Gilman School - Cynosure Yearbook (Baltimore, MD)

 - Class of 1964

Page 1 of 108

 

Gilman School - Cynosure Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1964 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 108 of the 1964 volume:

r .: 2.:3wt 7 Itsyln .r 1.?ka .h ... ,..V,,V. n W'd.4-u -.- . Mil! ;.L.. - W $1.1 v.5:- ir-T-L r" --,. - V ,-.:4. TV: a XVh-k 1.me L-R Z ..n . -?1 VOLUME XLVII BALTIMORE, MARYLAND i BMRD 0F TRUSTEES OFFICERS RICHARD W. EMORY, ,31 ............. I. RIDGEWAY TRIMBLE, 18 ......... ROBERT M. THOMAS, 381 ............. H. NORMAN BAETJER, JR, 35 ...... BOARD H. Norman Baetjer, Jr., ,55 Allen MCC. Barrett, 540 ngrancis F. Bsirne, ,08 R. McLean Campbell, ,42 J. Crossan Cooper, 19 Owen Daly, H, ,43 Edward K. Dunn, 18 Richard W. Emory, 31 Dawson Farber, ,35 D. C. Wharton Finney, 43 Jf'George G. Finney, ,17 $gCharIes 8. Garland A. McGehee Harvey Donald H. Hooker, 28 john T. King, III, ,36 Walter Lord, ,35 ngonomry Trmtee ................... Preyidem ........... Vice-President ................... S ecretm'y ................. Treawrer William D. Lynn, ,36 William J McCarthy, ,49 Nicholas G. Penniman, III, ,27 J. Hurst Purnell, IL, 37 John Redwood, Jr., 17 William F. Schmick, Jr. Thomas Schweizer W. Cameron Slack, 546 J. Richard Thomas, 143 Robert M. Thomas, ,38 I. Ridgeway Trimble, 18 M. Cooper Walker, ,33 s'iiPalmer F. C. Williams, 19 W. Barry Wood, Jr. Alan C. Woods, Jr., 36 Theodore E. Woodward It is with sincere appreciation for what he has meant to us, both as an inspiring teacher and an outstanding individual, that we, the Class of 1964, dedicate our Cynomre t0 EDWARD E. THOMPSON LUDLOW H. BALDWIN On September 10, 1965, Gilman School began its sixty-sixth year. Old and new students as- sembled for the first time in the auditorium and were addressed by the schools new headmaster, Mt. Ludlow Baldwin. This year Mr. Baldwin, with the aid Of the faculty, has successfully started Gilman on a new administration. The retirement of Mr. Gallard and five of the school's most devoted and beloved members necessitated many changes, which have been carried out smoothly. Ludlow H. Baldwin is the ninth headmaster 0f Gilman. A graduate of the school in the class of 1922, he went on to Johns Hopkins University, where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree. From here he went to the Harvard Law School, which conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1929. Mr. Baldwin then went into business, eventu- ally becoming the President of the Terminal Warehouse Company in the early thirties. During this period, he was honored by being elected President of the Junior Association of Commerce, and his fellow Gilman alumni selected him to be president of the Alumni Association. When World War II broke out, he entered the Navy as a seaman, serving in both the Atlantic and the Pacific, and emerged a lieutenant commander. Mr. Baldwin joined the Gilman faculty in 1946 to teach American and ancient history and shortly thereafter obtained his Masters degree. In 1955, he was appointed dean, and has served as acting headmasret on two occasions. Mr. Baldwin comes to the position of head- master with exceptional experience and brings to this Office a rare blend of the qualities of scholar, business executive, and leader. He is notable for his good fellowship and fine sense of humor, as well as his understanding of youth and its prob- lems. The members of the class of 1964 wish Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin all possible success and happi- ness in the years ahead. 4 Ag UPPER SCHMIL FACULTY Headmaxler LudIOW H. Baldwin, A.B., M.A., LLB. 10an Hopkim, Harvard Law Charles R. Gamper, B.SA, Penmylwmia, Johrz Hopkim ............. Admirzixtmtive Ayyiytmzt, Mathematicy, Athletic Director James Leland Dresser, C.E., Remmlaer Polytechnic Imlitute .......................................................................... Mathematics James C. Pine, B.A., Yale, Harvard Graduate School of Educatiow ............................................. Hixtory, Public Speaking Frederick R. Williams, A.B., M.A , Columbia ............................................................................................ Biology, Science George M4 Chandlee, JL, B.A4, M.A., Yale, Loum'cma State . ,,,,, Mathematiu Roy C. Barker, A.B., A.M., Wexleyzm ...................................................................................... Englijla William H. Porter, B.S., U. S. Naval Academy ............................... .. Phyxics, Mallaematici, General Science Allison Jarrard Downs, A.B., M.A., Oberlin, John: Hopkim ...... .. .................... Eaglixb P. Meredith Reese, III, A.B., Ed.M., Harvard .............................. V Hiitory, Bible Alexander Armstrong, A.B., M.A., Princeton, 10km Hopkim ......... Englixla R. Jack Garver, B.F.A., Carnegie Tech ................. Art Willis Spencer, B.A., M.A , Harvard ...... ., ........................................................................... Hijtory Redmond C. S. Finney, A.B., M.Ed., Princeton, Harvard, 101m; Hopkins ................................. Hthory, Mathematiw, Bible WarEeld M. Firor, A.B., M.D., John: Hopkins and School of Medicine ............................................................... Bible Edward E. Thompson, B.S., Yale ......................................................................... Cbemixtry, Mathematiu, General Science Dimitri S. Manuelides, B.A., LL.B., M.A., Atbem College !Greecw , Um'verjity 0f Atbem wireecw, University of Virginia ................................................. French, Hijtory John Brand Hewett, B.A., William: ..... .. Mil Fullbrigbl Exchange to Germany Nicholas M. Schloeder, B.A., M.A., Bucknell , Hillary, Public Speaking, Govemzmem Frank W. Andrews, JL, BA, University of New Mexico. ................................................ English Richard K. Marshall, A.B., M.A., 10km Hopkim ................. . . . .............................................................. Latin Bernard H. Bichakjian, Baccalaurt$at-Philosophie, TeackemV College, Lyom, France ................................................ French William Beverly Campbell, A.B., Princeton ............................................................. Geography, Hixtory Karl Cadem Lemp, A.B., LL.B., Ambent, Harvard Law ....................... Latin Bruce H. Beeler, B.S., M.A., Temple Univemity, New York Univerxity,., Spanish, Latin Joseph P. Carroll, B.S., LL.B., Georgetmwz Umvenity, Univerxity of Ballimore Law School ........... Matlaematirs R. Bruce Daniels, B.A., Ambemt ................................................................................................................ Englixb John R. Merrill, B.Mus., M.Mus., Peabody Corzxermtory 0f Mmic. Wlmic, Englixk Harold Holmes Wrenn, Univemity of Virginia, Columbia ................ Mrs. William B. Crane, Maryland Inititute ........................................................................ Mechanical Drawing Mrs. Abou D. Pollack, B.A., M.A., Cornell, George WdIbiflgton Univemity .................. Developmental Reading Program Alfred B. Starratt, B.S., B.D., Ph.D., Boston University, Epiicopal Tbeologiml School, Harvard ............................ Bible JOhD F. Barrkowski, B'Sw M'S'a Univenity of like South, Syracuse ................................................. Mathematicj, Science Miss Mireille F, Bertrand, M.S., Univenity 0f Cam Wmmw, 1019725 Hopkim ...................................................... French Robert Alvin Day, B.A., M.A., Whitman College, Mexico City College, Jolam Hopkins ...................................... Spanixb S. Butler Grimes, III, B.A., Wexleyan, jobm Hopkins ....................................................... English Lawrence Lockwood, JL, A.B., Dartmouth ........................... Eizglixb Kevin J. O'Leary, A.B., Bmwv Um'verjizy . V . William Walker Pheil, B.A., Univemity of the 507th .................................................................................... Matlaematiu Karl-Heinz Rinke, Staatsexamen, Goettingen University Germ4nw Anenorexozmen, Univemity of Hanover KGermanw Grenoble ................................................................................................................................ French, Latm Edwin S. Villmoare, III, B.A., Harvard , . V .. .. .. . . V .. ......... English Harry Burton Kester, Uflivemity 0f Illinoix, Univerjity of Maryland ...................................................................... Band Thomas R. McDaniel, B.A., Hampden-Sydney College, John; Hopkim ................................................ Verbal Aptitude L0WEHJSCH00L FACULTY Reginald S. Tickner, Head; A.B., M.A., Franklin and Marxball, Unimmily of Pewmylmmia Lower Four and Six English, Geography, Spelling K. Graeme Menzies, A.B., Waxbington College ................................................................................ Lower Four, Five, Six C. Huntley Hilliard, B.S., M.Ed., Univerjity of Maryland ............................................... Lower Six, Craft: Warren A. E. Magruder, B.S., M.Edl, Univemity of Pennsylvania, Weitern Marylandn. Lower Five, Six William S. Merrick, JL, A.B., debington and Lee ............................................... Lower Four, Five ............. Lower Four, Five, Six William Middendorf Miller, B.A., M.Ed., Jobm Hopkim, Univerxity of Virginia. Lower Four, Five, Six Elliott K. Verner, B.A., John; Hopkim ............... ,. ............................................... Mrs John W. Algeirson, B.A., M.Ed., Uizivenity 0f Rockexter, Gaucher. ............... Lower Three Mrs Louise G. Fitzell, Maryland State Teacher: College ................................................................................... Lower Two Miss Helen K. Stevens, B.S., Education ami Mmic, Pelmwlmnia State, College, Univenity 0f Mane, Philadelphia Comervalory ................................................................... Lower 0718, Mmic Mrs. David H. Wilson, Bradford Junior College, Numeral Training School of Boston, folam Hopkim Lower Four Spelling, Amman; Lower Two and Three, Librarian Mrs. William B. Crane, Maryland Institute ........................................................................................................... Art Mrs. Abou D. Pollack, B.A., M.A., Cornell, George Waxbington Univerxity ........ Louw Four and Six Readiizg R. Jack Garver, B.F.A., Carnegie Tech ................................................................................................ Crafn Mrs. Charles E. Lang, A.B., Hoot! ...................................... Animmt Lower One Miss Gay Hunner Parsons, B.A., Camber College ........................ ...A55ixtmzt Lower Two and Five SCHO0L STAFF Charles C. Emmons, A.B , Princeton . ,. . , . . . , , .. . .. Director, Development Offzce Palmer F. C. Williams, M.D., Univemity of Maryland Medical School; Aumaizt Vixitmg Pbyxicizm, 101m; Hopkin; Hoypiml .................................... .7 .................... ,. . 5519001 Pbyu'cimz Mrs. Alton A. Davison, A.B., Convene College ................................................ Librarian Mrs. Dona J. Danz .............................................................................................. . Secretary, Headmzmer Miss Henrietta M. Rittler ....... . , ....... .. V ........................... School Secretary, Upper 5519001 Miss Elizabeth A. Heinmuller .. V . .. .V . . Ant. Secretary, Upper School Mrs. Harrison B. Irwin ........................................................ Fimmcial Secretary Mrs. Meredith M. Janvier..... . . , Secretary, Development OffEce Mrs. George M Chandlee V. ............................................................ Secremry, Development 01$ce Mrs. George A. Bowen ........................................................... . . ................................... Secretary, Lower School Mrs. Fletcher A. Anderson, Jr. . . .. .,. .., .V. .. . ....................... Dietitimz E. Vincent Pabst .............................................................................. . V ................................ Superimwzdem 9 w x STUDENT COUNCIL. Seated: McCormick; Reed; Isaacs; Locke; Miller. Standing: Sims; Johnson; StiHer, R.; Le- Boutillier; Farber, P.; Harvey, B. . v4; N E SIXTH FORM COMMITTEE. Seated: Isaacs, PreJi- JUDICIARY COMMITTEE. Seated: Winstead; Locke, dent. Sthzling: Locke, Firxt Vice-prexidem; Reed, Second Cbairmmz; Slaughter. Fimt Row: Farber, R.; Sims; Baker, Vice-preyident; Miller, J., Secretary; McCormick, Twas W. R.; StiHer. Met: 10 SIXTH NRM SIXTH FORM. Salted: McCormick, Treamre'r 1' ' resident: Isaacs, Pr JIIZQIZI: Reed, Second Vi '-Pl1e Mew: Miller, Sewetzzry. First r1021" Owens, M; Winstead, T.; Revell; Anderson; Beck; Mason; McDonough; Whedbee 1as.; Silverstein; G1bb011s-Neff,P.;Coffay. Secwzzlrozv: Beers; Trimble T. R.; 11111, N.;XVarf161d; Sollod; John- 5011, D.; Allan D.; Cianos; Reese; AacLean; Scott; Symington; Priddy Third 10w, Ricl1,R.; Green, D.; Gillelan; Barton; Redwood 10 Lundberg; Wood; Abrahamson; Mc- Carthy;Browr1,R.;Hardesty;P1ne;Caplan.Faintbroux' Stafford; Sigler; Ober; Slaughter; Davis, A. B.; Chelton; McCay; Coe, H 10nes,1 Childs; Lox1e; Herrmann L. Fifth 1110111. King; Campbell,1.; Easter; C11ne;DuV1vier; Bryson;KelIy; FlandeIS' Bragdon;Weisk1ttel Kaplan. 1964 ANNUAL FAREWELL The days pass inexorably by, and the time draws near when we, the sixty-four members of the Class of 1964, will leave the hallowed halls of Gilman behind us. The long hours of home- work, the tedious tasks of education, the trying tests and exams, the sleepless nights before term paper deadlines, the triumphant moments on the athletic field, and the devotion of six years will soon fade in everyone's minds but our own. But Gilman has not meant merely eight hours a day, five days a week to us, for as we became a part of this lnStituthn, it has surely become a part of us. From the day we walked into the Upper School in 1958, numbering seventy-eight, we have been a unified class in everything we have done. As a class, we faced being thrown down the banks by Second Formets; as a class, we met the require- ments of a demanding curriculum; as a class, we supported activities, both the schools and our own. We recall three satisfying victories in the Circus, especially the one in out Fifth Form year. We remember out First and Second Form Dances and the postponed Fifth Form Dance, and most of all the parties during our Senior year. The Library Annex, the Science Building, "B" Study Hall, the Lower School wing, and a new athletic field have all been added during our tenure. As Sixth Formets, we will be the first graduating Class under the leadership of out new headmaster, Mt. Baldwin. Not only do we remember important things, but also we recall the little things that made life at Gilman as rewarding as it was: First Form History plays, afternoon study halls, mass meetings 15 in "A", first class citizens, S. A. T's, Circuses, Red Cross drives, Sixth Form speeches, and college interviews. We also recall what we have done to serve Gilman: work jobs, supervising WA" and "B" Study Halls, coaching teams, tefereeing games, serving on committees, and other innumerable responsibilities. We have been challenged by Gilman in out pursuit of education. The mastery of a foreign language, one or more laboratory sciences, history, mathematics, and English have been required of us. Guided by an excellent faculty, to whom we are indebted, we also were exposed to art and music appreciation courses, along with the regu- lar study of religion. Our studies, however, did not so overwhelm us that we had time for nothing else. In extracur- ricular fields the class has excelled. Support of, and membership in, one or more of the many clubs has been important to each of us. The ath- letic side of our character was also developed, culminating in many of us making one or more varsity teams. The success of the football team, in which we played a big part over the past two seasons, is evidence of out athletic ability: But now we turn our backs on the past and look forward with aspirations for the future, yet not knowing what the years to come will hold for us. We realize now what Gilman has done for us, and we hope that we, in our own way, have made some contributions to Gilman. We leave the school this June, not as the young boys of yester- day but the young men of todayethe members of the Class of 1964. DAVID STEPHEN B. ABRAHAMSON Gilman Representative to Hopkins . . . Goucher mascot . . . V.P. Literary Club . . . Charter member of A.L.O. . . . Varsity Soccer Offense t . . Rosy cheeks . . . Abrahmster . . . Pr. H. . . . Sylvia and her tray . . . switchboard operator . . . very enjoyable bus companions. DAVID ALLAN "Flash" . . . Pnyx Debating Club President . . . "B" Study Hall Chairman . . . head of James Brown Fan Club . . . uXWake up and say Yea ya!" . . . Clean-up Committee . . . two years as Varsity Baseball manager . . . head cheerleader . . . Friday morning football team introductions . . . uMary, Mary, quite contrary" . . . Green Spring Valley socialite . . . "Requesting permission to IandW . . . "For cryin, out loudlh WILLIAM THOMAS ANDERSON All-Maryland Honorable Mention as tackle for football team . . . Varsity Baseball catcher for three years and captain in senior year . . . heavyweight wrestling star . . . uHawg" . . . "Gee, What a sharp knife" . . . the driver of the "Tangerine Terror" . . . Peach Blossom . . . often seen With a certain Eastern girl . . . "No, youtre the greatest guy, Joth WILLIAM CARLYLE BARTON Varsity Lacrosse . . . Co-captain of championship Special Ex team . . . "Oh, shut upV . . . hDOfft y0u ever study?" . . . Jane, Jane, Jane . . . tallest member of the Varsity Soccer Team . . . You have to pay the price!" . . . handles the money for the Recess Lunch Committee. THOMAS SPRINGER BECK "Beautiful Country" . . . All-Maryland midfleld in lacrosse . . . Honorable Mention AlI-Maryland in football as tailback with forty-five yard punting average . . . Varsity Wrestling veteran . . . captain of three sports and President of the Ath- letic Association . . . Dance Committee as junior and senior . . . "What kind of tree?" . . . For these he deserves a pat on the beck. JAMES W. BEERS Kathy . . . "Do you want to be a marineV . . . There goes another chair . . . "Keep your books on your own side!" . . . Lend me your comb. .. The man with the frown . . . Often seen suffering in "B" . . . Wolf in tight pants Varsity Wrestling Team V, VI . . . Poet in Literary Club. BROOKS PAUL JOHNSTON BRAGDON One of Varsity Football's harbinger guards . . . first-string corridor clock-breaking team . . . Norman, my love Varsity Wrestling Team . . . Gilman's good-will ambassador to Georgetown . . . Brax . . . rernowned linquist, world traveller, quick-witted commentator. ROBERT A. BROWN Sally who? . . . Russian cigarettes? . . . three inch fllters? . track team . . . member of Civil War skirmish unit and Political Club . . . "I don't have the foggiest" . . . Co-head of Blue and Gray Business Board . . . "C'est la vie." . . . Military History Club VI . . . Auditorium Committee V, VI. JOHN ALAN BRYSON President of Dramatic Association and Political Club . . . "Now look, Mason" . . . "I swear, that man is crazyV . . Center Stage . . . Botticelli team captain . . . what a Saab story! . . . rights of neutrality . . . "Where can I dream up six journal entries?" . . . U.N. Youth work . . . "14m fed up with Caplanly, . . . always in need of a haircut . . . bossism in the P. C. . . . staying at the Masons'. JAMES IRA CAMPBELL, JR. Arrived 8:44-45 . . . Varsity Football end ,62-63 . . . Second- Team AIl-Mnryland Football and Unsung Hero for McDonogh game . . . "Bullwinkle is the best show on TV." . . . "Checkers, Ham? . . . Coat and tie?4nCVer touch the stuff . . . Second Form Bible . . . That meany that ran "A" and "B" . . . after five years, number one. THOMAS MARK CAPLAN VP. of Political Club . . . the brain behind Youth-tO-Youth . . . "111 have you shot at sundown!" . . . accomplished debater and journalist with a rambling style . . . dreams of early re- tirement . . . foremost admirer of the late J.F.K. . . . power struggles with Bryson. RONALD KEITH CHELTON Member of Steve Allen Fan Club . . . Christian Association . . . Audio Visual Committee . . . "Do you think we,ll have a quiz today?" . . . likes Agatha Christie, Liz Montgomery . . . "Wauhl, uh, I dodt know about that." WALTER S. B. CHILDS Four-year patron of the boarding corridor . . . Christian Association . . . "Oh, really? . . . often seen in blue Volks or writing letters on Sunday night to a Stone Ridge senior . . . Walrus Fan Club . . . Varsity Wrestling Team as senior . stamp vendor . . . second-string Clock-breaking team . . . four year French nut . . . the chest. JAMES N. CIANOS President of Astronomy Club . . . Check!-Double Check! eClyeckmate! . . . Auditorium Committee . . . singing class . marked tendency to wear brightly-colored clothing . . . enjoys geology, evolution, and physics . . . hBut you did say the next moon hight leaves from Room 40. . . number one on Chess Team . . . good-natured non-conformist. Vice-President of the Astronomy Club and an expert on the heavens . . . invaluable trombone player in the Gilman Band . . . managed only an eight hundred on his English Composition achievement . . . going to Wesleyan for its fine CASPER EZRA CLINE, III I Astronomy program . . . likes jazz . . . Cappy. BRIAN COFFAY Believes unHinchingly that Texas has more good-looking girls than Baltimore . . . the originator of the cereal dinner . . . "McHalEs at 823W . . . wee few sarcastic, meet for many in a row . . . creator of the WAUHL spelling and pronuncia- tion guide. ALDRICH BARTON DAVIS Areopagus Debating Club . . . Business Manager of the New; . . . Hoffman Club . . . hWhats so funny?" . . . Every- body worries too much . . . Rich . . . Often seen With the one who knows all . . . Halfback 0n Varsity Soccer Team. PAUL TRIMBLE DUVIVIER Political Club, Military History Club . . . the perfect gen- tleman . . . Christian Association . . . V Form Dance Com- mittee . . . Safety Committee . . . French and German scholar . . . loves food twill try anything oncej . . . guitar at beach parties tor shipwrecksl JAMES HAMILTON EASTER Often seen driving to school in pick-up truck . . . usually laying nEaster eggs" in Mt. Potter's classes . . . Gilmads version of Milton Berle . . . the Frank Ramsey of Varsity Basketball . . . one of Gilmarfs original advanced chemistry researchers . . . can be found With jeans 0n, and a piece of straw in his mouth . . . first to be accepted into college. FOREST CRAIG FLANDERS Duane . . . longest hair in the class, often threatened With scissors . . . the Library Annex . . . the original mocket . . . the Marlboro man . . . "my gangh . . . plays electric guitar for the marvellous Vandells . . . four years on Varsity Special Exercise . . . F, Craig. PETER GlBBONS-NEFF "Neffer" . . . fearless dictator of the Lower North Corridor . . . All-Marylnnd Honorable Mention as guard for football team . . . punishing lacrosse defenseman . . . WCAO hops held at the Chestertown Armory . . . avid duck hunter, sailor, and scuba diver . . . two major failings: sleepwalking and high blood pressure . . . future Secretary of Agriculture . . . "All right, Coffay, you,ve had it!" JOSHUA THOMAS GILLELAN, II The Black Box . . . hyou pseudo" . . . Chess team . . . Papa and Su at Bryn Mawt . . . four years an officer in the Hoffman Club . . . the Canoe trip . . . outspoken about certain ideas . always 21 debater . . . Center Stage . . . Nancy, Jennie, Peggy, Nancy, Barbara, Nancy and Annewill it ever end? DOUGLAS GUSTAVE GREEN Class hypnotist, egotist, psychiatrist, and humorist . . . two years of labs with Ham . . . First Form Bible Assistant . . . Botticelli Team . . . "Who wants to double this weekend?" Literary Club Officer . . . "The Great Green" . . . Dough . . . often seen rehearsing Hamlet . . . Cynottme Associate Editor . . . the uBagels" . . . a Hair for words, whether they exist or not. JAMES DUN N HARDESTY Active in Chess Club and Political Club . . . captain of the Gym police . . . favorite activity: sleeping in Varsity Football managefs room . . . radio station WANA . . . Nova 11 . . . DMA co-founder . . . Jim's Driving Rules of the Road . . . April 28, 1965 . . . gazelle . . . 'hLet,s be realistic about this? Member Of the Nova Caravan. ROBERT LEITH HERRMANN A third of the nameless trio . . . drives the blue bomb . . . "Why should I?" . . . "Oh, bull, Harris!" . . . "Wait a sec, I've got to put my finger picks on" . . . Member of Nova caravan . . . plays harmonica while trying to drive . . . biggest smile in class . . . Glee Club. NICHOLAS TAYLOR ILIFF Christian Association . . . The man with the contact Eye- ball . . . Member of A50. . . . All-night history report . . . plays unfinished symphonies on roommates gitbox . . . "Oh, Stuart!!!" . . . member of Varsity Soccer Team . . . nicknamed Jim Bowie by corridor mates . . . Karate expert . . . practices on younger brother. JAMES WILLIAM ISAACS President of the Student Council . . . Varsity Basketball, Captain . . . nine seasons on Varsity Football, Basketball, and Baseball Teams . . . All-Maryland Honorable Mention and Unsung Hero at fullback . . . "Speak softly and carry a big stick!" . . . "trouble-maker" . . . llae hrst-class citizen. DAVID STARR JOHNSON, JR. Business board New; and Cynomre . . . V8zVI Form Dance Committees . . . Varsity Lacrosse V, VI . . . Sherwood, May 1963 . . . VP. of James Brown Fan Club . . . drives motley colored M.G. . . . Charter member of Cleanup Committee . . . "Hi, Charlie, . . . Frank Leonard representative . . . "It doesdt cause Cancer!" . . . 8: 15 Morgue . . . chief weakness: bleached blondes. JEFFREY CHILD JONES Audio-Visual Committee . . . JV. Football manager . . . Hoffman Club . . . pushing the 140 Chrysler and changing tires . . . eats up Johnny Winters . . . Clean-up Committee . . . playing With his slipstick in physics lab . . . future engineer. ARTHUR GUY KAPLAN "Snowballs anyone?" . . . VI Form Dance Decoration Chair- man . . . Circus organizer . . . "My way to Edmondson is faster than Caplzufs!" . . . Astronomy Club V. P. . . . thcial class star, fish, and chessboard watcher . . . "When is the next chess match?" FREDERICK LINES KELLY Varsity Soccer Team . . . an advocate of more action in the Political Club . . . frequent quarrels With hDoughh . . . most outspoken in English class . . . Kitty Lou . . . hrst broken window of the year . . . "If it weren't for calculus and physicsh" . . . the practical man in the idealistsy corner. ANDREW PHILLIPPE KING "Soccerhs a rough sport; dodt kid yourself." . . . Varsity Soccer goalie . . . red sweater . . . demon in 21 little car . . . debater for the Pnyx . . . "Seen any good movies?" . . . "Only one French test todayl'h . . . "Who wants to play Chess? ROBERT WYNTER LOCKE, III "I don't get itlh, . . . First V. P. of class and head of Judici- ary Committee . . . Secretary of Aeropagus . . . Political Club . . . Nellie . . . class representative to humane society . . . fuzzy, ensy-going, ever-ready, always right . . . "Whut? HHi, coach." . . . Stonewall . . . "You've got one hour, O. K.?" h h JOHN LOWE Lower North Corridor psychologist and philosoPher Political Club, Military History Club, Chess Club, and track squad . . . future plans include engineering and co-ed college . . enjoys physics . . . space travel fan . . . loves to read . . . a natural 0n skiis . . a tasts for something diHerent. MARTIN MCKEE LUNDBERG Chairman of the Christian Association Xmas Drive Pnyx Debating Club . . . Advisee Committee co-chairman . exponent of Poe and Other morbid writers . . . "I did not tell you I won the Hyde Bay sailing trophy eight times; it was six at the most." . . . Chess Club and Team . . . nputt, putt, putt" . . . lots of mathematical common sense. JOHN KENNETH MacLEAN Lacrosse Manager V and VI . . . "City dump on wheelsh, . . . the misplaced table . . . Aeropagus Debating Club . . . cham- pion bird-callerhSherwood, May of 63 . . . chief weakness: Southern girls . . . "three day vacation" . . . Political Club and D. A. . . . "No, you're the greatest guy, Bill." STEVEN JANNEY MASON The Goat and Ma . . . as Chairman of the Circus Com- mittee has risked life and limb in leading the form to two consecutive wins . . . a game famtic . . . Cymxme Associate Editor . . . headed for medicine . . . Mount Mason . . . Botti- celli Team . . . "There, there, Hortensio, will you any wife?" STUART RAE MCCARTHY The perpetual fog . . . charter member of A4 L. O. . . . Mr. Porterhs cross to bear . . Lynn . . . 15 due South . . . plaster frescoes . . . Soccer Team right wing . . . Sylvia . . . Hava- tampas . . . the ground shot . . . "Eadapedingy" . . . "legs" . . . "Oh, Stuartl". JOHN ALBERT MCCAY "Alaskan Honeybear" . . . Secretary-Treasurer of Chess Club . . . member of Aeropagus . . . New; reporter . . . "Shut up!" . . . "Trollope way a moralist!" . . . Lower School conch . the tiger 0n the "B" Study Hall Committee . . . hYo esta un estudiante." . . . "Donk argue with me!" ROBERT NEVILLE MCCORMICK United Appeal Chairman . . . tWO-year Varsity Basketball Social Director . . . Junior and Senior Dance Committee Chairman . . . three years on Varsity Lacrosse; Rutgers Cup h winner as junior . . . Cleanup Committee Chairman . . . Class Treasurer . . . Associate Editor of Cynowre . . . wild summers at Sherwood . . A hobbies: golf and B. B. K. mot in that orderTL JOHN MARTIN MCDONOUGH, JR. Military History Club President . . . third Monm in two years . . . Rebel Without a cause . . .pugnacious . . . Cynomre artist . . . the te-enaCtments . . . class parties on the farm every spring . . . Blue and Gray Business Board manager . . . short story specialist in the Literary Club. JEFFREY BERNARD MILLER Sixth Form Committee Secretary . . . house mother First Form Bible assistant to Mr. Reese . . . the Varsity Swim- ming Team for two years, placing third in the M. 5. A35 100- yard butterfly in 1963 and second in the butterfly and breast- stroke as a senior . . . fearless defenseman as Varsity Lacrosse co-captain. DOUGLAS GARY OBER Head of Audio-Visual Committee . . . cO-manager 0f Cyno- mre Business Board . . . two years on Varsity Lacrosse . . . "Waall" . . . "512" . . . "Who's goin' South?" . . . What's the matter with Ford's? . . . the body beautiful . . . hYou!" . . . MITCHELL GOUGH OWENS GO tackle a tree! . . . long hair . . . motor scooter . . . Vat- sity Wrestling Team . . . "Now, down at Sherwood-" . . . canoe trip on Gunpowder . . . 9t23t65 . . . nature boy and Hoffman Club President . . . scuba diver . . . red animal . . . "Really, you ought to lift weights." . . . trips to Washington . . . K. S. N. ROBERT GRAHAM PINE Aeropagus Debating Club VI . . . Chess Club . . . Varsity Football Manager: co-head . . . Circus Committee V, VI . . . Bobbeee, Knot . . . Chauffeur of the Great White Cruiser . . . 'hWhat, Wlmt?'t . . . Political Club Sergeant-at-Atms . . . undaunted reign in "B" Study H1111. LAWRENCE HARWOOD PRIDDY JOHN REDWOOD, III Aetopagus Debating Club . . . Associate Editor for Cyno- mre . . . New; Business Board . . . Community Chest Treasurer . . . Political Club . . . amateur psychologistein secret . . . green sweater . . . a devotee of Hootemzmzy . . . Faulkner . . . "Shuffle, shufHe" . . . The Little Pleacher's Plnmllelograms for Plaupers. WILLIAM PATTEN REED "Thweaty" . . . Varsity Football wingback for about ten years . . . Hattest, but fastesr, feet on the football team . . . class thcet since the Third Form . . . favorite pastimes include gunning, trampoline, and the Limbo . . . hangout: Harvey House . . . the Adirondacks . . . nicknames: Glee Club, Twang, Wimpy . . . a T-man senior. "PhewH" . . . M.T.B. . . . the Math wizard . . . "Hold it, dodt move till I get the setting" . . . hard working Cynoma'e Photography Editor . . . Chief News Photographer . . . owner of the Lancer Hardtop . . . Distinguished Big League Coach . . . Larry! . . . N.B.M. . . . Walrus Fan Club. FREDERIC MILLER REESE, JR. "B" and Morning Study Hall Committees . . . Varsity Base- ball manager, 1963 and 1964 . . . best posture in the class . . . "Wheres my tie?" . . . driver of the "Black Beast, . . . Cleanup Committee. SAMUEL T. R. REVELL, III hMr. Clean" . . . dictates every movement of the inhabitants of the Upper North Corridor . . . only member of the class to bag a grizzly in Alaska last summer . . . Sherwood . . . his coaching a highlight of the Little League Football season . . . likely to be seen pumping goals for Colgate Lacrosse Team next year. RUSSELL P. RICH The volunteer member of the Cynomre Business Board . . . lOng-standing member of the Chess Club . . . Astronomy Club . . . green Chevy . . . enjoys sailing, when he has the chance . . . the hardest worker in the Class . . . "The Machine". STEPHEN TOTTLE SCOTT Smunch Republican, would rather light than switch . . . member of G. M. A. . . . head football manager . . . Political Club Treasurer . . . Chevy 11 Caravan . . . Sixth Form Dance Committee . . . full of glee eclubh . . . News Business Board . . . . IV Form Bible professor . . . Pnyx debater . . . current events genius. RICHARD MEGARY SIGLER "How's the weather down there? . . . Mr. Bassman in the Glee Club . . . Sam was a man . . . Bow ties and red sox . . . "Whaddaya mean, uglyV . . . Known for his poker face . . . The seven foot, eight inch, five hundred thirty pound tackle from Miami State . . . U.M.A. and the Vulture . . . Goes for tall blondes . . . "Oh, bosh!u . . . "Andy, you,re fat!" JOHN MEYER SILVERSTEIN Jack, Silvra, Yak, Silver . . . Despor of the Upper South . . . President of the Aetopagus Debating Club . . . Varsity . Basketball and Varsity Baseball . . . Sports reporter for the New; . . . enthusiastic about W. Va. . . . "NOW hear this, Jack!" . . . Colt bench warmer . . . Gilman Coach of the Year . . . Can be seen clawing the walls in the corridors like an ape. RICHARD KEMP SLAUGHTER The lefty with the martyr complex . . . Cynomre Editor- in-Chief . . . master of the sheepish grin . . . Pnyx Vice-Presi- dent . . . Judiciary Committee . . . Chess Club President by upolitical maneuvering, . . . Sue . . . would like to be an , idealist . . . "slugging" Varsity Baseball flrst baseman Varsity Football and Basketball Teams. HOWARD HERSHEY SOLLOD One of Newtonls proteges . . . member of Fifth and Sixth Form Dance Committees . . . Varsity Football and Wrestling l Teams . . . infrequent, though delightful, contributor to the N610! . . . arcticulate spokesman for the United Appeal . . . "Fame? . . . a "solid" Gilmanite. WILLIAM LOWELL STAFFORD Turtle . . . manager of Basketball and Tennis teams . . . long term member of glee club and secretary of it as senior . . . Hat-top . . . uReed, youyre Hat . . . tWO years on T-men . . . She lives in Rhode Island" . . . auditing physics class . . . the hidden camera. JOHN FIFE SYMINGTON, III "A real white guyh . . . very conservative in his views . an artful diplomat . . . "Well, yes, but again, no? . . . Varsity Football and Lacrosse star . . . power-wielding Editor- in-Chief 0f the New; . . . skiing enthusiast, often showing off on Oregon slopes . . . bound for Harvard and politics . . . i Oh, well, "you can always tell a Harvard man" . . . White rat. THEODORE RIDGEWAY TRIMBLE Official monster of Angkor Wat . . . Varsity Wrestling Squad; his favorite hold is the fireman's carry . . . The Mad Hatter in an XKE . . . Varsity Soccer Team . . . Gilmanis Own sadistic carpenter; he builds things and then tears them down . . truly an aristocrat. ALBERT GALLATIN WARFIELD, III iiWally" . . . star guitarist . . . "You donit think Iim any good, do you?" . . . enthusiastic skin-diver in his dirty pond . volunteer fireman in Lisbon, Md. . . . President of the Literary Club, known for his instituting of joint meetings . . . New; reporter . . . "T" man . . . c001 lacrosse player . the original Beatle. STURTEVANT F 0RD WEISKITTEL "Fordy, Fordy, Fordy, Fordyf . . . Auditorium Committee chairman and member of Audio-Visual Committee . . . Chess Club and Team . . . playing LU manager of basketball team . . . h'Calligraphyewasnet he a Roman emperor?" . . . keeps the Sixth Form Room free of flies . . . Dickie . . . scribe of the senior class. JAMES s. WHEDBEE, JR. "Jimmyhs Cab,, . . . pipe smoker . . . hths this Pam? . . . fastest cross-country sprinter . . . Political Club member . . . "Bh, Study Hall Committee . . . talks least, says most . . . "Yea, bossV . . . although new this year, has been a great addi- tion to the class. THOMAS W. WINSTEAD, JR. "Teetlebomb" . . . little bundle of tussle and muscle on the wrestling mat . . . Little League Football coach . . . Christian Association President . . . Aeropagus Debating Club . e . mem- ber of New; paste-up crew . . . hTina" . . . number One member ? of Dionne Warwick Fan Club . . . Judiciary Committee. JONATHAN FAIRBANKS WOOD Head of Cynomre Art Board . . . Circus Committee . . . extra art course . . . 'hAh and "B, Study Hall Committees . . . Varsity Wauhl-Wheezw Team . . . worlds fastest hot-rod . . . . . . President of Jonathan Winters Fan Club. CLASS BALLOT Done most for Gilman .............................................. Isaacs Done Gilman for max; ........................................ Flanders Mont likely to succeed ....................... Slaughter, Campbell First married ................................................... McCormick L432 married .......................................................... Cianos Chm bayjeed .................... V ...................................... Easter Mon popular .................................................... McCormick Talk: man, my: least .............................................. Caplan Laziext ................ , ................................................ Johnson C141: flycatcher ................................................ Weiskittel Whittiext ........................................... Coffay, Silverstein Tbinkx be ix ................................................ Green, Easter M ml in a fog ....................................... McCarthy, Locke Clam nail ............................................................. Allan Clan mockingbird .............................................. Mason Clay; balm! ..................................... Abrahamson, Hardesty Clay; walrm .................................... Ober, Gibbons-Neff Claw 1901x704 ...................................... Brown, Lundberg MOI! in zoitb the faculty ............................... Isaacs, Reed Tries lo 179 .................................................. Stafford, Reed Claxx radical .......................................................... Gillelan Mon" typical Gilmam'te .................................... MacLean Claw carnivore .......................................... Slaughter, Reese LVCAO mfe driver .................................................. Allan Bey; themed ........................................................... Cianos Chm 190! dog ........................................................... Wood Clan whale .......................................... ............... Anderson Bey! athlete .............................................................. Beck mum NW w wxva b CLASS PREFERENCE Girk, 1519001 .......... R.P.C.S., Gunston, Forest Park, B.M.S. Playground ...................................................... battefs box Hangout .................................. ...... 562 West, moon Expreuimz ....................... the local nine, Gilman dangler Spermtor .rport ................................... bird-watching, Ham Participatimz Sporl, ........ mocking Committee ........................................................ clean-up Radio Station ......................................................... WSID Party ........................................................... Winstead's TV Show ................. Mary Tyler-Moore Show, Sky Queen Singer .............................. Dionne Warwick, James Brown Marie ................ Anatomy Award Winner: My Bair Lady Activity .............................................................. indulging LIJWER NRMS FIFTH FORM. Seated: Whelan, F., Treaym'er, LeBoutilliei, President: Stiller, Rt, Vice-Prexident; Baker, W. R., Saree tary. Firtt row: Dewicki; Whitman, L; McDaniel; Robinson; Smith, C; Wilkes; Travers; Crosby; Ward; Kerr; Cooper, .. aye i 4 J.; Seipp; Zeigler, G. Second row: Klinefelter, 8.; Wallenstein; Goldberg; Helfrich; Levi, A.; Smith, J.; Zink, T. F.; Barker; Dunning; Swope; Harwood, R.; Whitman, M.; Mounrcastle, V.; Cross, J. Third mu': Harris; Jenkins, H.; Kelly, 1-1.; Legg; Winstead, D.; Groff; Scarlett; Brown, G.; Zink, P. R; Cobb; Hudson; Beall; Shiling; BuckeLew; Brown, T.; Rumsey. Fourth mm Christhilf; Redd; Mitchell; Turnbull; Jenkins, J.; Gundry; Yearley; Allen, G.; Clapp; Trimble, l. R.; Lewis; Schroeder. Fifth rozz': Foster, M.; Hull; Fisher, A.; Slaughter, C; VanDutand; Potter; Primrose, C.; McCoy; Swinehart; DeVries; Andrews; Israel; Giardina; Donohue; Thomas; Lang. Abxem: Jattatt; Obet, DeL.; FIFTH FORM YEAR Rogers; Tilghman. Perhaps the distinguishing characteristic of the Class of 1965 is its size: seventy-nine. Barring any unforeseen accidents, the class should be the largest group to graduate in Gilmanls history. One dis- advantage of this size has been a luck of Organiza- tion, which has been responsible, in part at least, for the Fifth Fotm's failure to win the Circus for five straight years. Another characteristic of the Form is its di- versity of interests, which range from skeet-shoot- ing to drag-tacing, and from Civil War re-enact- ments to pool-playing. On the athletic scene, there have been Fifth Formers on every varsity team, including twenty- one on the Varsity Football squad. Ray BuCk-Lew, who is ranked twenty-ninth nationally among sixteen-yeat olds, captained the tennis team, and CO-Cuptain Clay Primrose 0f the Varsity Wresrling team took third place in the Interscholastics. Jay Giatdinu was elected captain of next year's foot- ball team, and Jim Donahue became captain of the basketball team. In Other activities, Jeff LeBoutillier was Presi- dent of the Travelling Men, Gilman's answer to the Beatles. The Fifth Form Christmas Dance was 21 sparkling success, thanks to Chairman Phil Rogers and his committee. The faculty will long remember the T N Tls. Each year the school sends its officers and them. bets 0f the Christian Association to :1 conference at Buck Hill Falls. This year, Bill Baker and Phil Rogers were two of the officers who represented Gilman at this conference. In publications, next year's Newt will be led by Editor Fred Whelan, with David Winstead, Rocky Ober, and Frank Cobb as assistant editors. This has been a fine year for the Dramatic Association also, with a number of Fifth Formets performing very capably in the Gilman and Bryn Mawr senior productions. The Fifth Form has assumed important responsi- bilities and carried them out with distinction. The Class of l965 looks forward to the challenges of the senior year. 54 FOURTH FORM. Sealed,- Deford, G, Treann'er'; Farber, P., Viwar 12'9111.'J0hns0n, R., Pr "fe;1t,'Cook, B. Fin! raw: Kain, 1.; Barr; Price; Goodman; Robms; Zeigler, C.; 51 ,Harriman; Koester; Kolodner Yaggy:Haas;1VIeans; Millstone; Boro. Second mu': Hendin; McCarthy; Curtis, R.; Moore, J.; Miller, R.; Workman; arber, R.; Jones, G.; Baker, R. W.; Koma , Baerjer. Third row: Hendrix;1ngalls, G. S Hoffman; Marlow; Marcu5' Hart, J.; Lloyd; Crocker; Owens, R; Green, R. IN ; Perry; Rich, G.; Naquin, D.; Riepe, G.; Klimt; Klinefelter, H, Tevis. Fourth 7'011': Novak, R.; Stanton, M. 1.; W erma Boland; Davis, J.; Woods, R. C: Michelson; Veale; Reynolds; Hopkins; Tu- multy; Morris; McCleary; Foster, I. R. 1M7 rou'. Sachy Irw1r1,Secremr3 Rumford; Hart, Gr Parkinson; Gibbons-Neff, H.; Grady; Dockman; Costa; Buck, R.; Campbell, E.; Fenwick, C; Iliff, A. Abram: Davis, 1V Dell; Fulford. THIRD FORM. Sealed: deBuys; Barrett, Secreta Legg, C., Tremm'er; Harvey, F. B. Pr xident. Fizzrt r01" Jen- kins, T.; Kiefaber; Dana, E, Cooper 13.; StiHer, D.; Kidd Moore, G.; King, J Brooks. Richardson, W; Taylor; Quartner; Benson; Pass; Morrill. W, Brock. Second Rou, thLcIiffe; Palmer; Redwood . 5.; Rouse; Grow Bias; Cavanaugh; Edgerton; Garlick; Whelan, AK; Seal; Zink, 8.; Harbold; VVhedbee, M. Third row: Gamer; Sims, Vic Pz'ekrizz'em; Harvey, G.; Herspergcr; Turner; Stanton, A P.; Solley; Schmick; Howard; Levi, Jv; Shoemaker; La France; Cunningl 1m; Peabody; Bell; XVaJker, J. 17010th row: Krometis; Polloc Singcwald; Rittenhouk ; Cross, 3.; Brooks, 8.; Williams, D.; William A; Beehler; Bushby; Claggett; Callahan; Beadk, Stanton, M.; Blake; Allen, T; Hughes; Hous- Abwm; Birckhead; B we; Bryson, T.; Cooke; Gavora; Houscwright; Jackson; Primrose, N.; Somerville, SECOND FORIVI. Fin! row: Whitman, D: Hundley; Erlandson; West; McDonald; Wilson, C; Stengel; McElroy; Hyde; Shaw; Bennett; Downes; Naqum, S Hooker; Levering; Nesbitt. Second row: Wilson, A., Ober, C; Emer Wlalker; Anderson, E.; Merrill, T Morto Acton; Owens, D.; Grose; Fcnwick, B.; Father, A.; Wagner; Ingalls, T Boyce" Stephens; Dunn; Bowie. Third row. Bergland; Green. R. B.; Mountcastle, G Chriss; Fox Jones, 5.; Wiebb; Riepe, J. G0 ion; Kelly, 6.; Iglehart, F.; Proutt, R. J' Richards B.; Murphy; Barnes; Ward, A Harper, P.; Dale; Slagle. Fourth row: Macgill; Whedbee, J. D ; Fisher, W Brown, J Baker, B Smith, 13.; Nelson; Woods, R.; Chemo- weth; Kenny; Dana, R.; Harwo d, E Spragins; Fitzgerald; Sparks; Speed; Campbell, K.; Sener; Singley. Abxent: Brunn; Groom; Harper, A.; Hirsch: Kirkpatrick; Schweizer; Snead. FIRST FORM. Firct row: Baier; Coe, M Lynn; Opfer; Proutt, R. G.; Milner; Novak, W. D: Imboden; Minkowski; Libbey; XVhedbee, T, Marshall; Smithwic Rouse; Sunderland; Slaughter, T.; Rice; White; Tompkins; Riepe, F: Machen; Whelan, J. Lambert. Second rozr: Bortz; Fenwick, G.; Curtis, G Huppman; Dunn; Lewenz; Magladery, Nichols; North; Goldsmith; Harvey, J. C.; Moulden; Stalfort; McCardell; Ixoppelman, L; Gamper; Rohrer; Igleharn T.; Gontrum; Jones, RS, Clark; Pitts; Norris. Third rou': Dunmore; Chandler; deVilliers; Easter, C.; Somerville, XV. Herlihy; Henderson; Koppelman, A" Dunning, A.; Clinnin; Eager. Danzer; Dy6r; Cooke, W. R.; Andrews, 13.; Barr, WK: Dwight; Harvey, J. L: Dandy. Family row: Burghardt; Simmcrs; Gaines; Baker, 8.; Carroll; Strauss; Peters; Lan- caster; Herrmann, D.; Franks; Boyce, A. P.; Bradley; Wheeler; Johnson, P.; Pinkard; Buck, T Maumenee. Aluenf: Purnell. WWER SCHO0L We, the sixth graders, are worldly wise as we embark on our Upper School careers, We know, for example, that it is dangerous to judge beauty contests. Look what happened to Paris and Troy! We know how to close sets and coordinate axes and how to figure the diminishing brightness of light by inversely squaring the distance. We know such important information as how the climate of Manchester; England, was for years a good substitute for air conditioning in the textile industry and why Asians raise fish in their rice paddies. And, finally, we know that our teachers are smarter than average bears. It was a pleasant year in many ways. We loved the hours we were privileged to put in on home- work assignments, and were delighted with all the and resulting Friday detentionsethat the pitching staff of Sandy Koufaxes in the Lower School handed out. Of course, there were times that were not so enjoyable. We hated beating Calvert in football, basketball, and baseball all in the same year. We were miserable when a snowstorm closed the school for a day. We were absolutely and totally crushed the day a certain teacher showed up for class on a test day and couldnlt find the test. But we are philosophical now. We have learned to accept the bad with the good; we know strikes that some days-about four out of five-it doesnlt pay to get up in the morning. We will miss a number of things about the Lower School: the camaraderie between teachers and boys; Miss Stevens' music concerts for which we had to learn several hundred songs; the vari- ous projects that always delighted our parents; the solid satisfying sound that a certain teachers strong right palm made When it came into con- tact with its objective while paddling another boy; the tidal wave that surges forth at the sound of the 4:50 dismissal bell. These are some of the things well miss, but not all. We are happy that we have fond memories to look on as well as new challenges to look for- ward to. After all, we're twelve now! We have new Visions. Only four more years of bicycling. Were already preparing our parents for our six- teenth birthday present a fiteeengine red Sting- ray. Welre looking forward to the Upper School and its many activities: athletics, new fields of study, athletics, various clubs, athletics. Like Hercules, we leave the Atlases in this year's fifth grade to carry the weight of the Lower School on their shoulders next year. We have completed our labors. We go forth to the Upper School with the golden apples of the Hesperides. SIXTH FORM. Kneeling: Andrews; Bullock; Rienhofl; Brune; Libby; Jackson; Brock; Clinnin; Eppler; Wilson; Wise; Bizek; Shaw. First row: OlDonnell; Obtecht; Gerlach; Brewster; Tickner, R.; Rennet; Case; Gilpin; Mont- gomery; Renneburg;Zouch; Siems; Sanger; Seal; Adams. Second row: Kiefaber; Baker; Culver; Weisheit; Catlin; Father; Rowland; Cleveland; Hebb; Rienhofl; Pistell; Brooks; Chase; Smith; Mueller. Xg vgag ATHLETICS w m t VARSITY FOOTBALL. Firit row: Thomas; Campbell, J.; Bragdon; Anderson; Symington; Isaacs; Beck, Captain; Reed; Gibbons-Neff, P.; Sigler; Sollod; Slaughter, K.; Scott, manager. Second row: Donohue; Beall; Giardina; Baker, W. R.; Smith, C.; Primrose, C.; McCoy; Cross; Lewis; DeVries; Potter; Ober, DeL; Cooper, J.; Pine; manager. Third rout: Campbell, T.; Irwin; Boland; Wasserman; Costa; Swinehart; Foster, M.; Swope; LeBoutillier; Trimble, I. R.; Schroeder; Yearley, Hardesty, quiimnt managers. VARSITY FO0TBALL This season, for the third consecutive year, the Varsity Football Team finished with a winning record, featuring six wins with a tie and two losses. The season was characterized by determined effort on the part of the team and stellar support by all the members of the school. The preparation for the football season is long and strenuous, beginning at spring practice during the last week of school. Summer work includes, for all serious candidates, informal practice ses- sions and plenty of conditioning exercises. About fifty candidates for the Varsity Football Squad are then invited to come back in the humid days of early fall, two weeks before school opens, to start building up lithe Finney Machine? Three pre-season scrimmages, with Archbishop Curley, Calvert Hall, and Friends, gave the coaches a Chance to see the members of the squad playing under pressure and pointed out what facets of the teams performance needed polishing. The first game, a 20 t0 0 victory over Southern, featured flne defense by Gilman; two Southern drives were halted within Gilmarfs twenty yard line. Probably the most satisfying game of the entire season was the win over Landon the follow- ing Friday. The Gilman-Landon rivalry has al- ways been an intense one, but this game was of special significance, for, not only was this to be the last game in the football series between the two schools, but Landon also was the team which 42 l last year tied Gilman, keeping the Greyhounds l from a perfect season. Landon scored first and led 7 to 0 at the half. During the third quarter, how- ever, a Tom Beck punt was fumbled by a Landon back and recovered by Fife Symington on Lan- don's thirty yard line. The Greyhounds managed to capitalize on this opportunity, as a touchdown by Captain Tom Beck was followed by a com- pleted extra point pass to Jim Donohue. Gilman earned an 8 to 7 Victory by holding Landon score- i less for the remaining ten minutes of the game. l The following two games also resulted in wins for Gilman. Against St. Paul's, Gilman jumped l ahead with a touchdown in the first period and l held on to win, 7 to 6. Gilmanls air attack, not- i mally conspicuous for its absence, was most evi- l dent in this game, with ends Jim Campbell and Steve Thomas making fine receptions. The Severn game was the most convincing win for the Grey- hounds, who triumphed by a lopsided 36 to 16 score. Although Severn scored htst, touchdowns by Jim Isaacs and Tom Beck, two each, and Pete Swinehart put the game out of reach. When the team played St. Albanls in Washing- ton they fell behind, 13 to 0. Like the Landon game, however, a strong second half, featuring wingback Bill Reedys twenty-four yard touchdown scampet, enabled the Greyhounds to eke out a victory. There followed a tie with Forest Park and a loss to Edmondson, one of the public school , powers. Both of these teams had fast, shifty bucks, which proved the diEerence in two hatd-hitting games. Gilman got back on the winning track by beating Mervo, and then all attention turned to the hnal game against McDonogh, and to Mr. Russell, who returned to chapel to read from the Almanac. Varsity Football Seasonls Record November 22 was the day of the McDonogh game. Both teams played their toughest, ignorant Gilman s. 20 Southern ............ 0 of the death of the President. The Blue and Gray, Gilmnn ............ 8 Landon . .............. 7 bruised and bloody but still proud, lost in a "war Gilmun ,,,,,,,,,,,, 7 St. Paul's . .......... 6 of attrition? The coaches, Mt. Finney, Mr. Gilman ............ 55 Severn ................ 16 Schloeder, Mr. Lord, and Mr. Riggs, selected Jim Gilman ,,,,,,,,,,, 14 St. Albnn's .......... 15 Campbell, second team All Maryland end, the Gilman . .......... 16 Forest Park ........ 16 McDonogh game Unsung Hero and Jim lsnnCS, Gilmnn . O Edmondson ........ 7 who made third team All Maryland, the Unsung Gilman ............ 27 Mervo ................ 14 Hero for the year. Mr. Finney and the other Gilmnn ........... 7 McDonogh .......... 8 coaches, Captain Tom Beck, and the whole squad deserve praise for a line season. Won 6, Lost 2, Tied l th-x OJ A ' ' .awlwmm: , I J.V. FOOTBALL. Fimt row: Zink, T. F.; Beehler; Novak, E. R.; Baker, R. W.; Moore, 1.; Slaughter, C., Captain; Legg; Father, P.; Barrett; Bushby; Van Durand. Second mu: Israel; Davis, M.; Owens, P.; Kerr; Fenwick, C.; Stan- ton, M. J3, Miller, R.; Woods, R.; Robinson, 8.; Davis, J. Third row: Baetjer; Jenkins, J.; Michelson; Green, RL; Whit- man, H.; Rumsey; Hart, G. Fourth row: Turner, W4; Solley; Hoffman; Gibbons-Neff, H.; Rumford. J. V. NMBALL Swinehart. Abterzt: Stafford, Manager. VARSITY BASKETBALL. Seated: Donohue; Easter, H.; Slaughter; Isaacs, Captain; Silverstein; McCormick; Giar- dina. Stmzdhzg: Weiskittel, Anittdm Manager; McCarthy; Novak, E. R.; Boland; Trimble, It R.; Irwin; Stiller; Beall; VARSITY BASKETBALL Looking at the records it would be hard to say that the season was successful. In many ways, however, the year could not have been more of a success. The overall record was live wins and twelve losses, but the team improved and sh0wed its strength for the coming years. After five early season losses in a row, the team finally jelled against Friends School. Friends had been enjoying a tie for first place in the Private School League and an undefeated record when Gilman entirely outplayed them and won 49 to 46. A miserable loss to Severn down at Severna Park immediately f0110wed this upset, but from this point on the squad really improved and began to play good ball. The reason for the teams great improvement stemmed from Christmas vacation practice, when Mr. Schloedet asked several J. V. boys to try out for the varsity. Five of these boys joined the squad and began playing regularly, with four going directly to first string. Mike Boland, a sophomore, added needed punch to the team both by scoring and ugetting the boards? Dave Irwin, also a sophomore, found a first team position waiting for him and rose to meet the occasion. A third sophomore, Roget Novak, went to the first string as a forward, and his accurate set shot added a great deal to the team's scoring potential. The fourth member of the unew teaml, prob- ably improved most of all and developed into a real threat for the Greyhounds. Ridge wheel Trimble and his 64" frame gave the team the extra scoring and rebounding power it needed. uTree" shot for 5285:; from the floor, the best per- centage on the club, and made 121 points. As the new unit began to work together, it became experienced. Winning three of the last four games of the season was the reward of the 46 hard work and nll-ziround improvement of these boys. Jim Donohue, the unanimous choice for c2 next year, had another fine year. He scored 172 points, an average of about ten points per game, to lead the club in this Category. "Flakes" defensive work was also invaluable, as many of his steals led to baskets for the team; Captain Jim Ismcs had 21 good year, but Mr. Schloederls plan of de- veloping for the future kept him and the other seniors to only limited action. John Silverstein, the beSt "driving" threat 0n the team, provided a lift several times when quick buckets were needed. The season brought many thrills, including Donohuels tackles, Trimble's antics, and some good, tense basketball. The seniors 0n the squad deserve a lot of credit for "pushing" the younger members of the team. Jack Silverstein, Robbie McCormick, Kemp Slaughter, and Ham Easter all did a fine job. Mr. Schloedet's plans will pay off next year in 21 truly fine basketball team which has a good chance to win the private school titlf' and to raise basketball to the heights of wrestling in popularity during the winter season. It will be 21 team of which the school can be extremely proud. Varsity Basketball Seasonls Record Gilman ............................ Gilman ............ Loyola .................. Gilman ............ , Dulaney .............. Gilman ............ , St. Paul's ............ Gilman ............ McDonogh .......... Gilman ............ Friends ................ Gilmzm ............ Severn Gilman . .. .................... Gilman .......... , Edmondson . Gilman i. "l Boys Latin .......... Gilrnan ............ St. Paul's ............ Gilman ............ T Friends ................ . Gilman ........... McDonog 1 .......... w, imy'w Gilman ............ Severn .............. t' Ml " l Gilnmn ........ , ' ................... i . y Gilman . .. Forest Park ........ Gilman ........... Boys Latin Won 5, Lost 12 m v 1 VARSITY WRESTLING. Fimt rou': Slaughter, C.; Winstead, T.; Primrose, C, co-captain; Beck, w-mptain; Lang; Warheltl. Second mic: Owens, M.; Sollod; Revell; Bragdon; Anderson; Chilos; LeBoutillier; Ober. VARSITY WRESTLING At the beginning of the season, the Baltimore Sun made a prediction about the order in which the wrestling teams would finish. The prediction for the Gilman Wrestling team was as follows: "Things will be tough at Gilman this year. Look for a poor season. They will be lucky to finish third in their division." On February 25, that same Gilman team wrestled City College for the city championship. Although Gilman lost the meet, a very important point was proved: never count out a team. That was the keynote of this year's team. There were no individual stats, just a group of boys who rose to whatever challenge was presented to them. The season started well with a 53-5 win over Forest Park. A very thrilling match with Poly followed. After the first four matches, Gilman was down, 16-0, but a team effort defeated the ovet-conhdent Poly team. Mitch Owens, Jeff LeBoutilliet, and Pitts Dockman won decisions. The two co-captains then won, Tom Beck with a Clutch pin and Clay Primrose by decision, to give Gilman a 17-16 edge. Bill Anderson then pinned Poly's 285-pound heavyweight to win the meet and keep Gilman in the running for the league championship. Captain Beck remarked after the heavyweight match that it was the hrst time Anderson had ever looked skinny. Victories over Dunbar and Southern followed the Poly meet. The next match, a loss to Mt. St. Joe, placed Gilman in a tie with Poly for the league lead. After victories over atch-rivals McDonogh and Carver, the playoflC match with Poly was won by Gilman by a decisive 20-11 score. The championship match with City was a dis- appointing one, as City took a 6-3 lead after three matches, and was never behind. It was with re- newed hopes, however, that the team set out for the Interscholastic Wrestling Tournament at Cal- vert Hall. In order to win in this tournament, a team must have some outstanding stars; balance is of secondary importance. Whereas Gilman had won during the season because of its overall ability, it did not have the outstanding individuals neces- sary to win in the tournament, The only Gilman wrestler to reach the finals, Bill Anderson, lost in a close decision to the defending champion. Clay Primrose was the only other Gilmah wrestler to place, taking third at 175. The disappointments at the end of the year should not be allowed to obliterate the successes of the team and of their coach, Mr. Marshall, how- ever, for this team, though decided underdogs at the start of the season, came through as runnet-up for the dual meet championship with a fine 7-2 record. Varsity Wrestling Seasorfs Record Gilman Gilman Gilmnn Gilmzm Gilman . Gilmz Gilman . Forest Park ........ .............. 16 Dunbar Southern ............ ............ Mt. St. J McDonogh Carver .............. Poly ............. 8 City .. akDivision I Championship 7: skDuaLMeet Championship ' .l'; 43, VARSITY BASEBALL. Fin! row,- Slaughter, K.; Isaucs, J.; Sigler; Anderson, captain: Locke; Silverstein; Giardina; Donohue. Second mzr: Smith, C.; Miller, R.; Novak; Cook, B.; Irwin; Boland; Wasserman; Davis; A. B.; Reese, 711472462873 VARSITY BASEBALL Two weeks before spring Vacation a group of Rich Davis and catcher Bob Miller complete the about thirty hopefuls attended the first meeting squad. of the Varsity Baseball Team called by Coach Mr; Gilman plays in a strong, highly competitive Carroll. The squad, a small but spirited one, was league. Couch Carroll and the team look for im- finally cut to sixteen 21 week before the season be- provement over last year and for that upset or two gm. Poor weather during spring vacation, includ- which can "make the season." ing a few unexpected snow Hurties, and early April showers limited the team's opportunities for pre-season practice. With hope for continued im- Varsity Baseball ptovement, however, the team Opened the season at Edmondson on April 10. 10 April Edmondson A Returning hrst-stringets ate Captain Bill Ander- 14 April Calvert H2111 A son at Catcher, third baseman Jim Isaacs, first base- 17 April Forest Park H man Kemp Slaughter, and centet-fieldet Jim Dono- 21 April McDonogh H hue, with sophomore Mike Boland occupying the 24 April Carver A shortstop spot which he filled at the end of last 28 April Poly A year. The stiffest competition exists at second 1 May St. Joe H base, where returnees Bob Locke and Jay Giatdina 5 May Edmondson H are fighting for a starting berth, and the outfield, 8 May Calvert Hall H with John Silverstein, Dave Irwin, and Dick Wns- 12 May Forest Park A sermtm 2111 in the running for the remaining two 13 May McDonogh A positions. Rich Siglet is the dean of the pitching 19 May Carver H staff, followed by Craig Smith and two J.V. grads, 22 May Poly H Bryson Cook and Rog Novak. Utility infleldet 26 May Stjoe A D1 ., i, mmw VARSITY LACROSSE. Fin! mm: Costa; Symington; Baker, W. R.; Miller, J., co-mptain: Beck, complain: Prim- rose; McCormick; Revell. Second rou': MacLean, manager: Reynolds, asst. manager: Porter; DeVries; Stifler; Trimble, Ii R.; Gibbons-Neff, P.; McCoy; Barton; Thomas; LeBoutillier; Lundberg, mm. manager. Third rou': Johnson, R.; Stanton, M. J; Johnson, D.; jcnkins, J.; Warheld; Turnhull; Campbell, T.; Buck. VARSITY LACIHISSE The coming season brings with it the high hopes of the lacrosse team for a league champion- ship. It is believed that this year's squad has as much chance for the title as does any other private school. Severn, Boys Latin, and Friends have tugged teams, but returning lettermen 0n the squad will make Gilman hard to beat. Co-captnins Tom Beck and Jeff Miller lead the midfield and defense, re- spectively. Beck, All-Maryland center midfielder last year, is one of the best, and Millet will be one of the top defensemen in the state. Tom Revell, Bill Baker, Steve Thomas, and Don Dthies played on last years team and will give the midfield strength. Fife Symington, Hugh Mc- Coy, and Doug Obet return for more action this year to help out Millet defensively. The attack is paced by Robbie McCormick, last year's Rutgers Cup winner, and Clay Primrose. Dave Johnson is also experienced. Chris Costa is a more thm capable goalie, and, being just a sophomore, he promises to be great. It is hoped that needed depth will be supplied by members of last year's Junior Varsity. The season begins early this year since there are two games during spring vacation, with City and Poly, before the league contests begin. Coach Chandlee and his new assistant, Mr. Thompson, look forward to an even better record this year than the impressive 7 and 3 record of the 1963 squad. Varsity Lacrosse 26 March City H 31 March Poly H 3 April Boys Latin A 10 April Loyola H 17 April McDonogh A 24 April Friends H I May Severn A 9 May St. Pauls H 13 May Calvert Hall A gal GILKAR VARSITY TENNIS. Firit rouu' Koman; Barker; Buck-Lew, Captzzi11;Rogets; McCleary. Second row: Beall; Shiling; Goldberg; Klinefeltet, H.; Cooper, E; Stafford, Manager". VARSITY TENNIS Early in March one of the largest groups in the history of the Varsity Tennis Team began practice under the direction of Mt. Daniels and Mr. Jacob- sen. The team, perennially one of Gilmanls finest, was hampered in the early part of the season by bad weather, but managed an early season victory over Poly. This yearls squad is led by Captain Raymond Buck-Lew. After winning the Maryland State 16 and under Tournament last year, Ray was the man to beat for the M.S.A. singles championship. Un- fortunately, Ray is the only member of the team with a great deal of varsity experience, and the hopes for regaining the championship lie on the progress of Tim Barker, Phil Rogers, Stan Mc- Cleary, and Andy Komnni Fortunately, Calvert Hall, the winner of the Private School League Championship last year, has lost MacPardew through graduation, so that the race promises to be a Close one. Since the team has no seniors, it looks as if Gilman soon will have a new string of M.S.A. Championships. Varsity Tennis 14 April Poly H 16 April Friends A 18 April St. Andrew's H 21 April Severn A 23 April Hopkins H 28 April City H 30 April Loyola A 7 May Calvert Hall H 9 May McDonogh H 11 May Forest Park H 14 May St. Joe H 21 May 25 May Team Championships Individual Championships ? AW M" ACTIVITIES CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. Seated: Lundberg, Drive Chairman; Winstead, T., PI'EJident; Baker, W. R.; Rogers Fifi! rouu' Kain; Owens, PI; Woods, R.; Revell; CoHay; Jones, J.; Wood; Bragdon; Childs; Gibbons-NeH, P.; Silver- stein. Second razr: Chandler; Means; McDaniel; Jackson, 8.; Housewright; Cline; Iliff, N.; Smith, C.; DeVries; Chelton. Third razr: Van Durand; Harvey, B.; Lloyd; Seal; Cavanuugh; Schmick: Hull; Gundry; Fisher; Yearley. Fourth rozr: Stanton. Mi; Helfrich; McCleary; Klinefelter, H.; Parkinson; Cook. 13.; Buck, 13.; Johnson, R. CHRISTIAN ASSHCIATIHN Again the Christian Association enjoyed a very successful and worthwhile year. The C. A., with a student membership of forty-five, had guest speakers on a variety of topics. Mr. Lemp took over the spot vacated by Mr. Baldwin as faculty adviser. The first speaker of the ,65364 schedule was Mr. Peter Powell, a former graduate of Gilman. Last summer Mr. Powell led a group of student workers to Nigeria as part of the Crossroads Africa Organization. In November, Mr. Michael Robbetts addressed a gathering of Gilman, Bryn Mawr, and Roland Park students in the auditorium. Mr. Robbetts works in Washington with a group which is spon- soring a domestic Peace Corps bill. He spoke on the possibilities of such a Corps being established and what its aims would be if it was established. Father James OlHara spoke to the C. A. in De cembet on the Ecumenical Council and its future. Also in December was the annual Christmas Drive to colleCt gifts for the families in the Lexington- Poe Housing Development. This drive was one of the most successful to date because of the large donations by both the Upper and Lower Schools. In February, five members of the Christian As- sociation attended the annual Buck Hill Falls Con- ference. The topic of this year's conference was "Man: Determined or Undetermined?" Unlike previous years, members of all three upper forms were represented. In the spring, the Christian Association had speakers who discussed juvenile delinquency and who also spoke about a poverty-stricken school in Washington. In addition, there was a panel dis- Cussion made up of members of the C. A. It has been an active and successful year for President Tee Winstead and the other members of the Christian Association. . w .t t: .. s . xg : . POLITICAL CLUB. Seated: Miller, J., Secretary; Scott, Tremmer: Btyson, J., Pretident; Caplan, Vice Pretident. Firs! row: Zink, 8; Scarlett; Hull; Goldberg; Moore, J.; Sheff; Bryson, T.; Dewicki. Second row: Stanton, M. J.; Shiling; Zink, P. R.; MacLean; Reese; deBuys; Millstone; Workman. Third row; Whelan, F.; Whitman, H.; Yearley; Chtisthilf; Wasserman; McCarthy; Michelson; Silverstein; Childs. Family rout Cobb; LeBoutilIiet; Giardina; VanDurand; Dono- hue; Slaughter, C.; Hettmann; Locke; Redwood. Fifth rou': Brown, T.; Mitchell; Whedbee, J.; Pine; Dthies; Brown, R.; Green, D.; DuViviet; Gilielan; Warheld, Abrahamson. POL1TICAL CLUBS The Political Club enjoyed one of its most ex- citing and controversial years, if unfortunately, not one of its most active. With the guidance of faculty advisot Mr. Pine, supplemented by the leadership of President John Bryson, Vice-Ptesi- dent Tom Caplan, Treasurer Steve Scott, and Sec- retary Jeff Miller, the club's organization has been continually improved. A new Constitution has been drawn up, and the most startling new change is the proposal to alter the name of the club to the Baket-Fotum. This change is to honor the club's founder who has so often expressed his con- tinuing interest in the club; In between debates and filibusters over the new Constitution, the club has had a variety of inter- esting speakers. Mr. William Marbuty started this yeafs string of meetings with a dissertation on the Justice Department. 57 Dr. Richard Te Linde, a member of Medico, spoke at the second meeting on the problems in South Viet Nam. The Northern Student Movement was repre- sented at the next meeting, and everyone was given a Clear picture of the wonderful work in education that the Union is trying to promote. This was certainly one of the most controversial and inter- esring meetings of the year. The next meeting was on redistricting in Maty- land, and this was followed with the year's spec- tacular, Joseph Tydings, speaking on his senatorial aspirations. In the closing months of school the club did not intend to rest, but instead planned a panel on the Republican Presidential candidates, and a meeting with Vetda Welcome, state Senator. DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION. Fin! mu': Kaplan; Oher, D.; MacLean; Bryson; Whitman, Secretary; Mason; Gille- lan; Wilkes. Second row: Green, R.; Brock; Johnson, R.; Shoemaker; Dewitki; Klimt; Curtis, R.; Whelan, A.; Clapp; DeFord, G; Barker; Rich, G; Klinefelter, 8.; Levi, A.; Allen, 6.; Mitchell; Cobb. DRAMATIC ASSIICIATHJN On December 7, the curtain went up on the first presentation of the Dramatic Associations 1963-64 season, Philip King's farce, See How They Ram. Directed by Mr. Armstrong and cast from the members of the Third and Fourth Forms and the Bryn Mawr Drama Club, the play starred Rick Green, Ellen Marshall, Miknl Frey, and Josh Shoe- maker. Outstanding performances were given in supporting roles by Sarah Carter, Ronnie Klimt, Rob Baker, and Randy Curtis. Shakespeare's riotous funning-and-punning cos- tume farce, The Tamiwg 0f the Shrew, was the ma- jor production and extravaganza 0f the D. A. seae son. Staged on April 13 and 14 :15 part Of the Shakespeare Quadricentenniul activities, the play, on which the Broadway musical, Kin Me, Kate, was based, centered around the subjugation by kindness of a shrewish young noblewoman, Kath- erina, by Petruchio, a young than seeking to con- solidate his fortune by claiming her dowry. A ttm- gential plot was provided by the conHict among 21 number of suitors for the hand of the fair Bianca, Katherina's sister. Tim Barker and Christie Currick played the lead parts; Kathie McDonald was lovely as Bianca, and John Bryson, Steve Mason, and Doug Mitchell as the suitors added a great deal to the ovet-all effect of general hilarity. Director A. J. Downs pulled off some ingenious bits of casting and directing skill as John Cross, John MacLezm, Gill Deford, and Second Former David Schweizer turned in memorable performances in minor roles. The fine costumes, Mt. Metrille music, Schwei- zer's cockney 21nd Dcfords lellnmet accents, and Tony Whitmmfs lighting effects were a few of the many small touches which made the play even more enjoyable than it would otherwise have been. A month after their two packed-house performances at Gilman, the members of the cast gave a repeat performance at the Central Enoch Pratt Free Library in connection With the Quadricentennial. In reciprocation t0 Bryn Mawr's cooperation, the D. A. lent a number of its members to the Bryn Mawr Drama Club for its annual production. Mrs. Griepenkerl directed the cast of thousands for the Hunt Cup weekend performances of the stylized Chinese comedy, Lady Preciom Stream, by S. I. Hsiung. Carole Naquin, Stan Klinefelter, John McCuy, and Connie Monroe starred, with Gordy Allen, Natl Proctor, Beckie D011, Josh Gillelan, Doug Green, Frank Cobb, and Dabney Smith in supporting roles. The D. Afs final presentation of the season, the First and Second Form Play, was staged in May. It consisted of two one-act plays, direCted by seniors John Bryson and Steve Mason. GLEE CLUB. First rou': Gontmm; Norris; Riepe, C; Emery, G.; Wilson, Ct; Whefan, B.; Campbell, K.; West, C.; Whitman, D.; Ober, C. Setond row: Easter, C.; Clark, A.; Tevis, J.; Brock, R; Schmick; Cavunaugh; Radcliffe; Palmer, C.; Redwood, Jus. Third mu': Whelun, A.; Hendrix;K1imt; Crocker; Howard; Levi, A.; Cross, J.; Harwood; Swope; Rumseyt Fourth rou': Irwin; Baker, R. W; Goodman; Price; Obet, D.; Scott. Fifth raw: Wilkes, M.; Whelan, F.; LeBoutiIlier, Vice-Pretidenl: Foster, M.; Turnbull; Allen, G. Sixlb mu': Harris; Warheld; Sigler, Pretident: Stafford, Librarian; Reed; Mitchell. Alueillfeet: Somerville, Wt; Zeig'er, G.; Fulfotd, M. GLEE CLUB The past year has been one of quality rather than quantity for the Glee Club. Its concerts have numbered four, including joint concerts with Bryn Mawr, Roland Park, and St. Timothyis. The Christ- mas concert and the traditional Baccalaureate Serv- ice featured only the Gilman Glee Club. Mr. Merrill, the club's, able director now in his second year with the Club, produced an excep- tionally well-rounded repertoire, getting away from the previous emphasis on religious pieces. One other very commendable feat of Mr. Mertill's was that he never really lost his temper the whole year! Standing beside their fearless director were stal- warts Rich Sigler, President, Jeff LeBoutillier, the Vice-Ptesident, and Secretary Bill Stafford. Back again pounding the ivories was Mrs. Baldwin, tee turning after a year's rest. Hard work by the whole club has made the year a success. The Traveling Men once again had an active year, performing on their own as well as at the Glee Club concerts. These thirteen boys, headed by Jeff LeBoutillier, were coached by Mr. Porter, as in past years. First rowx Hetrmann; Stafford; Wilkes; LeBoutii- lier, Pretident; Sigler; Warheld; Tumbull. Second row: Allen, G.; Mitchell; Harris; Reed. Third rou': Whelan, F.; Foster, M. a HOFFMAN CLUB. Seated: Reed, Secretary; Owens, President. FirJt rou': Gamper; Quattner, J.; Lambert, H.; Mar- shall; Rouse; Smithwiek; Dunmore; Iglehart, T. Second row: Opfer; Rice; Bowe; Whedbee, T.; Milnor; Boyce, P.; Lewenz. Third row: Kelly, H.; Hudson; Foster, M.; Abrahamson; Warheld; Mason; Iliff, N.; Jones; Grady. Fourth rou': Dewicki; Brown, G. A.; Jenkins, H.; Rich, G.; Jenkins, T.; Klimt; Williams, D.; Costa. Fifib rou': Trimble, I. R.; Winstead, D.; Gundry; Fenwick, B.; Rumford; Gibbons-Neff, H. Alumni: Gillelan, VicePr'eIizl'em; Danzer; Veale; Klinefelter, H.; Simmers, 8.; Moore; Morris, J.; Dunn, J.; Dunning, Bt; Stalfort; Baker, R.; Baker, 8.; Koester; Parkinson; Dunn, P.; Minkowski; Murphy; Kelly, P.; Kelly, 6; Brooks, 5.; McCarthy; Rohrer; Sunderland; Walker; HHFFMAN CLUB Goldsmith; Houston. The Hoffman Club, with a membership of sixty- two, was again one of the largest clubs in the school. Mr. Pheil took over the Club's advisory duties and proved to be the interested and active man the club needed. Although the monthly meetings, featuring speakers on topics ranging from moun- tain climbing to scuba diving, were well-attended, ofhcers Owens, Gillelan, and Reed shifted the emphasis this year to trips. The hrst expedition, an October canoe and kayak trip on the swollen Gunpowder, was nearly disastrous; the swift and frigid waters claimed two borrowed canoes and a borrowed kayak. In No- Vembet, with a depleted treasury and a badly frightened adviser, the club again ventured out, this time on a skeet shoot. Although gusts of wind swept the range, the trip was a great success. Robbin Hudson turned in the high score. The December trip, a raccoon hunt, led a mnt- 61 ley group of twenty-two boys tramping a rugged hve-mile course in the dark, through bogs and streams, woods and helds, and up and down steep hills. Although the group had one good chase, the hcoon found a den tree and was not sighted. Part of the group was lost for a time in a rank and foggy bottom, but they were duly extracted. Rob Hudson once again ended up above the rest of the group; one of the hounds employed in the hunt mistook him for a raccoon, and the nimble "Rock" took to the trees. In January, forty boys went to Western Penn- sylvania for the ski weekend. With the lowest cas- ualty rate in Hoffman Club ski history, the ex- pedition was an extremely successful one. An active year was culminated by a crow hunt, a fishing trip, and a skeet shoot during the lasr months of the year. PNYX. Seated: Scott; Slaughter, K.; Allan, D.; Green, D.; Gilleian. Standing: Isaacs; Gihbons-Neff, P.; Mason; King; Hardesty; Lundbergt DEBATING The annual competition between the two de- bating clubs, the Areopagus and the Pnyx, was :15 heated 215 ever this year, with a very peculiar trend in the debate results. The Pnyx won every inter- club debate, but the Areopagus took three Out of four best speaker awards. Topics debated included the Peace Corps, the usefulness of Latin study, the Gihntm grading system, and coeducation. Confident with their success, the Pnyx opposed Roland Park, debating the continuation of prayer in public schools. The girls prevailed, however, and :1 week later defeated three members of the Ateopagus, who were debating the opposite side of the same topic. The climax of the debating year is the final debate in May, when the Pnyx will be represented by President Dave Allan, Steve Mason, and Doug Green and opposed by John Silverstein, Tom Cap- lan, and John Mchy of the Ateopagus. AREOPAGUS. Seated: Winstead, T.; Locke; Silverstein; Watheld; MacLean. Standing: McCarthy; Davis, A. B.; Redwood, John; Caplun; Pine. WX$ xxx.xxww: 7f ASTRONOMY CLUB. Seated: Kaplan, Vice-Preyident; Cianos, Pretidenl; Barker, Secretary Second row: Farbet, R.; Walker, J. W.; Millstone; Bell. Third roux: Kolodnet; Rich, R.; Rouse, C.; ASTRIIIWMY CLUB Michelson. The Astronomy Club was originally organized in 1952 by Dennis Rawlins. Since that time, it has grown in size to its present membership of about fifteen students. Although it is not one of Gilmanis "prestige" clubs, the Astronomy Club has always had a hard core of interest which has made it worthwhile. This interest has been apparent this year in a number of constructive projects. The club went on several trips this year. The first was in November to the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. Although tumors are Circulating that some of the participants were more interested in the female members of the trip than in the Plane- tarium, most found the displays informative. At least two more trips have been planned, one to the Hayden Planetarium in New York, and another to CHESS CLUB. Fin! row: Mason, St; McCay, Secretary; Slaughter, Preyidem; Miller, J., Viae-Pfesident; Kaplan; Lund- berg, Second row: Boto; Somerville, J.; Pass; Ingalls, 5; Cooper, J.; Costa. Third h row: Gavora; Naquin, D.; Shiling; Lloyd; .. ' Haas; Dockman; Grady. Fourth row: Marlow; Lowe; Crocket; Hendrix; Cooper, 13.; Blake; Smith, C; Giardina; Hardesty; Pine. Fifth row: Marcus; Trimble, I. R,; Dthies; Thomas; Israel; Millstone. Ab- ;em: Gillelan: Green; Koestet; Hart; K0- man; Rich, Rt; Cianos; Weiskittel. an observatory 0n the Anagathy River, an observa- tory which houses a twelve and a half inch tele- scope. Two club members, John Walker and Tim Barker, are engaged in another project: attempting to grind mirrors for reflecting telescopes. Although progress is slow, the work is interesting, and, if successful, could provide the club with a much wider array of instruments. The club meetings themselves have been very interesting. The club is fortunate to have Mr. Frank Cecil, a lecturer at the Enoch Pratt Library, to conduct the meetings, at which films are fre- quently shown. President Jim Cianos and offlcers Tim Barker and Arthur Kaplan are pleased with the interest that has been shown and ate conhdent that this interest will continue in the future. LITERARY CLUB. First row: Gillelan. Second r0uu'McDonough; Abrahamson, 566714! Warheld, Prerizz'em; Green, Vice-Pt'esidem; McCarthy. Third row: Marcus; Naquin, D.; Dewicki; Klimt; LeBout1 er; Cobb; Wilkes. LITERARY CLUB Sustained by a competent "01d guardyy of seniors, by noteworthy creative achievements from some of the new members, and by the able sponsorship of its new faculty advisor, the Gilman Literary Club has certainly had One of its most productive and satisfying years. Under the direction of Mr. Grimes and ofhcers Gully Warheld, Dave Abrahamson, and Doug Green, the Literary Club has continued its tradition of encouraging creative writing at Gilman. Seniors Stuart McCarthy and Josh Gillelan were active in submitting poetry and in making perceptive com- mentary. Fifth Form stalwarts Frank Cobb, Jeff LeBOutillier, Martin Wilkes, and John Dewicki demonstrated their talent on many occasions, as did several new members who kept the Ironmen from becoming complacent. Popular demand, plus the Club's talent for ne- gotiation, brought about a "first" in Literary Club history: the joint meeting with Bryn Mawr. Such meetings not only produced a greater amount of constructive criticism, but also brought to light considerable variety and originality of approach. As far as T176 Blue mzd Gray is concerned, the winter issue was as original as any we remember in the past, and it contained some very stimulating work. Poems by VVarheld and Abrahamson were featured, in addition to prose contributions from Doug Green and newcomer David Schweizer. Many poems focused upon contemporary events. The winter issue was distinctive because, for the first time within our memory, girls were the sub- ject of much of the poetry. PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB. Seated: Clapp, Secretary: Cross, Prerident; Kerr, Vice- Pre'rridem. Standing: Walker; Goodman; Riepe, M.; Benson; Mitchell; Mason; Robins; Ingalls, St; XVallenstein; Taylor; Robinson; Crosby. ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. Seated: Anderson, W.; Miller, Vice-Preyident; Beck, Prejident; Isaacs. Standing: Buck-Lew; Primrose. VI FORM DANCE COMMITTEE. Low row: Slaughter, K.; Kaplan; Allan, D.; Jones; Scott; Anderson; Sollod; Johnson, D.; MacLean; Reese. Top row: Beck; McCormick, Chairman; Winstead, T. Abxent: Weiskittell V FORM DANCE COMMITTEE. Fm: row: Rogers, Chairman. Second row: Israel; Primrose, C.; Potter; Gold. berg; Van Durand; Swinehart; Helfrich; Scarlett. REVUE 64 Every attendance record, every fondest expecta- tion, and many peoples faith in the younger gen- eration was smashed by Revue 64. This smashing success was the result of gratifying?Y teamwork by over half of the Fifth and Sixth Forms. Doug Green, Gally Warheld, John Silverstein, and Chris Beall were the happy producers. The objectives of the show, to amuse the people viewing it and to unify the upper branches of the school, were ac- complished. The show began with the Chorus Line, a group of scantily-clad behemoths, followed by highlight after highlight. The satire of the College Bowl Came next and then a fOIk-singing duo, as the Revues policy of good music interspersed with good humor developed. After John MCCay's Columbus Lecture came the act that had stirred the public and had brought out the fantastic crowdleme Bagels, four hambone Sixth Formers satirizing the Beatles, with two hun- dred girls, all screaming out of their own volition, possibly out of fear. The Bagels were followed by more folk-singing and more humor. After inter- mission Craig Flanders wowed the audience with some live electric guitar playing. The next really big act was Andy's Gang, featuring the renowned Froggy the Gremlin. After this study in farce, the Sixth Form Trio, complete with bassman, di- maxed an evening of good singing. A sntirization of Hamlet's Gravedigger Scene followed, and at the end the Chorus Line Came out for the Grand Finale and were unexpectedly met with pies, as were the curtains, the microphones, and several of the spectators. CIVIL WAR CLUB. Fm; row: Kerr, ViceePreJident; Cooper, J., Prerident. Second row: Boro; Wilkes; Somerville, J.; Cooper, E.; Ward; Morrill, W. Third roux: Reipe, M.; Rich, G.; Perry; Na- quin, D.; Robins; Rittenhouse. Family row: Dunning, D.; Smith, C.; Gundry; Levi, A.; Foster, R.; Blake, Wt Fifth row: Mountcastle, V.; Harwood, R.; Curtis, R.; Seipp; Whelan, F. Abtenl: Crosby; Robinson, 5.; Travers; Jenkins, H.; Dewicki; Hull. .t NEWS STAFF. Seated: Caplan, Feature; Editor; Winstead, Newt Editor: Sigier, Senior Editor; Symington, Ellitor-in- Chief; Reed, Sportr Edilorx Davis, A. B., Blarinen Manager; GibbonseNefT, 13., Bminexr Mmzalgerr Second rozr: MC- Cormick; Sollod; Redwood; Anderson; Green, D.; McDonough; Wariield; Gillelan; Silverstein. Third rou': Gundry, Giardina; Woods, R.; Rogers; StiHer; Ober7 Del.; Price; Cobb. Fourth row: Lloyd, Klimt; Hart, G. H.; Christhilf; Winstead, D. Fifth row: Thomas; Beck; Donahue; Stafford; Abrahamson. 52x11? row: Trimble, I. R; Smith, C. THE NEWS The Gilman Nezw, under the capable leadership of Fife Symington and his Editorial and Business Boards, has just completed one of the most suc- cessful years in its history. Symington, as Editor-in-Chief, was ably assisted by Tom Caplan, Bill Reed, Tee Winstead, and Rich Sigler, respectively the heads of the Features, Sports, News, and Senior Departments. Financial matters were handled by Rich Davis and Pete Gibbons-Neff, Co-Mzmagers of the Business Board. The New featured several innovations and im- provements this year. In a major layout change, the sports section moved to the back page, and each issue was marked by an increasing amount of original news. The editorials were well-written and particularly outstanding in their content. There were also several humorous and revolutionary c01- umns by Doug Green, and a number of articles by Dave Abruhamson on controversial topics. The members of this year's New; staff are noted for their divergent views, but they proudly claim to be one of the most efficient in the annals of Gilman, for they completed a six-page puste-up in two hours. To counter the fact that fewer issues were produced because of a low working balance, the editors point out that they left a sizeable legacy of wealth. In summary, the New; Board can look back with a high degree of satisfaction upon their efforts and accomplishments of the past year. BLUE AND GRAY STAFF. Seated: Brown, R., Cos Chairman of Bminerr Board; McDonough, Cerhairman of Bmiuerr Board; Wartield, EllilorvinvClaief; Green, D., Amiirlmzt Editor, Simzding: Rumford; Smith, J. Abram: Johnson, R., Director of Adzrertirizlg; Abrahamson, A5- J'iirlmzf Editor. CYNOSURE EDITORIAL BOARD. Redwood, J., AJ- Iociate Edizor; McCormick, AJIociate Editor; Slaughter, K., Editor-in-Claief; Mason, Alsatian? Editor; Green, D., Amociate Editor. CYNOSURE 1964 CYNOSURE BUSINESS BOARD. Johnson, D. Co Bmines; Manager; Ober, D., Co-Bzuhzeu Manager. CYNOSURE PHOTOGRAPHY-ART BOARD. Seat- ed: Priddy, Photography Editor; Wood, Ar; Co-Editor; McDonough, Art Co-Editor. Standing: Stafford; Owens, M. Ableillt Taylor; Cosby, Photographers. PRIZES AWARDEIJ F0UNIJERST DAY- 1963 William A. Fijhee Medallion. Terence Holliday Ellen Head of the Upper School. Robert Haxall Johnson The Elimheth Woolyey Gilmom Senioe Prize. Peter Stephens Rodman. Junior Prize. Philip Timothy Barker The William Cahell Bmce, In. Athletic Prize. John Henry Claster The De. Johh M. T. Finney, Sn, Dehetihg Prizey. John Henry Zink, 111; Albert Struven Fehsenfeld, Jr. The Dehatz'ng Cup Prejemed hy MN, J. Croymn Cooper. Winning Team was composed of: Albert Struven Fehsenfeld, JL; Mitchell Hooper Miller, Jr., John Henry Zink, III Camemn Dehtzting Medallion. John Henry Zink, 111 Sixth Form Speaking Prizex. Thomas Carl Chase, III; Mitchell Hooper Miller, Jr. The Heyhew E. Pichett Prize for General thciemy m Hijzory. Ernest Ivon Cornbrooks, III The Dr. John M. T. Finney, S45, Exmy Prize. James Wilson Lehninger. William; College Prize for Geheml Prohciemy m Latin Richard Kemp Slaughter Prize for ijiciency in French. Claudius Robert Klimt Prize for Prohciehcy m Mathemdlics. Steven Janney Mason The D. K. Eyle Fiyher szml. John OhDell Dunning Ammtmng Psze: for Proxe and Poetry. PraeceeMitchell Hooper Miller, JrrePoetryeMitchell Hooper Miller, Jr. The Blue mzd Gray Poetry Prize for Fm; or Second Former. Pope Furman Brock, 111; David Halstead Schweizer The Chm of 1952 Drama Prize: William Leslie Paternotte; William George Scarlett, III The Alex. Randall, 17., Memorial Prize. Mitchell Hooper Miller, Jr. The Peter P. Blanchard Memorial Award. David Graham Robinson; William George Scarlett, III The Daniel Baker. J42, Memorial Award. Ward Baldwin C06, 111 The Mn. John M. T. Finney, Sn, Tami; Cup. Raymond Buck-Lew The Junior Tami; Cup. Harry Klinefelter The C. David Hamil, In. Temzi; Award. Mitchell Hooper Miller, Jr. The Alumni Bayehall Cup. James William Isaacs; Alexander Byers Martin The Tyler Campbell Lacmme Cup. Charles Edward Leach, Jr. Clan of 1939 Bmhethall Trophy. John Henry Claster The Culvee Football Cup. John Henry Claster The C. B, Alexander Wrextlmg Cup. Donald Hamilton Patterson, JL; Randolph Craig Woodward The Lewi; Omar Woodward Awam'. Robert Haxall Johnson The Meredith M. Jozmxzer Prize. Thomas Carl Chase, III The Eddie Fenimore Award. John Allison Nesbitt, 111 Family Awardj. Thomas Carl Chase, III; Albert Struven Fehsenfeld, Jr.; William Emerson Lamb, J11; Mitchell Hooper Miller, Jr.; Richard Watters Small PRIZES IN SCHOLARSHIP in each of the six Forms of the Upper School: First Form .................... George E. P. Mountcastle Fourth Form ........... Isaac Ridgeway Trimble, 111 Second Form .................. Pope Furman Brock, III Fifth Form .................... Richard Kemp Slaughter Third Form ................... Robert Ennis Farber, Jr. Sixth Form ......................... John OTDell Dunning AWARDS MADE AT CHAPEL ON MAY 25, 1965 Brown Univemity Award. Richard Kemp Slaughter The Dorothy Benjamin Cm'mo Award. David Graham Robinson Clamiml Cluh of Baltimore Context: Level IeHonororable Mention; Richard Curzon Honan, IV; Level 2eR0nald Bruce Sheff; Level 3eFrederick Graf Whelan, III Franklin and Mawhell Awm'd. Isaac Ridgeway Trimble, 111 Harvard Booh Prize. Richard Kemp Slaughter Methematiw Anocietion 0f AmericaeSociety 0 f Actuarie; C omen: John O,Dell Dunning National Federation of Mzm'c 0th. Frederick Graf Whelan, III Rothemnel Award to Second Former. Allen McCullough Barrett, Jr. Yale Booh Prize. James William Isaacs x- x- HAN-IAUIHONQUIQNO x- o-auuounowodwuowoawu4Maauonquuuwuo-cNaNu-IauwuumuwuowouuouaAdnuu x- x. x. Abrahamson Acton Allan, D. Allen, G. F. Allen, T. Anderson, A. Anderson, W. Andrews, B. Andrews, R. Baetier Baier Baker, B. Baker, R. W. Baker, 5. Baker, W. R. Barker Barnes Barnes Burr, J. Barr, W. Borretf Burton Beadle Beull Beck Beehler Beers Bell Bennett Benson BergIc-xnd Bias Birckhead Blake Bolond Boro Bortz Bowe Bowie Boyce, A. P. Boyce, C. P. Bradley Bragdon Brock Brooks, F. Brooks, 5. Brown, G. Brown, J. Brown, R. Brown, T. Brunn Bryson, J. Bryson, 1. Buck, F. Buck, T. BuckvLew Burghardf Bushby Cal1ahan Campbell, E. L Campbell, J. 1. Campbell, K. Caplan, T. Carroll Cavanuugh Chandler Chelton Chenoweth Chilis Chriss Christhilf Ciunos Clugetf Clapp Clark Cline x dwgudou-I x. x- x- x- 0-4UIN-'-'NM54U'IUI-dk-IbwAth-d-INth4-IWWUIUIKKAUIU x- 4-4 -l-l-l 4, 3+ x- x. -lw-'LnOsO-5anwdHAHNUIJLQNNUIdeA5-NMNMQ 4 SCHOOL ROSTER Clinnin 4 Cobb 2 C08, H. 4 Coe, M. 6 Coffey 4 Cook, B. 2 Cooke, C. 5 Cooke, R. 2 Cooper, E. 2 Cooper, J. 3 Costa 5 Crocker 4 Crosby 3 Cross, J. 6 Cross, S. 2 Cunningham 2 Curtis, G. 4 Curtis, R. 6 Dale 4 Dana, R. R. 4 Dana, H. R. 3 Dandy 3 Dunzer 1 Davis, A. B. 311 Davis, J. 1k2 Davis, M. 5 deBuys 5 Deford, G. 11 Deford, R. 4 Dell 4 deViHiers it1 DeVries 1 Dewicki 6 Dockman 3 Donohue 2 Downes 4 Dunmore 2 Dunn, J. 4 Dunn, P. 3 Dunning, D. 3 Dunning, R. 3 DuVivier 5 Dwight 3 Dyer 5 Eager 2 Easter, C. 1 Easter, H. 2 Edgerfon 2 Emery 1 Erlandson 4 Farber, A. 6 Farber, P. 41 Farber, R. 4 Fenwick, B. 2 Fenwick, C. 4 Fenwick, G. 6 Fisher, A. 5 Fisher, W. 3 Fitzgerald 5 Flanders 5 Foster, 1. 5 Foster, M. 3 Fox 6 Frcnke 51 Fulford 4 Gaines 4 Gumper 6 Garlick it1 Gavora 2 Giardina 4 Gibbons-Neff, H. 6 Gibbons-NeH, P. 6 Gillelan 2 Goldberg 5 Goldsmitn 2 Gomer 5 Gontrum 3 This Goodman Gordon Grady Green, D. Green, R1. Green, Ro. Groff Groom Grose Grow Gundry Haas Harbold Hardesty Harper, A. Harper, P. Harriman Harris Hort, G. Hart, J. Harvey, B. Harvey, G. Harvey, J. C. Harvey, J. L. Harwood, E. Harwood, R. Helfrich Henderson Hendin Hendrix Herlihy Hermann, D. Herrmann, R. L. Hersperger Hirsch Hoffman Hooker Hopkins Housewrighf Houston Howard Hudson Hughes Hull Hundley Huppman Hyde Iglehart, F. lglehort, T. Iliff, A. IIiFf, N. Imboden lngulls, SA lngalls, T. Irwin lsaacs Israel Jackson Jorrotf Jenkins, H. Jenkins, J. Jenkins, T. Johnson, D. Johnson, P. Johnson, R. Jones, G. Jones, J. Jones, R. Jones, 5. Kain Kaplan, A. Kelly, F. Kelly, G. Ke.ly, H. Kenny Kerr Kidder page was 3 6 3 2 4 4 5 4 4 4 1 1 3 3 1 it1 5 5 4 3 2 5 3 1 5 1 4 6 6 6 1 2 1 6 11 4 4 1 6 1r1 Moumenee 1 6 4 6 4 6 5 5 2 6 52 4 4 6 4 4 1 61 5 3 4 2 3 4 2 41 2 5 2 4 2 2 2 51 1 4 Kiefaber 2 King, A. 5 King, J. 6 Kirkpatrick 1 Klimt 2 Klinefelter, H. 6 Klinefeher, S. 4 Koester 3 Kolodner 4 Komun 3 Koppelman, A. 3 Koppelman, L 4 Krometis 1 LaFrance 6 Lumber? 1 Lancaster 1 Lang 3 LeBoufiIlier 5 Legg, B. 4 Legg, C. 6 Levering 5 Levi, A. 3 Levi, J. 1 Lewenz 2 Lewis 1 Libbey 3 Lloyd 3 Locke 5 Lowe 3 Lundberg 6 Lynn 6 Macgill 6 Machen 6 MacLean 4 Magludery 1 Marcus 4 Marlow 6 Marshall 2 Mason 3 2 1 McCordell 1 McCarthy 4 McCarty 1k3 McCoy 44 McCleary 5 McCormick 5 McCoy 1 McDaniel 3 McDonald 1 McDonough 4 McElroy 5 Means 4 Michelson 5 Miller, J. 3 Miller, R. 5 Millstone 2 Milnor 6 Minkowski 3 Mitchell 5 Moore, G. 2 Moore, J. 2 Merrill, 1. 4 Morrill, W. 5 Morris 3 Morton 6 Moulden 6 Mounfcastle, G. 1 Mounfcasfle, V. 3 Murphy 3 Naquin, D. 2 Nuquin, S. 2 Nelson 5 Nesbitt 6 Norris 1 North 5 Novak, E. R. 2 1 Novak, W. D. 5 Ober, C. Ober, DeL. Ober, D. Opfer Owens, D. Owens, M. Owens, P. Palmer Parkinson Puss Peabody Perry Peters Pine Pinkard Pitts Pollock Potter Price Priddy Primrose, C4 Primrose, N. ProuH, R1. ProuH, R0. Purnell Quortner RadcliHe Redd Redwood, Jo. Redwood, Jo. Reed Reese ReveH Reynolds Rice Rich, G. Rich, R. Richardson, V. Richardson, W. Riepe, C. Riepe, F. W. Riepe, G. M. S. Rittenhouse Robins Robinson Rogers Rohrer Rouse, C. Rouse, W. Rumford Rumsey Sachs Scarlett Schmick Schroeder Schweizer Scoft Seal Seipp Sener Shaw S'nef? Shiling Shoemaker Sigler Silversfein Simmers Sims Singewald Singley Slagle Slaughter, C. Slaughter, K. Slaughter, T. Smith, C. Smith, D. Smith, J. given by a friend a- x- x- AQQMUIddUINNwAw-'ONNN-'QOQMA x- x- x- MONJAOUINUINOJNAUIOJUIt-OMUIHUIUI x" 44-4 u-CANQ ummunukhamoouwwuwmuudeuu Smifhwick Snead Solley Sollod Somerville, J. Somerville, W. Sparks Speed Spragins Stafford Stolforf Stanton, A. P. Stanton, M. J. Stanton, M, Sfengel Stephens Sfmer, R. Strauss Sunderland Swineharf Swope Symingion Taylor Tevis Thomas Tilghman Tompkins Travers Trimble, I. R. Trimb'e, T. R. Tumulty Turnbull Turner Van Durand Veale Wagner Walker, J. W. Wa1ker, W. G. Wa1'enstein Word, A. Ward, G. WchIeld Wasserman Webb Weiskitfel West Whedbee, J04 Whedbee, Jo. Whedbee, M. Whedbee, T. Wheeler Whelan, A. Whelan, B. Whelan, F. White Whitman, D. Whitman, H. Whitman, L. Wilkes Williams, A. Williams, D. Wilson, A. D. Wilson, G. Winsteod, D. Winsiead, T. Wood Woods, R. C. T. Woods, R. C. Workman Yaggy Yearley Zeigler, C. Zeigler, G. Zink, P. R Zink, S. C. Zink, T. 1'. ENS JUN C. MARKLAND KELLY, JR. SEPTEMBER 22e1916 JUNE 4,1942 GAVE His HFE FOR HIS COUNTRY ON JUNE 4, 1942 m THE BATTLE OF MiDWAY 22nd ANNIVERSARY THE ENSIGN C. MARKLAND KELLY, JR. MEMORIAL POST jj:174 of thc AMERICAN LEGION was formed in his honor, to perpetuate his name and keep alive the AMERICAN ideals for which he so willingly gave his life. To this end the Ensign C. Markland Kelly, Jr. Memorial Post iil74 has been active in many pro- grams and activities, a few of which are listed below. 0 American Flag Educational programs for flag eti- quette and American Flags presented to Boy and Girl Scout Troops. o Athleticselunior baseball. basketball and lacrosse teams sponsored. Lacrosse trophies for High Schools and Colleges. A baseball field is main- tained in the Northwood area. Annual Sports Award presented to an outstanding coach in the State of Maryland. 0 Baltimore City ZooeGifts of UM Polar bears. Jenny the elephant and most recently the Sar- ' dinian donkeys, Ginger Bread and Cupcake. 0 Boys and Girls StatestSi High School Juniors each year sponsored. 0 Boy ScoutseOVer 18,000 Boy Scout calendars pre- sented annually to schools, troops and Cub Packs. 0 Drum and Bugle Corps e Sponsoring St. Marys Drum and Bugle Corps and Honor Guards in American Legion competition each year. 0 Essay and Oratqrical ContestseSponsoring contests In all schools 1nterested. 0 Open ShuttereMaintain film library for iishut-in" institutions as well as provxdmg live entertainment and refreshments as occaslon arlses. o Scholarships e McDonogh School and Baltimore College of Commerce. 0 Memorial ServiceseOpen to the public, each year a Memorial Day Service is held at London Park Cemetery on May 30th for all who have made the supreme sacrifice for their country. Watch for announcement in the papers. Since its inception, the Post has been interested in the community; and many things have been done to promote its welfare. Special credit should be given to the ENSIGN C. MARKLAND KELLY, JR. MEMORIAL FOUNDATION, INC. for their financial assistance. The resultemany of the programs are a reality rather than a dream. Best Wishes from the Saint PauPs School for Girls Hockey Team 'I'HE NASSAU CONSTRUCTION CO. We Offer You Personal Attention and Complete Advice On All Real Estate and Insurance Problems "MULTIPLE LIST YOUR HOME WITH US FOR A QUICK SALE" TEMPLE Ho PEIRCE Q85 CCOMPANY REALTORS V 30 w. 25th Street HO. 7-3100 Compliments of Good luck ENTERPRISE FUEL Gilman COMPANY THE ROMPER ROOM BALTIMORE, MARYLAND Best Wishes from Delvale Dairies . . . Danni; The last thing that melts is the ftavor! UDEL BROS, INC. photographers to Baltimore since 191 0 1018 N. CHARLES STREET LEXington 9-3740 HARRY 'I'. CAMPBELL SONS' CORPORATION QUARRYMEN - CONTRACTORS - MANUFACTURERS Towson, Maryland VAlley 3-7000 Compliments of THE BARTON - GILLET CO. BALTIMORE NEW YORK FOR REAL ESTATE SERVICE de Buys 8i C0. MULTIPLE LISTING REALTORS 5201 Roland Ave. 323-3060 COMPLIMENTS OF gHYNSON, WESTCOTT 81 DUNNING, INC? T. ROWE PRICE AND ASSOCIATES, INC. Investment Research and Counsel One Charles Center Baltimore 1, Md. T. ROWE PRICE GROWTH STOCK FUND INC. OBJECTIVE: Possible long term growth of principal and income. OFFERING PRICE: Net asset value. There is 110 sales load or commission. REDEMPTION PRICE: Net asset value less 192,. Prospectus on Request One Charles Center Baltimore 1, Md. COMPLIMENTS OF WM. H. WHITING CO. When you think of boating, think of Whiting 6701 Moravia Road Baltimore, Maryland Telephone: 488-3200 C ongratulations t0 GILMAN CLASS OF 1964 CLINE'S FURNITURE STORE, INC. OF FREDERICK Established 1888 FLYNN AND EMRICH COMPANY 0 ESTABLISHED 18420 ENGINEERS FOUNDRYMEN MACHINISTS HOLLIDAY S; SARATOGA STREETS BALTIMORE 2. MARYLAND AMERICANS OLDEST SILVERSMITHS Baltimore 18, Maryland OS. A. Bank 7?; Mc1othcs 105 Hopkins Place I o BALTIMORE 1, MD. ID 54170 WALKER-WILSON TRAVEL, LTD. Call Ogden Gorman :Gilman 194m our ex- pert in faculty, alumni: parents: friends7, and students7 travel. 6305 YORK ROAD Adjacent to Stewarls, Cooper Walker 1933 COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND NAMED RADIO 130 Compliments of MATZ, CHILDS and ASSOCIATES CIVIL ENGINEERS and LAND SURVEYORS Baltimore and Rockville, Md. Office: Home Phone: ROgers 4-3311 CL. 5-0095 CL. 5-2737 DAWSON GROOM, Inc. HAULING cmd EXCAVATING Mt. Washington Baltimore 9, Md. Manager HALL A. KELLOGG SMNHAT'S THIS guw moor HN A0 IN THE CYNOSURE, ALL THAT MONEY Jusrm NV 60013va FROM THE CLASS 0F 'eeE HEY, LET'S JUST SAY GQCEHBY 'PERSONALAY THEN THERE WONT BE ANY COST. C6 gjyh A J3 LI x ,1 A M Hire 4 f g YAH, WE GOITA ow A Lcrm DOUGH GUST To SAY GooDaBY 10 "THE CTRADUATING- cmsg OF '6. I c 1p 0 g3? tT's A DARN SHAME. . . WV ARE YOU KuDDING?, YOU EVER 35:51 SCALDED 'N A LOCKER ROOM SHowEg? i Have you ever been run over by 27 enemy Spitiires while in a double i twist-over jehli roll in a Ferrari-powered FOKKER wolfeW No, but have you ever spent 180 days and nights on the Lower ' North Corridoriw Heck, HOV We11 then Yd say youTe luckyW I MANNSCHAFTSANGEHORIGER: Dave Abrahamson John Lowe ; Brooks Bragdon Stu McCarthy Walt Childs Hugh McCoy Cappy Cline Marty McDonough Pete DuVivier Jimmer Potter Alex Fisher Julian Schroeder Pete Gibbons-Neff wiloo Fife Symington Doug Green Ridge Trimble Nick Iliff Gally Wartield Jimmy Isaacs Alex Yearley KINDERGARTEN PROGRAM You are invited to the Kindergarten Christmas Program on Friday, December 21, 1951 1 1:00 am. HOW SANTA FIRST USED LIGHTS ON HIS CHRISTMAS TREE SANTA CLAUS Bobby Pine REINDEER Robby McCormick SANTA,S BROWNIES Johnny MacLean Tommy Beck Doc Michel Bobby Speed David Johnson Stan Brady Johnny Redwood Jimmy Cianos TOY TEDDY BEARS Timmy Barker Johnny Hawks Gary Woodruff Stafford Hayes Peter Munsell Bruce Fingles Brooks Mays Jackie Hill TOY SOLDIERS Lcith Herrmann LITTLEST POLAR BEAR Joshua Gillelan Richmond Wannen Ricky Reese Johnny Lambert Central . . . where generations of Baltimoreans have saved with safety and profit for more than a century. Central SAVINGS BANK a mutuw savings bank founded in 7854 0 Charles and Lexington o Mondowmin Shopping Center 0 Baltimore and Eutaw o 23 Alleghany Avenue, Towson - Loch Raven Boulevard and Taylor Avenue MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORAYION Compliments of iord-mott COMPANY INCORPORATED lord-hlotfs Em 514,4: GREEN BEANS TYPICAL GILMANISM It has come to our attention that there is a wave of feeling concerning the image of The Gilman Boy. To be specific, certain of us were attacked for the way we dressed. The feeling was expressed that every Gilman boy should dress in the fashion of the time and, most impor- tant, like the iitypieal Gilmanitefi Let it be known that we desire to be most unlike the tttypical Gilmanitef and that to be an individual is not a crime, social or otherwise. tAt least, we do not regard it as a crime, but who are we to judge our own aetionsN Furthermore, let it be known that we do not bemoan the fact that we do not itbelong to Elkridge, but . . . satis- fied with LiHirondelleW Sorry is the day when the forces of eonformisrn triumph over the forces of individualism. F.U.F.L. In this, the 1964th year of some of usis some- time Lord Jesus Christ, a group of three neu- rotic Gilmanites, scorned by Providence and thorned by humanity, have bonded together into a ball of unrealized frustration called the F.U.F.L.is. It is the purpose of this organiza- tion to enjoy eommiserate misery while eating out their hearts. President John tDemosthenes XI Bryson is usually unable to stop the log- rolling of Vice President Josh tkind fatheri Gillelan 11. Both of these citizens are inter- mittently interrupted by oil and on member Doug tLud RankinI Green, the most intensive and most derisive. Because of its unusual nature, membership in F.U.F.L. is long term and limited to a select few. Membership quali- fications that have been discovered so far are: II lack of: personality, perseverance, perspin caeity, pulehritude, and penitence; 2i a com- pletely independent father complex; 3i a poly- zoidal personality which alters upon the whistling of the St. Louis Blues. $ V.M.M. My morning coat, my collar mounting firmly to the chin, Mynecktie rich and modest, but asserted by a simple pm?- tThey will say: But how his arms and legs are thinlU Do I dare Disturb the universe? T. S. ELIOT. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrack We, the Victims of the Modern Malady, recognize that part of our life is bound up in The D.M.A. was founded upon the principle that all men are created against their will as mugwumps. In order to ease the strain and to endure our applesauce sophisticatedly, we aim to actively participate in the perpetuation and propagation of philosophies expounded upon in History Class. To this end we offer the fol- lowing ttWords to Live Byii in order to prevent further pining away of nambie-pambies for perpetuity: LET US HOPE D.M.A. trivialities. We are complacent and construc- tive. Will we, Nill we, we recognize our situa- tion, and we, the only two declared members, John Bryson and Kemp Slaughter, look opti- mistically t0 the future. Perhaps, unlike J. Alfred, our mirror image, we shall . after tea and cakes and ices Have the strength to force the moment to the crisis. ttI dont want to be a mugwump? tLSuck, dear, suek-Napoleon says its sugar? itEvcrybody to his own taste, said the old lady as she kissed the cow? liEnough is enough, but too much is more than enough? ttThereis the flip-Hopfi tlIt all comes out in the wash? ttI suppose you sophisticates would think that was a lot of applesauce? MORGAN 8: MILLARD, Inc. . . NATIONAL SPORTING GOODS Retail Druggtsfs We Specialize in PRESCRlPTlONS CO., Inc. Cigars - Candy - Cosmetics COLLEGE and SCHOOL SPECIALISTS Soda Fountain - Luncheonette Olficial Outfitters for Gilman Country School SLAGLE 4Q: SLAGLE9 Inc, 310 E. Baltimore Street Baltimore 2, Md. HOMEOWNERS SERVICE CALL MUlbcrry 5-0284 and 5-0285 ID. 3-7411 ID. 3-7412 FOR ANY TYPE OF HOME MAINTE- Guns, Ammunition, Fishing Tackle, NANCE OR REPAIR SERVICE Emergencies: 24 Hours a Day, 7 Days a Week Only a Limited Number Of New Members Will Be Accepted Archery Tackle and Athletic Supplies COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND COMMITTEE ON MORAL STANDARDS OF THE GILMAN MISSIONARY SOCIETY 0 x fENWICK , S.Au-w -$-.-.--'m ...:.;- , ,. . ?ROM +he SOUTH CORRIDOR CLASSMATES 9 5 z the game the Social Committee prepares to limber up Afterwards they relax and solve the teamhs social problems at "the morguf BY AUTHORITY OF FLAKE, R., AND ROB Let us bow our heads in a moment of reverent silence. Let us devote this fieeting instant to all that we have lost and shall never behold again, to pay solemn tribute for that which is lost, gone or departed. One game, one season, one coach, one war cry, one effort, one team, and one heck of a good time. PATRON S LIST Mr. and Mrs. Carlyle Barton Dr. and Mrs. Roland F. Beers, Jr. W. S. Bergstrom Mr. and Mrs. J. Early Hardesty Mr. and Mrs. Hugh E. Jones Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Kaplan - Gail Kaplan Rev. and Mrs. Richard M. Lundberg Dr. and Mrs. Angus L. MacLean Dr. and Mrs. Harry A. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. Ober Mrs. Frederic M. Reese Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Rich Dr. and Mrs. Aaron C. Sollod Dr. and Mrs. Edward S. Stafford For Anne, Barbara, Brenda, Jenny, Judy, and Nancy; For Diane, Dolly, Inga, Kathie, Kitty, and Marie Who else has zipper shoes? T. R. and a bleach-blonde friend Fritz, 1, 2, 3, and all their friends A Friend I want: to play my harmonica A Nail and a bow-legged friend llThatls average; Ilm so embarrassed? For all the T.Cfs at Forest Park IV Form Basketball, J.V. Jimls Barber Shop, 512 W. Cold Spring Lane T. C. Wing Chinese Hand Laundry, 4504 Schenley Road This space belongs to Anne, and so do I OF F ICERS DR. D. C. WHARTON FINNEY, 43 Presidem W. CAMERON SLACK, '46 Vice-Prexident WARD B. COE, JR., 3?. Treasurer EDWARD T. RUSSELL Secretary EXCUTIVE COMMITTEE DR. JOHN M. SCOTT, 30 EDWARD A4 SUPPLEE, 39 DAVID B. BAKER, '45 H. FURLONG BALDWIN, 50 CHARLES F. OBRECHT, 52 WILLIAM A. FISHER, JR., ,31 DAWSON L. FARBER, JR., 35 A. SAMUEL COOK, .39 CHARLES T. ALBERT, 47 FRANCIS G. RIGGS, 57 DR. G. H. WILLIAMS. JR., 10 RICHARD F. OBER, 33 THOMAS J. S. WAXTER, JR., 52 CHARLES F. JENKINS, 46 CHARLES C. EMMONS, 23 Director of Developmem ALUMNI REPRESENTATIVES TO BOARD OF TRUSTEES DR. DONALD H. HOOKER, 28 DR. WILLIAM D. LYNN, 36 DR. ALAN C. WOODS, JR., 36 J. HURST PURNELL, JR., 37 HONORARY FACU LTY MEMBERS RICHARD K. MARSHALL, 42 FREDERICK R. WILLIAMS R. JACK CARVER EX-OFFICIO JOHN M. NELSON, III, '36 WILLIAM J. MCCARTHY, '49 ALLEN M. BARRETT, 40 ALUMNI BULLETIN EDITORIAL BOARD ALEXANDER ARMSTRONG, 33 RICHARD K. MARSHALL, 42 ADOLAY HAUSMANN DAVID W. BARTON, JR., 43 MRS. EDWARD T. RUSSELL TO YOU, THE MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1964, WE OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION EXTEND OUR WARMEST GREETINGS GILMAN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION THE GILMAN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION welcomes the Class of 1964 as fellow Alumni. This Association reflects the continuing influence of Gilman School on the lives of its graduates. This iniluence began the first day we entered the School, and it will end only when we are too old to remember the intellectual and spiritual values imparted to us at Gilman and their effect on our lives as adult men. Through this Association and its activities, we maintain contact with the School and with other Classmates and friends who have shared with us in Gilmanls traditions. We find this a most rewarding experi- ence, and we are conlident that you, the Class of 1964, will also enjoy our activities as fellow Alumni. This Association is also the means by which the personal intluence of the Alumni is, in turn, brought to bear on the continued growth of the School itself. In recent years our work on behalf of the Alumni Audi- torium and our leadership in organizing an unrestricted endowment known as ltThe Gilman Fundh have been tangible evidence of this support. We extend to you, the members of the Class of 1964, our heartiest congratulations and a most cordial welcome to the ranks of the Gilman Alumni Association. BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1964 ZEPP PHOTO CENTERS "The FRIENDLY SPOT to Photoshop" 3042 Greenmount Ave. Towson Plaza Baltimore 18, Md. Towson 4, Md. BE. 5-4900 VA. 3-1680 ERundnlph Wooffon 0 Eumpuny REAL ESTATE SENIOR COLLEGE CHOICES AMHERST , ., ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,Miller BOWDOIN ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , Green BUCKNELL , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Priddy CASE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY , ,,,,,,,,, ,Jones COLGATE ,,,,, , Locke MacLean Owens Revell Silverstein COLORADO , , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, CotTay COLUMBIA ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,, ,, , Bryson CORNELL ,,,,, , ,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Lowe, Lundberg DARTMOUTH , ,,,,,,, , ,, ,,McC0rmick DUKE ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , 7 ,, Beck FAIRLEIGH-DICKINSON ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , 7 Flanders FRANKLIN AND MARSHALL ,,,,, Gibbohs-Neff, King GEORGETOWN , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Hardesty GETTYSBURG ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 7 7 ,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,, Kapian HAMILTON , ,, Winstead HARVARD ,,,,, ,, , 7 ,,,,,,,, Isaacs, Redwood Symington HOBART ,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,, ,, ,,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,,, Beers, Rich JOHNS HOPKINS ,,,,,,,,, Abrahamson, Davis, Easter MARYLAND ,, ,, ,,,,, , , , Cianos MIDDLEBURY ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Whedbee OBERLIN , , ,,,,, ,7 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,, McCay OHIO WESLEYAN w, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,, Brown PENN ,, , ,, ,,,,,,,, Sigler Sollod POMONA ,, ,,,,, ,, Wood PRINCETON, ,,,,,,,,,, Campbell, Ober, Reed, Warfield, Weiskittel RANDOLPH-MACON , , ,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,,,Andersor1, Herrmann, Scott RIPON . , . , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , , H ,,,,, 7 Reese RUTGERS 7 ,,,,,, , ,,,,,, ,,,,, , McCarthy SEWANEE ,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,,, , 7 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, McDonough ST. JOHNis , ,,,,,,,,,,,, a Gillelan TRINITY ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Barton DLiVivier Kelly, Pine Trimble TUFTS A , ,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Caplan WAKE FOREST ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Chelton WASHINGTON AND LEE ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, W H ,,,,,,,,,,,,, A11an,J0hnson WESLEYAN ,,,,,,,,, 7 ,,,,,,, 0 , ,0 Cline WILLIAMS ,,,,,,,,,,, Bragdon, Iliff, Mason VIRGINIA 7, 7 , ,7 , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,Childs YALE , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,, CSlaughter, Stafford The Traveling Men have been Boot-ed for- ward this year by our fearless and gearless leader, who consistently sets a fine example by never clutching up. Our meetings every Sunday night always Foster a great deal of lousy sing- ing, good fun, and an overabundance of Bull, who in turn, Jacks up everyonels spirits. Often- times, our practices are simply Dolly, and everyone always has a Whelan good time. The members of the trio certainly proved to be three strong winds, even for the time when Hairyman was forced to Leith the group, which says something about the other two. There are several Martins to be found in this years T-Men; all but one are hat-tops, and the one 1 exception seems to be more of a long-hair value. Many of us have been Allen-ated by one of our members, who is not only wordy, but extremely Chordy. He sometimes transforms the room into a Warheld by ordering some of us to ttDonall do this and tlDonall do that. Sig has to get pretty high to sing out his love for ttLitl tLizu Janell but we all know he can go down very far, especially ltDown by the Sallie Gardensii ltls fairly obvious that, like the rest of us, Billy canlt Reed music, but we still think hes pretty sharp. When Turtle wanted to buy a new Gibson shell, he had to hock his saxophone, and hels been saxless ever since. SIGMA EPSILON CHI First Row: Jones. Anderson, Reese. Center: House Mother. Second Row: Scott, MacLean, Beck. mx mew . 2 Mmaw 33$: 5,22 ' w . WWWIMIMIWMHI .. I , AWWM . Ix 44472,ng , Ifwwg I W ; ll NH 1 2 ', WEI, , amarannnwlur Iy szyz . KI . x . , j i, V ,',7 Z , . A9144 ,1 . 1" ,IzIV IQI I r I ii. I IWWMMWMWWIIMWXWIIWIIIQI I , , I I x' ' v . " , xiii I L , , , , I I , WM" 95;? "MQWW I , I v ,, III III! 3" I 511223;;in 3.1.1:an 1' Wm M HMWWZ'MWM; WIWWWW Wwi" 4 r' WWMI; zllwy l, 1 7'7 x 51' W I yww i l UNIVERSITY PARKWAY PHARMACY Paul C. Gaver, Ph.G., Prop. Phone BELMONT 5-2121 100 W. University Pkwy. Baltimore 10, Md. Compliments of the SHERATON-BELVEDERE HOTEL Majestic Cleaners 8: Dyers Lawndale Ave. at Wyndhurst BALTIMORE 10, MD. ID 3-9761 ROLAND PARK EDDIE'S MARKET ROLAND PARK HIGH QUALITY - LOW PRICES 1 FREE DELIVERY HAMMANN MUSIC COMPANY Home of Hammond Organs Knabe Pianos Everything in Music 206 N. Liberty St. at Lexington ' PL 2-6737 Towson Plaza on the Mall ' VA 3-8622 Glen Burnie, 28 Balt0.-Ann. Blvd. ' SO 1-3434 Westview Shopping Center 0 747-7782 UIIIUERSIW 0f BHlTImORE Coeducafionul SCHOOL OF LAW 3-YEAR EVENING Program leading to 1he LLB. degree, qualifies for fhe Maryland Sfafe Bar Examinations. CLASSES-THREE EVENINGS A WEEK. PRE- LAW 2-Year Day or 3-Year Evening Program quali- fies for Law School. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS. INDUSTRY. AND MANAGEMENT 4-YEAR DAY and 6-YEAR EVENING Programs leading '10 1he 5.5. degree in Accounting. Business Management. Finance, lndusfrial Managemenf, Marketingl and Trans- porfafion. JUNIOR COLLEGE 2-YEAR DAY and 3-YEAR EVENING Programs in Liberal Arfs General Educafion, leading +0 +he A.A. degree. Wrife or Call for Booklef 1420 N. CHARLES ST. BALTIMORE 'l. MARYLAND Telephone: 323-3223 MEYER MOTOR CO. EXPERT IGNITION AND TUNEUP WORK Repairs - Storage - Gas - Oils Delco Batteries - Auto Accessories 714 DEEPDENE ROAD ROLAND PARK Compliments of ROLAND PARK FLORIST WWW H eadquarters for Arpege Christian Dior Marcel Rochas Chanel-S TUXEDO PHARMACY 51 15 ROLAND AVENUE 323-3000 We nine, being of sound mind and healthy body, do this day record our last will and testament on behalf of our twelve departed classmates. Being forever indebted to that everlasting institution on Tuscany Road, Calvert School, we leave whatever wits and brains that remain after six years at Gilman and this half page to the memory of the fol- lowing teachers and friends: Miss Keyser, Miss Mooney, Miss Dye, Mrs. Vernon- Williams, Miss Waltze, Mrs. Jones, Mr. Gil- let, Mr. Cosman, Mr. Marcopolis, Mr. Kirk, Miss Wright, Miss Boggs, Mr. Hart, Mr. Perry, Mr. Huey, and most of all, Mr. Brown. SIGNED AND WITNESSED: Bill Barton, Rich Davis, Drew King, Bob Locke, Steve Mason, Doug Ober, Bill Reed, Fife Symington, and Tee Winstead. JEWELERS AT THE BENCH SINCE 1905 DESIGNERS AND MAKERS OF UNUSUAL JEWELRY Congratulation; T 0 T be Clan of i64 mam 231 N orth Howard Also Tidewater Inn, Easton, Maryland THE BOTTICELLI TEAM Pseudo Josh Gillelan Intel1ectua1 , John Bryson Wistfu1, Nan Proctor H0ney BeaW John McCay Sheepish,, Kemp Slaughter Strumming John Redwood Ma Proctor Sadistiw Steve Mason Great Doug Green House Mothef Gillelan from our University Shop OUR NEW BOLD STRIPE OXFORD WEAVE JACKET Here is an interesting Spring sport jacket of lightweight AmePE triacetate and cot- ton that will give excellent service. In at- tractive bold stripes of navy or yellow on white. Sizes 35 to 42. $37.50 Also Popical Spring Suits, $65 and $70;k WaximMe DacrzmGD Polyester and C 0;th Poplin Suits, $45 Liglztweigizl Odd Jackets, from $27.50 And our good-laoking "3 4 6t, furnishings. 9fPrices slightly higher west of the Rockies. ESTABLISHED 1818 agia gfgm 5 62-24: a GE L m H N Q$D $ wax Men's ar Boys Furnishings, Hats erghocs 346 MADISON AVE, COR. 44TH, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10017 46 NEWBURY, COR. BERKELEY, BOSTON, MASS. 02116 PITTSBURGH 0 CHICAGO I SAN FRANCISCO --LOS ANGELES WWW GARAMONDIPRIDEMARK PRESS BALTIMORE. MARYLAND i . 1 23 "'3 F, i uzgug 9..., a;- - ,, . hwy, ;; m-gw w yWIWEIS-f'Sf-H L , r, m vs fry 4 L'- w x, : H' xwo'w'v'io , L 3, h .h yaw, 1 ...,.,u, $1 4 .40 gm; Mgr , 'r -v- ..:r,'-.- 4m ":3 w, p .7? ;. r, z I ' ,- Z; lRNE'Vi nth ;. :.. 3 -hxmwztz' "km 2.2: I . ., ..- 1;: .. -rm


Suggestions in the Gilman School - Cynosure Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) collection:

Gilman School - Cynosure Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

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Gilman School - Cynosure Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

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Gilman School - Cynosure Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1963 Edition, Page 1

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Gilman School - Cynosure Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1965 Edition, Page 1

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Gilman School - Cynosure Yearbook (Baltimore, MD) online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

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