Gettysburg (CG 64) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 2007

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Gettysburg (CG 64) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 2007 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 101 of the 2007 volume:

s I Q . 5 , . L 4 3 Table of COI1t6I1'CS Operations Department Battle of Gettysburg fy Air Department Gettysburg Address " ,Training Teams Crest, Shield, 81 Motto is , ' y yy r, P ,lfvhlferdroom Commanding Officer Quntlgzw V Mess Commanding Officer C- 07I'?,, Zvi it: Malaga, Spain Executive Officer Dubai, UAE Command Masteif i0 - . anama, Bahrain ww 2Q'01le .,i if P e G Executive Department ' I P Engineering Department -H- Combat Systems Weapons Depart Su pply, Department? ' 2007 was a busy year for the USS her crew. From the very beginning of the year with "week one work-ups," through various unit level assessments, two ENTERPRISE Strike Group Sustainment Exercises, and a complex ITT Final Evaluation Problem, 2007 was marked by a rigorous training cycle and a very aggressive underway and maintenance schedule. However, the very highlight of 2007 for the USS GETTYSBURG came on July 9, 2007 when she deployed with the USS ENTERPRISE Carrier Strike Group to serve as Air Defense Commander, in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Though the hours were long, spending 71 consecutive days at sea early on, and the stress levels high, N 'I I 7 ' ' ' f - J!--4 --- ----- -A -----nn:-an as :gunning lg 133 l .,........--...-... .-...,..... 1-aim: BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG 1-3 JULY 1863 b s a climactic moment in our nation's history. The battle is wide wa' The Battle of Geuys mg h 1 h h the Civil War lasted another two years after Gettysbl lUm1niP0'ntEfC?Ftg:QggZcgf wrifrnglg The story of the battle is one of the great dramas of o Confe eracy 21 1 ' In late Spfmg of 1863 the Con C g b t ve of this cam ai n w N h V r mia The military 0 jec 1 p g PSHHSJ ll mm mth mb Army of on em I g t to threaten Phrladel hra into southeastern Pennfl Wamfl cmd be ln '3 POS' 'On P history' . f deraie ovemment decided to have General Robert E. Lee mo cw . I 1 3 . . - . . . - ' ' ' 3 f . Th C J . ?lYriiSlwlalg1ClFeaIdyt?simrrieIf?nLlin the North and to put political pressure on President Lincoln to C to the war they would Th Confederacy also hoped that by demonstrating its ability to invade the North 6 B t and France to give the Confederacy formal diploma finally convince Great rr arn and perhaps even enter the war as Confederate allies. ' 9 , L I C A . ' . , . , , , Lee 5-mm mm, l't' al ob'ective of the campaign was to build on public drsrllusromn 9 ' . ' U e I . 1 f june General Lee began moving his army of some 75,000 men from central Virginia Blue Ridge late June, General Lee's Anny was across the Potomac and advance infantry units had moved miles of Harrisburg, the capital of Pennsylvania. General Lee sent General Jeb Stuart ahead infantry forces with instructions to screen his advance and bring back information about the Union Army of the Potomac. On the Northem side, President Lincoln, frustrated by the lack of a decisive response on the n ear y Mountains so that he could move the army north across the Potomac River mto P ,o u ' m P1 u command of General George G. Meade. Meade's instructions were to ensure that he kept hrs between General Lee's army and Washington and try to engage the Confederate army rn a d General Meade had good intelligence about General Lee s movements and ordered his army t in the direction of Gettysburg. As the Northem Anny began to approach General Lee's forces, Lee had no knowledge ofthe generals, relieved the general in command of the Army of the Potomac and placed that army , ' ec I . . , . t 1 t was not until the night of 30 June that Lee learned from a Confederate spy that Meade s arm toward him and that an advance Union Cavalry force occupied Gettysburg only 30 miles awa mountain ridge to the east Lee hastily issued orders to his infantry corps to change direction Gettysburg gn the mommg of 1 July, General Lee's troops made contact with Union Cavalry troops und heneral John Buford. Buford, recognizing the tactical importance of the geography around is men to drsmount and take up defensive positions along Willoughby Run, northwest of Ge General Stuart had' moved far ahead of the Confederate infantry force and had lost contact wi . I A . , . , I 1 ' E G 1 c Alt - - . . . meg-Oeuagilhe 'Confederate troops instructions were only to investigate the report of Union for 2 mess to ight led them to immediately attack the Union position. Throughout the rn more and more , . . . Confederate troops poured across the mountains and put pressure on the Unroi Specs, gust as the Union defenses were ready to break, General John Reynolds arrived with for e e' d ' dguere Umm Cavalry- Throughout the aftemoon Confederate troops converged on the north and west h'l ' , ' . . of the town Althouxghlgegglorlffoops raced up from the southeast to set up defensive posmc General Ewell the general utah' ee ordered an immediate attack to prevent the Unionrlines fl' h f ' .,. . . L 'USC Of lh1S Portion of the Confederate line, did not organizer Dig tall, e Hdms The possibility of further action. Throughout the ' ht h ' . just south of Geglib 't e Umm Army moved fapldly to develop defensive positions along C y mg' on the Confederate Side, General Lee deployed his 2 ly forces rlong Semin try Ridge facing east toward Union positions. By dawn both armies were deployed along a three mile line running south from Gettysburg On the moming of 7 July General Lee, observing the disposition of Union forces along Cemetery Ridge, decided to use General James Longstreet s Infantry Corps to attack the left side of the Union line that was on a small hill known locally as Little Round Top. Lee was convinced that the best chance of success lay in surprising the Union forces on Little Round Top and allowed Longstreet to spend most of the day trying to L maneuver his corps into position for the attack while remaining concealed behind a low ridge. This effort at , conce rlment was ultimately unsuccessful and cost the Confederates the better part of the day. The Confederate attack on Little Round Top finally got underway toward themiddle of the aftenroon on 2 July. The Confederates advanced on the Union positions on a rocky outcropping known as "Devil's Den" that was at the base of Little Round Top The fighting was fierce and casualties wereheavy on both sides. As this attack took place General Longstreet continued to try to convince Lee to stop the attack and move around the Union flank. As the light faded the Confederates repeatedly charged up through the rocks and woods of Little Round A Top s slopes, and were continuously driven back. . The 20th Maine Regiment commanded by Colonel Joshua L. Chamberlain held the extreme left end of the ' y Union position on Little Round Top. As the 'Confederates continued to make repeated attacks, Colonel p aChamberlain's men ran out of ammunition. Knowing the importance of his position and determined not to let Confederates overrun it, Chamberlain had his menffix bayonets and charge down the hill. This action A and overwhelmed the Confederates and they retreated in dismay. This brought the battle for Little 1. Top to a dramatic conclusion. 0. 0 .ett Q' , p . V A y f , f A the night, Longstreet tried to convince Lee to maneuver into a more favorable position but Lee .decided . , . x Z L T x ' W . . D "' 9 ' I 1 7 . , t ." ' rv K . . . . ' 9 f L . r 1 v 1 . , . . . 1 . 9 I press the attack with a bold infantry attackon the center of the Union line. Lee's plan was to use three o .. D divisions in a frontal assault on the Union center and split the Union line in halfg Longstreet was T A pen fields toward Union positions thatwere well established by this time - but Longstreet duly began A A the attack. A s J f ' p - . I On the moming of 3 July the Confederate artillery opened up on the Union center and continued their barrage: for almost an hour. J General Meade avoided the temptation to use his artillery in a counter-barrage and held of his cannon in reserve for the Confederate infantry attack he knew would follow. At the conclusion of , the cannonade, some 15,000 Confederate infantrymen began advancing toward the Union position on Cemetery Ridge. s V , y T This attack has become known as "Pickett's Charge" after General George Pickett, one of the more colorful' p r Confederate generals whose division participated in the attack. The Confederate troops advanced bravely despite murderous tire from Union cannons and infantrymen. The Confederate troops wet abgle tlp break' D rn through the first line of Union defenses but could do nothing else. Exhausted and outnum ere , t e remain g Confederate troops fell back. The Confederate troops suffered almost 70'Za casualties. The farthest pomt up Cemetery Ridge that the Confederates were able to advance has become known as the high water mark of the Confederacy." ' t . With Pickett's char e the Battle of Gettysburg came to a dramatic conclusion. Although the Confederates S , organized their troops to oppose an expected Union counterattack, General Meade ordered no such attack. On the evening of 4 J uly, General Lee made the decision to withdraw. Q - In the three da s of fighting, the two armies suffered more than 50.000 casualties tkrlled. wounded and y . missingi. Although it was immediately apparent that Gettysburg had been a Confederate' defeat, it was not until later in the war that the real significance of the battle was appreciated. Today. the battle is widely recognized as - ' '- ' 1 f l ' ' the reservation the tuming point of the Civil War and a milestone in our country s history, ultimate y ensuring p of the American Republic. 1- W-, Y y -5-sung ' - .3..g--.-as-1-..-,....,..,--....-..... .. ,...... .vp . ' -av-v ' that this attack had littlechance of success - the troops would have to move more than a mile ,across rr,.'q 1 GETTYSBURG ADDRESS President Abraham Lincoln Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 19 NGV 1863 l Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this con a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. p y p i Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether? that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can lO1'1gq'Q11dl,lI6f,lVV6'21I'C met r on a great battle-field of that war. We have come, to adcdvicatciq portion of that field, as a final resting place, for those who herergavei their lives that nation might live. lt is altogether fitting andrpropcif this. l r s r i s A y g i But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate--we can not hallow-f-this ground, The brave men, struggled here, havefconsecrated fit, far above our detract. The world will little note, nor long i but it cannever forget what they here. It is be dedicated hereto the aunfinishepdworkwhicha i thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to great taskremaining before us that fromthese' increased devotion to that cause forwhich they gaverthe of devotion - that we here highly resolve that not died in vam -- that this nation, under God, shall 0 p freedom - and that govemment of the people,'by people, shall not perish from the earth. i , he eg A r 4 mill' COAT OF ARMS SHIELD: Dark blue and gold are the traditional Navy colors. The shield, divided dark blue and gray, refers to the colors of the Union and Confederate Armies and a country split by war. White expresses peace optimism and red is a reminder of the immeasurable valor and blood shed at the epic of Gettysburg. The three pheons represent the number of days of this intense the Union and Confederate assault lines. The pheons point up RG's vertical launch capabilities. Their number also reflects missions, anti-air, anti-surface, and antisubmarine warfare. The arch Ridge, Culp's Hill and Little Roundtop, critical positions on the The nc or symbolizes sea prowess and the ties with the ship's two stars r present the twolpreviousships named "US5 cneswf ational of the Gettysburg battle ground, mo The scroll with a drop of blood dead shall not have diegbln Y. vain." President Lincolnlafnclgths sivictocy and 559254. the Glllfifls action , " ' 'I' " Ca Jtain Willlllm l .' ,G-. , Commanding OlllLCl C McQuilkin. USN p 02JUN2006 - 07 NOV 2007 . Q iptain W illiain C McOuillvin is a graduate ol the University ol' Florida and received his cominissionui r CJl'l'icer Candidate School. Newport. Rhode Island in I June l983. He is also a graduate ol' the Naval stgraduate School. where he was awarded a Maw i ol' Science degree in Management Science and a graduate ol' the Army Command and General Stall College where he was awarded a Master of Arts dem, ilitary History. A Surlace Warlare Ollicer. Captain McQuilkin has y O served predominantly on cruiser and destroyer type iships including USS ELMER MONTGOMERY llil: and USS VICKSBURG CCG 69l. He has also commanded the mine counter measures ship. USS SCOUT tMCM Sl. and the guided missile frigate, USS HALYBURTON CFFG 401. Ashore. Captain McQuilkin has served on the Stall of the Chief of Naval Operations assigned to the Surface Warfare Division. He assumed command of USS GETTYSBURG CCG 647 on 02 June 2006. Captain McQuilkin has completed deployments tothe Mediterranean, Indian Ocean, and Arabian Gulf. His personal awards include the Legion of Merit, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal. Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal. and the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal. as well as various unit and campaign awards. 15 A 6 7 10823. USS DALE CCG-l9l, USS DOYLE tFFG 391. ' Captain Richard A. Brown, USN Commanding Officer 07 NOV2007 r, , ., ., -v"N' " '---Quinn 'H " 5 , 1- - , ,L Q Captain Brown is a native of Lowell, Massachusetts. He was appointed to the United States Naval Academy in l9Sl and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics upon graduation in l985. Captain Brown's sea tours include Navigator and Damage Control Assistant in USS CHARLES F ADAMS tDDG 211 Flag Lieutenant for Commander. Cruiser Destroyer Group TWELVE: Operations Officer in USS OBANNON tDD 98751 Operations Officer in USS LEYTE GULF tCG 5551 Executive Officer in USS MAHAN tDDG 725: and Commanding Officer, USS THE SULLIVANS CDDG 685. Captain Brown served as Flag Secretary for the Supreme Allied Commander. Atlantic!Commander in Chief, United States Joint Forces Command from February 2000 to July 2002. Captain Brown's most recent assignment was Branch Head for Surface Commander and Lieutenant Commander Assignments, Navy Personnel Command, PERS 410, from April 2005 through August 2007. Captain Brown holds a Master of Science degree in Operations Research from the Naval Post Graduate School and a Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College. Captain Brown's personal awards include the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, two Meritorious Service Medal, five Navy Commendation Medals and two Navy Achievement Medals. He assumed command of GETTYSBURG on 7NOV07 during 'i regularly scheduled at-sea. change of comm ind ceremony 7 l . r if is F l? 51 if E l -mv-mmf L l l ll Q t I L, 5 'Q " ' Commander William R. Daly, USN Executive Officer CDR Bill Daly graduated With Merit froin the United States Naval Academy in l993. He received a inaster's degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the United States Naval War College, where he graduated With Distinction in 2005. While at the Naval War College he was also the American student selected for the first full-curriculuin Naval Staff College Class tClass of 20053. in which he spent Q year with international students from 21 different navics. As a Surface Warfare Officer, CDR Daly has served on cruiser and destroyer type ships including USS MOBILE BAY tCG 539. USS SPRUANCE tDD 9635, and USS THOMAS S GATES tCG 513. Ashore. CDR Daly has served on the staff of Commander. Pacific Fleet and the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations, Strategy and Policy Division. ln 2002 LCDR Daly was a finalist for the Surface Navy Association's Arleigh Burke Leadership Award for Operational Excellence. CDR Daly's awards include the Navy Meritorious Service Medal. the Navy Commendation Medal C4 awardsl and the Navy Achievement Medal C2 awardsb. CMDCMCSWXAWJ Loretta Glenn, USN Command Master Chief 4 'xv ap Cx A 1, t g X .I A native of Baton Rouge, La, Master Chief Glenn enlisted in the Navy in 1984. She attended Recruit Training Command in Orlando, FL and graduated from the U.S. Navy Senior Enlisted Academy in 2001 .At sea, she served as a Storeroom Storekeeper working in the Quality Assurance Division aboard USS Canopus QAS 345, LPO of the Stock Control Division and LCPO of the Open Purchase Section of the SUBSAT division aboard USS Frank Cable CAS 407, Reporting aboard the Frank Cable as a Second Class Petty Officer, Master Chief Glenn advanced to the rank of Chief Petty Officer three years later, as well, as earning her Enlisted Surface Warfare pin. She was the First Senior Enlisted female to report aboard USS Spruance QDD 9635 in Mar 1998, serving as the Supply Department LCPO, S-1 Division Officer and Division Chief and advanced to Master Chief Petty Officer during this tour. Seven months after her selection to Master Chief, she was selected for the CMC program. She currently serves as the First female Command Master Chief aboard USS Gettysburg CCG 64D.Ashore, Master Chief Glenn worked in the Security Department at Naval Communication Station, Harold E. I-Iolt, Exmouth, Australia, served as the Supervisor in the First Lieutenant division and worked in the CSO Department at Patrol Squadron Thirty, Jacksonville, FL, while there she eamed her Enlisted Aviation Warfare Pin. She was also assigned as the Supply Officer for Navy Office of Information, East, New York and served as the Assistant Supply Officer and Department LCPO at Presidential Retreat Camp David.Joint experience includes a tour as First and Second Family member Coordinator, Joint Task Force-Armed Forces Inaugural Committee QJTF-AFICJ, where she was charged with providing specialized training to Joint Military Officers as Military Assistants for immediate Family members of the President and Vice President of the United States for the 2005 Presidential Inauguration Ball. The first enlisted Person to serve in this capacity Master Chief Glenn's awards include the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, the Joint Service Achievement Medal, four Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals, Presidential Service Badge and numerous unit and service awards. E 5 .- ' . :v 13' - " ,g v' 'Sm 4 I ' 1 .- , .. V" 'I 11, - 'x 11 i 1 X! Aix? -.ll lv .- ll V f- Su 'f f'kwa.- ' V . HM 2, -N" F 9' lv! . , ..- QS: P 1 r f rin bv K s .4 ig: I 'x .3 -V:-fy- . ., . Executive Department e , . uf- ft 32" " --x- 5- ,- ag, t W- M " C A ' ' 4 --- " 'f' L Qui ff, , N 4,tv f rf' A J' 4 . 1 ,M tix ,S A V, f 1 ,fx ? -HW - LH- '- f ' b R' "E--,.,h , rw, 2 - t 'A ' A ff I L ef tt gg b , NN ' f f' f f P x 1 , A ,f f- m L: Al' R-V .- ."M'4 new L 1 """"h-.1 LWNX Nhwtw. -.ws wmshh L.,.4..1-.., . r 'N ,. ben.- . D -X. h g - ,il -.Sk M ,I '- A Engineering Department ...f- L. F 7 x -K Y V E i FX. I X . I, I K, VN ! 'Pri' ElI42, , F1 . 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Suggestions in the Gettysburg (CG 64) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Gettysburg (CG 64) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1993 Edition, Page 1

1993

Gettysburg (CG 64) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1999 Edition, Page 1

1999

Gettysburg (CG 64) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 2001 Edition, Page 1

2001

Gettysburg (CG 64) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 2007 Edition, Page 77

2007, pg 77

Gettysburg (CG 64) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 2007 Edition, Page 79

2007, pg 79

Gettysburg (CG 64) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 2007 Edition, Page 71

2007, pg 71

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