh it is excellent To have giant's strength. Varsity Trackg Colonel R. O. T. C.g Senior Sponsorg Athletic Association Councilg Riiie Teamg Fencing Clubg Glee Club. Louis WEISSMAN ............................ , ......... Curly You may have known that I'm no wordy fman. Interclass Footballg Corporal R. O. T. C.g Interclass Basketballg Track. FRIEDA LEAH WOLFE .............................. Frifzie The nienriest bird upon a tree Hath never a merrier heart than she. Civics Clubg Senior Sponsor. VIRGINIA WHITE .............. ......... . ............., J im my Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low. An excellent thing in woman. Friendship Club, Treasurerg Girls' Civics Clubg French Clubg Torch Boardg Senior Sponsor. MAURICE WOLKOFF ........................ ......... R ed Education 'makes the man. PAUL WILLIAMSON ........................................ If he had any faults, he has left us in doubt. Student Councilg Reserve Footballg Trackg Radio Clubg Kodak Klubg Senior Sponsor. Girls' Band. MARIAN A. WOODRUFPZ ........................ . She drives all gloom away. Friendship Clubg Civics Clubg Senior Sponsor. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 23 ALBERT N OROSNY Track. LAURA ECKSTEIN DONALD WALKER ............................................. . A good name keeps its luster in the dark Track, Swimming. LUno B. ZIMMER ............,........................... Dade l Sincere, faithful and practical. JOSEPH C. PLACAK, JR. ................................... . If I lose my honor, I lose myself. Torch, Managing Editor, House of Represen- tativesg Hi-Y, Hi-Pressg Major R. O. T. C.g Senior Sponsor, Rifle Team, Captain, Ath- letic Association, Presidentg Honor Key. OLIVE LE VARIN ZIRKER ........................ Come, let us sit and watch the sky, And fancy clouds where no clouds be. Reflector Board, Art Editorg Senior Spon- sor, Friendship Club. ROBERT COULTON .............................................. He knew the precise, psychological moment when to say nothing. Swimming Team, Student Councilg Reflector Board. EDYTHE ZWICK .............................,.... ....... E die Come and trip it as you go, On a light fantastic toe. Glee Clubg "Joseph and His Brethren", "Hiawatha's Wedding Feast", "Minstrel Show", "May Festival". ARTHUR DEUTSCH ......................... . ................. . A merry companion is music on a journey. .........Lots ' 'Tis good will makes intelligence. FANNIE FORMAN ................. My life upon her faith. STELLA CHLOE KNOFF ..................................... ...Sally So buxom, blithe, and debonair. HENRY KRAINES ..............l............................... A man he was to all the country dear. Senior Football. A wise man never loses anything, if he has himself. LoTTIE PIERCE .................................................. A soul lieautifully poised upon itself, nothing doubting, nothing desiring, clothed in peace. LoUIs DELAUER ............................. ......... S miles I rely on him as on myself. 24 The Olympiaol,CLASSES 1926 January, '26 LTHOUGH the class of January, '26, 1 is much smaller than the June class, it has every reason to be proud of its achievements. As the highest class, it has acquired a position of prestige in the eyes of adoring underclassmen. This class originated a novel and prac- tical idea. It presented to Glenville a. sil- ver cup on which are to be engraved the names of the valedictorians of classes to come. Isadore Epstein, as valedictorian of the January class, was the first to be honored with the presentation of it. 12 A House of Representatives of January, 1926 OFFICERS George Fairchilds ...... ........................ ................... P r esident Helen Cline ............... ........ V ice President Alfred Tucker ....... ...... .............. ............ S e or etowy George Friedman ...., ....................................................... T reasurer Dorothy Gregg ........ ........ C hairman Entertainment Committee OTHER MEMBERS Donald Bell Stella Benham Eleanor Bevington Isadore Epstein Sadie Fineman Edna Juergens Eleanor Lumsden Marvin Schanfarber Florence Schwartz Yetta Silverstein David Weinberger FACULTY ADVISERS Mr. J. E. Bahner Class Motto: With Us The Future Lies Mrs. N. Rosebaugh Class Colors: Maroon and Silver CLASS HONOR ROLL Isadore Epstein .................................... 95.4 Yetta Silverstein ........93.9 Stella Benham ............. ........ 9 2.6 Theresa Brantweiner ..... ........ 9 1.2 Frederick Smith Anna Solomon ...... Joseph Huber ..... ........91.6 ........90.0 ........90.0 HONOR KEY STUDENTS Stella Benham George Fairchilds Maurice Bishkoo George Friedman Helen Cline Joseph Placak Vera Engelbrecht Laura Ruple Isadore Epstein Yetta Silverstein LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 25 Brhiraiinn Ein Hllr. E. E211 Qlnllinga nur muut milling unh prariiral ahuizrr, nur ntaunrhvat frivnh auh the hyat nf gnnh fvllnum, uw, Ihr mrmhrru nf hia :lawn uf Zlunv, ninrirm hunhrrh tuxvnig-six. hrhiratr this annual, thv rvnuli uf nur last anis brat rifnrta at Glvnuillr. 26 The Olympiad,CLASSES 19 ass of June at Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-Six LENVILLE HIGH SCHO MORRIS ENGLANDER ........................................ M orry Can any man have a greater notion of the rule of right and the eternal fitness of things? 11A Speakerg 12B Class Presidentg Drama Clubg Senior Sponsorg Annual Board. SYLVIA ABBOTT ........................................ Tonny Kind hearts are more than coronets. Drama Club. BERNICE KELLER .......................................... She was a phantom of delight, When first she gleamed upon my sight. 12B Class Vice Presidentg House of Rep- resentativesg Reflectorg Annualg Military Sponsorg Student Hostessg Sports League. LOTTIE MARIE ABRooK ........................................ Elegant as simplicity, and warm as ecstasy. EARLE CooK ............................ . ................ Cookie None but himself can be his parallel. 12B Class Treasurerg Secretary-Treasurer, Senior Sponsorsg President, Radio Clubg Glenville Hi-Y, Secretary-T r e a s u rerg Torch Boardg Annual Boardg Reflector Boardg Tennis Teamg House of Represen- tativesg Hi-Press. CARRIE ADLER .......................................... C onnic Sweeter than Cytherea's breath. Basketballg Volley Ballg Baseball. ELEANOR SELBY .............................................. El In life's small things, be resolute and great. Senior Sponsor, Presidentg Friendship Clubg Drama Clubg Secretary of Senior Classg House of Representatives. RUTH ADLER .................................................. Red The intricate lovely play of sense. Drama Club. MANUEL G. BENJAMIN ........... .......... ....... . . Man And e'e11 though vanquished, he could argue still. Debate Clubg Varsity Debating Team, two years Captaing Chairman of Entertain- ment Committeeg House of Representa- tivesg Drama Clubg Student Councilg Re- flectorg Senior Sponsor. FRANCES ELIZABETH ADOMEIT .............. Hippie The maid who modestly conceals her beauties. Senior Sponsorg Student Council fdelib- erative assemblyl 3 Refiectorg Art Commit- tee. OL 27 28 Th HERBERT ALTENBURGER .......................... Herb Possessing the granite of patience. Trackg Boys' Glee Club, Choral Club. ' x MARGARET ATEN ........ l I ............................. Margie Loneliness needs not the forcing aid of ornament, But is when nnadorifcl, aolorn'd the most. Senior House of Representativesg Student Councilg Friendship Clubg Senior Sponsorg eOlyinpiad,CLAS 9 If I were a poet Sports League. MAMIE ALTSCHULER ...................... ......... Il I a rf Little I ask, my wants are few. Choral Clubg Glee Club. GooDwiN AURBACH .................................... Good Type of the wise, who soar but never roam Senior Sponsor. ALBERT AMSTER ........,..................................... AI Measures, not men, have always been our mark. Tennis Team, Captaing Senior Sponsorg Annual Board. HELEN SONYA BAKER .................................. Je All things about her drawn, From Maytime and the cheerful dawn. Senior Sponsorg Friendship Clubg Sports League, Executive Board. V1v1EN ANSCHUTZ ........................................ Vic I'd hymn your praise through a silver horn. Sports Leagueg Senior Sponsorg Basket- ballg Volley Bally Hiking, Baseballg Swim- mingg Rifie. SARAH BARKAN .................................................... None I remember more serene and sweet than she. HANS ASBECK ...................................... Germany With merry laughter, talk and songg and lightly spoken jest. FRIEDA BARTEL ............................................ Speaks and acts with a nzaiolenly grace, Which shows itself in the lines of her face. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 29 i JACK BASSICHIS .......................................... Jake Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul. Naturalists Club. JEANNE BENEDETTI .................,................ Bobby 1 There's not a bonnie bird that sings, But minds -me o' my Jean. Friendship Club, Girls' Rooters' Clubg Sports League, Civics Club. CLARENCE BAUMAN ...................................... Clar Oh, blest with temper whose nnclonded ray, Can make tomorrow cheerful as today. ANNA BERGSMAN ..................... ......... A nn Content, quiet, friendship. General Arts Committee. MARGARET BAUMGARTEN ......... .......... ......... B u m The flower of truth in the garden of good- ness. DAVID BERK .............................................. Berkie ,Tis not what man does which exalts hinz, but what man would do. Orchestrag Sponsorsg Track, Chess Club. EDWARD BEALLO ........................................ Eddie Reason's whole pleasure, all the joys of sense, Lie in three words-health, peace, and competence. Glee Clubg H. R. Basketball Champs, Cap- tain, 2nd Team. HILDA BERKOWITZ .. .... ......................................... . All that ever was Joyous, and clear, and fresh, thy music doth surpass. Q EDITH BEDOL .................................................... E This is another kind of sweetness. Baseball, Reflector Board. Moaais BERKow1'rz .................... ........ I ierlcy Scholar and athlete is he. The Olympiad, CLASSES 19 GEORGE BETTERToN ,,........................................... . A heart that can feel for anofher's woe, And share his joys with a genial glow. MARION BLOCK ............... . ........... ......... M ary Ever fair and efver young. Glee Clubg Choral Clubg Senior Sponsorg Torchg Typing Awards. NATHAN BERNSTEIN .............................. Berny He was indeed the glass wherein the noble youth did dress themselves. Debate Clubg Senior Sponsorsg Annual Board, Advertising Manager. EVA HELEN BoMAN ................................ Eve-er Pure and good was she. Sports Leagueg Naturalists Clubg Senior Sponsor. DOROTHY BINCKLEY ............ ................ G oldy It never was our guise To slight the poor, or aught humane despise. Drama Clubg Senior Sponsor. GRACE B0w1E ...................................... John Bull Earfh's noblest tributes fo thy name be- long. Glee Clubg Choral Club. GUss1E B1GELsoN ...................... ....... G us The soul's calm sunshine. MARTHA BORLAND .................................... Marty Thy niodesty's a candle to thy merit. Glee Clubg Senior Sponsorsg Rooters' Club. GRACE MARIE BINDER ................................ Babe As bright as u daisy. Baseballg Volley Bally Basketball. JAMES BRAvo .............................................. Or lore fo banter and fight so well. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL RUTH LILLIAN BREITBART ..... ...... T oofsie Queen of the twilight. Glee Clubg Senior Sponsors. ORPHA BROWN ........................................ Orphee Her eye intent on all the nobler things. Bandg Senior Sponsorg House of Repre- sentatives. EVA BRODY ............. .... ................................. B a be Shadow of annoyance never came near thee. Senior Sponsor. GEORGE BURGESS . ..................................... Tabby Toiling up the steep ascent, Toward the complete accomplishment. HAROLD H. BROOKS .............................. H. C. B. Thy purpose firm is equal to the deed. Class Entertainment Comrnitteeg Torch, Advertising Managerg Annual Boardg Varsity Track, Managerg Varsity Basket- ball, Asst. Managerg Orchestrag ReHectOr Board., FRANCES BURNsTE1N ......... , .................. Frmvcy Far more than great or high. KATHLEEN BROOKHART .,.......................... Kath Come, gentle spring! ethereal mildness! come! Band. SOLOMON COHEN ............................................ Sol Thou art so bounteous and mild and have not any care. Boys' Glee Clubg Reflector. SOLLIE BROOKS .....................,........................ Kid That fine sense which men call courtesy. MARGARET CAMPBELL .............................. Peggy Blue were her eyes as the fairy flax, Her cheeks like the dawn of day. Senior Sponsorg Friendship Clubg Sports League. 32 The Olympiad,CLAssEs 19 i MARYLEE CARROLL ................................................ Straight and slight as a young larch tree. 3 Glee Clubg Sports Leagueg "Joseph and i His Brethren." A RUTH R. COHEN ............... ....... R uthie Thou maid of worth! FRANCES CARTER ................... . .............. Frenchy Her beauty hangs upon the cheek of night like a rich jewel. Glee Club. GENEVIEVE COHEN .......................................... Ge Her song is all of the joy of life. LUCIA CHRISTOPHER ........................................ Lu A merry heart goes all the day. ALICE COLLIGAN .......................................... A lovely lady garmented in light, From her own beauty. 11A House of Representatives. HARVEY CHURCH .............................. Buck Shot Wholesome as air and genial as the light. 12B House of Representativesg Rifie Teamg Captain R. O. T. C. HELEN COMSTOCK . ..................................... H6116 The sweetest thing that ever grew beside a human door. ALICE CLEMONS ........................................... A face with gladness overspreadg Soft smiles, by human kindness bred. Glee Clubg "Joseph and His Brethrenng Friendship Clubg 12B House of Repre- sentativesg Senior Sponsor. WALTER CONROY .................................... Connie 'Tis he who smiles and laughs away, The little trials of life today. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 33 DORIS MAY CORINA ..................,............... Maizie Sweet as the first rnild violets. ETHEL DANCHES .......................................... Her ways the path of goodness choose, And loving friends she ne'er can lose. RUSSELL CROZIER ...................................... Rusty He will rise to the challenging hour. Torch Boardg Hi-YQ Hi-Press Club. BESSIE DE ANGELO ........ ..... .............,......... B e tty Virtue shines as a lone star in the night. Orchestra, Kodak Klub. IRMA BERNADINE CRIITCH ................ ...,.... B arny Dainty and sweet, so very petite. Glee Clubg Orchestra, Naturalists Club. BERNICE DEDREUX ........................................ Bud With a smile that glowed celestial 'rosy red. Drama Club, House of Representatives, 12Bg Sports Leagueg Senior Sponsorg An- nual Board. PAULINE CSEAK ................ . ......................... Polly You lighten our hearts and eyes. CHARLES DIEDERICH ..,..... .......................... I lhick His smile gives its owner passport 'round the globe. Varsity Trackg Football, R. O. T. C. Capt.g Senior Sponsorg Radio Clubg Glee Club. MYRTLE CURRIER ........................................ Myrt None but the brave deserve the fair. KATHERINE DILL ................. . ...... . ....... ........ I Cay All colour, light and loneliness. The Olympiad, CLASSES 1 9 GERTRUDE ROSELLE Dom-'MAN ................ Gertie Staimch., without a slain, like the im- charzgirzg blue. Glee Clubg French Clubg Senior Sponsorg Reflector Board, Student Councilg Hi-Press Club. llfIARTE L. FEIN .......................................... Marte Worthy to hold such adniiratiorz. House of Representatives, Senior Sponsorg Interclass Track, Entertainment Commit- tee. MORRIS DORSKY ................,..................... M01-riff His courtesy frarzsmutes aliens into trust- ing friends. Senior Sponsorg Varsity Footballg Var- sity Track. SARAH FELDMAN ..........,................ ..... A sweet and fzfirtuous soul. Glee Club, Choral Club. Ems DUNCAN .................................................. Ed Which like thee, to those in sorrow, Comes to bid a sweet good-morrow. DOROTHY FILLER .......................................... Dol So sweet and ifoluble is her discourse. MARVIN H. ENGEL .................................... Mike Stauneh as homml and fleet as hawk. Varsity Trackg Varsity Football, Captain. MILDRED EUNICE FINGERHUT .................. Milly Of tranquil happy mind. Naturalists Club, Vice President, Glee Clubg Sports Leagueg Senior Sponsor. NORMAN EPSTEIN ..........................,......... Norm. Whence is thy learning? Hath thy toil O'er books consunfd the -midnight oil? Senior Sponsorg House of Representativesg Torch Boardg Student Council, Chess Team. ROBERT FITCH .............................................. Bob -And still the wonder grew, That one small head could carry all he knew. R. 0. T. C.g Hi-Yg Annual Board, Business Managerg Torch Boardg Hi-Press, Honor Roll. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL WILMA MARIE FLESHER .............. ......... B zllze She is a winsome wee thing, , She is a bonny wee thing. Choral Clubg Glee Club, Treasurerg Senior , Sponsor. So firm in every look and limb. Football Reserves. HARRY FLYNN ......,....................................... Wert kind as resolute, and good as brave. Student Councilg R. O. T. C. Lieut. DOROTHY FRIEDMAN ...................................... Dot Light skirted, feather-rooted, laughing, dancing. GERALD C. FORSTNER .............................. Jerry With singing lips and bright gay eyes. "Joseph and His Brethrenug Glee Clubg Choral Clubg "Cleopatra", BEATRICE MARGUERITE FRIEND ..... ...... B ee Ever charming, ener new. SAM FREDERICK ............................................ I am a man, and nothing that concerns 11 man do I deem a matter of indifference to me. JOSEPH FRIEND .................................................... He adorned whatever subject he either spoke or wrote upon, by the most splen- did eloquence. Varsity Debate Teamg Torch, Debate Clubg 11A-12B House of Representativesg Class Honor Roll. SELMA FRIEDLAND ................................... With the sea-breeze hand in hand. Came innocence and she. Glenville Naturalists Club, Sports League. HARRIET FRITZ .......................................... Frifzy An influence luminous and serene, A shining peace. Clhoral Clubg Glee Clubg French Clubg Naturalists'g Rooters' Clubg Friendship Clubg "Joseph and His Brethren", "Min- strel Show", "Hiawatha's Wedding Feast". ALVIN FRIEDMAN ...................... . ........ ......... A l '36 The Olympiad,CLASSES 19 1 i 5 ROBERT FULTON ............................................ Bob There sounds not to the trump of Fame f The echo of a nobler name. JOSEPH GATTOZZI ................................ .... Nice to everyone he knows, For he treads with taetful toes. LESTER GADKE ............................ . ................... Les He stayed not for brake, and he stopped not for stone. Glee Club. LESTER GLICK ................................................ Les Thought is deeper than all speech. MARCELIJA GAKING .................................. Marcy Blessed with that charm, the certainty to please. Sports Leagueg Basketballg Volley Ball. TELZA GLICK ................................................ A great mind is made up of qualities that meet or make great occaszons. ANN MARIE GALOUPPO ..............,....... The bravest heart in any land. Retief-tor Board. CHARLES GOLDBERG .................................. Chuck Shnt within him the rare seed of learning. Senior Sponsorg Home Room Basketball. PHILIP GAR1-'IELD ........................................ Gu rf It is the mind that makes the man. MORRIS GOLDSMITH .................................. Butch A flowered future was unrolled. Debate Clubg Senior Sponsor. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 37 A Brssis GULDSTEIN .............. ...... ........ ......... . B e tty Content and happiness emanate. ' Civics Club, Senior Sponsor, French Club. SOPHIE GORDON ............................. ......... S oplt , The Query flower of youth. Naturalists Clubg "Hiawatha's Wedding Feast", "Minstrel Show"3 Glee Clubg ' Choral Club, "Joseph and His Brethren". NORMAN GOLDSWORD ................................ Dutch Amidst the sons of reason, fualoar and virtue. 12B House of Representativesg Hi-Y, Pres., Athletic Association, Pres.g Annual Board, Sport Editorg Torch Board, Sport Editor, Choral Clubg Hi-Press Clubg Track, As- sistant Managerg Football, Assistant Man- agerg Basketball, Manager. HOWARD M. GRA1-' ...................................... Peach He loved chivalry, Truth, and honor, freedom and courtesy. Band. ROSE GOODMAN ..,.............................,..,....,........... Emcefrliizg wise, fair spoken., and persuad- ing. Torch Boarrlg Senior Sponsor, Secretary, House of Representativesg Debate Club, Secretary and Treasurerg Varsity Debate. HARRY GRAU ...................................... .... I 'euuuts Mon of few 'words are the besf men. SOLLY GOODMAN .................................... Whitey The reason firm, the temperate will. Football Reservesg R. O. T. C. JEAN GRAY ..... . ............. ...................,,..... . .. Always 'very gracious and sweet, Nicely groomed, and oh so neat. TILLIE GOODMAN .......................................... Ted Woman's at best a contradiction still. LEONARD GREENBAUM ............................ Greeny His Own character is the arbiter of every- one's fortune. Glee Club, Chess Club. its 33 The Oly1nptad,CLASSES 19 ISADORE GREENES ........................................ Issy The heart of life sang at his side. FLORENCE GRIFFIN ................ .... ....,...... She so constant and so kind. Senior Sponsor. SELMA GREEN ..... . .................... , ................. Tiny True wit is nature to advantage dress'd. Girls' Band, Naturalists Club. LE0 GROSSMAN ............................ With face lit with delight, And all gratitude. ELEANOR M. GREENBERG ..,..... ...... E na Guy A progeny of learning. Torchg Reflectorg Sports Leagueg Natural- ists Club, Secretaryg Hi-Pressg Typing: Awards. LENORA HABINK ...................................... Larry Nature in her mildest grace. Senior Sponsorg Orchestra, 11A House of Representatives. ROSALIND GREENB1-:RG ................... .... Grateful for the blessing lent, Of simple tastes and mind content. Girls' Civics Club. NORMAN HALL .......................................... Norm The heart to conceive, the unrilerstanding to direct, and the hand to execute. Bandg Orchestrag All High Bandg Senior lnterclass Footballg Band Committee. MARCEL GREENBERG ................................ ............ Deeper in promise than the earth beneath him. HAROLD HARBATH ,....................................... Hoo His heart and hand both open and both free. Executive Council Athletic Association, i Varsity Football. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 39 MIRIAM HAUSER ............................................ Sis Sweet mercy nobil'ity's true badge. Friendship Club. ANNA HERBERT ............................................ A nn Best and brightest come away- Fairer far than this fair day. Kodak Klubg French Clubg Senior Spon- sor. VIOLI-:T ROMAINEO HAUSRATH ...................... Vi And all the treasures of the mind, These be thy guardian and reward. Student Council, Secretaryg Glee Clubg 12B House of Representativesg Senior Sponsorg Torch Boardg Annual Board. NORMA HERR ................................................ Ned Fair tresses man's imperial ensnare. Nlaturalists Club. RUTH HAYLOR .....................,.................... Ruthie With resigned and acquiescent heart, DAVID HECT .............,.................................. Heck Write me as one that loves his fellowmen. N ETTIE HELL1-:R ........................................ Nicky Society is wholesome for the character. Sports Leagueg Basketballg Volley Ballg Baseballg Glenville Naturalistsg Girls' Rootersg Senior Sponsor. SIGMUND HERSKOVITZ ........... ................. We found you changeless and true. ERLA HENNING .............................. ......... E ai-I Beauty is truth, truth beauty. Girls' Band, Secretary. Rox' HERTZ .................................................... He is a man to hold against the world. The Olympiad, CLASSES 192 MERTON HERTZ .................................................. A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches. BESSIE E. HORVITZ ................................ I am the very pink of courtesy. Niaturalists Clubg Choral Clubg Glee Clubg Senior Sponsor. DONALD Hicks .............................................. Don I dare do all that may become a many Who dares do more is none. Bandg Track. lJoNALD Honwrrz ............... , ................................ A merry heart maketh a cheerful coun- tenance. RUTH HOARE ............................................ Rufus A nature sloping to the Southern siole. CHARLES S. HoRv1Tz .............................. Chuck He holds and shares the silence of the sky. Senior Sponsor. HELEN HOLI,ANDER ...................................... Her ways are ways of pleasantness and all her paths are peace. Torchg Sports Leagueg Rifile Teain. SYLVIA R. Honwrrz ................................ S lift er Sylvia on her triuinphal progress goes. Senior Sponsorg Typing and Shorthand Awardsg Aletihian Club. LUCILLE Hom' ............,... ........ J ack Auld comrade dear. JULIA ELEANOR HUNTER .............,........,... Julie. And beauty draws us with a single hair. A Student Hostess, Treasurerg Friendship! Clubg Glee Club. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 41 IDA MAE HUSTON .........,...................... Little Bit Very droll, and, Oh! so funny, Brings a laugh from anybody. ENID JEANNETTE JEPHSON ........................ Jael: She is a legend emptied of concern. Friendship Clubg Swimming. ELLA HUTTON ................................. ........ A wa Virtue alone is true nobility. Senior Sponsor. RICHARD JEPHSON .......... .... .......... ....... D i e le Who doth ambition shun, And loves to lie i' the sun. HERBERT PAUL JAHNKE ............................ Herb Thinking of him as I might think of day- break. EVELYN R. .JOHNSON .................................... Ev Her beauty smoothed ea'rth's furrowed face. 12B House of Representativesg Student Councilg Orchestrag Band. FRANK JANEZIC ......................................,..... Jan Sh-ut up in measnreless content. Cartoon Club. NORMA L. JOHNSON ..... ........ N ormie Fashioned so purely, Fragilly, surely. CARL JEDLICKA .................................................... I laugh, for hope hath happy place with -me Trackg R. O. Ti C., llst Lieut.g Band. ARLINE KABER .................................................. R A violet by a mossy stone, half hidden from the light. Annual Boardg Senior Sponsorg Short- hand Awards. 42 The Olympiad,CLASSES 19 f SYLVIA KAHN .............. .............................. S ukey I Persuasive speech and more pefrsuasiye sighs. Debate Clubg Glee Clubg Senior Sponsorg Sports Leagueg Naturalists Clubg Base- ballg Basketballg Volley Ball, Captain in 12Bg Girls' Rooters Clubg Hiking. VIOLET KASTNER .............................................. Vi Silence that spoke, and eloquence of eyes. House of Representativesg Senior Sponsor. SYLVIA KALM AN ......................... Peaceful to a fifne degree, Never makes au enemy. ANITA KATZ .......... ..... ................. , ....... H a l ' int IP Thy beauty haunts me heart and soul. Girls' Civics Clubg Reflectorg Drama Club. SAMUEL KAMELINSKY ............................ Kamey Prudence and sense, a spirit brave and free-. GEORGE KENDIG ............................................ A man he was, to all the country, dear. Choral Clubg Senior Sponsorg Tennis. GOLDIE KAPLAN ...................................... Your hea'rt's desires be with you. Girls' Civics Clubg Senior Sponsor. ALTHEA KERLIN .............................................. Al You'll find her just a bonuie lassie. Bandg Orchestrag Choral Club. SARA Y. KAPLAN ...................................... Skooks Au image, 'volatile and bright. Sports League. DOROTHY KERMODE ...................................... Dot Saints have adored the lofty soul of you. Sports Leagueg Torchg Annualg Senior Sponsorg Shorthand Certificatesg Typing Awardsg House of Representativesg Re- flector Sub-Boardg Class Honor Roll. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL EUGENE KINGSBURY .................................... Kink Thus I steer my bark and sail On even keel, with gentle gale. Fencing Club. MARION KNIELING ...................................... Mich Radiant as the air round a star. Friendship Club. ARTHUR KITTEL ..............,............................. Art He drank the nalorous youth of a new world. CLARENCE KOKLAUNER ................. . .......... Binks He was a 'zrerray Q2!l7'f'1'f gentil knight. MARK KLAUS .................................. . ........... Santa He makes as wish that we were in his , place. I Senior Sponsor. SAM W. KOREN ......................... ....... S am my I I have only done my duty ' As a man is bound to do. Orchestra 9 Torch. JOE KLEGER .................................................. J ohn Variety is the very spice of life that gives it all its flavor. Orchestrag H. R. Basketball Champs. MAX KRASNY ........... . .................. ......... S hor-ty 'Fore God, I am no coward. JOHN KLESS, JR. .......................................... Jack None named thee but to praise. Varsity Football, Varsity Trackg Lieut., R. 0. T. C.g Athletic Association Boardg 12B House of Representatives. LOUISE E. R. KUEHN .................................. A nobler counsellor than my poor heart. 44 Th e Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 ANNA RUTH KURLANDER .... ....... A mze A worthwhile -friend. Senior Sponsor. DOROTHY GLORIA LEAVITT ., ...................... Doi-sy Bright gem instinct with music, poral Glee Club. ANITA EVELYN LAM BLEY ..... ........ N im spark. With mild, benignant air. NETTIE EVA LEAVITT .................................... Ned Politeness is to do and say, The kiiidest thing in the lrinolest way. SELMA LANDESMAN ..... ....... S ally I find thee worthy. Senior Sponsor. JEANNETTE LECKIE ............................ . ..... Jeime Her hair was long, her foot was light, And her eyes were mild. Glee Clubg ReHect0rg Annualg Senior Sponsorg Drama Club, Vice Presidentg Military Sponsor. JAMES H. LANG ......................,..................... Jzm Still as the utmost depths of ocean. Interclass Football. WALTER LEE The strength of forests braced his -mind. - DOROTHY LEACH ............................................ Speaks full well in language quaiizf. DOROTHY LEMMON ........................................ Dot Youth on the prow, and pleasure at the helm . LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOLlf 45 I 1 ' ,,l 1 fvf..JJ 5 .J ALVINA L. LEV.Al7t,,..' ...............................,........ Al She listens with a fitting blush, With downcast eyes, and modest grace. J JEROME LIMBERT ..............................,......... Jerry Serenely silent as some mighty hill. s RHODA JUNE LEVINR ................................ Rody In the stark might of her deed, There is none than art or creed. Civics Club. G1-:RTRUDR LOCKSPERSER .......................... Gov-tie Hens was a still and lonely face. BI-ZATRICI: LEWIN ....................... . ........... ...... B ee Whose happy heart has power To make a stone a flower. Senior Sponsor. DANIEL LOESER ........................................ Danny He's our Darid Garrielc, describe him who can, Au abridgment of all that is pleasant in man. Assistant Sport Editor, Torch, Dramatic Club, Treasurer, Hi-Y Club, Secretary, Treasurer, Vice President, "She Stoops to Conquer", "Enter the Hero", Hi-Press Club. ARTHUR DAVIS LEWIS .................................. Art To the hero, when his sword has won the battle. Swimming Team, 12B House of Reprc- sentativesg Athletic Association Board, Varsity Football, 2nd Team, Basketball, Varsity Track, Captain. ANNETTI: LoNG ............................... ........ A ndy A daughter fair, So buxom, blithe and debonair. Basketball. MIRIAM LEIBE ................. .......................... Midge A daughter of the gods, Diiwinely tall and most divinely fair. Senior Sponsor, Annual Boardg House of Representatives, Debate Club, Vice Presi- dentg Friendship Clubg Drama Clubg Yar- sity Debate Teamg "Suppressed Desiresf' VIRGINIA Ross LOOMIS ................................ Vee A 'very shower of beauty. Annual Board, Torch Board, Reflector Boardg Senior Sponsor, 11A House of Representatives. 46 The Olympiad,CLASSES 19256 DOROTHY MAHON ........................ . .............. Dot Brings gladness to all. Annual Board, Friendship Clubg 12B House of Representativesg Shorthand Cer- tificate, Typing' Awards. ALBERT MANN ................................................ Al Just at the age 'twixt boy and youth, When thought is speech, and speech is truth. Bandg R. 0. T. C. DAVID MACEY ........................................... .Don Q His thoughts were roots that firmly gripl the granite truth. Class Honor Rollg Assistant Manager of '25 Basketballg Senior Sponsor. SOPHIA MARGARET MANTWILL .................. SoSo Sweet flower that speaks of friendship truf RICHARD COLTON MALLETT ........................ Dick I am not only witty in myself, But the cause that wit is in other -men. Torch Boardg Hi-Yg Senior Sponsorg Radio Club. HELEN MARCUS .......................................... Mitzy Her ways are ways of pleasantness. Orchestrag Glee Club. ELEANOR R. MANAHAN .............................. When she had passed, it seemed like the ceasing of exquisite music. Redector Board, Art Committeeg Torchg Friendship Clubg Annual, Literary Editorg Hi-Press Club. PEARL ,MARCUS ..,........................................... Pete We have not her genius or appreciation. FRANCES MANCINI ..... ....... F 'renelzy Calm and serene. ELEANOR MARKS ............................................ El Earth's noblest thing--a 'uroman perfected. Swimming. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 47 GENEVIEVE MARSIi ........... ........ G en Like a 'rose in Jmze. Torch Boardg Friendship Clubg Hi-Press. JAH ES L. MCGUIRE ................................ Jimmie A clever writer, in our belief. Torch Editorg Varsity Debate, Captaing Student Council, Vice Presidentg House of Representativesg Dramatic Clubg Fencing Clubg Hi-Y, Secretaryg Hi-Press. JOSEPH MAZGEIKA .................................... Teddy Discreet he was and of great 1'e'uerei1ce. HELEN MCLAUGHLIN ..,....................................... Witlz malice toward none, with charity for all. JOE IMAZUR ..................... . ..................................... . But I nm constant as the northern star. GENEVIEVE MCMAHKWN .............................. Gentry Thought hast u charm to stay the inmwz- ing star. Friendship Clubg Girls' Civics Club. JAMES MCCULLEY ............................. ........ J im His words were oaks in acorns. 12B House of Representatives. W1NsTON MCNAMARA ................................ ..... How happy could he be with either were father dear charnzer away. DOROTHY MCDONAIJD ................................. .Irish Bashfulizess is an ornament of youth, Friendship Clubg Sports League. A ERIC H. MELKERSON . ............................. Swede He from whose lips divine persuasion flows. The Olyrhpiad, CLASSES 1926 EMANUEL MELTZER .........,..................... W Iann ie What fortitude thy soul contains. Band. BERNARD MII,I.ER ...................................... Clyde He held his place and ,faltered not at praise. Lieut., R. O. T. C., Radio Club, Secretary, Senior Sponsor, Glee Club. ELIZABETH METZ ......................,............... Lizzie Benignity, and home-bred sense, Rlpening in perfect innocence. Senior Sponsor. 1 f FLORENCE L. MILLER ......... ........ . .. ...... Flor Sweet as f B .k tb 1? , ff '11 as e a MORRIS J. MESCHANSKY ........................ Marry And gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teche. Orchestra, Glee Club, Senior Sponsor, De- bate Club, Debate Business Manager. RUSSELL EDWIN MILLER ............................ Russ He most lives who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best. Reflector Board, Business Manager, Kodak Klub, Hi-Y Club, Hi-Press Club, Drama Club, "She Stoops to Conquer", "Tickless Time", Cleopatra", "Enter the Hero". MARJORIE MEYER .................................... Marge And in our hearts we shall remember you always, We knew you once, O lovely and wise! Reflector Board, Annual Board, Senior Sponsor, Kodak Klub, French Club. MARGARET MILLS ................................................ Horne on a breath of swift and buoyant air. DoRo'rHY MEYERSON .................................... Dot In maiden-meditation, fancy free. Glee Club, Sports League, Choral Club, Girls' Rooters' Club. SARAH MINDEI. ...........,................................ Sally Nature fits all her children with some- thing to do. Senior Sponsor. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 49 5 RACHEL MIRSKY ............,............................. Rae The hidden soul of harmony. French Clubg Rooters Clubg Orchestrag Sports Leagueg All High Orchestrag Glee Club. JACK N OTKIN ..................... . .......................... Erect with his alert repose about him, and about clothes. LEO MosKovv1'rz ......................,................. Mosky Unspoiled by praise or blame. Senior Sponsor. GERALDINE OBERLE ...................................... Gere Joy on her lips and a smile in her eye. 12B House of Representativesg Senior Sponsor, Entertainment Committee Spon- sor. MARK NAGUSKY .................................................. Great truths are portions of the soul of man. Great souls are portions of eternity. Varsity Debateg Torch Boardg Glenville Latin Medalg Student Council, Recording Secretaryg Dramatic Clubg Senior Spon- sorg 12B House Of Representatives. GILBERT O'BRIEN .......................................... Gil The glaolness of the wind that shakes the corn. SARAH NEGIN .................................... Sally Ann She pleases all the world. Girls' Bandg Sports Leagueg Gym Aid. DONALD 0'HARE ........................................,. Don Supreme of heroes-bravest, noblest, best. Varsity Footballg Varsity Basketball. RAYMOND NEUMAN ............................................ A proper man, as one shall see in a sum- iner's day. Interclass Basketball. HELEN ONDERDONK ............. ................... H oney All youth's lively senses keen and quick. E s ANNETTE PASTORELLE .............. .... .............. T o ll y RAY OSTERHOUSE ...................................... Dutch. Admirably schooled in every grace. 11A and 12B House of Representativesg R. 0. T. C. Lieut. RosA PEACE ............ .................................... B oofs Queen rose of the 'rosebud garden. Sports League. BIARJORIE OTT .......................................... Midge But from the hoop's bewitching round, Her very shoe has power to wound. Trackg Student Hostessg Glee Club, Mili- tary Sponsor. EMANUEL PEARLSTEIN .............. . ..... Baltimore His, fo trace the stars and search the heavens for power. HARRIETT LATITIA PARKER ........................ Tish With thy keen, clear joyance Languor cannot be. Drama Club, President, Friendship Club, Presidentg Reflector, Flim Flam Editorg 12B House of Representatives. ROY PECK .........................,............................ A man made to meet the mortal need. Dramatic Club. WILLARD PARKER ................................ ....... B 'ill Shining with justice and truth. R. O. T. C. Lieut.g Rifle Team. MARY PERRIS ....................... ...... ............... M i clcey Speech as the whispering grass 01' the silent sky. Sports Leagueg Glee Cluibg Senior Spon- sor, Annual Boardg Basketballg Baseballg Volley Ballg Shorthand Certificateg Typ- ing Award: Hiking. Nools and beelcs and wreathed smiles. 11A House of Representatives, 12B House of Representativesg Senior Sponsor. RAYMOND PETERS .......................................... Hay Noght o word spak he more than was nude. The Olympiad, CLASSES 1925 LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 51 BERNARD PIORKE .................................... Bu 1-ne Who mix'd reason with pleasure, and wis- dom with mirth. EDNA POWELL .. .......................................... Eddie All her hidden virtues shirie. Girls' Bandg Girls' Rooters' Clubg Typing Award. RUTH POHLMAN ..,.......................... She's as precious a jewel. Senior Sponsor. CARL PRENTICE .......................................... Cully Nothing is impossible to a willing heart. REGENE E1.1zAB1-:TH POLLOCK .................... lied Learning and worth in equal measure. Reflector Boardg Drama Clubg Hi-Press Clubg French Club. DOROTHY LILLIAN PRENTKE ...................... Do! 'Tis she fulfills great Nati4re's plan. Military Sponsor, Majorg Reflector Board, Assistant Business Managerg Student Hostessg Annual Boardg Hi-Press Clubg Drama Clubg Senior Sponsor. SAMUEL POLACK .......................... Ifoariizg Sam The good-will of the rain that loves all leaves. R. O. T. C., Captaing Orchestrag Bandg Annual Board. LILY RABINOVITZ ................... . ....................... Lil Ah sweet! Ah. little one! So like a earifcn saint. Reflector Boardg Student Councilg French Club. T1:oMAs POPE ....,............,.......................... Mick A mcrrier man I never spent an hom"s talk withal. . HLEN REEDER ........................ .................... I rzsh But to see her is to love her! Ceneral Art Committeeg Reflector Boardg Annual Board. 52 TheOly1npiad,CLASSEs19e6 BEATRICE REICHES ........................................ Bee Sweet, you are praised in a silence, A nd sung in a sigh. ESTIIER REITER ...............,............................ A perfect woman, nobly planned. HARRY REID .................,........... ........ R eidy . A noble, Of Natn1'e's own creating. Football, Interclass and Reserve Team. ESTHER RIJITHOFFILR ............................................ With a smile on her lip, and a tear in her eye. Glee Clubg Friendship Clubg Reflector Board. DAVID RI-:IN ........................................................ Endurance is the crowning quality, And patience, all the passion of great hearts. Varsity Debateg Dramatic Clubg Debate Club, Presidentg Annual Boardg Orches- trag Senior Sponsor. RUTH EVELYN REYNoI,Ds ........................ Woof VVifh constancy, and peace, and fortitude. ReHector Boardg Friendship Clubg Sports League. SIDNEY H. REIN ..........,................................. Red The courage of the bird that dares the sea. ADELBERT RICE ............................................ Twin His best companions, innocence and health -and his best niches. Track Teamg Interclass Footballg Lieut. R. O. T. C.g Reflector Boardg Torch Boardg Annual Boardg Cartoon Club. DOROTHY REITER ......... . ........ Dor That fire is genius. Senior Sponsorg Student Councilg Annual Board. Ross MARIE ROBIN .................................. Reggie Beanteous rosebnd young and gay. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL DOROTHY ROGIN ................................. ........ D ot Nor know we anything so fair As is the smile upon thy face. Glee Clubg Choral Club. JOSEPHINE EUDICE ROSENBERG ............,..... Joe And her hair is as dark as the shadows That fall where the fir trees grow. Sports League. CIRIL ROODMAN ..4............................................. Si I look upon you as a gem. "Joseph and His Brethrenng Senior Spon- sorgG1ee Clubg Choral Clubg Reilector Boardg General Art Committeeg Hi-Press Club. FRANCES ROSENBLUM ........ ......... F mnlrie Tlo know is to esteem. Civics Club. ' FERNANDO ROPCEA ..........,....................... Fez-dy The secrecy of streams that make their way Under' the mountain to the rifted rock. ' Rcflectorg 2nd Lieutenant R. O. T. C. ALICE Rosi-:NTHAL .......................................... Al Wolcorizff in every clime as breath of flowers. Basehallg Sports Leagueg Naturalists Club PHYLLIS EDITH Ross .................................. Phyl Redundant are thy looks, thy lips as fair. Sports League. MAX Ro'rH ...................................................... Axe To make his deed the rnf'asm'o of a man. R. O. T. C. Ross Louisa ROS-EN ............................................ The soul's calm sunshine and the heartfelt joy is 1Iirtue's pfrize. l'aturalists Clubg Girls' Sports League. Louis Ro'rI-I .... , ...............................,............. His ways are ways of pleasantncss. And his paths are peace. ,E 54 The 0lympiad,CLAssEs192 CUTHBERT RowLEs ............................................ He smiles and speaks to all his friends, As through our halls his way he wends. MILDRED SCHAEFFER .................................. Milly What hand but would a garland cull, For thee who art so beautiful? 11A House of Representativesg Senior Sponsorg Drama Clubg Glee Club. ELOISE MURIEL ROY .................................... Ell There's a woman like a dew-drop. Senior Sponsorg House of Representativesg Civics Club. EARL SHAUFFLER ........................................ Earl S0 came the Captain with the mighty lzeart. ELVIRA RUGGIE ............... ......... E I, Vi Joy is a sweet voice. LUCILLE SCHLESINGER .................. ....... I ,ulfe The lassie in her bestg VVas dress'd from top to toe. Torchg Reflectorg Sports Leagueg Tennisg Baseballg Senior Sponsorg Hi-Press Club. LILLIAN R. SADUGOR ....................................,. Lil With honest joy her heart abounds. Sports Leagueg Senior Sponsorg Bowlingg Baseball. ALEXANDER SCHWARTZ ...................,.............. Al He held his place- Held the long purpose like a grow-ing tree. Basketball. BARBARA SAUNDERS ........................ ......... B orb May you hold Loyalty, truth, obedience fast. Student Councilg Friendship Clubg Mili- tary Sponsorg Student Hostess, Secretary. EUGENE SCHWARTZ .................................... Eug i I only know you shall be great. Orchestrag Motto Committee. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 55 LILLIE SCHWARTZ ....................,..................... Lil Shall I not crown her with immortal praise? MARY SHIRKEY ................................, ...... S hirk Friendship is a sheltering tree. SANI-'ORD SCHWARTZ .................................. Susie I lore tranquil solitude, And such society as 'is quiet, wise and good. Senior Sponsorg Interclass Footballg Glee Clubg t'Captain Van Der Hum", "Joseph and His Brethren." NIARION SHIVHLY .......................................... A creature not too bright or good, For ltumavz 11atare's daily food. Military Sponsor, Senior Sponsor, Student Hostess. lVlARIE SCHWEISTHAL .............................. Shorty Thence flows all that charms of ear or sighf. General Art Committeeg Sports Leapfueg Bowling. ALICE SILVERMAN ........ . ......................... . ...... .AI Elysian beauty, melancholy grace. Girls' Bandg Girls' Rooters' Club. MARJORIE SIICKEL .................................... Marge She's all my fancy painted her. Sports Leagueg Kodak Klub, Drama Club, Senior Sponsor, Treasurerg "Suppressed Desire". SAUL SILVERMAN .......................................... Sliv Efvceedingly well read. Senior Sponsors, Presidentg House of Rep- resentativesg Ring' Committee, Student Councilg Debate Team, Captain, Reflector Story Contest ffirst prizel. RALENE SHIRLDS ........................................ Rink Joy rises in me, like ll sNmn1er's morn. ARTHUR SIMON ............................................ Art He was always human when he talked. U 56 The Olympiad,CLASSES 1926 EDWARD SIMON ................................. ....... S ee A life that knows no fear! Radio Club, Presidentg Senior Sponsor. ONEITA LOUISE SNODGRASS ........................ Nita Be good, sweet maid, cmd Ief who will be clever. Girls' Bandg Friendship Club. FRANCES GERTRUDE SMITH ...... ...... A me She is modes! and discreet. Senior Sponsor. MILTON SOBLOBITZ ...................................... Sogy Intense and keen and sharp fzrzd clever. LE GRAND SMITH ........................................ Gun With the szmlzfglzt of good cheer. . WILLIAM SOBOL ............................................ Bill To line for marzlcihd is far more fhan to Zire for a Hume. ROBINA D. SMITH .................................... Robin A 'merry heart goes all the day. Glee Clubg Senior Sponsorg "Joseph and His Brethren". HARVEY LEELAND SPERO ..................... ..... Wcfre faifh and hope fl-plenty. ROSALIE SMITH ........................................ Dollie Words from thy mouth are music. Girls' Rooters Club. MAURICE SPERO ........................................ A migo As a wit, in the Very first line. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 57 GILBERT SOUL ...,............................................ Gill High-erected thoughts, seated in the heart of courtesy. RICHARD STEIGERWALD ..................... ........ R ich A manner blithe and debonair. Interelass Basketballg Interclass Football. ELIZABETH SPRAGUE ................................ Betty To me the meanest flower that grows can give Thoaghts that do often lie too deep for tears. Friendship Clubg Annual Board. CEDRIC STERN ........, ....................... ......... ....,.. S e d They are never alone that are accompanied with. noble thoughts. Interclass Football. DOROTHY STADLER .................................... Dottie I Promise stirs, rises, opens and grows sweet, And blossoms and is you. ROBERT W. STERN ...................................... Bob I'm not in the roll of common men. Reilector Board, Editor-in-Chief, Senior Sponsor, Radio Club, Hi-Press Club, Presi- dent. ' KENNETH STAMPLI .................................... John To make his dream and its fulfilment one. Hi-Y Club, Lieut. R. O. T. C.g Bandg Orchestra. MABLE STONE ......................... ........ H ich She's lovely, she's divine. House of Representatives. A WINIERED STANLEY ................................ Windy O talk not to me of a name great in story, The days of Oar youth are the days of our glory. Torch, Feature Editorg Reflector, Literary Editor, Drama Club, Hi-Pressg House of Representatives, Senior Sponsor. FLORENCE STONEROOK ....................... Q .... Bobbie The world was sad-till ivoman smiled. . Naturalists Club. Wi 08 Th e Olympiad, C LASS BELLE SUID ........ ........................... . ........ Babe I have no other but a ioomarfs reason. Drama Clubg Senior Sponsor. STANLEY TI-IRALL ...................... . ................. Stan Was ever master yet so mild? Senior Sponsor. STANLEY SUIT .............................................. Stan A presence to be loved and revered. Radio Clubg Senior Sponsorg Bandg Or- chestrag Glee Clubg Choral Club. ANNA TOLEU .......................................... Hamm All melodies, the echoes of that voice. Glee Clubg Senior Sponsorg Choral Club. RICHARD TAYLOR ...................................... 4 ..Diclt Great thoughts come from the heart. SAM UMANS ....................... ..... ....... S t ew Who says in verse What others say 'in prose. Orchestrag Radio Club, Sergeant-at-Arms and Traffic Managerg Senior Sponsorg In- terclass Footballg R. O. T. C., Lieutenant. RosE TAYLOR ........,.,..................................... Row As sweet, and 'musical As bright Apollo's lute, strung with his hair. French Clubg Sports League. RUSSELL J. VAN DAME ................................ Van For he were not as other men. Senior Sponsor. MILDRED TEN WINKEL ................................ Hon Of surpassing beauty and in the bloom of youth. Senior Sponsorg Torch Boardg Annual Boardg 11A, 12B and 12A House of Rep- resentativesg Entertainment Committeeg Hi-Press Club. PAUL VEASEY .......................................... Captain Oh, how full of briars is this iootrking-day world. LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL SAM VINITSKY .................................................... Large was his bounty and his soul sincere. BELLE C. WEBER ........ ................................ B illy A Thy soul was like a star, and dwelt apart, in cheerful godliness. EVABELLE VIETS .............. ..................... ...Vee To those who know thee not, no words can paint. Drama Clubg Senior Sponsor. MARY WEBER .......................................... Shiekee Because of you we will be glad and gay. ESTHER ANN VOGEL ......................... . ............ Es Oh, Esther's rare, and Esther's fair! Civics Clubg Drama Clubg "The Shep- herd in the Distanceng Basketball. FRANCES ROBERTA WEED . .......... ........ F ran She is every way complete. KATHRYN WARNER .......... . .......................... . For thy understanding, a sweet woman. Senior Sponsor. JOHN WEEDON .... ................. ................ . .............. True as the needle to the pole, as the dial to the sun. R. O. T. C. lst Lieutenantg Debate Clubg 12B House of Representativesg Annual Boardg Radio Club, Treasurerg Hi-Y Clubg Senior Sponsor. ROBERT WARREN ............. ......... B ob He is most princely. Band. STANLEY WEST .. .......... ............. ...... .. Peace and order and beauty draw Round thy symbol of light and law. 60 The Olymp1.ad,CLASSES 1996 NIIRIAM CLIVE WEINBERCIER ........ ....... i Wlifzie Her face, oh, cull if j'ui'r.l Naturalists Club, Presidentg S p or t s Leagueg Senior Sponsor. MYRTI.E WHITLAM ................,................,.. Myra' Tliaf come-lzithei' Iool: in lzer eye. Senior Sponsorg Torch Boardg Shorthand Certificateg Typing Award. CELIA Wmss ....,............. ....... ................. C 7 ev, Sii Her eyes as stars of fwlhlligllt fair, Lilre lwilight foo her dusky hair, Drama Clubg Debate Clubg House of Rep- resentativesg Senior Sponsor, Vice Presi- dent. FRED B. WIEGAND ...................................... Bus To be rr well-favored man is the gift of fortune. Interclass Footballg R. O. T. C. FRANCES VVHALEN ............ . ....................... IM-lui 'Tis only noble to lie good. Senior Sponsorg Interclass Football. WII,I.lAM WICKS ...................... W'iel.'e1'-Wor'l.'e1' His heart was merry as his dress. ARTA WHEATKHN ......................,............... Ihmly Aurora, daughter of the down, Witlz rosy lustre. Drama Clubg Girls' Rifle Teamg Senior Sponsor. MARION A. W1Lcox . ........,........................ Mania The friendly tear, the sympaflzefic glow. Friendship Clubg Senior Sponsor. PAUL WHITE .......................................... ..Whitey Thaf life is long wliiclz ru1s1vei's lifr"s great end. ARTHUR VVlI.I.ER'l' .........................,................ Art The milrlest nionners with fhe lzrmfest mmrl. LENV IGH SCHO OL 61 HELEN WILLIAMS ............,......................... Tony Ifl'llI6II11I6l'f'TIg you, we voill be brave and strong. Class Entertainment Committeeg 12B House of Representativesg 11A House of Representativesg French Club, Vice Presi- dentg Naturalists Club. BLANCHE WoLIfs .............................. ........ Content and romfort bless me. Girls' Civics Cluh. FLEANUR E. WINIJISCH .................................. EI fl vzeuf, a ufoizderful, zz qzzeenly state. Girls' Glee Clubg "Joseph and His Breth- ren"g Choral Clubg Annual Board, Feature Editorg French Clubg Friendship Clubg Sports League. .Bee .IosI-:PHINI-1 WCJLP'E .......................................... Jo ,l qnrzinf precision rules her days. C HARLES WISE ..........,............................. C11 14 I-1: He did not gain, but zoos, success. RiHe Teamg Swimming Teamg R. O. T. C. Lieutenant. MILToN Wom' ................,............,................ Mzlt VVise to resolve, and patient to perform. Glee Clubg "Captain Van der Hum", 'Joseph and His Brethrenng Senior,Spon- SOI'. RUTH .II-:AN WOBlJLT ................................ Hoothe She has dfznoiizg eyes and ruby lips, Delightful boofs and away she skips. Friendship Club, Social Chairmang 11A House of Representativesg Senior House of Representativesg Reflector S ub-Boardg Senior Sponsor. NoRMAN WOLF .......................,.............,.. Norm The glory of a firm, I7!l1JIlf'l.01lS mind. Trackg Chess Club. ERNARD WoLIf ...................................... Bernie So sweet und ooluble is 11 is discourse. Glee Clubg R. O. T. C.3 'tCaptain Van der Hum", "Joseph and His Brethren". IRWIN WOOIIRIIFF ..,..,. ................................. T ad But sure the eye of time beholds no name, So blest us thine in all the roll of fame. Radio Clubg Hi-Y Clubg Interclass Foot ballg Varsity Track. 62 The Olympiad,CLAssEs 19 SYLVIA WORMLEY .................................... Slwers . Kind hearts are more than coronets. Swimmingg Bowlingg Sports Leagueg Hockeyg Basketball, Captain 12Bg Riflle Teamg Baseballg Volley Ballg Hikingg Sen- ior Sponsor. EMILY ZOLOTINTSKY ....,....... ..................... E -nz A generous one, as ever. ReHector Boardg Drama Clubg Senior Sponsorg General Art Committeeg "Shep- herd in the Distance". LILLIAN WULLIGER ................. . ...................... Lil Dotlz modesty stand in need of praise? MARIE ZUPANIC ........................................ ...... Like the vague scent of a flower. ARTHUR YELLEN ..........................................., Art The noblest mind the best contentment has. Varsity Trackg Senior Sponsorg Interclass Football. LOTTIE ZUROVSKY ..................... ......... I ,ot Laugh thy girlish laughter. PEARL ZELKOWITZ ........................................ Pat The sweetest thing that ever grew beside a lmman door. Girls' Rooters' Clubg Sports League. CHARLES ZWELLING .................................. Chuck He was a scholar and a ripe and good one. FRANCES H. ZIM MER .............................. Zimmie With thoughts so sweet and dear. QLincoln High, Ferndale, Michjg Lincoln Hi Playersg Drama Clubg Girl Reserves. JEROME GOLDBURG .................................... Jerry To be good is noble. Choral Clubg Boys' Glee Clubg Varsity Footballg Varsity Trackg "Cle0patra"g In- terclass Basketball. 5 LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 63 ABE AARONS .......................................... I trust to virtue and not to arms. HENRY GOLDSTEIN ......................... He knows the truth of virtue, The joy of sacrifice. BAMBRIGHT MIDDLETON .............................. Fire from the mind as vigor from the limb. HARRY BUTTS .................................. Those move easiest Who have learn'd to dance. RICHARD MUNN ....................................... Small of stature but, you know, It makes him more attractive so. Here is a man of all kinds of work, Never was known his duty to shirk. Cartoon Club, Presidentg Senior Sponsor, Treasurerg Lieut., R. O. T. C.g Varsity Trackg Torch Boardg Annual Board. He reads much, He is a great Observerg and he looks Quite through the deed of men. JAMES WADE WATTLEWORTH ................ Waddy An idle moment and a busy one, Folks say that he's lots of fun. GORDON FORKER ............................................. Moderation, the noblest gift of Heaven ESTHER DON ............................................... . Within the limit of becoming mirth. ALBERT RICE .................................................... Al JACK FERGUSON ...................................... . 64 The Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 STANLEY RALPH GOLDBERG ................. ............. . . There's honesty, manhood, and good fellowship in thee. MARVIN HERZIG .................................................. Marv The rectitude and gatienee of the cliff. WILLARD F. KING .................................................. Bill If he be not fellow with the best hing, Thou shalt find him the best king of good fellows. A Class Basketball. LEONARD LEVEN .................................................... Each man is a hero and an oracle to somebody. Debate Clubg Senior Sponsor. JOE MOSCARINO .................................................... 'Tis the songs ye sing and the smiles ye wear, That's a makin' the sunshine everywhere. Vlarsity Football Managerg Hi-Y3 Glee Clubg "Captain Van Der Hum", "Joseph and His Brethren." GEORGE NEILL ...................................................... He was a gentleman from sole to crown. LILY PALEY ............................................ . ...... ....... L il The price of wisdom is above rubies. JOE REMBRANDT .............................. ......... ............ J o hn His foot was winged as the mounting sun. Basketball. SADIE ROSENBERG ....................................... Smiles and talks with pleasantness, Has an air of gentleness. J AMES SANDS .................... ..................... . ............ J im And what he greatly thought, he nobly dared. Dramatic Club. IRENE SGHWED ..,................................................. Reny Sweet and nice to all who know her. Senior Sponsor. LILLIAN SOBLOVITZ ................. ..................... L il, Sob The fair, the chaste, the uneocpressibe she. CHARLES R. TILLMAN ...................................... Chuck Nature's second sung Causing a spring of virtues where he shines. STANLEY J. WETTRICH ....................... . .............. .. Who to himself is law no law doth need. LENVILLE HIGH SCI-IO Zin Hlrmnriam FREDERICK WEIGAND His classmates mourn the loss of one who was a good student, a loyal friend, a splendid pal. .His high ideals and outstanding virtues will always live in the most cherished memories of Glenville High School. ilu flllrmnriam RUTH BLUHM The rolling seas swell on. Their endless tides sway in and out. The gleaming stars of heaven send out their softened glow. All is peace. All is quiet. But in the hearts of those who are left behind a dull, aching pain takes the place of rest and slumber. To those who knew her, Ruth Bluhm lives on. The remembrance of her sweet loving kindness, the friendship of her dear ones is eternal. Ever in their memories the sweet flower of her youth will bloom fragrantly. Her class- mates of June, 1926, know and love, revere and re- spect her memories. And so her course has not yet been run. With us who are, our dear friend still is. The seas will roll on. The never-ceasing tides will sway in and out. The stars of heaven will send out their softened glow. And in the lives of our class, as a sweet inspiration will ever live the memory of dear Ruth Bluhm. OL 65 66 The Olymplad,CLASSES 1926 Jun OPING that the rest of Glenville will not consider us conceited, we think fnaturallyl that our class should be one of the mightiest of the classes thus far, and trust that future classes may proiit by our many mistakes and accomplish all that we had hoped for ourselves. C '26 However that may be, we herewith pre- sent, in conjunction with the worthy class which preceded us, our annual, the epi- tome of our abilities and aspirations. Our class officers, we think, have been particularly efficient in their respective capacities. They are as follows: 12A HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES-CLASS OF JUNE, 1926 OFFICERS Morris Englander .... ........................... .............. P 1' esident Robert Fitch ............ ........ V ice President Eleanor Selby ..... ....... ....... .... .......... S e c fr etary Earl Cooke ............... ......................................................... T 'reasurer Manual Benjamin .............. Chairman Entertainment Committee OTHER MEMBERS Morris Berkowitz Orpha Brown Norman Epstein Joseph Friend Rose Goodman Violet Hausrath Roy Hertz Violet Kastner Bernice Keller Dorothy Kermode Arthur Lewis Daniel Loeser Marjorie Meyers James McCu1ley James McGuire Rachael Mirsky Raymond Osterhouse Annette Pastorelle Eloise Roy Barbara Saunders Saul Silverman Winifred Stanley Mabel Stone Mildred Ten Winkel John Weedon Celia Weiss Helen Williams Ruth Wolbolt Irwin Woodruff FACULTY Anvxsr-JR, MR. E. D. COLLINGS Class Motto: Let Us Be Judged By Our Deeds Class Colors: Celtse and Silver HONOR ROLL Marjorie Meyer .... 94.27 Rose Goodman ...... 93.60 Morris Berkowitz..93.39 Mark Nagusky ........ 93.35 Saul Silverman ...... 93.0 Eugene Schwartz 092.78 Robert Fitch ............ 92.53 Orpha Brown ........ 92.2 92.14 92.0 Lillian Rabinowitz Gertrude Dorfman Regene Pollack .... Eleanor Greenberg Jeanette Leckie .... Max Krasner ........ Violet Hausrath .... 90.62 90.74 90.48 90.39 90.21 Dorothy Reiter ........ 90.14 David Macey ........ 90.7 Roy Hertz ................ 90.6 Joseph Friend ....... Mary Perris ............ .90.0 90.0 GLENVILLE HIGH SCH OOL 67 History of Class IN the beginning we were assembled in the auditorium, representatives of many schools, but blind as yet to the starry heights we might attain in high school. Then we were as a mass without form un- til we were divided into our numerous session rooms where we were individually sponsored. Blindly we stumbled along until the days of awakening should come. As a start into the stellar kingdom we were given a sophomore party where we learned of the possibilities before us and wondered. With this gleam of light-to-be wel hastened along. In our junior year came the real awaken- ing. Election of officers under the super- vision of the Student Council placed four bright and shining lights in our midst. There developed a constellation which we called our H o u s e of Representatives, from our ranks a representative for each home room went to dwell in the nebular circle. Lesser groups sprang from these, one of which, called the Entertainment Committee, furnished our amusements for the coming year. At last we were becoming a significant part of the school. From our world we of January '26 sent glittering comets to blaze in the sky. Many of our classmates became members of literary assemblages, others sought drama, art and athletics as a means of self-expression. Though we may have been considered slow in reaching our place in the firma- ment there was always foremost in our minds the ideal of sending forth planets that would be lasting instead of meteors that would be conspicuous for a short time -only to sink into oblivion. Finally our senior year arrived bring- ing with it election of officers. With this, new stars came into existence. Under their management we had our first senior party. Following this were our class days, our 12A party and final class night. Of course we were not all bright and shining lights but the majority of us man- aged to be nebulae glowing a little if only enough to make a fitting background for congeniality among our members. In grateful remembrance of our many happy associations together we wish to ex- press our appreciation to the faculty, especially to Mrs. Nellie P. Rosebaugh and Mr. J. Bahner, faculty advisers. BETTY GOOD History of Class of June '26 I N an old copy of the Glenville Torch, we note a front page cartoon, illustrating the wanderings of a group of sophomores in the halls and recesses of Glenville. Just below that bit of art is found a good sized headline "G L E N V I L L E ' S BEAUTY BACK." Our disappointment is profound when we discover that this head does not, unfortunately, refer to the beautifying effects of an aggregation of sophomores, but rather to improvements on the front lawn. Our grief becomes still more poign- ant when we discover that the sophomores whose aesthetic virtues are thus denied are none other than the class of June, 1926. It was about this time that a large num- ber of blushing sophomores began to wish that there had not been so many architectural afterthoughts in the build- ing. The system of building additions as needed may swell capacity, but it also produces some rooms rather elusively tucked away in odd corners. However, Perseus, unraveled the mys- tery of the labyrinth. In a like manner 68 The Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 the Glenville tangle gave up its secrets in the course of time. In due course, the class, speaking in a general way, advanced into the 10A class- ification, rolling up, in the process, an honor roll which outranked that of other classes. In this semester, the boys received a helpful bit of advice when, under the aus- pices of the Hi-Y club, they were ad- dressed by Mr. J. L. Bethune on the sub- ject "Keeping Fit." April saw the presentation of "Dulcy" a production which scored an unrivalled success. Thursday, May 29, was a memorable day for sophomore boys of other than aquatic proclivities. That was the date of the Military Field Meet, when several thousand cadets stood about Gordon Park while mud oozed through their shoes and icy rain water trickled down their respec- tive necks. With this watery benediction the first year at Glenville closed. The opening of the 11B year gave that highly prized opportunity of directing trusting sophomores to varied places of interest, such as the third floor swimming pool and basement roof garden, both easily accessible by means of the elevator. As is the custom, January came, and with it accession into the 11A division. An increasingly large number began to realize that the school activities offered an attractive and beneficial field. Torch, Re- flector, athletics, and clubs attracted large numbers. A debate team which included five 11A's won the city championship, bringing to Glenville a large silver cup. This year, too, was marked by Glen- ville's first carnival, which, through the co-operation of school organization, was made a complete success. But the event which, probably more than all others, marked the emerging of the 11A's from their stage of incubation, was the organization of the class. Before that, it had not been a real concrete body. Now, however, a House of Representa- tives was organized, a chairman elected, and the class set to its work as a concrete, formidable entity. Rings were ordered, colors selected, and the inevitable dance given. This affair was held on May Day, 1925, which was also observed as class day. Perhaps the consummation which brought most clearly to our minds our advanced state was when we were en- trusted with the duty of organizing the Senior Sponsors. It brought forth more clearly the contrast since the days' when we, sophomores ourselves, had been guided about Glenville. After officers had been elected for the Senior year, the class held a dance, the date being November 25. With the graduation of the February class, our last semester in high school came upon us. For some, studies became a surprisingly engrossing matter, as the specter of graduation points and college entrance examinations began to peer threateningly over the horizon. For others, the semester brought increased efforts in activities, efforts to make Glen- ville life fuller and richer outside of the classroom. ' Thus the formal history of our class is brought to a close. But this is not the true history of our life at Glenville. That is not a thing that can be represented by black blotches on white print paper. That, the true history of Glenville's meaning and gifts to us, can be found only in the hearts of us who have received from her inspira- tion to do things worthy of her name, and from her too mea.ns wherewith to turn these aspirations into deeds, deeds which, when annuals are gone, and school records have mouldered, will be the true index of our debt and affection to Glenville. J AMES MCGUIRE , .-,A -- ,. Aw 1-, ., .':-:.u I , ,... I V. ,.: x .. 'W -.Q fi-zfjgifiyr 11,1-i: 31-I.-.1 ' -,mp V. -- -. Lp-,.1:,'.-::-..'- - 51, ,tiflig Qs: . ,ZL I: .I fl gg. .. ,wi T.,-I 3515:-1-5 I .t ' S.-3-gl , .S ,, . 5' iff sf If ' v,f."f- ,2. gpg ., l 1 61-5 A .12-22115562 5-,'f5!kF'f: , :vga .-gf.-432 -'I'.' I1'.I'1'In - .gf ,. -.331 . .4 , . M. ,N .,,- --a .jf V., ,4 1. . sv n-f,. I-,, 1... -. -1 H .,. ., ,. el. ..'l??:"E.' , A :AA.nss - pg 2 .. i , 4-'L X rs' , ,.:. , ff Q.. , V 1 f'i"'v ' --,-,.-g.:'.:1.-- - ' 2 -1.:E:r: 'T +L ' ' A If V, 'M f, gk , , 1' as M -'J Q K' ul HY5' HD if 'GZ' 1' . f l 'M 1 B If , ' fi. -gal 1. F1 E' '52 :tl .139 5 'P x ""f. , -15' L Yf V "'v- 7' fi' 4' WZ4,fl.' 2' P A .gi 4 X 5 L2 jzf H' + I X 9' X7- affe ' '1 rf A JUG Q ll V ' ry xr Q 1 1 L jk, 2 sn. ., Q x 1,-e X 21, . Q A -V7 JXQLW: 1 X , R Q: ,, Lift 1 ight, ,MQ N , ,H Ss s if W .v 1 N dref . .Pxrcbifecfs of Fixle jfs :-z,f. '::: :1. Thermometers and Thrills 70 The Olympiad,CLASSES 1926 MARTHA hadn't been in the hospital long enough to get used to the smell of iodoform and painful cleanliness. She still perked up her ears at the sound of rubber heels approaching and as for les- sons, they were still an unscorned and un- dreaded pastime. She took a constant joy in standing in front of the window in her little cubby-hole of a room and prac- tising the art of shaking a little medical thermometer. It was quite a trick.. It had taken her four weeks to master the art of twisting her wrist at the proper time, but now she was perfect, and so she took the temperatures of everybody in the building, a.nd when she had finished with people, she started on things and tested the cocoa and the milk and even ruined one thermometer by poking it at an elec- tric iron to see how hot was hot enough. They at the hospital had a lot of faith in Martha because she had some common- sense, and so when the flu epidemic hit Charleston and it was necessary to keep all medical attendants in the place on duty till they could no longer stand up and maybe longer, they put Martha in charge of four dangerously ill men who were due for a crisis at any time. They were placed in the four corners of the room and Martha was in the center with an oxygen pump and a pan of ice and a little hot-water heater and told to do what she could. Martha was not quite sure about how to use the oxygen pump and she was still hazy on when to use an ice pack, and when a hot-water bottleg but she was sure of her little thermometer, so she spent the first ten minutes sticking it in the men's mouths and marking the results on her little chart. When she had a com- plete list of temperatures, there didn't seem to be much else to do, so she sat down to watch and wait. She had tied a little shade around the light bulb in the center of the room and the dimness of the room made her feel a little drowsy. She forced herself to be alert and her sharp- ened senses were acutely aware of the breathing in the room. The slightest deviation from regularity in respiration had her sitting tense with one hand reaching to the pump and the other to her thermometer. One man woke up and asked her for a glass of water. She gave it to him, only to find him too weak to hold it. It spilled all over the bed and her apron. The man was gasping and so she forebore scolding him and changed the sheets in silence. By the time she had heated a little more water and was pre- pared to give it to him herself, he had gone back to sleep and was quiet and seem- ingly comfortable. It wasnit many minutes till the man in the other corner was calling for her. She felt irritated with him. He was so big and lean and generally strong looking that it seemed impossible that he should be cry- ing, yet crying he was, with long passion- ate sobs that shook his whole sturdy frame. Large watery globules rolled down his cheeks and formed in little puddles on the wrinkled pillow. He made Ma.rtha come close and hold his hand. He said he was homesick. He had a nice room in a board- ing house a.nd the board was paid for two weeks ahead. If he didn't pull through the night, he would be twelve dollars out. He wanted to go to his little room and draw crayon portraits of movie actresses. All this delirious chatter made Martha quite shivery. Suppose he shouldn't pull through? She had never met death be- fore, and the idea made her nervous. She pulled her hand away from him and sought to quiet him with the glass of water she had offered the first man. But he refused it. He kept babbling about his little room, and finally in desperation she put her little thermometer in his mouth and then he couldn't talk. She cou1dn't leave it there forever and when she took it out he kept up his pite- ous weeping. "Hush up, Archie," she hissed at him. "You'll wake the others up and then they'll all cry. You're all right. You're fine. Now go to sleep." Archie was not reasonable. And Martha sat down in disgust to watch her little fiock. The climax came at about three- thirty. One of the quiet men began to breathe fast and audibly. The irregular harshness frightened the girl. He wak- ened slightly and tried to call, but choked GLENVILLE HIGH SCH L 71 instead and twisted in hideous discomfort. His face was purple with the rush of blood and his thin hands clawed the air in paroxysms of agony. He was doubled up in horrible postures and great tears of ex- quisite suffering rolled silently down his pasty face. Martha was with him in a moment and with trembling fingers adjusted the pipes of the little tank, turned the screw and Watched the bubbles rise. She held the little cone over his face for about six min- utes although to her it seemed years. All the time her eyes were riveted to his twitching features. At last he was quiet. She took away the pump and came up to him. She tried to put him in a more com- fortable position, but his body was stiff and hard. A panicky fear grew on her and she listened for his breathing, There was no sound. Her hand flew to his pulse, but there was no alternate swelling and retraction. His staring eyes were fixed on the light globe on the ceiling. With a queer numbness, Martha drew the sheet over his face. She had not the strength to close his eyes. That must be the work of some one else. She felt faint as she walked to the door to call someone. She had barely opened it when she heard a low chuckle behind her. She wheeled, angry at the inappropriate mirth. There in the center of the room, stood Archie, clad only in his short hos- pital night-gown, and the sheets from his bed over his arm. He bowed low before her. 'Tm goin', Miss Marthy," he said thick- ly. "I gotta go back to my own little home in th' west. Little home inn' west. No place like it. Got to go. Like you a lot, Miss Marthy, but I gotto go. See you on th' Christmas tree-e-e-e-e. Goo'bye." And before she could lift a finger, he had stepped to the window and with un- believable strength fiung it open and stepped out on the sill. With uncanny agility, he grasped the drain pipe and staiited to clamber up the spout to the roo . Martha screamed and hung out the win- dow into the icy air and snatched at his heels, but the effort was vain. He was beyond reach and he only paid enough at- tention to her to loose one hand and wave it drunkenly at her. He swung himself up over the stone cornice and stood up on it, balancing himself sixty-eight feet above the pavement below, and a clean drop all the way down. No wonder Martha's heart stood still. But she was brave and took the only way she could think of out of the dilemma. She tucked her skirts up about her and climbed out of the window and up the pipe after him. She was a good little climber and it wasnft long before she had clutched the lead gutter, and hung there by her ha.nds, swinging in the icy winds, and wishing herself anywhere but where she was. The lead was sharp and cut her, but the tears that rolled down her cheeks were not tears of pain but tears of anger and irritation. She didn't much ca.re what happened to her if only that silly Archie wouldn't go and,kill himself. With infinite pain and exertion she man- aged to pull herself up and over the nar- row cornice, and on it she lay for a short moment to get her breath before she went on with the pursuit. She looked down the dizzy distance to the bricks below. She swallowed her heart and rose. Bravely, she teetered along the slender stone front after the will-o'-the-wisp of Archie's fluttering night-gown. Past that there was a great field of murky blackness. Archie stooped and peered over. Then he chuckled and sat down letting his ba.re feet dangle over the edge. He turned and saw Martha's white apron and slim black legs hurrying toward him. He called to her, "C'mon. S'nice night. Sit here on the bank with me and we'll go fishin'." He pointed to the black void in front of him. "Nice black river. Nice fish. Black fish. Must be black bass. We'll fish for black bass. Nice fish, black ba.ss. You're nice, too. Miss Marthy, only nicer even than a black bass." He nodded judicially. Martha clutched at his arms, and hung on desperately. She was afraid that he might try to go wading in his nice black river. "Archie," she said pleadingly. "Archie, listen to me. We're here at the river, but we have to go back to the ward. I forgot my gloves and I'm cold, and I don't know how to get back. What shall we do ?" Archie chuckled. "S'easy. Ask me sump'm hard. We'll swim across." And he actually put an arm around her and 72 The Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 started to slide over the edge. Martha leaned back as far as she could and screamed. Her heart missed a full half- dozen beats, but she managed to keep Archie on the stone. But the question remained. Here he was and here she was. But what could they do about it? She didn't know how she could get him back again and she knew that it would be suicide for her to at- tempt to get down the drain pipe. There was no trap-door in the roof and she didn't think it would be safe to shove him down a venilator or a chimney. Must they sit up here in the cold forever? Then Martha proved her worth. She took away one of Archie's sheets and told him to stay where he was till she came for him. Then she wobbled back to the place over the surgery window. She sat down and labored long a.nd hard to make her numb fingers remove her shoe. This shoe she tied to the sheet and swung it down till it was even with the window. Then she lifted it out and pulled it back as hard as she could. The sharp little heel cracked the glass, and she was re- warded by seeing the window fly open and hearing angry voices saying something Helen of Troy The kings that fought for Helen Are gone-like wraiths away, And all their wars are done now And all their hates-for ayeg But he that harped for Helen His fingers strike and strum, Tho Helen's hands are dust now And Helen's lips are dumb. And I dream dreams of Helen As men shall dream for aye Till all the prayers are said then And all our gods are grey. For all the loves of Helen In sweetest words are sung As when Helen's grave was grassy And Helen's fame was young. GERTRUDE SOMERS, Jan. '26 about people who threw stones at hos- pital windows. They saw the sheet and gazed upward. Martha yelled back the story of her predicament and almost wept for joy when the window snapped shut. Twenty minutes later, a fire net was spread below and Martha was ordered in stern tones to make Archie jump into it. All she did was to tell him to dive into the pretty river. Archie chuckled and dove. As soon as he was out of the net and into a blanketed stretcher, Martha bunched up her skirts and jumped too. In a moment she was bounding lightly into the net and then was helped out by slightly amused iiremen. They put Archie into his bed with a straight-jacket around him and left him in Martha's care. She looked at him disgustedly as he began to talk about the nice river and the pretty dive he had made. "Such nice river," he babbled happily. "Like the one at home. Li'l home in'na wes-" ' Martha pulled her thermometer out of her belt and shoved it into his mouth. "Here, hold that," she ordered. WINIFRED STANLEY, June, '26. Two Doors FIRST VOICE Two doors I see In front of me And I shall open one. SECOND VOICE How will you know Which way to go Before you have begun? FIRST VOICE Oh, there are windows in each door And a.ll that I shall do Is raise my heels just off the floor, And peer serenely thru. DAVID REIN, June '26 74 The Olympiad,CLASSEs 1926 vm, vidi, vici CAESAR wasn't to blame, neither was Perrichon 3 both were. It began when the two rivals were placed in the same locker, Perrichon in the upper berth with the hats, and Caesar in the lower with the muddy rubbers and dripping umbrellasg perhaps to remind him of his beloved cam- paigns. Caesar disdained to associate with the bourgeois under any circumstances. This angered the affable Perrichon and each day added to his hate for the celebrity. Whether by accident or design the bour- geois one day shoved a chemistry book from the upper berth onto the be-laurelled head of the soldier-scholar in the lower. The effect would not have been as disas- trous had not some far-sighted student prepared the formulas for use in future tests, which same exploded upon meeting resistance with a hard head. The laurel crown and what there was left of his few scanty locks were blown to--well we can- not say just where. That was not all. Since there was noth- ing to cover up the baldness, Perrichon, with malignant purpose, called attention to it by remarking that the head looked like a billiard ball. Caesar could have easily called out his celebrated tenth legion but he spurned the very thought of it, desiring rather to rely on his own courage and strength. There- fore he challenged his enemy to a duel. The date being set, they combined forces to get out of their metallic castle, as it was too small for such spirited work as duel- ling. We refrain from showing just how the lock was opened for the reason that the imitators Qof which there are manyj of the real Caesar and Perrichon might try it to the pecuniary sorrow of their keepers. At any rate, the coast being clear, the two repared to a secluded spot at the end of a hallway. Perrichon's tempered rapier was much superior to the crude short Roman weapon of Caesar but what the general lacked in steel he made up in skill. For half an hour they warmed each other's blades by slashing, parrying, and thrusting, but neither could wound the other. A terrific, ear-splitting ring sounded just above their heads. All too well they knew its significance, and the wily general with his military knowledge of retreat grasped Perrichon by the arm and pulled him into a nearby locker. The sluice gates being opened, a brightly clothed Hood of humanity poured into the halls. One wave, in balloon trousers, bright shirt and brightly colored bow tie, tore itself free from the noisy Hood and stopped before the locker in which the culprits had hidden themselves. Soon an- other wave joined him. "Say, Bob, you forgot to lock the locker." "I did not." "You did." "Hurry up the bell's gonna ring. Lock it good." All was quiet again and the two found themselves alone. They tried to open the lock and to their dismay found it was so much different from their own that they were unable to open it. Perrichon in wandering about their prison discovered a book on drama and opening it, he cried out, "Great Caesar." "Now what's the matter?" Perrichon plucked something from the page and handed it to the bewildered Caesar. It was a wig, beautifully made, and guaranteed to be human hair. When its use was explained to Caesar, that great man descended from his pedes- tal of dignity long enough to hug the hero of the day and to confer on him the command of the tenth legion. So they lived happily ever after. Jos Boas, Jan., '26, GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 75 And So lt ls- PROLOGUE Before the curtain opens Let me give you just one hint, Beware of the Lord Malbigh For he's as sharp as flint. And when you get a glimpse of Bess, The great Lord's niece, you see, You'll just know she's the heroine But she's fickle as can be. And when that tall, slim man comes in, The one that they call Art, You'1l think that he's the hero Who captures Betsy's heart. The fourth upon my list comes next A man who's called Sir Grey, Who makes the plot come out right when He comes into the play. There still is one more character To make this tale complete, And that's the jolly fiddler whom Throughout the play we meet. Now one more thing before we let The actors start to play, And that is that this scene takes place In the jolly month of May. It happens on the Lord's estate, He's as rich as he can be, And on the stage are Bess and Art In the shade of a willow tree. SCENE I. BESS: But really, Art, if he ever found- ART: But he's out of town, we're safe and sound. BESS: If only I could think that too, But if uncle Robert ever knew, That you've come to see me everyday Ever since he went away. He'd have you exiled from this place And never more I'd see your face. He'd lock me in that old watch tower, He did it once for just one hour, 'Twas bad indeed, 'twas dark and gloom And rats and mice recrossed the room. And then he said, "If't happens again You'll stay there four score days and ten." A Tragic Comedy Shuddering- To think of that old gloomy tower And how I dreaded it that one hour. ART: Oh, Bess, brace up! He won't come yet. Laughing- , Not 'till that tenant pays his debt. BESS: Oh, Art, could I be brave like you, But as you say those things a.re true. Fiddler enters and sings: Oh, what is so nice as a wedding in June, When you and I sit 'neath the magical moon, And think pleasant thoughts and forget days gone by, Of the sorrows and cares, and forget how to sigh. BESS: Oh, what a sweet song, and indeed it is true, But I do hope that uncle will never see you. ART: Ha, ha, the old rogue! He won't see us to- gether, He must be out boating in this lovely weather. There's a noise at the gate, And the sound of a horse, And the voice of Lord Malbigh Gruff, rough, loud and coarse. BESS fstartledj : Oh, come, let us flee, 'tis the Lord at the gate. QThey run, but he sees them, alas, 'tis too late.J LORD: Ho, ho! what is this, the old saying is true, When cat is away-, Mr. Leigh is it you? Sternly- Miss Betsy come here and explain this to me. So you like the old tower? Hm? Speak up quickly! Pause- Well, what is the matter, have you naught to say? The niece of a Lord with this fool, Mr. Leigh. 76 The Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 If ever this news reaches London, you'll hear, My name connected with Mr. Leigh's bier. And now Mr. Leigh leave this garden at once. To the tower, Miss Betsy! No more of your stunts. BESSZ Oh, uncle, forgive me just this one time, please. ART, kneeling- Yes, do sir, I pray thee on my bended knees. LORD: No! My word is law! As for you, sir, please go, Ne'er more must I see you, or with just one blow, I'll do for you, sir. Now, Miss Bess to the tower, Go get yourself ready. I'll give you one hour. FIDDLER: Oh, what is so nice as a wedding in June, When you and I sit 'neath the magical U, moo And think- CVoice dies out in the distancej CURTAIN The curtain drops to indicate That fifteen days have gone, Since Betsy was imprisoned And Arthur Leigh had Hown. SCENE II. BETSY, in tower- Oh, how I hate this wretched life, 'Tis filled with naught but pain and strife. Noise outside window- A sound? Is it true? Again? What is that? In my prison I've heard but the mouse and the rat. Goes to window- Is it Art? Why it can't be! Uncle'd surely see him. ART: Is it you, Betsy, dear? This is Art, I sneaked in. We are safe, for your uncle is giving a dance. And, by my side, Betsy, I have a strong lance. So climb down this ladder that I brought for you- CUncle Robert who has followed Art raises dagger-J UNCLE Z Strike! Oh, dagger! Oh, strike, strike straight and strike true. Art falls to the ground and calls in a dying voice: Betsy-Dear-Goodbye-oh, goodbye. BETSY, weeping- Oh, Art, I can't-I won't let you die. ART dies? LORD: 'Tis good for the rogue for I warned him, too. And now Mistress Betsy, I'll see about you. Well-knowing this fool can no more haunt this place, You may come down stairs. QBETSY comes down.J Why such a sad face? FIDDLERZ Oh, what is so nice as a wedding in June. When you and I sit 'neath the magical moon. LORD : Hush up there, old fellow. Not one more song! Get out of this garden! Go where you belong! CURTAIN "tAuthor's note: Dramatically, please read this part, Where dies the lover, namely, Art. For if you don't you'11 lose the fun, And all in vain my work was done. The curtain drops once more to say That two years have passed by, Since we saw Bess in the garden Of her Uncle Lord Malbigh. SCENE III. Now again Bess is 'neath the willow, But this time with Sir Grey, And she seems truly happy In this jolly month of May. GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 77 SIR GREY : Lord enters: And then, Betsy, dear, we'll be married in And now- But what is this my friend, June. A courtship? Oh, hark--what is that? Bigsgg Ah, what a sweet tune. YES, 'tis true. , LORD: FIDDLER' . Oh come and kneel my children Oh, what is so nice as a wedding in June, Ana please may Goa bless you ' When nyou and I sit 'neath the magical CURTAIN ' moo . PHYLLIS RosE, June, '26. A Tale of Patagonia SEVERAL years ago, when I was repre- senting a New Jersey oil company in South America, I received instructions from my manager to make a trip to Pata- gonia in the southwestern part of Argen- tine. My work was to locate various con- cessions granted to us by the government. I took as my companion the very eminent Spanish geologist, Doctor Figurroa. He's a good fellow and a fine companion for such a lonesome trip as we had to make. Patagonia is practically barren of all vege- tation except a small growth of hardy bushes. Well, we started across the Pampa on burros, using four altogether-two for luggage and two for ourselves. We rode this Way for about two days. By the end of the second day we were within about twenty miles of our destination when we were forced to stop on account of dark- ness. It was barely six when we awoke the next morning. While I was packing up our trappings, the doctor went out to un- strap from the mules enough food for breakfast. Almost as quickly as he went, he reappeared with a look of utter dismay on his face. The mules were gone! All our food was gone, and we were miles from any living person. At first we were desperate. After care- ful consideration we decided that we were a full three-days walk from the Indian vil- lages in the foothills of the Cordilleras and five days from Commodore Rivadavia. On account of the wind and sand storms, walking would be exceedingly difficult, but it was the only thing to do. We packed up our few remaining things in a short time and set out for the Indian villages. All day long we walked with no food. By nightfall we came to a place where there was some sage brush growing. The doctor suggested that we cook the roots for supper, so while he was gather- ing them, I collected a few bits of wood to make a fire. Soon an ugly-looking mess was boiling over my ill-constructed fire. Both of us were weak from our long walk and lack of food, so we talked but little. Suddenly, as I was digging my heels into the sand, I unearthed the queerest- looking object. It was like a large, black rock. I examined it for a few minutes and then handed it across to the doctor. "Doctor," I said, "what kind of a rock do you call that ?" The doctor drew a small magnifying glass from his pocket and examined very intently all the peculiarities of the object. After about five minutes, he said: "Well, whatever it is, I'm sure it isn't a rock." "Well," I declared, "you geologists are supposed to know everything there is to know about such things. What is it, if it isn't rock?" "It surely is beyond me. I never saw its like before. Then since the roots were ready to eat, he tossed it into the fire and we began our meager meal. 78 The Olympzad, CLASSES 1926 It was fully thirty minutes later that the doctor noticed that the black rock had cha.nged color. When he tool: it from the fire he perceived that it had turned red and was exceedingly soft and spongy. I watched him very intently as he felt it, ex- amined it, smelled it, and finally broke a piece off and put it into his mouth. Sud- denly a curious look came into his face. "What is it?" I exclaimed. "What is the trouble ?" "Just taste it yourself," he replied. Accordingly I ate a small particle of it. "It tastes just like corned-beef," I said. "That's exactly what it is. It's corned- beef." "How do you explain that?" "Well, you see," declared the doctor, "This is a nitrate bed where we are. Prob- ably some cattle, crossing the Pampa were frozen to death or starved, and the salt preserved the meat, and in time it was changed to corned-beef." Within a few days we reached the In- dian villages and from there to Commo- dore Rivadavia. Here we sold half our claim to a man by the name of Moore. When Moore arrived in Patagonia he planted cabbages. Now the Patagnia In- dians go to Moore's for corned-beef and cabbage. MARGARET COMYNS, Jan., '26, Faber Quisque Fortunae Suae S surely as the world is old, all pro- Agress, all artistic achievement, all beauty-in-life is the result of individual efort. Somewhere it has been Said that the history of civilization is a record of individual attainment through the ages, that one man like Descartes has by the might of his transcendent genius set civilization centuries ahead of what it would be had he not lived. Civilization today is passing slowly and surely into the dark mists of a new dark age, of the triumph ,of matter over spirit, of the machine over the maker, of the mass over the unit. If we would save it a descent into Avernus, we must struggle free from the paralyzing grip of standardization. We must not stifle the individual spirit, but rather give it light and air and warmth, that it may grow. Education alone can preserve civilization, and education forgets its mission. For if the purpose of education is not to a.rouse in every boy and girl a fine self-consciousness of his and her place in the cosmic Scheme of things, a glory in his and her kinship to a creature so infinite in foresight, so splendid in creation, as man, and a burn- ing desire to add to the marvelous heritage of man called civilization-then education is worth little. To bring to life the will to be and do, the creative impulse, the pride in building,-that is the object of education. In brief, the purpose of all learning, all teaching, is to awaken the artistic spirit in the individual where it lies dormant. For everyone is a potential artist in the supreme art of living. The great tragedy of the world is that not everyone knows this. "Know thyself," remains life's injunction to man. For if one knows himself, he knows all that is great. "Man is the measure of the universe." If man is to justify his ex- istence, he must be of worth to mankind. That is the good old doctrine, so familiar to theologians of a by-gone day, of salva- tion by good Works. It is what Long- fellow, himself not of the greats, knew and urged. The poet symbolizes civilization as a lofty cathedral, perhaps never to be com- pleted through all eternity, but always and always to reach to the stars, slow stone on stone, and every stone is a part of the mighty splendor. From foundation to top- less towering spires it ascends by the pain- fraught labor of everyone who has ever lived. "All are architects of Fate." Some of the builders are of surpassing skill and some are humble stone-cutters. Some lay the solid foundations, and some fashion cunningly the lovely tinted glass, and heavy Silks and exquisitely wrought candelabra. Some shape the hot metal in- to heavy brazen tubes, and others, gifted, GLENVILLE HIGH SCH ooL 79 draw golden thunder from the solemn organ. But all contribute. Each must shape truly with the artist's passion for perfection, for "the gods" of conscience are everywhere. Though no one sees or hears, their trumpet blasts bring the walls of our lives about our feet in ruin, if we work not truly, and no one knows except ourselves. There have been superbly great artists in the art of living. Jesus, Plato, Leo- nardo, Shakespeare, Beethoven, Bacon have, unaided, constructed splendid walls and marvelous delicate ornamentation for the cathedral. But "Nothing is useless, nothing is low." One in generations may be formed in Nature's mysterious molds of genius. Shall we, then despairing of greatness, be idle? Rather it should be an incentive, a source of inspiration, to think that we have lived on the same earth with a master builder. It is a high privilege to create, to live. Do not fling it careless- ly away. Build today, strong and sure as you are able. We do not know the future. W'e had best live the life we haveg but let us live as artists, builders and architects of the temple of civilization. JOSEPH FRIEND.-June '26 Laocoon fAeneid Bk. II Lines 199-2275 Still must we tremble to newer fears Behold this horror that now appears! Laocoon, chosen Neptune's priest, Was slaying the sacrificial beast When lo! Swift over the tranquil sea From Tenedos-frightful memory - Smoothly shoreward, side by side, Through the waves twin serpents glide. Red crests upreared, huge tails behind, In sinuous folds their bodies wind, Their swishing coils lash the seething deep, They have gained the shore-straight course they keep- Bloody eyes darting fork'd fire They lick their jaws in hissing ire. We fly the sight, struck panic-pale, We know for whom this venomed bale Is meant. First strangling folds they lay Around his sons, and swiftly slay The wretched boys, each rending each. Then as the father to the beach Mad with grief at the monstrous sight With brandished sword and puny might Rushes to slash the deadly coils, Swift weave the writhing, sinewy toils Twice, circling waist and throat and thigh, Death twines about him-death looms high., Frantic with pain and crazed with fear, The frenzied victim strains to tear The crushing coils from his body, wet With poisonous slime, and bloody sweat. His death screams rattle to the skies. When the wounded bull at the altar dies Thus do his bellowings crack the air. Their work is over,-speedy lair The serpents find in their gliding flight. In Pallas' temple, and Pallas' might. She guards the harbingers of doom,- The dread executioners find room At the goddess' feet, beneath her shield, Trojan gods to Grecian yield. JOSEPH F. FRIEND, June '26 8 eOlympiad,CLASSES 19 GL1-:NVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 81 Richard Bothwellis HComehack" I TEN years in jail had not shut out the awful sound of the sentence which rang in Richard Bothwell's ears night and day-the sentence which doomed him to life imprisonment for the murder of Frank Boyd. Only ten years had he spent here? Incredible! It seemed to him that he had already spent a life-time brooding in that dark cell. Now when he was be- coming resigned to his fate, now when even the injustice done him ceased to stir him to terrible and futile wrath, now, the real murderer had confessed. The irony of it! If it had not been for the train accident which had killed John Calvin, giving him barely time to confess his crime, leaving everyone in the dark as to his motive, Richard would still be sitting in his cell waiting with mute despair for the Grim Reaper to end his life vigil. Against his volition, pictures of his childhood came to him. The little town where he had spent his happy boy-hood days came back to him with remarkable clearness. Frank and he had been rivals in ath- letics before pretty Margaret Rider had come to Cedarsville. Her arrival marked the beginning of their rivalry in love. They vied with one another in their ef- forts to discover who held the greater favor in her eyes. Margaret's two cava- liers were, for a time, the joke of the town. One of the favorite pastimes of the town gamblers who frequented Riley's Pool Room was betting on whether Dick or Frank would take Margaret to the com- ing dance. Margarent, however, wended her merry way, showing no partiality or preference, distributing her favors equally and indiscriminately. So the years passed until Margaret's twentieth birthday arrived, bringing with it a turning point in Dick's care-free life. At her party, Margaret adopted a course which she had never used before, never had she been so sweet to Frank, never so tantalizing and indifferent to poor Dick. Frank, flaunting his victory in front of Dick, made the most of his triumph. Strange, however, no one dared to tease Dick. His face seemed to warn his friends that the days of teasing were over. Even the announcement of Frank and Margar- et's engagement which came as a complete surprise to everyone did not make him dis- play the emotion which the guests ex- pected of him. Only the pallor of his face and the stricken look in his eyes showed the shock he had received. The tenseness in the air deepened as Frank, intoxicated with happiness and something more potent than happiness, continued to make re- marks about "It is better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all." At last, unable to bear it longer, Dick departed. In a daze, not knowing or car- ing where he went, he started to walk. He walked until the first faint streaks of dawn reminded him that another day of suffering had begun for him and that he had to go back and face the pity of his friends. He was surprised to see how far he had walked. Stores were open and the whole town was awake by the time he reached his home. Exhausted, he threw himself upon his bed and, worn out as he was by his night of tramping and pain, he was soon asleep. He was awakened by the incessant ring- ing of the door-bell. Still half asleep, Dick opened the door to the sheriff, who, with- out preliminaries, informed him that he was wa.nted for the murder of Frank Boyd. Dick never knew what happened after that. His next recollections were of the town jail where he vainly protested his in- nocence, and of his trial where all hope of clearing himself fled. His story of his long walk and the statement that he had not reached home until morning were openly ridiculed. Few of his friends pro- fessed faith in his innocence--some even went so far as to say he could scarcely be blamed. Only the lack of conclusive evi- dence kept him from being hanged. As it was, he was sentenced to life imprison- ment. Ah would he ever forget the words of the sentence: "Richard Bothwell, you have been found guilty after a fair trial by the jury of this court for second degree murder, the penalty for which is imprison- 82 The Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 ment in the state penitentiary for the re- mainder of your natural life." Would he ever forget the staring crowds pushing and jostling each other to get a last glimpse of the murderer before he was led away? l II "What references?" asked the portly man sitting behind the desk. 'Tm sorry. I haven't any." The an- swer came slowly and with reluctance as if the speaker had gone through the scene many times and knew what would follow his admission. "No references? Why not?" Dick straightened his shoulders as the inevitable query which he had been ex- pecting, came. "Well, you see-." And once more Dick told his story, hesitatingly and with a visible effort. How hard it was for him to tell it no one would ever know. Again, however, the telling was useless. "Sorry, my boy, but we can't afford to employ ex-convicts. I know it wasn't your fault but you can see our position, I'm sure." Dick turned away mechanically. Past experiences had taught him the futility of both pleas and arguments. What was the use of trying? For three months he had met with repeated rebuffs which had stripped from him his last shred of pride. "Dire necessity," he reflected bitterly, "would make the proudest man immune to rebuffisf' Wearily, with a weariness which came from a tired soul, not from a tired body, Dick climbed the stairs of the tenement house which he called home. As he opened the door of his dingy room, a dog shot out as if released from a bow and with joyful barks and wild leaps tried to demonstrate his over-flowing exuberance. He was just the kind of a dog boys would molest-the kind which seems to be of every breed know nor imagined-the kind which is forever tormented by boys intent upon tying cans to their poor victim's tails. In- deed, Dick had found him in that very predicament and had promptly adopted him. The little mongrel pup had become his confidant to Whom he poured out his troubles, his hopes and ambitions. "Down, Buddy, down l" Dick stood for a moment irresolute. "One quarter left, Buddy. l.et's toss to see whether we have a feast tonight for it or whether we fast tonight and eat tomorrow. If we feast, we'll go for a walk-if we fast, we'll work." Taking out his lone quarter he threw it in the air, watching eagerly as it fell on the table. A shadow crossed his face as he observedthe side upon which the coin had fallen. "No luck, Bud. We fast and work. Well, there's no use cry- ing about it, I've found that out. Let's start, what say ?" Taking out some folded papers he hurriedly scanned the last one and then began to write. It was late when he at last put away his papers and rose from his cramped posi- tion. "Hungry, Buddy? I'm starved! If only I would hear from those publishers, but that would be too good to be true!" Try as he might he could not keep the bitterness from creeping into his words every now and then. III "A letter, Buddy! An honest 'to good- ness letter!" He clutched the missive tightly as he hurriedly re-entered his room. A check fluttered from the letter as his nervous fingers opened it. The check fell unheeded for the moment, how- ever, for his eye had caught one para- graph in the letter which meant more to him than fifty checks. " 'The pathos in your story was admir- ably handled. It shows a real under- standing of suffering and a kean insight into human nature. In short, Mr. Both- well, it is this quality in your story which makes it outstanding. Your work is so commendable that if you will send us-" "The mills of the gods grind slowly," said Dick, as the letter slipped from his grasp. "But," he hastily amended, "Thank God that they grind I" YETTA SILVERSTEIN, Jan., '26. GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 83 On Friends THERE isa certain author, who inthe introduction to his charming book, states that he is, by nature, a rather gloomy, morbid, discontented person, suf- fering from ill-health. Consequently he has named his collection of essays, The Plea- sures of Life,--an inspiration which is, you will say, quite delightful. He includes, among his "Pleasures," music, art, books, health, wealth, ambition, and poetry, but he has forgotten something-something vitally important to happiness and con- tentment,-friends. Cicero has said, long, long ago, "They seem to take away the sun from the world who withdraw friendship from life, for we have received nothing better from the Immortal Gods, nothing more delightful." -and the same statement holds true today. And again, "Every man can tell how many goats or sheep he possesses, but not how many friends." And I truly believe that most of us do not take our friends serious- ly, not half so seriously as our "goats or sheep." We take them for granted, and leave the selection of them to chance. Yet it is our friends who influence our whole lives for good or for evil. Instead of sending up to the heavens a more or less devout prayer of thanks- giving for those few friends we do possess, we come home and announce cheerfully, "I have just quarreled with my best chum. We're not on speaking terms now." But yet, however much worthy and true friends may add to the value of life, we must depend on ourselves,-we are our own best friend or worst enemy. This thought ought to console those un- relenting cynics who aver with scornful lips that there are no friends, there is no friendship, everyone is selfish, mercenary. Of course, there were friends, true and reliable friends, in the "good old days," but in this era of selfishness, greed- friends?- Bah! What a calamity for this world! VVhat an empty heritage should we bequeath to posterity! Fortunately, it is not true. The thought itself is only the mirage of a disillusioned, bitter soul. There are friends in the world today, many of them, but like all great blessings and great trea- sures, theygmust be patiently and diligent- ly sought after and then-most important of all-preserved. Why is it, I wonder, that we think that friendship gives us the privilege of mak- ing ourselves generally disagreeable and obnoxious? We are so thoughtful, so courteous to strangers, to mere acquain- tances, but of our friends, whom we should consider most, we shrug our shoulders and say airily, "Oh, she's an old friend, and she'll understand." Yet after all, accord- ing to the poet, "We know the sight of those we call our friends, and the sound of their voices, but nothing Whatever of their mind or soul." And some people never seem to appreciate their friends till they have lost them. "But," says Ruskin, 'tHe who has once stood beside the grave to look back on the companionship which has been forever closed, feeling how impotent then are the wild love and the keen sorrow, to give one instant's pleasure to the pulseless heart, or atone in the lowest measure to the departed spirit for the hour of unkind- ness, will scarcely incur that debt to the heart which can only be discharged to the dust." Yet distance, time, all other physical elements, even death cannot really sever friendship. This sounds rather paradox- ical, perhaps, but still, if we consider, again with Cicero,-"To me, indeed, Scipio still lives, and will always live: for I love the virtue of that man, and that worth is not and never will be extin- guishedf' Is not that a noble thought? If then, with the great author, we choose our friends for what they are, not for what they have, and if we deserve so great a blessing, then they will be always with us, preserved in absence, and even after death, in the "amber of memory." MARJORIE MEYER, June '26 84 The OZympiad,CLASsES 1926 A Trust That Was Betrayed "Little Bumble-bumble bee, buzzing in the sun, Wont you come and play with me, when your work is done?" THE rhyme above isa very misleading one, for bees do not play. No time have they for such nonsense. They are busy creatures and tolerate no interfer- ence, no matter by whom nor on what oc- casion. There was commotion in the school- yard of the small rural schoolhouse. Helen Holmes, the oldest of the pupils, surrounded by all the other children, save one, was expostulating with the youngest in the school who stood alone a few yards away. "Betty Jane, you'd better go home right now. I said you can't come with us." "Yes, I can too. I can catch butterflies just as well as you can," Betty Jane Knowles retorted. The other was plainly exasperated. "No you can't and we're only wasting time. Oh, it's always like this, you always want to do what we do. You're always tagging along, just as if you can do everything we do. Why you're not even six years old. Now listen here," she implored. "Let us go now and we'll let you do everything we do when you're six years old . Come on now, please! We'll help you across the fence." But Betty Jane had stood adamant until Helen mentioned helping her across the fence. Then she flared up in all her pent- up anger. "You don't need to help me across the fence, Helen Holmes. I can get over myself. And you don't need to think I'm going to play with you when I'm six years old, an' I wouldn't go with you any- how and I'm going straight home, too. Pooh! 's if I couldn't catch butterflies just 's well as you can, an' you an' you an' you an' you, but I wouldn' do it 'cause they're too pretty." With this, she turned abruptly on her heel and started homeward. But she was so blinded by anger that she failed to notice an obstacle in her path. As a re- sult, she lost her equilibrium, a circum- stance which might not have been so exas- perating, if certain young people, who had heretofore been watching with amused in- terest had not burst into loud gudaws of laughter. But with ruffled dignity, she picked herself up and strode onward as best she could with their laughter ringing in her ears. - They watched until she reached the fence. Though she had never climbed it herself, she was nothing loath. But be- fore the onlookers had a chance to realize what was happening, she was hanging by her dress. They ran to her aid and soon she was standing on firm ground again, but the incident only served to make her more incensed. Without a single word of thanks she proceeded on her way. For days afterwards she neither looked at nor spoke to the pupils. The latter were full of the wonders of the butterfly chase, but she scorned them. Alt last Helen, her heart softening toward little Betty Jane, tried to make advances. "Don't you want to see some the butterflies I caught?" she asked. "Hm, think you're smart, just 'cause you can catch butterflies." "Maybe you could catch a bee," taunted someone. This was too much. She would not be made fun of, so, without thinking what the results might be, she answered hotly, "I could too." "Ho, ho, Betty Jane says she can catch a bee," traveled from one to another until Betty was surrounded by all those who had participated in the incident in which she had so lowered her dignity. Poor little Betty Jane! She was en- tangled in a web of her own weaving. To go back was unspeakable, to go ahead meant certain disaster. Not that she real- ized what the disaster might be, but she was keen enough to know that she had made a startling, incredible statement. As she wavered, she was aware of jeers. Then, all of a sudden, sunshine flooded her face. The solution had dawned upon her. "'Course I can," she boasted. "I'll show you tomorrow." "Tomorrow? She's scared," re-echoed through the group. "No I'm not," she replied, "but my-I GLENVILLE HIGH SCH L 85 -," here she thought quickly, "my mother told me to come home right after school." "We'll let 'er go. She'll show us tomor- row." Many winks were exchanged at this remark, but everyone began to saunter home. That evening, Mr. Knowles noticed that his little daughter was fidgety. He did not know to what to attribute this. "Per- haps," he thought, "she is nervous because she is starting regular school tomorrow." In most country schools, a.s was the case in this school, one started regular work when he attained the age of six. "Just think," he mused to his wife, "our little Betty Jane will be six years old tomor- row. She'll be quite a voung lady." He regarded Betty Jane affectionately. This was just the opening that was needed. Betty Jane came closer to her daddy and queried, "Will I really be a young lady, an' I'll be real big, an' nobody can hurt me, an' I won't be five years old no more, an'-and I'll be different, won't I?" she ended breathlessly. Mr. Knowles was taken aback at this voluble outburst. "I guess so," he responded vaguely. Betty was satisfied. She was safe. After she had gone to bed, he inquired of his wife, "What can she mean by being different?" "Oh," Mrs. Knowles laughed, "that's just a little theory of her own. The dear child seems to have gotten the idea that on her sixth birthday a miracle is going to happen to her. I've always told her that when she becomes six, I'm going to let her do certain things I don't trust her to do yet. I fear she's going to be disillusioned. She expects to awake an entirely different person with all kinds of unbelievable powers. For the last six months she's been asking how many days before her birth- day." Poor little Betty Jane! If she had only heard them it might have saved her many heartaches. She truly expected the mir- acle to happen. Some supernatural power would protect her. All through the night, her dreams were filled with bees-big bees and little bees. She sat upon a throne in the schoolyard. Bees waited upon her, bees with long, spindly legs and arms. They walked around on thin air and when anyone atempted to approach her he was stopped by a horde of bees. It was no small wonder then, that when she awoke the next morning she believed herself im- mune from harm. As school neared its close that day, everyone was feverish with excitement. At last the bell rang. From then on Betty Jane reigned supreme. She strutted out with the school at her heels. "'S'pose Iill have to catch a bee," she uttered, feign- ing indifference, "or else you won't think I can do it. Now I'll show them. They don't know I'm six today,', she said glee- fully to herself. Nonchalantly she approached a bush around which several bees were Hitting aimlessly. Suspense ran high among the watchers. As if it were an everyday oc- curence to her, she reached out her hand and grasped the nearest bee, then holding it tightly out she glared with animosity about her. "Well, I'll be-" "Didja ever-" "Of all the-" It was all they could utter. They stood spell-bound. Betty, clever as she was, thought this was the proper time to depart, so depart she did, leaving them staring after her, dumfounded. Before she had advanced more than a few paces, alack for her! The bee began to feel uncomfortable. At first it had tol- erated its close quarters, but now it began to long for the rosebush again. Just one moment after it decided this, Betty ut- tered one long, piercing shriek. Sobbing she stumbled home, her hand smarting with pain. "Why, Betty Jane, what has happened ?" Mrs. Knowles cried upon seeing her daughter's tear-stained face. "The-the--the-the old bee, he-he- he-he stinged melnshewhimperedin reply. Without wasting further words, the proper aid was administered. Soon the sobs died down and Mrs. Knowles was able to gain a rather disconnected account of what had happened. "I-I guess the old bee didn't know it was my birthday," she ended drowsily, and tired after the exertions of the day, she fell asleep. Somehow the story leaked out, that little Betty Jane Knowles had placed such sub- lime trust in her sixth birthday that she had defied nature and caught a bee. Need- less to say, the incident was not soon for- tt . go en BEss1E GOLDSTEIN, June, '26 The Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 High School Life Oh, a wonderful stream is the river of Time As it liows through the realm of fears. With an even flow and a musical chime With a desperate struggle, a surge sub- lime As it numbers our High School years. MABLE STONE, June '26 Photos At last our task is over, Our work is now all done. Our photo's in the Annual A picture of everyone. As I gaze on those faces, The winsome looks and smiles, The eyes that dance and 'twinkle Their looks my heart beguiles. Yet down deep in my system I feel for those poor folk 'Cause I too, was a victim I felt the heavy yoke. Mayhap I'll tell my story It may help some poor soul To bear up till the finish, Tho work will take its toll. '25 th A mi v O9 .QC 366 0-X6 6 The hardships at the finish Are worse than all the rest 'Tis then one gets one's picture Ta'en at and in his best. The outcome is "just awful" You hardly know yourself You hate to think of it reposed On anyone else's shelf. But when "he" says they're middling That you're better looking than they, You neatly "step" a Charleston And shout hip-hip-hooray! You feel you're greatly flattered You know "his" words are true. You're friends will say in consent They're not a bit like you. odleb 'Ok Q-It W o L S2 9 Q e, QS . I X Nllxoq ' 'fa 2' is WW . :Z x 4012. GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 87 The Call BARTON HOUSE-yes, there it stood, that long, low, rambling house set far back from the road. There was the thick pond sunk deep into the little valley before the building and-there in the tall grass at the edge of the water one fluffy white duck nestled. A lonely white duck it was which emphasized the barren lifelessness of the whole place. In the soft gray twilight of this par- ticular J une evening the scene lay peace- f'ully before me. I lingered by the mas- sive gate, wondering why the house had always haunted me-fascinated me since childhood. X The evening star came out and was re- flected in the velvet blue waters of the pond-a lonely, twinkling star which made the heavens seem more vast. As I stood there, the events of five years ago came rushing to my mind-the in- cident of my first visit to Barton House, that gruesome adventure. I shuddered. "Mister is that house haunted?" With a jolt I found myself again in the present and turning, I saw a small dark- eyed boy staring wonderingly at the dim outlines of Barton House. "Of course it's not haunted, child! Who has been telling you such silly stories?" But the child, frightened by my sharp tones, ran off. HF DF PK The telephone on my desk buzzed in- sistently-irritatingly. I lifted the re- ceiver. "Doctor Grant's office. Yes, Grant speaking. An emergency case? 11307 St. Clair Avenue-yes, I'll be over as soon as possible." 11307-11307--why! It was my haunt- ed house! Barton House. What could it mean? There was no one living there, I had seen that in the early evening. Now a call had come from there for a doctor. But there was no time to ponder over such questions. A doctor's duty is to assist and I, just beginning my practice, was sorely in need of patients. Hurriedly I left the office. '44 Pk FF Again Irstood before the entrance of the Barton Estate. I walked slowly up the path to the building and mounted the steps. After lifting the knocker I waited expectantly for an answer. There was none. As I walked over and looked in the window an uncanny feeling came over me -a feeling that someone was watching every move I made. I returned to the door and knocked again. There was no response. Again I walked over to the window and peered in-nothing but thick, black impenetrable darkness met my eye-that and nothing more. As I started down the pa.th I turned for a last look at the mysterious house, and there, at the very window into which I had looked, a faint light glimmered! A light in a deserted house! I always say that my sense of duty made me return to the house-the thought that perhaps some- one lay in there too ill to answer the door. But, in my heart I knew that it was the old fascination that the house had for me, my old love for the mysterious, that made me return. I walked up the steps and tried the door. It opened and I' entered, seeing nothing but a flickering candle set on the grand piano at the far end of the room. That was all-no sign of human beings-noth- ing but weird, dancing shadows cast by the flickering candle. Gaunt, suggestive shadows which loomed about me and en- veloped me in their blackness! Suddenly the feeling of being watched came over me again. A pair of eyes seemed to stare at me from the opposite wall which lay in black shadow. I strode to the piano and, picking up the candle, I searched all parts of the room. And there, on the wall facing the door, I found the eyes which had been watching me. Glit- tering black eyes, set in a face which was a net work of wrinkles, glared down at me from the painting hung on the wall! A painting of old Barton Elliston. Never have I seen hatred so well por- trayed. The mouth smiled-a strange, inscrutible smile but in the eyes gleamed hatred, a fierce resentful hatred for all human kind. As I stood there staring at those eyes I realized that there was al- most a tender gleam in them if one looked a certain way. 88 T iz e Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 Then I felt a stir behind me-someone had slipped by me. I turned and saw a faint gray shadow moving towards the piano. "StopI" I screamed in my excitement. But the figure strode purposely towards the instrument. I followed, trembling, still holding the candle. And just before I slipped into unconsciousness I perceived the gray, transparent figure of a young girl, seated at the piano. Suddenly she struck a few chords, them putting her head upon her arms she sobbed, "Grand- father-Grandfather Barton! Come back to me!" My last thought was: "That accounts for the tender gleam in those eyes." Then I knew no more. Ik Pk lk It was dawn when I awoke, the room, bathed in a ruddy glow, seemed an un- likely setting for the incidents of the pre- ceding night. I looked about me. There was no sign of a picture, no candle--nothing but the Why Rip Van Winkle Fell Asleep Now here's the sad, sad story of Old Rip Van Winkle's nap. He slept for twenty years, it's said, In some wild mountain gap. When Rip was just a little boy Each night up late he'd stay, And lose such hours and hours of sleep He drowsier grew each day. And then when he grew up he found He could hardly keep awake, So he lay down in the mountain gap His sleep to overtake. A moral this sad story tells For children young and old: Don't be a Rip Van Winkle Go to bed when you are told. DoRoTHY LEAVITT, June, '26 huge piano at the far end of the room- but, on the piano lay a yellowed news- paper. I knew it had not been there last evening. As I lifted the paper, glaring headlines met my eye, "June Elliston-heiress com- mits suicide in home." The account stated that six months a.fter her grandfather's death the girl, grief stricken at being 'left alone in the world, had killed herself. I looked at the date on the paper-five years ago to the very day! Slowly I left the house. Outside the massive gate, I lingered for a minute to see the sun rise above the gables of the house, and the red dawn re- Hected in the pond. Suddenly a voice at my side said, "Were you in there, Mis- ter?" It was the child I had seen the night before. "Yes," I answered. "Is it haunted, Mister?" the dark eyes gleamed expectantly. "Yes, child," I replied, "it is haunted -haunted by memories." HELEN W1LL1AMs, June, '26 A Rainy Day Bright bobbing umbrellas And wind-blown girls With smiling faces and rain-drenched curls, Fretted elms with silver leaves- And dripping, dropping, drooping trees. Little laughing puddles Smiling to billowy sky. Scurrying-hurrying children Skipping carelessly by. This I heard Diana say Was a rainy-raining day! GERTRUDE SoMERs, Jan. '26 LENVILLE HIGH SCHO 90 The Olympiad,CLASSES 1926 Atmosphere FUR.ROWS." Here was the foundation for my original essay! Upon it I would build an imposing structure that would elicit praise and a satisfactory grade from my w'orthy pedagogue. I chose "Rivers" for the subject of my discourse. I resolved not to read other essays to dis- cover what other men felt at the sight of a great, flowing stream. I, I myself would see and feel, and then I would set down my thoughts for all to know. I decided to visit the Cuyahoga river in quest of "atmosphere" I wanted a beautiful, crystal stream, casting back the reflection of tall, awe-inspiring trees, and nestling upon its bosom a swiftly gliding canoe. I saw a river, much too slimy with oil to cast back the picture of ugly factories, and a lumbering, dirty ship be- ing dragged through the mud by a panting, little tug. My essay would deal with "lakes," not rivers. Again I went in search of "atmosphere," this time to our old Lake Erie. I ven- tured only about ten feet out on the pier for I wished to make certain that in case of a fall, I should land in water about my depth. O, how I do love life! Then I mounted my horse, Pegasus, ready to soar above the clouds. But some- one had fed him green apples and he tossed me from his back, leaving me, never to re- turn. I sat disconsolate. How could I put down my thoughts if the said thoughts were not forthcoming? In desperation I looked about me. My nearest neighbor was a man, far out at the end of the pier. I would go to him, per- haps he could help me. Need I tell you of my struggle to vanquish the nauseating qualms of fear that overcame me at the prospect of approaching the extremity of the pier, the water yards above my depth? Suffice it to say that I at last screwed up enough courage to proceed cautiously to my destination, perhaps my last. Carefully I sat down beside the man and took a hasty survey of the one who I hoped would be a friend in my dire need. His clothes suggested the poet, his face, the thinker. As he gazed fixedly across the lake, his mind seemingly steeped in thought, I congratulated myself on find- ing the ideal person to interpret the mood of the lake. Perhaps, in his great mag- nanimity, he would disclose to me some of his thoughts and impressions forming at the sight of this great expanse of water. I, secretary pro tem, would record his musings, and report them accurately to my fellow classmates. I hated to break into his reveries, but what could I do? My essay had to be writ- ten! I was at the point of addressing him when he began to whistle. I expected the tune of a great opera, but instead came the tune, that melancholy lament by the followers of that defunct old gentleman, the Honorable John H. Barleycorn. I wended my way homeward, heartsick and worn-disillusioned, discouraged. The foundation of my essay still stands. Per- haps, some day, when this experience will be only a vague memory, I shall build that grea.t structure. Quien sabe? MORRIS GOLDSMITH, June, '26 My Beloved She is the one, the only one, Whose charms have captivated me, She is my own, my very own, A precious gem of rarity. Her vision stands before me now, Such sky-blue eyes-such cheeks so red, And like the sunbeam's.dazzling rays, Her golden curls encrown her head. But more than all, her ruby lips Entice me on to steal one kiss, As in my arms in warm embrace I hold that bit of joy and bliss. You may taste the sweets of wordly gains, Of pleasures rare-of fashion's style, But you've missed the greatest joy of all, If you've never felt-a baby's smile! DAVID Noz1K, Jan. 27 GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 91 The Cave Man ALTHOUGH it was after midnight, the interior of our roomy wall tent was well lighted by the full moon. All was quiet but for the rustling of the leaves and the lapping of the waves on the shores of Indiana Lake. I glanced over at Bob's cot and saw the glow of his luminous watch. "It's after two o'clock," he whis- pered, "let's start." In answer I crept from my warm blan- kets, slipped into my clothes, and silently made my way to our tent door. Bob was doing the same, but while he was looking for his flashlight it fell from his cot. He hurriedly picked it up but it didn't light, so he tossed it onto his blankets. He started for the door, but halted suddenly as We heard someone moving on one of the cots. Our hearts thumped so loudly that we thought our tent-leader must surely hear them and awake. We waited for what seemed hours, until everything was quiet again. Then we crept under the canvas and were free. Our camp seemed to be enchanted in the spell of the silvery moonlight. The tents loomed here and there among the trees like huge ghosts. The leaves cast weird and delicate patterns upon them. We softly stole down to the lake, where the waves rippled in a low, melodious vt ice. We heard a faint "Whoo-oo, Whoo-oo," and we hastened to the meeting place. The other boys-Jack, Red and Slim-were already there. We didn't speak, but started, Indian file, along the shores of the shimmering lake. After hiking about five minutes we came to our "treasure", a log raft. We had made it ourselves and had hidden it in a small cove. We untied it and started paddling out on the lake, where we could see our destination, a small, thickly wooded island. How thrilling it seemed, paddling on that moonlit lake to the mysterious island. We felt like explorers discovering an unknown continent. As our craft was heavy, it was some time before we landed on the sandy shore. We jumped 05 and pulled the raft upon the beach. The trees had never been thinned out, and they grew close together, making the island seem very dark and mysterious. There was only a faint trace of the trail that crossed it. We were without lights, as Bob's flash- light was now broken. Slim had brought a stubby candle and matches, but we couldn't use the candle in our travel up the old, rocky path. Fallen logs, large boul- ders, and bushes blocked our way, and it was four o'clock when we reached the cave near the center of the island. Of course we wanted to explore that cave, but none of us liked to go in first. It was sug- gested that we flip a coin, and Bob lost. Slim lighted his candle and gave it to Bob. Then we entered and crossed the first part of the cave. It was ten feet high and quite long. There were curious rock formations on every side, and in the flickering candle- light they seemed to be moving and alive. We didn't pause, but entered a narrow winding passage. Following this through several chambers we thought that we were nearing the end. The damp atmosphere chilled us, but we wanted to advance a little farther before leaving. "Let's go around that bend," whispered Red, "and then turn back." We agreed and proceeded around the bend. What was that in front of us? A luminous, moving skeleton! We stood as if petrified. It seemed to advance, with a grinning face. Bob dropped the candle and we were in darkness. We didn't stop to recover it, but out we ran, bumping into rocky walls and stumbling on the uneven floor, but going as fast as we could. At last we saw the moonlight outside. What a relief! We fell over each other at the entrance, and scrambled a safe distance away. We looked back but saw nothing. Still, we didn't enjoy staying near that awful place, and soon we were hiking back to our raft. But it was gone! Remembering care- fully the spot where we had placed it, we searched the beach thoroughly. Finally Jack spied it, far out on the lake, drifting. Red and I swam for it, with our clothes on, as dawn was beginning to color the eastern sky. We brought the raft to shore and the others boarded it. 92 The Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 Soon we were safe in the little cove once more, and we tied our raft to a tree. We hurried back to camp, anxious to get there before "First Call." If we were found out we would be punished in some way, as no one was to leave camp with- out permission. We quickly and quietly returned to our tents. The sun was now up, and the birds filled the woods with song. The camp which had looked so mys- terious in the moonlight again looked nat- ural. We had just crawled into our cots when the bugler sounded "First Call," and then "Reveille". All our tent mates were up and out for pajama drill with us. Our hopes of escaping unnoticed were shat- tered when the tent-leader asked, "Bill, why is your hair all wet so early? And how did those clothes by your cot get wet?" Well, Bob and I had to confess and we found that the others had done the same. We reported to the Camp Director after breakfast. Gee! how we hate the sight of dirty dishes now! "There's a reason" -we washed 'em all for two days, and did the rest of the kitchen work, under the direction of "cookee". We told him of the ghostly inhabitant of that cave and he en- lightened us. It had been painted there with luminous paint for the initiation of some new fellows last summer, and it was still there. Well, dishwashing isn't so bad after all in return for such an adventure. MILTON R. GROTH, Jan., '26 The Rai n Life has a striking parallel in the beauty of a rain storm. The ceaseless monotone, the gloomy outlook, and the occa sional rift in the clouds, a beam of hope. Dark and black, thick and fierce, The clouds swing low. No sun can pierce their menace. Harsh and sad, drop on drop, The rain pours down. No sun can stop its fall. Pitter and patter, chitter and chatter, Tip and tap, ready and steady, On and on, down and down, Rain. Bit by bit The wind roars by, The dismal world Grows light. Bright and clear, color, cheer, The sun gleams forth. No further fear Of Rain. SAUL SILVERMAN, June '26 k A. gf 4 1 Jr' " "" " .lr 'mm ff N. if S. I' A u I 5 1 . - ' I ,, 2 w Z L S ,I Q. Rx 4' ' - I 'I J '. 31 Q 5 if O f .1 .ff . Q, 'H ., a, A f Q3 K I WA go f . ., ,o. Q X ,Q I gy, , I m - A "-- .XX 5 l frf7? 'U 1 k 3 NXNX 5 5 fifxzy A' 9 . ' ff "" +. ' lr E?-'Ar if LK W. ' Q F - Ei: Q :gli 2 ' 15 Q 35 7 1 14, i ' A K e 34 fr- N 5 ' s- 2 ' 5,1 2 U is Q Q - I: ' f 16 2 ., - A :a vg 5 1 fl 9 f 11 3 ff 5 J 21 i 2 wfQ'Mf4fwwTMwf'Mi' 6 I AY,. ..,. ..f. i -H ...,.. ., .... .... . Game Wm massive was Xgikmank grvitwgigl , Bmt wmi mrnirm-mm'RB M ghm Q 2,.,,,..,,.,,.,,,,,Q,,.,.,..,,..,-..,...,..,,.-..,,.,,.,...,...,,.....,Q Literary Department Circulation De mrtmcnt Sport Editor Typists 94 The Olyntpiact,CLASSES 1926 Olympiad Board HE 1926 Olympiad board Was chosen by a faculty committee after some dis- cussion and elimination. Although the board experienced some difficulty in get- ting subscriptions at Hrst, it has had time and talent as Well as the experience of other classes, to make it a worthy publica- tion. Several comparatively new ideas, estab- lished by other classes, have been con- sidered Worthy to be continued. The book has been called "The Olympiad", a name contributed by the June, '24, class. We hope that future classes may consider it a fitting title for subsequent annuals. It has been deemed advisable again to create an annual, published by the combined graduating classes. This system was in- augurated by the Class of '25, Yetta Silverstein ......................,............................... Editor-in-Chief Chairman Eleanor Manahan Margaret Comyns Vera Engelbrecht Isadore Epstein Miriam Liebe Marjory Meyer Samuel Pollack Helen Reeder David Rein Elizabeth Sharnoff Eloise Tucker Feature Department Chairman Eleanor Windisch Violet Hausrath Harry Levine Milton Groth AIT. I Circulation Manager Morris Englander Elizabeth Blosser, Sec. Elizabeth Sprague, Sec. Eleanor Bevington Bernice Keller John Weedon Business Manager Robert Fitch Picture Com mittee Chairman Theresa Brantweiner Chairman Mildred Ten Winkel Albert Amster Bernice De Dreux Eugene Schwartz Norman Goldsword Art Department Chairman Virginia Loomis, Jeannette Leckie Ida Marshall Dorothea Stoye Aclrertising Committee Chairman Nathan Bernstein David Abrams Harold Brooks Earl Cooke Jeannette Forman Samuel Franks Dorothy Prentke Chairman Arline Kaber, Jennie Dreifort Dorothy Kermode Dorothy Mahon Mary Perris Dorothy Rosen Ca rtoonists Adelbert Rice Albert Rice FACULTY ADVISERS Davies, Miss McHannan, Miss Bernstein, Miss Maclntyre GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 95 To rch Board E HAVE come to believe almost, that without the "Torch" Glenville would not be "Old Glenville". The pur- pose of our weekly has been to present to subscribers an interesting report of Glen- ville life. Besides accomplishing this pri- Gordon Berryman Joseph Placak ........ Elizabeth Good ..... Helen Cline ............ Winifred Stanley ........ ...... Elyvooql West ......,............ ...... Norman Goldsword Eileen Owens .......... ..................,.Illu:laying Editor ......,.....Ncws Editor ......Assistm1f News Editor ........Featurc Editor Erclmiigc Manager ............Sp0rt Editor ....:Editori'aI Writer Dorothy Gregg ....... .......... C 'irculotion Manager Harold Brooks ...... .... .Ad'1'ertis1'ng Manager Mr. F. D. Aldrich ........ ............... F acuity Adrisel Eleanor Barber Milton Benjamin William Campbell Kenneth Cline Earl Cooke Russell Crozier Norman Epstein Robert Fitch Samuel Frank Joseph Friend Mary Gramling Eleanor Greenberg Eleanor Healy Jeanette Hinsdale Lillian Hollander Donald Hutchinson Evelyn Johnson Edna Juergens Maurice Kaplan Dorothy Kermode Alfred Klein Sylvia Klein mary purpose it has seemed to create a better school spirit. In spite of the comparatively short time Mr. Aldrich has been with us, he has been extremely popular and eflicient in thc capacity of faculty adviser. STAFF-FEBRUARY TO J UNE James McGuire .............................................. Editor Gordon Berryman ..... ................ M Imaging Editor Robert Carlson ........ .........., B usincss Manager Selma Mentall ...... ....................... N cws Editor Marjorie Kennel .............. Assistant News Editor Winifred Stanley ....... .................... F eature Editor Elwood West ............... ........ E xclzaizge Mana-ger Norman Goldsword ..... ................. S port Editor Eileen Owens ............. .............. E ditoriavl Writer Harold Carlson ...... ...... C firculartion AMKLTZGQG1' Harold Brooks .... ........i 4 diwcriising Manager Daniel Loeser Emanuel Rosenberg Virginia Loomis Eugene Schwartz Kathleen MacLaury VVillard Spear Richard Mallett Saralouise Spencer Eleanor Manahan Marie Spetrino Genevieve Marsh Mildred Ten Winkcl Sydney Pearlman Evelyn Tronstein Ernest Polascek Helena Wakefield Adelbert Rice Gizella Weiss Albert Rice Virginia White Dorothy Rosen Morris Zipperstein 96 TlLeOlympiad,CLASSES19" Reflector Board HE Redector for the past year has been concentrating its efforts on im- proving its literary standing. To this end the literary department has been increased and strengthened until the magazine now shines forth as a really literary produc- tion. SEPTEMBER T0 JANUARY Many new departments aie being fra tured, and its interests are therefore -dl versified. The business department has fared equally well. In a truly successful season, we can truly call it the mirroi of life he re on Glenville's Reflector. JANUARY 'ro J UNE Robert Stern .................... Editor-in-Chief .................... Robert Stern Russell Miller .............. liusiizess Manager ................ Russell Miller George Fairchilds ......,. Associate Editors ..,......... Winifred Stanley Stella Benham ................ Associate Editor Winifred Stanley ............ Literary Editor .................. Eileen Owens Virginia Loomis .......... Flini Fldm. Editor ............ Bernice Tramer Olive Zirker .......,................ Art Editor .................. Frances Adomeit Arthur Cohen ....,....... Advertising IVIanr1ger ............ Arthur Cohen Thomas Lipert ............ f,i'iVClli!1t'i0II Momlger ..........., Thomas Lipert OTHER BOARD MEMBERS Harold Barnett Robert Cathcart Gertrude Dorfman Vera Engelbrecht Isadore Epstein Alex Feinsilver Paul Flandermeyer Bernice Keller Walter' Klein May Laing' Ruth Lanzer John Loster Dorothy MacMillan Ruth Mandelker Marjorie Meyer Regene Pollack Dorothy Prentke Helen Reeder Esther Reithoffer Ruth Reynolds Theodore Rosen Elediyth Rowlands Lucille Schlesinger Evan Spalt Freida Tucker Mary Vogelsburg David Weinberger Linnette Weinberger Faculty Advisers Mr. D. G. 1lIf'Ra0, Miss Tiim G. Bernstein, Illiss Mary Piclfard GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 97 Debate Club DEBATE has always been supported by both faculty and student body, in a most gratifying manner. Having attained an admirable standard, by winning the senate championship last year, this year's team made no mean start toward another such triumph. No distinctions are made in selecting a team. Assistance is given by Mr. Brown, the coach, to all who wish to prepare for the tryout. After a period of preparation, tryouts are held, in which any member of the Debate Club may participate. An afiirmative and negative team is selected by a faculty committee. Only three members of last year's cham-- pionship team retained their positions this year,-Saul Silverman, lVIanuel Ben- jamin and Joseph Friend. The choice of the faculty was as follows: Affirmative: Saul G. Silverman, cap- tain, Joseph H. Friend, Albert Lederman, Rose Goodman, Armond E. Cohen. The negative team is: Manual G. Benjamin. captain, David Rein, Miriam Liebe, James Bravo. The question for debate as stated Was, Resolved: That the United States Adopt the Parliamentary Cabinet System of Government. Of the four debates parti- cipated in, Glenville won three decisions. A new subject: Resolved: That Busses be substituted for street cars in Cleveland, will be debated in the early spring. This debate will conclude a successful season. DEBATE TEAM A.Ul1'7'IIlflti'L'6 Rose Goodman Joseph Friend Saul Silverman, Captain Albert Lederman Armond Cohen, Alternate Negative Miriam Liebe David Rein Manuel Benjamin, Captain James Bravo, Alternate Frances Adomeit Mildred Schlafer 98 The Olympiad CLASSES 1926 . J Student Council HE Student Council this year has been reorganized to give greater representation to the student body. To this end the council has been divided into two houses, the general assembly and the deliberative assembly. These two bodies together constitute the Student Represen- tatives. As usual, the chief object of the Council has been the awarding of honor keys to worthy students at Commence- ment. Among the lesser activities of the Council have been several dances, the sale of pencils containing the basketball sched- ule, and also the sale of Glenville Pennant pencils. The Council is affiliated with the Hi-Council and is represented there by David Wahl, who is vice-president of both organizations. GENERAL ASSE MBLYA OFFICERS Saul Silverman .................................................................... President David Wahl ................................................................ Vice President Mark Nagusky ....... .....,...,.... R ccorrling Secretary Mary Vogelsberg ...... .......... .............,.. C I orrcsponding Secretrz'ry Norman Epstein .....,............................................................ Treasurer OTHER MEMBERS Margaret Aten Mary Baldwin Harold Barnett Ruth Bialosky Lily Blum Thora Bucher Agnes Breen Cecil Chessin Miriam Citron Arthur Cohen Edward Cohen Harmon Cohen Gertrude Dorfman Norman Epstein Harold Fellenbaum Sadie Finenian Harry Flynn George Friedman Sidney Gordon William Gordon Francis Griffin Florence Groth Stanley Harr Julius Hertz Jeannette Hinsdale Virginia Houston Theodore Isenstein Evelyn Johnson Carl Kaplan Dorothy Katz Evelyn Katz Sidney Katz Harriett Kess Austin Klein Milton Klein Ruth Lanzer Glenn Le Prevost Albert Lederman John Lester Kathleen MacLaury Franklyn Marks Esther Mintz Mark Nagusky Abe Newman Eileen Owens Gustav Reich Milton Reitnian Dorothy Reiter Charles Robinson Ruth Sandler Jeannette Samuels Barbara Saunders Helen Schaefer Eleanor Schultz VVinifred Shaw Helen Spenko Fred Shatanof Saul Silverman Florence Schwartz Margaret Stahli Bernice Tramer Evelyn Tronstein George Vaughan Mary Vogelsberg David Wahl Arthur Weiss Alfred Wilhelmy Thomas Weedon Paul Williamson Sam Maron Eleanor Osborn LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL ' DELIBERATIVE ASSEMBLY OFFICERS Saul Silverman .... George Friedman .... Harold Barnett .... Bernice Tramer ...... Evelyn Tronstein .... 12A Sadie Fineman George Friedman Ruth Lanzer . Glenn Le Prevost Florence Schwartz Paul Williamson 12B Frances Adomeit Margaret Aten Norman Epstein Evelyn Johnson Mark Nagusky Saul Silverman 10B Ruth Bialosky Gustav Reich Preszdent Vice Preszdent ..... Vice President, Jan. to June cretaw Treasurer 11A Harold Barnett Albert Lederman Evelyn Tronstein Bernice Tramer 11B Arthur Cohen Winifred Shaw Mary Vogelsberg David Wahl 10A Milton Klein Jeannette Samuel S 100 TIZ'1'Ol'jlI721JI.l1d,CLASSES1926 The Glee Clubs, Orchestra, Bands HE Girls' Glee Club has won much recognition, from its recent produc- tion of the "Middie Maids", which is a topsy-turvy extravaganza in one act. Be- cause of the large membership in the club, two Glee Clubs have been formed, one for sophomore girls, and the other for juniors and seniors. The majority of the members of the Choral Club are chosen from the Girls' and Boys' Glee Clubs. Mr. G. J. Jones, the clubi's director, trains the voices for the Choral Club. The Glenville High School Orchestra seldom plays outside of school, but concen- trates its attention on the programs given at Glenville. The Girls' and Boys' Bands are now combined and are under the direction of Mr. B. D. Gilliland. GIRLS' GLEE CLUB Julia Barnes Eleanor Berghoff Eleanor Becker Marion Bloch Ruth Breitbart Grace Cowie Marylee Carroll Sylvia Cohen Cecile Cohen Ella Cohen Eleanor Dattelbaum Gertrude Dorfman Alice Emphey Vera Engelbrecht Montana Faber Myldred Fingerhut Margery Fleming Vera Englebrecht Olivette Geisler Jeannette Goldsteen Janet Haims Thelma Harvey Violet Hausrath Eleanor Healy Beatrice Horwitz Bessie Horvitz Virginia Houston Ruth Isaacson Evelyn Johnson May Laing Lillian Last Anne Lederman Pearl Marcus Genevieve Martin Selma Mentall Mollie Meyerson Marie Morasca Lillian Narosny Marie Orser Dorothy Prohaska Esther Reithoffer EledrythRowlands Thelma Rowe Laura Ruple Jeannette Samuels Tillie Schenker Joanne Schonauer Frances Selker Ruth Selker Eunice Schmidt Rhea Simms Lillian Shiprin Ruth Smith Dorothea Stoye Ruth Tiefenthaler Evelyn Tronstein Eloise Tucker Florence Uberstine Ruth Warnock Harriet Wickes GLENVILLE H1 GH SCHOOL 101 Harry Abrams Lloyd Adler Solomon Cohen Charles Diederich Adolph Fox George Friedman Harry Friedman Lester Gadke Nicholas Gee Jerome Goldburg Barnhart Goldlust Bernard Goldman Morris Goldman Norman Goodman Joward Hagen William Hanna Philip Kahn Alfred Klein Ben Kaplovitz Clayton Kulish BAND Harry Abrams Grace Austin Maurice Bishkoo Kathleen Brookhart Orpha Brown David Budin Charles Coltrin BOYS' GLEE CLUB Thomas Cuthbertson Isadore Edelman Clyde Deubel Arthur Farkas Elizabeth French Luella French Philip Garfield Lester Goodman Isadore Goldberg Earle Gordon Leanore Gottfried Howard Graf Laurence Greasel Selma Green Norman Hall Erla Hennig Charles Herrick Donald Hicks Carl Jedlicka Evelyn Johnson Juliette Klein Sanford Karp Willis Kelly Althea Kerlin Jack Landlskroner James Laurenson Myron Levine John Lester Jack Levine Alfred Miller Bernard Miller Harold Newman Albert Perlman Harold Price Samuel Rabb Jerome Rado Theodore Rosen Emanuel Rosenberg Morris Rothenberg Edmund Round John Rudd Frank Schwernler Abe Selznick Leland Sobel Harold Unger George Vaughan Ralph Walter Julian Zettelmeyer Morris Zippersttin Albert Lefkowitz Hyman Lefshetz Robert Linn Dave Lurie Albert Mann Emanuel Meltzer Fred Newman First Violin Hilda Berkowitz Bernadine Crutch Isadore Edelman, Conc. Alex Feinsilver Minnie Fuss Ethel Goldenberg Benjamin Gross Henry Hoffman Ben Koplovitz Albert Lederman, Librarian David Liebling Thomas Lubin Morris Meschansky Rachael Mirsky Gustav Reich ORCHESTRA Second Violin Mary Alexander Lincoln Bishop Mast. Irving Bendis, Principal Rosaria Drago Margaret Friedman Louise Gage Alex Goldman Lenore Habink Mabel Jobson Helen Schaffer David Wahl Viola Sam Ornstein Double Bass Milton Weisenberg, Pres. - , Harriet Wickes Flixnley Suit Elwood West Clarifnets Elizabeth French Norman Hull Jack Presser Accolllpfmist-Rhoda Rosenthal-Secretary-Treasurer Director-Griffith J. Jones David Nozik Rosa Peace Samuel Pollack Lawrence Prill Jack Presser Clayton Rock Howard Rose Laura Ruple John Schalois Albert Schwartz Helen Schause Carl Schieman Frank Schwemlcr Beatrice Scott Alice Silverman Josephine Smith Ruth Smith Onita Snodgrass Saralouise Spencer Kenneth Stampfli Stanley Suit Frieda Tucker David Wahl Gertrude Weiss Ray Wilkofsky Thomas Wilmshorst John Winchester Ruth Zuckerman C Melody Saxophone Grace Austin Beatrice Scott E Flat Saxophone Evelyn Johnson David Nozik Baritone SHNOQJII one Lester Goodman Cornet Charles Coltrin Willis Kelly Horn Laura Ruple Kenneth Stampfli T'l'0l7lb0l'1lC Lawrence Greasel Althea Kerlin Timpomy Percussion Maurice Bishkoo Clyde Deubel Albert Schwartz 102 The Olympiad,CLASSES 1926 Choral Club N FEBRUARY, 1924, Mr. Jones select- ed the best voices of the Glee Clubs to form what is called the Choral Club. The number has increased since that time until there are now about seventy-eight mem- bers. The Club has given several concerts in the city, but the crowning success of the year was its trip to Lorain when it won the prize in the competition with high school choruses. As the magazine goes to print, April sixteenth is the date set for the trip to Detroit as a representative U. S. high school chorus for comparison with a Canadian chorus. Grace Abrams Julia Barnes Eleanor Bergholf Marian Bloch Grace Bowie Edwin Brown Sylvia Cohen Eleanor Dattelbaum Vera Engelbrecht Gerald Forstner Adolph Fox George Friedman Harry Friedman Morris Goldman Barnhart Goldlust Norman Goldsword VVilma Flesher Harriet Fritz CHORAL CLUB Roslyn Gingald Jerome Goldberg Jeannette Goldstein Mildred Goodrnan Howard Hagen Norma Hanslik Thelma Harvey Eleanor Healy Katherine Heinrich Bessie Horvitz Ruth Isaacson Evelyn Johnson Ruth Kaplan George Kendig Alfred Klein Anne Lederman John Lester Sylvia Lipp Martha Loomis Pearl Marcus Kathleen MacLaury Selma Mentall Dorothy Meyerson Betty Moore Marie Morasca Lillian Narosny Mildred Nehamkin Harold Newman Harold Price Dorothy Prohaska Samuel Rabb Jerome Rado Emanuel Rosenberg Morris Rothenberg Edmund Round Thelma Rowe Eledryth Rowlands John Rudd Tillie Schenker Frank Schweinler Frances Selker Ruth Selker Abe Selznick Irene Smith Stanley Suit Ruth Swaney Anna Toleu Bernice Tranmer Florence Uberstine Harold Unger George Vaughan Helena Wakefield Ralph Walter Ruth Warnock Eleanor Winclisch Julian Zettelmeyer GLENVILLE HIGH SoHo OL 103 R. O. T. C. HE Glenville R. O. T. C. is a part of the National Junior R. O. T. C. The government instructors at Glenville are Colonel Counay, Sergeant Fischer and Sergeant Napier, retired U. S. Army of- ficers. The O. D. system is under the control ot the R. O. T. C., and has improved con- ditions remarkably during the three or four years of its existence in Glenville. In 1925, the Riiie team vvon the city championship and contributed five men OFFICERS OF Russell VVindisch ............ Lf. Col. ........,........... Staff Fletcher VVillianis .......... Lf. Vol. ..... ............ S taff Nicholas Gee ....... ......... I lujor .... ......... I field John Schalois .... ........ I fripf. ..... ....... B oard Ralph McCane ..... ........ K Vrpf. ..... ....... R eserve Sam Pollack ......... ,....... C Vlpf. ...... ...... C fo. D Harvey Church ................ ffupf. ...... ...... I fo. B Henry Wiech .................. Capt. ...... ....... C Zo. A Winston McNamara ...... Cffpf. .. ....... Co. C Bernard Wolf .................. Capt. ..... ...... . Stuff Donald Bliehall ..... A Ming Frrpf. ..... ....... C o. C Carl Garret ........,........... Ist Lt. . ........ Staff Albert Rice ...................... Isf Lf. ..... ......... S taff Norman Goodman ...,...., I sf Lf. .... ...... C o. B John VVeedon ........,......... Ist Lf. ...................... Co. IJ to the Cleveland team. This team Won the championship of the fifth corps which includes Ohio, Indiana, West Virginia and Kentucky. The duties of the military sponsors con- sist mainly in managing military social affairs and lunchroom traffic. Due to the fact that the Board of Edu- cation has decided to discontinue military training, the R. O. T. C. will be discon- tinued hereafter. We feel sure that every- one Will miss this department. R. O. T. C. Edward Lawler ,... ...... 1 sf Lf. ........ Co. B Morton Stotter ...... Ist Lt. .... ....StaH Carl Jedlicka ..... ...... I sf Lt. .................... Band Lloyd Yeagrle ........ ...... I st Lf. .................. Co. A Vancel Beck .................... lst Lf. ........ Crack Squad Isadore VVoldman ........... Ind Lt. .................. Co. D Donald Osborne ........ ...QJMZ Lf. .................. Co. C James Arnold ........ .... 2 nd LI. .... ...... C o. D John Lester .............. ...Jud Lf. .... ...... C o. A Kenneth Stampfii .... .... J nd Lt. ....... Band Arthur Davies .......... ..., 3 nd LI. .... ...... C o. C Fernando Ropcea ........... Jud Lf. ...... ........ S taff lsadore Friedman .........., :nd Lf. ...... ........... S taH: James Rose ....................... Jud Lt. .................. Co. D MILITARY SPONSORS Major Dorothy Prentke, Capt. Bernice Keller, Capt. Marion Swaney, Captain Marjorie Ott, Capt. Helena Wakefield, Cap Capt. Jeanette Leckie. Faculty Adviser-Colonel Colonius Shivley, Capt. Ruth t. Barbara Saunders, LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 105 FOOTBALL TEAM Left to Right, First Row M. Lambright R. Moss D. O'Hare D. Aaron M. Engel, Captain J. Reardon W. Dennis H. Harbath J. Levine Left t04Right, Second Row W. Burgess M. Dorsky S. Herman R. Roth I. Weiss E. Van Derwerken A. Lewis S. Landskrouner S. Goodman W. Spear H. Goldstein Left to Right, Third Row J. Kless E. Dilla J. Goldberg R. Maher A. Friedman M. Slavin J. Rudd J. Moscarino, Student Manager N. Goldsword, Asst. Student Mgr. Mr. G. A. Hartinger, Faculty Mgr. Mr. H. H. Cully ............ .............. P rincipal Mr. H. M. Conrad ........ ....................... C oach Mr. C. J. Bliley ......... ....... A ssistant Coach, 106 The Olympia Basketball Saul Lipkowitz, L. G., Captain Harry Grossman, L. F. Donald O'Hare, C. Gus Goldstein, G. Edward Van Derwerken, R. G. Abe Miller, R. F. Irwin Weiss, G., Sub Manuel Grossman, F., Sub Joe Rembrandt, C., Sub Norman Goldsword, Student Manager "Ching" Bliley, Coach G. A. Hartinger, Faculty Manager LENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 107 Tennis Team Albert Amster, Captain Edwin Brown, Student Manage: Earle Cook James Reider Bernard Levy Steven Saas Edwin Lubiskey Earl Smith The 1925 Football Season 108 TlLcOlympfiad,CLASSES1926 WITH but one letter man back to start the season, Coach Conrad had an- other great problem confronting him, that of building a team from nothing. This kind of a task is by no means the ea.siest thing in the world to do even though work and co-operation is given by all. Coach sent out a call for aspirants in the spring of 1925 and the fundamentals were pound- ed into the heads of about fifty young gentlemen. Before school took up in the fall, candidates were once more summoned to brush up on what they had once learnt to prepare for the Latin scuffle which was to take place early in the season. Injuries throughout the entire season kept some of our best men on the side- lines and impaired our chances for formid- able outfit. Weather was another 'thing that was sadly off color this season, for wet fields were as plentiful as sand on a desert. The team developed some fairly good aquatic material for deep sea diving. The first contest of the year drew the biggest crowd of the season, for the an- nual Latin-Glenville classic was a much heralded affair. The locals received a whitewashing compound as their reward in the figures of 34 to 0. Van Derwerken starred for Glenville, while Sammons was the luminary for the Irish. The next week the locals met the highly touted West High bunch over on the other side of the river and nearly brought home the bacon. West won by a 6 to 0 count due to a break of the game. "Tete" North, of West, blocked a kick which bounded in the hands of Kotay who ambled over the goal line with a victory. Central who had one of the strongest of Senate teams trampled upon our hopes with a 44 to 0 drubbing. Let us not dwell long upon distasteful encounters. The first touchdown of the 1925 year was obtained at the expense of Shaw out at Shaw's stadium. This thrill was ex- perienced by a good crowd of lo y al rooters who were not discouraged by a 27 to 7 defeat. The next game brought Glenville and South together at Gordon Park and Wat- son Sz Co. took the affair by a washout, 19' to 0.. The game was played in a cold rain which poured forth from the heavens during the whole dismal afternoon. - A sea of mud, otherwise known as Shaw Stadium, was the scene for the Lincoln game the following Saturday. Glenville completely outplayed its rivals in every phase of the game but scoring seemed im- possible. A slippery pigskin got away from Engel near the goal line and "Mike" succeeded in falling upon the ball, but the condition of the field allowed the pill to get awa.y and skid over the line where Ettin- ger of Lincoln flopped his 250 pounds down on it for a touchdown. The result: Lincoln 7, Parkwooders 0. The worst field of the season presented itself to the locals when they journeyed to Painesville for a hookup. Glenville held supremacy during the entire game but an intercepted pass gave the farmers a touchdown. Later in the game Lewis was skidded over his goal line and made the total 8 to 0 against us. The referee was outfitted with hip boots and the spectators paddled themselves about in gondolas to witness the fray. Bob Rath, Moss, Van Derwerken and Harbath came near drowning after attempted swan dives and under water swimming. All eleven men reached the shore safely after life lines were tossed out by the U. S. coast guards. The following week was the great and marvelous event of the season, the season's only victory, but at the hands of our age old rival none other than East Tech. This feat served as a most wonderful con- solation to local followers even though the season was not a success. Rath placed a neat drop-kick, Van Derwerken intercept- ed a pass, and "Pete" Weiss plunged over, -amassing a total of fifteen markers to thirteen by the Brown and Gold. The season's final was played at Gordon Park with East High who took the game by a 6 to 0 count. Glenville was working desperately for a touchdown when the final whistle blew ringing down the curtain on the 1925 season. The men who worked hard during the season and who were rewarded with letters GLENVILLE HIGH SCH OOL 109 were Captain Marvin Engel, an end and a guard, Art Lewis, a halfback, and two letter man, Harold Harbath, a line man, Donald O'Hare, center, Morris Dorsky, halfbackg John Kless, halfbackg Henry Goldstein, quarterbackg and Manager Moscarino. These men will not return next year. The material that will be back Basketball BASKETBALL seems to have taken the major position in the athletics of Glen- ville for the past two years, and .again this year it continues in its ever-increasing popularity. Last year our team was tied with West Tech for the Senate champion- ship, and at the time this article is being written it seems that the Bliley-coached team is again on its way to city honors. To start the season Coach Bliley conduc- ted an inter-home room basketball 'tourna- ment which was well received by 'the students of every grade. The result of this competition was the winning of the school title by Home Room 105, which was not defeated during the entire schedule of contests. Basketball practice was called immediately after the tournament and about sixty players turned out to try and 'land a' berth on the school five. Glenville ha.d three lettermen back from last season in "Sis" Grossman, last yea.r's captain and all-scholastic player, HCYCISN Lipkowitz, captain-elect, and Joe Rem- brandt, last year's center. With this com- bination as a nucleus, the Coach was able to build up a powerful, well-oiled machine to represent the Red and Black. The members of this year's team are Captain Saul Lipkowitz, Harry Grossman, Bo Miller, Edward Van Derwerken, Gus Goldstein, Donald O'Hare, Joe Rembrandt, Mannie Grossman, Irwin Weiss, and Man- ager Norman Goldsword. This year marks the second season for Captain Lipkowitz who plays a forward. "Cycie" broke into the lineup last February, and immediately became one of the leading players in the Senate, being noted for his unusually clever floor work, and skill in handling the ball. Lipkowitz has been one of the main factors in the for a big year are lettermen,-"Eddie" Van Derwerken, captain elect, Irwin Weiss, fullback, Robert Rath, halfbackg Robert Moss, and Elman Dennis, tackle, "Jake" Reardon, guard, David Aaron and Willard Spear, halfbacks. We who are leaving wish the team great success for the coming year. Review success of Glenville in its first eight games of this season and will be greatly missed on next year's squad. "Sis', Grossman has played first team basketball at Glenville for three years, be- ing captain of last year's outfit. The re- cord that he has attained in this sport is a very commendable one indeed. The first season on the team he was one of the highest point scorers in the Senate, and was chosen on the all scholastic team. Last year "Sis" repeated his antics, was the 'second highest point scorer, and was again chosen for the all-scholastic team. Everyone will remember the ever aggress- ive playing and shooting of Grossman, for again this year he has treated the fans to many thrillers. As this articlepisbeing written only half ofthe -sehedulehas been completed, but we will say here that we wish Grossman much success in return for his brilliant performances on Glen- ville cage crews. Edward Van Derwerken and Gus Gold- stein both played on last year's second team and have advanced to first team caliber. The guarding of this pair is superb in every sense of the word, for this combination has succeeded in keeping down the score of the opponents, and add- ing to our own score at the opportune moment. This fast, elusive pair will be back next season to take over the guard- ing duties on a new outfit. Rembrandt has played at center during a big part of this season's campaign and has performed admirably in that capacity. Especially will be remembered the fine playing that Joe exhibited in the Lincoln game, which he almost won single handed. This season is Rembrandt's second and last as a member of the Glenville basket tossing aggregation. 110 The Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 Bo Miller has been given a chance at center position and has made good almost over night. He started the Youngstown Rayen and West Tech frays, and finished with flying colors on both occasions. Miller is exceptionally valuable in that he has two more years of basketball to play at Glenville. Irwin Weiss and Mannie Grossman are two first subs possessing much capability along cage lines. These two have been used to some extent this season and have shown their worth, when given a chance to do so. They should prove very valuable to the team next year for they will both be back to demonstrate their ability for the Parkwooders. Glenville opened the season with the usual Cathedral Latin classic played be- fore a record crowd in the Latin gym- nasium. This affair was one of the kind that gives the backbone unnecessary chills, for the locals nosed out the Irish by a 23- 22 count. Captain Lipkowitz and "Sis" Grossman deserve credit for most of the Red and Black scoring and for consistent playing as well. The second game was played at Oberlin, where the locals took over the fast Bicyclists 32-22. In this game Rembrandt took away the scoring honors, closely fol- lowed by Grossman and Lipkowitz. The close guarding of Goldstein and Weiss pre- vented the veteran Oberlin crew from scoring at will. During the Christmas vacation a select group of alumni captained by Benny Fried- man was picked to play the school five, and after a hotly contested battle fought be- fore a large crowd, the varsity emerged victorious by a 18-16 score. Grossman starred for the locals while Cohen was the big noise for the Alumni. The West game was next on our schedule and after a grueling contest the Park- wooders finally gained the upper hand and turned back the Blue and White 16-14. The great playing of Van Derwerken at guard and Goldstein at forward featured the Glenville attack while "Tet" North played the stellar role for West. The only defeat handed Glenville thus far this season was administered by Lin- coln on the home court 23-22. In this game the Red and Black was greatly handi- capped by ineligibility, which hit the squad at the last moment. Rembrandt and Gross- man tried valiantly to put the locals in the fore but the shooting of Russ, the Lin- coln captain, would not allow it. The next week saw Glenville win a 16- 12 verdict over East Tech at the Car- penter's gymnasium. Only after a torrid last quarter rally was Glenville able to dispose of its ancient rivals who threat- ened to overcome our boys. The scoring was led by Grossman and Rembrandt com- bined with the fine performance of O'Hare, Goldstein and Van Derwerken. Traveling to Youngstown, Glenville met the powerful Rayen crew who were stop- ped in their tracks 25 to 14 by the Cleve- landers. This battle was fast and in- teresting, the work of Miller, Lipkowitz and Grossman on the forward wall, and Goldstein and Van Derwerken at the guards completely baffling the down- staters. The crowning event of the season was the defeat of West Tech at Glenville after a fast and furious game, 33 to 31. The highly touted Westerners were at a loss when the Glenville machine worked with remarkable precision and speed. The game was waged before a record crowd that jammed every nook and corner of the local court to witness this great contest. The wonderful, uncanny shooting of "Sis" Grossman combined with the clever work of Lipkowitz and Miller gave the fans a great thrill. Van Derwerken and Gold- stein at the guards performed beautifully in keeping down the West Tech offense. The all around playing of the Glenville team was at its best in every respect and nothing could have stopped the great on- slaught of fighting demons. Only half of the season's schedule has been completed at the writing of this article, therefore in closing we wish the team the best of success for next season. E -A X 1, X, If if- 54: 575, t , .4 ' X X f az-gf: f, 'A ' , .-fr-.Qi,..f.f:.-',sf::.i2g.- -.f:,5,-M 31113111-' 3.5 x d5'l'7lw, '4'C1",L' 'r' fn' -wx - ., ' .w , -. . .,,.. K: ...V 4 1-. ' .1-,.,,... ,-'. . -uv,-.,-., ,.,f,, . L, . '21,-?!'f1 , ,, 4,55 -1,5 ...MK . . ,X W !. ::HV.viE? 5 --src ,N-' I FQ- . ,,.3 , Mgr MY! H 1 L Qi , , ' , wr fx ek WI! Nmlhimg Uaella-:ss iw ww Ge ww 6: Q Q mlmw Each Flhhmg nm .Q Tfllame A -wifi um-fa 1 x "1 Rv .. 77 Q-rv K -,-----.--------- ,Q ,' A 1 1 QQ f Mhf 1-:sin e qs! 2- fvvif- 7 , - f""?, 14 WWE A fv?Qi--..- J' - J' Q-.e.Dm-mnjbegielfb The OZympiad,CLASSES 1926 ... ..- 7 .'-, HFIRRIE HRKERI Q , HARRIET PARKER T 'i' HQ I .. . A, . POI'-Course Um! 5 I Would Be President of the Class In N' ,Q - H I Gold Medal in Talkers' Contest , Q5 if ' : Sweet Thing x4 l x f, -' rl Gm w"1'x- X T fffff- f kwin? GEORGE EAIRCHILDS . gs ,f n -- 4 . C. .,,,, Mess-Course X - .1- l - President of Head High at :J Senior Spoophers . ' "ui -F' G2 Editor of Beflector Roard . T' - Q " gg One ofthe Pins in the Bowling' Blub t o - FAKRC HLDS- NQITINE Q ho'.:?W'1' , f"i"'El SQ7' f 3 ' gf 9 DoRoTHY GREGG ' 1 ', ? 9 , f, 7 f j eeeeeeeeee rreOf-Course lc J -53 J 52+ A W 1512-.P S 5 : ff ml n Qmlllll lull DQT GRELGG - A 9-:SY Housewive- in gevrcn ,Z-' 'G Snow P HERE CCHS. , 0 5' f 1 X '- - C-E22 ' 'E' f-E ' AQ? " LEWXS 1 THE SPEED NERCRANT- Head of Entertainers Committee Newsgirl-Sells Mirror Monthly Tlenville Gorch ARTHUR LEWIS ,e eEEEOf-Course Captain of the Tack Team Chief Actor on the Dead Man's Ball Johnny Kless' Husband Rootball Beam GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL Y vgucri fo ,??f"5'li F lag, on 'if 'MATSQEAN EARLE COOK T l gf 1,-5 l ,,,,,,M0?'L62j-COZl7'S6 I E125 .4 Chief Nuisance of Class T yr 5 - Radio Club-Chief Tube ' . Demonstrator for Rocks Shampoo --grae, "Shi One Lung" the Other Lung EARLE COOK - QADIO OPERATOR lN 'ma Swiss NAVY- ' A .J- in N., T N fi-fl cs, 6 N E 1 Q P 4 so out I I 1 N lu 5, 'Gigi Q . 'LQVJ-+A Q f R 3 Q K Q 5 Um. : 1 Q, , . ..,, 1-ee .-4 -1- ?1?' Eg 1-rain " ' -Ti EDNA JUERGENS : .E - Fmous mme sup.-f 175 Q M J-L - - T ll XG nevfmr' l 'C xx LY ll ISADORE EPSTEIN ,ssmmeeValet-C1214rse Chosen Valedictorian Lenior Stronsors Head of the Know It All Club EDNA JUERGENS sT i TsRolling Pin-Course President of the Girls Spivics Grub Proposes Amendment to Constitution that no one can vote unless he can run the mile in two seconds. "Tomboy Taylor" Chief Taylor ROBERT STERN sareese,COf-Course Editor of Deflector Hoard Inter-publication Bootball Chosen as the delegate to the "Eat More Yeast" Convention 114 The 0lympiad,CLASSES 1926 Last Will and Testament of the Classes of 1926 We, the combined classes of February and June, 1926, having been pronounced to be of sound mind, do hereby make and declare this, our last will and testament. ARTICLE I We make the following requests of the faculty: Section I. That Mr. Cully continue to present all speakers and entertainers' that come to the school. Section II. That Miss Davies continue to lecture the incoming soph girls on the evils of cosmetics. Section III. That Mr. Towne find some form of punishment other then tenth periods. Section IV. That Mr. Davies continue to guide the seniors in the publishing of their Annuals. Section V. That Mr. Bendler keep up the splendid attendance record he has established in our school. Section VI. That Mr. Jones and his Choral Club continue to bring home lion- ors for Glenville. ARTICLE II To the Sophs, we leave the Senior Spon- sors, to guide them, and initiate them in the Ways of the school. ARTICLE HI To the whole student body, we leave ARTICLE IV To the O. D.'s we leave the delightful task of patrolling the halls, during class periods. ARTICLE V To the Juniors, we leave the Olympiad, the world's best Annual. ARTICLE VI To the Student Hostesses we leave the management of traffic in the lunch room. ARTICLE VII To the Student Body we also leave the 8:20 tardy bell, on the condition that they invent some original excuses for being late. We also bequeath to them the new Senior Library, Glenville's newest acquisition. We hereby appoint, by reason of their faithful services to our classes, Mrs. Rose- baugh, and Mr. Collings, to be the joint executors of this, our last will and test- ament. In testimony whereof, we hereby set our hand and seal to this Last Will and Test- ament, the twenty-third day of January, in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred and Twenty-six. Signed. THE CLASSES or JANUARY AND JUNE 1926 --ELEANOR E . WINDISCH. CO1ficiaZly Authorizedj the O. D.'s and may they treat the S. B. Witness- better than they treated us. I Ruth Reynolds. we suppose ous: ' STYLES WILL 'rmxrcic N 00 FooIeAuAsomAmsw.L cs-uw - orzoummcegv- U U Q egg, G0 'TO COLLEGE ANOTQHE f ' Q News Tneroomm. cg .-'gf gang- 7 - U , ' U COUQSE .x -.5 s 4J, . lac.: Nr- K ,'-E.' Vi' ' , 3 9 . Z rx f -x-q- Hx , K -E qdlluli-is X 0 0 Q , E R , ! 51" 4 FN S C: li - I' fl Qt ,A 3 5, . 4 'QSO Gs 935m Q GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 115 THE HENHILL SCORCH HENHILL, MARCH ON, '761fg Vol. Wow No.No. Price-1 yip GALLAGHER VICTIM OF RELATIVES IRON WILL Henry Porus, the inventor of the Porus Plaster, was hailed into probate court to- day by order of Judge S. Abbot. When he asked what the charge was they told him: "Five Dollars." He assumed a dazed look but was soon revived when he learned that his rich uncle from Buenos Aires had willed him S11,091.95, and the S5 charge was the fee for recording the will. This made him very generous and he gave the newsboy three cents for the Scorch instead of the ordina.ry nickel. FINANCIER OPENS BAKERY Mr. Irwin Woodruff, a noted stock broker, has entered the bakery business. When asked for his reasons for this move, he nonchalantly answered: "Don't tell anybody, but I heard that there's 'big dough' in it." ROTOGRAVURE PICTURE SECTION This rare view shows "Major Hooplev Pla c a k staggering thru the snow drifts at the South Pole. He is toward the left of picture, dressed in white polar bear furs. A remarkable picture of Hen Hill's palatial au- ditorium. T his w.as taken at midnight by Staff Photographer S. Napshot. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR-JANITOR Dear Ed.-I have never heard that rare piece of music "The Prisoner's Song" on the radio. What do you think? -L. Del. Ans.: I think that you don't own a radio. FRENZIED FINANCE IN YAP Yap, July 77-Yap's distinguished wo- man premier, Mlle. Keller, issued a sen- sational statement today concerning the condition of this modern little republic. She asserted that Yap would pay her debts to the last centime by borrowing a vast sum from Lapland where King H. Har- bath is reigning in regal royalty. ANOTHER RECORD SMASHED Miss Ruth Ponsky, a local telephone operator, broke the world's trilling record today, taking two and one-half minutes to say "three," Her closest rivals were Dot Rosen and Betty Roth. SPANIARD ENTERTAINS Madrid, Sep. O-El Senor Fernando Ropcea treated some Mexican Students to an exhibition of throwing "what you call him, the cow's husband," as he says in quaint old Hungarian. The contest was held at the local "Arena de Torosi' and young Gilbur Wibson proved himself champ over numerous entries, including Roberto Sieker, Wussell Rindisch, and Samuelo Singer.. i. SOUTH SEAS VOTE Juneau, June O,-Cable dispatches re- ceived from Fiji and Hong Kong indicate that the islanders, urged on by Senator Earle Cook, have unanimously voted to adopt the P. R. system, and to abolish light wines and bologna. Senator Cook was greatly aided by his henchmen, Harry Butts and Louie Weisman. SOCIALIST VISITS BEDFORD ' Bedford, Nov. 77-Shirley Schwartz, a well-known radical, visited Miss Jeannette Forman here. They were schoolmates to- gether. While here, Miss Schwartz deliv- ered a lecture at the Uproar Club on "Let's Get Together." This was met with ap- proval, and the National Guard, under the command of Capt. Fletcher Williams, was called to stop the fighting. 116 T iz e Olymgmcrd, CLASSES 1926 SPURNS MINE OFFER One of this city's most influential busi- ness men, Richard Jepson, informed police of a confidence scheme to swindle him of 5152.54 for a gold-brick mine some- where in Uruguay. The "con" men ap- peared to be a little over 96 years old and Jepson suspects that they were "Codfish" Jedlicka and Solly Goodman, with Ben Goldberg as the "master mind" behind the plot. -..... COUNCILWOMAN SPEAKS Miss Dorothy Gregg spoke on "The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Sardines' at the next meeting of Tired Business Man's Club. She illustrated her lecture with an original dance. President G. Martin urged both of the members to attend. -A NOTED MUSICIAN ARRIVES Sandusty, March 2--Sir Miltonio Wies- enberg, a famous scotch piper, came into this thriving metropolis in his private Pullman Kyes, it has a sidedoorJ accom- panied by his 6-ton organ. He was Wel- comed by Mayor Bickse, and was told by Sheriff Rosin that he would be given just 24 hours to "make himself scarce." He soon left, without giving the musi- cal people a chance to hear him. PLAY DISCONTINUED London, March 1-"The Pink, Pink Nose," a mystery play, by Jos. Bors, has been withdrawn after a run of 67 weeks. N o reasons were given, but it is a mystery why they didn't stop it 66 weeks ago. DONATES PONY TO ZOO Frederick Smith has announced his in- tention to give a good, gentle Latin "pony" to the Chagrin Falls Zoo." "Me no use him anyways," he asserted. WEATHER TAKES EFFECT Robert Fulton, a traiiic cop, was treated for frostbite by Dr. Levin when he came in and said he was "chilled to the bone." He had forgotten to wear his cap. AUSTRIA REVIVED Vienna, Jan. 6-Miss Helen Frazine and Miss Anna Gorzynski, world famous travelers, who are taking a three-day va- cation in Europe, report that Austria is again established on a sound economic basis. The currency has been restored and the standa.rd of trade is the old mark. The factories are running overtime, shops are filled with visitors and hotels are crowded with guests. Theaters are of- fering grand opera and everyone is happy. Viienna, Jan. 7-Austria has collapsed again. HUNTER RETURNS FROM WILDS Htudson's Bay Post, May 2-Morris Eng- lander, a well-known hunter of big game, arrived here today from the desolate, lonely wilds of Broadway, New York. While there he met several "loan" sharks and conquered them bare-handed. "But the most ferocious animal of all is the pole cat," he said. "It won its name be- cause it's hunted with a pole-the longer the pole the better." ELEPHANT KILLED BY FALL Denver, Colo. Feb. 31-"Minnie" the well known pet pachyderm of the muni- cipal zoo was crushed to a pancake today when a visitor tripped and fell on her 5-ton frame. The man who did it is not definitely known but Zookeeper Arvin Mann suspects one Harold Bremson. PATENT GRANTED LOCAL INVENTOR Arthur Deutsch has been given the com- plete rights to discard his machine for removing the ashes from cigars before smoking. He invented this apparatus after hearing Sam Pollock warbling "I Don't Wanna be Cremated, 'Cause My Wife Objects to my Leaving Ashes Around the House." SKIPPER FINISHES HUNDREDTH TRIP Skipper Louie DeLauer of the freight- er "Hiram H." has passed the century mark of trans-Atlantic trips taken under his command. He is a former bailiff. GLENVILLE HIGH SCH OOL 117 SHEIK EMBARKS Skoorb Dlorah, a native Abyssinian ruler, has returned to Monte Carlo to claim seven cents which he says he won there several years ago. With him as bodyguard Went Ztrawgcs Drofnas and Sihcissab Kcaj. As their rowboat steamed out of Gates Mills harbor they kept singing "How I Wisht I Wuz in Peoria." HONOR CHEM WIZARD Prof. Seymore Ginsberg was feted at a banquet given by the faculty of Western Reverse U. here last night. He has re- cently finished his masterpiece, a dime novel entitled "Foozled" or "Deadeye Dick's Daring Deviltryf' Mr. K. M. Peos- ing, Ginsberg's former teacher, was among the noted guests present. OUR DAILY SHORT STORY BY I. M. Scribblmg Monday morning, no breakfast, late for school, no homework done, another tenth period, ho hum! how hectic! ART AND MUSIC DANCERS MAKE A HHIT77 The names of the famous vodvil team, Blosser 8a Brantweiner, will be blazed forth in Broadway's lights for quite a while yet, as the co-stars have signed a contract to appear in Harry Flynn's "Frolix" daily for the next nine years. ORCHESTRA ACCLAIMED Berea, June 32-The Cleveland Simp- funny Orchestra and its motorman Cpard- on us, we mean conductorj Stanislaus Suitsky achieved fresh honors Cand eggsl Sunday afternoon when they performed in Moscarino's hall here. There were few empty seats and the many spectators amused themselves between numbers by playfully tossing miscellaneous and sun- dry articles of diet at the delighted musicians. WARNING ISSUED Mr. Toob, our esteemed ed, advises each, every and all radio fans not to buy any more vacuum tubes for, as he says in his quaint old Swedish, "There's noth- ing in 'em." UNIVERSITY TO ACT Composer and Chorus Girl are combined in the personality of the charming "lady" who appears in the University of Itch- again Comic Opera, "Why Did The Gum- drop?" to be presented soon: "She" is none other than Dan Loeser, one of the supporting cast of 352 players. MAYOR NAMES CABINET Mayor Richard Taylor, of Twinsburg, picked his cabinet for next year, if he gets elected. Appointments will include Edwin Davis, Supt. of General Nuisance, and James Sands, Supt. of Sparks. ALUMNI NOTES The Rice Brothers are reported to be working for Joe Auerbach, an optometrist. Their job is to stand in front of the optical office. When passersby see them, they think that they're seeing double, and immediately step into the office to buy a pair of "specs", This has given the busi- ness a tremendous boost, and it keeps 50 employees busy every day to supply the demand. TRANSPORTATION MEN MEET Mr. Joseph Gattozi will address the Brotherhood of Straphangers, meeting here. His topic as announced today, will be: "Go in both ends, or go in the center. You pay as you leave, and you pay as you enter." ARRESTS INCREASE The number of arrests made to date, this year, jumped up to 315, when Patrol- man Chas. Diedrich woke up long enough to nab Miss Frances Rotter as she was taking a picture. She was bailed out by friends after being indicted for felony in Justice of the Pea.ce Woodruff's court- room. lst Prof: Everything I tell those students goes in one ear and out the other. 2nd Prf.: You're wrong. Sound can't penetrate a vacuum. "Someday, I'll be rich," said the dog, as he picked up the scent. 118 T It o Olynzpiad, CLASSES 1926 JUANITA SINKS AGAIN CSpanish Novel by Count de Cashj The beautiful, the exquisite, the Won- derful Juanita sank by the sink just as the sinking sun sank. For had not her dashing chandelier passed her on 'the street without a glance? True, it was night, and consequently dark, but what excuse was that? Oh, she would have r-r-reven ge I She wrapped her manana closely about her, and opened the solid oak door of the old agenda. She stepped out and stole across the patois. Noiselessly she en- tered his suite to get suite revenge. There he sat, escritoiring at his descalzo. "Caramels," she heard him swear silently. "Sir, how couldst thou ?" she asked. He turned and looked daggers at her. She caught one of them and sank the shining blade of the bolero into his shoulder blade. He sank forward. She sank the blade again, and again he sank. Her heart sank within her for she had killed her future meal ticket! p She stepped to the sink and cleansed her bolero. Everything turned black, the 'sun sank behind the sink, and she too sank. All was sunk. A sinking sensa- 'tion and all was over. Finis! SCOTTY HAS CLOSE CALL Banff, Alberta, Oct. 32-Wm. Robert- son, a noted member of the Northwest Mounted Police, barely escaped with his life a few days ago. While touring the Rockies in his Twin-two he noticed a lpenny on the road. While stepping out to get it he stepped over a 253-foot precipice, but the fall was broken when he landed in a spring and bounced out un- harmed. THE SCORCH'S DAILY RADIO SEction A. VACKUME TOOB, Editor Sz Janitor, Etc. TODAY'S RADIO PROGRAMS CEast, Stand. Tiempol BLAB-PEORIA 15 P. M. Four-hour lecture by Prof. S. Sliverman on "Brevity is the Soul of Wit." 19:02 P. M. Concert by the Agony Boys, assisted by the Awful Quartet--Roth- enbergio, Chairfilds Kr Kreinbring. KULISH WINS PRIZE Dr. Clayton Kulish has been awarded the ig-Nobel Prize for 1896. He has in- vented a device for removing the pitch from pitchforks. "I knew he could do it," his cousin Edith said, "and I am glad that he is coming into his own. They are al- ready sweeping out Padded Cell No. 85764 for him." BLUB-CHAGRIN FALLS 9:15 P. M. Talk on "Garlic" by the famous Dutch editor, J. McGuireg to be given in 16 languages. WHEE-N'YAWK 1.61 P. M. Dance Music by V. Du Fais and his "Heavenly Harpists" at the Para- dise Hotel. WOOP-PAWTUCKET Silent-Somebody came up and kayoed the announcer who insisted on laughing at his own jokes. KOKO-KUBA 12:15 A .M. Spanish program given by the United Irish under the direction ofiSadie Goldstein. KNOT-KANKAKEE 3:25 A. M. Dinner Hour program by M. Bishkoo-the Silent Drummer. KLIM-COWBELL CROSSING, KAN. 9:22 A. M. Farmer's talk on "How to raise a Bumper Crop of Alfalfa on Your chin," by Iona Whiskers. WHOA-GIDDAP, ALA. 5:55 P. M. Travel Talk by Louie Weisman, on his hair-raising experience "Grow- ing a Mustachiof' REFORMERS ORGANIZE A move was made by Professors Man- gold and Betterton, of Barber College, to equip every American high school with a beauty parlor and cabaret. "This would keep the young people's minds more on the benefits of education," said Prof. Man- gold. "And goodness knows they need it," agreed the jovial Betterton. GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 119 S.p.o.r.t P.a.g.e NEW COACH ANNOUNCED Ellivnelg High School was delighted to learn that one of the alumni of the famous class of '26 has been signally honored. The University of Itchagain, of Ann's Barber, Mich., has chosen Edward Paley as head football and tiddlywink coach, to succeed Mike Engel who is retiring on account of old age. Engel is 23 years old and can no longer stand the strain. Paley is a robust, virile fellow with a wonderful physique, and is remembered as one of Ellivnelg's famous athletes as well as 'the teacher's "terror." He gained 'this 'title on account of his great affinity for that grand old game-"hookey." He was often absent three days out of five just to play this game, and he became an expert in it. Nine for Ed! A LOCAL BOY WINS BOUT Louie "Gunboat" Lipps kayoed Harry "Slugger" Reid in a thrilling 28-round bout tonight. Referee Wattleworth fell asleep at the end of the 29th round, 'while waiting for the end. This gave the fighters a chance to kiss and make up, while the immense crowd of 15 men, 3 re- porters, and one young peanut salesman wildly applauded. GIRL CAGERS WILL PLAY Toronto, January Zlfg-The S h i n gl e- bobs, only unbeaten Girls' team in the Canadian Mens' League, will meet 'the Curlingirons, another undefeated team. The opposing captains Hazel Horner and Eleanor Lumsden are rivals for hi-point scoring honors. It has been hinted that the Prince of Whales will attend this con- test if his wife allows him. POLOISTS PLAY HERE The Galloping Galoshes were ad- ministered a defeat to the Terrible Turks here tomorrow. They led during the first nineteen chukkers, but the Turks fought hard and one. Charlie Howitz was the star, and did the Prince-of-Wales act several times, falling off his pony so grace- fully that everyone thought he was the Prince himself. SAMOA WINS IN OLYMPICS Paris, June 31-The Samoan Islands won another event today when they annexed a ,win in the 78 meter hurdles. Their star and captain, Juan Fless, shone and he easily won beating Finland's entry Arturio Lewis by a few inches. This puts Samoa in 12th place, nosing out Uruguay. The United States has managed to keep irst place despite a hard struggle, and retains a lead of a mere 9647 points according to Coach Colonius. CHICAGOANS BEAT PAINESVILLE LADS The Chicago Hares trounced the Paines- ville Poleca.ts in a tight game of footbawl last night. At the end of the 9th inning the score was tied 56-7. It remained for "Speed" Gallagher to toss in the winning basket, and the Painesvillians won. This was the deciding game for the "pro" championship, and all the players showed their willingness to die for "dear old Kale." as the saying goes. ' GOLFERS COMPETE Bobby Stern will play off a challenge match with Gedric Stern this week, it was learned. Both have been contenders for the tin cup now held by Stan Goldberg. TENNIS CHAMPS MEET Brussels, Nov. 31-Ed Koskinen, the leading pinch-hitter of the Hungarlan National League met Alberto Amster, the Boliuian wonder, in a match here three weeks ago. The game was exceedingly interesting to the lonely spectator, M. Wolkoff, the auburn-haired water boy. It lasted 5 hours and was featured by the gazette like leaps, dashes, and snorts of the two stavs. As their share in the gate receipts each was given a sunburned Her- shey bar by Eugene Opperman, their gen- erous Manager. Mrs. Martha MacSwcll's Colymn Your dumb problems given dumber an- swers. Shovel 'em in-we will answer any- thing and everything. 120 The Olympiad,CLASSES 19 Dear Mrs. Flee:-Thruout our high school careers we have tried in vain to gain an athletic letter, and we are dis- couraged. We would like to play football, and track. Is there any hope for us? ARTHUS LEWIS AND JOHN KLESS My dear boys, cheer up. Some day you may make the tiddlewink team. Keep on trying. Dear Mrs. Glee:-I am just graduating from high school and am very lonely. Have never participated in a single activity. How can I become Popular? G. E. FRIEDMAN, ETC. Enter every club that you can. Be less bashful and more bold. lk 41 lk Dear Mrs. Fee:-What are the proper Ududs' for graduation? GEO. ROSIN For this very informal occasion I would suggest pink Paris garters, striped purple sox, wing collars, red, white and blue ties Knot foreign handj and pale green Nor- folk suits. But why not be original and wear overalls and galoshes? HK Pk Bk Dear Mrs. Spree :-I am notorious for my wildness. I am never happier than when I'm battling a squad of cops or be- ing expelled from school, which occurs weekly. But I'm tired of it all, a.nd I want to settle down. Is it possible? Also how can I study more? My average last term was 55, and I'm taking two subjects. ISADORE EPSTEIN You are more to be pitied than blamed. I am sorry that you cannot study, but per- haps if you really try you may raise your average to 56. Get one of the leaders of the class to do your work for you. lk lk Pk Dear Mrs. Flee-Threwout are hie skool kareerz, we hav tryd in vain 2 gane an athaletic letter, and we are discour- aged. We wood like to pley footbawl and track. Iz ther enny hoap four us? "Arthur Lewis and John Kless" Answer-My dear boys, I am sorry to say there is not much. But cheer up. Keep on trying and some day you may make the tiddldywink team. Bk Pk FK Dear Mrs. Knee-I am a boy, 12. I cannot get any work because I am so thin. No one thinks I can work because really I'm the thinnest thing you ever saw. Where can I get a job? "Gallagher." Answer--If you are so thin, get a job in a music store cleaning out flutes. Dk HK lk Dear Mrs. Glee-Do you believe in the old proverb: "It's the deeds that count, not the words"? "L. Delaney." Answer-Not when I'm sending a tele- gram. FK PIC Pk Dear Mrs. Free-I am so lonesome. How can I get in touch with someone who will bring light and warmth into my life? "Lonely Liz." Answer-See the East Ohio Gas Co. Sk Pk Sk Dear Mrs. Tree-Last night as I was walking home a man stopped me and asked if I had seen a "cop", lately. I said "no" and then he robbed me of my In- gersoll and 31.58. Was that nice? "Little Chester H." Answer next week. Pk 114 Pk Dear Mrs. See-I have just returned from a trip around the globe. While in Tur- key I noticed that the peasants are ex- tremely dirty. What can the reason be? "M, Schanfarberf' Answer-They are so dirty because they export all the Turkish baths to the United States, and therefore cannot use them themselves. Stern parent: "My son, you know absolutely nothing." Son: "Well, we live so far from school, that I forget everything on the way home." GLEN I LE HIGH SCH00 121 U WH kk 9 E , f mf 5 Q' of S 1 of -.Q E 'H 5455? i Q2:f'N' ' 9' k 'Q O Q O ' if A I Q 6 63541522 Q 7 k an o X Gl'lADUATt1gN .: - .emu 2: 1 1 gj5 Qf Ei a 1gf ' , 5: f X 9 CAN vou mmAc:3gN .',- .'.. g.G3 -AND CEE L-is 2UgOLYcfELIL'fAHi ,'., .nimnwi ye- .'h-. mzesnozw-r A PLUMBER .-- A s :g?15xii ffW'W1 Q 5 5-? E O y Ag 1 f .4 : . . ' X Q '54, LVD ff -','L f? ilgf fffffEi A b 4..v QI-I-'Nu ..v,-' , K gq. g I i'j5 f K q 'i . f3 217 I ll "WEEE ROW 1"f'1'f'?.:"f'Z i-??i1',' H U M 7 A I? mwmv 0 fQ'lg'?i"?R I , QAFXB ' ' in 2 E 2 gif M A Egemsmssim P A ,MIM f'W?q A 0 il aff 5 Q aj Q XEEZXMR , Rigas? ' ' -BEZEL, L Qowcnuzrzco JL A J You Have Been Thinking "How Can I Advance Rapidly 'T-Make Money Easily- Find Life Really Worth VVhile?i' That's a Mighty Serious Question--Decide it Right gookkeeping Your problems are simplified 5'e""g"'Pb5f Correspondence Secrelarysbrp Accounting for you through private Comptometer fBusiness - t t- Ofce Adminislration ms I-uc Ions Appliances me PALMER,-JVIEEKER9 OFFICE TRAINING SCHOOL "A Commercial School of Distinction" 621 Prospect qflvenue Mid-Arcade Bldg. Cleveland, Ohio Q7VIain 1070 122 GLENVILLE HIG'H SCH L 123 MAGAZINES PERSONIFIED Life so , , , ...r. . L -O ,- . . .r.r H. M. T. Etude ..,....,....,.....,....,,..... ............. M r. Jones Vggue H ,,,,,,,,, ,,,,, , ,,,,,.,, . Eleanor BeVl1'1gtOI1 Literary Digest -- .O .... Morrie Rothenberg Cgllggg Humoq' ,,,,,,V,,,,,,,,, Ruth McAllister Photo Play .,,... ..,. . .... Elizabeth French Bookman ,,,,, ,,,,,,,. L Ouie Puette, F. Smith Yonth's Companion ..... ..... . ...ML C010HiuS Ohio Motorist ............... Wade Wattleworth Popular Mechanics ............ Harold PapCkf-I Judge M ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Mr. H. H. Clllly Hgt Dog G 4oooo,,ooo.,ee,,oo,e,eeoeooo, Roy Henderson Good Housekeeping. ..,,.... , Olivet Geisler La Parigierme t,,,, . e,,, .Glenn Le PI'6VOS'C Classic is .ooo,ooo. I I Pearl Gerscheski Vanity Fair . , . . Lucille Delaney E1ge1'yb0dy'3 ,,,, ,,,,, , ,,,,,,.i . .,,.,,, M I'. Davies Worldis Work - .... -. .. . All Of US ,iil-.i LEST WE FORGET Mr. Smith's jokes. Our dashing O. D.'s. Rallies. Music, twice-a-week. Fairchilds' Famous Cider. Trying to write a play. Vacations. Mr. Bahner's gentle voice. Cap. Hawkins' Katsf Mr. Lensner's stories of his trip. Those portables. That 12A feeling. Rehearsals-and then- Graduation. T- he seniors of Glenville are leaving, H- ow empty the halls will be! E- ach one of us greatly bereaving. B- ygone times that trained us to see. U- phill beginning our furture, I- n earnest endeavor weaving. L- ives that will be worth the nurture. D- ownward never descending, rpm-1 - ver on our upward climbg - eturning to portals that gave us trong foundations for lives sublime. "From what kind of tree does a dough- nut come ?" "Don't know, I'm sure." "The pan-tree." "WHY WE COME TO SCHOOL" C. Rock, G. Weiss-To play the trombone. G. Friedman-To deprive us of our class dues. H. Horner, D. Stoye-For all girls' ath- letics. "Spang"-To get our pictures into the Annual. L. Ruple-To preside over the Girls' Band. T. Rowe, G. Forstner-To sing. D. Rein, S. Silverman-To argue. E. Good-To write for the Torch. C. Garrett, R. Walter-To run the savings bank. ' O. Zirker, V. Loomis-To study art. J. Huber, S. Benham-To study. Most of Us-To get a "sheepskin", THINGS WE'RE SORRY UD TO LEAVE BEHIND US. Tenth periods. Chem. lab. , All notebooks. The Lunch Line. The "Gimme-a-hunka-paper" guy. Report Cards. Homework. Caesar. THE PERFECT SHEIK HAS- "Hoot" Gibson's complexion. , Heinie Porus' neck. ' ,, Harrison Gould's silky hair. Maurice Kaplan's eyes. Ben Goldberg's distant stare. Russell Windisch's size. Iz Epstein's brains. Paul HiXon's feet. Ed Koskinen's tennis. Weldon Jordan's jokes. Sam Opper's hot ties. Bob Wa.rren's sax. OUR BOOK REVUE Tarzan of the Apes--Henry Weich. Little Men-Harold B., A1 Amster. Little Women-Bessie D'Angelo, Esther Vogel. Don Quixote-Davy Rein. Tom Sawyer-Herb Altenburger. Last of the Mohicans--Stanley Gold- berg. The First Violin-Bernadine Crutch. tl A1l?s Well That Ends Well-Gradua- ion. 124 The Olympiad,CLASSES 1926 WHY IS A QUEEN? I T was again a Windish day. King Wood- ruff was yellen loud and Long, because the Cook wouldn't make him some Rice. Some Hicks were lounging around the palatial Kendig Hall. They were Harbath, Engle, and Jedlica, and they were all Whalen for a Betterton of Mann. "Suf- ferin' Katz," said the Baker when Loeser, Lewis, Williams, and several others blew in. Right away they all began Barkan for O'Hare. The Hunter returned from the West, and began talking to the king. "How long do you expect to Reyn. old boy?" he asked. "O, I don't know, I'll have to ask Santa Klaus," was the King's answer. The King took a liking to this Newman and took him in as a Friend. Before he left, Woodruff presented the Goodman with a Gold sword, and as he went out the door, he said "Coll igan." The king was a Stern fellow, with Gray eyes, but he had several Marks on his face, when his wife had given vent to Herr an- ger. In fact, there never was Peace in the royal family. The poor king was hen- Pecked. Although the Queen was a Reiches woman, she would not Neill to her husband and she often called him a Bloch head. He appeared nearly every other day, quite disabled, and he used a Crutch, because his wife grabbed Holt like a Leach. After they had Aten, the King and Queen went to Church. There the Abbot told Queen Rose that some Boman, named Weber had called her a Lemmon. This made the queen very angry, and she sent her husband out to find the culprit. Once on the street, he searched for a cigar Butt. For he was very fond of the Weed, but he could not afford to buy it. "My Soul," said the Wise man, "that Stone house looks familiar. O, I know, that's where Marion Wilcox, my old sweet- heart, lives. I'll go in and see her." Inside, he greeted his old flame, who immediately broke into a conflagration. The Flaming Youth, she had once been called. But you should have seen her now. Still single, she was full of wrinkles, and her wig was the wrong color. Angry at having been so deceived, he left the Haus rath, and on the way home he passed A brook, and falling into the Sands of the desert,.he cried "Cart'er out! Cart'er out I" So saying, he died, a horrible death, leav- ing the poor queen a widow. Moral: Never do anything to please your wife. It will always cause you some discomfort. ADELBERT RICE AND ELEANOR WINDISII WE'VE OFTEN WONDERED- If Harold B. will ever grow up. Why it alwa.ys rains on our "days off." How many tenths H. M. T. assigns in a year. He used to dance with Betty, She danced with fairy grace, He used to drive with Eva, She'd such a pretty face, He used to call on Clara, She always praised his book, But he finally married Mary, For she knew how to cook. OUR COMIC STRIP CHARACTERS Salesman Sam ............ ........ Sammy Frank Barney Google . .... ...... C . Spangenberg Freckles - .. .......... . ....... ...Maurice Bishkoo J1ggS ..... . ............. ........ . Tom Gerspacher Mickey Qhimselfb McGuire c.... Jimmy McG. Mutt KL Jeff ........,... R. Miller, H. Bremson Abie the Agent ....... ....., ...Dave Abrams Hairbreadth Harry ,.............. .Harry Flynn Andy Gump - ........ .... . , Seymore Ginsberg Tomboy Taylor .... . ..... Genevieve McMahon Major Hoople. ........,.. .,,.,L. , ..,,,, Joe Placak SENIOR "PEARS" Y. Silverstein, B. Weingart. E. Blosser, T. Brantweiner. L. Puette and F. Smith. Jeanette F. and Shirley S. N. Goldsword and D. Gregg. Dave A. and "Mag" O. A. and A. Rice. DuFais, Rothman. Gallagher and Porus. Ruth W. and Barbara S. GLENVILLE HIGH SCHO 0 L 125 Our Faculty Towne Bush CuLly Knott Davies Marti 'n ElLsworth Gleason AI-C1fiCl'l 'Ferrell' SCOFiCld Edwards Hull I..eNsner T L Davies ay1-Kgmas Pelisl ng Campblill M1lLs CArlton Rein.-ey Conrad EmErson Hump!-Ireys Matthl as Hartinger WiNship Chapl n RosebauGh HastinGs MCH Harnish annan BOycl BoSch Mccollfzts jagfabs Peterson xer -Iones BYOWTIH eld Konigslfjw Buschman Limbach . Sm1tH Mccombs BEman WhitwoRth Fraser PattErson HArbourt Bahner KiMber GraY B0ycl Burriclge Paliker . RaRdlI1 Ofhson schfidlzr . Sutton . Efilomus Schaplirkotter YH B N ' MK::QJiSch Wrigj:liTste1n C e I-IillEr Bliley Dietsch B'dclL IIMZET lVIclnTyre Collings CarmAn RaY N elson Sh0ver Pickafb Hunter ILCOX COMMERCIAL SCHOOL Enroll any time for the Following Courses: Business Administration Private Secretarial Complete Business Training Higher Accounting Leading Course To C. P. A. Degree Auditing, Bookkeeping Business English Adding, Calculating Business Letter Writing Shorthand, Filing Dictaphone Secretary Duplicating Machines TYPEWRITING The School of Individual Instruction Teachers and Students Alike Enjoy Their Work .M. Good Positions Guaranteed to Graduates We are Prepared for Students From all Parts of the City For Day and Evening School WILCOX COMMERCIAL SCHOOLS EUCLID AVENUE SCHOOL PUBLIC SQUARE SCHOOL 10014 Euclid Avenue Ulmer Building Garfield 9572 Main 2426 126 ff w 1 1 X , ff ' GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL VW 29" Who's Who He's quite a bashful fellow, Of him the girls are fond, Blue eyes and pretty dimples- Handsome, tall and blonde. He's quite a noble swimmer As well as football man. Of Civics Club was president In track he often ran. P. W. is always liked He has such winning ways So with good looks no wonder He's popular all his days. Well, welll You all know him, I'm sure! He's rather tall with slick black hair fparted on the sidej wears spiffy hose and is most always grinning. Quite collegiate, too. Yes, you're getting warm, he's a 12B. I must admit tho, that he is not as dignified as a 12B ought to be but he's always hav- ing a good time and making other people laugh so we don't mind, do we? He writes up the sports for the Torch, belongs to the Hi-Y, was selected as a member of the literary department of the Annual, and honors the Dramatic Club with his mem- bership. And dron't you remember, he play- ed in "She stoops to Conquer" where he took the part of the dashing young Tony Lumpkin? Well, now I'm positive you know him so I won't even tell you that his initials are D. L. flf you'd like to know more about him, ask Mr. Bosch.l She was forever busy! Indeed she is now one of those illustrious alumnae of whom you've so often heard. Being short didn't keep her from participating in several school activities for she was Asso- ciate Editor of the Reflector, Secretary of the Dramatic Club, Secretary of the Senior Sponsors, a Student Hostess, a class repre- sentative in the 12A House, a member of the Girls' Civics Club, Chairman of the Entertainment Committee of the Friend- ship Club and member of the Social Com- mittee of her class. That was enough to keep anyone busy, wasn't it, but that wasn't all. This little black-haired alumnae was bright enough to make the class Honor Roll. Right you are! It's S. B. 128 The ' A Olympzad, CLASSES 1926 SOME "WHO'S THRU" BIOGRAPHIES Adler, Harry-A Pearl Fisher from Tokyo. Beallo, Isadore-A Cracker-Barrel Salesman from N'YaWk. Church, Harvey-A Model for Animal Crackers. Davis, Florence-A Greek Tragic Poet and Milliner. Engelbrecht, Vera--Prominent Wom- an's' Rights Lecturer. Ferguson, Jack-Dutch Steeplejack of High Renown. Gottfried, Ruth-Fashion Model and Designer. Heimlich, Ohesnut-A Swiss Goat Herder. Janezic, Frank-Irish Pugilist and Art- ist. Kingsbury, Gene-President of the Pretzel Benders' Union. Lanzer, Ruth-Originator of Fried Ice Cream. Melkerson, Eric-A Swedish Herring Hunting a Yob. Narosny, Al--An Alpine Yodeler. O'Hare, Charles-A Deep Sea Diver. Prentice, Carl-A Beau Brummel. Quayle, Rosa-Famous Grand Opera Star. Rabinovitz, Milton-The Zweibach King von Zurich. Schanfarber, Marvin-A Baltimore Oyster. Tillman, Charles-A Pickle Magnate from Peru. Umans, Sam-A Siberian Vacuum. Van Horn, Donald-A Persian Rug Weaver. Weinberger, Dave-An Australian Ab- origine. 'Xtra Member-Another Vacuum. Yellen, Arthur-A Spanish Dancer. Zimmer, Ludo-The Arabian Coal Heaver. "So many men marry for money," she said. "You wouldn't marry me for money, would you Harry?" "No," said Harry, who had never pro- posed. "I Wouldn't marry you for all the money in the world." And he was amazed when she cried out, "Oh, you horrid, horrid wretch!" Does George Niell Cwe wonderh to his girl? Does Frances Carter books to school? Does Ruth Lanzer jaw herself? Is Robert Stern to his sweetie? Can Harriette Parker car on the Public Square? Does Julia Hunter wild animals in Africa? Does Frances Adomeit fadd a miteb to our school? Does Eleanor Windisch out peas with a knife? Does Norman carry a Goldsword? Has anyone ever caught Marion Kneiling to a man? Does Harry smoke Butts? Does Ruth Wolbolt to class? If Barbara joined the movies, would Stan- ley go West? Is Betty Good? Is Beatrice Reiches Crighteous?J Does Kenneth Stampfli off the handle? Does Eloise Tucker covers over her at night? Does Harvey go to Church? Does Frances Weed her garden? I Does Althea use a Kerlin iron? Is George a Fairchild? Does Earle Cook his own breakfast? ls Celia Weiss? Is Annette Long? Does Esther Don her cloak? Is Ellen a Birch Tree? Is Sam's Chertoff? "Who gave the bride away?" asked Mrs. Evans of her daughter, just return- ed from the wedding. "Her little brother. He stood right up in the middle of the ceremony, and yelled 'Hurrah, Blanche, you've got him at last' 1" ??? OUR FUNNY PAGE ??? Prof.-What is a vacuum? Allan J.-A vacuum is-a vacuum is- er-a-oh. I've got it in my head but I can't express it! Can Elizabeth speak French? Why are Edith and Clayton so Kulish? Can Thelma Rowe a boat? Why does Robert Sieker, but never find 'er? GLENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 129 Title P By Milton R. Groth A MANN was driving his FORD around the WILLIAMSON Building one WIN DISCH day. Frantically he looked for a GOOD place to PARK'ER At LAST, after a two-hour search, he found a spot by a ROWE of BIRCH trees. He left his pet WOLFE-hound on guard, and entered the building. His STERN face showed that he WOOD RUFF up any who tried to bar his way as he ascended the inCLINE in an elevator, where the OPERator was playing that favorite old game called "SEVEN come 'LEVINK' But Our Hero, whose name was EDMOND SMITH, was not turned from his enterprise. "I SIEK'ER, he muttered, "and I'm a FINE MAN if I do not find her. "Up he ROSE now as he approached the GARRET. There, unknown to Our Hero, sat the object of his search, guarded by two fierce KRAINES. She was a FAIR CHILD, So beautiful that she might be called a BELLe. Before her was a bowl of RICE, a dish of KARP, and a SILVER STEIN of SOEDER water. One of her captors was a HOLLANDER who answered to the name of GALLAGHER, and the other was a Chinaman called Jim Lum. "She's a PEARL, MAN," remarked one. "Yes, she is, "agreed his partner," I like the FRANK expression of DU FAIS. But KAN'T'ER parents bring us the ransom? I'd like to get my hands on the MUNNEY. "She HAS KINsfolk who've g10t, the JACK, SON, just wait and they WOL KOFF it up." Our Hero heard these words and he RAMmed thru the door. His face was WHITE and PALE, Yet determined. "Caramba! "he murmured in a PIERCE- ing voice. "I'll show you-to TUCK'ER away in this LUM'S DEN. I WIL LICK you both, singly or together. And don't CHE SNICKer either. I mean it!" He was about to take a ROCK from his pocket when the two villains pounced upon him. 'They tore his CHERT OFF but left his COULT ON. One of them, wise as SOLO- MON, was trying to WAVROpe around his neck, while the other tried to seat him on a SPIKE. But brave Edmond, always using his NUDEL, MANaged to blow three shrill blasts on his steam calliope. This was the signal for his FORMAN to appear with the wrecking crew. They proceeded to make a PORUS mass of the girl's captors, while Our Hero watched the GROTH of a smile on the Heroine's carmine lips. "Let's SHERR our SOMMERS and win- ters together forever, "he pleaded, "Don't be so KULISHY' She a.rose and in the voice of a SINGER, "SHAR'NOFF," she replied, with a slight FRENCH accent. "This small-town stuff BORS me." And they descended the stairs arm in arm. They went out and looked for his car, but it was gone! "Well, "he said," I guess no KREIN' BRINGS the 'can' back, so I'll have to look for it. Wait here." In despair he went to the town MARSHALL, who was the entire police force. He gave the COPPER a description of his auto, and told him how he had LOST'ER. "Oh, so you're the WEISS guy who parked his auto on the grass, are you? Well, it's parked in the jail-yard now, and it'll stay there until you pay a fine!" Poor Edmond had visions of being a WALKER for the rest of his life, as he had but a few RUPLES in cash. He was just turning the c CHD ORNER to rejoin the girl when he saw a strange sight coming down the street. His pet wolf-hound had retrieved the car and was dragging it along in his teeth. His astonished master was so pleased that 130 The Olympiad, CLASSES 1926 he bought the faithful dog a gallon of cream, and the hound, his work well DUN,LAPped it up joyfully. The girl ap- peared on the scene just as Eddie was lifting the Ford's HOOD to see what was making it ZIMMER so much. He soon found that the motor was missing, but he didn't let a little thing like that daunt him. He gracefully picked up the girl and they rolled calmly on. Soon they came to a little lake. He bought two ice cream COHENS, and then he suggested a stroll along the shore to watch the soaring SEGALS, and the beautiful SWANS ON the placid waters. WHAT DIDN'T YOU SEE? Harriet Fritz saw Roberta Weaver driving her private taxi around "Old Hen- hill" while the chauieur, Earl Schauffler, reposed on the rear tire. F. Willich reports that she saw Tommy Gerspacher playing a mean saxophone while walking in his sleep at East 105th and St. Clair. Ann Toleu noticed Nettie Heller swim out to rescue a Life Guard in distress. Sylvia Kahn saw a Chinese truckman's bill, which read: "IO goes, 10 comes, at 500 a went 35.00. EVER HEARD THESE? Mr. Jones-"Cut the cheap comedy stuff." Any teacher-"Take the next chapter for tomorrow." Mr. Towne-"Ten nights." ' Chem. Stude-"First you take Nitric Acid, 'then-" Mr. Smith-"Didjia ever hear the one about the-" Pupil-"I know what it is, but I can't express it." Mr. Cully-"I take great pleasure-" Speaker-"I shall say only a few words -etc. etc, etc. "Wot's the diff between a tree and a sausage?" "I dunno." "One of 'em has the bark on the out- side." - FACULTY ALPHABET A is for Aldrich, of our Torch so great. B is for Brown, who coaches debate. C is for Cully, his work we'll proclaim. D is for Davies, we have two by this name. E is for Edwards, who English does teach. F is for Fraser, who likes parts of speech. G is for Gray, his hobby's wireless. H is for Hunter, with smiles numberless. I is for ideas, which help us along. J is for Jones, who's our expert in song. K is for Klopsch with his chocolate bar. L is for Lensner, who's traveled afar. M is for Martin, of these we have two. N is for Nalovsky, to Glenville so true. O is for Orbison, she likes history- sharks. P is for Persing, with his witty remarks. Q is for Quizzes of hardest degree. R is for Reilley, librarian is she. S is for Scofield, so friendly to all. T is for Terrell, who's not very tall. U is for us, all these teachers we've had. V is for vacation, when it comes we are glad W is for Whitworth, an actress is she. At the end of the alphabet comes x, y, and z. And our faculty is the best that can be. CAN YOU IMAGINE 'Z Bessie DeAngelo six feet tall. The Annual without YOUR picture. Helen Cline without those dimples. Mr. Towne not in a rush. Bob Coulton not wearing Collegiate styles. Jennie Dreifort being wild. Louie DeLauer not grinning. Sylvia Abbot or Dot Gregg with blonde hair. Or Olive Zirker a brunette. Howie Swanson not playing "C" in sen- ior music. Genevieve Ma.rtin without "bangs" Al Tucker being studious. The whole class ever coming to music. Mr. Cully growing a beard. Mr. Davies with a bald head. No more homework. Mr. Allyn not wearing wide collars. Mr. Towne saying "Cut all the classes you want to boys, I won't say a word." GLENVILLE HIGH SCH 001, 131 CHAUCER REVIVED When ata parte ina Soupen Fisha, You slipp an oister from the coctale disha, And it behaves very quite contrairy, And landes inside yore vesteg you still be marry, Yore girrl mae not have seen the acci- dente, Or knows that you cud not the dede pre- venti, She mae have one herself upon her lappie, Which she will hide, and then bee very happie. Mule in the barnyard, sleepy and slick. Boy with a cockleburr on a stick. Creeps up behind him, quiet as a mouse. Crepe on the door of the little boy's house. The canoe was drifting farther and far- ther out into the lake. "O I" she exclaimed suddenly, "don't you think we ought to hug the shore? With instant interest he en- quired, "Why the shore?" "I noticed you powder your nose several times an hour," said the efficiency expert. "I do," said the pretty stenog, "but I don't go around poking it into other people's business." Wanted-Man to retail canaries. Qknow how it's done?J Is there a reason why- Knees rhymes with breeze? Bliss rhymes with kiss? Strife rhymes with wife? Spoon rhymes with moon? Peach rhymes with beach? Eyes rhymes with skies? -Exchange .f. .-. .-. .,. .,. ., I sat me down and thought profound, This maxim wise I drew, It's easier far to like a girl, Than make a girl like you. .v. .y. .v. ,,. .,. .,. "What did you say your age was?" he remarked between dances. "Well, I didn't say," smartly returned the girl, "but I've just reached 213' "Is that so?" he returned consolingly. "What detained you ?" -Punch Bowl Household hints -- Wear stockings wrong side out if you have a hole on the other side. Miss Terrell - "Mark, what is a synonym ?" Mark-"A word you use when you can't spell another." Football enthusiast Kas the first op- ponent is carried off the fieldj 4'One done, ten to go."-Record I I I 'W I I it I LI? Xe if ww I I -M Q fr W lpfesiiyswafis A - yqfl it ff , 4 95 We rig l l I ' u 1 Ei' Q QL NRI 'nf iv, Q 4,1 D g.-,?":'?' l J I I 1: fr.: 2- 5 fa 6 h Xi Q ,., A lvl I Q! tl nv 7 a i I x mmm' I i If 'K' K e- K t- e -5 f, " 9 N. I P4 F3 CJ S .5 l B I I. I 'T' I E1 S 132 The Olympiad,CLAssEs 1926 4,1-1-"N B HELP! f X 9 mu-AGS 'al I ' wE'r-zz W- DX l24 - f f 4 UL- SOQRY Q5 'W .,J f f pfgx ff XXT: Laws k. f ff M f 1 x BEHIND " Mg, I3 f - Til" us. K 1 6-4 FAX K' 5 f 11,4 rr K A K ff I L -YOURA THANs'Cil VGIMME Money Foe " WEN WUT W Q' ETSJQSSSESXFSS lo! L 7' X , 'F CLASS was AQMQS, X ' -ETQ. ETQ.L'TQ- sms 3 jf ov: mf ' - vw I 3 5 X. 1 X , X 11 , f, N GR f FUTURE J ' Q9 QS C vm VOTE ' U I QX si 9 Fm fm f Xt' ' V Z1 'QW' I '5 ' 5 in 2" W -- , A 9 1- x. JR.: '- 'X 'ONE 0' 5 'L Q fB1L1.Sf MAI L- . 1 SOME f ' -7 ? 3 ' PWR E'fSL',Ii 4 V - f ,Xfi- 2X c., 1":.,L , a y we ZQLMZ - U 2 3 QQ: K, HEN"D'REAMS 3 f 1 ,, COME TRU E A 5Qj"f ' Come 'To , ,ijwb ENVQNTQQS 153 1- - N as-sry - ' if-:I Goajiarl' If 5 O0 O0 A Hum' 7 M5 5 f l! 1-0 FuTuRE I , Q LASS ,l5g,:u.,,,ihJS,,f' dx OUQ WHOSWLO ' ALBERT on ADEL M 363 3-xfiise ,, f Q35 M .mf E X15 ' v- -a um-e 'W ,, 11 X "3r33F1avba.xx sw- -Twm ...W MUIVON mm X , ,-iii I .,,.,, .. V In .4 ,I H if .- 'i .llllsllliumllln, r , , 1 'M' ll rlll lllll 1 'ill lu ill ! in vlllw-alll fill .ll-.r. f . lull-l 'llllll' lllllrlllull l M V l,1ll lr,l.l. .llpllnluslllqlll lm. Q . 1:11I'lllunr1fll1l1ulnl1 A L ljlllNllslmuslllllllllIllllllmlllllluu.1 ' I . " ll Qs W fiiiggf ummm' Voice lover phone at 3 in the morningb : Maria: "John! John! Get up, the gas "Hello, is this the garage? I've just is leaking!" turned turtle-H John "Aw, put a pan under it, and Garageman: "You don't want the gar- Come to bed." age, you want the zoo." Pk :ff :lf Pk Pk Pk -fstudying historyl "What's the race problem, dad ?" Dad: "Picking winners, son." "What was the denomination of that bill you lent me?" "Episcopalion, I guess. It keeps lent. Dk Dk vk Dk Pk Pk Pat: I call your daughter Sunmaid. TOYHI "WIN YOU FUN UDSt31I'S and get Mike: And fur what raisin? my W21'ECh? Pat: She's the first girl my Sunkist. Bob: "Wait awhile, and it will run X if 1' down. "Is calfskin good material for slippers? Tom: "No, it won't we have a Winding "Banana skins are better." staircase." This Annual is a Ward SL Shaw Product Our special annual service- Cur co-operation with the different annual boards- Our attention to details- Suggestions, etc.- Delivery on specified date- These are some of the reasons why we print more school annuals than , anyone in this part of the country 6533655 The WARD GL SHAW Company Printers of the 1926 HOLYMPIADH 100-106 St. Clair Ave., West Cleveland, Ohio 133 PORT R IT RE Do not forget that the Portraits of today become memories of tomorrow Give your friends something that is priceless, YOUR "PORTRAIT" "Childhood',-the First "event"-Maidenly Charm-the wedding. Family Portraits "Group," While You Are! All Together. The greatest gift to those who love "him", the Father. Mother's picture is a blessing. Old Pictures Copied and Made Like New Rynald A. Krumhar PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAITS Wurlitzer Bldg., 1017 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, Ohio Superior 1963 Appointments only 9 to 55 Sunday I0 to 3 134 illlemurivn .,,1,,. "" In years to come oft' times your 'F thoughts will return to your Q. school daysgyour graduation night. As a lasting and visible memory you have your Annual, """ Q ' TFFF: O """' i "QssQ . your school day life told with pictures. The mgrafving iflurtmlionr in this finnual were made by THE CENTRAL ENGRAVING COMPANY Designers and Engravers of Printing Plates 2182 GUS KLAUMINZERY P1-rom-:s, MAIN 674-675 CLEVELAND O Pres. sl Mgr. Eddy 4429 Compliments of Center Fruit 8: Ve t bl Fox. BROS. Market ge a 6 Moving and Expressing 1128 E' 105th St' "The Store That Saves You 662 East 105th Street Money" Cor' St' Clair Avei Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Daily d, . Cleve an O Teddy Green, Prop. "What kind of fruit grows on telephone A dance, a data, poles?" I Perchance out lata. "Electric currents. Here's a good one." A class, a quizza, X ,,, X No pass, gee Whizza. , , , :if :ie Pk if iagugilimoklng' A girl and a man sat under the palm The smoked last just outside the ballroom. "Is your love In ay Owder mill true?" asked the girl. p ' "As true," the man answered, in low l it it it eager tones, "as true as the delicate Hush Violet-I thought you took an algebra on your cheek." 'BGSU D O,er-an-" the girl stammered hurried- Mabel-I did. ly, "isn't-doesn't the band play nicely?" 135 Ice Cream Candy W W 6 W. 6 r lb 6 Q Baked Goods Lunches if Hoffman' Write Your Own S uperlatives STORES IN GREATER CLEVELAND LOVE NEST THE BEST EATING CANDY BAR IN THE WORLD FOR A NICKEL For Sale Wherever Candy is soid The E U C L I D C A N D Y COMPANY Cleveland, Ohio Brooklyn, N. Y. "What time is it when the clock strikes thirteen," "Time for the clock to be fixed." Pk Pk Pk Guest-CAt hotel, hearing knock on doorj : "What is it ?" Bell-Hop "Telegram." Guestg "Well, shove it under the door." Bell-Hop: "Can'tg it's on a tray." lk bk Dk "How do they get the Water in a Water melon ?" "Plant the seed in the spring." GLENVILLE DRUG CO. John A. Mitermiler 10427 St. Clair Avenue Drugs and Medicines Prescriptions a Specialty Kodaks and Films COME TO Ed. Goodman's Delicatessen FOR A REAL SANDWICH 1141 E 105th St. Eddy 7704 GLENVILLE COLLEGE OF MUSIC Violin, Piano, Voice, Saxophone, Flute, Clarinet, Cornet, Trombone, Cello, Bass, Drums, Xylophone, Banjo, Mandolin, Guitar and Ukelele Instruments, Sheet Music and Supplies Sold 10403 St. Clair Avenue West Branch, 10312 Lorain Ave. COLLEGIAN SUITS OXFORD BAGS TCP COATS A527395 52 750 MEF? The Lyon Tailoring Co. Five Stores in Cleveland 845 Prospect Ave. Rose Bldg. Printing- - - THE BENCRAFT PRESS DISTINCTIVE PRINTING 5600 Carnegie Ave. Al E. 55th Street Randolph 4278 In Algebra class-"The object is to reduce all equations so that their value equals zero, as I often do on test papers." Pk Pk Pk "Five cents' worth of liniment and five cents' worth of cement," asked the boy at the druggist. "Want them tied in separate packages ?" asked the druggist. "Yes, I guess so," answered the boy. "One is for mother--the cement, I guess, she wants to mend the teapot." Dk Ik Ulf She sang and sang: "I will hang my harp on a willow tree-e-e-e, I will hang my harp on a willow tree-e-e-e-e," each time breaking on the high note. Finally the patient father from the next room ventured: "Better hang it on a lower branch, Liz." bk Pk Pk Horseback riding will reduce your weight, just see how the Prince of Wales has fallen off. Russ. W. "Last night I fell asleep and dreamed I was Prince Albert-but it was only a pipe dream." rk Pk Pk Art. K. "What makes the street cars so crowded this morning?" Chuck: "The passengers. Give me a harder one." Pk Pk Pk Farmer D.: "Do you call him a dwarf? He's over 5 feet tall." Showman-"That's the wonderful part of it. He's the tallest dwarf in the world." Dk PIC Dk Men are what women marry. They smoke, lie, swear, and gamble. They don't go to church, but women do. Both men and women sprang from monkeys, but women sprang farther. -Widow Pk Pk Pk "They call her Spearmintf' "Why, because she's Wrigley ?" "No, because she's always after meals." The Sign off '-NX Good the year round. The same perform- ance, Summer or Winter. A quick start, even in the coldest weather. A world of Power on hills and plenty of Pep in traffic. And, above all, more miles for every dol- lar spent for fuel! That's why 85,000 Greater Cleveland Motorist swear by this superior Motor Fuel. Just a trial - and you, too, will become a constant user of Brooks White Star Gasolene -The Original Benzol Motor Fuel Good as the best Better than most There's a While Star Station Handy To Your Home The Brooks Oil Company, Cleveland, Ohio 138 THE CLEVELAND LAW SCHOOL 1336 Engineers Building Founded 1897 Incorporated 1899 Oldest and Largest Night Law School in Ohio Over 1700 Graduates Degree of LL.B. granted. Until October 15, 1926, high school graduates received, after which time, one year of college will be required. NEXT TERM BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15th Afternoon and evening sessions. For further particulars inquire of the office. q Dean Willis Vickery, LL. D. judge of Court of Appeals Catalog upon request. Main 2533 Adelaide-"I see you're trying out for the Dramatic Club. Had any experience ?" Marg.-"Yep-had my leg in a cast once." Pk Dk Dk Country boy: "Come on, let's go to the house. Dinner's ready." City boy: "Not yet. I want to see the end of this brook go by." Pk Pls Pk Betty, in Latin-"I don't think they had any boats in Caesar's time. At least, I don't remember any." Dk Pls Pk The best argument for the styles of to- day is the family album. Pk Pk Pk The parson had been preaching for an hour. "I gazed at the ocean," he said, "and cried, "Mighty as you are, you will eventually dry up, but I will not." Prof. "There's a town in Ohio named after you." Proud Frosh: "You don't say." Prof. "Yes, Marblehead." PF Pk Pk t 63'Say, brudda, vvhere's all yo chickens go 0 ." "Some fool left de chicken coop open, an' dey all Went home." Pk PF Pk Stan. "I think a street-car just passed." Bob. "How do you know ?" Stan. "I can see its tracks." Dk PK Ik Mr. Harbourt-Name an island posses- sion of the U. S. Bob- frudely awakenedj Huh? Why, an- Mr. H.-Correct, sit down. Dk Ik Pk Mr. Jones: "You're flat." Singer: "Beg your pardon. I'm a sophomore." Class Rings and Pins Club Pins Fraternity Pins in Half and Whole Pearls De Molay Pins 'PMG CLEVELAND METAL SPECIALTIES CO. A line of party favors to interest you and save money. 1783 East 21st Prospect 4186 Graduates of Glenville Learn a Profession Chiropody fa recognized branch of medicinej. Your high school diploma quali- Hes you for admission. for further particulars address THE OHIO COLLEGE OF CHIROPODY 1030 Euclid Avenue M. S. Harmolin, D. S. C. Secretary Boyd Business School The Boyd Course of inten- sive training in Shorthand, Typew r i t i n g, Secretarial Duties and Business Corre- spondence will prepare you for an excellent position in twelve weeks' time. Posilions secured Graduates Heals ERIE BUILDING Cor. East 9th and Prospect Ave. Prospect 2028 We are specialists in the Laundry Business. Our specialty is Overalls, jackets and all Working Garments. Also Painters' Drop Cloths and Overalls. The Ohio Mechanics Laundry Company East 47th St. and Lexington Ave. Randolph 5379 CLEVELAND PREPARATORY SCHOOL Established 191 I First Grade-Co-educational-Diploma on Graduation Member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools Day and Evening Classes in High School Subjects Under Some of Cleveland's Best Teachers . SUMMER TERM Begins Monday, May 31st, 1926 FALL SEMESTER Begins Monday, Sept. 13th, 1926 JVIain 4543 D' H' HOPKINS' Principal 219 ULMER BUILDING Miss Smith tlooking thru her basketj "At last! Here it is. I wonder why one always find a thing in the last place in which he hunts?" Wise Student- "Maybe, it's because when we find what we're looking for, we stop hunting." lk PK Pk Compliments of A New York clerk asked his boss for an increase in salary. The latter said, "Why should you have one? There are 365 days in a year. You work 8 hours a day, and MILLS RESTAURANT that is 122 days. There are 52 Sundays in a year, and you get them oi, leaving 70 days. There are 14 holidays and two busi- . ness picnics in a year, for which you get 315319 Euchd Avcnue of, which leaves you 54 days. You take one hour ofl' for lunch each day and that leaves 40 days. You get Saturday after- noons off, which makes 26 days and leaves you 14 days, and I give you two weeks' vacation each year. When do you work, anyhow ?" -Exchange Ik Pk lk Ice: "VVhat's in a glacier bed ?" Cream: "Ice sheets, I suppose." 141 High School Graduates Among the many reasons for securing one's training at The Spencerian School of Commerce, Accounts and Finance, located in Cleveland, the city of opportunity, are: A wide range of courses. A nation wide reputation for excellence in training young men and women. A veritable city of successful graduates-57,000 students having at- tended the Spencerian. Four courses of collegiate grade leading to degrees. A placement bureau that receives several hundred calls a month and serves Spencerian graduates without charge. Modern school buildings located in the heart of Cleveland on spacious grounds. COURSES OF STUDY ADVANCED COURSES Day and Evening Sessions Ijeading f0,Cf0Uffg? Deglzees Business Administration Qwrth de- B00kkeePmg gfee of B. c. s.y Shorthand Secretarial Science fwith degree of Speed Shorthand and Typewriting B. S. SJ High Sghogl for Adults Commercial Normal Cwith degree of B. s. in Ed.j P . rwate Secretary Evening Law Cwith degree of LL. English fP'reparatory-Advancedj . . B-D Commercial Spanish Higher Accounting, Cost Accounting Commercial Normal fwi-th State and Auditing Cprepares for C. P. A. Certiiicatej Exam.j Call, write or 'phone for bulletins and full information SPENCERIAN SCHOOL of COMMERCE - ACCOUNTS - FINANCE Founded 1848 3201 Euclid Avenue Prospect 4500 142 LEARN A TRADE That Will Be a Life Insurance For You. We Never Know What The Future Will Bring, So Why Not Learn a Livelihood Cleveland Designing and Cutting School of Ladies' Garments Teaches Ladies' Tailoring, Dressmaking, Hemstitching Beading and Machine Embroidering SEPARATE FRENCH MILLINERY CLASSES LATEST SYSTEMS USED DAY AND EVENING CLASSES-12 LESSONS FOR 815.00 Diploma Upon Graduating New Classes Now Forming We Have Moved to Larger Quarters OUR NEW LOCATION --- 308 ERIE BLDG. Cor. E. 9th and Prospect Phone: Superior 2756 fFormerly of 400 Euclid Building! - Bring Your Material WE CUT OUT YOUR GOWN WHILE YOU WAIT The W. H. Baetz Company -Pi? Dry Goods M en's Furnishings l as 10405 St. Clair Avenue Fred-'Tm surprised that you should cheat in that Way." Robert Ceagerlyj-"Why? Do you know a better way?" Pk Pk Dk Glenville Student-"I don't like these photographs at all, I look like an ass." Mr. Krumhar-"You should have thought of that before you had them taken." ,F ,,: at Excited soph. "What bell is that?" Wise Seniorg "The one right up there on the Wall." ' MILLER'S H ome-M ade Candies Ice Cream E. 105th and St. Clair Ave. Phone Bell, Eddy 3079 Why You Should Attend DYKE SCHOOL 9' BUSINESS L. Student Body 6 VVe appeal to students of high school and college grade only. 2. Faculty The best teachers are employed. 3. Courses - All courses are organized to meet I the requirements of a mature and discriminating student body. 8 4. Results The graduates of this school are fitted to accept positions of re- sponsibility. 5. Positions Dyke graduates are placed in worth-while positions. Cheap 9 positions are not filled by our Service Department. Superior 180 1001 HURON Permanent Service Once a Dyke graduate always a Dyke graduate. Our Service De- partment stands back of graduates for all time, Whenever a need may exist. Location Conveniently located in new build- ing at 1001 Huron Road. Rates The cost of a course in the Dyke School of Business is in direct proportion to the ability of the student. The best school is the cheapest school for any good stu- dent to attend. Accredited Member National Association of Accredited Commercial Schools. ROAD Superior 181 GLENVILLE HOSPITAL JULIA M. WHITE Supl. of Hospital Training School for Nurses ELIZABETH K. SMITH Supi. of Nurses 144 WHISLER'S SHOR THAND SCHOOL 10406 Euclid Avenue S. W. Corner E. 105th St. ABSOLUTELY INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION Begin Any Time Catalog on Request Cedar 1681 Life is just one fool thing after another. Love is just two fool things after each other. bk Pk PK A woman may be shocked if you make love to her, but she's mighty disappointed if you don't. Pk Pk Dk Many a true word has been spoken through false teeth. Pk Pk Pls Nowadays, it takes two licenses to make a girl yours-marriage and automobile. In case of fire, the Seniors should march out first, for the rest of the school are so green, they wouldn't burn anyway. if Pk DK "I wouldn't marry you if you were the last man on earth." "You bet you wouldn't. You'd be killed in the rush." DF PIC Pk "O, will you miss me ?" warbled the serenading lover?" "Not if I can help it," muttered Dad as he took a windup with the water pitcher. Early Spring Needs Full Line of Lawn Seeds and Fertilizers also Garden Supplies General Repairing Abrams Hardware Co. Eddy 6321 1027 E. 105th sr. The Best in Music is always found at The EUCLID MUSIC Co. 10526 St. Clair Ave. THE JOHN MARSHALL SCHOOL OF LAW 242-248 Superior Avenue, N. E. CLEVELAND fudge David S. Meek, Dean 146 S pf' MM CWM J I X, N N JW , My j e,....,,,-,, "g!,.k.I,Q.,, Al.u+2 N 'QD-xs.LlJL-J :A-M ' 'N I ' LflUKlA b 0 EV 4 f - X ff 7 myf Q nn:-mm, - mm ,mam PJ ' A 1, -- :A 1.4, -mum 1.41 W, umm. v'-s-.-.mliwm .mu,,s:-asa iii 3 .1 vb E3 W fi 1


Suggestions in the Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) collection:

Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1914 Edition, Page 1

1914

Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

1918

Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1924 Edition, Page 1

1924

Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

1929

Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

1935

Glenville High School - Olympiad Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

1937

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.