George Rogers Clark High School - Powder Horn Yearbook (Whiting, IN)

 - Class of 1962

Page 1 of 168

 

George Rogers Clark High School - Powder Horn Yearbook (Whiting, IN) online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 168 of the 1962 volume:

George Rogers Clark High School Hammond, Indiana table of contents Social Life.4 People.24 Academics.58 Sports.72 Activities.92 Advertising.126 POWDGR HORN George Rogers Clark High School Hammond, Indiana table of contents Social Life.4 People.24 Academics.58 Sports.72 Activities.92 Advertising.126 powccr mm That Wonderful Year 1962 . . . Home-coming parade . . . Queen’s float . . . dances . . . Washington trip . . . football . . . band concerts . . . “Swing to Spring” . . . “Tonight at Eight” . . . National Merit Scholarship Test . . . College Boards . . . orchestra concert . . . harpsicord . . . revised Student Council constitution . . . Senior King and Queen . . . Hayward Memorial Fund . . . “Pecola” . . . “Wonderland by Night” . . . NEDT . . . Metropolitan Debate Union Championship . . . new crop of teachers . . . Representative Ray J. Madden addressing assembly . . . exchange assembly with T. F. South band . . . aggressive basketball squad . . . “Littlest 500” chariot race . . . The Matchmaker . . . College Day . . . Career Confer¬ ence . . . Southern Illinois University Chamber Singers . . . FTA student teaching . . . Sectional victories over Highland and Lowell . . . The Boy¬ friend . . . IHSFA Sectional Champs in debate . . . “Crystal Holiday” . . . GAC “College Playday” . . new principal D. D. Lockey . . . 1962 . . . THAT WONDERFUL YEAR 2 Remember? George Rogers Clark This is it—George Rogers Clark High School— 836 students’ worth of stark reality. At 8:30 each morning the halls fill with stampeding humanity and a new day begins, a day just like every other. Seven hours comprise the normal working day of a Clark student. One of these hours, either fourth or fifth period, is spent at lunch. Every Wednesday the three morning hours are shortened in order to accommodate an extra activity period, during which such organizations as the Student Council meet. The ensuing pages paint a portrait of the George Rogers Clark High School, home-away-from home for 836 lively students. Leaf pickin’ on school grounds is an everyday thing for freshman biologists. The latest school gossip is hashed over as students “anxiously” wait for the bell to ring. and that wonderful year . . . 1962 Workmen finish the new 1962 addition to the school—an exit and a teachers’ lounge. During fourth-period lunch, Clark athletes enjoy casual conversation with one another at the “Senior Table.” “Ye olde ticket window” saw the sale of over 3500 tickets for games, plays, and concerts during the 1961-1962 school year. 5 After a hard days work scads of Clarkites eagerly climb aboard the bus bound home. The famous yellow Shore Line buses transport students to and from school each day. Observing Holidays and Saving Bottle Caps Are Seeing a smile on a Clarkites face is not only a heart-warming experience, but also a common one. Whether it is in “That Wonderful Year’’ or just any year, it is something which one will al¬ ways remember. Every school day a great number of Clark stu¬ dents must come and go by bus. After many times it becomes no problem, for one finds it a time to meet new friends, hash over the days events, and discuss tomorrow’s homework. When vacation comes, whether for a holiday or for the summer, it is a time to put forth with a smile. But deep down every Clark student knows they will miss talking to their friends in the hall before homeroom and between classes and only wish they were back in school so they wouldn’t have to do the work Mom had lined up for them. Which is the monster? Pot-.shot. John Mazur pitches Pepsi Caps into “Pecola” for the Hayward Memorial Fund. Now—Memories The elated look on Freshman Jo Ann Conrad is caused by the final bell of the Friday before Christmas vacation. “Yuletide Joy” is spread to the library by Carolyn Zrenchik as she decorates the traditional Christmas tree. Background music provides atmosphere. Clark Royalty Escorted to Homecoming Festivities Jt r-“. ■ N k Cm f I H| ► 99k M TOP—“We caught ’em,” yells a Keystone cop. The orches- r caught the judges’ eyes and won first place in the petition. BOTTOM—— ’ " •- Jester J Senior Vaike Kuldsaar, the radiant queen, reigned over an enthusiastic 1961 Home-coming crowd. 8 A rousing 1961 Home-coming weekend began with a pep assembly and Senior skit Friday afternoon. Vaike Kuldsaar captured the title of 1961 Home¬ coming Queen. Mary Keith, senior attendant; Eileen Foreman, junior attendant; Donna Stombaugh, sophomore attendant; and Paula Roadman, fresh¬ man attendant completed the court. A parade, consisting of both cars and floats, formed before the game. In the float category, the queen’s float, created by the stage crew, placed first. The Keystone cops, the orchestra’s car, won first in the car division. The loyal supporters, how¬ ever, witnessed a 20-0 loss to Hammond High. Students capped a memorable weekend with a dance Saturday night in the gym. It was the per¬ fect end to a memorable weekend. Home-coming attendants—P. Roadman, Frosh; M. Keith, Senior; V. Kuldsaar, Queen; E. Foreman, Junior; and D. Stombaugh, Soph. “Deck the float with frills for Vaike!” That’s the cry as Stage Crew joins to build a float fit for a queen. Under the direction of Miss Knapp and with the co-operation of all, the queen’s float earned first class results. Jk Fun like this helped to relieve the mono¬ tony of waiting for the game. Tim Banas- zak, senior, gets the full treatment. “Pancho, ” Pep Sessions Wednesday, February 21, proved to be a very successful day for Clark. At the annual sectional assembly, Mr. Aldrich roused Pioneer spirit with his pep talk. After the assembly, students partici¬ pated in a caravan to Washington gym. Clark boost¬ ers had good reason to be mighty proud of their “Pioneer team”. The Pioneers fought their way to the semifinal round of the sectionals by defeating the Highland Trojans, with a score of 64-43. That same evening, they showed their strength by elim¬ inating a hopeful Lowell squad, 65-59. On Friday, during seventh perio d, another as¬ sembly was held in honor of our team. At this time, a surprise guest, Pancho Gonzales, led the cheering section in his version of “Two Bits.” Unfortunately, the Pioneers were defeated by the East Chicago Washington Senators in the semifinals on Satur¬ day afternoon, 68-51. As the end of the game nears, Pioneer hopes fall in streams of disgust and anguish. and Piercing Cheers Arouse Pioneer Sectional Spirit “And you . . . yells Coach Stravros during a time out at a tense moment of the Sectionals in the Clark-Lowell 11 “Holy Cabooses” the Juniors Have New York in the 1880’s was the main background for the Junior Class play, The Matchmaker, by Thornton Wilder. Under the direction of Miss Jeani Knapp, the actors presented a successful two-night- er. Chaos broke loose when a wealthy Yonkers mer¬ chant tried to prevent his niece’s marriage. With the aid of a “matchmaker,” the couple attempted an escape to New York, but by a series of coinci¬ dences repeatedly met the uncle. The play introduced such characters as Horace Vandergelder, who thought nothing more gratify¬ ing than making money; Miss Dolly Levi, the “matchmaker,” whose main objective in life was to find Vandergelder a wife, preferably herself; Er- mengarde, Vandergelder’s niece, and Ambrose, her husband-to-be, the subjects of most of the conflict although merely an innocent couple trying to get married; Cornelius Hackel, Mr. Vandergelder’s assis¬ tant, who came to New York in search of some adventure, and his “tag-along,” Barnaby Tucker, also in search of adventure but not as self-assured as Cornelius; the widow Molly, tired of selling, whose main objective is to meet some men; her assistant Minnie Faye, the perfect image of inno¬ cence; and finally Miss Van Huysen, a fine old woman who takes great pleasure in relating all the many farcical happenings of her life. When Mrs. Levi told Mrs. Molly, “Yonkers lies up decimated today,” she was not aware of the truth of her statement. The events in Mrs. Molloy’s hat shop ended up with men hiding under tables and Mrs. Levi winning a chance to hook Mr. Vander¬ gelder. At the restaurant, Mr. Molloy, Minnie, Cor¬ nelius, and Barnaby had the misfortune of meet¬ ing Mr. Vandergelder and Mrs. Levi. Fate also brought Ermengarde and Ambrose there. Miss Van Huysen’s house also served as a meeting place for the entire company, but under more favorable cir¬ cumstances. “Even my mother didn’t think I was as interesting as all that.” Become Matchmakers “Money is like manure, it’s not worth a thing unless it’s spread around encouraging young things to grow.” I CAST—Cornelius Hackle, (J. Boswell); Gertrude, (K. Kur- asz); Malachi Stack, (D. Pramuk); Mrs. Molloy, (J. Tolchin- sky); Cabman, (M. Kessler); Minnie, (C. Hoffman); Barn- aby Tucker, (M. Levin); Mrs. Levi, (L. Ruf); Vandergelder, (G. Gardner); Joe Scanlon, and August, (G. Gross); Miss Van Huysen, (L. Swenson); Gypsy, (D. Dziadosz); Cook, (S. Gabbert); Rudolph, (B. Reichert); Ermengaurde, (T. Golden); Ambrose Kemper, (J. Stasny). 13 Players Venture One Step love and kindness. They all get their wishes and Dorothy comes back to consciousness to find her¬ self at home with her aunt where she now knows she really belongs. The cast for the WIZARD OF OZ: Dorothy, Mada- lyn Moldraski; Toto, Chris Condo; Good Witch, Dawn Hickman; Scarecrow, Konrad Banasak; Tin Woodsman, Mike Kirn; Lion, Joe Jackson; Wicked Witch, Judy Gmerek; Glinda, Vaike Kuldsaar; Wiz¬ ard, Diane Wozniak; Guard, Gary Gardner; Munch- kins, Jean Tolchinsky, Beth Yackish, and Mark Trombley. The Wicked Witch of the West schemingly devises a vicious plot for the devastation of the voyagers from the Land of Oz. Dorothy consoles the Cowardly Lion because he feels so inferior to all the other members of the forest. Toto, Dorothy’s dog, listens intently. “If happy little blue-birds fly beyond the rain¬ bow—why, oh why, can’t I?’’ Is there ever a child in the world who hasn’t asked that question? Well, the children in the audience from 7 to 70 had the wonderful experience of “flying” over the rainbow when the all-school production, THE WIZARD OF OZ, was presented under the direction of Miss Rhoda Kittelsen. There were two performances of this fanciful show, one in the afternoon especially for the grade school students, the other, an evening presentation. The story centers around Dorothy, who is run¬ ning away from home with her dog Toto to prevent his being taken away from her. She doesn’t get very far before a cyclone lifts her high in the air and brings her down with such a thud that she be¬ comes unconscious for some time. During this period, she has a most fascinating dream that in¬ volves a scarecrow, looking for a brain, a tin woods¬ man, in search of a heart; and a cowardly lion, wishing for courage. They all join forces and meet with many adventures on their way to OZ, where there is a wonderful Wizard who, it is believed, can give them what they desire. There is the bad witch with her terrible curse, and, of course, the beautiful good witch who conquers all evil with 14 Beyond the Rainbow to the Land of Oz TOP LEFT: Glinda the Good, beautiful queen of the court, a symbol of all that is right and pious in the world, is faithfully attended and protected by her two watchful guards. She helps Dorothy reach her goal, returning home to Kansas, by directing her to Emerald City, where the Wizard of Oz rules. There, he enables Dorothy to reach home by sending her and her dog, Toto, home in a balloon. BOTTOM LEFT: The “bold” and “fearless” Wizard of Oz contemplates a pressing problem which confronts the safety and welfare of the people living under his supreme guidance. Although he is an imposter, he still manages to help Dorothy and her friends, the Cowardly Lion, the Tin Woodsman, and the Scarecrow. BOTTOM RIGHT: The Guard of the Palace of the Wizard of Oz watches attentively for the arrival of the weary travelers Dorothy, Toto, Scarecrow, Tin Woodsman, and the Cowardly Lion. TOP RIGHT: The beautiful and kind Good Witch of the North advises her loyal subjects, the Munchkins. The arrival of Dorothy and her dog, Toto, soon adds to their plight. Yo-Yo Ties Up ’62Fads Plaids Lead Fashions Fashion-conscious Clarkites displayed the fads that followed through the year from “Beaver der¬ bies” to pantaloons. Sweaters ranging from bulky knits to plain cardi¬ gans for both boys and girls were popular during the school season. Bright colors, unusually blend¬ ed, added to the hours spent in and out of school. Traditionally pleated and straight skirts in bright solids and plaids were worn directly below the knees. For the males, subdued plaid and dark pegged pants were the school attire. Shoes for school had either pointed or squared toes. The newest fad came in colorful stripes for the females. Standard slacks and matching tops were the apparel for afterschool activities. For extremely casual dates, girls donned the local university and college sweatshirts. For more formal occasions, brocade and silken materials used in bouffant dresses with bell-shaped skirts were fashionable. Dark suits with ronlet shirts fitted out boys for any formal occasions. Sweaters are here to stay. The classical long-sleeved pullover is modeled by Junior Carolyn Sinder. Senior Tom Blazak sports one of the favorites this season, a long blazer striped cardigan. A hit this year is the unique bulky v-neck worn by Senior Fran Condo. Paula Grandbois, Marilyn Popovich, and Mary How¬ ard display their favorite colleges by their color¬ ful sweatshirts. Mr. Mueller and Mr. Powell kibitz as Richard Mur- zyn demonstrates techniques of the yo-yo fad to Mr. Meadows. Carol Tkach, in a blue brocade cocktail dress and Chet Farrell, in a charcoal suit, prepare to go to a formal. J. Taylor, R. Szot, J. Dybel, R. Kowal, W. Wood, and M. Murzyn are the fashioned-minded Clarkites. Meet Madden, Present “Students,” thunders the Honorable Raymond A socmtas presented by the Latin classes popularized mod- J. Madden, as he addresses the student body ern Latin from Clark, about Congress. “Boys unwanted” reads the bulletin the day of the all-girl Fashion assembly by Simplicity. “This Is Your Life” View Fashions on GRC Stage Literally hundreds of cultural horizons, at least one horizon per pupil, expanded this year through the influence of assemblies. Mr. Arthur Erickson, chief administrator of assemblies, brought a wide assortment of talent to the Clark stage. One of the first assemblies of the year intro¬ duced Principal D. D. Lockey to his new student body. Candidates for Student Council offices ad¬ dressed their constituents in April. Local talent fur¬ ther displayed itself when the debate team, cham¬ pions of the Metropolitian Debate Union, conducted an intra-squad practice session for an assembly. The Thornton Fractional South High School band played a concert here in February for the first half of a cultural exchange program. Our band reciprocated in April with a concert at Fractional. Mr. Franklin’s tumbling squad disproved President Kennedy’s assertion that American youth are unfit. Everyone will remember the “This Is Your Life” assembly honoring Mr. Darwin Eret, retired Orchestra teacher at Clark. 19 Couples Whirl into “Wonderland by Night” With habitual elegance, the class of 1962 plan¬ ned and presented the Junior Class Prom, June 3, 1961. Madura’s Danceland, focal point of Whiting’s deb season, burst into bloom in shades of pink, rose, and silver, the class colors. The Decoration Committee, led by Ron Dembowski and Paul Mar- konni, bordered the dance floor with columns of aluminum foil and pink and rose crepe paper, fur¬ nished every intimate table with an intimate candle, and displayed on the rear stage a mannequin dressed in the costume of a lovely Southern belle. Ron and Paul gave their final exquisite touch of the “Won¬ derland by Night” with a lavish ceiling centerpiece. The 120 ecstatic couples danced the night away to the sweet strains of Reynold Young and his So¬ ciety Orchestra, appearing through the courtesy of Paul Wood, class treasurer and music chairman. Prom-decorators P. Fech, C. Freeland, and C. Hoyda adorn Madura’s with pink and rose crepe paper. Junior and Senior class officers and their dates lead the Grand March at “Wonderland by Night.” Freshman Rosemary Duhon instructs Sophomore Stanley Kawlinski in the finer art of the “Cha-cha” at the “Peppermint paradise.” Clark Juniors Michele Kampo and Janice Dybel show how the twist was done at the dance “Twistin’ Twenties.” Rumble, Crumble, and Stomp Through the Gym Unusual? The past year has been a collection of dances that could better be called “unique.” Since the Latin Club’s “Rubicon Rumble,” Clark’s gymnasium has worn a dozen outlandish Friday night disguises. The aforementioned extravaganza featured an ersatz-chariot race, the “Littlest 500,” in which heroic charioteers clung to tricycles as they rocketed around the track, savagely compet¬ ing for the victor’s spoils. The noble Bill Rowley, represented Mr. Watkins’ Junior algebra class, with his trusty steeds and vehicle. Not to be outdone, the orchestra perpetrated the “Schnibble Stomp,” named after a modern folk song of sponsor Thelma Wilcox’s creation. The limelight rested on the world of folk culture as local artists wept, wailed, and grunted in the Original Rock ’n Roll Contest. Top honors were won by an all-star group fronted by Jeani Knapp, playing and singing the soulful ballad, “Purple Flying Carpet.” The Junior Class displayed its methodical mad¬ ness with “Twistin’ Twenties,” and the GAC’s “Crater Crumble” travestied John Glenn’s orbital flight three days later. Seniors Paul Wood and Gary Kaplan give Bill Rowley that extra “pull” for the chariot race at the “Rubicon Rumble. 21 Washington and Clark Meet on Common Ground The morning of October 24 brought a sigh of relief from the conglomerate throat of more than forty teachers and administrators. Such an unin¬ hibited display was occasioned by the departure of a trainload of Washington-bound Hammond stu¬ dents, about fifty of whom called Clark their home. After a pleasantly active night at the Manger Hotel in Richmond, Virginia, the pilgrims proceeded to Jamestown and Williamsburg, there to steep themselves in Early American culture. Next on the itinerary was Washington, D. C. In the capitol city, our junior tourists visited all the usual attractions. They visited the Lincoln and Jefferson Memorials, the White House, the Capitol, the Smithsonian Institute, the Washington Monument. October 31 saw them home, dissipated, but happy. “Old Abe’s” monument was one of the historic sights taken in by Clark students who took the Washington trip. These seven voyagers stop at the statue of Captain Smith in Jamestown. 22 ft “We Finally Made It,” Echoes the Class of 1962 Donned in mortar boards and robes, Clark seniors gather around the school entrance for dress rehearsal of commencement. All are happy as they approach this final step. One-hundred fifty seniors said good-by for the last time June 6, as Commencement drew to a close. The previous week had been a constant rush of ac¬ tivity appropriately named “Senior Activity Week.” First on the long list of diversions was Game Night, held in the spacious gymnasium. The group warmed up on volleyball and dancing, then moved headquar¬ ters to Sheridan Beach for more activity. A twin note of gentility was introduced by “Cul¬ ture Night,” when the entire class attended the band concert and the Senior Tea, bringing parents, teachers, and students together for a final evening of fond reminiscence. The preliminary round of socializing concluded with the Senior Banquet at Teibel’s Restaurant in Schererville. Baccalaureate, prelude to graduation, followed all too closely, drowning a week’s giddiness in the somber liquor of farewell. Old bonds of comradeship waxed strong in anticipation of the last night to¬ gether. Graduation, when it arrived, was greeted with a poignant mixture of relief and regret. “Flower-makers” Cynthia Hoyda, Pat Krygier, and George Troksa cut out flowers for programs for the banquet. 23 t That Wonderful Year People U Bouncy cheerleaders jumping about Clark field . . . tough football players tackling opponents . . . Studious bookworms reading in the library . . . frantic photographers slamming the darkroom door . . . hustling “paper people” flying about 223 . . . cheery ladies operating the cafeteria . . . aspiring dramatists emoting in the G.R.C. auditorium . . . hopeful counselors guiding us all . . . literature teachers listening to recitations from the Canterbury Tales and Shakespeare . . . efficient business teachers instructing us . . . lively stage crew people painting sets . . . “almost civilized” editors screaming at their staffs . . . sparkling Home-coming queen . . . band people tooting their “charge” . . . these people helped THAT WONDER¬ FUL YEAR. In Memory of Our Late Principal Mr. 0. B. Hayward, principal of our school for the past eleven years, was a man who strove to apply a constructive philosophy of education to the fulfillment of his duty. Through his meticulous regulation of school policy, he created the enviornment which he felt would afford every stu¬ dent the best possible start in education. He placed scholarship at the top of his scale of values, but never slighted the character and personality¬ building experience of extra-curricular activities. Although his tenure on earth has ended, his memory will be preserved, not only in the educational program he helped develop, but in the minds and hearts of all who knew him: friends, parents, teachers, and the thou¬ sands of students for whose educational development he was responsible. To these his life was dedicated, to these his death brought sorrow. Capable Administrators Counsel and Direct Us Behind every successful student stands a faculty, a guidance office, and a principal, helping him to achieve his goal in education. The following is Clark’s staff: Miss Veva McAtee, is the National Honor Society and College Day sponsor, the Director of Guidance and Junior Class Guidance Counselor. Mr. Arnold Corder, Guidance Counselor for the Sophomores and Seniors, is the vocational advisor. The Freshman Class is the assignment of Miss Edna Howe, the teacher-counselor who directs group testing at Clark. Supervising activities of the entire school is Mr. Durward Lockey, Principal. Mr. Lockey, a past President of the Hammond Lions Club, has shown an interest in both civic and school affairs. Some of the duties of our guidance personnel are home and school adjustments, testing, coun¬ seling, and maintaining of records and test scores. Durward Lockey—B.A., M.A., Principal, Past President of the Hammond Lions Club, Colonel in Community Chest Drive, Sunday School Teacher. Veva McAtee—A.B., M.A., H.M.A., Di- Arnold Corder—B.S., M.S., Guidance Edna Howe—B.S., Ph.M., Typing, rector of Guidance, Guidance Counselor, Counselor, Boys’ Counselor and Ad- Group Testing, Y-Teens, Guidance Girls’ Counselor. visor. Counselor. 27 Directors of the Hammond School System R. B. Miller is Superintendent of the Hammond Public School System. The Hammond Board of Education, under the capable direction of Superintendent of Hammond public schools, Mr. R. B. Miller has a great deal of influence on the students’ school lives. The School Board appropriates funds for various projects in the Hammond school system. Not only does the board direct the funds, but it also arranges for the completion of these projects. The board has made it possible for Clark to use facilities which promote both educational and rec¬ reational development. Mr. Miller has been at his present duties since December 1, 1959. Since this date one of his pri¬ mary projects has become a reality. Hammond now has four high schools which offer courses in driver training. His plan for offering Russian in all Hammond public high schools has not yet been initiated, but is soon to be. Within the next two years the School Board will have another complete high school added to its jurisdiction. This will increase the number of its already overabundant obligations. HAMMOND SCHOOL BOARD—FRONT ROW: Mr. Leo Bereolos, treasurer; Mrs. Margaret Allen; Mrs. Claire Stern, secretary; Dr. Henry Eggers, president; Mr. Charles Scott. ROW TWO: Mr. Oliver Rapp, assistant superintendent; Mr. Charles Bomberger, attorney; Mr. M. H. Thorsen, assistant superintendent; Mr. Donald Gabit, business manager; R. B. Miller, superintendent. 28 They Prepare Us EMERSON ALDRICH . . . B.S., M.S.Math¬ ematics, Football, and Baseball Coach LEAH E. BOOTH . . . University of Chicago, Trig¬ onometry and Plane, Solid and Analytic Geometry RAYMOND A. BUELL . . . B.S., M.S., . . . U. S. History, Student Council BERNARD CHARLET . . . B.S., M.S.U. S. History, Government, Forum Club JOAN M. COUGHLAN . . . B.S., M.S.Short¬ hand, Bookkeeping, Secretarial Practice, Secretaries RICHARD DAUGHERTY . . . B.A.Health, Industrial Arts CATHERINE H. DUNHAM . . . B.E.Business ARTHUR A. ERICKSON . . . B.S., M.A . . . Jun¬ ior Class Sponsor, Chairman of Social Studies De¬ partment, Economics, Debate, Photography JOE FRANKLIN . . . B.S.Physical Education, University of Chicago LEE GEHRIG . . . A.B., . . . German, German Club DAVID HEIN . . . B.S.Industrial Arts, B- Team Basketball Coach JOHN HESLIN . . B.S., raphy, Forum Club . World History, Geog- MICHAEL HRISO . . . B.S., M.S., . . Algebra, General Mathematics, Commercial Mathematics MARGARET IDE . . . B.S., H.E.Home Econ¬ omics, Junior Red Cross , JEANI KNAPP . . . Speech, English, Drama Club, Stage Crew CAROL KRUPA . . . B.S.English, Remedial Reading . ... HARRIET LAKE . . . A.B., . . . Librarian, Library Club „ _ .. . CAROLYN LAMBERT . . . B.S., . . . English, Literary Club 29 Our Lives Will Picture Their Influence on Us DELORES McCAMPBELL . . . B.S., M.A. English, American Literature, Future Teachers of America EDWIN MARTIN . . . B.A., M.S., . . . Physics, Chemistry, Tennis Coach ROBERT MEADOWS . . . B.S.English, Litera¬ ture NORABEL MORRISON . . . A.B., B.S., M.F.A., M.A., . . . Art, Art Club WILLIAM MUELLER . . . B.S.World History, World Geography GEORGE MUIR . . . B.S., M.S., . . . English, Jour¬ nalism, School Publications POWDER HORN and PIONEER NEWS DORIS I. MYERS . . . B.S.Physical Educa¬ tion, Girls’ Athletic Club, Cheerleaders, Modern Dance MARIE NORDVIG . . . B.E.Junior High and High School Clothing, Co-Sponsor of Senior Class EDWARD POWELL . . . B.S., . . . Biology, Summer School Health GERALD PREUSZ . . . World History, U. S. His¬ tory EDWARD SHIELDS . . . B.S., M.S.Com¬ mercial Subjects. Athletic Director CARLYLE SNIDER . . . B.P.S.M., M.A.In¬ strumental Instructor, Band DORIS SNIDER . . . English, Literature STEVE STAVROS . . . B.S., . . . Business Training, Business Law, Business Machines, “C” Club, Basket¬ ball Coach JUDITH TANGERMANN . . . B.A.Spanish, Spanish Club 30 Their Lives Be Brightened by Our Successes NANCY TURNER . . . A.B. . WILLIAM WAKELAND . . . . . Vocal Music ORAL WATKINS . . . B.S., and Advanced Algebra, Hi-Y THELMA WILCOX . . . B.M.E., LILLIAN WILCOX . . . B.A., . Club, Co-Sponsor of the Class of 1! WANDA WILHARM . . . B.A., . . Geography RAY WILLIAMS . . . B.S., M.S.Industrial Arts, Wrestling, Freshman Football HELEN WULKOW . . . B.A., M.A.English, British Literature, Homecoming Committee PAUL A. WILKINSON . . . B.S., M.S., . . . Math¬ ematics, A.V.O., Senior Hi-Y, Radio Club ALVIN PETERSON . . . B.S., M.S., . Football, Golf, Safety Patrol FLORENCE MILLER . . . B.S., R.N. N Nurses’ Club FLORENCE SCHROER . . . Secretary . .Varsity •P.H. DOROTHY MAE BURK . . . Office Staff CHARLENE SALLE . . . Bookkeeper ESTHER JACOBS . . . Secretary to Mr. Lockey 31 Work Before Play—But Then . . . After Chaucer, Miss Helen Wulkow, British Literature teacher, relaxes with Bach at the grand piano. Our faculty bowling team hits the alleys weekly to keep up with Kennedy’s physical fitness program. Marksman Jeani Knapp, a new faculty member, pre¬ pares for any challenge as she demonstrates her hobby. “Splash” Meadows, accompanying “Bing” Bingaman, will serenade anyone brave enough to listen. Clark’s Little Helpers Office hum-drum is eliminated by the office staff Mrs. Jacobs, Miss Salle, and Mrs. Burk. Tidying Clark is the task of the maintenance men Fritz Gourmet meals are prepared by the cafeteria staff Pat Krause, Chester Centkowski, and Ed Rathman. Eidem, Paulene Taylor, Juanita Barr, and Christine Krull. 33 Clickin’ Class of 62 Participated in Activities In 1959 the class of 1962 was organized under the direction of Miss Marie Nordvig and Miss Elaine Gonzalez. We chose Dave Chyla, president; Susan Kalina, vice-president; Carol Cudek, secretary; and Ron Kalina, treasurer. As ambitious freshmen we presented our first class dance “Topsy Turvy Tum¬ ble Turnabout”. As “know it all sophomores”, we rolled up our sleeves another notch to present “Barnyard Capers”. We selected our “sea Blue” class rings and copped second place for our homecoming float. As proud juniors, we finally realized we were upperclassmen. To prove our talents, we sponsored our class play “Good Housekeeping”. Then, we went European to present our junior class dance “April in Paris”. Our Junior class prom “Wonder¬ land by Night” high lighted our third year as we anxiously awaited “THAT WONDERFUL YEAR.” As we turned “Big bad Seniors”, we overcame all our fears and developed cases of the well-known “Senioritis.” With the memories of our past three years, we eagerly awaited graduation. As Juniors, we decorated Madura’s for the silver and pink, star-studded prom “Wonderland by Night.” Our Senior Class officers were Jack Taylor, veep; Paul Wood, pres.; Jo Anne Jalovecky, sec.; Mike Kirn, treas. Senior Clarkites invaded the nation’s capitol and visited Mount Vernon in the fall. 34 from Play to Prom After prom Dunes trips were popular among all “Wonder¬ land by Night”-goers! — All too soon the BIG MOMENT finally came as Seniors chat in their caps and gowns. Their majesties, Tony Xidis and Jo Anne Jalovecky were honored at the Senior Class dance, “Frosty Frolics.” College Day—Carol Francisco got answers to her many questions from one of the college representatives. Bright, Eager Freshmen, We Took Our Places, GAYLE DAWN ANTILLA — Student Council 4; PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 4; National Thespians 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Majorette 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2, 3; Stage Crew 1, 2, 3, 4; Nurses’ Club 4; Y-Teens 1; “Good Housekeeping”; “Our Town”. DON AYRES — Wrestling 1, 2. JUDITH ANN BAN AS — POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Stage Crew 4; Y-Teens 3, 4; F.T.A. 3, 4; Future Secretaries of America 4; Spanish Club 1, 2; Na¬ tional Honor Society 4; Quill and Scroll 4. KONRAD JOSEPH BANASAK — Student Council 4; POWDER HORN 4; A.V.O. 1, 2, 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Debate 4; National Honor Society 3, 4; National Thespians 3, 4; National Forensic League 4; Stage Crew 4; German Club 3, 4; “Wizard of Oz”; “Good Housekeeping”; “Tonight at Eight”; Junior Rotarian. TIMOTHY E. BANASZAK — POWDER HORN 2, 3, 4; A.V.O. 1, 2, 3, 4; Biology Club 2; Orchestra 2, 3, 4; Science Project Club 3, 4; Photo Club 1, 2, 3, 4. JOHN BARRON — Latin Club 1, 2. JERRY RICHARD BERCIK — POWDER HORN 4; National Thespians 4; Booster Club 4; Drama Club 4; Stage Crew 3, 4; Spanish Club 2, 3; Football 1; “If Men Played Cards as Women Do”. CAROLE JOAN BERLAND — Ideal Senior — Scho ol Spirit; POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 3; Future Secretaries of America 4. ERIC N. BEST — C-Club 4; Basketball 1; Cross Country 1, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4. STEPHEN JOHN BIEL — Ideal Senior — Laugh; POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 4; Basketball 1; Cross Country 1, 2. THOMAS W. BLAZAK — Ideal Senior — Dress; Stage Crew 4; Football 1, 2, 4. KAREN ANN BOJDA — Ideal Senior — Dance; PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3. 4; Music Appreciation 2; Nurses’ Club 4; Y-Teens 3, 4; F.T.A. 3; Conservation Club 1. JOSEPH BOTCH CAROLE ANNE BREHMER — Student Council 4; POWDER HORN 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; National Honor Society 3, 4; Drama Club 1; Junior Red Cross 1, 2, 3, 4; Health Career Club 2; G.C.C.S. 2; Latin Club 3; “Our Town”. ROBERT BROM — Art Club 1; Junior Red Cross 1; Cross Country 2; Track 2, 3. 36 Among Unfamiliar Teachers, Classes and Faces DENNIS MICHAEL CARNAHAN — PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Stage Crew 3, 4; Junior Red Cross 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2; Football 1. ALLAN BENEDICT CHILLA — Student Council 4; POWDER HORN 4; A.V.O. 1, 2; Drama Club 3; Stage Crew 3, 4; Hi-Y 2, 3, 4; Biology Club 2; Tennis 4; Wrestling 4. DAVID RAYMOND CHYLA — Class Officer 1, 2; Student Council 3, 4; POWDER HORN 4; A.V.O. 1, 2; National Honor Society 3, 4; C-Club 3, 4; Drama Club 3; Stage Crew 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 3, 4; Weight-lifting 4; Boys’ State; Junior Rotarian. SOPHIE ANNE CIONTA — Nurses’ Club 2, 3. FRANCESKA CHRISOULA CONDO — Ideal Sen¬ ior — Wit; Student Council 3, 4; POWDER HORN 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 2, 3, 4; Vocal Music Organi¬ zations 1, 2, 3, 4; National Thespians 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 1, 2, 3; Drama Club 1, 2, 3; Stage Crew 1, 2, 3; Junior Red Cross 1; Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4; “Good Housekeep¬ ing”; “Stage Door”; “Tonight at Eight”. CARLENE ANN COPPI — PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Y-Teens 1, 3, 4. CAROL LYNN CUDEK — Class Officer 1; Student Council 4; POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2; National Honor So¬ c iety 3, 4; Cheerleader 1, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 3; Stage Crew 1, 2; Y-Teens 1, 3, 4; “Our Town”; “Stage Door”; “Good House¬ keeping”; Girls’ State Alternate 3. MARK CUTLER — A.V.O. 1, 2; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Hi-Y 1, 2. DELORES CZAPLA KENNETH DAUGHERTY — Ideal Senior — Shy; Cross Country 1, 2, 3; Track 2, 3. RONALD DEMBOVVSKI — Student Council 3, 4; Hi-Y 3, 4; POWDER HORN 4; National Honor Society 4; C-Club 4; Latin Club 1; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3; Cross Country 1, 2, 3, 4. OLIVIA N. DIAZ — Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2, 3; Stage Crew 1, 2; Junior Red Cross 3, 4; Nurses’ Club 4: Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, 4. YVONNE CAROLE DRASCO — POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 3; Vocal Music Organizations 1; G.C.C.S. 2; Latin Club 1. GERALDINE MARIE DUBC ' ZAK — Student Coun¬ cil 4; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 4; Stage Crew 1; Hi-Fi Club 3; Nurses’ Club 2, 3; Y- Teens 4; F.T.A. 4; G.C.C.S. 2; Future Secretaries of America 4; Latin Club 1. LYNDA LORRAINE DUNN — POWDER HORN 3; PIONEER NEWS 1, 2, 3; Vocal Music Organiza¬ tions 1, 2, 3; National Honor Society 3, 4; Booster Club 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2, 3; Stage Crew 2, 3; Junior Red Cross 1; Y-Teens 4; F.T.A. 2, 3, 4; Future Secre¬ taries of America 4. 37 As Sophomores We Talked of Many Things, SHARON ELIZABETH ESHENA — Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Red Cross 1, 2; Nurses’ Club 3, 4; Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4; Biology Club 1, 2. RONALD FALSCHETTI — Ideal Senior — Smile. JOANNE S. FALDA — Booster Club 1, 2; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Stage Crew 1; Hi-Fi Club 3; Latin Club 1. SUZANNE M. FALDA — Student Council 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Stage Crew 1, 2; Hi-Fi Club 3; Latin Club 1. PATRICIA DARLENE FECH — Ideal Senior — Talent; POWDER HORN 1, 2, 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 1, 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Debate 1, 2; National Honor Society 3, 4; National Forensic League 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Y-Teens 3, 4; F.T.A. 2, 3, 4; Girls’ State 3; Latin Club 1; “Good House¬ keeping”. SHARON KAYE FLORER — Art Club 1, 2; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3; Y-Teens 3, 4. PATRICIA CAROL FRANCISCO — Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2; Booster Club 1, 2 , 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2 , 3, 4; Modern Dance 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2, 3; Stage Crew 1, 2, 4; Y-Teens 2, 3, 4; F.T.A. 2, 3, 4; Future Secretaries of America 4. CHARLES FREELAND — POWDER HORN 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1; National Honor So¬ ciety 3, 4; C-Club 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 4; Hi-Y 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1; “Night of One Acts”; Junior Rotarian. JOHN MICHAEL GALATZER — C-Club 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 4; German Club 1, 2; Cross Country 2, 3; Track 1; Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4. FRANCES ELIZABETH GEHRKE — POWDER HORN 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 4; Y-Teens 2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 1. SANDRA GELETA — Ideal Senior — Most Ath¬ letic; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Y-Teens 4. RICHARD GOODMAN GAIL TINA GORDON — Student Council 1, 4; POWDER HORN 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 1, 2 , 3; Drama Club 1; Stage Crew 1; Nurses’ Club 1, 4; Y-Teens 3, 4; F.T.A. 2, 3, 4; G.C.C.S. 2, 3; Spanish Club 2, 3. MARY WILLETTE GRAHAM — Ideal Senior — Smile; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Stage Crew 1, 2; Junior Red Cross 1; Nurses’ Club 1, 2; Y-Teens 1; Biology Club 1. CONRAD M. GRIGSON — Vocal Music Organiza¬ tions 1, 2, 3, 4; Stage Crew 4; Photo Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 38 “Barnyard Capers” and Selecting Class Rings SUSAN BARBARA GROGAN — Student Council 4; POWDER HORN 4; Booster Club 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Future Secretaries of America 4; Latin Club 1. VALERIE JEAN GROVES — Irving School 1; Art Club 3; Junior Red Cross 4; Nurses’ Club 4; Y- Teens 3, 4; Spanish Club 2, 3, 4. SANDRA A. HAND — Nurses’ Club 2, 4; G.C.C.S. 1. JAMES JOSEPH HANTZ — Photo Club 4. ROSE KAY HARTMAN — POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 3; Drama Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Stage Crew 1, 2; Y-Teens 3. DAWN EVE HICKMAN — Student Council 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2. 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2, 3; Stage Crew 1, 2; Y-Teens 3, 4; F.T.A. 2, 3, 4; “The Wizard of Oz”; “Good Housekeeping”; “Our Town”. BONNIE LYNN HOOPER — Art Club 1; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3; Booster Club 4; Stage Crew 4; Junior Red Cross 1, 2; Nurses’ Club 3, 4; Y-Teens i, 2, 3, 4; Literary Club 2, 3, 4. THOMAS JOSEPH HOVANEC — A.V.O. 1, 2; C- Club 4; Basketball 2; Cross Country 2, 3; Baseball CYNTHIA ROSE HOYDA — Vocal Music Organi¬ zations 1, 2; Hi-Fi Club 3; Cheerleader 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Future Secretaries of America 4. JUDITH MARIAN ICE — Art Club 1, 3; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3; Booster Club 4; Nurses’ Club 4; Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4; Library Club 3; Literary Club 1, 2, 3, 4. EDGAR JACOBSBERG — Union Hill High School, Union City, N. J. 1, 2, 3. RUTH JACOBSBERG — Union Hill High School, Union City, N. J. 1, 2, 3. JO ANNE MARIE JALOVECKY — Class Officer 4; Student Council 4; POWDER HORN 4; PIO¬ NEER NEWS 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 2, 3; Music Appreciation 3; National Honor Society 3, 4; Cheerleader 1, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2. 3, 4; Future Secretaries of America 4; Library Club 1; Spanish Club 1, 2. CAROL JAMROZIK — Vocal Music Organizations 1; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Nurses’ Club 2, 3; Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4; Future Secretaries of America 4. REGINA MAE JANAS — Class Officer 3; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3; Modern Dance 2, 3; Junior Red Cross 3; Nurses’ Club 3; Y-Teens 1, 2; F.T.A. 4; Future Secretaries of America 4; Literary Club 2. 39 “April in Paris”, A Great Success GERALDINE JANKOWSKI — Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 4; Orchestra 2, 3, 4; Nurses’ Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y-Teens 4; G.C.C.S. 2. PETER JONES — Student Council 4; Art Club 1, 2; F.T.A. 4; Biology Club 2, 3; German Club 2, 3, 4. PHYLLIS ANN KALETA — Booster Club 1, 2, 4; Stage Crew 4; Nurses’ Club 1; Y-Teens 4; G.C.C.S. 2, 3. RON KALINA — Class Officer 1; Stage Crew 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 3, 4; Football LOUISE KANDALEC GARY MICHAEL KAPLAN — Ideal Senior — Talent; Student Council 3, 4; POWDER HORN 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Debate 1, 2 , 3, 4; National Honor Society 3, 4; National Thespians 3, 4; National Forensic League 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Quill and Scroll 3, 4; German Club 2, 3, 4; Photo Club 1; “Our Town”; “Stage Door”; “Good Housekeeping”; “To¬ night at Eight”; “Ways and Means”; Junior Ro- tarian. CAROL ANN KEISTER — Booster Club 4; G.A.C. 1; Stage Crew 4; Y-Teens 4; G.C.C.S. 2, 3. MARY LEE KEITH — Ideal Senior — Hair; Stu¬ dent Council 4; POWDER HORN 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 1, 2; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2, 3; Stage Crew 2, 3; Y-Teens 4; F.T.A. 2, 3, 4; Future Secretaries of America 4; “Good Housekeeping”. MICHAEL EMMET KIRN — Class Officer 4; Stu¬ dent Council 2, 4; POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; De¬ bate 1, 2, 3, 4; National Honor Society 3. 4; Na¬ tional Thespians 3, 4; National Forensic League 1, 2, 3, 4; Stage Crew 4; Hi-Y 1, 2, 3, 4; Science Projects Club 3; German Club 2, 3, 4; “Good House¬ keeping”; “Wizard of Oz”; “Ways and Means”; “Tonight at Eight”; Junior Rotarian. RUTH MAE KOWAL — Ideal Senior — Dress; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Stage Crew 1; Y-Teens 4; G C C S 2 PATRICIA ANN KRYGIER — Vocal Music Organi¬ zations 1, 2, 3; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2; Stage Crew 1, 2, 4; Y-Teens 3, 4. VAIKE MARIE KULDSAAR — Student Council 3, 4; POWDER HORN 2, 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 2, 3, 4; National Thespians 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 3, 4; Stage Crew 3, 4; Junior Red Cross 1, 2; G.C.C.S. 1, 2; “Good Housekeeping”; “Night of Comedy”; " The Match¬ maker”; “Wizard of Oz”; “Tonight at Eight”. ELIZABETH ANN KUNDRAT — St. Mary of the Woods, Terre Haute, Indiana 1; Vocal Music Or¬ ganizations 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 2; Junior Red Cross 2, 3; Nurses’ Club 4; Y- Teens 4; Library Club 2. ANDREA JOY LOCK RIDGE — Irving School 1; Booster Club 4; Drama Club 3; Y-Teens 4; F.T.A. 3. CAROLYN LONGO — Hammond High School 1, 2, 3; Y-Teens 4. Prove All the Talent That We Possess NANCY R. MACEWICZ — George Washington, Chicago 1, 2. FRANK CHARLES MACNAK — Debate 1; Photo Club 2, 8. PAUL J. MARKONNI — POWDER HORN 3; A.V.O. 1, 2; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; C-Club 3, 4; Booster Club 4; Basketball 1; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3. CHARLES W. MELTON — Student Council 4; Art Club 1; Band 1. 2, 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1; Orchestra 3; Junior Red Cross 1, 3, 4; Biology Club 1, 2; Literary Club 3; “Our Town”. MARYANN MICHNAL — Art Club 2; Stage Crew 3; Junior Red Cross 3; Y-Teens 4; G.C.C.S. 3; Fu¬ ture Secretaries of America 4. JANET MARY MIERLAK — Nurses’ Club 2, 3; G.C.C.S. 2. JOHNETTA ANNE MIHALO — Ideal Senior — Laugh; Student Council 3, 4; Vocal Music Organi¬ zations 1, 2; Cheerleader 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 3, 4; Drama Club 3; Y-Teens 3, 4. JAMES MIKULA RONALD MIKULY — A.V.O. 1, 2, 3, 4. ERMON MILES — Wrestling 2, 3, 4; C-Club 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4. KENNETH WAYNE MILLER — POWDER HORN 4; A.V.O. 1, 2; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; C-Club 3, 4; Booster Club 2, 3, 4; Stage Crew 2; German Club 2, 3; Basketball 1; Cross Country 1, 4; Baseball 4; Football 2, 3. WILLIAM MITCHELL — Biology Club 2. JAMES IRVIN MOFFITT — Ideal Senior — Most Athletic-; Student Council 3, 4; C-Club 2, 3, 4; Bas¬ ketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 4; Cross Country 3, 4; Football 1, 2; Track 3, 4. MADALYN BARBARA MOLDRASKI — POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organi¬ zations 2; Music Appreciation 2; National Thes¬ pians 3, 4; Cheerleader 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C, 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2, 3; Stage Crew 2, 3, 4; Y-Teens 1; “The Matchmaker”; “Good Housekeeping”; “Tonight at Eight”; “Wizard of Oz”; “A Night of Comedy”. SANDRA MOORE — Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 1; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2; Literary Club 41 Unforgettable June Evening, Sparkling Bright PATRICIA ANN MORDUS — PIONEER NEWS 8, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 1, 2, 3; Drama Club 1; Junior Red Cross 1; Y-Teens 3, 4; F.T.A. 2, 3, 4. ROBERT PATTERSON MULLINS — Student Council 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 2; F.T.A. 2. ANN MARIE NAGY — Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3; Drama Club 3; Junior Red Cross 4; Nurses’ Club 1; Biology Club 2. BARBARA JEAN O’DROBINAK — Orchestra 1, 2; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2; Booster Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Stage Crew 2; Y-Teens 4. LAWRENCE OLSON SUSAN JEANNETTE PARKS — Student Council 1; POWDER HORN 2, 4; PIONEER NEWS 2; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Stage Crew 3; Drama Club 1, 3; Orchestra 4; Y-Teens 2; F.T.A. 1. JOHN PATRICK ROBERTA JOAN PHILLIPS — Vocal Music Or¬ ganizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 3; Y-Teens 4; F.T.A. 1, 3, 4. PHIL PRATT — Student Council 2, 4; Football 3, 4; Track 2. ROBERT THOMAS PRIEST — Ideal Senior — Hair; Class Officer 3; C-Club 2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 2; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4. STEPHEN JOHN PSIKULA — C-Club 3, 4; Spanish Club 3; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1; Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4. GERALD PUSTEK NANCY RADLOFF — PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3. 4; Junior Red Cross 1; Y- Teens 4. MARCIA EVE REFFKIN — Student Council 4; Art Club 1; Vocal Music Organizations 2; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 3; Nurses’ Club 1, 2, 3, 4. RONALD EUGENE RENICKER — A.V.O. 1, 2, 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1. 42 Enhanced Our Prom, “Wonderland by Night” ELLYN ROSENSTEIN — POWDER HORN 3; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 4; National Honor So¬ ciety 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2, 3; Stage Crew 3; Nurses’ Club 4; Y-Teens 4; F.T.A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Latin Club 1; Spanish Club 4. WILLIAM LEO ROWLEY — Student Council 4; Art Club 1; C-Club 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 3, 4; Hi-Y 1, 2; German Club 3; Cross Country 3, 4; Football 1; Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD RUMAN — Ideal Senior — Wit; Stu¬ dent Council 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 4. KAREN MARIE SANDRICK — Ideal Senior — Friendliness; Student Council 4; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Quill and Scroll 3, 4; Nurses’ Club 3; Y-Teens 1, 3, 4; F.T.A. 3, 4; Li¬ brary Club 1; POWDER HORN 4. ALBERT MAURICE SCHNEIDER — Basketball 1; Football 1; Track 1, 2, 3. CAROL DIANE SCHWE1KERT — PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2, 3; Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4; Future Secretaries of America 4; Music Appreciation 2 , 3. ROBERT CHARLES SETH — POWDER HORN 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Booster Club 2, 3; Drama Club 2, 3; Stage Crew 2, 3, 4; “Tonight at Eight”; “Our Town”. EDWARD SHIELDS — Student Council 4; PIO¬ NEER NEWS 4; C-Club 3, 4; German Club 2; Bas¬ ketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Football 1. JOHN DAVID SHIMALA — A.V.O. 1, 2, 3, 4; Spanish Club 1, 2; Basketball 1; Football 1, 2, 3, 4. BARBARA HELEN SICHAK — POWDER HORN 2, 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 2, 3, 4; Vocal Music Or¬ ganizations 1, 2; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1; Quill and Scroll 3, 4; Junior Red Cross 1; Nurses’ Club 2, 3; F.T.A. 3, 4; G.C.C.S. 1, 2. JOAN EVALYN SLUKA — Ideal Senior — Shy; Hammond Youth Council 3, 4; POWDER HORN 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 2, 3, 4; Vocal Music Organi¬ zations 1, 2, 3; Booster Club 1, 2, 3; G.A.C. 1, 2; Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4; G.C.C.S. 1, 2, 3; Spanish Club 3; German Club 3, 4. NANCY JEAN SMALL — PIONEER NEWS 3; Art Club 1; Vocal Music Organizations 2, 3; Cheer¬ leader 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Nurses’ Club 4; Spanish Club 2, 3. YOLANDA THERESE SMRIGA — PIONEER NEWS 3; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 3; Booster Club 1, 2, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Nurses’ Club 3, 4; Y-Teens 3, 4; Spanish Club 1, 2, 3. CLIFFORD SNOWE — A.V.O. 1; Band 1, 2; Ger¬ man Club 2, 4; Football 1. KENNETH JAY SOLIS — Art Club 1, 2; A.V.O. 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Red Cross 1; German Club 2, 3, 4; Football 1. 43 Baccalaureate, Banquet, All Our Senior Activities NANCY LAVONNE NAOMIE SPANIER — PIO¬ NEER NEWS 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1; Y-Teens 3, 4; Latin Club 1. LAWRENCE STEFFEL PAMELA KAY STEWART — Student Council 3; POWDER HORN 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Vo¬ cal Music Organizations 1, 2; National Honor So¬ ciety 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2; Quill and Scroll 3. 4; Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4; G.C.C.S. 2; Girls’ State Alternate 3; Spanish Club 1, 2. KATHLEEN MARIE STOFCIK — POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; Vocal Music Or¬ ganizations 1, 2, 3; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Nurses’ Club 1, 4; Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4. EDWARD PAUL STRZELINSKI — PIONEER NEWS 4; Booster Club 4; A.V.O. 1; Latin Club 1; Photo Club 4. RITA LOUISE SZOT — PIONEER NEWS 4; Vo¬ cal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3; Booster Club 1, 2, 3; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4. RONALD EDWARD SZOT — A.V.O. 1; Basketball 1; Cross Country 1, 3; Baseball 1; POWDER HORN 4. RAYMOND SZLANDA — C-Club 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. MICHAEL TALABAY — Booster Club 4. JACK ALLEN TAYLOR — Ideal Senior — School Spirit; Class Officer 2, 3, 4; Student Council 4; POWDER HORN 1, 2, 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 1, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 2, 3; A.V.O. 1; National Honor So¬ ciety 3, 4; C-Club 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 1, 2; Stage Crew 1, 2; Hi-Fi Club 3; Quill and Scroll 3, 4; Junior Red Cross 1, 2; Hi-Y 1, 2, 3, 4; Biology Club 1; Latin Club 1; Conserva¬ tion Club 1; Photo Club 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Golf 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Rotarian. SHARRON ROSE THOMAS — PIONEER NEWS 4; Art Club 1, 2; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 1, 2; Drama Club 1, 2; Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4; G.C.C.S. 3; Future Secretaries of America 3, 4; Biology Club 1; Spanish Club 1; “Our Town”; “Death Takes a Holiday”. BARBARA JEAN TOOPS — Booster Club 4; Y- Teens 4; Future Secretaries of America 3, 4; Lit¬ erary Club 3. DOROTHY TROKSA — Ideal Senior — Eyes; Fu¬ ture Secretaries of America 4; Y-Teens 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4. GEORGE STANLEY TROKSA — Ideal Senior — Dance; Student Council 4; Art Club 3; Booster Club 4; F.T.A. 4; Latin Club 3; Cross Country 1. ELAINE JANE UII KIN — SUulcnt Council 4; POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Y-Teens 3, 4; F.T.A. 3; Fu¬ ture Secretaries of America 4; Spanish Club 1, 2. 44 Now All Are Woven Into Everlasting Memories JANET LOUISE VAVREK — Art Club 1; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 1, 2; Drama Club 1, 3; Stage Crew 1, 3; Y-Teens 4; F.T.A. 2, 3, 4. TIMOTHY VESLOCKI RONALD WALCZAK — A.V.O. 1, 2, 3, 4. NANCY JEAN WARNER ROBERT S. WEINBERG — Ideal Senior — Most Likely to Succeed; Student Council 3, 4; POWDER HORN 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Vo¬ cal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; Debate 1, 2, 3, 4; National Honor Society 3, 4; National Thespians 3, 4; National Forensic League 1, 2, 3, 4; Drama Club 3, 4; Biology Club 3; German Club 4; Photo Club 1; Science Club 4; Lyle Memorial Awrd; Bausch and Lomb Award; “Our Town”; “Good Housekeeping”; Junior Rotarian. LINDA DEE WETNIGHT — POWDER HORN 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3; Music Apprecia¬ tion 1; Booster Club 1, 2, 3, 4; G.A.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; Modern Dance 1; Drama Club 1; Junior Red Cross 1; Y-Teens 3. ROBERT WILEY — C-Club 3, 4. DONNA LORAINE WILLIAMS — Student Coun¬ cil 1; Art Club 1; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2; Booster Club 3, 4; G.A.C. 3, 4; Spanish Club 2, 3. ROBERT EUGENE WITZKE — A.V.O. 1; Junior Red Cross 1; Spanish Club 1, 3; Basketball 1, 2; Cross Country 2, 3; Football 1. PAUL JOSEPH WOOD — Ideal Senior — Friend¬ liness; Class Officer 3, 4; Student Council 3, 4; POWDER HORN 4; PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 2, 3, 4; National Honor So¬ ciety 3, 4; Booster Club 4; Hammond Safety Coun¬ cil 3, 4; Boys’ State 3; Track 1; Junior Rotarian. DIANE W ' OZNIAK — Ideal Senior — Most Likely to Succeed; Student Council 3, 4; PIONEER NEWS 3, 4; POWDER HORN 3, 4; Vocal Music Organiza¬ tions 1, 2; Music Appreciation 1; National Honor Society 3, 4; National Thespians 3, 4; Quill and Scroll 3, 4; Y-Teens 1, 2, 3, 4; G.C.C.S. 2; Girls’ State 3; Spanish Club 1, 2; DAR Award 4; “Good Housekeeping”; “Wizard of Oz”; “If Men Played Cards as Women Do”; “Tonight at Eight”. TONEY XIDIS — PIONEER NEWS 4; Vocal Music Organizations 1, 2, 3, 4; C-Club 4; Booster Club 3, 4; Hi-Y 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2; Wrestling 2. KENNETH J. ZELLER — Ideal Senior — Eyes; A.V.O. 1, 2, 3; C-Club 1, 2; Stage Crew 4; Football 1; Wrestling 1, 2. GEORGE A. ZVONAR — A.V.O. 1, 2; Stage Crew 1 , 2 . 45 Graduates Were Wisely Led Miss Marie Nordvig and Mrs. Lillian Wilcox, class sponsors, plan senior activities for the 1962 year. SENIORS—At last! My, how time does fly! Just when a person begins to know what it’s all about, it’s all over. Relieved ? Yes! But High School is pretty good after all; and it’s not going to be the same OUT THERE. The finals; looking for a job; singing on the steps of G.R.C.; wearing a cap and gown; the last dance; having pictures taken; seeing a lot of things never noticed before; walking around “sorta sad like”; but, swelling up when someone points and says, “SENIORS!” Scholars say that we have 365-plus days in our year. Of these, some are yesterdays, some are todays, some are tomorrows; but there is one day that is a big day. The great¬ est day for you. Graduation is your day! So, we celebrate with you and are pleased that we’ve had a chance to share in the high lights. We extend our congratulations and sincere good wishes! 1 47 Nineteen 63’ers Junior Class Officers: Cliff Leigh, v-president; Jan Forauer, secretary; Sharon Gabbert, treasurer; Bob Ference, president; Mr. Erickson, sponsor. Again this year, the Junior Class made his¬ tory with its class dance. “Twistin’ Twenties” was one of the most successful dances of the year. “The Matchmaker” was presented as the Junior Class Play and received almost capac¬ ity crowds on both performances. All these events led up to the climatic event of the season, the prom, “In The Still Of The Night.” Ronald Adam Judy Allen Tom Allison Sharon Amundson Linda Anderson Jim Babusiak Barbara Balint Tim Balko Ed Barlo Larry Bazarko Carol Bednar Steve Bendis Bonnie Benko Nancy Biel Ed Bogucki Judy Borowski Jim Boswell Diane Bugajski Judy Bunn Ron Burk Eugene Burkat Claudia Carpenter Evelyn Catchur Wayne Chovan Nancy Collard Diana Cornelia Chris Condo Karen Csiegas Evangeline Davits Marsha Dean Dave Dedinsky Faye DeLong Jim Dijak Dave Dolak Connie Duda Barbara Dudzik Mark Duray Janice Dybel Dan Dziadosz Jim Eberle Ron Elo Sandy Falaschetti 48 Brought The Matchmaker ; “Twistin’ Twenties” Sandy Fauth Bob Ference Priscilla Ferguson Linda Field Jan Forauer Eileen Foreman Judy Fox Sharon Gabbert Denise Gallagher Marty Gajdos Gary Gardner Trudy Golden Gloria Gonsiorowski Sharon Gootee Afarilynn Gradek Susan Greenberg Steve Greneik Greg Gross Bill Gulvas Bernadette Guros Carol Gyurcsan Richard Hanchar Barbara Hered Pete Hernandez Cheri Hoffman Donna Hutira Susan Ramin Michelle Kampo Jeff Render Jim Render Dianne Rerr Marty Ressler Barbara Rindle Larry Ring Marsha Rnapik Dave Rnox Rathy Rulik Ritty Rurasz Bill Russy Howard LaBrant Rita Lawson Betty Lazowski Marc Levin Allan Lewandowski Diane Lohrmann Carren Long Dan Madura Ronada Majcher Susan Matej Lu Ane Malone Diana Markovich Ron Mertz George Mihalo Tom Milanowski Mary Miller Pat Mores Nancy Mrkacek Tom Mueller Virginia Murzyn Joe Nanista Ronald N ovak Joe O’Drobinak Terry O’Rourke Janice Pasyk Jean Petrovich Joyce Pietrzak Elaine Pinkston Arlene Piskorow ' ski Dorothy Pivovarnik Lenny Pomonis Sandy Poplawski Leszek Potapowicz Dan Pramuk Bob Priesol Jack Pruzin Joan Puplava Mary Ellen Puplava Charles Reichert Bob Ross Linda Ruf Ray Rusnak Leo Ruzyski Janet Rybarzyk Ken Rybicki Lorraine Sajdyk Jill Sandilands Dee Schelling Pat Schrage Ellen Shade Joe Silvian Caroline Sinclair Carolyn Sinder Joan Slanac Rich Slivka Diana Smigla Sharon Smith Bob Smolar Jim Stasney Mary Steliga Sharon Stewart Veronica Stofcik Fred Strezo Cheryl Svitek Linda Swenson Jimmy Taylor Virg-.nia Taylor Carole Tkach Jean Tolchinsky Mark Trombley Bob Vater Janet Vater Pat Veslocki Marcia Wagner Ricn Walsko Dan Warner Bernatette Waszak Roger Wetnight Ron Wilson Eugene Wytrykus Beth Yackish Pete Yancich Louise Zagrocki Pete Zatorski Joan Zmiga 50 Sophomores Hop About “Disneyland by Night” Sophomore Class Officers: M. Kokot, R. Kukta, C. Shalow, G. Terranova; and Class Sponsors Mrs. Dunham and Mr. Frank¬ lin. Mike Arnold Patsy Bachi Carol Balog Dave Bangert Lynn Bartholomay Kathy Bartoszek Judy Beda A1 Berger Don Brenner Muriel Brodowski Ken Bryant Andrea Budnyk Maryann Bugajski Den Burk Gary Conn Dianne Countreman Betty Domagalski Sharon Dostatni Kathy Dubich David Duerr Annede Dvorscak Phil Dzurilla Janet Eggers Chet G. Farrell Joseph Fasnacht Jon Fech Dennis Fedor Bari Lynne Finnegan Tim Forbes Pam Forystek Daniel Galatzer Marcia Gaughan Bruce Gehrke Virginia Geleta Mike Gerenda Sandra Gibson John Golembiewski Valerie Gonsiorowski Carol Gorby Jenny Grabara Janice Graefen Diane Grahovac Paula Grandbois Kathryn Gregrovich Roscoe Grigson Anthony Gross Laurie Gurevitz Theresa Hajduk Danny Haluska Kent Hannon Marsha Hawkins Gary Hayes Phyllis Hernandez Bernie Hmurovich Dennis Hornsby Mary Howard Ray Hoyda Karen Hrasch Linda Hric Robert Hric James Ilijanich Judy Jackim Beverly Jackson Barbara Jallo Helen Jamrosz Carolyn Jancek Theresa Jancik Tom Jez Gail Johnson William Jorkon Jim Kaminsky Maryann Kantor Ken Kantowski Henrietta Kasprzak Don Kauchak Mary Ann Keckich Phyllis Kelly Bobby Kemple Marita Kenes Ed Kish Sandy Kmetz Frank Kocsis Joe Kocsis Mary Ellen Kew Mary Ann Kokot Theresa Konechni Phyllis Kostanczak Janet Kowal Bob Kovacich Bob Kukta Bob LaBrant Sharon Labus Karen Lakatos Mary Alice Lavrincik Ron Leckrone Anita Lukacek Karen McCutcheon Walt McLean Phil Macnak Janet Macocha Buzz Madsen Mary Ann Mallelc Leonard Marcisz Michael Maruszczak Paul Makis Carol Mazur Janice Means Bob Mergesky Tom Merry Wayne Michalak Tim Mihalso Kathleen Mikulaj Barbara Miles Maureen Mileusnich Nancy Miller Jerry Modjeski John Murzyn Richard Murzyn Tom Mullins Evelyn Nagy Cheryl Nednien Janet Norrington Lorraine Noworyta Sandy Offredo 52 Donna Ogle Mary O’Keefe Brant Olds Karen Pajak Jim Palko Joseph Pazanin Rick Pemberton Georgene Penciak Diane Pfiester Dennis Pirosko Jerry Poloncak Avril Poison Marilyn Popovich Warren Prickett Marion Reffkin Martha Robinson Juanita Roof Dennis Rowden Tom Rowley John Rozcicha Fred Rozinski Judy Rozinski Janice Saczawa Mike Saksa Carol Schalow Carol Shimala Margaret Silaghi Joann Smigla Beverly Smith Bob Smith Donald Smith Tom Snider Nancy Soptich Ralph Sotak Bonnie Spanier Joe Sroka Virginia Sroka Cynthia Stanek Waily Steliga Donna Stombaugh Henry Strand Andrew Strisko Carol Ann Sturgeon Michelle Summers Greg Terranova Carol Tierney Marge Tkacz Ruth Tokarz Terry Tomko Yvonne Trbovich Melby Treadway James Troksa Georgene Turnquist Eugene Voycz Joe Vargo Bob Vasilko Karen Vasilko Roberta Vater Shirley Walker Barbara Wallace Wayne Wallace Marjorie Watson Andrew Wichlinski Cathy Witkewiz David Wingis Charles Wolf Walter Wood Scott Wright Marilyn Yengich Carolyn Zrenchik Mary Ann Zvonar Thomas Zygmunt 53 News Flash— The Freshmen Class began an active first year with the election of officers in Novem¬ ber. Their class dance, “Peppermint Paradise”, was the high light of their first school year. After working long and hard they proved to themselves that they, too, were capable of creating a successful dance. After a year of hard work, they have finally gained their place at George Rogers Clark. The next few years will tell what type of individuals the Class of 1965 will produce. Freshman class officers: M. Trelinski, D. Sallay, B. Vaughan, M. Toops, and sponsors Mr. Meadows ' and Mr. Pruesz. Elaine Adams Jack Adley Bruce Allison Frances Ambrose Mary Ashcraft Kathy Avery Paul Banik Linda Baronowski Barbara Barr Bradley Barton Tim Beaudrie Henry Beitler Mary Benko Kathy Best Thomas Blazek Mike Boblaik Mary Ann Bobowski Sandra Bognar Phyllis Bojda Barbara Bonacela Mary Boswell Linda Boyer Nancy Bragiel George Brown Christina Brownell Frank Bubala Nick Bulmovich Barbara Bugajski Judith Burkat Jim Busch Jim Bzibziak Jim Carnahan Jerri Carpenter Joan Carpenter Nancy Cervone Marilyn Chilla John Cichon Eddie Ciesar Marilyn Cison Claudia Clark Pat Clark Allan Clements Jo Ann Conrad Paul Companik Rich Crouch Linda Crozier Frank Czechanski Nancy Dafcki 54 Initial Steps of Frosh Indicate Bright Future Marjorie De Chantal Dennis Dijak Philip Drescher Denis Dsida Rich Dudzik Rosemary Duhon Bonita Dvorscak Andy Dzurovcik Geraldine Dzurovcik Laura Dybell Jack Enright Marilynn Fauth Benedict Ferko Nancy Ferrara Suzane Ferry Vickie Filas Judy Finley Kay Fitzpatrick George Fredy Larry Fuchs Nancy Fuller Richard Gajdos Susan Garza Carol Girski Pat Golembiewski Susan Gonsiorowski Danny Gootee Nancy Gora Stella Grabara Nancy Greskovich Sharon Gross Gary Gurevitz William Haddad Lynn Halik Ed Hall Sharon Harangody Jim Harbin Bob Harper Sharon Harris Bob Hatczel Michael Hein Dora Hernandez Bonnie Hicko Kenneth Holman Linda Holt Phillis Hmurovic Ho ' ly Humphreys Helene Jacewicz Mary Jakuboski Diana Janik Ethel Jansak Joelma Jarman Jim Juricic Joel Kaplan Diana Keister Laura Kessler Ted Killian Dennis King Carole Kirk Ed Kitka Geri Klemensiewicz Sharon Kmetz Chuck Kocsis Gloria Kol 55 Greenies Aroused by First Impressions of School Liz Kollmar Larry Kowal Kathy Kowalski John Krajnak Kurt Krause Allen Kress Gene Koehler John Kokenis Diane Kuker Ed Kusnir John Kuss Lynn Larsen John Latiak Diane Leimbach Steve Leland Barbara Leslie Dottie Leslie Mary McLaughlin Jim Madsen Bob Mansfield Cindy Marinari Ava Markonni Cynthia Maslikowski Connie Masura Janie Matlon Pete Merich John Merker Jim Merriman Janice Michalak Tom Michalak Mary Michalak Daniel Mihalo Gerald Miller Pat Miller Charles Miner Paul Miskus Tamsie Miskus Janis Mizerik Roy Moffitt Marion Moskal Lois Mrzlock Jack Murzyn Marianne Murzyn Robert Nash Peggy Nednien Myra Niblett Paul Nichel Lucinda Noland Jerry Novak Thomas Novotny Jim O’Drobinak Sharon O’Drobinak Dennis Panasuk Linda Parks Greg Patrick Jeffrey Picklin Larry Pishkur Mary Ann Poracky Wayne Price Karen Radloff Judy Radosa Pete Regashus Cora Remlinger Judy Richardson Wide-Eyed Frosh Look Forward Eagerly Paula Roadman Stanley Rokosz Jim Ruf Judy Rybarczyk David Sailay Andrew Saliga Patricia Scepkowski Carol Seifert Sharon Shade Dennis Sheffield Judith Shrader Jayna Simko Timothy Simko Allan Skiba Pamela Smutniak George Soltis Bernie Staley Susan Starke Shirley Stasny Janellen Stipulin Judy Stofcik Edwin Stolarz David Stone Paulette Strabavy Bill Sweet Bob Swetnam Nancy Swiontek Ruth Tkach Don Tokarz Carole Tokarz Mary Toops Barbara Tomko Barb Trebs Mike Trelinski Mary Ann Treschak James Troksa Pamela Troksa Chuck Turpin Ed Vale Randy Vasilak Barbara Vaughan Donna Vince Janis Vogel Tom Vrabel Joyce Wagner Charles Walker Howard Weinberg Jeff Weiss Joe Wenglay Phyllis Whitman Terry Wiak Beatrice Wihig Marcia Williams Alexa Winsberg Eileen Wisemiller Marge Wisniewski Anna Marie Wojtowiez Dom Woszczynski David Zato Marge Zellez 57 • That Wonderful Year. . . ACADEMICS We drew monsters in Miss Wulkow’s class ... in Mr. Martin’s class, we discovered how the automobile engine functioned . . . three qualified from Clark for the National Merit Scholarships finals ... we learned of Mark Twain in Miss McCampbell’s class . . . We prepared fudge in Miss Ide’s cooking class . . . Disecting and drawing grasshop¬ pers and worms proved of extra interest in biology . . . graphs proved to be of definite difficulty in trigonometry . . . Boys’ and Girls’ State delegates found their experi¬ ences at Indiana University unforgettable . . . Barbara Toops earned the title of top homemaker by winning the Betty Crocker Homemaker Award . . . these academic pro¬ grams gave the school the record it has and added to THAT WONDERFUL YEAR. “Out, damned spot! Out, I say!” quotes Gerry Dubczak as she portrays Lady Macbeth in Miss Wulkow’s literature class. Grammar, Literature, Clark’s varsity debate team, under the direction of Mr. Arthur Erickson, possessed a highly impres¬ sive record of fourteen victories and only two de¬ feats. During their season they defeated Hammond Morton, last year’s state champions, and walked off with first place honors at the Invitational Debate Tournament held at Hammond High. One of the many research topics was a contro¬ versial problem which proved to be of definite in¬ terest. This problem consisted of the question as to whether or not the federal government should equalize educational opportunities by means of grants to the state or public elementary and sec¬ ondary education. During the summer, in order to improve their speaking skills, some team members attended debate Varsity debaters Konrad Banasak, Gary Kaplan, Mike Kirn and Bob Weinberg, en¬ grossed in a word tilt on the need for federal aid to education, are oblivious to Linda Swenson’s signal that it’s time for their gems of wisdom to cease. and Oratory Form a Basis for English Usage clinics which were held at numerous colleges and universities. These schools included Northwestern University, Michigan State University, and the Uni¬ versity of Colorado. Speech pupils this year were given a small taste of debate and the results proved to be very success¬ ful. In this stimulating course a pupil became fa¬ miliar with demonstration speeches, “selling” speeches, oral interpretation, and choral reading. Public speaking was also encouraged in English and literature. While the literature pupils were busy reading and interpreting fascinating stories, Eng¬ lish scholars were delving into the correction of such gross illiteracies as the comma splice and the dangling or misplaced modifier. In speech class Yvonne Drasco plays “beautician for a day” as she gives Gail Gordon a new hair-do. Juniors Cliff Liehe, Barbara Hered, Jim Dijak, and Marty Kessler are helped by Miss Delores McCampbell in selecting suitable books for oral and written interpre¬ tive review ' s for both English and literature class. Clarkites Delve into the Languages of German, " Ole,” crys matador Allen Strisko as “Bull” Bailey charges. This is a part of the Spanish class’s study of bull fights. Miss Wilcox and Miss Tangerman, the Latin and Spanish teachers respectively, discuss teaching methods with the German instructor, Mr. Gehrig. Through the use of records, films, tape record¬ ings, and review teams, Latin pupils acquired an appreciation of language and style. The many Latin words, quotations, and mottoes used in everyday English were thoroughly studied. Mrs. Wilcox stressed words derived from Latin to increase the pupil’s understanding of medical, judicial, and musical terms. Grammar content and usage were important musts in Spanish. First year pupils used grammar to present skits; second year pupils, by writing themes. The Senors and Senoritas learned to under¬ stand the Spanish by studying their cultural back¬ ground and customs. German pupils, using the folk song as a tool, explored the cultural background of Germany. Among the more popular examples were the student marching songs, “Das Wandern,” and “Mein Vater warein Wandersmann.” These and other folk songs carried out their original intention by providing the students with a vivid realization of the lan¬ guage and culture of the motherland. Spanish, and Latin Techniques of pronunication are practiced by Greg Gross and Frances Ambross in German class. These three Latin students are showing their interest in ancient Roman culture. Michael Trelinski studies the dress of senator Jerry Novak and of Roman soldier Tim Beaudrie. Formulas, Phalanges, Chemistry pupils laboriously probed the atom and its structure. As amateur Rembrandts, they learned how to draw atomic diagrams. In physics, juniors obtained practical knowledge about the different parts of the automobile engine. In addition to making applications of previously studied truths, seniors investigated new truths in special advanced math classes. By studying plane geometry, sophomores obtained the knowledge of logical arrangement and thought. Biology ignited sparks of interest by providing a constant variety and wide choice of topics for study. Freshmen studied how living things func¬ tioned and how they obtained nourishment to main¬ tain life processes. Health classes dealt with the analyzation of the fascinating phenomena perform¬ ed by the human body. In the study of a first course of algebra, fresh¬ men received the knowledge of working with signed and literal numbers. Mr. Oral Watkins taught jun¬ iors functional relationships, radical and imaginary numbers, quadratic functions, logarithms, combina¬ tions and probability. Physics students who partici¬ pate in a demonstration of cen¬ trifugal force are Barbara He- red. Ron Elo, Ed Bogucki, and Cris Condo look on. This is just one of the various demonstra¬ tions of principles learned in Mr. Martin’s Physics classes. Members of Miss Booth’s trigo¬ nometry class watch attentively as a fellow classmate explains the various applications of complicated trigonometric func¬ tions. Figures and Phyla Frenzy Frustrated Clarkites “The Blackboard Jungle” seems clearer as a volunteer com¬ mercial math student points out short cuts to those seeming¬ ly impossible problems. Such demonstrations help students to visualize the steps to correct problems. Juniors Fred Strezo and Ron Mertz disect “Herman the Hu¬ man” as they show their third period class the intricate parts of the body. This demonstration proves to be both educational and entertaining. In one of Mr. Martin’s chemistry classes, with the available laboratory equipment and the aid of John Barron, Phil Pratt attempts to validate the chemical equation 2KBr + MnO- + H-SO K 2 SO, + MnO + Br, + H.O. Freshmen biologists, Charles Francis and Judy Burkat, peek into the fascinating world of the amoeba, protozoa, and paramecium through the all-telling eyes of the microscope. This fine instrument aids in the froshs’ learning. 65 Journeying to those far away places with strange sounding names is an economical and pleasant trip experienced by all world geography pupils. Mapwork gives pupils a chance to display their new-found talents. Students Seek Home and Global Understanding The social sciences, essential to the understand¬ ing of civilization, provide the key to contemporary world problems. At Clark, economics, government, United States history, world history, and geography comprise this key. Economics and government provide a knowledge and understanding of the economic and govern¬ mental structure of our country. These classes serve to make Clark seniors better consumers and citizens. In order for the youth to perpetuate the in¬ stitutions of this country, they must be informed of their origin and development. United States his¬ tory serves this purpose. Understanding of civilization, one of the objec¬ tives of the social sciences, is the idea behind the world history course. The curriculum of this course traces man’s political and cultural development from prehistoric times to the present. The fifth component of the social science cur¬ riculum is geography. Because environment has a definite effect on the way of life, knowledge of geography is essential to world understanding. Students enjoy the pleasures of home as they sit in Mr. Erickson’s economics class and watch educational television. 66 Prepare to Venture into Business World More than three-fourths of the Clark student body participated in business classes this year. Shorthand, typing, business machines, bookkeeping, business law, and general business composed the commercial course. Through the use of these sub¬ jects, expertly trained teachers gave students a glimpse into the business world. College preparatory pupils, as well as general course pupils participated in business work. In typ¬ ing, the equal representation of pupils participating in the three types of courses offered at Clark ex¬ emplified this fact. Typing was the most pursued subject in the com¬ mercial courses. Shorthand and business machines tied for second ranking. “Seek and thou shalt find” is the Golden Rule of room 10. Junior Jean Petrovich practices a daily warm up assign- Calculating numerous figures, business-bound senior girls tackle the many-keyed machines in Mr. Stavros’ business machines class. “Dictator” Coughlan’s new order is read to eager third period shorthand students. Speed and accuracy are stressed as keys to the leader’s heart. 67 Lynn Lawson “meets the press” in the sewing class to make good use of some steam heat. Gene Kohler industriously learns the “tricks of the trade” of the handy-man as he sands one of his projects in Mr. Hein’s shop class. Aspired Students Cooking is the chemistry of food. In cooking class girls learned, through experimentation, the vital procedures in preparing a meal. Teachers also in¬ structed these future homemakers in proper eti¬ quette and table setting. In sewing class pupils not only learned to make their own clothes, but also became conscious of styles, colors, and textures of the materials used. The woodworking artist expressed himself in shop. With the variety of tools available, every boy could make his own creations, adding his own per¬ sonal touch. “The Language of Industry,” more familiarly known as mechanical drawing, acquainted each boy with a basic knowledge of the construction and de¬ sign of buildings. This basic knowledge was then put to use by the boys in drawing neat and accurate blue prints. Whereby the four previous classes had a definite pattern to follow, the pupil enrolled in art developed his creative abilities using his imagination, not a pattern. Develop Skills from Clark’s Fine Arts Courses Rita Szot, Betty Lazowski, and Ron Falasehetti discuss and exhibit their art projects. Meritorious Students Recognized for Their Clark pupils again showed their prowess in dif¬ ferent fields by earning various prizes and awards. Three boys achieved a position which was con¬ sidered by many as the ultimate in scholastic prowess. This position was that of a National Merit Scholarship finalist. Konrad Banasak, Gary Kap¬ lan, and Robert Weinberg accomplished this end by scoring well on a series of tests. Other pupils earned recognition by being given posts of trust. Among these students were the Girls’ and Boys’ State Delegates and the Junior Rotarians. The Junior Rotarians attended weekly meetings of the Rotary—a different boy each month. Other winners consisted of: Barbara Toops, Bet¬ ty Crocker Future Homemaker; Diane Wozniak, DAR Award; and Linda Hric, Biology Award. Konrad Banasak and Robert Weinberg achieved the honor of salutatorian and valedictorian, respectively of their class. Junior Rotarians Gary Kaplan, Jack Taylor, Robert Weinberg, Mike Kim, Ron Dem- bowski, Dave Chyla, Konrad Banasak, and Charles Freeland are given the opportunity to meet community leaders at Rotary Club meetings. 70 Barbara Toops, senior, won the Betty Crocker Award for being the outstanding homemaker of 1962. Outstanding Efforts Diane Wozniak, recipient of the Daughters of the American Revolution Award, represents ideal qualities of leadership. Konrad Banasak, Bob Weinberg and Gary Kaplan are among the ten thousand National Merit Scholarship Finalists. Linda Hric, 1962 outstanding sophomore biology student, was honored with the Lyle Memorial Award. That Wonderful Year. . . SPORTS Closing second football victory over Whiting . . . Ermon Mile’s Sectional championship . . . upset of Morton . . . Sectional victories over Highland and Lowell . . . Moffitt setting school record . . . C-Club selling popcorn . . . G.A.C.’s “College Playday” . . . annual gym assembly . . . Ruzycki, Lewandowski tie for batting average leadership . . . B-Squaders rap Gavit thrice . . . initiate new sport at Clark — weightlifting . . . baseballers hustle for third place Conference finish . . . wallop¬ ing Oilers twice in track meets . . . yearly G.A.C. bowling tournament . . . tennis team records eight victories . . . winning record posted by Frosh footballers . . . Coach Stavros makes a fine showing in rookie sea¬ son . . . these athletic activities intensified THAT WONDERFUL YEAR. Clark’s cross-country team worked this year with only three seniors: K. Miller, J. Pustek, and E. Best. The Harriers, coached by Mr. Edward Shields, dropped the opening meet of the season to High¬ land, 25-30. The Pioneers’ only other dual meet re¬ sulted in a 20-41 romp of Cross-Town rival Whit¬ ing ... In their next engagement, The Hammond City Meet, the Shieldsmen placed fourth. The Har¬ riers attained an over-all record of 4 wins and 8 losses. They secured their remaining victories from Lew Wallace, Horace Mann, and Whiting. In the Conference meet the Pioneers finished nineteenth. Clarkmen then traveled to the Hobart Sectionals where they placed eighteenth. Next year’s team will be built around several promising re¬ turnees, lettermen Ed Barlo, Tom Jez, Bob LaBrant, and Tom Milanowski. Varsity harriers Tom Milanowski, Ken Miller, and Jim Moffitt show perfect form in a photo finish. Harriers Romp Twice Over Cross-Town Rivals FRONT ROW: J. Fech (Mgr.), J. Pustek, E. Best, J. Mof¬ fitt, K. Miller, T. Milanowski, P. Yancich, B. Kussy, R. La- Brant, T. Jez, E. Barlo, D. Bangert (Mgr.). ROW TWO: W. Ward, W. Wallace, K. Kantowski, B. Rowley, B. Gehrke, J. Troska, T. Wick, J. Ruf, B. Walczak, B. Ferko, D. Rirosko, D. Smith, J. Weiss, J. O’Drobinak, D. Haluska. ROW THREE: W. Jorkon, W. Mihalak, R. Adams, R. Hanchar, J. Murzyn, B. Allison, R. Hotszel, D. Brenner, T. Mihalso, R. Vasilok, J. Golembiewski. ROW FOUR: K. Hannon, J. Forbes, D. Kanchak, J. Madjewski, R. Murzon, T. Rowley, M. Hein, P. Merick, P. Regashus, N. Bubnovich, P. Banik, Coach Shields. 74 Racket Men Swing for Eight Conference Wins FRONT ROW: P. Nickel, B. Smith, P. Macnak, J. Adley, C. Reichart, J. Picklin, B. Ferrenee, M. Saksa. ROW TWO: A. Chilla, T. Vrabel, P. Dreseher, G. Miller, L. Fuchs, J. Ma- zurkiewcz, F. Czechanski, T. Blazak, J. Kaplan, R. Gajdos, J. Busch. ROW THREE: Coach Martin, M. Trombley, M. Duray, D ' . Burk, C. Wolf, G. Gross, J. Boswell, M. Kessler, R. Burk, T. Snider, C. Liehe. Junior Ron Burk stretches to his full height to return a volley in one of the daily practices. On days when there are no meets scheduled Coach Martin runs the Netmen through a short but grueling practice session. Clark’s tennis team placed fourth in the West¬ ern Division this year with an eight and six rec¬ ord. This year for the first time the Netmen played each of the seven other Western Division teams twice, resulting in a fourteen game schedule rather than the usual seven game slate. In their first match Hammond Tech downed the Pioneer team, 3-1. The Pioneers bounced back with two wins, one over Horace Mann, 4-0, and the other over Tolleston, 3-2. In their next match the Net- men dropped a 4-1 decision to Hammond High. The Pioneers then hosted Lew Wallace and handed them a 5-0 defeat. Following this victory E. C. Washing¬ ton, the Western Division champs, clipped the Rack¬ et Rattlers 3-2. In the second round of play, the Netmen regis¬ tered a four and three record, identical to the first round. They repeated the loss to the Tech Tigers, 3-2. The Pioneers then triumphed over Hor¬ ace Mann, 5-0, and Tolleston, 3-2. In their next outing Hammond High’s Wildcats shut out the Clarkmen 5-0 by capturing all the matches. The tennis team climaxed its season with victories over Roosevelt and Wallace by scores of 3-2 and 5-0 respectively, and a loss to E. C. Washington, 4-1. Pioneers End Season by Downing Whiting, 7-0 VARSITY FOOTBALL 1961—FRONT ROW: D. Galatzer (Mgr.), R. Ruman, T. Blazak, A. Lewansowski, D. Dedinsky, Jeff Render, T. Xidis, L. King, B. Priest, Jim Render, E. Miles, T. Balko (Mgr.) ROW TWO: J. Deshincoe, L. Stef- fel, S. Bendis, J. Shimala, P. Markonni, P. Pratt, C. Free¬ land, S. Psikula, J. Taylor, B. Gulvas, B. Makis. The Pioneer Gridmen opened the 1961 campaign by competing in the Whiting Football-O-Rama. In their single-quarter clashes with East Chicago Washington and Whiting, the Aldrichmen lost to Washington, 7-0, while tying the Oilers, 0-0. Wash¬ ington managed to score in the closing minutes of play to gain their victory. Whiting and Clark battled to a scoreless tie, although the Pioneers threatened to score on several occasions. Morton dealt the Clarkites a resounding 53-0 defeat in the Pioneer’s first scheduled encounter. East Chicago Roosevelt followed suit by turning a 0-0 half-time deadlock into a 21-0 win in the first Clark Western Division game. East Chicago Wash¬ ington also found the Pioneers vulnerable and walk¬ ed away from Clark field with a 25-0 victory. Clark dropped its next four scheduled contests to Highland, 14-13; Gary Emerson, 19-13; Ham¬ 76 mond Tech, 19-7; and Hammond High, 21-0. Larry King scored two touchdowns in the four games, while Bob Priest, Jack Deshincoe, and Buck Makis added one each. Chuck Freeland added two of the extra points and Dave Dedinsky the other. The Pioneers capped an otherwise unsuccessful ’61 season by defeating cross-town rival, Whiting, 7-0. The Clarkites scored their lone touchdown of the game with only eighteen seconds left to play. Junior Larry King, the Pioneer’s leading scorer, rammed over for the score. Junior Dave Dedinsky, Clark’s leading ground gainer, plunged over from the two yard line for the final point. Clark’s all- over record was one win against seven losses. Senior guard Steve Psikula rated both an honor¬ able mention on the annual U.P.I. Indiana high school All-State squad and a second team rating on the Western N.I.H.S.C. All-star squad. “I’m coming!” Bill Gulvas shouts encouragement to Chuck Freeland as he hustles to his assistance. Their efforts came to no avail as the Pioneers lost to Morton, 53-0. NAME ATT. YDS. G. AVE. PTS. Dedinski 55 420 7.5 2 King 57 299 5.2 18 Makis 15 36 2.4 6 Render 14 30 2.1 0 Priest 43 87 2.0 6 Gulvas 60 108 1.8 0 Blazak 4 6 1.5 0 Ruman 13 20 1.3 0 Deshincoe 0 0 0 6 Freeland 0 0 0 2 CLARK OPPONENT First Downs 53 92 Points 40 171 Yds. Gained Rushing 1430 1986 Yds. Gained Passing 225 471 Yds. Penalized 165 290 The three football coaches, A. Peterson (backfield coach), E. Aldrich (head coach), and R. Williams (line coach), smile triumphantly after last second victory over Whiting. “Thanks, Chuck!” Dave Dedinski, grateful for the fine block by Charlie Freeland, slips away from a would-be Hammond High tackier for a sizable gain in the 21-0 loss to the Wild¬ cats. 77 Frosh Post Respectable Four and Two Mark The Settlers lost their opening game to Morton by a 12-0 score. E. C. Roosevelt inflicted another 12-0 shutout on the Settlers. Paul Makis initiated scoring for the Settlers in a 7-6 loss to Gavit. Hammond High’s Wildkittens shutout the Settlers in their next outing, 21-0. The long awaited first victory came at the ex¬ pense of Tech’s Tigers, 7-0. Roy Moffitt led the Settlers to this win by passing to Harvey Crouch for the touchdown and adding the extra point. The season ended with a 24-6 loss to Whiting. Freshmen had the only Clark football team with a winning record. The Homesteaders won four of six games. Gavit fell victim to the Frosh in the season open¬ er, 12-0. They next defeated the pigskin toters from Hammond High, 7-0. The Freshmen then victimized Irving, 14-6. Morton’s Frosh dealt Coach Hein’s cohorts their first defeat, 12-0. The Homesteaders bounced back with a 12-7 vic¬ tory over Whiting. Hammond Tech ended the sea¬ son by nipping the Frosh in the season final, 7-0. FRESHMEN FOOTBALL—FRONT ROW: D. Dsida (Mgr.), J. Harbin, C. Krause, A. Skiba, J. Yedinak, G. Patrick, P. Roedel, D. Dijak, J. Latiak, B. Mastej, E. Dzurovcak. ROW TWO: F. Bubala, T. Michalak, J. Madson, B. Harper, D. King, R. Szapk, B. Lesak, C. Turpin, J. Bibzak, J. Enright, R. Eberle. ROW THREE: E. Kusnir, J. Juricic, E. Kitka, T. Novotny, T. Simko, J. Krajnak, J. Merker, D. Panasulc, P. Miskus, G. Kohler, B. Staley, Coach David Hein. B-SQUAD FOOTBALL—FRONT ROW: D. Galatzer (Mgr.), H. Strand, H. Crouch, C. Farrell, C. Condo, B. Hmurovich, B. Vasilko, T. Zygmunt, J. Kocis, P. Hernandez, L. Barzarko, B. Ross, K. Bryant, T. Balko. ROW TWO: J. O’drobinak, D. Dziadosz, R. Sotak, K. Bailey, J. Antilla, J. Ilijanich, G. Conn, J. Stasny, W. Chovan, H. LaBrant, J. Palko, J. Dijak, R. Moffitt, S. Grenchik. I VARSITY BASKETBALL—Coach Stavros, G. Terranova, B. Novak, B. Kukta, R. Kalina, E. Shields, J. Pustek, T. Smolar, R. Dembowski, D. Chyla, T. Allison, J. Moffitt, J. O’Rourke (Mgr.). Washington Proves Hex in Sectional Semis The Pioneers initiated the season by losing to South Bend Riley, 51-47. The Roundballers produc¬ ed rookie Coach Stavros’ initial varsity win, a 77- 56 victory over Hobart. Jim Moffitt shot the Sta- vrosmen to victory with 27 points. South Bend Washington and Hammond High dealt the Clarkmen their second and third losses of the season by scores of 57-42 and 77-50, respective¬ ly. The Pioneers marked their second notch in the win column with a 67-61 decision over E. C. Roose¬ velt. After dropping outings to S. B. St. Joseph and Gary Tolleston, the Stavrosmen journeyed to Hunt¬ ington for the Holiday Tourney. The Pioneers re¬ turned with two defeats. They opened the tourney with a 53-41 loss to Huntington. The Whiting Oilers inflicted a 50-43 defeat on the Roundballers in the consolation game. The Stavrosmen next journeyed to Gary to upend Lew Wallace’s Hornets, 61-58. Whiting dealt the Clarkites another defeat, 54-50. The Pioneers suc¬ cumbed to Washington after providing the top-rated Senators with a few anxious moments. Valparaiso then clipped the youthful Roundballers, 64-50. Junior Tom Allison led the Pioneers with 20 points in a rousing 76-62 victory over Tech’s Tigers. The Stavrosmen next skimmed by Horace Mann, 61-59. Continuing their streak, they disposed of Morton’s highly touted Governors. Seniors Jim Moffitt and Dave Chyla bombed the nets for 21 and 19 points, respectively, in the 63-61 win over Morton. The next night brought a 69-47 shellacking of T. F. North. Chyla continued his weekend scoring spurt by de¬ positing 24 counters in this walk-away. Emerson halted the Pioneer streak by clipping the Clarkites 61-51. The Roundballers closed out the regular season with a 54-52 victory over Grif¬ fith and an 81-66 loss to Gary Froebel. The Stavrosmen qualified for a Saturday after¬ noon berth opposite Washington in the Sectionals by whipping Highland, 64-43, and Lowell, 65-59. The Senators squelched any hopes of a Sectional Championship with a 68-51 victory. 79 Senior Dave Chyla shows perfect finger-tip control as he delicately drops in a t.wo-pointer in the 61-51 loss to Emer- “Scoop it, Moffs!” Senior Jim Moffitt replies to the shouts from the Pioneer bench as he lays up an easy two-pointer in an early 48-45 loss to South Bend Saint Joseph. INDIVIDUAL SCORING NAME FG FT PTS Moffitt 154 112 420 Chyla 120 36 276 Allison 64 48 176 Novak 58 43 159 Terranova 43 29 115 Kalina 19 13 51 Hoyda 16 2 34 Render 6 8 20 Shields 7 3 17 Kukta 2 1 5 Dembowski 1 2 4 Pustek 2 0 4 Piskur New school 1 record 0 2 “Jump up, Tom, jump up!” Tom Allison answers the plea of the booster section as he taps the ball into the awaiting hands of Freshmen Jerry Novak in the second loss to Whit¬ ing, 54-50. 80 B-SQUAD—FRONT ROW: J. Fech (Mgr.), H. Crouch, A. Berger, R. Smolar, J. Kocis, D. Bangert (Mgr.). ROW TWO: Coach D. Hein, J. Antilla, D. Dills, L. Piskur, D. Hornsby, J. Eberle. FRESHMEN—FRONT ROW: D. Madsen (Mgr.), T. Vrabel, J. Enright, J. Harbin, C. Turpin, R. Gajdos, T. Killian. ROW TWO: B. Hatzel, P. Miskus, J. Ruf, B. Allison, J. Latiak, R. Moffitt. ROW THREE: J. Kokenis, D. Dills, J. Busch, J. Krajnak, T. Simko, Coach A. Peterson. Freshmen Achieve Plus .500 Season Record The B-Squaders followed their opening loss to S. B. Riley with a 42-32 conquest of Hobart. They next axed the Gavit Gladiators by a final count of 46-21. Hammond chopped the Settlers down in their next outing, 50-40. The Heinmen recuperated with two victories, one over Gavit and the other over Tech by scores of 51-49 and 35-32, respectively. The Settlers lost their next six games, bowing to Hammond, Morton, Whiting, Washington, Valpo and Tech, in that order. Gavit provided the Hein¬ men with their fifth win, 57-38. They climaxed the season with a loss to Morton and a season end¬ ing win over Griffith, 46-40. This year’s Freshman team posted a respectable 13-4 record. However, the season opened on a sad note with a 39-38 loss to E. C. Roosevelt. The Homesteaders began their winning streak by walloping the Gladiators of Gavit, 36-22. They added seven more victims to their list, disposing of Hammond, Calumet, Irving, Morton, E. C. Roose¬ velt, Tech and Gavit in that order. E. C. Washington and Hammond High sidetrack¬ ed the Frosh by scores of 48-38 and 43-31, respec¬ tively. Whiting, 46-30, and Irving, 61-36, next felt the power of the Homesteaders. After a 44-40 loss to Whiting, they climaxed their season with victo¬ ries over Morton, T. F. North and Tech. Senior Turfman Jack Taylor concentrates hard while trying to blast a deeply embedded ball from the rough. The Clark Turfmen opened their 1961 season by participating in the Hammond City Meet. Clark finished fifth with a 521 total. In their first Western Division match, the Di- votmen fell to E. C. Washington and Lew Wallace. The Teebreakers then defeated Horace Mann, while falling victim to Hammond. Valparaiso and E. C. Roosevelt then dealt the Pioneers two losses. In the Lake Hills Invitational, Clark’s team of Taylor, Warner, Eberle, and Gross shot 388 and placed 18th in the meet. The Turfmen defeated Emerson twice, while being nipped by Tech in two encounters. Hor¬ ace Mann was the last victim of the Pioneers. Clark lost its next two encounters to close out the 1961 season with a 4-12 conference record and a seventh place finish. In the sectionals the Turfmen, Taylor, Warner, Eberle, and D. Burk, shot a 374 total. Teebreakers Place Seventh in Western Division GOLF—FRONT ROW: D. Haluska, K. Hannon, K. Kantowski, D. Burk, R. Smith. ROW TWO: G. Gross. R. Burk, J. Warner, B. Burk, T. Snider. ROW THREE: Coach A. Peterson, R. Hoyda, J. Eberle, J. Taylor, J. Palko. 82 WRESTLING—FRONT ROW: B. Kussy, P. Drescher, A. Dzurovich, D. Galatzer, D. Sheffield, T. Rowley, S. Leland. ROW TWO: E. Miles. W. Wallace, J. Galatzer, B. LaBrant, K. Kantowski, B. Mastej, E. Kusnir, J. Juricic, B. Rowley, H. LaBrant (Mgr.). ROW THREE: A. Chilla (Mgr.), D. Dziadosz (Mgr.), T. Novotny, B. Priest, S. Psikula, J. O’Drobinak, C. Condo, P. Makis, Mr. Buell (Coach), Mr. Williams (Coach). Miles Captures Sixth Place in State Tournment Tuning up for the Regionals, John Galatzer, Sectional Run¬ ner-up, and Ermon Miles, Sectional Champ, check their abili¬ ty to escape certain holds. Even though the Grapplers had a 4-8 record, they produced a Sectional Champion, Ermon Miles, and a Sectional Runner-up, John Galatzer. Miles advanced to win sixth in the State. The opening match resulted in a 28-22 victory over Highland’s Trojans. In their next match the Pioneers received a 44-8 spanking at the hands of the Thornton Fractional South Rebels, Illinois de¬ fending State Champions. The Grapplers bounced back by romping over Lowell, 36-16. They continued their winning ways by trouncing Bishop Noll’s Warriors, 33-23. After these two victories, the Pioneers hit a long dry stretch of six consecutive losses. In this string Tech, Tolleston, Valparaiso, Hammond, Roosevelt and Crown Point inflicted losses on the Grapplers. The Pioneers ended their season with a win over Washington and a loss to Morton. TRACK—FRONT ROW: W. Wallace, Coach Stavros, D. cich, L. Bazarko, Assist. Coach Powell. ROW THREE: R. Dolak (Mgr.), L. Zygmunt, D. Murzyn, B. Hmurovich, W. Holman, J. Antilla, T. Milanowski, T. Jez, R. Hanchar, P. Michalak, B. Gerhke, B. LaBrant, K. Bryant, P. Murzyn, Beitler, J. Kocsis, J. Ilijanich, R. Slupski, R. Brom, R. Sotak, M. Reffkin, J. Sroka. ROW TWO: K. Daugherty (Mgr.), J. T. Barlo, J. Vasilko. ROW FOUR: D. Hornsby, E. Best, P. Deshincoe, D. Dedinsky, R. Shumaker, H. LaBrant, H. Markonni, B. Wilson, J. Moffitt, G. Lucksich, D. Wetnight, Crouch, C. Condo, E. Barlo, B. Jorkon, D. Brenner, P. Yan- G. Conn, D. Chyla, E. Miles, J. Wagner. Shumaker Sets City Low High Hurdles Record Coach Steve Stavros opened his first season as head track coach by traveling to the University of Chicago Fieldhouse for the Conference Indoor. The youthful Pioneers returned with a tenth place finish. One week later the trackmen returned to the Fieldhouse to place third in the Hammond City Indoor Meet. In the dismal team showing in these first two meets, one bright spot glittered. Senior Robert Shumaker finished a close second in both the high and low hurdles in the Conference Indoor. He im¬ proved upon these and finished by completely out¬ running all opponents in capturing first place in the two hurdles races in the City Indoor. Valparaiso’s Vikings pinned a loss on the thin- clads in their first dual meet. The Stavrosmen re¬ turned home with revenge in their eyes. Whiting’s Oilers ventured onto Clark Field to combat the Pioneers. Coach Stavro’s cohorts ran up their high¬ est score of the season in whipping the Greenclads from Whiting, 75-34. In their next meet the Clark trackmen enter¬ tained Morton’s Governors. The Governors dealt the Pioneers their second dual meet defeat of the sea¬ son, 79-30. The Gary Froebel Blue Devils extended the Pioneer’s losing skein by tripping the Stavrosmen in Gary, 72-37. In their first triangular meet, the Hammond Tech Tigers and the Gary Lew Wallace Hornets nosed out the Pioneer thinclads. In winning the tri¬ angular the Tigers scored 49 l z points to 47 V 2 for the Lew Wallace Hornets. The Clark trackmen plac¬ ed a close third scoring 41 points. As he clears the bar, high jumper Jim Moffitt exemplifies the saying, “Put Your Best Foot Forward.” Clark 211 2 Valparaiso 87i 2 Clark 75 Whiting 34 Clark 30 Morton 79 Clark 37 Froebel 72 Clark 41 Tech 471 2 Clark 41 Lew Wallace 491 a Clark 52 Bishop Noll 48 Clark 52 Whiting 29 Clark 10th Conference Indoor Clark 3rd City Indoor Clark 7th LaPorte Invitational Tuning up for the LaPorte Invitational the Pioneers held a triangular meet. The Clarkites proved to be poor hosts as they skimmed by the Warriors of Bishop Noll, 52-48, and again trounced the neighboring Oilers, 52-29. Bob Shumaker led the cindermen to a seventh place finish in the LaPorte Invitational by finish¬ ing second in the high hurdles. Coach Stavros is expecting a better season next year. He is basing his hopes on several promising returnees. Gary Conn and Harvey Crouch broke the Freshman school records in the shotput and the half-mile respectively. Jim Moffitt, a promising performer, six times came within an inch of setting the school high jump record. “Only a half lap to go.” That’s what might be going through Sophomore Tom Milanowski’s mind as he finishes the gruel¬ ing last lap of the mile, the toughest of all track events. Ever try running hurdles? It’s not easy. But Senior Eric Best makes it look “simple as pie” as he shows perfect form in running the high hurdles. Stickmen Hustle to Place Third in Conference The Pioneer stickmen sported a conference rec¬ ord of 7 wins and 3 losses while accumulating an over-all record of 8 and 5. Cas Ruzychi and A1 Lewandowski led the Pioneers with batting averages of .428. Chuck Freeland set the pace with 7 R.B.I.’s. The Aldrichmen notched their first victory of the season by shellacking Highland 14 to 4. The initial conference proved successful with a 4 to 1 win over E. C. Washington. After squeaking by E. C. Roosevelt, 3 to 2, the Pioneers lost their first conference game to Whiting’s Oilers, 5 to 1. The fighting Pioneer team regained form with an im¬ pressive 4 to 1 victory over the Hammond High Wildcats. On May 15, the stickmen faced Hammond Tech for the Western Division leadership. Tech’s Tigers left the Pioneers in second place, 7 to 1. The Aldrichmen climaxed their season with consecu¬ tive conquests of East Chicago Washington, Roose¬ velt, Whiting, and Hammond High. Tech’s Tigers closed the season by trouncing the Clarkmen, 7 to 1. With a long stride off the rubber and a smile of confidence, Sophomore Bob Smolar delivers a side arm curveball to the opposing batter. VARSITY BASEBALL—FRONT ROW; J. Render, E. Shields, A. Lewandowski, J. Sima, G. Terrenova. ROW TWO: Manager B. Kussy, T. Hovanec, K. Bailey, S. Psikula, B. Smolar, J. Bowers. ROW THREE: T. Shields, D. Hmuro- vich, D. Shimala, C. Ruzycki, C. Freeland. 86 With a 7 and 3 Western Division Record “You’re out.” That’s one of the familiar calls of the umpire that every baseball player hears at sometime or other dur¬ ing a game. Sophomore Greg Terranova, sliding home, cer¬ tainly hears that call as he is tagged out by A1 LeWandow- ski during an inter-squad game. NAME AB R H RBI AVE. Ruzycki 28 5 12 5 .428 Lewandowski 21 1 9 6 .428 Smolar 8 1 3 1 .375 T. Shields 33 5 9 2 .273 Freeland 37 5 10 7 .270 Bowers 8 2 2 1 .250 Terranova 28 5 7 6 .250 Psikula 9 1 2 0 .222 Hovanec 25 2 5 3 .200 Shimala 29 5 5 3 .172 Sima 19 4 . 3 0 .158 Hmurovich 10 1 1 0 .100 E. Shields 8 1 0 0 .000 Render 5 0 0 1 .000 Before a game, Coach Aldrich pushes a perfect bunt down the third base line during infield practice. Physical Fitness is Stressed for All “Practice makes perfect” for the girls gym classes as they shoot baskets in hopes of making the varsity team. “That’ll cause you three extra laps,” was a phrase that echoed from the rafters of the gym. Both the males and the females of Clark helped to put Presi¬ dent Kennedy’s physical fitness program into ac¬ tion. Girls, under the instruction of Miss Doris Myers and Miss Donna Marco, learned poise, good sports¬ manship, and the fundamental rules and skills of popular sports. Boys’ gym classes, under the instruction of Mr. Joe Franklin, were put through their paces. They learned all techniques of football, basketball, and baseball. To “get in shape” the boys practiced cal¬ isthenics. Instead of taking four semesters of gym, the required amount, boys could participate in many sports and gymnastic activities. Among these were a gym and tumbling show. Scholastic ability and physical fitness combined to make Clark one of the top-ranking schools in this area. Tumblers display their talents as “headstanders” and Miniature rope climber skims the rope to the top of the gym “pyramid builders” perform for the entire student body. and then down again in record-breaking time. G.A.C. Banquet Ends an Active Year These G.A.C. members get in the swim of things. Senior Mary Keith throws the ball and hopes for a strike. “College Playday,” was the theme for the annual GAC picnic. Under the direction of Miss Doris My¬ ers, the girls frolicked in the sun at Marquette Park, in Gary. Members engage in four seasonal sports, begin¬ ning with swimming and softball and concluding with bowling and basketball. These sports keep GAC members fit, trim, and healthy. This is the main goal of GACers. Girls are eligible for membership after partici¬ pating in two of the four sports that are offered, and are formally initiated at the Mother-Daughter Banquet held at the Panel Room. An informal initia¬ tion is conducted by the senior members. The Girls’ Athletic Club has grown to be one of the largest organizations at Clark. It will continue to grow and promote its creed of health education, as its members derive fun and enjoyment from healthy exercise and sports. G. A. C. officers are Miss D. Myers, sponsor; L. Wetnight, president; C. Berland, treasurer; J. Dybel, secretary; J. Tolchinsky, vice-president; and B. Benko, head-of-sports. C-Men Help Support School Spirit Clark’s Lettermen Club again, this year, was one of the most active of school’s various organiza¬ tions. The selling of popcorn proved to be the most suc¬ cessful of the different fund-raising campaigns. C- Club members sold popcorn at the school functions, ranging from freshman basketball games to the annual P.T.A. Food Fair. Of course, the C-Club carried out its yearly duties of selling programs, seating fathers on father’s night, etc. The members, also, tried to have the club help them. One way in which they tried to accomplish this end was the delegation of points for various services performed. A certain accumulation of these points would entitle a boy to a lower-priced ticket to the annual banquet. “Aw, come on. Be a sport!” C. Freeland, J. Taylor and E. Miles coerce B. Kussy into buying a bag of C-Club popcorn. C-CLUB—FRONT ROW: Mr. Shields, Sponsor, C. Free- B. Makis. ROW FOUR: P. Hernandez, R. Burk, E. Best, A. land, J. Moffitt, J. Taylor, Mr. Daugherty, Sponsor. ROW Lewandowski, B. Ross, L. Bazarko. ROW FIVE- E Miles TWO: K. Milter, B. Rowley, B. Kussy, J. Galatzer, J. T. Milanowski, G. Terranova, T. Xidis, T. Hovanec, B. Smolar, Render. ROW THREE: E. Shields, C. Liehe, T. Balko, M. J. Render, E. Barlo. ROW SIX: D. Dziadosz, H. LaBrant, S. Trombley, D. Dedinsky, B. LaBrant, J. Deshincoe, B. Priest, Psikula, P. Markonni, D. Chyla, S. Bendis, B. Gulvas. 90 VARSITY CHEERLEADERS—Carol Cudek, Nancy Small, Cynthia Hoyda, Madlyn Moldraski, Jo Anne Jalovecky, Johnetta Mihalo. Blue-White Girls Advocate Spirit FRESHMEN CHEERLEADERS—TOP TO BOTTOM: Bar- B-SQUAD CHEERLEADERS—FRONT: Joyce Pietrzak. bara Barr, Ava Markonni, Paula Roadman, Peggy Nednien. BACK: Janice Dybel, Michelle Kampo, Virginia Murzyn. 91 c 4 1 That Wonderful Year ACTIVITIES Student Council revises election procedures . . . Hi-Y wins City Basketball Tourney . . . Harp and harpsichord supplement orchestra . . . Trial by Jury . . . serve the less fortu¬ nate both at home and overseas . . . “Deep Purple” . . . Y-teens sell potato chips . . . nivices learn from professionals . . . spy on amoeba and parameciom ... The Match¬ maker . . . type bodies and crop pictures . . . honor enthusiastic speakers, actors, journal¬ ists, and scholars . . . Hi-Y picks papers . . . University of Southern Illinois Madragelists and University of Michigan Men’s Glee Club visit Clark . . . hold Slave Auction . . . Wag¬ ner and Strauss . . . “ The Three Bears” . . . man lights and sets . . . exchange pro¬ gram with T. F. South . . . these activities influenced THAT WONDERFUL YEAR. Students Enthralled by S.I.U. Choir A CAPPELLA—FRONT ROW: W. Graham, M. Gradek, S. Fauth, R. Hartman, F. Gehrke, M. Cutler, H. Strand, B. Mullins, C. Vega, C. Berland, K. Bojda, S. Smith, J. Forauer. ROW TWO: K. Kurasz, J. Rybarczk, J. Kundrat, C. Schwei- kert, S. Thomas, D. Hickman, P. Macknak, R. Wilson, J. Vavrek, B. Benko, F. Condo, L. Field, R. Lawson, T. Golden. ROW THREE: P. Schrage, E. Uhrin, B. Smith, G. Gardner, R. Burk, P. Wood, D. Hornsby, M. Kessler, G. Gross 1 , C. Grigson, J. Hoover, L. Ruf, P. Fech. The visit of the Southern Illinois University Chamber Choir and two other college glee clubs high lighted a highly successful season for the Vocal Music Department under the direction of Mr. Wil¬ liam Wakeland. The S.I.U. group, along with about 180 students from ten area high schools, came here for a Madrigal Festival which Clark sponsored. The Wabash College Men’s Glee Club was here in Sep¬ tember and the Michigan State University Men’s Glee Club presented a concert in March. Members of the department also heard a jazz concert by Dave Brubeck, the musical My Fair Lady, and the Indiana University Madrigal Singers. The winter concert in December included “The Night Before Christmas.” The spring concert in March featured Gilbert and Sullivan’s operetta Trial by Jury. A vesper program was presented on the school steps in May, and the department closed the year by sing¬ ing at the Seniors’ Baccalaureate. The Boy’s Quartet, consisting of Ken Miller, Gary Kaplan, Charles Melton, and Ron Burk, sings for clubs and concerts. 94 Do Gilbert and Sullivan’s Trial by Jury HARMONEERS—FRONT ROW: G. Kaplan, T. Xidis, K. Miller, P. Macnak, W. Wood, H. Strand, B. Gehrke, G. Hayes, K. Hannon, J. Kaplan. ROW TWO: D. Sallay, E. Jacobsberg, J. Csigas, R. Wiley, M. Kirn, C. Grigson, _ R. Swetnam, G. Gurevitz, A. Seliga, C. Walker, T. Mullins. ROW THREE: R. Harper, J. Fech, S. Wright, R. Wilson, P. Wood, R. Weinberg, T. Snider, D. Burk, 0. Madsen, M. Cutler, R. Grigson, R. Mullins. ROW FOUR: K. Banasak, G. Gross, D. Hornsby, G. Gardner, R. Burk, L. Marcisz, M. Kessler, C. Madsen, T. Forbes, R. Smith, C. Melton, D. King. HARMONETTES—T. Golden, S. Thomas, R. Hartman, S. Amundsen, P. Fech (accompa¬ nist), C. Longe, B. Benko, D. Hickman, L. Ruf. B O Y S’ C H O R U S—FRONT ROW: L. Marcisz, K. Hayes, J. Madsen, B. Madsen, S. Wright, C. Gurevitz. ROW TWO: A. J. Saliga, B. Harper, D. Sallay, C. Walker, J. Csigas, R. Grigson, T. Mullins. 95 Singers Diligently Practice for Concert “All right, cherubs, let’s get to work!” On Tuesday night and Thursday morning this cry could be heard ringing in the vocal music room where the Madrigal Group meets. The Madrigal Group, the most advanced singing group, sings Baroque and Elizabethan music, arranged folk songs, and contemporary numbers. To top off this year’s effort they combined with the A Cappella Choir to present a Bach sonata for two choirs. Linda Field accompanied on the school’s new harpsi¬ chord. The Girls’ Choir is a group which meets seventh period every day. This year it sang a wide range of contemporary music including songs from Brit¬ ten’s Ceremony of Carols and Bernstein’s West Side Story. MADRIGALS—FRONT ROW: N. Miller, H. Humphreys, L. Swenson, P. Schrage, P. Bachi, L. Field, B. Hered, W. Gra¬ ham. TWO ROW: R. Mullins, G. Kaplan, E. Kundrat, M. Summers, E. Uhrin, M. A. Poracky, F. Gehrke, J. Vavrek, P. Fech. ROW THREE: K. Miller, G. Gardner, R. Burk, P. Wood, P. Markonni, M. Kessler, G. Gross, C. Melton, B. Smith. GIRLS’ CHOIR—FRONT ROW: C. Suiter, L. Bartholomay, C. Balog, M. Yencjich, K. Hrasch, K. Csigas, K. Dubich, T. Jancik, J. Smigla, C. Mazur. ROW TWO: S. Amundsen, L. Hric, M. Kenes, P. Veslocki, P. Forystek, C. Carpenter, N. Radloff, L. Malone, M. Hudson, M. Dean, C. Synder. ROW THREE: D. Carros, K. Pajak, S. Eshena, P. Grandbois, L. Kessler, B. Finnegan, B. Jackson, C. Longo, D. Kerr, M. Hawkins. The Vocal Music Department, under the direction of Mr. William Wakeland, is composed of a number of different groups. Upon entering Clark, freshmen interested in music may join either Girls’ Chorus or Boys’ Chorus. After gaining a limited amount of music appreciation, they are allowed to join any of the groups they wish. Among these groups are Girls’ Choir, composed of approximately thirty-five girls, and Har- moneers, being made up of fifty members. Another group is Harmon- ettes, a triple trio, which meets after school on Tuesday evenings. Meet¬ ing daily is A Cappella Choir which consists of approximately forty-five members. All these groups play a big part in the composition of the Vocal Music Department. GIRLS ' CHORUS—FRONT ROW: D. Leimbach, S. Haran- gody, L. Halik, D. Janik, C. Marinaro, C. Tokarz, S. Gon- siorowski, P. Bojda, T. Miskus. ROW TWO: C. Kirk, E. Adams, T. Hajduk, B. Trebs, V. Filas, P. Roadman, P. Whitman, N. Fuller, P. Scepkowski, J. Saczawa. ROW THREE: M. Fauth, M. Ashcraft, B. Leslie, N. Greskovich, J. Means, J. Matlon, K. Fitzpatrick, G. Johnson, J. Simko. ROW FOUR: N. Ferrara, J. Stofcik, P. Miller, B. Barr, J. Michalak, B. Tkach, G. Dzurovcik, B. Vaughan, R. Duhon. ROW FIVE: J. Raaosa, S. J. Stasny, M. Benko, M. Gaughan, L. Mrzlock, J. Stipulin, A. Markonni, D. Keister. ROW SIX: P. Smutniak, M. A. Laurincik, M. R. Treschak, M. B. Mc¬ Laughlin, M. L. Mileusnich, K. Kowalski, C. Seifert, S. Garza, K. McCutcheon. ROW SEVEN: M. Summers, N. DeChantal, J. Mizerik, B. Banik, M. Williams, S. Dostatni, S. Gross, M. Wisniewski. ROW EIGHT: D. Antkowiak, M. A. Poracky, C. Shimala, S. O’Drobinak, P. Strabavy, D. Leslie, K. Avery, J. Rybarczyk. ROW NINE: P. Bachi, C. Stanek, B. Jallo, J. Beda, P. Hmuroyic, J. Conrad, M. Bobowski. ROW TEN: B. Tomko, D. Vince, L. Baranowski, J. Eggers, K. Best, H. Humphreys, M. Treadway, E. Nagy. Hard Work, Perseverance Culminate in Show “That’s the spot. Stand right there,” directs Mr. Erickson. A serene pose in the rehearsal of “Trial by Jury” is struck Pat Schrage and Gregg Gross look on. by Ken Miller, Roscoe Grigson, and Pat Schrage. Pianist Linda Field practices on the new Steinberg Baby Grand piano. Two Suites Highlight Orchestra Concert In its first year, under the direction of Miss Thelma Wilcox, the orchestra performed the “Nell Gwyn Suite” by German, and the “Mirtillo Suite " by Handel. A harpsichord and a harp supplemented the usual complement of strings, woodwinds, and percussion. The brasses joined to help in other com¬ positions, such as “El Pelacario” by Padilla. Indivi¬ dual achievement was stressed. Ensembles and so¬ loists fared well at both the district and state con¬ tests. The orchestra also contributed to the social at¬ mosphere. Their rendition of the “Clarkstone Cops,” which used an antique auto, garnered a first in the Homecoming Parade. The orchestra dance, “Schnib- bel Stomp,” featured original rock ’n roll composi¬ tions. The winning composition was. entitled “Purple Flyin’ Carpet.” Practicing diligently on a difficult concerto for the Orches¬ tra Concert in March is Sandy Fauth, harpist. ORCHESTRA—FRONT ROW: N. Small, B. Smith, K. Laka¬ tos, N. Cervorne, J. Tolchinsky, E. Rosenstein, F. Gehrke, G. Jankowski, M. Fauth, M. Broadowski, M. Gradek, S. Fauth. ROW TWO: K. Holman, L. Marcisz, L. Larson, T. Mueller, i I T. Banaszak, K. Banasak, S. Parks, B. Hered, R. Weinberg, T. Snider, M. Miller, R. Smith, L. Field, B. Madsen, M. Kessler, Miss Wilcox, sponsor, J. Vavrek, R. Burk. Tooters Trippingly Toot Way to Nap town The twirling and candy-selling majorettes are Gayle Antil- la, Diane Kerr, Jan Dybel, and Sharon Gootee. Director Carlyle Snider announced a modification of traditional band policy, effective in 1962. He de-emphasized participation in the annual ensemble contest sponsored by the Northern Indiana School Band, Orchestra, and Vocal Association. Two per¬ manent ensembles, one woodwind, one brass, re¬ hearsed throughout the year, playing both popular and classical literature, and performed with the full band in concert. The new de-emphasis did not extend to the NISBOVA solo contest, in which the band participated with customary distinction. Twelve soloists won first division rating in the district contest and played in the state contest, held February 17, at Broad Ripple High School, In¬ dianapolis. The January Winter Concert, a demon¬ stration of aptitude and perseverance, included literature as advanced as the finale from Dvorak’s “New World” Symphony, and “Folk Song Suite” by Vaughan-Williams. Clark’s loyal pep band adds rhythm to school spirit by sup¬ plying background music to inspire the team on to victory. Behind the big dark door of room 12, Junior Jim Boswell and Senior Ellyn Rosenstein practice for the band concert. BAND—FRONT ROW: P. Fech, B. Hered, F. Gehrke, A. Sandilands, L. Kessler, Ellyn Rosenstein, J. Tolchinsky. ROW TWO: S. Parks, B. Yackish, K. Hannon, B. Smith, C. Turpin, J. Picklin, D. Madura, T. Forbes, R. Grigson. ROW THREE: J. Fech, K. McCutcheon, L. Gurevitz, L. Holt, S. Harris, G. Jankowski, H. Humphreys, G. Kaplan, L. Swen¬ son, J. Kaminsky, J. Silvian, J. Boswell, C. Liehe, T. Snider, B. Weinberg. ROW FOUR: T. Mullins, J. Ilijanich, S. Smith, T. Miskus, A. Markonni, G. Gardner, P. Schrage, D. Antkowiak, M. Boswell, R. Leckrone, B. Vater, M. Kessler, B. Madsen, M. Treadway, S. Leland, R. Francis, W. Wein¬ berg, D. Burk, N. Miller, J. Vavrek, R. Burk. “Littlest” Pioneer, “George”, Arrives at Clark The sounds of “Mighty Proud of It, G.R.C.” and “P-i-o-n-e-e-r-s, Pioneers” resounded mightily in the Whiting Memorial Gymnasium from the Clark cheering section. Organizing the cheering block in conjunction with the cheerleaders was just one of the activities engaged in by the Booster Club. Chartering a bus to the Huntington Tourney, purchasing blue and white shakers, and passing out “Rah Rah” pins and Clark buttons were some of the other activities engaged in by the club. The club purchased a mannequin and clothed him in typical pioneer garb from the coonskin cap to the moccasins. The “littlest” Pioneer was nick¬ named, “George”. Booster Club officers are Janet Vater, sec.; Linda Ruf, treas.; Jack Taylor, pres.; and Joyce Pietrzak, veep. 102 Bulging Eyes Peer into Gym Tuesday Nights Like the Balinese, the main objective of the thirty-five members of Modern Dance was to inter¬ pret music and to create dances to fit this music. Membership was open to any high school gill interested, but decision of new members was based upon the prospective members’ co-operation, poise, and co-ordination. Because of the extensive material involved, Modern Dance held a regular Tuesday night meet¬ ing. Besides these regularly scheduled meetings, MODERN DANCE—FRONT ROW: C. Nednien, S. Labus, C. Wicziewicz, M. Kampo, C. Cudek. ROW TWO: V. Mur- zyn, L. Gurveitz, C. Francisco, J. Pietrzak, P. Krygier. ROW THREE: J. Dvbel, L. Dunn, M. Keith, G. Gordon, B. Yachish. ROW FOUR: J. Vater, E. Catchur, G. Antilla, B. Spanier, E. Rosenstein. ROW FIVE: K. Kurasz, J. Mihalo, D. Hick¬ man, C. Carpenter. special rehearsals were called and held in prepara¬ tion for their public performance. Before their crea¬ tive abilities were put to use, the girls limbered up for fifteen minutes. Girls that belonged to Modern Dance wore black leotards which served as a basis for any costume they needed. In the spring concert, Modern Dance performed to the misty “Deep Purple,” “Stairway to the Stars,” and the lively “Everything’s Cornin’ Up Roses.” Junior Sharon Gabbert and Senior Mary Keith, attired in hoodlum black, dance to “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue” from “West Side Story,” for the Vocal Music Concert held in the spring. Drama Members Help with Acting, Staging, and “Does it hurt?” inquires Stella. “Is that question rhetorical or do you really mean it?” yells Toby after cutting his forehead. Crash! Bang! First Place! The Stage Crew had another first to add to its line of activities. With the helpful co-operation of its members, the Crew copped a blue ribbon for its entry of the Queen’s float in the 1961 Homecoming Parade. Group co-operation was also responsible for the Production of “A Night of Comedy,” a combination of three humorous one-act plays. Stag Crew, again was instrumental in the success of this venture. Ways and Means, If Men Played Cards As Wom¬ en Do, and Amicable Parting found life in the per¬ sons of our Stage Crew. The ambitious Crew, under the direction of Miss Jeani Knapp, supplied the lighting, “scraped together” the props, produced the costumes, furnished the actors, and engineered a very successful “first production.” Not only has the Stage Crew been resourceful Jerry Bercik, Ken Zeller, Mike Kirn, and Gerry Carpenter, members of Clark’s Stage Crew, are pictured in the process of preparing the set for the 1962 Junior Class production of “The Matchmaker.” 104 Make Up. Queen’s Float First in Homecoming STAGE CREW—FRONT ROW: Miss Knapp, Sponsor, G. Dzurovcik, D. Cornelia, C. Francisco, P. Krygier, J. Bercik, L. Gurevitz, M. Moldraski, J. Banas, P. Regashus, B. Sallay, K. McCutcheon. ROW TWO: M. Watson, B. Hooper, F. Condo, S. Alfred, J. Allen, C. Keister, P. Kaleta, M. Cison, C. Short, G. Johnson, J. Eggers. ROW THREE: B. Jackson, M. Hawkins, J. Means, L. Swenson, V. Kuldsaar, B. on its own, but its members also served many other organizations throughout the 1961-62 Clark school year. Lighting for all the dances and assemblies was a special project for them. The Stage Crew furnished curtain-pullers and lighting men for junior high assemblies and fashion shows. The music department was also furnished with a Stage Crew to handle the technical end of its productions. The elementary groups also felt the far reaching support of the Stage Crew. These groups were fur¬ nished with furniture-movers, curtain-pullers, and light crews necessary for elementary staging ef¬ forts. The Stage Crew served Clark in many areas be¬ ginning with the elementary grades, through the junior high and, finally, the senior high. Wozniak, L. Anderson, G. Gurevitz, K. Zeller, B. Carn¬ ahan, B. Seth, M. Trombley. ROW FOUR: B. Benko, T. Golden, L. Ruf, J. Macocha, G. Antilla, A. Poison, J. Car¬ penter, H. Kasprzak, J. Palko, J. Oliver, C. Grigson, B. Reichert. ROW FIVE: S. Kalwinski, W. Michalak, C. Condo, G. Kaplan, A. Chilla, K. Banasak, B. Weinberg, M. Kirn, G. Gross, B. Pramuk, T. Blazak, R. Wetnight. “Hold Still!” The art of applying make-up is shown here by Linda Swenson while Jean Tolchinsky tries to co-operate. 105 Going Once; Wagner and Strauss; Goldilocks LATIN CLUB—FRONT ROW: C. Masura, R. Duhon, B. Trebs, C. Wolf, D. Bangert, D. Stombaugh, J. Kowal, K. Vasilko, M. Tkacz, L. Halik, M. A. Treschok. ROW TWO: T. Konechni, B. Domagalski, M. Steliga, M. E. Kew, S. Dostatni, K. Csigas, T. Todd, N. Greskovich, J. Kaplan, D. Mihalo. ROW THREE: P. Kelly, S. Greenberg, E. Oxford, A. Budnky, S. Labus, P. Veslocki, C. Shimala, P. Clark, M. A. Poracky, P. Smutniak, N. Bubnovich. ROW FOUR: H. Humphreys, N. Miller, J. Fox, J. Rybarczyk, M. Kekich, M. Boswell, A. Dzurovcik, P. Regashus, H. Strand, W. Wood. ROW FIVE: J. Ruf, C. Reichert, H. Weinberg, T. Wiak, J. Kaminsky, D. Smith, G. Brown, T. Beaudrie. GERMAN CLUB—FRONT ROW: J. Sluka, L. Field, B. Hered, M. Toops, G. Daurovcik, L. Holt, K. Avery, A. Mar- konni, D. Kukek, L. Kessler. ROW TWO: J. Troksa, D. Galatzer, B. Madsen, B. Weinberg, F. Ambrose, J. Vogel, C. Clark, D. Sallay, M. Fauth, D. Fiester. ROW THREE: B. Smith, C. Liehe, M. Levin, M. Kirn, G. Gardner, K. Holman, P. Merich, J. Madsen, K. Hayes. ROW FOUR: K. Hannon, T. Forbes, M. Trombley, D. Burk, P. Banik, G. Grigson, P. Jones, T. Mullins, J. Adley, B. Harper. ROW FIVE: G. Kaplan, T. Snider, J. Fech, K. Banasak, A. Berger, D. Dolak, G. Gross. 106 Clark’s language clubs acquainted the pupil with the culture of the people that speak that language. Celebrating the Saturnalia and holding a Slave Auction were two of the main activities of the Latin Club. Dancing and games based on the Latin Lan¬ guage sparked the Saturnalia, the Roman Christ¬ mas. At the Slave Auction, the highlight of the year, older members of the club purchased the services of freshmen members for a day. The members of Spanish Club planned and staged an auditorium program based on “Christmas in Mexico.” Club members sang songs in Spanish, danced, and told stories. A Spanish spoof of “The Three Bears” starred a contingent of the male mem¬ bers. Deutscher Gesangenverein means German Singing Society, but is better known as German Club. Club members sing marching and hiking songs, convivial songs, and other songs for every and any activity. Leaving Wagner and Strauss, the club took a field trip to near-by Wolf Lake. A pilgrimage to “Der Herr’s” in Joliet, Illinois, for the purpose of edifica¬ tion, high lighted the year’s activities. SPANISH CLUB—FRONT ROW: B. Vaughan, V. Filas, C. Girski, N. Fuller, P. Roadman, W. Price-Pres., C. Nednien- Sec., B. Kovacich-Treas., B. Barr, S. Harangody, P. Whit¬ man. ROW TWO: G. Penciak, B. Wittig, M. Brodowski, P. Ferguson, O. Diaz, C. Vega, V. Groves, G. Gordon, K. Powell, B. Banik, R. Tkach. ROW THREE: V. Geleta, M. Kenes, C. Kirk, J. Macocha, K. Dubich, J. Norrington, M. “lens, iens, Hums (Going, going, gone),” shouts Chuck Wolf, accepting bids for slaves Jan Kowal and Donna Stom- baugh. Ashcraft, J. Radosa, J. Rybarczyk, K. Bartoszek, P. Bachi, J. Michalak. ROW FOUR: E. Rosenstein, L. Hric, D. Antkowiak, G. Hayes, M. Gaughan, M. Popovich, A. Poison, L. Bartholomay, M. Benko, M. Williams, M. McLaughlin. ROW FIVE: K. Kantowski, D. Brown, W. McLean, J. Weiss, B. Allison, J. Ilijanich, G. Conn, K. Bailey, A. Stricko, J. Sroka, J. Murzyn, J. Tangerman, Sponsor. 107 Y-Teens and Red Cross Raise Funds to Serve SR. Y-TEENS—FRONT ROW: C. Francisco, C. Cudek, J. Mihalo, C. Coppi, K. Sandrick, F. Condo, P. Krygter, D. Hickman, R. Phillips, P. Mordus, W. Graham. ROW TWO: S. Moore, A. Lockridge, E. Rosentein, L. Kandalec, D. Troksa, C. Keister, P. Kaleta, F. Gehrke, S. Geleta, G. Gordon, V. Groves. ROW THREE: M. Keith, L. Dunn, B. Hoiper, J. Banas, G. Dubczak, G. Jan¬ kowski, K. Bojda, N. Radloff, J. Vavrek, J. Sluka, ROW FOUR: S. Eshena, J. Kundrat, D. Wozniak, P. Stewart, R. Kowal, S. Thomas C. Schweikert, K. Stofcik, E. Uhrin, B. O’Drobinak, C. Longo. ROW FIVE: J. Ice, N. Spanier, S. Florer, C. Jamrozik, M. Michnal, B. Toops, P. Fech. Two clubs at Clark concentrated upon serving those less fortunate than themselves. SOPH.-JR. Y-TEENS—FRONT ROW: S. Poplowski, P. Ferguson, M. E. Puplava, D. Bugajski, M. Wagner, J. Pretrzak, K. McCutchen, T. Hajduk, E. Nagy, E. Pinkston, B. Balint, S. Amundson, E. Shade, L. Sajdyk, C. Svitek, C. Sinder, ROW TWO: J. Allen, B. Benko, K. Kurasz, M. Kampo, J. Dybel, G. Johnson, J. Zmija, P. Hernandez, J. Means, D. Countreman, L. Anderson, B. Dudzik, V. Murzyn, J. Forauer, L. Gurevitz, V. Taylor, M. Miller, A. Budnyk, D. Gallagher. ROW THREE: T. Golden, D. Hutira, L. Malone, J. Eggers, A. Diskorowski, S. Falaschette, S. Kamin, N. Biel, J. Jackim, S. Fauth, M. Gradik, E. Foreman, J. Graffen, B. Davits, D. Smigla, S. Dostatni. ROW FOUR: S. Hoffman, R. Lawson, E. Catchur, A. Dvorscak, M. Robinson, S. Smith, S. Matej, E. Oxford, S. Greenberg, K. Kulik, J. Rybarczyk, M. Dean, D. Pfiester, M. Bugajski, M. Summers. ROW FIVE: S. Gabbert, S. Gootee, J. Vater, D. Antkowiak, D. Schellang, A. Lucacek, C. Duda, B. Gurds, D. Grahovac, C. Gyurcsan, L. Ruf. The motto of the Junior Red Cross, “We believe in service for others,” manifested itself in the activities of the club. Funds raised by the annual movie project were used to buy a Christmas basket for a needy fam¬ ily, clothing for the Northwest Town¬ ship Old Folks Home for Men, cloth¬ ing for needy boys, and supplies for boxes sent overseas. A new project initiated this year was sending birth¬ day cards and cakes to elderly people. In order to inform the public of the work they had done, club members decorated a window in the NIPSCO building. The Y-Teens, a division of the Young Women’s Christian Associa¬ tion, also performed many acts of selfless service. Work to organize the club started with a summer workshop at Syracuse, Indiana. Two delegates were sent to this work¬ shop. At Christmas the club sent baskets and Christmas trees to needy families in the community. Club members also delivered a Christmas tree, some candy, and cookies, and a giant card signed by all the members of the club. Part of the Y-Teen pro¬ gram was teaching the girls about grooming and fashion. The Hammond Y.W.C.A. offered a course in this area. The social activities of the club were capped by a Burton Holmes Travelogue about the Carribean. Because of the overwhelming num¬ ber of students interested in joining Y-Teens, Clark’s Y-Teen Club was divided into two groups. The Senior Y-Teens were co-sponsored by Mrs. Catherine Dunham and Miss Edna Howe. Miss Carol Krupa sponsored the newly organized Freshman Y- Teens. 108 the Needy of the Community and the World FROSH Y-TEENS—FRONT ROW: S. Harangody, J. Rich¬ ardson, P. Whitman, L. Halik, K. Kowalski, K. Fitz¬ patrick, M. Toops, L. Kollmar, C. Brownell, B. Trebs, D. Hernandez. ROW TWO: A. M. Wojtowicz, P. Bojda, P. Roadman, G. Dzurovcik, M. Wisniewski, S. Gonsiorowski, L. Baranowski, B. Banik, B. Vaughan, B. Leslie, J. Matlon, N. Gora. ROW THREE: B. Boncela, C. Maslikowski, M. Cison, J. Stipulin, A. Markonni, S. Shade, E. Jansak, D. Kuker, B. Bugajski, J. Rybarczyk, M. Ashcraft. ROW FOUR: D. Leslie, B. Barr, N. Ferrara, C. Seifert, S. Ferry, J. Radosa, S. Harris, P. Troksa, J. Wagner, S. Garba ra, M. A. Trcschak. ROW FIVE: N. Bragiel, M. Boswell, S. Bognar, M. Williams, S. Harris, C. Clark, M. Benko, M. Bobowski, P. Hmurovic, J. Conrad, H. Humphreys. RED CROSS—FRONT ROW: C. Kirk, C. Brehmer, C. Mel¬ ton, O. Diaz, C. Vega, M. Zellez. ROW TWO: F. DeLong, C. Brazina, C. Balog, J. Petrovich, L. Crozier. ROW THREE: C. Wolf, B. Jallo, A. M. Nagy, B. Hicko, R. Stofcik, Miss Ide. 109 FROSH-SOPH HI-Y—FRONT ROW: B. Madson, D. Burk, Powell, R. Murzyn, T. Snider. ROW THREE: R. Leckrone, B. Smith, T. Frobes. ROW TWO: J. Fech, K. Hannon, K. T. Mullins, T. Wiak, G. Hayes, 0. Watkins, sponsor. Hi-Y Wins Basketball Tourney; Serves Others JUNIOR-SENIOR HI-Y— FRONT ROW: C. Liehe, K. Mil¬ ler, T. Xidis, K. Banasak, C. Freeland, A . Chilla, T. Balko, Mr. Wilkinson, sponsor. ROW TWO: M. Kirn, R. Burk, G. Zvonar, R. Dembowski, J. Boswell, J. Taylor, C. Condo, M. Kessler, R. Wetnight. The Easter week religious services and the an¬ nual induction ceremony capped the activities of the Hi-Y. The clubs this year participated in many activities organized by the Hammond Y.M.C.A., such as the City Hi-Y Basketball Tourney, which the Clark Hi-Y won. Activities of the Freshmen-Sophomore Hi-Y, under the direction of Mr. Watkins, included the sale of pop at school activities, the checking of coats at dances, and the sale of football and basketball schedule pencils. The Junior-Senior Hi-Y, headed by Mr. Wilkin¬ son, raised funds by having newspaper drives and car washes. The funds collected by the two clubs were used to support world service projects, the Hammond Y.M.C.A., and “to create, maintain, and extend throughout the home, school, and community, high standards of Christian character.” 110 Clubs Serve School by Providing Pictures A. V. O.—FIRST ROW: A. Clements, D. Sheffield, C. Acheson, K. Powell, G. Mihalo, E. Burkat, E. Ciesar, F. Czechanski, J. Csigas, J. Nanista, D. King. ROW TWO: J. Carnahan, A. J. Saliga, B ' . Divak, L. Potapowicz, S. Kalwinski, J. Mihalso, R. Wilson, F. Morganthaler, R. Mertz, G. Watkins. ROW THREE: J. O’Drobinak, D. Wal- Hardly a day went by during which a member of the Audio-Visual Operators’ Club was not seen dash¬ ing about the halls. The A.V.O. Club, under the di¬ rection of Mr. Wilkinson, performed a vital service to the school. Members of the club provided music for dances, ran movies, made announcements, oper¬ ated tape recorders, and maintained and repaired audio-visual equipment. The A.V.O. held a Christmas basketball party and sponsored a dance to raise funds for the club treasury. Members of the Photo Club, under the leader¬ ship of Mr. Arthur Erickson, commonly known as “Mr. E,” snapped shots at school activities, scur¬ ried to take “ad” pictures, and reprinted an infinite number of “lost” pictures. The pictures taken by the Photo Club were used by the POWDER HORN and were sold to school organizations, teachers, and students. Club members processed well over five- hundred separate pictures this year in a hole in the wall in room 223. Ill PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB—FIRST ROW: S. Kalwinski, L. Potapowicz, T. Banaszak, E. Udycz. ROW TWO: C. Grigson, E. Hernandez, C. Farrell, F. Macnak. ROW THREE: J. Hantz, R. Reinicker, B. Olds, T. Tomko. ROW FOUR: A. Erickson. ker, C. Capps, F. Rosinski, C. Walker, J. Sroka, P. Mac¬ nak, R. Wetnight G. Kaminsky. ROW FOUR: R. Reinic¬ ker, D. Dziadosz, R. Eberle, J. Shimala, D. Hornsby, R. Burk, S. Wright, G. Gardner, M. Reffkin. ROW FIVE: R. Walszak, W. Chovan, R. Mikuly, K. Banasak, T. Muel¬ ler, G. Conn, R. Rusnak. Neophyte Nurses Train under Mrs. Miller Nurses’ Club gives valuable aid to the school as they help organize the program of tuberculin testing for the school year. Special doctors and nurses are provided to give the test to both freshmen and seniors. Nurses’ Club officers are Nancy Small, president; Karen Csigas, vice-president; Pat Veslocki, treasurer; and Joyce Pietrzak, secretary. The Nurses’ Club enabled girls to become ac¬ quainted with hospitals, clinical techniques, and community health problems. The club also provided information and help in choosing a nursing school. In order to meet these goals, the club held discus¬ sions, heard speakers, and saw movies. The club heard a representative from the Army, the Director of the Saint Catherine’s Hospital School of X-Ray, a recruiter from Saint Margaret’s Hospital, and a representative from the Lake County Cancer So¬ ciety. The members of the club planned a visit to one of the local hospitals in the spring. Aside from the programs, the members were given the chance to work in the school nurse’s of¬ fice. This opportunity provides invaluable experi¬ ence to Clark’s future nurses. The Nurses’ Club provided gifts for the Norman Beatty Hospital patients for Christmas. Protozoans Engross Budding Biologists By peering through the narrow orifice of a microscope, Biology Club members saw assorted one- celled animals known as protozoans. After becom¬ ing familiar with paramecia, amoebas, and rotifers, the club attacked the one-celled plants. When the budding biologists could distinguish between these two kingdoms, they were confronted with the per¬ plexing euglena that is seemingly half plant and half animal. Leaving the area of the one-celled life forms, club members moved through the thallo- phytes to the spermatophytes in the plant kingdom and through the poriferates to the vertebrates in the animal kingdom. The Biology Club, under the direction of Mr. Powell, was formed eight years ago in order to ex¬ pand through movies, field trips, and personal con¬ tact, knowledge of biology obtained in the class¬ room. This knowledge was then applied to personal research conducted by the members. Examining biological specimens near the “good old fish tank” are Tim Beaudrie, Bob Hatczel, and Jeff Picklin. BIOLOGY CLUB—FRONT ROW: T. Miskus, J. Mikalik, M. Michalak, S. Garza, J. Patrick, M. Murzyn, D. Liembach, D. Carros, J. Burkat. ROW TWO: A. Clements, C. Ache- son, J. Mizeric, M. Niblett, R. Tkach, P. Golembiewski, M. Fauth, S. Staple, Mr. Powell. ROW THREE: H. Wein¬ berg, T. Beaudrie, G. Kaminsky, J. Picklin, K. Haluska, A. Dzurovcik, B. Mergeski, J. Golembiewski, K. Hayes. ROW FOUR: J. Enright, J. Juricic, R. Moffitt, B. Hatzel, D. Panasuk, T. Jez, W. Michalak, T. Michalak, B. Staley. 113 Two Clubs Help Students Determine Vocations Future Teachers of America, sponsored by Miss Delores McCampbell, organized to help its members decide if teaching is to be their vocation. At their meetings, the members learned about the pro¬ fes sion through talks given by teachers, movies on the life of a teacher, and group discussions on the problems of a teacher. The initiation of new members, the installation of officers, and a dinner to honor the graduating seniors made up the activities of this club. Aside from these social activities, the senior girls par¬ ticipated in a cadet teaching program. Under this program the girls gained practical teaching ex¬ perience by helping pupils through reading groups, and spelling and arithmetic practices in the ele¬ mentary grades during their free periods. The Future Secretaries’ Club, sponsored by Miss Joan Coughlan, prepared girls in the advanced shorthand classes for secretarial careers. The mem¬ bers reached a broader understanding of the im¬ portance of the secretary in the fast-moving busi¬ ness world of today. The meetings, held every fourth Wednesday, featured speakers who explained the duties of the secretary, demonstrated office equipment, and stressed the importance of good grooming, co-opera¬ tion, and efficiency on the job. Representatives from the personnel department of various industries described the procedure for placing job applications. The meetings, which were most interesting, in¬ cluded the informative discussions with alumnae who had entered the business world as steno¬ graphers and secretaries. F. T. A.—FRONT ROW: D. Troksa, C. Francisco, R. Phil¬ lips, M. Keith, P. Mordus, S. Amundsen, C. Svitek. ROW TWO: G. Dubczak, G. Gordon, J. Banas, L. Dunn, F. Gehrke, M. Kew, N. Soptich. ROW THREE: R. Janas, E. Rosenstein, J. Vavrek, S. Fauth, M. Gradek, L. Holt, C. Short. ROW FOUR: Miss McCampbell, Sponsor, B. Sichak, J. Rybarezyk, P. Fech, E. Oxford, L. Kandalec, M. McLaughlin. ROW FIVE: M. Bodowski, D. Hickman, M. Popovich, R. Hart¬ man, G. Troksa, J. Fech, K. Sandrick, J. Petrovich. FUTURE SECRETARIES—FRONT ROW: C. Francisco, E. Uhrin, J. Banas, W. Graham. ROW TWO: D. Troksa, G. Dubczak, M. Keith. ROW THREE: R. Janas, C. Hoyda, J. Jalovecky, L. Dunn, C. Berland. ROW FOUR: C. Schwei- kert, S. Thomas, C. Jamrozik. ROW FIVE: Miss Coughlan, Sponsor, S. Grogan, M. Michnal, B. Toops. LIBRARY CLUB—FRONT ROW: D. Countremen, M. Sum¬ mers, P. Kelly, A. Kress, E. Shade. ROW TWO: T. Jancik, J. Pasyk, D. Markovich, J. Mat- Ion. ROW THREE: Miss Lake, V. Gonsiorowski, A. Poison, Miss Turner. Dewey Decimals Plague Librarians “From 100-199 is philosophy. From 200-229 is religion.” The necessary learning of the Dewey Decimal System was just one of the many activities in which this year’s Library Club participated. The members also learned the proper procedure for keeping books and magazines in proper condition, managing the desk, circulating library materials, and preparing new books for circulation. Through these activities the club strived to serve the student body of Clark. Those pupils who main¬ tained above average grades and who devoted about one hour per day to the work in the library gained much valuable experience in meeting and working with all kinds of people. The club also maintained the library bulletin board, which colorfully pictured such things as Christmas, Easter, Washington’s birthday, and Memorial Day. To support the club and to buy books and sup¬ plies, a bake sale was held in the spring. 115 i 1 ■ w s i £1 Pioneers Learn to Fold and Publish Paper Assistant editor Pat Mordus and Editor Barbara Sichak concoct tine “all-famous” Pioneer News headlines. Feature writer Steve Biel writes a column as typist-colum¬ nist Judy Banas pounds over the typewriter. Clark’s Pioneer News, a member of the National Scholastic Press Association, the Indiana High School Press Association, the Columbia University Scholastic Press, and the Quill and Scroll Society, is sponsored by Mr. Muir. 116 Page editors Jean Tolchinsky, Karen Sandrick, and Jack Taylor compare “dummies.” The major duties performed by the members of the Pioneer News staff included folding papers, laying out dummy sheets, assigning and collecting stories, typing stencils, and mimeographing pap¬ ers. From the paperfolders to the editor-in-chief, each duty was essential to the publication of Clark’s newspaper, the Pioneer News. In its 29th consecutive year of publication, the P.N.’s 34 mimeographed issues were produced week¬ ly during the school year. Pictorial issues high¬ lighted the home-coming, Christmas, and the sen¬ ior edition. Four editors prepared an annual feature page about Clark High for the Hammond Times. The P.N. also sent delegates to the Indiana High School Press Association Conference at Franklin College; a Press Conference sponsored by the Chicago Sun Times; and, the Northern Indiana Journalism Sem¬ inar at Valparaiso University. PIONEER NEWS WRITERS—FRONT ROW: N. Woszcyn- ski, N. Radloff, J. Bybel, B. Waszak, M. Wagner. ROW TWO: R. Kowal, E. Shade, J. Bunn, C. Brehmer, M. Howard, B. Domagalski, P. Grandbois, J. Jalovecky, C. Cudek. ROW THREE: C. Schweikert, C. Tierney, V. Murzyn, D. Hick¬ man, C. Stanek, G. Dubczak, C. Berland, J. Sluka, M. Moldraski, R. Hartman, P. Fech, F. Gehrke. ROW FOUR: S. Thomas, G. Gardner, C. Coppi, E. Shields, J. Taylor, G. Antilla, V. Kuldsaar, E. Uhrin, M. Popovich, H. Kasprzak. Mr. Muir, publications sponsor, patiently arbitrates, ad¬ vises, and sympathizes in room 223. Pioneer News staff members are J. Banas, typist; S. Gab- bert, circulation; N. Small, artist; B. Benko, circulation; B. Seth, artist, R. Szot, artist. 117 Blood and Sweat; Toil and Tears VKilKKS-FRONT ROW: M. Kirn, J. Mihalo, J. Banas, C. Cudek, Y. Drasco, K. Milter. ROW TWO: G. Gardner, R. Weinberg, L. Swenson, M. Keith, E. Rosenstein, C. Free¬ land. ROW THREE: J. Palko, R. Dembowski, J. Bercik, C. Wolf, J. Taylor. POWDER HORN staff members are C. Berland, typist; J. Jalovecky, typist; V. Kuldsaar, picture editor; S. Parks, artist; F. Gehrke, index editor; J. Sluka, identification editor. POWDER HORN staff members are R. Hartman, senior editor; M. Moldraski, senior editor; L. Ruf, underclass editor; K. Miller, sports editor; R. Dembowski, sports editor; P. Wood, faculty editor. 118 Powder horns symbolized pioneer life just as this Poioder Horn symbolizes the student life at the George Rogers Clark High School during the year 1961-62. The Indiana University High School Journalism Institute started the endless schedule rolling. The first job of the co-editors, Diane Wozniak and Pamela Stewart, was to select staff members who would be willing to devote more than the expected. A theme and new layouts for the pictures had to be decided upon. The story of the year was centered around the theme “That Wonderful Year.” With the beginning of the school year, the staff began to write stories, take and crop pictures, solicit ads, and encourage yearbook sales. These things were all necessary for a terrific yearbook. As the work progressed, many unforeseen events caused delays and frazzled nerves. In spite of the problems faced, the staff tried to represent “That Wonderful Year” as simply and as clearly as pos¬ sible. The Poioder Horn was distributed to Seniors at the Senior Banquet in May and to underclassmen on the last day of school. With the Signature Swing and the hectic exchange of autographs, the 1962 Powder Horn become a record of the joy and sor¬ row of that wonderful year—1962. Co-editors Diane Wozniak and Pam Stewart crop pictures for the ’62 Powder Horn.. POWDER HORN staff is S. Grogan, publicity editor; C. Brehmer, secretary; L. Wetnight, publicity editor; J. Bunn, ad editor; P. Fech, business manager; and B. Benko, ad editor. Literary editors are Gary Kaplan, Dave Chyla, and Konrad Banasak. They take charge of all POWDER HORN copy. Publishing the Powder Horn and Pioneer News “Run-offers” Seniors Ruthie Kowal, Nancy Spanier, and Fran Condo put in ; days work and dress for the part as the Pioneer News goes to press. “Dark room addict” Chet Farell enlarges a picture to ap¬ pear in the ’62 Powder Horn. Page one editor, Jeart Tolchinsky, puts the finishing touches on her page by adding colorful headlines. Requires Work ABOVE—“Smile pretty!” requests Fran Condo, “chief flash-attachment-holder,” as photograph¬ er Tim Banaszak shoots another one of those “impossible” Powder Horn action shots. TOP—Even the paper-folders, who put the crease in over 1500 white, pink, green, yellow, and blue papers each week, are essential to the production of the Pioneer News. MIDDLE— Linda Wetnight, publicity edtior; Susan Gro¬ gan, publicity editor; Beth Yackish, identifica¬ tion editor; and Linda Swenson, subscription editor; “goof off” while creating halL signs for the Powder Horn subscription drive. BOT¬ TOM—“What a day! Phew!” quips sports editor Ron Dembowski as he collapses on the old P.N. room counter while composing those last minute captions for the final March 15 deadline. CABINET—FRONT ROW: B. Weinberg, D. Dembowski, V. Ku ' dsaar, M. Keith, G. Kaplan, M. Kirn. ROW TWO: P. Wood, J. Moffitt, K. Banasak, D. Chyla, A. Chilla. Council Revises Constitution; Cabinet Drinks The Student Council, sponsored by Mr. Buell, undertook the task of reforming the antiquated election procedures. The primary objectives of this reformation were to eliminate any possibility of “black-balling,” to generate more student initia¬ tive, and to open the offices to more and better people. After reforming the election procedures, the Council decided to pursue and find solutions for the problems that faced both the students and the faculty. The pulse of the body politic was discerned by the use of a questionnaire. Many problems were resolved by discussion and committee work. Aside from the normal governing jobs, the Coun¬ cil engaged in sponsoring many social events. To the traditional intramural volleyball tourney, other intramural sports, such as bowling, were added. The assemblies were sponsored by the Council. The an¬ nual Inaugural Ball signified the end of the Coun¬ cil’s year and the commencement of a new year. 122 Student Council officers are Mary Keith, sec.; Konrad Ban¬ asak, pres; Dave Chyla, treas; and Jim Moffitt, veep. STUDENT COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES—F R 0 N T ROW: G. Antilla, C. Cudek, J. Mihalo, M. Reffkin, G. Gordon, C. Brehmer, G. Dubczak, E. Uhrin. ROW TWO: M. Levin, S. Falda, B Hickman, D. Wozniak, J. Jalovecky, F. Condo, G. Gardner. ROW THREE: B. Rowley, C. Mel¬ ton, G. Troska, L. Noworytz, B. Benko, J. Stasny, P. Pratt. ROW FOUR: W. Weinberg E. Shields, N. La Brant, J. Taylor, P. Jones, M. Kessler. Tea; All with a Smile In spite of cold weather, three Senior girls, Johetta Mihalo, Dawn Hickman, and Carol Cudek, raise the flag. Konrad Banasak, Vaike Kuldsaar, Mike Kirn, A1 Chilla, Gary Kaplan, and Bob Weinberg prepare new constitutions. Outstanding Achievements Recognized by Four NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY—FRONT ROW: V. Mur- zyn, J. Tolchinsky, N. Small, C. Brehmer. ROW TWO: C. Cudek, D. Hickman, J. Jalovecky, J. Banas, D. Williams, P. Stewart, S. Gre’enburg, L. Field. ROW THREE: P. Fech, R. Hartman, L. Dunn, E. Rosenstein, L. Swenson, D. Woz- niak, S. Parks, P. Schrage, B. Hered. ROW FOUR: C. Freeland, E. Best. ROW FIVE: J. Taylor, B. Ference, C. Leigh, M. Kessler, L. King, G. Kaplan, M. Levin, M. Trom¬ bley, J. Silvian. ROW SIX: R. Burk, G. Gross, R. Dem- bowski, D. Chyla, K. Banasak, R. Weinberg, M. Kirn, G. Gardner. The National Honor Society dedicated itself to create an enthusiasm for scholarship, to stimulate a desire to render service, to promote leadership, and to develop character. Membership, based upon scholarship, co-operation, leadership, and character, was open to all juniors and seniors that were in the upper third of their classes. Membership, how¬ ever, was limited to five percent of the Junior Class and fifteen percent of the Senior Class. Quill and Scroll, an international organization, recognized the individual achievements and encour¬ aged individual initiative in the field of journalism. Membership was based upon individual qualities and the contributions made to journalism in con¬ junction with the publication of the Pioneer News or the POWDER HORN. QUILL AND SCROLL—FRONT ROW: J. Tolchinsky, P. Mordus, P. Stewart, J. Banas. ROW TWO: L. Swenson, B. Benko, B. Sichak, K. Sandrick. ROW THREE: S. Parks, F. Gehrke, D. Wozniak. ROW FOUR: G. Kaplan, R. Dem- bowski, J. Taylor, K. Banasak. 124 National Honoraries Two national organizations, the National Thespian Society and the National Forensic League, encour¬ aged, respectively, diligence and excellence in the dramatic arts and elocution. To become a member in either honorary, a student had to earn points by participating in the activity of the honorary. National Thespian Troupe 1769 sponsored the all-school play, The Boyfriend, and a rollicking night of one-act comedies. The members also met to dis¬ cuss plays and acting techniques. They strived to help in productions by participating in plays, aiding the direction of plays, or supervising the technical end of plays. The National Forensic League endeavored to train students to become leaders and influential citizens. The members participated in debate, dis¬ cussion, oratory, and other forms of public speak¬ ing. The highly controversial issues of Federal aid to education and nuclear testing were the main topics of discussion. NATIONAL THESPIANS—FRONT ROW: F. Condo, V. Kuldsaar, M. Moldraski, J. Tolchinsky. ROW TWO: D. Wozniak, L. Swenson, L. Ruf, A. Poison, J. Macocha. ROW THREE: B. Reichert, B. Weinberg, M. Kirn, G. Gross, G. Kaplan. ROW FOUR: G. Gardner, C. Condo, K. Banasak, D. Pramuk, Miss Knapp. NATIONAL FORENSIC LEAGUE—FRONT ROW: G. son, M. Boswell, C. Short, M. Kew, C. Tierney, M. Levin Kaplan, H. Humphreys, J. Sandilands, B. Hered, P. Fech, ROW THREE: J. Picklin, G. Gardner, W. Weinberg, K. J. Tolchinsky, M. Kirn. ROW TWO: R. Weinberg, L. Swen- Banasak, J. Silvian, D. Pramuk, G. Gross. 125 jjT Sf.if Sip jjipfi sherman oJ jtU WAY _r f«| J P jp That Wonderful ADVERTISING Clarkites bowled at Towne House . . . bought contemporary cards at Whiting News . . . rented tuxedos from Logan’s . . . bought swinging LP’s at Neal Price’s . . . had their hair done for the Prom at Rudolfs’ . . . went to Condes after games and put on weight . . . spent money on high fashions at Brown’s . . . saved Pepsi - - caps for Hayward Memorial Fund . . . purchased class rings at Aron- berg’s . . . ate at Vogel’s after the Sub Deb . . . read about the Pioneers in the Hammond Times . . . kept warm with Egger’s fuel . . . filled up the car with gas from Poppen’s . . . got “tough” attire from Jack Fox and Sons . . . purchased our goodies from Parkview . . . sneaked down and patronized Varsity Grill . . . these,’ our advertisers, helped make THAT WONDERFUL YEAR. Best Wishes To The 1962 Senior Class 128 Terrific In Your Bathing Suit From BROWN’S 1343-119th Street Whiting, Indiana WHITING 5 10 1334-119th Street Whiting, Indiana SUPREME CLEANERS 1849 Indianapolis Blvd. Whiting, Indiana Bayus Radio and Television Service and Sales 1733 Indianapolis Blvd. Whiting, Indiana Phone 659-3039 GREGOROVICH SERVICE 806-119th Street Whiting, Indiana Soucy Service Station 2070 Indianapolis Blvd. Whiting, Indiana 659-9525 Dr. John J. Vukovich Dentist Whiting Hardware Co. Inc. 1600 East 119th Street Sam, Your Barber 1921 New York Ave. Whiting, Indiana Liberty Savings Loan Association 1904 Indianapolis Boulevard Whiting, Indiana Andrew Smolen President Steve A. Kalina Sec.-Treas. Phone 659-6700 Your Self Service Friendly Independent Grocer Shimala’s 904-119th Street 659-0754 Harry R. Barton, D.D.S. 1240-119th Street Whiting, Indiana Andre’s Beaute Box 1200-119th Street Whiting, Indiana Phone 659-0250 Home of Nationally Advertised Brands Whiting Store 1302-04-119th Street Cakes for Specialist in all occasions children’s cakes Boulevard Bakery Famous for Wedding Sheet Cakes 2141 Indianapolis Blvd. 659-0133 Weiner Foods Super Market 1950 New York Avenue Whiting, Indiana rudolf’s House of Beauty 1114-119th Street 659-0286 Dr. Edward F. Kosior 1902 Indianapolis Blvd. Whiting, Indiana 130 Condes’ General Milling Place For Area Teens 1440 Indianapolis Blvd. Ideal Seniors — Friendliness Paul Wood Karen Sandrick Hammond Times Your News Paper A Heritage of Truth A Frontier of Freedom Lighting America’s Way Schalter’s Funeral Home 0530 1620 Indianapolis Blvd. Telephone 659 Whiting, Indiana “When You Say it with Flowers . . . Say It With Ours” WHITING FLOWER SHOP H. Stawitcke 1347-119th Street 659-0326 Whiting, Indiana “Serving the Calumet Region Since 1900” 131 “We’re Itching To Remodel Your Kitchen” Sherman’s Indiana Supply 1326-119th Street Whiting Ideal Seniors — Hair Mary Keith Bob Priest Johnson’s Shoe Service Cleaners 1320-119th Street McCreary’s Barber and Beauty Shops Russell’s T.V. Sales Service Russell Merry 1401-119th Street Specialists in Ladies’ Hair Cutting 1821 Indianapolis Blvd. Whiting, Indiana Calumet Cabs Inc. 1310-119th Street Whiting, Indiana 659-0708 Baran Funeral Home Josephine Style Shop 1331-119th Street Whiting, Indiana 1235-119th Street Whiting, Indiana 659-4400 Ciesar’s Chrysler-Plymouth 659-1200 Imperial-Valiant 1939-45 Indianapolis Blvd. Whiting, Indiana 132 “She’ll adore YOU in clothing from ...” Lewin and Wolf Whiting’s Most Modern Men’s Store 1317-119th Street 659-0022 4808 Hohman WEstmore 2-0177 Ideal Seniors — Most Athletic Sandra Galeta Jim Moffitt IDEAL CITIZEN MAYOR DOWLING City Hall OWEN’S Poppen’s Auto Service FUNERAL 119th and Wespark Avenue Phone 659-1090 HOME Nothing but the best Get Since 1892 Carley’s Mayflower Local and Worldwide Movers 4605 Hohman 133 Twist over to Neal Price’s Firestone 1309-119th Street Ideal Seniors — Dance Karen Bojda George Troska IgasiUl Mister Robert’s On the corner of 119th Street and Calumet To Be In the Best of Spirits Go To Sandrick’s 1716 Indianapolis Blvd. Phone 659-2985 Ideal Seniors — School Spirit Carole Berland Jack Taylor Dress Right When You Look Your Best You Do Your Best Winsberg’s 1341-119th Street Phone 659-0744 Peter Jones Mr. Winsberg 134 NISCO Office Supplies Northern Indiana Stationery Company 5307 Hohman WEstmore 2-4111 Hammond, Indiana Trudy Golden, Michelle Kampo, Sharon Gabbert LOOK better FEEL better FIT better LOGAN’S Tuxedo Rental Go formal in style with our new lightweight summer formals — rentals and sales. 5315 Hohman Avenue Hammond Ideal Seniors — Smile Willette Graham, Ron Falaschetti Central Drug Store Ernest F. Korosi, R. Ph. John D. Barton, R. Ph. 1452-119th Whiting, Indiana 659-0873 Henry F. Eggers Building Material Trucking Excavating 2227 New York Avenue 659-0697 Dennis Carnaham, Virginia Murzyn, Marcia Wagner 135 The 1962 POWDER HORN Engravings by ASSOCIATES ENGRAVING CO, INC. Springfield, Illinois Represented by Mr. Richard Brier 3453 Chamberlin Drive Indianapolis 27, Indiana HERFF JONES COMPANY 3144 W. Ill Street Chicago, Illinois “World’s Best Class Ring Manufacturer” The 1962 POWDER HORN Printed by BENTON REVIEW PUB. CO, INC. Fowler, Indiana “Don’t be shy. Come over to PARKVIEW SUPER MARKET 1836 Calumet Ideal Seniors — Most Shy Ken Daugherty, Joan Sluka Northern Indiana Lumber Company 114th and Lake 659-0670 Ken Miller, Donna Hutira, Bonnie Benko 137 what’s their future The young people you see in these pictures are all on their way to successful careers in one of America’s basic industries . . . steel. They decided (as we hope you will decide) to let Inland Steel Company help them plan their future. Some are gaining knowledge and experience in spe¬ cial trades to become journeyman machinists, car¬ penters or electricians . . . some are concentrating on certain phases of steelmaking by working in the open hearth shops, the cold rolling mills or the galvanizing lines. Still others are working in laboratories building a sound foundation for a future in steel research. Inland offers the high school graduate an excellent opportunity to further his education. Employees may participate in a variety of on-the-job training pro¬ grams, or they can continue their formal education by registering for evening courses offered by local Purdue and Indiana University Extension Centers. Plan now to investigate the unlimited opportunities for you in steel . . . with the midwest’s own steel company ... inland steel. INLAND STEEL COMPANY Indiana Harbor Works 3 Employment Division 3113 Block Avenue East Chicago, Indiana ‘EYE” ADORE ARONBERG JEWELERS Sidney Levin 1348-119th Street Whiting, Indiana 659-0396 Ideal Seniors — Eyes Ken Zeller Dorothy Troksa FRED’S Paint — Wallpaper — Supplies 1719 Calumet Avenue Whiting, Indiana 659-3354 Dave Tolchinsky’s INDIANAPOLIS PHARMACY Woodmar’s Rexall Store 7011 Indianapolis Blvd. Tllden 4-1915 SEARS ROEBUCK and COMPANY “Satisfaction Guaranteed or your money back” 452 State Street Hammond, Indiana “Rain or Shine” HAMMOND “41” OUTDOOR THEATER Calumet and Sheffield Joyce Pietrzak, Ed Shields Sharon Gabbert, Bob Smolar 139 Congratulations-1962 Graduation Class We Too Are Pioneers In The Insurance Field Central Agency 1904 Indianapolis Boulevard Whiting, Indiana Phone 650-3458, 659-3459 Joseph F. Lampa, Manager “Face Your Future With Reliable Insurance Coverage” Fashion Furniture Drive in Pleasure at HOUSE OF DECOR ART’S 566 State St. — 564 Sibley St. 1402 Indianapolis Blvd. Hammond, Indiana Phone 659-1626 Phil Smidt Son 1205 N. Calumet Whiting, Indiana Specializing in fish, chicken, frog legs, steak, and lobster dinners. 140 You Never Outgrow Your Need For Milk BORDEN’S 402 Clinton Hammond WEstmore 2-0536 “Fashions For Children” For Unusual Gifts JACK and JILL SHOP 1240-119th Street Whiting, Indiana The Red Barn 822-119th St. Whiting, Indiana Penney’s Downtown Hammond 5134 Hohman Uliana Garage Body — Fender — Painting and Welding Insurance work is our specialty. 1918 Calumet Whiting, Indiana Compliments of SINGER SEWING MACHINE CO. Hammond, Indiana WE 3-0486 H and M Shoe Store 1346-119th Street Whiting Varden Studios Steinberg-Baum Co. 5431 2 Hohman Hammond Wholesale General Merchandise 555 E. State St. Hammond, Ind. 141 Richard’s Prescription Center Congratulations and Best Wishes 1350-119th Street Whiting, Indiana Leo M. Zelenack Class of 1948 Geffert Hardware Dr. Myron Gordon Optometrist “Pleasant Shopping With Friendly People” 1308-119th Street 817-119th Street Curosh’s 659-4300 1238-119th Street Whiting, Indiana George Rogers Clark and Franklin Parent-Teacher Association Extends Congratulations to the Graduating Class of 1962 Douglas Park — Spiccia’s — Pharmacy Restaurant Lounge 2143 Calumet 659-2112 Whiting, Indiana We fill any Doctor’s prescription B. A. Weinberg, M.D. 3835 Hohman Avenue 1346-119th St. WE 2-6220 Hammond, Indiana Whiting, Indiana Jersey Maid Ice Cream Across from the Community Center 4641 Hohman Avenue WEstmore 2-1122 ANDES PIZZA Newberry’s Broiled Chicken, Fish, and Shrimp 659-3078 Largest 5 10 Cent Store 1412-119th Street Closed Mondays Open 4 P.M. Planning a Get-Together VOGEL’S DINNER DANCE ANNIVERSARY BANQUET CLUB PARTY WEDDING BIRTHDAY BUSINESS MEETING POLITICAL RALLY OTHER SPECIAL EVENTS RESTAURANT LOUNGE 143 YOUR FUTURE’S BRIGHT IN NORTHERN INDIANA If your eyes are on far horizons following graduation, here’s a suggestion: Look around you right here in NIPSCOLAND! There are vast and challenging opportunities in northern Indiana for trained young men and women in industry, commerce and agriculture. Some of the greatest challenges await the talent and imagination of young people in the investor- owned utility business. We will be happy to discuss your career opportunities at NIPSCO . . . drop in and see us! serving today . . . building for the future NORTHERN INDIANA PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY GREEN POWERS 2075 Indianapolis Blvd. BELSHAW Whiting, Indiana DANKO Whiting, Indiana Smith-Corona Galaxie World’s Finest Portable See it at Star Sales Office Equipment Co., Inc. 1703 Calumet Wholesalers of Name Brand Merchandise Whiting, Indiana 659-0087 433 State St., Hammond, Ind. WE 2-6210 144 Congratulations and Continued Success To The Class of 1962 American Oil Co. Whiting Refinery 145 The directors, officers, and staff members congratulate the members of the class of 1962 and wish them a happy and prosperous future. THE FIRST BANK OF WHITING Walter E. Schrage, President 1500-119th Street Tel. Local 659-0043 Whiting, Indiana Chicago BAyport 13900 Ideal Seniors — Most Likely to Succeed Diane Wozniak Bob Weinberg 146 OUR VERY BEST WISHES TO THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1962 STATE BANK OF WHITING G. P. Smith, President C. A. Binhammer, Vice President and Cashier S. M. Sabol, Assistant Cashier Member Federal Reserve System Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 147 Jack Fox Sons Downtown Hammond Ideal Seniors — Best Dressed Ruth Kowal Tom Blazak Michaels Mann Modern Men’s Store 5237 Hohman Marcie’s Ladies Apparel 1404-119th Street Dr. M. D. Picklin Optometrist Hammond 1344-119th Street Whiting, Indiana Whiting Burton’s Men and Boys’ Wear 1250-119th Street Whiting, Indiana 659-1105 Bernard A. Dziadowicz Funeral Home 4404 Cameron Ave. WEstmore 1-2800 Swionteck’s Chicago’s Park and Shop Food Center 3817 Hohman Ave. Last Hammond, Indiana Department Angelo’s Finer Foods Store Best wishes to the Class of ’62 3702 Sheffield Ave. Hammond, Indiana 148 “Bumper to Bumper” FRANCE FORD 1753 Calumet Avenue Whiting, Indiana 659-1500 Karen Sandriek, Barb Sichak, Pam Stewart Parkview Recreation 1812 Calumet Whiting, Indiana Diamonds — Watches — Jewelry — Leather Goods Lesser’s 466 State Street Hob Nob 1204-119th Street 659-0478 659-4379 Roy G. Osborne and Son Hours: 11:00 A.M. to 12:30 Delivery Service Building Contractor THE HOUSE OF PIZZA 1745 Calumet Avenue Whiting, Indiana Telephone Tllden 4-6065 659-3217 7008 Indianapolis Blvd. Hammond, Ind. Towne House Lanes 1710 Calumet Avenue Whiting, Indiana Ideal Seniors — Wit Fran Condo Rich Ruman 149 ‘There will be a hot time in the old town.’ Senior Girls “Clear heads agree.” Senior Boys 150 Have Trust In Your Savings As a student you should begin during high school to save for your future. Regular savings provide security in the years to come. Member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Co. 1321-119th Street Whiting, Indiana Ideal Seniors — Laugh Johnetta Mihalo Steve Biel American Trust And Savings Bank Flowers for all occasions . . . Hansen Brother Florists 5320 Hohman Avenue Leslie T. Hansen WEstmore 2-0201 THE FAT BOY DRIVE-IN Best Wishes to The Class of 1962 Pioneer News Powder Horn INDEPENDENT PETROLEUM WORKERS OF AMERICA, INC. An Independent Union organized, operated, and supported by employees of the Standard Oil Co. 1932 Clarke Whiting 152 Autographs Index A 111, 113 .. 48, 74 .. 54, 97 .. 54, 74 . 113 29, 87, 111 105 Acheson, Charles Adam, Ronald ... Adams, Elaine ... Adley, Jack Aibleth, Mary . Aldrich, Emerson Alfred, Steve Allen, Judy . Allison, Tom . Ambrose, Frances Amundson, Sharon Anderson, Linda Antilla, Gayle . Antilla, Jim Antkowiak, Diane Arnold, Michael Ashcraft, Mary Avery, Kathy Ayres, Don . . 48, 105, 108 54, 74, 81, 107 . 54, 63, 106 . 48, 95, 96, 108, 114 . 48, 105, 108 36, 100, 103. 105, 113, 117 . 51, 81, 84 . 51, 97, 101, 107, 108 . 51 .. 54, 97, 107, 109 54, 97, 106 . 36 B Babusiak, Jim . 48 Bachi, Pasty .. 51, 96, 97, 107 Bailey, Kenneth . 62, 86, 107 Balint, Barbara . 48, 108 Balko, Tim . 48, 90 Balog, Carol . 51, 96 Banas, Judith . 105, 108, 114, 116, 117, 118, 124 Banasak, Konrad . 36, 60, 70, 71, 95, 99, 105, 106, 111, 119, 122, 123, 124 Banaszak, Timothy .... 10, 36, 99, 121 Bangert, Dave . 51, 74, 81, 106 Banik, Burdette . 97, 107, 109 Banik, Paul . 54, 74, 106 Baranowski, Linda . 54, 97, 109 Barlo, Edward . 48, 74, 84, 90 Barr, Barbara 54, 91, 97, 107, 109 Barron, John . 36, 65 Bartholomay, Lynn . 51, 96, 107 Barton, Bradley . 54 Bartoszek, Kathy . 51, 107 Bazarko, Larry . 48, 84, 90 Beaudrie, Timothy . 54, 63, 106, Beitler, Henry . 54 Beitler, Paul . 84 Bendis, Steve . 48, 90, 128 Benko, Bonnie . 48, 89, 94, 95, 105, 108, 117, 119, 123, 125 Benko, Mary . 54, 97, 107, 109 Bercik, Jerry . 36, 104, 105, 108 Berger, Alan . 51, 81, 106 Berland, Carole . 36, 89, 94, 114, 117, 118 Best, Eric . 36, 74, 84, 85, 90, 124 Best, Kathy . 54, 97 Biel, Nancy . 48, 108 Biel, Stephen . 36, 116 Blazak, Thomas . 16, 36, 75, 104 Blazek, Thomas . 54 Bobolik, Michael . 64 Bobowski, Mary Ann .... 54, 97, 109 Bognar, Sandra .. 54, 109 Bogucki, Edward . 48, Bojda, Karen . 36, 94, 1 Bojda, Phyllis . 54, 97, 1 Boncela, Barbara . 54, 1 Booth, Leah Borowski, Judy . 48, 1 Boswell, James . 13, 48, 75, 1 Boswell, Mary . 54, 101, 106, 1( 1 Botch, Joseph . Boyer, Linda . Bragiel, Nancy . 54, 1 Brazina, Cecelia . 1 Brehmer, Carole . 36, 109, l: 119, 1 Brenner, Donald . 51, 74, Brodowski, Murie . 51, 99, 1 Brom, Robert . 36, Brown, Douglas . 1 Brown, George . 54, 1 Brownell, Christina . 54, 1 Bryant, Ken . 51, Bubala, Frank . 54, 74, : Bugajski, Barbara . 54, Bugajski, Diane . 48, Bugajski, Maryann . 51, Bunn, Judy . 48, 117, Burk, Dennis_1_51, 75, 82, 95, 1 Burk, Dorothy . Burk, Ronald . 48, 75, 82, 90, ! 95, 96, 99, 101, 111, 1 Burkat, Eugene . 48, 1 Burkat, Judith . 54, 65, 1 Busch, James . 54, 75, Bzibziak, James . c Capps, Charles ... Carnahan, Dennis Carnahan, James .. Carpenter, Claudia Carpenter, Gerry Carpenter, Joan ... Carros, Diane .... Catchur, Evelyn ... Cervone, Nancy .. Chancellor, Ron ... Charlet, Bernard Chilla, Allen _ Chilla, Marilyn ... Chovan, Wayne ... Chyla, David . Cichon, John . Ciesar, Edward ... Cionta, Sophie . Cison, Marily . Clark, Claudia . Clark, Patricia . Clements, Allan .... Collard, Nancy . Cornelia, Diane ... Companik, Paul . Condo, Chris . Condo, Frances . Conn, Gary . Conrad, Joann . . Ill . 37, 105 . 54, 111 .... 48, 96, 103 . 54, 104 . 94, 105 . 96, 113 ... 48, 103, 108 . 54, 99 . 106 . 29 12 , 37, 75, 83, 105, 122, 123 . 64 . 48, 111 37, 70, 79, 80, 84, 90, 119, 122, 124 . 54 . 54, 111 . 37 . 54, 105, 109 . 54, 106, 109 . 54, 106 . 54, 111, 113 . 48, 108 . 48, 105 . 54 48, 64, 83, 84, 105 . 16, 37, 94, 105, 108, 120, 121, 123 . 51, 84, 107, 111 . 7, 54, 97, 109 Coppi, Carlene . 37, 108, 117 Corder, Arnold . 27 Goughian, Joan . 29 Countreman, Diane . 51, 108, 115 Crouch, Harvey . 81, 84 Crouch, Richard . 54 Crozier, Linda . 54, 109 Csigas, John . 95, 111 Csigas, Karen .. 48, 96, 106, 112 Cudek, Carol . 37, 91, 103, 108, 117, 118, 123, 124 Cutler, Mark . 37, 94, 95 Czapla, Delores . 37 Czechnski, Frank . 54, 75, 111 D Dafcik, Nancy . 54 Daugherty, Kenneth . 37, 84 Daugherty, Richard . 29 Daurovcik, Gene . 106 Davits, Evangeline . 48, 108 Dean, Marsha . 48, 96, 108 DeChantal, Marjorie . 55, 97 Dedinsky, David . 48, 84, 90 DeLong, Faye . 48, 109 Dembowski, Ronald 37, 70, 79, 118, 121, 122, 124 Deshincoe, John . 84, 90 Diaz, Olivia . 37, 107, 109 Dijak, Dennis . 55 Dijak, James . 48, 61 Diskorowski, Anne . 108 Divak, Dave . 48, 84, 106 Dolak, Dave . 48, 84, 106 Domagalski, Betty . 51, 106, 117 Dostatni, Sharon . 51, 97, 106, 108 Drasco, Yvonne . 37, 61, 118 Drescher, Phillip . 55, 75, 83 Dsida, Dennis . 55 Dubczak, Geraldine . 47, 108, 114, 117, 123 Dubich, Kathleen . 51, 96, 107 Duda, Connie . 48, 108 Dudzik, Barbara . 48, 108 Dudzik, Richard . 55 Duerr, David . 51 Duhon, Rosemary . 21, 55, 97, 106 Dunn, Lynda . 37, 103, 108, 114, 124 Duray, Mark . 48, 75 Dvorscak, Annedda . 51, 108 Dvorscak, Bonita . 55 Dybel, Janice . 48, 89, 100, 103, 108, 117 Dybell, Laura . 55 Dziadosz, Dan .... 13, 48, 83, 90, 111 Dzurilla, Phillip . 51 Dzurovcik, Andy . 55, 83, 106, 113 Dzurovcik, Geraldine .. 55, 97, 105, 109 E Eberle, James . 48, 81, 82 Eberle, Ronald . Ill Eggers, Janet . 51, 97, 105, 108 Elo, Ronald . 48 Enright, Jack . 55, 81, 113 Erickson, Arthur .29, 48, 98, 111 Eshena, Sharon . 38, 96, 108 154 Falaschetti, Ronald . 38, 69 Falaschetti, Sandy . 48, 108 Falda, Joanne . 38 Falda, Suzanne . 38, 123 Farrell, Chester . 17, 61, 120 Fasnacht, Joseph . 51 Fauth, Marilyn . 65, 97, 99, 106, 113 Fauth, Sandra .... 49, 94, 99, 108, 114 Fech, Jon . 51, 74, 81, 95, 101, 106, 110 Fech, Pat 20, 38, 94, 95, 96, 101, 108, 114, 117, 119, 124, 125 Fedor, Dennis . 51 Ference, Robert . 48, 49, 75, 124 Ferguson, Priscilla . 49, 108, 109 Ferko, Benedict . 55, 74 Ferrara, Nancy . 55, 97, 109 Ferry, Susanne . 55, 109 Field, Linda . 49, 94, 96, 98, 99, 124 Fiester, Diane . 106 Filas, Victoria . 55, 97, 109 Finley, Judith . 55 Finnegan, Bari . 51, 96 Fitzpatrick, Kathleen . 55, 97, 109 Florer, Sharon . 38, 108 Forauer, Jan . 48, 49, 94, 108 Forbes, Tim . 51, 74, 95, 101 106, 110 Foreman, Eileen . 9, 49, 108 Forystek, Pamela . 51, 96 Fox, Judy . 49, 106 Francis, Charles . 65 Francis, Ronald .101 Francisco, Carol . 35, 38, 103, 108, 114 Franklin, Joe . 29, 51 Fredy, George . 55 Freeland, Charles . 20, 38, 70, 86, 90, 118, 124 Fuchs, Larry . 55, 75 Fuhrer, Diane . 106 Fuller, Nancy ... 55, 97, 107 G Gabbert, Sharon . 13, 48, 40, 103, 108, 117 Gajdos, Martin . 49 Gajdos, Richard . 55, 75, 81 Galatzer, Dan . 51, 83, 106 Galatzer, John . 38, 83, 90 Gallagher, Denise . 49, 108 Gardner, Gary . 13, 19, 49, 94, 95, 96, 101, 106, 111, 117, 118, 123, 124 Garza, Susan .55, 97, 113 Gaughan, Marcia . 51, 97, 107 Gehrig, Lee . 29, 62 Gehrke, Bruce . 51, 74, 84, 95 Gehrke, Frances . 38, 94, 96, 99, 101, 108, 114, 117, 118, 124 Geleta, Sandra . 38, 118 Geleta, Virginia . 7, 51 Gerenda, Michael . 51 Gibson, Sandra . 51 Girski, Caroline . 55, 107 Goering, Hazel . 106 Golden, Trudy .... 13, 49, 94, 95, 105 108 Golembiewski, John . 51, 74, 113 Golembiewski, Patricia . 55, 113 Gonsiorowski, Gloria . Gonsiorowski, Susan . 55, 97, 1 Gonsiorowski, Valerie . 51, 1 Goodman, Victor . Gootee, Daniel . Gootee, Sharon . 49, 100, 1 Gora, Nancy . 55, 1 Gorby, Carol . Gordon, Gail . 38, 61, 103, ll 114, 1 Grabara, Jenny . Garbara, Stella . 55, 1 Gradek, Marilyn . 49, 94, ! 108, 1 Graefen, Janice . 51, 1 Graham, Willette . 38, 94, 96, ll 1 Grahovac, Diane . 51, 1 Grandbois, Paula . 16, 51, 96, 1 Greenburg, Susan .... 49, 106, 108, 1 Gregorovich, Kathryn . Grencik, Stephen . Hooper, Bonnie . 39, 105, 1 Hornsby, Dennis . 52, 81, 84, Greskovich, Nancy . 55, 97, 1 Grigson, Conrad . 38, 94, 95, 1 Grigson, Roscoe .... 51, 95, 98, 101, 1 Grogran, Susan .... 39, 114, 119, 1 Gross, Anthony Gross, Gregory . 49, 63, 75, 94, 9 5, 96, 105, 106, 124, 1 Gross, Sharon . 55, Groves, Valerie . 39, 107, 1 Gulvas, William . 49, Gurevitz, Gary . 55, 95, 1 Gurevitz, Laurie . 51, 101, 1 H Haddad, William . I Hajduk, Theresa . 51, 97, 1 Halik, Lynn . 55, 97, 106, 1 Hall, Edward . I Haluska, Danny . 51, 74, 82, 11 Hanchar, Richard . 49, 74, 1 Hand, Sandra . i Hannon, Kent 51, 74, 82, 9 101, 106, 11 Hantz, James . 1 Harangody, Sharon . .. 55, 97, 107, 11 Harbin, Jim . 55, 1 Harper, Bob . 55, 95, 11 Harris, Sharon . 55, 101, 1( Hartman, Rose 39, 94, 95, 118, 11 Hatczel, Robert . 55, 81, 1 Hawkins, Marcia . 51, 96, 11 Hayes, Gary . 51, 95, 107, ll Hayes, Kenneth 95, 106, 11 Hein, David . 29, I Hein, Michael . 55, ' Hered, Barbara .49, 61, 96, 9 101, 106, 124, 11 Hernandez, Dora . 55, ll Hernandez, Peter . 49, ! Hernandez, Phyllis . 52, ll Heslin, John . 1 Hickman, Dawn .... 39, 95, 103, 10 117, 123, 11 Hicko, Bonnie . 65, ll Hmurovic, Bernard . 52, ! Hmurovic, Phyllis . 55, 97, 11 Hoffman, Cheri . 13, 49, 11 Holman, Kenneth . 55, 99, 11 Holt, Linda . 55, 101, 106, l: Hovanec, Thomas Howard, Mary . Howe, Edna . . 39, 86, . 16, 52, I Hoyda, Cynthia 20, Hoyda, Raymond . Hrasch, Karen . Hric, Linda . Hric, Robert . Hriso, Michael . 23, 39, 91, 1 . 52, . 52, 52, 71, 96, 1 Humphreys, Holly . Hutira, Donna . .. 55, 96, 97, 1 106, 109, 1 49, 1 I Ice. Judith . _ 49. 1 Ide, Margaret . Ilijanich, James .... 52, 84, 101, ] J Jacewicz, Helene . Jackrebowski, Mary Jackson, Beverly . Jacobs, Esther . . 52, 55, 52, 96, i ' 05. Jacobsberg, Edgar Jacobsberg, Ruth ... Jallo, Barbara . Jalovecky, Joanne 91, 114, in Jamrosz, Helen . . 39, Z’’.’ " 52, 97, ' ... 11, 35, 39, , 118, 123, : Jamrozik, Carol . 39, 108, 114 Janas, Regina . 39, 114, 115 Jancek, Carolyn . 52 Jancik, Thresa . 52, 96, 115 Janik, Diana . 55, 97 Jankowski, Geraldine . 40, 99, 101, 108 Jansak, Ethel . 55, 109 Jarman, Joelma . 55 Jez, Tom . 52, 74, 84, 113 Johnson, Gail . 52, 97, 105, 108 Jones, Peter .. 40, 106, 123 Jorkon, William . 52, 74, 84 Juricic, Jim . 55, 83, 113 K Kaleta, Phyllis . 40, 105, 108 Kalina, Ron . 40, 79 Kalwinski, Stanley . 105, 111 Kamin, Susan . 49, 108 Kaminski, Stanley . 21 Kaminsky, Gerald . Ill, 113 Kaminsky, James . 52, 101, 106 Kampo, Michelle . 21, 49, 91, 103 108 Kanchak, Don . 74 Kandalec, Louise 40, 108, 114 Kantor, Maryann . 52 Kantowski, Kenneth . 52, 74, 82, 83, 107 Kaplan, Gary . 21, 40, 60, 70, 71 94, 95, 96, 101, 119, 122, 123, 124, 125 Kaplan, Joel . 55, 75, 95, 106 Kasprzak, Henrietta . 52, 105, 117 Kauchak, Don . 85 Keister, Carol . 40, 105, 108 155 Keister, Diana . 55j, 97 Keith, Mary . 40, 89, 103, 108, 114, 118 Kekich, Mary Ann . 52, 106 Kelly, Phyllis . 52, 106, 115 Kemple, Bobby . 52 Render, Jeff . 49, 90 Render, Jim . 49, 86, 90 Kernes, Marita . 52, 96, 107 Kennedy, Jeff . 105 Kerr, Diane .. 49, 96, 100, 108 Kessler, Laura . 55, 96, 101, 106 Kessler, Martin . 13, 23, 25, 49, 61, 95, 96, 99, 101, 124 Kew, Mary Ellen .... 52, 106, 114, 125 Killian, Ted _ 65, 81 Kindle, Barbara King, Dennis . 55, 95, 111 King, Larry . 49, 124 Kirk, Carole . 55, 97, 107, 109 Kirn, Michael .... 40, 60, 70, 95, 104, 105, 118, 122, 124, 125 . 52 . 55 Kish, Edward Kita, Edward Klemensiewicz, Geraldine Kmetz, Sandra - •“ Kmetz, Sharon . 55 Knapp, Jeani . 29, 32, 105, 125 Knapik, Marsha . 49, 108 Knox, David . 49 Kocsis, Charles - 65 Kocsis, Frank .• 62 Kocsis, Joseph . 52, 81, 82 Koehler, Gene . 66, 68 Kokenis, John - 66, 81 Kokot, Mary Ann ... 51, 52 Kol, Gloria Jean ...--— 55 Kollmar, Elizabeth . 56, 109 Konechni, Theresa . 52, 106 Kostanczuk, Phyllis . 52 Kovacich, Robert . 52, 107 Kowal, Janet . 52, 107 Kowal, Lawrence . 56 Kowal, Ruth .... 17, 40, 108, 117, 120 Kowalski, Kathleen - 27, 56, 109 Koznofsky, Mary . 105 Krajnak, John . 56, 81 Krause, Kurt ..i. 56 Kress, Allen . 56, 115 Krupa, Carol . 29 Krygier, Pat . 23, 40, 103, 105, 108 Kuker, Diane —. 56, 106, 109 Kukta, Robert . 51, 52, 79 Kuldsaar, Vaike . 8, 14, 19, 40 Kulik, Kathy . 49, 108 Kundrat, Elizabeth Ann .... 40, 94, 96, 108 Kurasz, Kitty .... 13, 49, 94, 103, 108 Kusnir, Edward . 56, 83 Kuss, John . 56 Kussy, William _ 49, 74, 83, 86, La Brant, Robert .... 52, 74, 83, 84, 90 Labus, Sharon . 52, 103, 106 Lakatus, Karen . 52, 99 Lake, Harriet . 29, 115 Lambert, Carolyn . 29 Larsen, Lynn . 56, 99 Latiak, John . 56, 81 Lavrincik, Mary Alice . 52, 97 Lawson, Rita . 49, 68, 94, 108 Lazowski, Betty. 49, 69, 108 Leckrone, Ron . 52, 101, 110 Leimbach, Diane . 56, 97, 113 Leland, Steve .56, 83, 101 Leslie, Barbara . 56, 97, 109 Leslie, Dottie . 56, 97, 109 Levin, Marc . 13, 49, 106, 123, 124, 125 Lewandowski, Allan . 49, 86, 87, 90 Liehe, Cliff . 48, 49, 61, 75, 90, 101, 124 Lockey, Durward . 27 Lockridge, Andrea - 40, 108 Lohrmann, Diane . 49 Long, Carren . 49 Longo, Carolyn . 40, 95, 96, 108 Lukacek, Anita . 52, 108 Luzksich, Gene _ 84 M McAtee, Veva . McCampell, Delores.eo n ’ini McCutcheon, Karen . 62, 97, 101, McLaughlin, Mary Beth .... 56, 97, 107, McLean, Walt . 52, 107 Macewicz, Nancy . Macnak, Frank .“ •• r « Macnak, Philip 52, 75, 94, ,95, 110 Macocha, Janet . 52, 105, 107, 125 Madejewski, Joseph 74 Madsen, Buzz . 52, 95, 99, 101, Madsen, James .. 56, 95, 106 Madura, Daniel -- 49, 101 Majcher, Ronada . Makis, Paul . 52, 83, 90 Mallek, Mary Ann ... Malone, Luanne . 49, 96, 108 Mansfield, Robert .------ 56 Marcisz, Leonard . 52, 95, 99 Marinaro, Cynthia .• 56, 97 Markonni, Ava .... 56, 91, 97, 101, 106, Markonni, Paul _ 41, 84, 90, 96 Markovich, Diane . 49, 115 Martin, Edwin - 30, 75 Maruszczak, Michael . 52 Maslikowski, Cynthia . 56, 109 Mastej, Robert .— 83 Masura, Connie . 56, 106 Matej, Susan . 49, 108 Matlon, Jane . 56, 97, 109, 115 Mazur, Carol Ann . 52, 96 Mazur, John . 6 Mazurkiewicz, John . 75 Meadows, Robert . 30, 32, 54 Means, Janice . 52, 97, 105, 108 Melton, Charles . 41, 94, 95, 96, 109, 123 Mergesky, Robert . 52, 113 Merich, Peter . 56, 74, 106 Merker, John ... 56 Merriman, Tim . 56 Merry, Tom . 52 Mertz, Ronald . 49, 65, 111 Michalak, Janice . 56, 97, 107, 113 Michalak, Mary Frances . 56, 113 Michalak, Thomas . 56, 113 Michalak, Wayne . 52, 74, 84, 105, 113 Michnal, Maryanne . 41, 108, 114 Mierlak, Janet . 41 Mihalo, Daniel . 56, 106 Mihalo, George . 49, 111 Mihalo, Johnetta . 41, 91, 103, 108, 118, 123 Mihalso, Joseph . 52, 74, 111 Milkula, James . 41 Mikulaj, Kathleen . 52 Mikuly, Ronald . 41, 111 Milanowski, Thomas . 49, 74, 84, 86, 90 Miles, Barbara . 52 Miles, Ermon . 41, 83, 84, 90 Mileusnich, Maureen . 52, 97 Miller, Florence . 31 Miller, Gerald .56, 75 Miller, Kenneth . 41, 74, 94, 95, 96, 98, 118 Miller, Mary Ann _ 49, 99, 108 Miller, Nancy . 52, 96, 101, 106 Miller, Patricia . 66, 97 Miner, Charles . 56 Miskus, Paul . 56, 81 Miskus, Tom . 56, 97, 101, 113 Mitchell, William . 41 Mizerik, Janis . 56, 97, 113 Modjeski, Jerry . 52 Moffitt, James .41, 74, 79, 80, 84, 122 Moffitt, Roy . 56, 81, 113 Moldraski, Madalyn . 11, 14, 41, 91, 105, 117, 118, 125, 140 Montgomery, Sue . Moore, Sandra . 41, 108 Mordus, Patricia . 42, 108, 114, 116, 124 Mores, Patricia . 49 Morgan thaler, Fred . Ill Morrison, Marion . 56 Mrkacek, Nancy . 49 Mrzlock, Lois . 56, 97 Mueller, Tom . 49, 99, 111 Mueller, William . 17, 30 Mullins, Robert . 42, 94, 95, 96 Mullins, Tom .... 52, 95, 101, 106, 110 Murzyn, Jacob . 56 Murzyn, John . 52, 74, 107 Murzyn, Marianne . 17, 52, 107 Murzyn, Paula . 84 Murzyn, Richard . 17, 52, 74, 110 Murzyn, Virginia . 49, 91, 103, 108, 117, 124 Myers, Doris . 19, 30 N Nagy, Ann Marie . 42, 109 Nagy, Evelyn . 52, 97, 108 Nanista, Joseph . 49, 111 Nash, Robert . 56 Nednien, Cheryl . 52, 103, 107, 115 Nednien, Peggy . 56, 91 Niblett, Myra . 56 Noland, Lucinda . 56 Nickel, Paul . 56, 75 Nordvig, Marie . 30, 47 Norrington, Janet. 52, 107 Novak, Gerald . 56, 63, 79 Novak, Ronald . 49 Novotny, Thomas . 56, 83 Noworyta, Lorraine . 52, 123 156 o O’Drobinak, Barbara . 42, 108 O’Drobinak, James . 56, 83, 111 O’Drobinak, Joseph . 49, 74 O’Drobinak, Sharon . 56, 97 Offredo, Sandra . 52 Ogle, Donna . 53 O’Keefe, Mary . 53 Olds, Brant . 53 Olson, Lawrence . 42 O’Rourke, Terry . 49, 79 Oxford, Elizabeth . 106, 108, 114 Palko, James . 53, 82, 105, 118 Panasuk, Dennis . 56, 113 Parks, Linda . 56 Parks, Susan . 42, 99, 101, 118, 124 Pasyk, Janice . 49, 115 Patrick, Gregory . 56 Patrick, John . 42, 113 Pazanin, Joseph . 53 Pemberton, Rick . 53 Penciak, Georgene . 53, 107 Peterson, Alvin . 31, 81, 82 Petrovich, Jean . 49, 67, 109 Pfiester, Diane . 53, 108 Phillips, Roberta . 42, 108, 114 Picklin, Jeffery . 56, 75, 101, 113, 125 Pietrzak, Joyce . , 91, 102, 103, 108, 112 Pinkston, Elaine . 49, 108 Pirosko, Dennis . 53 Pishkur, Laurence . 56, 81 Piskorowski, Arlene Pivovarnik, Dorothy . 49 Polon cak, Jerry . 53 Poison, Avril . 53, 105, 107, 115, 125 Pomonis, Leonard _ 49 Poplawski, Sandra . 49, 108 Popovich, Marilyn .... 16, 53, 107, 117 Foracky, Mary Ann . 56, 96, 97, 106 Potapowicz, Leszek . 49, 111 Powell, Edward . 17, 30, 84, 113 Powell, Kenneth . 107, 110, 111 Pramuk, Daniel . 13, 49, 105, 125 Pratt, Phillip . 42, 65, 123 Preusz, Gerald . 30, 54 Price, Wayne . 56 Prickett, Warren . 53 Plriesol, Robert . 49 Priest, Robert . 42, 83, 90 Pruzin, John . 49 Psikula, Stephen . 42, 83, 86, 90 Puplava, Joan . 49 Puplava, Mary Ellyn . 49, 108 Pustek, Gerald . 42, 74, 79 R Radloff, Karen . 56 Radloff, Nancy . 42, 96, 108, 117 Radosa, Judy . 56, 97, 107, 109 Reffkin, Marcia . 42, 123 Reffkin, Marion . 53, 84, 111 Regashus, Peter . 56, 74, 105, 106 Reichert, Bob . 105, 125 Reichert, Charles .... 13, 49, 75, 106 Remlinger, Cora . 56 Renicker, Ron . 42, 111 Richardson, Judy . 56, 109 Rirosko, Dave . 74 Roadman, Paula . 9, 57, 91, 97, 107, 109 Robinson, Marsha . 53, 108 Rokosz, Stanley . 57 Roof, Juanita . 53 Rosenstein, Ellyn . 43, 99, 101, 103, 107, 108, 114, 118, 124 Rosinski, Fred . Ill Ross, Bob . 49, 90 Rowden, Dennis . 53 Rowley, Tom . 53, 74, 83 Rowley, William . 21, 43, 74, 83, 90, 123 Rozcicha, John . 53 Rozinski, Fred . 53 Rozinski, Judith . 53 Ruf, James . 57, 74, 81, 106 Ruf, Linda . 13, 49, 95, 102, 108, 118, 125 Ruman, Richard . 43 Rusnak, Ray . 49, 1 11 Ruzycki, Leo . 49 Rybarczyk, Janet . 49, 94, 108, 114 Rybarczyk, Judith .... 57, 97, 106, 107 Rybickie, Kenneth . 49 Saczawa, Janice . 97, 53 Sajdyk, Lorraine . 49, 108 Saksa, Michael . 53, 75 Saliga, Andrew . 57, 95, 111 Sally, David . 54, 57, 95, 105, 106 Salle, Charlene . 31 Sandilands, Jill . 49, 101, 125 Sandrick, Karen . 43, 108, 116, 124 Scepkowski, Patricia . 57, 97 Schalow, Carol . 51, 53 Schellang, Diane . 49, 108 Schneider, Albert _ 43 Schweikert, Patty . 49, 94, 96, 98, 101, 124 Schweikert, Carol . 43, 94, 95, 108, 114, 117 Seifert, Carol . 57, 97, 109 Seth, Robert . 43, 105, 117 Shade, Ellen . 49, 108, 115, 117 Shade, Sharon . 57, 109 Sheffield, Dennis . 57, 111 Shields, Edward . 30, 43, 74, 79, 86, 117, 123 Shimala, Carol . 53, 97, 106 Shimala, Jack . 9, 43, 111 Short, Connie . 105, 114, 125 Shnader, Judith . 57 Sichak, Barbara . 43, 114, 116, 124 Silaghi, Margaret . 53 Silvian, Joe . 49, 101, 124, 125 Simko, Jayna . 57, 97 Simko, Timothy . 57, 81 Sinclair, Caroline . 49 Sinder, Carolyn . 16, 49, 96, 108 Skiba, Allan . 57 Slanac, Joan . 49 Slivka, Richard . 49 Sluka, Joan . 43, 108, 117, 118 Small, Nancy . 43, 91, 99, 112, 117, 124 Smigla, Diana . 50, 108 Smigla, Joann . 53, 96 Smith, Beverly ._... 53, 99, 106 Smith, Donald . 53, 74, 106 Smith, Robert . 53, 75, 86, 95, 96, 99, 101, 110 Smith, Sharon . 49, 101, 108 Smolar, Robert . 49, 79, 81, 86, 90 Smriga, Yolanda . 43 Smutniak, Pamela . 57, 97, 106 Snider, Carlyle . 30 Snider, Doris . 30 Snider, Tom . 53, 75, 82, 95, 99, 106, 110 Snowe, Bruno Clifford . 43 Solis, Kenneth . 43 Soltis, George . 57 Soptich, Nancy . 53, 114 Sotak, Ralph . 53, 84 Spanier, Bonnie . 53, 103 Spanier, Nancy . 44, 108, 120 Sroka, Joseph . 43, 84, 111 Sroka, Virginia . 53 Staley, Bemie . 57, 113 Stanek, Cynthia . 53, 84, 111 Stapke, Susan . 57, 113 Stasny, James . 13, 49, 123 Stasny, Shirley . 57, 97 Stavros, Steve . 11, 30, 57, 79, 84, 97 Steffel, Lawrence .. 44 Steliga, Mary Lou . 49, 106 Steliga, Walter . 53 Stewart, Pamela . 44, 108, 119, 124 Stewart, Sharon . 49 Stipulin, Janellen . 57, 97, 109 Stofcik, Judith . 57, 97 Stofcik, Kathleen . 44, 108 Stofcik, Veronica . 49, 109 Stolarz, Edwin . 57 Strabavy, Paulette . 57, 97 Strand, Henry . 53, 94, 95, 106 Strezo, Alfred . 49, 65 Strisko, Allen . 53, 62, 107 Strzelinski, Edward . 44 Sturgeon, Carol Ann . 53 Summers, Michelle Annette . 53, 96, 97, 108, 115 Svitek, Cheryl . 49, 96, 108, 114 Sweet, William . 57 Swenson, Linda . 49, 60, 96, 101, 105, 113, 118, 121, 124, 125 Swetnam, Robert . 57, 95 Swiontek, Nancy . 57 Szlanda, Raymond . 44 Szot, Rita . 17, 44, 69, 117 Szot, Ronald . 44 Talabay, Michael . 44 Tangerman, Judith . 30, 62, 107 Taylor, Jack . 17, 44, 70, 82, 90, 102, 116, 117, 118, 123, 124 Taylor, James R. 49 Taylor, Virginia . 49, 108 Terranova, Gregory .... 51, 53, 79, 90 Thomas, Sharon . 44, 94, 95, 108, 114, 117 Tierney, Carol . 53, 117, 125 Tkach, Carole K. 17, 49 Tkach, Ruth . 57, 97, 107, 113 Tkacz, Margaret . 53, 106 Todd, Terry . 106 Tokarz, Carol . 57, 97 Tokarz, Donald . 57 Tokarz, Ruth _ 53 Tolchinsky, Jean . 13, 49, 89, 99, 101, 116, 120, 124 Tomko, Barbara . 57, 97 Tomko, Terry . 53 Toops, Barbara . 44, 71, 106, 108 Toops, Mary . 54, 57, 109, 114 Trbovich, Yvonne . 53 Treadway, Melby . 53, 97, 101 Trebs, Barbara . 57, 97, 106, 109 Trelinski, Michael . 54, 57, 63 Treschak, Mary Ann .... 57, 97, 106, 109 Troksa, Dorothy . 44, 108, 114 Troksa, George . 23, 44, 123 Troksa, James G. 53 Troksa, James J. 57, 74, 106 Troksa, Pamela . 57, 109 Trombley, Mark . 19, 49, 75, 90, 105, 115, 124 Turner, Nancy . 31, 115 Turnquist, Georgene . 53 Turpin, Charles . 57, 81, 101 u Uhrin, Elaine .. 45, 94, 96, 114, 117, 123 V Vale, Edward . Vargo, Joe . Vasilak, Randall ... Vasilko, Karen . Vasilko, Robert .... Vater, Janet. Vater, Robert . Vater, Roberta . Vaughan, Barbara Vavrek, Janet Vega, Carole . Veslocki, Pat . Veslocki, Timothy . 57 . 53 . 57, 74 . 53, 106 . 53 . 49, 102, 103, 108 . 49, 101 . 53 . 54, 57, 97, 107, 109 ... 45, 94, 96, 101, 108, 114 . 94, 107, 109 .. 49, 96, 106, 112 . 45 Vince, Donna . 57, 97 Vogel, Janis . 57, 106 Voyce, Eugene . 53 Vrabel, Thomas . 57, 75, 81 w Wagner, Joe ._. 84 Wagner, Joyce . 57, 109 Wagner, Marcia . 49, 108, 117 Wakeland, William . 31 Walczak, Ronald . 45, 111 Walczak, William . 74 Walder, Shirley . 53 Walker, Charles . 57, 95, 111 Walker, David . Ill Wallace, Barbara . 53 Wallace, Wayne . 53, 74, 83, 84 Walsko, Richard . 49 Ward, William . 74 Warner, Daniel . 49 Warner, Nancy . 45 Waszak, Bernadette . 49, 117 Watkins, Gene . Ill Watkins, Oral . 31, 110 Watson, Marjorie . 53, 105 Weinberg, Howard . 57, 101, 106, 113, 123, 125 Weinberg, Robert . 45, 60, 70, 71, 99, 101, 105, 106, 118, 122, 124, 125 Weiss, Jeff . 57, 74, 107 Wenglarz, Joseph . 57 Wetnight, Linda . 45, 89, 119, 121 Wetnight, Roger . 49, 111, 114 Whitman, Phyllis . 57, 97, 107, 109 Wiat, Terry . 57, 74, 106, 110 Wichlinski, Andrew . 53 Wilhig, Beatrice . 57 Wilcox, Lillian . 31, 47, 62 Wilcox, Thelma . 31, 99 Wiley, Robert . 45, 95 Wilharm, Wanda . 31 Wilkinson, Paul . 31 Williams, Marcia . 57, 97, 107, 109 Williams, Ray . 31, 83 Wilson, Ron . 49, 94, 95, 111 Wingis, David . 53 Winsberg, Alexa . 57 Wisemiller, Eileen . 57 Wisniewski, Margaret . 57, 97, 109 Witkewicz, Cathy . 53, 103 Wittig, Beatrice . 107 Witzke, Robert . 45 Wojtowicz, Anna Marie . 57, 109 Wolf, Charles 53, 75, 106, 109, 118 Wood, Paul . 21, 45, 94, 95, 96, 118, 122 Wood, Walter . 17, 53, 95, 106 Woszczynski, Donald . 57 Woszczynski, Nancy . 117 Wozniak, Diane . 14, 45, 71, 105, 108, 119, 123, 124, 125 Wright, Scott. 53, 95, 111 Wulkow, Helen (Gates) . 31, 32 Wytrykus, Eugene . 49 X Xidis, Tony . 35, 45, 90, 95 Y Yackish, Beth . 49, 101, 103, 121 Yancich, Peter . 49, 74, 84 Yengich, Marilyn . 53, 96 z Zabinianski, Susan . Zagrocki, Louise . Zato, David . Zatorski, Peter . Zeller, Kenneth . Zellez, Margaret . Zmija, Joanne . Zrenchik, Carolyn . Zvonar, George . Zvonar, Mary Ann ... Zygmunt, Thomas .... . 106 . 49 . 57 . 49 46, 104, 105 . 57, 109 . 49, 108 . 7, 53 . 46 . 53 . 53, 84 Organizations A Cappella Choir . 94 Biology Club . 113 Booster Club . 102 Boys’ Chorus . 95 Cheerleaders . 91 Cross Country . 74 Debate . 60 Drama Club . 104 Football F. T. A. G. A. C. . . 114 German Club . Girls’ Choir . Girls’ Chorus . Golf . Harmoneers . Harmonettes . Hi-Y . Junior Red Cross . Latin Club . Library Club . Madrigals . Majorettes . Modem Dance . National Forensic League National Honor Society ... National Thespians . Nurses’ Club .. 106 96 110 106 115 uince stall Orchestra .. Photography Club . Pioneer News Powder Horn . Quartet . Quill and Scroll . Secretaries’ Club Spanish Club . Stage Crew . Student Council Cabinet Student Council Review Board Tennis . Track . . . Wrestling . Y -Teens . 158 Advertising Index A American Oil Company .. 145 American Trust and Savings . 151 Ande’s Pizza . 143 Andre’s Beauty Box . 130 Angelo’s Supermarket . 148 Aronberg Jewelers . 139 Art’s Drive-In . 140 B Baran Funeral Home . 132 Barton, H. R., D. D. S. 130 Bayus Radio and T. V. 129 Benton Review Pub. Co. 137 Bordemi’s . 141 Boulevard Bakery . 130 Brown’s Apparel . 129 Burton’s Men’s Wear . 148 c Calumet Cabs . Capitol Engraving Carley’s Movers . Central Agency . Central Drug Store Chicago’s Last . Ciesar’s . Condes’ Drive-In ... Curosh’s . D Dowling, Mayor . 133 Douglas Park Pharmcy . 143 Dziadowicz Funeral Home . 148 E Egger’s Trucking . 135 F Fat Boy Drive-In . 152 Firestone . 134 First Bank of Whiting . 146 Forty-One Outdoor . 139 Fox, Jack and Sons . 148 France Ford . 149 Fred’s Paint Store . 139 G Geffert Hardware . 142 Gordon, Dr. Myron . 142 Green, Powers, Belshaw, Danko .... 144 Gregorovich Service . 129 H Hammond Times . 131 Hansen, Florists . 152 Herff Jones . 136 H and M Shoes . 141 Hob Nob . 149 House of Decor . 140 House of Pizza . 149 I Illiana Garage . 141 Indpt. Petroleum Workers . 152 Indianapolis Pharmacy . 139 Inland Steel . 138 J Jack and Jill Shop . 141 Jersey Maid . 143 Johnson’s Cleaners . 132 Josephine Style Shop . 132 K Kosior, Dr. Edward . 130 L Lesser’s Jewelry .149 Lewin and Wolfe . 133 Liberty Savings . 130 Logan’s . 135 Lynch Office Supplies . 144 P P. T. A. 142 Park View Recreation . 149 Park View Super Mart . 137 Penney’s . 141 Pepsi-Cola . 128 Phil Smidt Restaurant . 140 Picklin, Dr. M. D. 148 Pioneer News POWDER HORN 152 Poppen’s Service . 133 R Red Barn . 141 Richard’s Perscription Center .... 142 Rudolf’s House of Beauty .130 Russell’s T. V. Shop . 132 s Sandrick’s . Sam, Your Barber . Schlater Funeral Home Sealtest . Sears, Roebuck . Sherman’s . Shimala’s . Singer Sewing Co. Soucy Service . Spiccia’s Restaurant . Star Sales . State Bank of Whiting .. Stecy, Peter, M. D. . Steinberg-Baum . Supreme Cleaners . Swiontek’s Foods . 134 129 131 133 139 132 130 141 129 T M Towne House Lanes . 149 McCreary’s Barber Shop 132 _ , Marcie’s Ladies Apparel 148 V Michaels and Mann . 148 Mister Robert’s . 134 Varden Studio . 141 Vogels Restaurant . 143 TVT Vukovich, Dr. John . 129 Newberry’s . 143 NIPSCO . 144 NISCO . 135 Northern Ind. Lumber Co. 137 o Osborne Contractors . 149 Owen’s ’Funeral Home . 133 w Weinberg, B. A., M. D. 143 Weiner Foods . 130 Whiting Flower Shop . 131 Whiting Hardware . 129 Whiting 5 10 . 129 Whiting Store . 130 Winsberg’s Men’s Wear . 134 159 That’s It Folks Co-editors .. Diane Wozniak, Pam Stewart Literary Editors . Dave Chyla, Gary Kaplan, Konrad Banasak Senior Editors ... Rose Hartman, Madalyn Moldraski Sports Editors . Ken Miller, Ron Dembowski Picture Editor . Vaike Kuldsaar Index Editor.Frances Gehrke Indentification Editors .... Joan Sluka, Beth Yackish Art Editor.. Susan Parks Publicity . Linda Wetnight, Susan Grogan Advertising Editors .Judy Bunn, Bonnie Benko Business Manager . Pat Fech Subscription Editor . Linda Swenson Faculty Editor. Paul Wood Photographers . G.R.C. Photo Club Ellse Boness Varden’s Studios Ed Andros Printer ..Benton Review Engraver . Capital Engraving Cover . S. K. Smith Journalism Sponsor . Mr. Muir Advisor.Mr. Richard Brier Hurray! Yes, we had our doubts about ever seeing the day that we would be completely through, but we made it. We can now resume somewhat normal lives and look back on some of the most trying but most enjoyable moments at George Rogers Clark High School. We’ll miss most of all “that” room at the corner of the hall, commonly known as the PN room. It held for us some of our most precious moments and our best friends. The “goose” charge, lunch raids, flying typewriters, and big after grad¬ uation plans comprised a lot of our time. We wish to thank our staff and especially the “old-timers” of the PN room for all the co-opera¬ tion we experienced in THAT WONDERFUL YEAR 1962. Editors Cxxfc Dtcv yuiw


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