George Washington High School - Continental Yearbook (Los Angeles, CA)

 - Class of 1940

Page 1 of 186

 

George Washington High School - Continental Yearbook (Los Angeles, CA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 186 of the 1940 volume:

!«ifi-- %iP cxi oo : Mf - • f -f;f =J £? % ■- ' s; «s ' t? ' f m if-K Dou,eU . ■ ' s ■1 J " ' , - . - - r 2 5::- CONTINENTAL GEORGE WASHINGTON HIGH SCHOOL LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA VOLUME THIRTEEN - ' The Conductor waves his baton . . . we hear the rhythmic swell of clear, harmonious music ... it opens vigorously . . . a distinct atmosphere of anticipation. With each succeeding movement it gains in vivacity, in- tensity, and purpose, until it fairly sparkles with richness and brilliance, and is fashioned into a gorgeous ornament of tone. As an expression of welcome and appreciation, we respectfully dedi- cate this effort to our principal, Mr. Karp Leonard Stockton, who, like the conductor of a symphony, sympathetically captures the spirit and bounding vitality of our aims and ambitions, and, through his capable direction, enables us to fashion them into actual deeds and accomplish- ments. S v CWM r Music . . . the emotion awakened within us when we hear instru- ments . . . the ecstatic melody of the violins . . . the languid voice of the flute . . . the lonely song of the oboe . . . the beating of drums . . . the distant drowsy sound of bells ... is this music? yes . . . and no ... it is nearer and farther than that ... it is our impression of life. This thought inspired our theme . . . " The Washington Symphony of 1940 " ... an impression of student life . . . presented for your entertain- ment . . . without explanation or interpretation . . . other than that af- forded by its own sounds and rhythm. - JB .. ' -.-r r- ' te ' ▼ .§ ■€1 vf iM C V»6YVA n THOMAS E. HUGHES " The ultimate end of music is the creation of beauty. " True genius is often revealed in the rendering of a simple melody, which, because of its sheer simplicity, touches our deepest and most vital sensibilities. It does not burst upon our consciousness with terrific force — rather we are gently drawn into a moving current of melodious music that seems to have begun nowhere but to have always been with us, so perfectly is it attuned. Gradually we become appreciative of its eloquence, beauty, and signifi- cance, until it seems all-expressive of the life which flows about and be- yond us. It is bright, warm, restful, and contains, perhaps, just a hint of melancholy, expressive of the wistfulness with which wisdom regards the restlessness and impatience of youth. It is a transitional passage of such surpassing loveliness, that until the end of the symphony we must ever lis- ten expectantly for that melody which has quickly and gently ended — for that motif which is never re-creat ed. I. NEWTON RICHER In the midst of tremendous waves of sound that reverberate about us, we find ourselves listening with unconscious absorption to a cleat mist of tone that floats almost inaudibly apart from the massive sonority of the general theme. So completely are we engrossed in the winsomeness of this lovely, lilting melody that all other sounds seem dim and distant — an indistinct background for this bright, refreshing passage. It is a joyous strain that teems with life and the spirit of youth, with interest and ani- mation. There are no dramatic climaxes, but an impelling air of calm and flowing peace. It is blithe and sweet and one feels the freshness of coun- try air and the vitality of springtime. It is a colorful strand that weaves itself thru the intricacies of our symphony and suggests to us the gentleness of strength — the Constance of devotion, and, as it fades into shadowy dis- tance, we are left with the impression that it has gradually and serenely descended into a placid valley, filled with sunshine and contentment. CAMPUS VIEW CAMPUS VIEW i J T N S CAMPUS VIEW FIRST MOVEMENT Emphatic chords . . . dynamic effect . . . tre- mendous breadth and power ... a kind of motto that shines through the fabric of the entire sym- phony. Directness . . . organization . . . efficiency . . . progressive leadership . . . prestige. " It is their care that the wheels run truly. " Softly but with spirit . . . melodious . . . bril- liant rhythm . . . thoughtful mood. SoLind that beats against our consciousness . . . dignity of wisdom . . . " We will our youth lead on to higher fields " . . . patience . . . untiring effort . . . best things . . . finest thoughts . . . guidance. L I - . K. L STOCKTON Portrait of a gentleman . . . tall . . . distinguished . . . polite . . . personification of democracy. Self-control, the courtesy of a cavalier. Erect, military bearing . . . black hair tinged with silver . . . piercing, snapping dark eyes . . . finely chis- eled features . . . resolute chin . . . firm jaw . . . square shoulders . . . strong, capable hands . . . strength . . . physical and mental fitness. Quick witted . . . mentally alert . . . earnestly eloquent. Excellent sense of humor . . . laughs with others and at himself. Cheerful . . . can dish it out . . . takes it on the chin. Confident . . . self-reliant . . . sticks to his principles . . . honest. Impressions of Washington . . . friend- ly attitude of students and faculty .... typical American stu- dents . . . good natured and eager to co-operate . . . with marked initiative and enthusiastic school spirit. Ideals . . . honesty of purpose . . . democracy . . . optimism . . . beauty of character. Striving to improve Washington. Man for the ages. Brilliant example of a patriotic American. Hats of f to a likeable gentleman . . . scholar . . . patriot . . . and regular fellow. P R N C P A L oo Cool grey eyes . . . hair of silvery waves . . . patrician features. Superb gracefulness . . . friendly elegance . . . flat- tering impressivenesE . . . kind- ness . . . calm eloquence . . . refinement . . . charm . . . poise . . . capability. Represents the eighteen hundred girl students at Washington . . . sponsors the Girls ' League . . . always pro- curing advantages . . . extend- ing happiness . . . maintaining harmony among girls. Unsel- fish in serving . . . striving for friendliness . . . equality . . . higher ideals. Caring for girls . . . advising them . . . helping them . . . searching for their perfections . . . providing op- portunities. Leaving an impres- sion of eminence . . . admira- tion . . . respect with all who know her. Indeed a character for each girl to follow and to know. Over six feet of unwavering capability . . . composed and consoling personality. Guidance of individual students . . . test- ing and placing . . . lending a helping hand to boys in need . . . enrolling and programming of all students . . . revising cur- ricular offerings from time to time . . . offering career guid- ance to many students . . . car- rying on boys ' activities . . . making master programs. Counseling duties . . . health instruction of boys . . . state reports . . . supervision of health attendance guidance . . . helpful service to students and faculty members. VICE PR CI PALS VIEWS OF OFFICES ' ■ Mr. Arthur Andreson . . . registrar . . . assisted in the attendance office by Miss Whitman and Mrs. Adams . . . supervises all phases of attendance . . . registers all new students . . . handles legal side of school affairs . . . trans- fers students . . . issues work permits . . . first contact between the school, social agencies, and the juvenile authorities. Mrs. Patterson . . . text book clerk . . . issues and collects the thousands of text books . . . has charge of lost and found articles . . . takes care of the school ' s switchboard, gives strangers information about the school. Mrs. Stephens on . . . Mr. Stockton ' s secretary . . . supervises the clerical staff . . . has charge of supplies and equipment . . . keeps the time sheets of the teachers, clerks, and custodians. Mrs. Herbert . . . Mrs. Stephen- son ' s assistant . . . writes the daily bulletin. Miss Deister . . . credit clerk . . . takes care of the credit cards of all active, graduate, and transferred students . . . keeps students ' report cards and possible failure notices . . . receives from and sends to other schools transcripts of grades. Miss Hollingsworth . . . Mrs. Sutherland . . . counsellors . . . assisted by Mrs. Morrison, Mr. Bauer, and Mr. McNellis . . . make out programs for all students . . . refuse or grant change of programs . . . give tests to deter- mine a student ' s general ability . . . give information about colleges, vocational schools, possible jobs, and scholarships . . . interview students who have two or more failures at the fifth week, the tenth week or the fifteenth week period . . . present members of the junior high guidance staffs and the graduating classes the work and the course of study in senior high . . . run off enroll- ing of all students in their classes before end of semester so that each student begins semester with program in hand . . . confer with homeroom teachers in regard to the program activities of the homeroom. OFFICES Elsie Whitman Jane Patterson Lena Corelick Edith Adams STUDENT BOD WINTER 1 3 4 D y Allen Ewen . . . student body president Winter ' 40. Tall . . . lanky. Revised constitution . . . every article and section brought up to date . . . raised grade standards for cabinet. Lower grade council formed . . . fifty members ... to encourage lower grade participation . . . very democratic move. Created tenth and eleventh grade representation . . . gave lower grades cabinet mem- bers. Put all clubs on par ... all clubs made equal ... no impartiality . . . limited students to membership in only two clubs. Dissolved old inter-club council and formed a new one . . . consisting of presidents of all clubs. Changed date of Needlework Guild drive from fall to spring . . . had chest built, inspired leadership class to teach public speaking and best ways for exerting leadership. Sponsored clean-up campaign. Truly Washington ' s most democratic president . . . serious . . . conscientious ... an excellent speaker. Very popular . . . was active in all walks of school life. Knight . . . Ephebian . . . member of Yeomen ... a cadet . . . brilliant scholastically ... a Seal- bearer. . . Torchbearer. Darrell Jensen . . . friendly . . . sincere . . . democratic . . . the students ' choice . . . for leadership . . . outstanding character. The nervousness of the campaign speeches . . . the platform . . . the students ' going to the polls . . . days of anxiety . . . election returns . . . new student body president . . . con- gratulations . . . happiness . . . desire to serve . . . his first cabinet meeting . . .organization and plans . . . his first assembly . . . each one improving his forcefulness and leadership. Luncheons and Commerce meetings attended . . . representative of Washington . . . Cabinet reorganization proposals . . . need of special election . . . the trying and enjoyable Friday Cabinet meetings . . . motions . . . controversy . . .vote taken. Test of endurance . . . other duties. The familiar " you are now excused to lunch " that follows the close of an aud call. . .cheerfully lending a hand in rallies. . .the invitation of the tenth and eleventh grade dance. As the semester ends draws near . . . the duties in- crease . . . the award assembly . . . the installation of new Cabinet officers. With heavy heart he turns his office over . . . sad but ready to give advice and experience to the new carrier of the burden. The reverberation of the student approval . . . with choking voice . . . " Thank you " accompanied by the continuous student applause, he exits . . . new president enters . . . an- other cycle has been completed . . . " Time waits for no man " . . . but his memories shall forever linger . . . Farewell! SUMMER 1940 PRESIDE T S Dahl, Young, Almany, Martin, Case, Kalpakian, Benesh, Mr. Khulburger, Urbank, Ewen, Zimmerman, Nissen, Criswold, Beane, Joyce, Johns, deCoede, F., deCoede, M. Cabinet meeting . . . Alan Ewen presiding . . . Mr. Kuhlberger advising ... a two-fold aim . . . creating spirit of friendliness among stu- dents . . . developing broader basis for work- ing cooperation between faculty and students . . . organization of student responsibilities in youth citizenship . . . cultivating interests in student body service . . . rewriting constitu- tion . . . studying requirements for offices . . . additional requirements for clubs . . . passing of new club constitutions . . . condemning chevrons for " B " sweaters . . . reorganization of inter-club council . . . limiting students to membership in two clubs . . . Winter Cabinet adjourns. N T C A B E R N E T C A B S U M M E R N E T 19 4 Cabinet office . . . Darrell Jensen . . . gavel is tapped ... roll is called . . . the business . . . committee reports . . . the eighty club consti- tutions have been gathered . . . the new busi- ness . . . qualifications changed for candidates seeking office . . . cups in trophy case replated . . . reorganized cabinet . . . amendments pro- posed . . . removal of offices from cabinet . . . new ex-officio members . . . combination of offices . . . new by-laws . . . Mr. Hughes ' s Memorial scholarship fund discussed . . . plans for student body contributions . . . Mrs. Hodgeman suggests . . . Mr. Kuhlberger ad- vises . . . cabinet agrees . . . summer cabinet of ' 40 is dismissed. Martin, Bayersdorfer, Marsh, Greer, Fodor, Griffith, Waddell, Cobb, Jensen, Dangler, Connary, Evers, Schuck, Davies, Brooks, Higgin, Purgitt, Smith, D. SELF COVER ENT GIRLS Row 1 — Chavez, Asmussen, Neuman, Packard, Huckins, Lash, Nelems, Shoemaker, Rempter, Pate, Warner, Nicholas, Norby, Terusa. Row 2 — Cox, Bohart, Bradley, Brown, Reid, Johnson, Brooker, Solomon, MacNab, McAnney, Galier, Herman. Row 3 — Melcher, McBratney, Bitterlich, Schon, Estes, DeSues, Dudley, Moser, Dodge, Haire, Nash, Luten, Shepherd, Dodge, P. Row 4 — Mike, Fernald. Blomquist, Zetwo, Barron, Smith, E. ; Rutledge, Hoon, Richards, Frazee, Pollitt, McClatchy. Row 5 — Pascoe, Miller, M. A.; Cordon, C. ; Jones, D. ; Brooks, Field, Lund, Dean, Jex, Hardy, Fischer. BOYS - ■ ' ' V ' j ' -tV - - y Row 1 — Howell, Confar, Bartik, Greeley March, Cooper, Modeland, Heiner, Kinman, Bollman, Dahl, Kee, Carnaqua, Henkle, Kimmell, Dolan, Toth, Weaver, Barclay, Wilson, Byron, Sakolis, Erickson, Mushett, Cordon. Row 2 — Leifwich. Dascenzi, Hill, Cross, Escovar, Tracy, Johnson, Moss, Anselmo, Alvarado, Wurzer, Elliott, Neighbours, Lamb, Jones, Robinson, Montgomery, Cieser, Coogin, Boecking, Clark, Hughes, Anderson. Row 3 — Archer, Malz, Whittington, Beckland, Dalton, Lavoie, Monson, Long, Nesbitt, Beck, Lodge, Theys, Wood, Whyman, Irwin, Weaver, Mathis, Jenke, Bolkovatz, Stone, Clark, Cooke. Row 4 — Carmichael, Schied, Renken, Monson, Sibbald, Nuno, Mertin, Risse, Bartley, Ezzell, McDonald, Raber, Russell, Knapp, Harris, Puddy, Orr, Hobbs, Rau, Hartzell, Staddon, Clancy, Perlin. Row 5 — Blunden, Ross, O ' Neil, Case, Dobyns, Hadley, Greene, Ward, Miller, Chapman, Ward, Thompson, LeLevier, Andrews, Whaley, Kappe, Brasile, Irvine, Clyde, Scott, Aylward. They maintain order in the halls . . . during and between periods at our high school . . . they serve for a whole semester . . . sacrificing a free period . . . maintaining posts at doors . . . loiterers, pranksters kept out of halls . . . demanding of hall passes. They have the power to give demerits . . . and for their work receive four merits each semes- ter . . .an average of 150 students serve. . .theirs is a real service to Washington High. ! loiby, Row ge, f .Row TRAFFIC AND SEHYtClHSOyADS Row 1 — Coldring. Morris, Tracy, Modeland, Heiner, Iwakoshi. Kuiaki, Nesbit, Frost, Furstnow, Furnishima. Row 2 — Cooper, Hartzelf, Thayer, Cordon, Hill, Timmerman, Smith, Yoshida, Turner, Robinson, Dascenzi. Row 3 — Yamane, Burnside, Johnson, Phernambque, Weaver. Mr. Edwards, Baynes, Spaeth, Schain, Harris. Row 1 — Bogart, McCerty, Ueschert, Taylor, Criswold, Dahl, Mr. Bauer, Benesh, Frame, Fodor, Brown :,,Hill gomW ' l onso " ' ( Ro )0l its !S- Row 1 — Bogart, McCerty, Ueschert, Taylor, Criswold, Dahl, Mr. Bauer, Benesh, Frame, Fodor, Brown, M.; Hamilton, Morris, Collins, Anderson, J.; Carter, Kinman, Marsh, Pealer, Anderson, N.; Morrell, Wahlquist. Martin, Priewe, Rowley, Cooper, Harrell, Littleworth, Creer, Conroy, Yamane, Waddell. Row 4 — Hanford, Hu Higgin, Evers, Heiner, Frierson, Clark, Jensen, Hamaji. Aiken. Row 2 — Row 3 — Griffith, jmphry, Mellbern, ) Service Squad . . . restraining the football crowds . . . maintaining order at assemblies . , . ushering at graduation exercises . , . checking tickets . . . passing out programs . . . guarding doors . . . shining their badges. Their members are selected on the basis of ability, character and dependability. They are an integral part of Boys ' Self Government. Traffic Squad. These " Aides to Washington " are known as the Lafayettes . . . They guard, patrol cars and direct traffic. . . Lafayettes, we salute you! J .i ' STUDENT ' -BODV STORE I Row 1 — Earle, Stroud. Cooksley, Sabo, Tuffey, Connary, Mr. Garst, Martin, Perry, Nesbit, Fillson. Bankston. Row 2 — Steel, Ritter, Coupal, O ' Connor, Hegarty, Marstou, Anderson, Reei, Engstrom, Reever. Row 3 — Fierdingstad, Schneider, Myers, Marr, Alvarado, Snell, Read, Marino, Bianchard, Drake. SENIOR B REPRESENTATIVES Littleworth, Downie, Maag. Wimmer, Chauncey, Hoewner, Callahan, Hill, Escovar, Nicks, Bogart. Student Body Store . . . administers business end of school affairs . . . has charge of tickets . . . Sur- veyor distribution . . . bus books . . . manila covers . . . emblems. Practical experience for commer- cials Senior " Bee " Representatives . . . executive committee of " Presidents ' nominate class officers F . . .recommend sweater colors, styles, prices. Cooperate with the cabinet on recognition . . . class day . . . prom . . . quickly approaching graduation. Learn use of complicated machines ... to make charge, f J STUDENT BODY STDRE VIEWS Bottom Row — Betterman, Dudley, Hughes, Stalker, Engle, Kejye, Dufeck, Top Row — Shepherd, Dorchester, Lettwieb, Bartley, Brooks. Row 1 — Hart, Hill, Greenburg, Foxlee, Gilroy, Margelin, Deigleman, Dudley. Row 2 — Long, Oerum, Marchbanks, Betterman, Johnson, Mr. Lawyer. Row 3 — Reynolds, Coleman, Miller, Tate, O ' Hara. Committee plans and supervises social events for tenth grade students . . . held a wel- coming party for BlO ' s first week of school to make them feel at home . . . backed Get Acquainted Week ... a chance for the new students to make friends. Tenth grade homeroom representatives ... an opportunity for tenth grade students to have their ideas recognized by the Cabinet . . . equal representation for all grades. COMmiTEE AND REPREUnATIVES TENTH GRADE . ELEVENTH GRADE COMMITTEE ANO REPRESENTATIVES Committee organized because a need was felt for social activities in each grade gives students a better chance to become acquainted with classmates. Sponsors elev ' - enth grade dances . . . committee members in charge of all preparations. Eleventh grade homeroom representatives . . . organized last semester to give eleventh grade fair representation on the cabinet . . . ties eleventh grade . . . into student organization! SECOND MOVEMENT Variety and intensity of color ... a breadth of conception . . . versatility and eloquence . . . perfectly blended . . . animated . . , harmonious. Themes and ideas . . . plans and purposes. " When duty whispers low, Thou must ' , then youth re- plies, ' I can ' . " Eagerness . . . effort . . . achieve- ment. H CA lETHRMEN ' S C L II B R,lrl lr , „„ , C ' ' I- " 7 , ' 7, ' i ' , . " ' - ' •-• ' ■ ' , iicimi-is, Andrews, Block, Brown, Wells, Eisenhart Robinson Br 1 1 h r I? ' ° " T ' ' ' ' ' ' Iquist. Row 6— Bollman, Varian, Fowler. Dreher, Fa appino cisennarr, KODinson, Brazil, Smith, Crey, Kemp, Ary, Street, Carpenter, Healy. , pm , 07cutt ' ' °D " ' ' MacDoul:ir " A T " ' " ' T ' ' " p T ' o " ? ' ' ' Row-Mr. Carmichael, Mace, Knapp, Prumers Urcutt, Davis, MacDougall, Anselmo, Reschert, Bushey. Back Row— Hickox, Cox, Brownell, Teeter, Dobbs. Membership in this service group is automatic to all boys who have earned their ath- letic letter . . under the sponsorship of the Boys ' Physical Education Department . . . Ihese boys are expected to aid in the maintenance of order at all athletic con- c ■ ■ c Af T ' ' ■ ' 5 ° was the efficient, popular president of this group for the bummer 1940 Semester. These fellows were sponsored by varsity coach Ralph Rich. Managed gym team . . . sent men to Southwest activities . . . also to Pomona Fair presented ar,nual Gym Show . . . brought back many old timers . . . money raised ' for athletic fund . . pushed gymnastics . . . promoted spirit for the team . . . encouraged gyrnnasts . . . kept in touch with alumni . . . provided entertainment Father and Son nights. . . Championship team . . . fine exhibition organized guiding spirits. .. G y CLUB WASHINGTON WINNERS % Row 1 — Risley, Denton, Huffer, Lewis, Schuck, Mrs. Segal, Coen, Mezzanatto, Rutz, Risen. Shaber, Hall, jakel. Row 2 — Macbeth, Jacobs, Knight, Adams, Marriott, Stroud, Bercovitz. Verman. Jones. Williams. Cosnell, Wykoff, Hoyle. Row 3 — Evans, Truesdale, Dick, Mitsuyeda, Bayersdorfer, Heaton, Schrock, McElroy, Hall, Rankin, Schill, Beauchamp. Row -1 Truesdale. Purgitt, Inman, Stevenson, Burson, Talbot, Lemont, McDonald, Taylor, Kincaid, Hoewner, Ruebhausen. Row I — Burns, Hinshaw, PuFahl, Oakley, Mrs. Clark, Worsham, Webster, Elwood. Wise. Row 2 — Oatman, Williams, Chambers, Wortman, Montreuil, Carr. Mitchell, Holiday. Row 3 — Hewey, Engle, Fordellone, Bach, Beeson, Coones. HI BAM Their hobby is sport . . . they express themselves thru action . . . motion . . . exer- cise . . . radiance . . . eagerness . . . pep and go . . . Playdays . . . new acquaintances . . . atmosphere of expectation . . . crowded busses . . . team work . . . clamor . . . active in sports . . . proficient scholastically . . . high merit records . . . undaunted spirits . . . sportsmanship . . friendly cooperation . . . Washington Winners. " Health in Body and Mind " . . . promoting health, overcoming physical handicaps . . . gaining poise and self-confidence. Brisk morning hikes . . . picnics. Enjoying the great outdoors. Maintaining a scholastic standard . . . cherishing high ideals . . . im- proving outward appearance . . . Candlelight installation . . . Healthy girls up- holding school traditions, law . . . developing strong bodies . . . wholesome minds. 1 CE COTTERS SILVER SKATERS Row 1 — Watkins. Platz, Gates. Corbin. Mr. Hoff, Rolston, Criewe, Vogel, Clover, EasHand. Row 2 — Sibbald, Barber, Lavoie, Korth, Dosmann, Johnson. Young. Mar- tin. Corbeil. Ryan. Row 3 — Lewis. Burford, Dascenzi. Johnson. Armdt. w ' alloch. Escovar, Thomas, McCerty. Row 1 — Winn. Jones, Pinson, Dangler, Roche, Hill, Patterson. Page. Neal. Row 2 Hubelmeyer. Hofferber. McBratney. Babb. Mintz. Denas. Row 3 — Bryan. Perrenoud Cilreath, Stockwell, Reid, Paschall. Weekly sessions at the rinks . . efforts to perfect technique ... to acquire balance . . . grace . . . poise. The flicker of multi-colored lights . . . swinging rhythm of skating music . . . whirr of skates ... a harsh grating of the ice ... shrieks ... re- sounding thumps . . . groans. An annual trip to the snow with the Girls ' Ice-Skating Club is enjoyable to all the Ice Cutters, who are sponsored by Mr. Frank Hoff. The flash of silver blades . . . nippy feeling of the cold air . . . mellow strains of Strauss waltzes. Smooth, rippling muscles . . . long, rhythmic strides . . . blue-white ice . . . hot chocolate . . .relaxation. Trip to the snow . . . trees laden with white . . . glare of the sun . . . glistening mountains ... a huge, white world. . .wonderful day. Sister organization to the boys ' Ice Skating Club. Sponsors, Mrs. Segal and Miss Whitman. E D U E S T R I E E • V ! ' f • V r P -ft- swr f Row 1 — Bayersdorfer, Martin, Hall, Johnsen, E.; Falxa, Brautovick, Marriott, Blair, Bankston. Row 2 — Mrs. Warnock, Cremli, Moe, Davidson, Pullen, Nevius, Cooksley, Cram. Row 3 — Hall, Bassford, Peterson, Johnson, MacCregor, Burson, Downie, Mos- bacher, Wurzer. RHYTHM ROLLERS Row 1 — Jones, Field, Brooks, Leake, Evarone, Haberman, Brewer, Flynn, Fulton, Paxton, Treadway. Row 2 — Mr. Childress, Herbert, Lair, Lennont, Summers, Weiner, Latronica, Carbe, Wight, Dobias. Row 3 — George, Howar, Flanagan, Ritchie, Hatton, McDaniel, Maass, Kenworthy, Williams. Row 4 — Leake, Stineberg, Sheedy, Oar, Leetes, Rieder, Fanest, Sterr, Brewer. They propose to ride horses well . . . they procure animals for the Art Department . . . they assist in ridding the campus of stray animals. Early mornings at the stables . . . chattering girls . . . beautiful horses . . . swift running horses . . . early five o ' clock rides. Monotonous trot . . . ther the rhythmic gallop . . . flying hair . . . mouths full of sand . . . after-ride snacks . . . talking it over. Sponsor, Miss Warnock. The lively swing of a popular strain . . . the whirr of a thousand wheels. . .the grace- ful activity of roller skating. The Forward Rex . . . the Backward Rex . . . gliding in and out through the crowd. Lights low and the slow, floating movement of the waltz . . . spread-eagles. The Scottische . . . spins . . . " Barnyard Specials " . . . buffoonery . . . spills . . . dust and adhesive tape. The fascination of rhythmic motion and music. R A C GIRLS ' A D GOLF E T S CLUB An organization for those interested in tennis . . . they strive to improve their game . . . they aim to promote good sportsmanship . . . thirty " Alice Marbles " in the mak- ing. Formal initiation by candlelight . . . small blue and silver pins with crossed rack- ets. Tennis book for all to read . . . tennis tournaments. They enjoy each other ' s com- pany . . . they build strong bodies . . . wholesome minds . . . lifetime enjoyment. " Mistresses of the Fairways. " Pitch and putt . . . driving practice . . . seemingly end- less eighteen holes . . . bothersome traps . . . incessant losing of the ball Rhythmic swing . . . grace of movement . . . keen competition . . . glowing health . . . gay, happy laughter . . . true sportsmanship. Initiation ceremony . . . banquet . . . speeches of welcome . . . new and lasting friendships. Peppy meetings . . . different parties. Row 1 — Eggert, Nickoloff, Cordon, Ford, Wolfe, Leonard, Herberger, Fuller, MacMaster, Risley. Row 2 — Shaber, Cosnell, Burroughs, Inman, Wills, Risen, Cline, Crantz. Row 3 — Nelems, Mrs. Burns, Dusel, Mrs. Helvey, Macbeth, Olson, Calbraith, Fujino. Row 1 — Lund, Wilson, Ray, Linge, Rogers, Mrs. Butler, Beauchamp, McCaughey, Stone, Benedett. Row 2 — Kolster, Munsey, Dunsmore, Rosser, Cuniffe, Morrison, Audet, Wood, Crimes. Row 3 — Carlson, Royce, Leh man, Reese, Schill, Taylor, Lewis, Hamilton, Wilson. ■|| jj@ y -— «f miCUQGLS HuvnAw MClAtv ns PEGGY KALPAKIAN Vivacious brunette . . . bubbling personality . . potential Dorothy Thompson. JIM EVERS Manager of Publica- tions, Summer 1940 . . . the " ladv killer " of the campus. The main purpose in his life is to " scoop " a story. Weekly publication. Reporters dashing about hurriedly . . . news flashes . . . scoops. Copyreaders . . . correcting galley . . . news boys. Slants . . . latest gossip about campus personalities . . . little doings about big shots. Social Lion . . . week-end doings and happenings . . . " who was where and when " . . .parties galore . . . Casino gatherings . . . what not . . . the low down. Twice Told Tales . . . old jokes. Introducing . . . likes and, dislikes . . . favor- ite foods . . . pet peeves. Who ' s who . . . achievements. Editorials . . . school life . . . politics . . . pro and con. " Principle-ly Speaking " . . . closer contact . . . authority of knowledge . . . guidance. " Generally Speaking " . . .stu- dents ' opinions . . . discussions. Striving to comprehend the incomprehen- sible. W ' 40 Manager of Publications . . . Peggy Kalpakian. W ' 40 News Edi- tor . . . Rolland Morris. W ' 40 Feature Editor . . . Louise Editorial Editor . . . Verna Holden. W ' 40 Copy Editor . . . Manager of Publications ... Jim Evers. S ' 40 News Editor S ' 40 Feature Editor . . . Donna Malin. S ' 40 Editorial Editor S ' 40 Copy Editor . . . Jack Spaeth. Hartshorn. W ' 40 Jack Spaeth. S ' 40 . Billy Griffith. Verna Holden. Row 1 — Bollman, Urban, Brooks, Eggert. Griffith, Evers, Criswoid, Holden, Malin, Birnie, Purgitt. Row 2 — Latronica, Thompson, Olive, Mrs. Helvey, Green, Holwerda, McDonald, Rankin, Oram, Kincaid. Shepherd. Row 3 — Stewart, Mitchell, Spaeth. Smith, D.; Woolf, Marsh, Fishman, Dahl, Anderson, Haley, Rusick. SURVEYOR L T E R A T Row 1 — Miss Haggart, Latronica, Walker Holden, Brautovick, Adams, Miss Heaton. Urban, Bolin, Nading. Holwerda, Shoman. Row 2 — Worsham, Birnie, Griffith, Literary group for student journalists . . . studying the works of old masters and the classics ... as- piring to a greater appreciation of poetry . . . seeking to discover talent . . . reviewing plays ... at- tending interesting gatherings . . . hearing famous personages. Potential geniuses struggling for a foothold . . . getting constructive criticism . . . aided and abetted by the well-read scribe sponsors. Miss Haggart and Miss Hsaton. Published " Laurel Leaves " . . . student contributions, poetry. QUILL AND SCROLL High school journalistic society . . . international . . . honorary. Four hundred published inches . . . hard work . . . hurrying to complete quotas . . . counting space each week. Two dollars . . . trouble collecting money. Pin ... gold quill and scroll . . . proud wearers. Monthly magazine . . . current features . . . worth-while stories and essays. Famous men honorary members . . . Will Rogers, senior . . . Will Rogers, junior . . . Benito Mussolini. A worthwhile goal for would-be journalists. Evers Morris Criswold Perl Holden Purgitt Kalpakian Ray Malin Spaeth JAPANESE ADELPNIA Row 1 — Yamane, Ihara, Miss Morrow, Hama|i, Matsuguma, Kobata, Migamoto. Tanabe. Row 2 — Nakayama, NIshioka, Okane, Teraoka. Yoshida, Mitsuyeda, Kabayashi, Kuroki. Row 3 — Teraoka, Mitsueda, Fuijimo, Mayekawa, Fujimura, Makao, Yoshi- uara, Ike. World friendship . . . ancient Japanese culture combined with Yankee originality . . . encourages Jap- anese students to actively take part in school activities. Lectures, skating party . . . dainty feet skill- fully manipulating heavy skates. P.T.A -Faculty teas, gay silk costumes, sandals . . . shining black hair . . . twinkling dark eyes. Cherry blossoms and the Land of the Rising Sun transported to Washing- ton Campus . . . clever and industrious students . . . modern youth from the land of the " Mikado " . ADELPHIA Row 1 — Diehl, Purgitt, Cummings, Nicks, Evers, Cooper, Mulholland, Heiner, Ruby. Greeley, Moore, Crowder. Row 2 — McKinley, Brauto- vick, Bayersdorfer, Pascoe, Kalpakian, Chow, Dangler, Wills, Caynor, Bailey, Mr. Duncan. Row 3 — Calier, Schmoll, Ptche, Miller Knight, Dusel, Shuck, Neuman, Flynn, Davies. Row 4 — Jensen, Greer, Salvail, Griffith, Alpers, Wahlqu St, Hanford, Aiken. Priewe. To promote world friendship ... to increase understanding among nations . . . encour- age world peace ... to foster greater friendliness. City Federation meetings . . . dele- gates from all schools . . . noted speakers . . . discussion of World Friendship ' s activi- ties. Tea for sponsors from other schools . . . interesting conversation . . . nice lunch- eon. Preparation of city-wide portfolio for foreign schools. Mr. Duncan, zealous sponsor. C A E L I C L A E Row 1 — Dent, Stine, Worsham, McCall, Urban, Sweaungen. Sipos, Coble, Spaeth, Wiener, Ritkind, Aubrey, Jones. Row 2 — Rodgers, Donnelly, Haire, Holwerda, Turner, Morrison, Weinberg, McAnney, Knight, Phelps, Cline, Hill, Hieding, Mazen. Row 3 — Earle, Verlato, Moore, MacKay, Quick, Clark, Kershner.Newers, Steward, Hooker, Benedett, Bercovitz. Row 4 — Maltby, Jenkslynn, Jensen, Lenihan, Barber, Lasher, Brasile, Watkins. Row 5 — Erickson, Houghton, Harrell, Dietz, Byllesby. Rose, de Coede, Haley, deVries, Stewart. DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN Row 1 — Kerr, Cummings, Hofferber, Jakel, Miss Draper, Dangler, Coldring, Wedekind. Row 2 — Mason, Klotz, Sherman, Kue- Ster, Parmenter, Wanger, Ihme, Carner. Row 3 — Honickle, Miller, Klein, Horman, Ryan, Mantax. Composed of third, fourth year Latin students . . . followers of Virgil . . . trying to capture the spirit of ancient cultures. Taking trips to museums and viewing old Ro- man relics ... journeys to Huntington Library and Art Gallery .. . Latin plays. Their motto, Nil desperandum, never despair . . . disciples of the mighty . . . and of Mes- dames Coble and Jones . . . modern teachers of an ancient tongue. We salute you. " Der Deutsche Verein. " Advanced Cerman students . . . participation in all functions of the language department . . . sponsored by Miss Draper. " To fluently speak the Cerman language ... to better understand the Cerman people. " Monthly meetings . . . interesting outside speakers . . . Cerman refreshments. Annual language ban- quet . . . German costumes and songs . . . fellowship between language students. i EL CIRCULO CASTELLANO «2- Row 1 — Miss Sintes, Johnson. Palmer, Smith, Roberts, Pinson, Inman, Hamaji, Wahlquist, Grannis, Hawley Lerch Vander Zee Row 2— Nash, Nelson, Patterson, Shaber, Cosnell, Scancarello, Shearer, Mcintosh, Caller, Renfro, Nading, s ' tarbuck. Nicholas, McGregor, MacMaster. Row 3— Crantz, Lambert, Wilson; Dunsmore. Davidson, Kelly, Hallis Hogue Campbell, Ibelle, Barry Flanagan, Sharp, Maass, Olsen, Durfee, Cast. Row 4— Nelems, O ' Connor, Edwards, Latronica, Eschuig, Royce, Nieman, Leake, Lemont, Greeley, Bucks, Covalt, Rudolph. Row 5— Harris, Slanker, Withrow, Dill Redmond Luedtke, Schwimmer, Carrillo, Bartik, Lacey, Taylor, Randall , Anderson. LE CERCLE ERANCAIS I Kue- Row l—Malin, Siokos, Freborg, Cilreath. Nuno, Miss Sintes, Holden, Miss Miquel, Correa, Coen, Marriott Blair Row 2— Truesdale, Logan, King, Jackson, Olson, Matula, Olson, Claypool, Koppe, Bailey, Ritchie. Row 3— Truesdale, Benedict, Carus, Holloway, Losey, Pullen, Nevius, Shepherd, Rowley. Row 4— Calbraith, Knick, Korth, Renauld, Cawlfield, Haldeman, Stewart Third and fourth year Spanish Students . . . adventures into the life and literature of far away Spain . . . romances of the old world revived in the new . . . mantillas and castinets . . . dons and senoritas . . . tangos and rhumbas . . . tortillas, tacos, tamales Semi-monthly meetings . . . community singing . . . spicy refreshments. El Circulo Castellano . . . peanut sale . . . Sponsors, Miss Lulu Draper and Mrs. Eleanor Neuton. " LeCercle Francais " ... open to students entering French V ... sponsored by the Miles. Miquel and Sintes. Plays important part in the Language Week Program. The Annual French Banquet . . . chocolate eclairs . . . knowledge with sociability ... im- pressive initiation of the French Fives . . . efficient officers ... the semi-annual dinners at " Queyrels " ... old French songs and proverbs . . . informal programs. A K E-y P C R E Row 1 — Sanchez, Jones, Carlson, Smith, Steward, Nowers. Row 2 — McBratney, Smith, Overbey, Williams, Michaels, Jakel. Row 3 — Dragotto, Ferrara, Mr. J. F. Clewe, Cunliffe, Byllesby. Sitting — Rime!, Allen, Bergstrom. Pavelis, Packard, Ezzell, Malaspma, Renauld, Mevius, Miss Halloway, Moore, Miller, Sprank- ling. Cooper, Roberts, Horn, Buddell, Dahl, Nicks, Griffith, O ' Laughlin, Perrenaud, Cobb, Glance, Shepherd, James, Jarrell, Koppe, Spicer. Harnish, Oram, Wilkinson, Schwenck, Herman, Johnson, Nieman, Martin, C; Mintz, Bayersdorfer, Martin, L. ; Maag. Kemp, Lund, Knight, Wheebe, Corrall, Hilton, Shipper, Raehn, Rawley, B.; Carues, Rawley, C; Wilder. Blackmere, Glanzman, Gale, Buechler, Baird, Lussky, Korth, Clanzman, Greenwood, Gates. Rudolph, Neal, Rogers, Grannis, Alvarado, Lawson. LITTLE THEATRE GROUP School plays . . . curtain calls . . . excited laughter . . . unctuous grease paint . . . beauty made hideous . . . young made ancient . . . features disguised . . . one of few school wig mak- ing industries . . . most complete set of make-up in city schools. Masks made of individuals. Visit to Max Factor ' s . . . unearth new methods . . . trek to theatre . . . backstage . . . meet- ing important people of stage and screen . . . Seniors ' Farewell banquet. . . Mr. Clewe, sponsor. Student stars . . . vast, boots and military caps fun. One Act Plays . . . . . slapstick comedy . Entertainment for our brilliant stage . . . glaring lights . . . curtain. ' Brother Rat " . . . , . . crowds . . . riotous laughter. " Stage Door " . . . excitement . . . " I Am a Jew " . . . drama . . . tyranny in Germany. " A Wedding " . . tuxedos and high heels. " Old Moonlight. " " Wurzel Flummony. " student body under the direction of Miss Holloway, sponsor. CINEMATOGRAPHY II lak- lals. isof , RADIO GOILO Row 1 — Hooker, Bercovitz, Calier, Renfro. Fodor, Paxton, Downie, Gale, Koppe, Nack. Row 2 — Miss Gill, Evans, Swezea, Mason, Long, Schrock, Barry, Kalpakian, Miss H. Smith. Row 3 — Raymond, Kenworthy, Konnerth, Penny, Higgin, Erickson, Radomski, Peyton, Masterson. Row 1 — Maag, Stafford, Roberts, Holiday, Copeland, Walters, Denas, Rudolph,. Moore, Lund. Development of appreciation and criticism of motion pictures . . . independent opin- ion ... observation .. .orientation. Scientific advancement. Studying recent picture improvements and photographic technique. Attending previews . . . writing critical reviews. Service to the school . . . rules of conduct . . . for the schoolroom . . . for assemblies and for each individual. Sponsor, Miss Gill; co-sponsor, Miss Hilda Smith, To promote an interest in radio ... to discover and develop talent. They entertain the student body at aud calls . . . they give performances on various radio stations . . . re- hearsals . . . choosing of characters . . . cues missed ... ad libbing . . . culprit laugh- ter. Director . . . chosen at random . . . Mary Ellen Ryan directed most W ' 40 ventures ... no formality ... or formal officers . . . meetings only when rehearsing programs DEBATE CHRONIAN SOCIETY Washington ' s best . . . modern Ciceros. " War of words " ... a desire to stimulate and improve self-expression . . . loquaciousness . . . forcefulness . . . pro and con. Con- tests with other schools . . . fiery speeches . . . satire . . . refutation. Southern Califor- nia Debate Contest . . . keen competition . . . individual files . . . statistics . . . squel- ching the opponent . . . " Language most shows a man; speak that I may see thee. " Social Studies majors only . . . high scholastic requirements ... an honorary organiza- tion. Semi-monthly meetings . . . discussions of vital current world problems and civic affairs . . . sponsorship of the Memorial Day program . . . awarding of the social stud- ies medal . . . good times . . . skating parties . . . field trips . . . theater parties. The club unites social studies majors . . . Sponsored by Mrs. Hertzog and Mr. Sampson. Coldring, Jensen, Wiener, Schwimmer. Row 1 — Nash, Jackson, Bercovitz, Kimmel, Mrs. Hertzog, Bayersdorfer, Brautovick, Purgitt, Hatton, Carroll. Row 2- maker, Pullen, Cordon, Pop, Williamson, Nelson, Cremli, Maass, Dudley. -Shoe ■ « nHo SPANISH DANCE GROUP Row 1 — Eschwig, Correa, Asmussen, Chavez, Latronica, Felker. Row 2 — Crannis, August, Hawley, Cilroy, Leake, Maney, Smith, LeLevier, Gust. Row 3 — Currier, Leievier, Clancy, Eschwig, Eatherton, Cill, Stegman, O ' Conor, Miss Draper, Mrs. Newton. Spanish and Mexican folk dances . . . tango and rhumba . . . gay, flaming color and vivid atmosphere of the Spanish Fiesta . . . lively, exhilirating music . . . intricate steps . . . fun and excitement. Performances on stage, aud calls, and programs. Sponsored by Mrs. Neuton and Miss Draper. President . . . W ' 40, Robert LeLevier . . . S ' 40, Connie Eschwig ; vice-president . . . W ' 40. Connie Eschwig . . . S ' 40, George Clanez. 1 1 ! 4 Eva Andrews John R. Brandon Gayle Burns Mary R. Carver Catherine Haggart : . f [JHelen Holloway Mildred Jones Muriel McKinlay Mignonette Miguel Olive Mulholland PHILATELIC SOCIETY Row 1 — O ' Connor, Steele, Bee, Cough. Row 2 — Barker, Humphrey, Lundgren, Osterhues, Lasher, Drake. Washington ' s stamp-collecting club... Mr. Bennet, sponsor .. .organized for benefit of stamp lovers. Meetings every Wednesday . . . reports and discussions . . . interest- ing conversations. Contests . . . everyone striving to win . . . prizes worth working for. Field trips to exhibit in Hollywood . . . rare and valuable stamps . . one worth $3,700.00 . . . purchases made of unique stamps ... an entertaining hobby. II L Verle Morrow Eleanor Neuton Ethel Overfield Ray Potter P. A. Richmond Frederick Sampson Alexander |. Smith Stanley Cundiff A Cavccys L VOCATIONAL P.filNT A E R N A T I C S The click, click, click of linotype . . . training to be efficient printers . . . operators of the press. Definite schedule to follow . . . three week shifts . . . keyboard linotype . . . practice . . . machinist helper . . . make-up . . . lock-up . . . typesetting . . . field trips to break the work . . . paper and machine companies visited. Special jobs performed for school . . . students of galley. Under the supervision of Mr. Ray for three periods. Whirr of a propeller . . . motor roars . . . blocks removed . . . down the field goes the plane ... a perfect take off . . . months of work . . . the work of Washington stu- dents. A better knowledge of aeronautics . . . wind resistance . . . fuselage design . . . wing span . . . layout and riveting. Rebuilding of planes . . . mechanical ability . . . the ability to repair, finish . . . further study . . . additional chances in the business world. Row 1 — Huls, Robinson, Clark, Snitzer, Modeland, Phernambucq, Kuhlman, Howard, Stewards. Row 2 — Mr. Rox, Blaikford, Barnes, Koupal, O ' Leary, Cook, Sullivan, Studebaker, Danskin, Runcie, Mullenaux, Cavanaugh. Trott, Coleson, Hunt, Phegley, Cooley, Westra, Meyers, Cass, Lamphre, Tirk, Prumis, Voss, Mr. Hairgrove, White, Barclay, Hughes, Hager, Olson, Kennedy, Richardson, Walters, Morales, Ribal. AUTO MECHANICS Row 1 — Cruen, Bondesen, Sitran, Blair, Lutes, Hatzke, Bachsfein, Poss, Stone. Row 2 — Henningsen, Blizzard, Dirkson, Licano, Drummond, Tamabe, Snrall, Karr, Knapp, Furishima, Mastro, Class, Lusoky, Perry, Simmons. Row 3 — Baynes, Bayliss, Ohie, Casey, Barth olomew, Tope!, Sawyer, Foote. ELECTRO C L B Row 1 — Erd, McClean, Wieben, Lohbeck, Hoss, Fulton, Treadway, Abel, Criewe. Row 2 — Williams, Estep, Maloney, McLaughlin, Mr. McCarter. Row 3 — Nickerson, McNutt, Ivy, Bethard, Shoemaker, luhasz, Bradshaw, Owen. McNeil, Colbath. Complete course in auto repair . . . motor overhaul . . . rebuilding of cars . . . fast serv- ice . . . welding and body repairs . . . bigger and better jobs . . . transmission repairs . . . brake relining . . . tire repairs to major overhauls. Only cost is for materials . . . jobs done for students and faculty. Two year course . . . work guaranteed . . . many students are made happier because of the student mechanics taking this course. Devoted to all boys interested in electricity . . . study electrical apparatus . . . they go on field trips to different corporations to study electricity . . . took a trip to Boulder Dam. Informal initiations . . . outside school . . . cops and robbers . . . red faces . . . formal initiations . . . receiving of pins . . . work in cooperation with the P. A. crew . . . they are easily shocked. . .or are they? Croup sponsored by Harold E. McCarter. I PUBLIC «E$S AND PROJECTION CREWS Row 1 — Fulton, Abel, Shoemaker, McLaughlin, Sellers, McNeil. Crouching — Wieben, Treadway, Juhasz, Williams. Takes care of amplification at all football games . . . track meets . . . gym meets in gym ... all hops and dances . . . speeches in auditorium . . . cares for and runs the movie projectors, large and small, at our movies. Amplification of the beautiful organ music in our auditorium . . . they are responsible for the rhythmic jive floating across the quad and grounds at noon-time . . . They are sponsored by Harold McCarter Rudolph Anger Stanley M. Cundiff Paul W. Hairgrove Harold McCarter Herbert Ray William D. Bennett Arthur E. Bishop Frank P. Hoff Alexander C. Macdonald SHOP TEACHERS A R T H N I A N S Row 1 — Miss Rebok. Anderson, Ferrara, Cecere. Moser, Johes. Heaton, Miss Cuildinger. Row 2 — Martin, Bailey, Field, Leip, MacDonald, Wood, Bohart, Cline, Row 3 — Pickett, Sanchez, Truran, Lund, Summers, Howard, Anderson. CAFETERIA ORKERS Row 1 — Harden, Carr, Matheis, Leake, Mrs. McNeill, Asadorian. Wallace, Cannerscio, Wernberg. Row 2 — Brons, Coodfellow, Martucce, Eberts, Harden, Betchard, Irwin, Colman, Snaperger. Row 3 — E. Leake, Strenbroner, Carrier, Russell, Laughlin, Kesson, Taylor. Promote the art of homemaking . . . cooking . . . sewing . . . future wives . . . moth- ers. Children ' s Hospital scrap books . . . scisssors snipping . . . needles flying . . . cook books. Chic costumes produced . . . tasty tid-bits in foods classes . . . happy girls. Home Coming Day Nursery . . . crying children . . . bandaging hurts . . . soothing injured. " The hand that rocks the cradle is the hand that rules the world. " Perform valuable services to entire school . . . always maintain a cheerful, clean, attractive dining room . . . shining tables and chairs, spotless drapes. Service at banquets as well as every day . . . efficient . . . speedy . . . neat. Returns: steam counter casualties . . . the occasional " Thank you " . . . well earned lunch. Newly organized to further cooperation . . . unite all workers in many outside activities. COMMERCE HONOR . Row 1 — Risley, Wimmer, Nicks, Eggert, Carlson, Smith, Macbeth, Schrock, Long, Page, Kolster, Vanderwall, Bankston. Row 2 — Risco, Steed, Walters, Scart, Shea, Smith, Harder, Hoyle, Nelems, Nealy, Calier, Earie, Hatfield. Row 3 — Bradley, Luten, DeSues, McClatchy, Verman, Cordon, Blackmer, Muehlberger, Ohiwiler, Willis, Lonergan, O ' Connor, Jacobs. Row 4 — Cox, Doran, Wiecking, Kobata, Winn, Marston, Waddell, Fodor, Anderson, H.; Kristenson. COMMERCIAL CHATTER Row 1 — Packard, Neuman, Flynn, Jones, Kolster, Eggert, Marr, Hoewner, Simpson, Smith, Kenworthy, Mam. Row 2 — Mrs. Carver, Bradley, Nelems, Long, Schuck, Page, Reever, Perry, Hewey, Cordon, Mcntruil. Row 3 — Sanchez, McBratney. I nman, Kobata, Risley, Hamilton, Nolan, Denton. Efficiency and competence in commercial subjects . . . accounting . . . business correspondence . . . economic geography. Shorthand stars and typing demons. Fu- ture secretaries . . . accountants . . . typists . . . clerks . . . stenographers . . . sales- men. Personality . . . perseverance . . . scholarship. Business law and office practice . . . bookkeeping . . . sales . . . tact. Sponsor, Mr. Hatfield; co-sponsor, Mr. Bauer. Commercial paper . . . reporters are all commercial students . . . relates the various commercial activities . . . features popular songs in the music box . . . has a section of jokes . . . personality skit . . . introduction to commercial teachers . . . reports on progress of all the class work. Embarrasses many through the Busy Bee . . . is the oldest departmental paper in ths school with most up-to-date news. HOME EC N CS TEACHERS Ruth E. Carhart Mary Crumpacker Ann E. Cuidinger Helen Bogan Grace Bowers Vernon P. Duncan Ralph E. Bauer Marguerite Hallinan Joseph R. Hatfield Merton Johnson Blanche Carlson Bertha Ley Esther Rebok Harry W. Stone Harold Axe Leroy Baker Joseph E. Burgess Muriel Butler (?r6f CS$V6» C AVCCA S i A I H E N A N S T. N. T. Row 1 — Ruby, Diehl, Cummings, Ford, Holden, Jakel, Cremii, Purgitt. Phelps. Row 2 — Weinberg, Downie, Mr. Maupin, Marriott, Hatton, Blair, Dangler. Row 3 — Kerr, Irwin, Collins, Davies, Walker. Row I — Harden. Stine, Harrell, Lestmann, Coldring, Wedekind, Turner, Bogart. Row 2 — Watson. Becktel, Graff, Fratt, Frame, Priewe, Holden, Van Holt. Row 3 — Edwards, Behrens, Lindskog, Criley, Martin, Rolston, Rose. s Sponsored by Mr. Roy Maupin. Field trips to important chemical industries . . . fascinating sights in the world of science. Organizers of newspaper called the Wash- ington Scientist . . . reports on new contributions to chemistry . . . interesting facts and opinions. Girls ' week exhibit to bring chemistry into the public eye . . . inviting displays . little-known facts. Dinner for graduating members. Sponsored by Mr. Kelly. Laboratory meetings . . . experiments . . . demonstration . . . sudden " pop " of a test tube. Analyses . . . patience . . . accuracy. Reduction of ores . . . obtaining pure metals. Lectures . . . prominent speakers . . . interest- ing subjects . . . amazing explanations. Opening new fields . . . today ' s students . . . tomorrow ' s chemists. Helping others to learn . . . field trips . . . social activities. GEOLOGY GLOB Row 1 — Holden, Bee. Wilson, Brown, McDowell, Fratt, Stine, Fishman. Row 2 — Nordstrom, Renfroe, August, Axtmon, Beaton, Brown, Rogers. Row 3 — Russell, Leievier, Brown, Holt, Fengler, McDowell, Nelson. Row I — Fischer, McKnight, Haden, Eatherton, Swanson, Williams, Osting. Row 2 — Ketchum, Barkar, Weems, Caugh, Patterson, Mr. Potter. Scientific service of young hobby enthusiasts . . . Geological Museum . . . displays . . . specimens . . . date. Field trips . . . chilly morning air ... speeding autos . . . hiking . . . abandoned gold mines . . . deserted caves and cabins . . . rare and valu- able specimens . . . beautiful scenery. Annual banquet . . . distinguished guests, speaking . . . talk of collections . . . plans for city federation of geology clubs. Student cameramen . . . flash bulbs . . . film . . . developing . . . printing . . . group pictures . . . candids . . . still figures . . . athletics . . . everyday activities . . . photograph the campus . . . field trips to view modern methods of film develop- ment . . . studying cameras . . . learning to judge photographs . . . They are handi- capped by the lack of a campus dark-room though . . . Sponsored by Mr. Potter. I _L CADETS Row 1 — Moodey, Lasher, Lemont, Fiedler, Blair, Marriott, Jakel. Row 2 — Flanagan, Earle, Leake, Moss, Moser, Mrs. Burns. Row 3 — Jaeckel, Osterbauer, Heiner, Wedekind, Leake. For students who aspire to become teachers ... a service and training club ... to gain experience and assurance . . . poise. Service to the school assisting teachers . . . managing classes . . . hesitation . . . uncertainty. . .doubt. . . " What to do now. " Developing self-confidence. Monthly meetings . . . friendly discussion and refresh- ments . . . fun . . . education . . . Sponsor, Mrs. Burns . . . Mr. Walter, co-sponsor. i Theodorg Losey Roy W. Maupin Evaline Morrison Dessie Myers Nancy Clare Ott JIccvcaH6v BOyS ' GLEE CLUB BflyS ' OBARTETTE Heard at all important functions . . . Christmas program . Featured soloists . . . Charles Escovar . . . Jack Copeland sing for graduation . . . make records class . . . George Casey, president . . the Summer ' 40 class . . . Ralph Lee Tschaikowsky Fantasy. . Cordan Shupe. They radio work. Officers for the Winter ' 40 Ralph Lee, vice president . . . Officers for president . . . Jack Copeland, vice president. Chief aim . . . school service. They sing at all important functions ... at churches . . . different schools . . . P.T.A. gatherings . . . scholarship banquet . . . special aud calls . . . radio work. Members for the Winter ' 40 . . . Jack Copeland . . . Bob Orcutt . . . Bob Whitney . . . Kenneth Byllesby . . . Members for the Summer . . . Bob Orcutt . . . Boyde Mott . . . Bob Kinsley . . . Kenneth Byllesby. : Row 1 — Woods, Escovar, Rose, Mogel, Copeland, Lee, Howard, Kingsley, Orcutt, Mott, Byllesby. Row 2 — Mrs. Davies, Shefftner, Becktel, Ketnahan, Clark, Anderson, Simmons, Harden, Vual, Healy, Meinert. Row 3 — Wentz, Benesh, Griffith, Williams, Holt, Cronen, Forrest, Donahue, Harter. Row 4 — Morris, Mathis, Fredricks, Sawyer, Brown, Kelley, Fesmnger, Baker, Eller. Bob Orcutt, Boyd Mott (seated) , Bob Kinsley, Kenneth Byllesby. GIRLS ' GLEE CLUB Row 1 — Burritt, Taylor, Wilkins, Rossiter, Schuck, Miss Berg, Bates, Crimes, Crowder, Rudolph, Leonard, McCarthy, Thompson. Row 2 — Burson, Vertrees, Widner. Launder, Hunter, Shumway, Knight, Freborg, Rosendale, C. Smith. Williams, Tyson. Row 3 — Sivert, Carus, Stewart, Cellagher, Hoyle, Curley, Han- ahan, Wall. Pratte, McChee, Stiewel. Row 4 — Beaird, Owens. Swan. Hatcher, Flaherty. Troxel, Low, Dostal, Mardis, Shacklett. Row 5 — Knapp. Carrington, Lewis, Baker, Wilder, Blackmer, Norman, Smith. Ceorgie Schuck. Mae Rossiter, Betty Wilkin G I R L S ' TRIO Expression through song ... a blending of girlish voices . . . happy notes . . . delight- ful verse. Streams of fresh sweet tones . . . deep tones . . . mellow tones . . . sad tones . . . gay notes . . . high notes . . . melodies from the heart. Blended tones . . . limpid tunes . . . crystal purity . . . feminine charm in song . . . " The hidden soul of harmony. " They participated in the Tschaikowsky Fantasy. Directed by Miss Berg. Versatile Ceorgie. . .quaint, charming Mae. . . ambitious, fascinating Betty. Alto . . . soprano. . .second soprano. . .blending in perfect haromny. Practicing in each spare minute. . .rehearsing for requested and voluntary affairs. . .entertaining at assemblies . . . banquets . . . teas . . . meetings . . . recitals . . . Clef Club activities . . . churches . . .special programs. Giving unselfishly of time to make many happy with their songs. STRING TRIO C I E F CLUB Plehn Kaplanian Koppe Row 1 — Mrs. Davies, Wall, LeLevier, Rossiter, Cobb, Mazen, Monsen, Freborg, Mrs. Elliott. Row 2 — Bunning, Rosendale, Denas, Martinick, Shumway, Kaplanian, Schuck, Stewart. Row 3 — Wilkin, Mason, Copeland, Alpers, Mott, Carus, Plehn. They furnish entertainment at many campus functions . . . aud calls . . . and ban- quets. The plaint of strings . . . loveliness, loneliness, joy, and warmth, penetrate their music . . . Lively rhythms, languid melodies . . . enjoyable music . . . Washington ' s String Trio. Direction of Mrs. Davies. Cello . . . Mary Alice Koppe. Piano . . . Mary Kaplanian. Violin, W ' 40 . . . Leiand Stickel . . . S ' 40, Pat Plehn. . Promote musical understanding . . . develop talents . . . vocal, instrumental, or Movements filled with the Masters ' music . . . classics . . . modern stunning sets . . . distinguished guests . . . music woodwinds . . . social events, joining the " Like the faint exquisite music of a dream. " in composition. . . . originality. Recitals piano . . . voice . . . strings torrent of music appreciation SENIOR ORCHESTRA VOCATIONAL ORCHESTRA Mrs. Elliott ' s baton brings forth accompaniments . . contests ... it plays whenever classical music is emotions ... in symphonic poems . . . overtures . . cadenza . . . serenade . . . rhapsody . . . romance . . . . Kostelanetzes . . . Tschaikowskis . . . Frimis . . . concerts . . . recitals . . . appropriate. Expressions of concerto . . . prelude . . . . Paderewskis . . . Heifitzes of Nineteen Hundred Sixty. Orchestra pit ... Mr. Smith . . . baton raised . . . music starts . . . popular dance . . . concert . . . classical . . . modern . . . experience. Surveyor shovv . . . rallies . . . commerce banquet . . . organization. Board of Education furnishes concert music . . . students buy stock arrangements . . . regular modern . . . dance band . . . Voca- tional Orchestra members . . . tomorrow ' s Glen Millers . . . future Benny Goodmans. Oram, Izzo, Brodavick, Mantay, Cravendyke, Zetwo, Covalt, Hajse, Burns ds, Koppe, Hobbs. Kersy, Mike, Plehn, Bentin, Orr, Fjerdingstad, Lewis, Beeson, Kaplanian, Moss, Miller. Olson. Mrs. Elliott, Munson, Carlson, Guise, Mazen, McElhose, Neal, Solomon. Koppe, Hillegas, Thomas, Osting, Estep. Swearingen. Mount. Taylor, Konnerth, Carmichael, Sidney, Rohrbacker. Row 1 — Smouse, Springer, Conley, McElhose, Dangler, Garner, lump, Clark, DeMaree, Morton, Barton, Story, Reyburn, A. Hoyt, E. Hoyt, Wilson, A. J. Smith. larrell. Row 2 — Morgan, 1 FRESCO CLUB ART HONOR SOCIEiy FRESCO CLUB Row ) — Knight, Cangler, Miller, Holterman, M. Williams, Frame Randolph Savage, Robinson, Mathis, Porter. Row 2 — Fielding, Hallis, Olson, Michaels Teeter ' deSoto, Overbey, C. Jones, Bassford, Fales, J. Williams, H. Jones. Bauder, ' Kelley! ART HONOR Row 1— Carbone, Eggert. Leonard, McDowell, Frame, Heaton, Olsen Michaels Row 2 — Adams, Overby, Roche, Hall, Zimmerman, Ritchie, Mrs, Ahrens Row — Kohlmiller, Frost, Furstnow, Alpers, Jones, Beader. . Artists to be. . .lovers of beauty. . .design. . . decoration . . . Murals . . frescos drawmgs. Field trips . . . meeting famous artists . . . attending lectures visiting art galleries . . . rapid sketching . . . viewing buildings . . , education and elation " Uead he is not, but departed, for the artist never dies. " Sponsored by Mr. Jones active ... enthusiastic ... art-minded members... presided over by Mary Frame. To create an active interest in art ... to recognize art students through semester awards . to assist art students in obtaining scholarships. Embryo Michelangelos _ brush and palette . . . harmony of bright colors . . . dreams conveyed to canvas I he Christmas Card Sale ... Alumni Art Exhibit ... Kate Gridley Memorial " Art IS the perfection of nature. " . . . Sponsors . . . Mrs. Ahrens, Mr. Jones Mr Anderson STAGE C R E Row 1 — Santiago, Mathis, Sokojis, Kuroki Porter, Rogers, Urban. Row 2 — Sanders, Wiggins, Henderson, Cox, Pow- »— Ohle, Cordon, Robinson, Craig, Brazil, Heise, Barnes, Coodson. ell, Wilson, Brown, Spicer, Stallr Edward Anderson Mary C. Davies Lillian Elliott Teresa Werminghous Velena Griffith Antonia Sintes Rhoda Parkill Helen Spears C Edward Safarjian Jerome VanZandt Mabel D, Sanders Mary Wright : BIRDS; ' I ' -.l ' ■■-■ ' l .■ ' ■ ' ' i R. H. Keamer Walter 1 1 Kathryn Colburn -iaze Cole MARCHING CHORUS J ' ' ( A ' DRUM AND BUGLE Row 1 — Hoewner, Irby, Spicer, Harnish, Benedett, Rogers, Kenworthy, Paschall, Ayars, Coker. Row 2 — Hunter, Wilson, deRldder, Reasor, Erickson, Pascoe, Stine, Evans, Johnston, Underwood. Row 3 — Aamodt, Bryant. Beck, Cullikson, Bier, Thomas. Randall, Verlato, Aubrey. Eggert. Row 4 — Cray, Morse, Detwiler, Cunliffe, Black, Moss, Pehoviack, Linge. Scanlon, Reese. Row 5 — Jones, Lair, Reid. Smith. Robson, Mcintosh, Maass, Morse, Peterson, Ash. Row 6 — Hartman, Page, Cordon, Wise, Perrenaud. They march for us at the football games . . . sing school songs . . . form initial letters . . . White uniforms . . . red and blue caps . . . megaphones ... in coliseum every fall . . . After one term they may graduate into the Glee Club . . . learn fine point of vocalizing and harmonizing . . . sing at Christmas . . . organization devoted to boys who can, and like to sing . . . sponsored by Mrs. Lillian Elliot. Washington ' s Drum and Bugle corps . . . Mr. Alexander Smith, director . . . musical contributions . . . flash of sun on silver . . . twirling batons . . . marching feet . . . blast of bugles . . . beat of drums . . . military air ... agility . . . Football spirit . . . new and colorful routines . . . vermillion jackets . . . snowy-white skirts . . . new sweaters and emblems. Girls ' Day . . . sports . . . rhythm . . . enthusiasm. B A y { D L E TT [|)M,[ Row 1 — Lewis, Green, Miller, Morrell, Smith, L.; Bottello. Markus, Evans, Kernaghan, Smith, A. Chowning, Flournoy, Verkler, Phillips, Piner, McKinnon, Platz, Carlson, Atkins. Row 2 — Kimmel, Ward, BAND Pow 1 — Taylo Row 2 — Long, Smith. Row 3 — Morrell, Topel. Row 4 — Campbel Shaffer, Mickens. Row Fiournoy, Hobbs. Scott, Swearingen, Mason, Hyland, )augh, Peck, Alpers, Hesslers, Stanard. Marison, Flournoy, Carlson, Lewis, Chaney, Germmiel, Kimmel, Verkler, Phillips, Crien, Lewis, Maltby, Alyward, Skala, Foote, Schariaban, Kernaghan. Burnside, Barron, McMalin, Adier, Chowning, Bottello. 5 — Miller, Stephen, Golden, Vandtwerp, Pierce, Evans, Piner, Two semesters of faithful service . . . they give their best with nothing in return . . . true school spirit. Harmonious melodies . . . new arrangements . . . Practise, practise, practise . . . they try, strive, and learn leading . . . we reap the benefit of their work . . . Three cheers for the band to give their finished product to the school. Mr. Smith helping, guiding, lettermen who are always on the job. The spirit of the school . . . giving service in the form of entertainment . . . giving time and effort to enliven school activities . . . straight red and white lines on the football field . . . music for all to enjoy . . . marches, waltzes, solemn pledge . . . all are played with zest and vim. . .Marching in the coliseum . . . playing for assem- bly . . . it ' s all in a day ' s work for the Washington Band . . . Director, Mr. Smith. i »!N«Oft E P H E B I A N S «• Elizebeth Benedict Alan Ewen Don Richards Harry Campbell Peggy Kalpakian Mary Ellen Ryan Florence de Coede )oyce Nissen Walt Urbank ' Row 1 — Shearer, Vanderzee. Oram, Kolster, Knight, Kalpakian, Chabez, Wills, Asaclorean, Nelems, Olson, Caugler. Row 2. — Olson, Morrish, Donnelly, Luten, Galbraith, Haire, Crantz, Worsham, Mr. Carrington. Row 3 — Green, Pate, Cox, Alpers, Long, Morrell, McLean. Row 4 — Brazill, Gold, de Coede, Haley. Barber, Lasher. NEW T R C H B E A R E R S OLD T R C H B E A R E R S Row I — Schipper, Carus, Carty, Jackson, Turner, _, Adams. Roche, Pinson, Bankston, Hatton, Maass, Nuno. Ro Renfro, Steward, Steed, Long, Smith, N.; Shaber, Hill, Wills Hooker, Galier, Pruber, Ferris, Wimmer, Nicks Freborg, Bayersdorfer, Earle, Jones, Harder. Reid McAnney, Egjert, Worsham. Collins, Marsh, Littleworth, Schrock, Cosnell, 2 — Pullen, Renauld, Siokos, Knox, Mohr, Coupal, Smith, M.; Leonard. Wall, Vanderwall, Miss Ott. Row 3 — Barry Fiedler, Banning, Lund, Wilson, Magalian, Nicholas, LeLevier, Greeley. Row A — Cully. Wadell, Myers, Rose. Sellers, Winn, Holden, Anderson. Row 5 — Watkins, Graf, Taylor, Green, Edwards, Erkel, Caukins, Boyle, Mott, Behrens. Williams, Evitt. SCHOLARSHIP SOCIETY iiL ■■i ■M e rW They succeeded in meeting the requirements of the Scholarship Society . . . they re- ceived the three A ' s necessary for membership. Blue " Scholarship for Service " ribbons . . . they comprise about ten per cent of the student body . . . their contributions to student life are outstanding . . . their activities are many and varied. " Scholarship Week " ... all scholarship students are given senior privileges . . . special assemblies . . . speakers . . . presentation to student body of Sealbearers and Torchbearers . . . Scholastic Tea for acquainting old and new members. These students also are privi- leged to attend district and sectional meetings . . . semi-annual meetings of all chap- ters of the Society. Torchbearers are students who have been admitted to the Society for two semesters . . . Sealbearers for four semesters, one of which must have been during the senior semester. They serve on committees and assist teachers. " The office of the scholar is to cheer, to raise, to guide men by showing them facts amidst appearances. " The Washington Chapter is sponsored by Miss Muriel Spellisey, Miss Nancy Ott, and Mr. Howard Carrington. For the Winter semester the officers were Hoxie Criswold, chairman; Conrad Walquist, vice-president; Florence deCoede, cor- responding secretary; Margaret Gremli, recording secretary; Roy Hamaji, treasurer. For the Summer Semester, Woodworth Marsh was chairman; Arthur Littleworth, vice- president; Eleanor Schrock, corresponding secretary; Mary Lou Worsham, recording secretary; Jack Collins, treasurer. N E W [ B E R S Row 1 — Adler, Cross, Porter, Ccughlin, Bartley, Carnagna, Jenke, Brochs, Scott, Myers, Ewen. Row 2 — Miss Spellisey, Collins,. Read, Flynn, Packard, Cecere, Randolph, Lanergan, Estes, Steed, Mc)ohnstone, Anderson, LaChapelle, Risco. Row 3 — Vogel, Dodge, DeSues, McClatchy, Carrett, Coldnng, Creen, Betterman, Soule, Pop, Kristenson, Wiecking, Doran, Osting, Rippe, Diegelman, Walters. Kirk. Row 4 — Howarth, Starbuck, Johnson, Brown, Cillespie, Bach, Shea, Goodwin, Blackmer, Holtermann, Knick, Colltieb, Keck, Frame, Earle, Slater, Carroll, Dudley. Row 5 — Campbell, Craser, Wight, Harth, Foxlee, Bogle, Proctor, Harris, Cooper, Kinnan, Millard, Mike, Narby, Linge, McHuth, Barry. Row 6 — Herndon, McClanahan, Hartzell, Butkie,. Coulet, Clark, Austin, Voss, Cottrell, Brons, Cathcart, Wood, Mason, Fengler, Colwell. S? « Q- : - t jt.1 s, v- KjTflHC L 1 9 - ' s i ! Sj mi »H S l SEALBEARERS WINTER 1940 I Almany Bredahl Aulman Banton Beck Benedict Bann Brazil Ewen Campbell Coons Christie deCoede Deserayn Dolan Crushaw Fernandez Foxlee Fisher Calier Cibbs Gootham Jamison Hakkane Hartshane Harrison Helbach Hellman Hill Nissen Kalpakian McMahan Martinez Meir Reid Newman Urbank Richards Robinson Rosenberg Ryan Sakurai Stone 4 Cox Covalt Flanagan Ford Clifford Dangler Clark Barry Diehl Holden Inman Fratt Cilreath Goldring Criswold Hamajl Martin Marriott Kerr )akel Kobata Macbeth Marsh Mowers Purgitt Miller Morrill Moser Muehlberger O ' Connor Sipos Smith Risley Rossi ter Ruby Schwimmer Schuck Winn Zimmerman Spaeth Til ton Wahlquist Webster Willis UlS " til SEALBEARERS SUMMER 1340 Don Richards Walt Urbank Alan Ewen Joe Young Bob Joyce Chuck Widener Bob Case Tom Almany Bob WIndisch Harry Campbell K G H T S EDDIE ROBif ' " f ' President INTER 1940 s u M E R 19 4 Carry on highest school traditions . . . achievement . . . personality . . . service, in- telligence, citizenship, character . . . Fifteen members of senior class chosen. Pro- mote friendly spirit in Washington. The Knights ' and Ladies ' dance, social highlight of semester . . . bright colored balloons . . . medieval atmosphere, silks and shimr mering satin, fragrant corsages. Graceful couples. Preserving gallantry and chivalry of years gone by. Writing courage and youthful optimism in the annals of Washington, and in its spirit. Knights ' Credo: " I believe in my country, and in the ideals of democ- racy, tolerance, and freedom under the laws upon which it was founded. I believe in the organization to which I belong and I pledge myself to abide by and further its purpose and ideals. I believe that my obligations as a Knight, as a member of society demand that I have and maintain a clean heart and a clean mind and a clean body, and that I lend my honest efforts to effect the defeat of intolerance, prejudice, op- pression wherever found. I believe in the ideals of Knighthood that teach gentleness of spirit, strength in right, the force of honest convictions, respect toward superiors, and tolerance for all. I believe I owe a duty to myself and to society wherein I live to maintain a life of honorable practices and unimpeachable integrity, and that only by practicing honesty with myself can I think and act honestly in my relations with others. " Motto: " Not to be served, but to serve. " Honor. Sweet memories. jyc! Conrad V ahiquist Darrell Jensen Lealyn Martin Rolland Morris Norman Dahl Woodworth Marsh James Griffith Neil Waddell Chuck Aiken John Heiner Don Smith Dan Morrill Jim Benesh Hoxsie Criswold Jim Evers Joyce Nissen Mary Ellen Ryan Genevieve Martin Peggy Kalpakian Lucille Robeson Helen Martinez Elizabeth Benedict Lorraine Johns La Verne Anderson Florence de Coede Doris Beane Mary Isgrig L A D E S Their members are chosen on the basis of character . . . person- ality . . . intelligence . . . leadership. They emphasize industry . . . friendliness . . . service to others . . . hospitality. The Knights ' and Ladies ' dance . . . semi- annual formal shin-dig . . . one of the most enjoyable social functions of the season ... is the result of earnest co- operation with the Knights. The very able sponsor is Miss Margaret Smith. I SUMMER 13 4 Marjorie Bankston Betty Woodman Ceorgeanna Schuck Betty Davies Chloe Inman Ivy Lou Macbeth Betty Ray Joyce McDowell Frances Ford Verna Holden Donna Malin Eleanor Leonard BOYS ' LEAGUE OFFICERS BENESH WIDENER fl BOCART FODOR GIRLS ' LEAGUE COMMITTEES , GIRLS ' LEAGUE OFFICERS SHUCK BEANE KAPLAN IAN SHUCK GIRLS ' LEAGUE REPRESENTATIVES Row 1 — Kenedy, Ruebhausen. Carner, Haldeman, Carlson, Schuck, Bates, Rosendale, Worsham. Birnie, Dick, Carder. Row 2 — Mrs. Ahrens, )ohnsen. Evans, Green, Latronica, Williams, Nickoloff, Miller, Wells, Cline, Nell, McDonald, Kincaid, Miss Smith. Row 3 — Bradley, Miller, Overby, Cunliffe, Perrenaud, lohnson, Morris, Hammond, Each, Hultquist, Cross, Nelson. Row 4 — Hansen, Smith, Hanahan, Paschall, Hoyle, Babb, Speers, Moser, Ellis, Vanderzee, Lerch, Main. vT i I Y ■ ' ). : 2 »u • • ' ' ' dA ' 1 : " i ' 5 r t ' - ■ V .... - " V s v i ow 1 — Ruby, Frame, Macbeth, Herberger, Ford, ., Diehl, Crowder. Row 2 — Mrs. Spears, Lohman, Fefris Schrock, Thompson, Cline, Miss Milach Row 3- Wills, Patterson, Hill, Prueher, Cummings, .Ncaiy Marsh, Morris, GriswoW, McNelis, Taylor , Begart, Row 1- Moran, Mr. . Stockton, Heiner. Bauer. Row 2 — Mr. Certy, Anderson, Trindl, Modeland, Wood. Mr. Edwards, Copeland, Fodor, Carlson .eonard, McDowell, Purgitt, Winlmer,. Nicks, Perrenaud, n, ?( 6rg, Kaplaniar, Dahl, Carter, N fartir, ' Evers,i Holden, MorrilJ ' , ,8rown, Mc-l Row 3 — :hauricey, Cokas, Walker, Foster, V ce: Truth . . . highest goals . . . V KEY pi School servic e Truth;. ' . . highest goals . . . impartiality in judgmenfl . . yoi ness in purpose . . . Knowledge . . . health . . ' , purity of soul. Candlerght servi formal mitiatiOn ». . . new sweaters . . . flowers . . . Mothers ' Day Tea . . . reverence tea and cakfis . . . chit-chat. Faculty Night . .f, vor te teachers ... a lovely eve- ning. Boys! nj t . . . shiny aut(5mot iles , . . sWirl of satin . . . dancing . . . memories. Clean speech . . . clean living . . . clean scholarship. Affiliation with Southwest Ki- wanis . . . contact with prominent men in community . . . Vocational Guidance Li- Ibrary , . . selecting suitable vocation . . . studying merits of intended occupations. Clean-up week . . . pick up trash . . . clean campus. W ' 40 president . . . Eddie Rob- inson. W ' 40 vice president. Bob Windish . . . S.40, Wagon Dahl, Hoxsie Griswold. " Ci a , ■■ »«, crx . v ■ ?jl.y: ■lF ;»% f A ' t ji;:t f f- t t ' t ' t t -j ... US? • r f i S ' i»ii. . Row 1 — Birnie, Wall,fRoss ter I r) yn, Schuc. Linge. Row l-HrMrs WirenST ' Worsham, Ro: Vanderwall, UWj WylA laag, Mrs. Davies House, Rissja an McDonald, l in(flai J, Row 1 — Kinman, Smith Richmond. Wahlquist, Criff Frame, .Rowley, Cooper, R«il Clover, deCoede, Hill, Pratte Creating fri of Ave Mar cornered pi Night dancing mpson, Lawton. Ruebhausen, arrington, Benesh, Mr ,Hanford, Greer, Collins, Woolf, PRY-TON — o- ce-tt- l_W Xli ' 3 d ' ■y cuv jolden circle initiation . . . lesty, scholarship blushes, smiles of friendship. Softly-lighted prayer service, strains glowing candles . . . bright flames of hope. Three- eadership. Clasped by bands of friendship. Boys ' growing up. Senior Tea, hearts and eyes over- flowing, strains of Aloha, unforgettable . . . adieu. Seniors. Sponsor, Genevieve Ahrens. The five C ' s . . . symbolic of brotherhood . . . Courage . . . Citizenship . . Capac- ity ... Conduct . . . Character. Friendly . . . sincere. Solemnity of formal initia- tion. Monday evening meetings . . . seriousness . . . fun. " Square Thyself for Use " Get Acquainted Tags . . . Sport Cards . . . encouragement for supporting the school. Church night . . . devotion. Girls ' Night ... a delightful occasion. Final Party . . . C A • 5t E D S »-«? XXt t ' tt v v ..rr.m gy ' ::5 n ««. LI % ' Row 1- Overby Bailey. WSt — Hofferber, P. Davies, Ci , Cram, Nickoloff, Jakel Clanzman, Blackmere Dangler, RavWorTd. Ro rOft.V ow arftmith, Kee, kv 2— Miss Fitzpatnck, Coerler, C rlson, Hoewiier, Jones, Nighlf ' . .Vj nnet) ' at e part . .Vpiakir l his . ' bes . . . nexAjVnenrdyers u. . fori . . . fair play . . . . X introductions . . . speeches . . . new friends. Girls ' dancing . . . fun . . . memories. Skating . spills . . . laughter. Senior farewell party welcome handshakes from old members. I 4ltty57£I)BJtfcTTLE-; ' I . Left to Right — Jones, Criswold. Cooper, Nicks, Morris, Wallace. Standing — Mr. Hatfield, Griffith. EMBASSY CLUB Row I — Foster, Sonitba, Mr. Clewe, Aiello, Weeke, Peck, Mr. Ray, Withrow. Row 2 — Moody. Gardner, Lockyer, Johnson, Smith, Carter, Maxwell. Row 3 — Breier, Mundell, Stafford, Byllesby, Timmerman. Faust, McGivney. Endeavoring to create greater school spirit ... to work the student body to fever pitch over some forthcoming school event . . . through subtle means ... is the task of the Rally Committee . . . headed by Manager of Athletics . . . the S ' 40 committee was divided into a creative and a productive staff. Bob Joyce W " 40 and Jim Griffith S ' 40 . . . headed this group . . . they were sponsored by Mr. Joseph R. Hatfield. Washington ' s newest social service club . . . encourages good attendance and conduct . . . works for more active participation in campus events among lower grades . . . helps them become acquainted Hospitality Committee . . . assists new students in finding their way about. Sponsors tenth grade dance in collaboration with Mr. Walter. Mr. Clewe, sponsor .. .Mr. Ray, co-sponsor. " Ambassadors, " we welcome you. C N T A R T JOYCE McDowell Art Editor N E N FURSTNOW JONES ■ Jelrtk edUor-in-chi f is in charge of « itirje artistic appearance of the annual . . . plans all the page lay-outs . . . experiments with new ways of placing photographs and copy on each page . . . spends long hours after school matching colors with the moods of the sym- phonic movements. Stately, pow- erful rhythm of Administration . . . deciding on colors best ex- pressing corresponding moods . . . repeating the process for each division. Assistant art editors are responsible for novel illustrations . . . unusual effects . . . help se- lect the style of type to be used . . . influence choice of cover de- sign . . . pore over cover mate- rials in search of that most suit- able . . . work on small line draw- ings. . .clever cartoons. . .etch- ings . . . suggestive borders. Art staff members do all the tedious mounting and cutting of photo- graphs . . . decide which pictures to use . . . prepare cuts for en- graver. Visits to printing plant reveal technical terms, as " bleed " . . . " copy " . . . " gutter " . . . " emboss " . . . " cuts. " Engraver ' s deadline approaches bringing worries . . . headaches . . . hur- rying to complete last touches. Staff utters sigh of prouci satis- faction. Don Frost . . . photog- raphy for fiv main, ivision pages. Row 1 — Mr. )ones, Uindhardt, McDowell, Jones. Row 2 — Frederick, l ata, Creer, Rackus, Coodson, Brechenridze, Fales. Row 3 — Alpers, Furstnow, Michaels, Kos- ter, Reschert. Row 4 — Beauder, Kelly, Mathis, Morris. i Row 1 — Cooper. Dangler, Coldring, Reilly, Miss Knapp. Row 2 — Sipos. Eggert, Bry- ant, Jakel, Taylor. Row 3 — Matula, Olson, Wilson, Shaber, Olive, Neuman, Hill, Spaeth. Row ' I — -Green, Malin, Worsham, Lundgren. Members chosen for creative writing ability . . . initiative . . . interest in school affairs . . . de- pendability and originality. Work- ing to produce a true record of campus life at Washington dur- ing the 1939-40 school year. . .a yearbook of student organization and achievement. Distribution of assignments . . . interviews with teachers and club officers ... a studious ferreting out of facts. Counting each letter. . .thought- ful figuring . . . anxious calcula- tion and eager scribbling ... re- counting . . . deadline. Worn erasers and writer ' s cramp. Brainstorms and deadlocks. Tak- ing names for pictures of clubs, teams, and classes. Efficiency and speed. Assistant Literary Editor, Jack Spaeth; Assistant Picture Editor, Marjorie Dangler; Girls ' Sports, Lillian jakel; Boys ' Sports, Bill Reilly; Winter ' 40 Senior Pic- tures, Jean Clendinning; Summer ' 40 Senior Pictures, Marjorie Van Cott; Advertising, Gaby Sipos; Members of the Staff; Jean Olive, Helen Shaber, Douglas Greeley, Donna Malin, Gerry Brvant, Dor- othy Newman, Car.l Lundgren, Gladys Olson, Margie Wilson, Dick Stevenson, Atalie Adams, Virginia Sunning, Jean Holwerda, Eugene Taylor, Lee Diehl, Gerda Eggert, Mary Lou Worsham, and Shirley Matula. Faculty advise.-s: Meluice Knapp, editorial; Harold Jones, art; Merton Johnson, sales; William L. Garst, business; Mary R. Carver, typing. Commercial ad- visers: J. F. Cannicott, engraving; John W. Cogle, senior photo- graphy; Barney Caliendo, group pictures and informals; Wood Glover, printing; Mr. Henderson, covers. . E D S T LIONEL COLDRING Editor-in-Chief STEPHANIE HILL JOHN COOPER , T A R F A L F S BELIES lETTRES LIBRARY STAFF They serve the school by assisting in the library . . . cataloguing the Dawson collection. Fortnightly meetings . . . speakers . . . book reviews. Field trip to Scripps College . . . solemn, cathedral-like library . . . educational visit . . . teachers hold classes in library . . . Miss Lane, librarian, coaches new students in use of card catalogue . . . Mr. Hughes ' desk claims place of honor in center of library . . . reverent feeling. Pleasant, quiet atmosphere . . . shelves and shelves of orderly books . . . the fascina- tion of printed pages . . . interesting exhibits . . . browsing students . . . large windows . . . beautiful murals and paintings . . . the rare, excellent Carnegie and Dawson collections . . . lovely flowers . . . Mr. Hughes ' desk . . . the library . . . supervised by Miss Lane, Miss Gorlick . . . efficiently kept up by the well-trained Library Staff. Row 1 — Kaun, Young, Cremli, Miss Lane, Collins, Claypool, Lindquist. Row 2 — Turner, Kunz. Eller, Jensen, King. Renfrc. 1 ow 1 — Ludlow, Woodward, Goodwin, Kaun, Mrs. Corelick, Miss Lane, Collins, Bodkin, Mitchell, King. Row 2 — Johnson, Pavelis, Risen, Cleason, Barber, Jensen, Kunz, Caro, Claypool. Row 3 — Nading, Hanahan, Ferrara, Ezzell, Griffith, Paine, Ross L. T. Dobyns Lulu Draper L yman Edwards Jane Fitzpatrick « Jessie Cil ■V ' ' -A ' W BJ H -Wm V ' _ i H P» V M L ' - V Alta Coble Edna Helvey Dorothy Hertzog Verda Hodgman George Homringhausen Juelle Heaton Theodore Kelly Anne D. Kemp Meluice Knapp William McNelis Marie Mullaney TEACHERS x Aj ' ' : -i - ' THIRD MOVEMENT The pulse of music becomes stronger . . . Vfcheerful . . . with an upward inflection ... a growth of power and emphasis. It is gay and jvivacious. Tenuous figures . . . happy faces . . . itrengtl .|J . supple graVe . . . exhilaration . . . I ' itality ' ., . ' ; acti i. U i Row 1 — Burson, Denton, Beauchamp, Inman, Risley, Kincaid. Cosnell, Purgitt, Jakel, Burroughs, Hall. Row 2 — Schrock, Bayersdorfer, Hoyle, This executive board promotes all athletic functions . . . " They make the wheels go round. " Intent upon advancing athletics . . . they are active in every sport. These girls plan clever playdays . . . programs ... C. A. A. banquets sign up Rallies. Aspiring to friendliness . . . this operative staff is interested in newcomers. Devoted to recreation . . . they offer the athletic girl a means of expression. " I shot an arrow into the air. " Shooting with bows and arrows . . . originated from crossbow and bolts . . . sport of the Middle Ages. Bows of yew and lemonwood. Tar- gets of coiled straw . . . concentric circles. Exact posture . . . perfect balance. Drawing . . . releaase . . . Ping! " A bulls-eye. " Sport that demands excellent musicular control keen observation. Grace combined with form. Manager . . . Lillian Jakel. ARCHERY BADMINTON " Watch the birdie! " . . . game centers on that cocky bit of fowl. Lively English sport Americanized . . . fast game. Unwelcome winds . . . misfortunes. Graceful- ness and speed . . . essential qualifications . . . perpetual recreation. Feminine chatter galore ... long handled rackets. .. flourished with precision ... fast corner slams. Energetic shots. . .suppleness the poetry of motion. Manager, Eleanor Shrock. America ' s game . . . rippling muscles under warm brown skin . . . watchful eyes on the ball. Alert players . . . speed and precision. Crack of the bat . . . complete circuit of bases . . . home run! The thrill of . . . stolen bases . . . strike outs. Regulation size diamonds . . . home plates . . . umpires. Keen competition . . . fun for all ... the wild excitement of baseball . . . lead offs . . . balks . . . Manager, Daphne Burroughs. BASEBALL ' V ' - ' F mmWU .iit . L fii i 4 H ■ i ■ TBM k i«-i " i l « A vJr " ■• «« ' ' " i V Girls dashing up and down the field . . . center bully . . . ground, sticks, ground, sticks, ground, sticks and hit ... a fast dribble, push shot and drive . . . the clashing of sticks ... a tense group in the striking circle ... a goal. Penalty corners . . . off sides . . . roll in . . . distant bullies . . . one of the fastest games. Fleet wing players. Strategy and luck. Manager . . . Betty Ann Bayersdorfer. y S P E E D B A L L The speed of basketball . . . the power of football . . . the teamwork of soccer. Intricate dribbling . . . juggles . . . tossups . . . throw downs. Field goals . . . drop kicks . . . touchdowns. Plenty of activity for everyone. Whistles . . . fouls. Swift running after a fast rolling ball. Passing within the forward line ... final attempts of an alert goalie. An excellent game for C. A. A. Manager . . . Ruth Risen. I Tennis . . . quiet, sunny courts . . . sparkling white outfits . . . sing of ball on taut strings. Rallying back and forth . . . lobs . . . intricate footwork . . . smashing drives . . . running with poised racket . . . breathless scurrying to cover the court. A game for old and young . . . alert. The work out of fast rallying. Most popular sport . . . games at sunset . . . health and grace. Love . . . game . . . set. Singles and doubles . . . background . . . promotes good sportsmanship. Manager, Helen Hoyle. Volleyball . . . tightly stretched nets . . . darting figures . . . broken finger nails . . . accurate passing . . . quickly returned balls. Key note . . . team work. Modification of tennis . . . hand for racket. Blares of . . . " Play your place " . . . " two hands " . Struggle for final point. Thumping of the ball on hands ... as it goes from side to side over the net. Rotation . . . serves. Manager . . . Jean Cosnell. TENNIS VOLLEYBALL • I " Ja ccer. (jfOP iwif mpts isen. GIRLS ' GYM TEACHERS Helen Hyde Clark Olive Cook !rrl Ruth Hermie Alice Segal Priscilla Shaffer Lucille Sylva s ' -. ' ■■■ m r : ' «te,; I ' 7 i u VARSITY FOOTBALL After a more or less disastrous practice season . . . the General football team . . . opened the season with a home game . . . with Roosevelt. First blood was drawn by Roosevelt . . . who capitalized on a General fumble . . . and scored six points . . . Again after a sustained drive . . . the Roughriders scored and con- verted . . . half-time. The third quarter saw a fighting Washington eleven. A wobbly pass . . . completed . . . good for a touchdown . . . Last quarter . . . stale- mate . . . unexciting. Generals lose 13-7. A see-saw encounter . . . played mostly in mid-field . . . featured the Polytechnic game. Fumble . . . Par- rots recover on the General nine . . . Again a fumble . . . and again . . . Poly recovers . . . touchdown . . . conversion. Score: Poly 13 . . . Washington 0. Fourth quarter . . . desperation passes . . . incomplete . . . defection . . . Generals lose their second game. The third game of the season . . . the Generals decidedly not the better team . . . Jefferson ' s dusky speedsters turn the game into a track meet. Slashing reverses . . . fighting line plunges ... a variety of scrimmage plays. Score . . . Jeff 30, Generals 0. YELL LEADERS © -S__S_ s %f ? ' «, ® ?_ . .« .T a W ' :f«fi !-n « !3 1 8 .34 l-i;: It- . On the Ground— Irwine, Pehoviack. Row 1— Riley, Nesbit, Compagnan, Myers, Wood, Baran, Furstnow Logan Cando Santaz Reld?n. cfnro- f " - -M . -h. Walker Kinman, Linnell, Yamane, Fowler, Varia , Meldrurr,, Turchetto Hor no°Alrnany ' Hflfrirh pT r V; ' Case, Rudolph, Ringbloom, Syler, Urbank Harvey Helfrich. Row 4— Crawford, Cnswold, Number, Foster, Williams, Clark, Wells, Ohie, Smith, Fowler, Bayless. ' ' V- 3 Q JL J 1 l-Xt Row I — Lyman, Hunt, Dubin, Spaeth, Lopez, Rawley, Osgood Myers Uose Row 2 — Morgan, Hager, Andrews, Blackford, Caubet, Ran, Whittingtor Sims Mr. Rich. The fourth game of the league season . . . with Fremont ... our cross town rivals. Improved team ornr A . 1 ■ •■ ■ ' • ' gg ' ' r§ rioi-s • • ■ the Generals held the favored Pathfinders until the second quarter. An intercepted pass . . . easy touchdown set up . . . six points for the Cardinal and Urey. A new half . . . entered into with a brighter outlook ... by the players Fumble deep in our own territory . . . Fremont marches to another touchdown ... sun is sinking closing Tn ' T r? g " - Fe ground plays . . . desperation passes ... can one be completedPWingman m the clear ... is he over? Washington touchdown ... wild rooters ... hilarious rooters blocked conversion . . . final gun pops . . . groans sighs of sorrow . . . tired players ... the loss will be avenged. Final score: Washington 6 . . . Fremont 12. M.!.n!f° " ' ' ' !T u ■ ; ' ' ' ' ' • • • d° o-- die spirit . . . Manual Arts must be beaten ... the Manual ,,nx must be broken . . . crowded stands . . . tense expectancy . . . awaiting that opening gun . . . the kickoff. Generals on the march . . . blocked punt . . . carried to a lightning touchdown Uroans ... rooting surprised players ... jubilant foes ... seven points for the toilers The ZTrrZ. ' J.U ' s e ' citing ... scoreless ... played in midfield. Undaunted General eleven rnarches sixty-three yards . . loses the ball just short of pay-dirt . . . cannot the Red and Blue score against our ancient rivals? Half-time talks . . . inspiring . . . spirited lively Third ! TJ ' y ■■■ . P j Pl ys . . . power plays . . . deception . . . reverses . . . Washington touchdown . astonished rooters . . . excitement . . . joyous Generals . . . disheartened purple and grey . . . tired . . . battered players . fighting for their schools. Again a sustained General march . . . smashing me plunges . . . again Washington scores ... the crowd breaks loose . . Generals are ahead . . lengthening shadows ... the game is drawing to a close ... the rest is anticlimax humbled the artisans ... on their own field ... by the score of: Washington 13, Manual Arts 7 i VARSITY L E T T ER M E N _, :i,„_j, -J - - S- -i f-f - ■ ' c ' J24, ce Row 1 — Clover, Lyon, McDermott, Rankin, Healy, Widener, Kemp, Wahlquist, Fodor, Matthews, Ary, Smith, Mogul. Row 2 — Cooper, Yamashita, Lasher, Chauncey, Aiken, Carpenter, Canzales, Kebbler, Dcdge, Thurber, Cimarusti, Mr. Fults. Row 3 — Gill, Atkin, Cokas, McDonald, Fitzgerald, Haley, Andrews, McClsan, Walters, Wyss. i 9 9 Sitting — Johnson, Tapia, Hall, Smouse, Paxton, Dill, Kelso Breckenridge, Rogers, Cathcart Center — Bruce, Clark, McKin- non, White, Harris, DeMaggio. Smith, Humphrey, Hutton, Mo- gle, Bartlett. Row 3 — Halm- gren, Dobyns, Walker, Killin. lones, Morino, Bain, Moore. Healy. " BEE " Truly . . . this was the " B " footballers ' year to shine . . . " C " lettermen . . . " B " lettermen . . . and experienced goofs. These comprised a championship team . . . Their new coach . . . produced a team . . . that lost only its last game ... a team that walloped all comers . . . even in practice . . . that carried off the co-championship of the Southern League . . . Fighting B ' s ... the varsity of tomorrow ... keep up the work ... Lettermen: Aiken, Ary, Atkin, Cokas, Dodge, Fodor, Conzalis, Healy, Chauncy, Lyon, Kemp (captain), Mathews, McDermott, Rankin, Young, Widener, Yamashito, Tippi, Walhquist, Clover. II ' Row 1— Rose Severson, Russell, Chavira, Baker, Hamaji, Woodard, Case, Latronica, Jones, Street. Row 2— German Hull vwTJ Nickloff, Hahemer, Teissera, Johns, Edens, Meunier, Anderson, Mr. Heilman. Row 3— Cragun, Lennert Forkner ' Waddell, Brice, Christianson, Danskin, Muno, Schidl. - After being runners up to the champions in their first year of competi- tion the " C " team looked forward to a successful season. One returning letterman. . .promising practice season. . .hopes ran high. Bad luck. . . coach takes ill for first game. . .demoralized team. . .slump result. . . three games hopelessly lost. . .one tied. . no triumphs. . . dismal season . . .cheer up, C ' s. . .Remember, next year may be yours to shine. c c c LUEDKE CILMORE HAUCEN BRISTOL ANDERSON EISENHART DUFEK L E T T E R M E N Roosevelt first General opponent . . . scores 27-21 . . . 27-19 . . . both games won by Generals . . . Generals outstanding on defense . . . Roosevelt ragged on long shots . . . Eisenhart outstanding for Generals. With Jefferson . . . scores 29-25 . . . 23-31 . . . Jeff and Generals split . . . Captain Urkof ' s great defensive play . . . Frank Eisenhart ' s swisher eyes . . . Jeff ' s second half drive was too much in second contest. Fremont . . . s cores 11-18 ... 25-29 . . . Pathfinders ' shifting zone " too much " for Generals . . . Generals ' foul shots especially poor . . . Fremont ' s star, Fohring, high point in both games . . . Anderson of Washington ' s great defensive play on Fre- mont ' s star center. Poly . . . scores 13-23 . . . 23-41 . . . Poly ' s team of champion caliber . . . first game a defensive battle . . . second game Coach Holbrook sick at home . . . Parrots ran wild with Townsend scoring 21 points. Manual . . . scores 27-32 . . . 25-19 . . . Generals split with old time rivals . . . most thrilling games during the season . . . the first game was featured by Anderson ' s defensive play . . . during the second contest Eisenhart swished 14 digits . . . Manual displayed fine defense first half. B Basketbal l . . . coached by Ed Carmichael . . . good season winning and losing six games . . . eked out wins over Fremont . . . Manual . . . Roosevelt. Sparked by Jack Collins ' dead eyes . . . Art Nickilof ' s fine defensive play . . . captained by " Tink " Heitzenreider . . . Lettermen . . . Mickey Aronson . . . Jack Beggerly . . . Jack Collins . . . Martin DeGode . . . Charles Hanford . . . Tom Heitzenreider . . . Art Nickloff ... Jim Scanlon ... Jim Teeter. BASKETBALL c C oo oo l oo Row 1 — Klein, Haugen, Dufek, Hirsch, Escovar. Row 2 — • Lorensori, McClanahan, Gilmore, Bristol, Taylor. Row 3 — Anderson, Luedke, Eisenhart, Mr. Holbrook. Top — Mr. Carmichael, Aronson, deCoede, Withrow. Bottom- Teeter, Nickloff, Heitzenreder, Hanford. OO Row 1 — House, Clifford, Woolf, McDonald, Sullivan, Martin, Mr. Childress. Row 2 — McMahon, Simmons, Robinson, Hagerdorn, Walsh, Lee, Ashworth. Row 1 — Dobbs, Kolster, Santiago, Morrill, Brown, F.; Browne, H. (Capt.) ; Marsh, Foster, Cundiff, Sloan, Walker. Row 2 — Mr. Childress, Huls, McKinnor, Brown, M.; Holden, Ledbetter, Carter, Brown, B.; Paxton, Kinman, Hollyfield, Mr. Heilman. Row 3 — Escovar, Jurewitz, Howery, Casey, West, Lutz, Viertel, Ebey, Fowler, Aiken. Row 4 — Hedy, Irvine, Lind, Schoebinger, Vose, Frierson, Powell, George, Howard. As did most of our other teams . . . the varsity track . . . which won in practice . . . looked forward to a better than average season. A well rounded team . . . with a few individual stars gave promise to a successful year. But only in the Jefferson meet did they assert themselves enough to give the city champions a scare . . . losing by five points. Both Roosevelt and Poly beat us by scores so close as to be decided by the relay. VARSITY TRACK " B " TRACK TEAM The members of the " B " track team were not very consistent . . . winning and losing alternately. They won their one practice game by a close score . . . only to lose to Polytechnic . . . and then to trample a strong Roosevelt team . . . several of the boys performing like champions. Walker and Taylor performed outstandingly in their events. Row 1 — Schwarz, Aiken, J.; Wood, Breckenridge, Bernard, Taylor, Benesh (Capt.), Mathis, Kobata, Walk- er, Foster, Schlickbernd, Cragun. Row 2 — Mr. Heilman, Case, Estes, Rose, Austin, Stivers, Criley, Rankin, Greer, Hosack, Littleworth, Teeter, Jones, C. ; Mr. Childress. Row 3 — Ceierman, Mushett, Mason, Hohener, Fuselier, Street, Maxwell, Edwards, Moreno, Palmer, Withrow, Chowning. Row 4 — Gardner, Rawlings, Bartlett, Maclean, Humphrey, Neighbours, Tolin, Rich, Mogle, Carter, Weinberg, Schneider. Row 1 — Moss, Currier, )enks, O ' Hara, Shepherd, Ichinose, Gifford, Walters, Sturtevant. Row 2 — Anderson, Blume, Grosse, Estes, Gill, Jahnz, Tomlinson, Leggett, Grondona, Hardy. The mighty midgets ... of the Red and Blue " C " track team . . . also lived up to the examples of the " B " and varsity by winning their practice meet . . . but then losing their first two league meets by high margins. This team acts as training ground for the varsity . . . and produces good performers . . . such as Moss, Blume, Leggett, and Tomlinson. " C " TRACK TEAM { ■f - ' A- ' V TRACK LETTERMEN This year ' s varsity produced an exceptional group of individual stars . . . and lettermen ... in both track and field events . . . Danny Morrill was an outstanding performer in the shot put department . . . breaking the existing school record. Also star performers such as Frank Brown . . . ace high hurdler . . . and Bill Kinman . . . equally excellent miier . . . both ought to equal ... or break the records of their events. Harry Browne ... a long striding half miler . . . and also Johnny Dobbs . . .the small. . .but mighty . . . pole-vaulter . . . are pushing their bodies to record breaking efforts. Studious Woodworth Marsh ... teamed with Danny Kolster to see that Washington was never shut out of the high jumping department. Jim Santiago also was responsible for points ... in both the low hurdles . . . and dash events. Even though the season was not an outstanding success . . . Washington looks with pride ... to these boys . . . many of whom graduate before next season. ii MARSH P SANTIAGO BROWN. F. BL ' -2 lEROWITZ r . N GYMNASTICS City champs. .. " Powerful Musclemen " .. .Washington ' s best ... Southern League ' s best . . . the city ' s finest gym team. Coordination . . . new sequences . . . originality. Difficulty in exercises . . . form . . . timing . . . poise . . . perfection. All vital factors . . . create wonderful team. Meets . . . nervousness . . . strange equipment . . . strange faces. All hindrances . . . make steel nerves . . . create versatile gymnasts. Workouts at U.C.L.A. . . . obtaining new ideas . . . learning . . . watching . . . being aided. Benefit shows . . . Pomona Fair . . . Harvard Playground . . . Junior High Schools. City competition . . . League Finals . . . twenty men entered . . . tenseness . . . hard work . . . heavy competition . . . thirteen men placed ... on to semi-finals. City cheering crowds . thirteen men ready men in fine condition . . . nerves meet going way over semi-finals . . . twelve schools compete . . . smooth exercises . vieing for honors . . . Roosevelt dangerously close. We win for supreme test . . . city finals. The big day . . . anxious . . . confident. Another race with Roosevelt time . . . fighting it out for first place . . . victory. Howard Reschert won side horse . . . Don Gill won free exercise. Jim Kerschner placed second ... Ed Cunney fourth ... on rope climb. Ben Davis ... a third on the parallels . . . Jim Varian ... a fifth. Doug Wilson . . . second in tumbling . . . Bud Vogel . . . third on the high bar. Victory well earned . . . reward of hard work . . . Coach Carmichael ' s fine help. I Hamilton MacDougall Hyam Bradshaw Cox Prummers Reschert Martin (Mgr.) Kerchnei UvLWI Aa 4 Vogel Mr. Carmichael Gill Gunny Sullivan Bushey Varian Cokas Dobbs .iafeja|S a -v«._ , . Row 1 — Marti Prummers, Wa Clark, Cosner, Phegley. (Managerl, Mr. Carmichael, Reschert, Evers, Lydick, Cox, Mace. Row 2 — B. Hyam, Austin, Vogel, Gunny, , Croft, Wilson. Row 3 — J. Hyam, McGivnr?y, Moss, Sullivan, McElhose, Park, Bushey, Wilmot. Row 4— amilton, Wyss, Teeter, Knapp, Orcutt, Davis. Row 5 — Kershner, Gill, Nellor, Cokas, MacDougall, Varian, VARSITY SOFTBALL ik tk m i ' ' | M| B BuiB9i -w ' ' nt " 41 ki 1 9 ■n 1 H 9 1 PBhAJ Ira r ■ ' wl m ' J HV H »t - B H .- pH JBf M i B9 ' sR. f BiT ' l! ! G 1 H I V S H i y M fw ' SfaH A IT ui,1i tlV rH Wr N f ' " ' m ' V ' t H Ib Row 1 — Dill, Bartik, Anderson, Dreher, Dufek, Chauncey, Falappmo, Laven, Pehoviack. Row 2 — Mr. Fults, Crank, Barnes, Klein, Ohie, Cray, Eisenhart, Robinson, Helfrich, Washington ' s outstanding team . . . league champs . . . won nine games . . . lost one, Captain Walter Dreher, Majority of team lettermen , . . many returning. Played five schools . . . two games each. Beat Roosevelt 3 to first game ... 2-1 the second. Took Poly 2-0 . . . 5-4. Toppled Jackson 15-1 ... repeated with 12-2. Also Manual 11-2 ... 12-3. Split games with Dorsey . . . won 1 0-0 . . . lost 7-1 5. . X- ' V Row 1 — Mr. Fults, Cark, Theys, Moore, Latronica, Helton, R unice,DiMa|gio,, Proctor, Danskin, Kuroki. Row 2 — Heitzen- reder, Hutton, Bogle, Stockton, Simmons, Duncan, Chapman,.. Earley S " t , Pa ejjgviack. • . This year Washington produced a great " B " Softball tea ' m . . . gaining the envy of the ath- letic department. Captained by Bob Hilton . . . these boys took the championship of their league. These players hope to advance to varsity softball. .and bring further glory to Washington ... by capturing a varsity pennant. This year the team won all its games. . . to take undisputed first place. . .and the championship over all the teams in the league. LL B " SOFTBALL I 1 V J. so FIBALL LETTERMEN IBTD Mr. Burgess, Tony Buonarigo, Randolph Lassky, Larry Sim- mons, Lloyd Krant, Murray Ward, John Anselmo. I 4 Facing a rather promising league season . . . due to their good showing in practice meets . . . the divot diggers of the Washington Golf team . . . had their high hopes satisfied by winning all games of the season. These boys do not have the opportunity to play before spectators . . . but still they are out there . . . fighting for Washington. This team . . . deserves your interest whether it is champion ... or not. Next year we will be on top. TENNIS TEAM Smashing volleys . . . screaming serves . . . feature the Washington Tennis Team . . . powerful from the first singles ... to the last doubles. From the seven returning let- termen and the experienced reserves . . . the team expects a successful season. They have had many promising practice tilts . . . surely seem headed for a championship. Two members journeyed to the Ojai Valley tournament and together placed second in the doubles section . . . comprising all California high schools. Five of the team mem- bers will return for next year ' s battles. With a little support our team will be a cham- pion . . . every year. F-UfUJ ' TrloiJJ FOURTH MOVEMENT Blazing and imperious . . . crashing cymbals . . . bold cadence of the march ... a mighty song of triumph . . . vigorous . . . dominant . . . jubi- lant. An out pouring of sound . . . full yet not clamorous. And once more some how tender complacence, recalling again the thought that inspired our theme and colored its every measure. Mighty Seniors . . . aloof . . . energetic . . . capable . . . courageous. High spirits . . . honors . . gowns . . speeches . . exaltation . . tears . and twilight falls gently, and all but imperceptibly across the final scene . . . leaving only memories . . . our Impression of Student Life. WINTER 19 4 Class officers of W ' 40 . . . Esquire leaders . . . sophistication personified . . . with the swank of the very modern. Don Richards . . . president of the winter class . . . tall dark . . . brawny . . . intelligent . . . with leadership ability and a friendly magnetic personality. Elizabeth Bene- dict . . . vice-president of the Esquires ... a perfect lady . . . gracious . . . charming . . . dig- nified . . . kind . . . graceful . . . intellectual . . . lovely . . . sweet and sincere. Patricia Haigh . . . secretary of the winter graduates of ' 40 ... vi- vacious . . . eager . . . bubbling . . . full of laugh- ter . . . lively . . . possesses zeal for living . . . happily efficient. Charles Widener . . . leader of yells . . . leader of class song ... an original by Edward Robinson and Peggy Kalpakian . . . peppy, dynamic . . . clever response stealer . . . possessor of a way with people. Class officers of the winter graduating class of nineteen hun- dred forty . . . marvelous leaders . . . responsible . . . efficient . . . capable . . . eager . . . ambi- tious . . . friendly . . . modern ... to the brim with ideas . . . good workers . . . doers of an admirable piece of work. DON RICHARDS BENEDICT HAIGH WIDENER S ' 3L I SENIOR RECREATION W ' 40 ANDERSON LIMBERS CLIFFORD NICKOLOFF SCHREICK ANDERSON, L. RISEN HOHKANE FISHER Washington ' s Senior Recreation Committee . . . Mrs. Hodgeman and Mr. Edwards, spon- sors . . . for seniors only ... a Service Com- mittee . . . not a club. Plans and supervises social activities . . . senior dances . . . infor- mal get-togethers . . . swing records . . . jit- terbugs . . . senior proms . . . soft lights, mu- sic, and laughter . . . the thrill of dancing with your best girl . . . memories to look back on in years to come. Committee must hire the or- chestra . . . make out dance programs . . . fur- nish entertainme nt and refreshments . . . ar- range for publicity . . . take charge of ticket sales. Afternoon hops . . . held weekly after school . . . an opportunity to become acquaint- ed with new people. It sponsors ping pong tournaments . . . where there is close compe- tition . . . players eliminated one by one . . . award presented to the happy winner. Senior Field Day . . . seniors in the limelight . . . sports and enthusiasm . . . hilarious pie-eating contests . . . novel races . . . laughs and gaiety . . . prizes to the best and most original cos- tumes. Decorates for the alumni dances . . . novel themes and ideas . . . purchases Ephe- bian rings . . . assists at parties and dances . . . around when needed. Committee activities. . . formal initiation into organization . . . new sweaters . . . recognized by the student body as a group . . . date nights . . . gay parties and dances . . . memorable occasions. " They ac- complish things. " Harold Aronson Beverly June Ash Doris Beane Rey Edward Beaumont Dorothy Ann Benedett Helen Thelma Bomke Margaret Alexander Margie V. Aulmann Margaret Barron Nick Belbaeff Catherine Blasnek Hazel Zelda Booker Thomas W. Almany Vance H. Baker Genevieve Baumel Lillian Ann Beck Elizabeth Benedict Mary Brann Thelma Anderson Ruth Frankie Bantum Henry Baumgartner Margie Beckwith Polly Benedict Richard L. Brasile Virginia Lee Aamodt Marie Ballantyne Dorothy Baskin Jack B. Beggerly Beatrice Hilda Block Virginia Irene Breeko Margaret Aseltine Ephraim Baran Frances Beauchamp Viola Leiah Bemis Theodore W. Bode Helen J. Budahl Mssor Car Mm, I, Osca » fl Marium George Brinkman Mason Cordon Campbell Truland Carter Mary Inez Coates ejuch! ° ' ' ' 5 Lucille Coons A 5(jiJ)scar E. Cummings W.I AsdH 8ji)« Virginia Marie Brossmer Harry M. Campbell J Bob Case Bob Coats Frances Cordova Helen Jean Dances Claudia Louise Brown Joan Campbell Sidney Cavanaugh Helen Robbins Cole Richard D. Cowart Henrietta Dapper Marion Lucille Brown Robert Cordon Burgen Mellie Marie Card George Chambers Jean Collins Robert Crawford Bessie D ' Anna Crayce Mary Caunder Juanita Christie Patricia Colvin Winifred Grossman Marjory Davidson George Warren Callahan Henry C. Carlon Norman Clifford Connie Conner Charles L, Crutcher Homer Day Maybelle Lucille Dean Marie Dolan Harvey Ericson Pauline Ferguson George E. Forshee Roger Caugler Florence DeCoede George M. Douglas Florence Escarzaga Gloria Fernandez William F. Fowler Ray Giampietro Eva Lopez DelVillar Betty Edelman Edward Evans Betty Finkle Margaret G. Foxlee Maxine Gibbs Pauline Demas Doug Eichen Alan Ewen Vivian Fischer Robert Fulloway Harry D. Gildersleeve Bette Deseran Kenneth Eldridge Guido Falappino Jack Fitzgerald Shirley Gabrielson Marjorie Eleanor Giordani Dena DeVries Herschel Elwooc Dorotha Farris Pauline Flaws Lena Galier Jeanne Glendinnir Enid H, Shirlp... M peVrits Elwi a Fs " « Gaiit ' Irene Coatham Lois Graham Robert Hambley Enid Harrison Shirley Heme Bob Hewitt Betty Jean Goldsmith lames Cravendyke Blanch L. Hanford Florice Hartman Betty Ann Helbach Catherine Hill Dorathy |ean Cordon Mary Craves Anna Lee Hardy Louise Hartshorn Charline Hellman Jack Hisey Iris Louise Gordon Pauline Gray Dick Hardy Ralph S. Harvey Charles L. Helms Dora Hodge Joanne Gottlieb Betty Grey Walter Harlow Oliver Haugen Marvin Henderson Lillian Hoflund Betty Goushaw Patricia Mae Haigh Mae Harris Paul Hause Robert Heirmann Sylvia M. Hokkane James Holdrideg Claude Hunter Lorraine Marjorie Johns Bob Kangas Stewart D. Knopp LeRoy Lincoln Herbert Holmes Mary Jean Hunter Marjorie Johnson Dale Kask Cecilia Kronenfeld Margaret Belle Long Charles House Mary Marchia Isgr Jeanette Rebecca Johnston Harry Kazanjian Tom Kurosaki Robert Long John Hudson Nestor llnicki Betty Mae Jones Lorraine Kay Rose Lampasi Vera Loomis Doris Huguley Marjorie Jackson Bob Joyce Lee Kebler June Larson Bob Lartie Jack Humber Alice Jamison Peggy Kalpakian Betty Mae Kelly ' ' Charles Robert Lember Bruce McAbery Marguerite McClure Virginia McRae Harry Mathew Henry Mura Betty Eleanor Murphy Warren F. Nickens Doris McClurg Dorothy Maiser Mary Meeker Rae M. Mitchell Kenneth Mussen Bill Nickloff Anna Grace McElroy Paul McCovern Margaret Vesta Yvonne Kathleen Charles Malloy Margaret Marston McLogan McMahan Dale Meier )im Meldrum Genevieve Martin Helen Martinez Antonie Molz Elaine Morrison Milton Meyer Glen Miller Steven P. Meyerkofer Hope Myrick Bill Mullen Hope Miller Joyce Nissen Bill Narcloss Harry Neumann Alton Nicholas Ruth North Phyllis Odhner Ralph Olson Elaine Paine Felix Petros Alonzo Rahn Eddie Robinson Betty Lee Sadler Jim Orstad Betty Plamer Marjorie Louise Pignet Marilyn Redding Carole Rombeck Sachiko Sakurai Mary Jean Osborne Marie Elizabeth Pauge Jack Pilkington Margaret Reed Marvin Rosenberg Edward Sanderson Louis A. Osterbauer Kenneth Paulson Thomas F, Finer Ray Reid Betty Ross Ann Sandstrom Marjorie May Owens Maryland Maxon Perl Bill Pollitt Don Richards Mary Ellen Ryan Edyth Sontini Thelma Virginia ; Paddock } Alma C. Peterson ' Mary Lee Posey Lucille Clare Robsor Norman Sackett ; Betty Savage j Ktnmil k Connie Scheid Kenneth Shaffer Yvonne Snell I Margaret Steuber Fred Thompson Jack Urkov Glenn Schuck Doris Shinn Lillian Snow Jeanne Stevens Rita Tromey Alice Vernand Paulette Schwartz Julie Shores Frank Sontag Mary Jean Stewart Irene Toth Peggy Vidano Pauline Scott Averill Shumway Lorra ine Spencer Edgar Stowe Lowell Totton Patricia Ward Bud Edward Selander Charles Sloan Carol Stranek Theresa Theiss Evelyn Underwood Norman Waring Suzanne Seybert Rosemary Lee Smith Arthur Stecher Jack Thomas Walter Urbank Mary Tomoko Watanabe Tom Watanabe Sidney White Jane Wilder Helen Wise Ellen M. Younggren Marvin Wear Robert Whitney Donna Wiler Robert Wood Dorothy Zimmerman Ray E. Weber Betty Jane Whitty Gladys Wilkins Evelyn Wyatt Tony Zippi Dorothy S. Wells Lorraine Whyte Murdock Frank Williams Hatsuko Yamashito Vincent Burrull Marie West Lorraine Widman Bob Windish Doris B. Ybarra Walter Bufftion George West Charles R. Widenen Geraldine Wise Joseph Young WARD MYRICK DESERAN BECKWITH COUSHAW HILL Efficient . . . responsible . . . dependable . . . trailing the seniors . . . measuring and fitting graduates. Red tassles . . . blue gowns . . . some short, some long. " That fits fine " , assign- ing the senior to his gown. Arrangement and monotony . . . the same routine . . . " Keep your gown clean " , they reminded. Enduring workers . . . undisputable service to the school. Armed with measuring tape. Capable Bette Deseran . . . lent a cheerful, smiling hand . . . Sub-Debs Betty Coushaw, Virginia Brossmer, and Dorrys Ybarra were others of the active group . . . Sealbearer Catherine Hill, vivacious Margie Beckwith, and business-mannered Marie Dolan were keepers of the pins . . . Rush season on . . . crowded room . . . first come, first served. Gowns borrowed for snapshots . . . solemn faces . . . erect bodies. Pat Ward and Hope Myrick, members of the Co-Eds, made up the last of the measuring committee. Tags, receipts, and money matters were the task of the remaining two. Charming Jeanne Glendinning and the sedate Lamb Cole ... in- geniously balanced the books. Each senior paid his dollar and got his identification tag . . . graduation night drew near . . . separate homeroom cap and gown racks were sent to the homerooms . . . distribution by respective teachers . . . mad dash. " The exe-cises will soon commence " ... " I can ' t find my gown " . . . " Where ' s my cap? " . . . tenseness . . . nerves on edge. It ' s all over . . . the gowns re- turned to their racks. Efficient . . . unrecog- nized committee returned to wor k . . . check- ing in and out. Thus their work was not done with the close of graduation exercises. CAP AND GOWN r40 SUMMER 19 4 The brown and beige procession . . . Dukes by name . . . the mighty senior ayes of the summer class of forty . . . led by a male sextet . . . head- ed by Hoxsie Criswold . . . blond . . . brainy . . . brawny ... a leader ... he possesses great abil- ity . . . personality plus . . . accomplishments piled high. That young man about school . . . Johnnie Heiner . . . the Dukes ' vice president . . . the perfect gentleman . . . supreme . . . man- ners personified . . . has that perfect combina- tion, tall, dark, and handsome . . . always willing to work ... a doer of the kindest thing in the kindest way. Neil Waddell ... the third of the male sextet . . . secretary of secretaries. . .most efficient note taker . . . corresponding agent . . . animated redheaded capability. . .Don Smith. . . Chuck Hanford. . .Johnny Dobbs, yell leaders su- preme . . . song leaders most excellent . . . bring- ing forth that dynamic Duke yell . . . directing the class song, written by Ellanora Bolin. Class officers of the nineteen hundred forty summer graduating class . . . mightiest of the mightiest . . . well done work . . . servers of the school . . . leaders of the brown and beige procession . . . the summer class of ' 40 . . . the Dukes. CRISWOLD HEINER WADDELL HANFORD SENIOR RECREATION S ' 40 ELLIS WOODMAN SCHREICK RISEN CLIFFORD ANDERSON, E. PAULIS PETERSON BERCSTROM ALLEN Washington ' s Senior Recreation Committee . . . Mrs. Hodgman and Mr, Edwards, spon- sors . . . open to seniors only . . . organized as a Service Committee . . . not a club. Plans and supervises different social activities of the school . . . senior dances . . . informal get-to- gethers . . . sweet and swing music . . . jitter- bugs. Senior proms . . . soft lights, music and laughter . . . the thrill of dancing with your best girl. . .memories to look back on in years to come. Committee must hire the orchestra . . . make out dance programs . . . furnish en- tertainment and refreshments . . . arrange for publicity . . . take charge of ticket sales. Aft- ernoon hops . . . held weekly after school . . . an opportunity to become acquainted with new people. It sponsors ping pong tournaments . . . where there is close competition . . . players eliminated one by one . . . the disappointment of losing . . . award presented to the happy winner. Senior Field Day ... all seniors in the limelight . . . sports and enthusiasm ... hi- larious pie-eating contests . . . novel races . . . laughs and gaiety . . . prizes to the best and most original costumes. It decorates for the alumni dances . . . novel themes and ideas . . . purchases Ephebian rings . . . assists at parties and dances . . . around when needed. Commit- tee activities . . . formal initiation into organi- zation . . . new sweaters . . . recognized by the student body as a group . . . date nights . . . gay dances and parties . . . memorable occa- sions. They accomplish things . . . Activities achieved under direction of Bette Woodman, president of Committee. ROBSON freiiri Ckatto ' Clirentc .i Bill Abbott Mary H. Anderson Madalyn Ayars Roma Barry Melvin Beecroft Francis Boecking Wanda Adsit lean S. Andrews Kathleen L. Bailey Martha Jean Bates Fred A. Behrens Ellanora M. Bolin Dorothy Ahlers Charles Aiken Kathryn Ainsworth John Anselmo Fred Aprea Hazel Armstrong Ward V. Baird Robert Baker Marjorie Bankston Jack Batte Betty Bayersdorfer Walter L. Baynes Helen Beeching Jimmy Benesh Doreen Bergan Robert J. Boyle Mildred Boyle Bernice L. Blair Elva Anderson Bill Ary Marion R. Barker Theda Beauchamp Ruby Nedra Berger June W. Blancher Eugene W. Andersol Marcella Austin j Paul Baron Edward Beckman ' Helen Birnie I Katherine BrautoviC-| Fred Brewer Morgan Brown Edna Button Fredrick Carr Charlotte Clark Cwynne Bristol Gene Browne Anne Cantor Lauro A. Carrillo Dorothy Claypool Ann Helen Brajevich William E. Brown Francis M. ICIarence A. Colweli Shirley Combes Harry Browne Margaret Carlisle Ernest C. Carter Virginia Clegg Vera Cone Hersey Bumstead William W. John Carpenter Virginia Chambers Thomas Clifford Ruth D. Cooksley Brown Bulkeley Cathryn Carbone Frank Chimarusti Lanna Lee Coen Joe Cooley Kenneth Brown Bonnie Burson Marion Carrington LaVera Chlarson Virginia Coker John Cooper Marvin Brown Lee Bushey Evelyn Carr Stella Cecerl Hazel Collins Barbara Connary Maurine Copeland Dwain Casner Robert A. Cottrell Gerald L. Cox Bettye Crowder Harriett Cummings Betty Davies Doris Denton Mary Diehl Mary Duncan Wilma Dusel Robert E. Edwards James Alan Evers Russell Evitt Gene C. Eyraud Sybil Ruth Finmark Joseph Howard Fishman Betty Flannagan Agnes Coupal Bill Couverley Milton Covalt Arline Cox Norman Dahl Marjorie Dangler William W. Daniel Anita Davis Harry Drummond Robert Daniel Dufek Robert E. Dufur Betty Lee Duncan Jim Ellis Norma Ella Engle Charlotte Engstrom Peter T. Estes Catherine Falxa Gertrude M. Fernald Freda Fiedler Zelda Fields William Flournoy Kathleen Patricia George Foate Frances Louise Ford | Flynn I.! I ilaxlne Mae Fowler Philip Daniel Fay Mary Frame Tessa Fulkerson Marjorie R. Fuller William Fulloway Evelyn Garrett Jack W. Gates Rose Marie Gauglei Walt Clover Lionel Coldring Virginia A. Crimes Hoxsie C. Criswold im Hamilton Robert W. Hand Donald E. Gill l ' «J James D. Griffith Iry Yvonne Hamilton Jack M. Fratt Wylie Fulton Alberta Gentry Ray Goadson Orville Grund Chas. J. Hanford, Jr. Kenny Frink Don T. Frost Morgan Furstnow Roy Furushima Gertrude Gelderloos Frank Georgi, Jr. Grace Green Margaret Gremli Juanita T. Guerra Dorothy Hagadorn Bob Harden Florence Hartlien Mary M. Fujimura Robert James Gail Lorena Gilreath June Griffis Roy Hamaji Wes Hartman •Wilbur Hartzell Don Hess Lucille Howard Wesley Jackson Dana lohnson ' Virginia Kenworthy Betty |. Hattan Virginia Hicks Flora Howarth Leiand J. Jaeckel Eleanor Johnson Roy Kernaghan Beverley Heaton Burtis Hickcox Alice Hubelmeyer Lillian Jakel Ruth Johnson Margaret E, Kerr Dale W. Hecker Verna Holden Thelma Huffer Lynn M. Jenks Grace Jurgensen Paul Kilgorl Therese Hegarty Melba Halloway Ike Haruno Lee Darrell Jensen Ralph Kaneen Katherine King John Fred Heinet Oleba Hollyfield Chloe Inman Marjorie Jensen Marjorie E. Keeler Clara Herberger Melvin Honickle j Satole Iwakoshi Marie Johnson Paul C. Kelley Annie Kirazian Marjorie Jean Klrtl i ({jUyhJiy ' ry -t - ' ' n l - .-t»r = C-.,::t: C i2.y rA- ) ' .i::€ ii-- - . ; --- paries Kirkpatrick Jxie L. Kohlmiller Irley Mary Lansing illiam F. Lenlhan Bertie Little ner Marcus Lund William Kirschke Daniel H. Kolster A! Lara Eleanor ). Leonard Lillian Klot Joe Kondo Edsel Layne Bobbie Levesque Dan Lackyer Clayton L. Lomax Randolf H. Lussky Robert W. Lutes Wilford Knapp George H. S. Kuroki Marjorie Marie Leake Gwendolyn Lewis Jack Lorensen Betty Ann Maass Virginia N. Knight Frances LaGrille Ralph Edward Lee Ed Lindskog Norma J. Losey Ivy Lou Macbeth Eugene Kobata Toshi Kobayashi Mary Evelyn Lane Violet Langford Pollyanna Leffler Ruth Leip Peggy B. Line Kenneth J. Linehan Ann Lucas Marvin Luedke Harvey MacDonald Marian Magarian Donna Malin Bill Mantay Lealyn Martin Edella Matzner Bud McElhose Tom McCerty Marcena Michener Arthur Millbern Mary Montgomery Marie Moody Rolland Morris Jack Morrish George Marr Beth Irene Marriott Woodworth Marsh |ohn Marston Jr. Jerry Martin Bettylee Maxwell Ruth Anne McBride Patricia McCarthy Daniel McDermott Joyce McDowell I Lloyd McCivney Donna McCuire J. Douglas McLaughlin Jack McNutt Sheila Me2zanatc| Frank L. Miller James C. Miller Bill Mitchell Mary Mitsuyeda Marjorie Moe Bob Moore Mary Mildred Moore Frances Morgan Dan F. Morrill Kenneth L. Morril Mary Mosbacher Mary Elizabeth Moser Muriel Moss Bob Mount Eva Muehlberger| Harry Myers Floyd Myrick Myran Niles Ruth Mae Nolan JStuart B. Oliver Gloria E. Olsen Bill Eugene Park Vivian Parmenter " Ray V. Perrin Hazel Perry Helen Pontius Donald W. Potthoff Cregor C. Napolitan Elvenor Noruers Doris Olson Evelyn Parsons Norman W. Perry Douglas Prather Virginia Nelson Milton Nesbit Muriel Nevius Leo J. O ' Connor Natalie E. O ' Connor Lewis Ohie Bob Olson Robert B. Orcutt Francis Paine James Earl Patterson Thomas Edes Paxton Wayno Pedersen Margaret Peterson Jean Phelps Edward Pike Cene Pratte Carmela Princeotto Betty Purgitt Bob Nielsen Marie Ohiwiler Isabel Parades Josephine Juanita Pehoviack Harold Platz Jr. Lucille Anna Putz |ejn Su ' lima ' ' T« Robert Rahn Marilynn Renfroe Holly Risley Edwin R. Sailer Georgia Small Louis E. Scott Ray Rankin Howard Reschert Helen Ritchie Charles A. Salvail Ruth Schneider Walter D. Sellers Betty Ray Stanley Rieder Darlene Ritter Rickard Sanders Rayna B. Schram Joe Setran Margaret Raymond Lyda Riess Paloma Roberts LeRoy P. Sanders Virginia Schreick Franklin Sewards Adaline Rees Paul Riley Mae Rossiter William C. Schaefer Ji Ceorgeanna Schuck Anna Lee Sharp Mariorie Reever William A. Reilly Miriam Rimel Ruth M. Risen Helen Ruby Donna Ruebhausen , Betty Anne Schill Margaret L. SchloS Aylward Schwarz Jerome Schwimmcr ' ' Helen Shepherd Jean Shumway pmes Edward Sibley Evelyn Smith lacqueline Steinbroner Jean Summers James Teeter June Twomey Deloris Simons Lester C. Smith Adelaide Stember Grace Swan William Thurber John Tyler Al Gabriel Sipos Catherine Solly Isabelle Steward Feme P. Swezea Alma Elaine Tilton Mary Jean Urban Eileen Rose Sivert Jack Spaeth Clifford Stine Don Tanabe Don Tonks Marjorie A. Vancott Charlotte Smalley Goldie Sparks Irene Stockwell Rebecca Tapia Bill Traviss Richard Viertel Angus Melvin Smith Shirley Evelyn Steed Melvin Lee Stone Bob Taylor George Edward Bud Vogel Don Smith Virginia Steele Shirley M. Stroud Glen E. Taylor Phvllis Tremblev Mildred E. Voris •• ' ;-- Neil E. Waddell Frank M. Walsh William C. Westra Jean Williams Walter Wiltfong Jerry Wood Conrad Wahlquist Billy Jo Waterman Hilary E. White Lyie Williams Bonnie Vee Winn Bette Woodman Frances Walker Kenneth Watkins Dorothy Wiebold Marge Williams Robert Winn Robert Worthman Tom Walker Betty Webster Sidney Weiner Ceraldine Willis Allen Withrow Betty L. Wulff Berton Wallace Eddie Wegner Al Wildberger Dorothy Wills Sally L. Wolcott Vic F. Yamane Roy Wallace Anne Wenger Betty L. Wilkin Phil Wilmot Jeanette Wolfe Yoshio Yamashita Catherine Walsh limmie West Fred Williams Charl es Wilt Evelyn M. WootS Doris E. Young ' I BANKSTON WINN PERRY SCHLOSS ean Marie Zimmerman Lorraine Zeigler PEHOVIOCH STEED O ' CONNOR MARRIOTT BARRY MARR Ever-responsible . . . willing to work . . . tactful . . . give tangible service to the school. The tailors of the spring seniors . . . meeting in bungalow 29 each day . . . waiting upon seniors . . . armed with tape and pins . . . fitting and measuring the largest grad- uating class. Row after row of the " commencement garments " . . . boxes of pins . . . red tassles . . . blue gowns . . . some long, some short . . . receipts . . . tags . . . iden- tifications . . . assigning the senior to his own gown . . . arranging the garments for graduation . . . same routine . . . enduring workers. Calm Beth Irene Marriot and Shirley Steed lend a hand . . . Co-Ed Margie Bankston aids Margy Schloss and Bonnie Winn in applying the pins. " Ouch " . . . Cheerful Hazel Perry and business mannered Margie Reever fit the boys while friendly Ruth Cooksley and Josephine Pehoviach stand by with the tape. Blonde Nata ' ie O ' Conner and reserved Roma Barry are others of the active group. A trio of boys, Frank Nesbit, George Marr, and Leo O ' Conner conclude the list of tailors . . . graduation day is here . . . mad dash . . . checking in and out . . . exercises are over . . . the committee returns for more work. CODA Enthusiasm. . .love of action. . .student aspira- tions . . . expressed through the medium of words, music, action, color. " He capers, he dances, he has eyes of youth. " Gaiety. . .festiv- ity .. . song . . . laughter. An independent, yet integral part of student life. The Coda of our Symphony, affording a more expressive termi- nation ... a more eloquent finale ... a substance for memories. I 1 ii.il SEPTEMBER ' nt (y OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER " JANUARY MARCH FEBRUARY RE CWERT KOLSTER KELLEY t IU S c A L r I DICTIONARY " ;;;w«»o«vwo lL i I I I I SCENES FROM BROTHER RAT H I Double Horseshoes Winner WOODS and WALKER ingle Horseshoe Winner HYAM NOME , ,1 y ■ ' i i TOM WALKER MR. STOCKTON FUTURE PLANS Dreams preceding reality . . . plans for future Hughes Me- morial Park to extend from Denker to Western Avenue. Spacious green lawns . . . cool, shady trees . . . tennis courts . . . " Keep Washington High School visible on top of the hill. " iiby MAI Gloria F id Sclit tional c derer. " ttiowas al syste ARBOR DAY Freborg Mazen MARY MAR CLO TRIO Gloria Freeborg . . . won award in Scholastic Magazine ' s na- tional contest . . . " The Wan- derer. " Composition for string trio was broadcast over nation- al system from New York. I courts oi the mill FRHOSHIP AND XESPEAHN COKTEST f NB E D D I N G PLAY : KNIGHTS AND LADIES DANCE ' V-x RING NecK WILD oucKS.roo AMD Hunoaeos oFHonsefues BV RUSS FORSThOUJ t f COUI tlOCLliS TOO BVfTTHl BEATi All s CLEANUP I FANTASY N D E X Page Adelphian 39 Adelphian, Japanese 39 Advertising 174-180 Aeronautics 49 Archery 95 Art Honor Society 65 Atinenians - 57 Auto Mechanics 50 Badminton 96 Band 69 Band Letterman i 69 Baseball 96 Basketball _ 1 08- 1 09 Belles Lettres 90 Boys ' Glee 54 Boys ' League 82 Boys ' Quartette 54 Cabinet, Surrmer 21 Cabinet, Winter 20 Cadets 59 Caelicoiae 40 Cafeteria Workers 52 Calendar 150-151 Cap Gown, Summer ' 40 147 Cap Gown, Winter ' 40 133 Christmas 1 61 Chronian Society 44 Cinematography , 4i Class, Summer ' 40 1 34 Class, Winter ' 40 ._. 1 22 Cleanup, Mr. Gr Miss 1 70 CItf Club 63 Co Ed 86 Commerce Honor 53 Commercial Chatter 53 Continental Art 88 Continental Editorial 89 Debate 44 Der Deutsche Verein 40 Drama 1 54 Drum Bugle 68 El Circulo Castellano 41 Electron Club 50 Embassy Club 87 Ephebians 72-73 Equestrienne 34 Ewen, Allen 13 Football 103-107 Fresco Club 65 C A.A Board 95 Geology Club 58 Girls ' Glee 62 Girls ' Golf 35 Girls ' League 82-83 Girls ' Trio 62 Gym Club 3 1 Gymnastics 114-115 Golf, Boys ' 1 IS Hi-Pam 32 Hockey 96 Home Coming 1 62- 1 63 Horseshoes . ' . 1 60 Ice- Cutters 33 Jensen. Darrell 1 9 Key Club 84 Knights 78-79 Knights ' Ladies ' Dance 16 Lad;es 80-81 ; D E X Page Le Cercle Francais 41 Lettermen ' s Club 31 Library Staff 90 Literati 38 Little Theater 42 Make-Up Crew 42 Marching Chorus 6S Marthonians . ' . - 52 Mary-Mar-CIo Trio 1 65 Musical Dictionary , 1 52-1 53 Offices 17 Orchestra, Senior 64 Orchestra, Vocational 64 Philatelic Society 46 Prytons 85 Public Address 51 Quill and Scroll 38 Racadets — - 35 Radio Guild 43 Rally Committee 87 Representatives, 1 1 th Grade 27 Representatives, 1 0th Grade 26 Representatives, Senior B 24 Rhythm Rollers 34 Scholarship 75 Seal bearers. Summer 77 Sealbearers, Winter 76 Self Government 22 Senior Class, S ' 40 136-146 Senior Class, W ' 40 1 24- 1 32 Senior Recreation, S ' 40 1 35 Senior Recreation, W ' 40 123 Service Squad 23 Shakespearean Winners 1 66 Silver Skaters 33 Sim-Funny _ 1 68- 1 69 Smith; Miss Margaret 15 Softball 116-117 Spanish Dance Group 45 Speedball 93 Stage Crew 66 Stockton, K. L 14 String Trio 63 Student Body Store 24 Sub-Debs 85 Surveyor 37 Teachers 45-46 Teachers 55 Teachers 59 Teachers 66-67 Teachers 91 Teachers, Girls ' Gym 1 00 Teachers, Shop 51 Tennis, Boys ' 1 1 3 Tennis, Girls ' 99 TNT 57 Track 110-113 Traffic 23 Tri-Y 84 Torchbearers, New , 74 Torchbearers, Old 7 4 Tschaikowsky Fantasy 1 7 1 Washington Winners 32 Whedon. Mr. Edwin 15 Vocational Print 49 Volleyball 99 Yeoman 86 Yell Leaders . " 102 B IIIMIIIIIIIIIIItlllitMl lllllllllllllllllll i.B POSED BY BARBARA CONNARY A LOVELY PORTRAIT FOR REMEMBRANCE OF YOUR GRADUATION DAY CAGLE STUDIO Q.. 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Western H [172] FOR THE LATEST IN STYLE Jerry ' s Men ' s Shop " YOUR FRIENDLY STORE " 8514 South Vermont REEL LUMBER SERVICE SUGAR PINE WHITE PINE SPRUCE 1248 East 63rd St., Los Angeles ..H 1 «( 0 " .■Q Icyclair Corporation, Ltd. MANUFACTURERS OF ICE CREAM AND FROZEN BARS 3410-12 CLENDALE BOULEVARD Phone OLympia 1 1 08 Los Angeles BAXTER - NORTHUP Music Company We Supply Schools With All Types of Instruments 837 S. Olive Phone Ml 4071 Pacific Wliolesale Grocery WHOLESALE GROCERS Phone TRinity 3626 761-763 Terminal Street Los Angeles, California Tower RENNIE ' S ■ Vn iVlaricet H. S. PROUTY QUALITY BAKERY Meats, Groceries. FOR CATERING Vegetables. 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Phone CEntury 2-61 10 Los Angeles Q [175] B " NEL ' S GENE ' S MALT SHOP MANCHESTER VERMONT SNAPPY SHORT ORDERS COOLING FOUNTAIN DRINKS • CHEESE BURGER • THICK MALTS • FRUIT COCKTAIL —All— 10c " GOOD EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR! " „H SOUTHWEST CHEVROLET CO., INC. CHEVROLET SALES SERVICE VERMONT AT 71st ST. • PL-3175 CAP AND GOWN CO. CALIFORNIA Gowns for All Occasions 1035 Santee St., L. A. PRospect-031 3 BEVERLY lU iiiiiocAot o [C£ CREA VIS Athletes prefer it for FOOD VALUE AND LASTING ENERGY Served Here Exclusively BEVBKLY DAimeS, LTD., Also makers of Green Lantern and Haydon ' s lee ' Creams J WHOLESALE AND RETAIL H [176] ■ ' . J!f, f IL


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George Washington High School - Continental Yearbook (Los Angeles, CA) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

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George Washington High School - Continental Yearbook (Los Angeles, CA) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

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