Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH)

 - Class of 1945

Page 1 of 106

 

Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1945 Edition, Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 106 of the 1945 volume:

Q. V 1 ' n 'n 1 . A .11-.N , fr.. 4 h ,.,1.,r I 5714 .J ,Q-TA. ., ,,. 1 f Q5 -. ' fi LQ w 'f ' HE' I K ' Ate. Q .A a .ffvlfr , F! z'-gi W2 2315?-fi! ,Q ' 9: 'id K - ,NEIL 1-'Q 'if 'v , - '-4 ,M q5F1" i" f x. . 75 wa. H, '. .4f,'," 1 31535, :P-eb " 71' Q :'s'5"'Af.Q- wp? --,1- ff 5- , Hy rx 5 ' 'if' 4 mf 3 is x L., Y - 'ff 1 yy a,w'+ '- A -fff - ' ,- 5 .L , 5' N f G2 vm- , .YM ,-1, I .- YN , ' ' ,. I k4f..3'f Z ,N 4.5. --.ggi uf' 'ff .p.,,1,.. Q M157 ww -1.5-'H QQ ' Zhi' '- he W' r Ki... .gi t.i'4l'gQQ - k?5"'Nf.-A 5.3 Sanus . ,V 13 V--in '51 W 1432 ,. ffY?'? ,, . . ., - QQ if R ti Q ...P . LQ "gg id id our IIQALS lXfllllllL!Xll2llD Your Almo Moter's onnuol thot helps you keep olive the memories of hoppy hours of bygone doys ot Millord High. Moy you enoy it mony times ogoin os the yeors go by, for to bring you thot future pleosure is its reol purpose. Published by THE '45 MILLARD STAFF of the Millord High School Student Body, Fillmore, Utoh .- l'e 28505, 96 MQW W 4 'X x Q? AMIDST the towering, snow-crested Wasatch Mountains, where can be found dark, fertile soil, noisy little streams, and skies as blue as endless fields of flax . . . WHERE the four seasons age as beauti- fully as they are able. . . WHERE, at dawn, the sun directs bright, piercing rays down on the sleeping village to woken the drowsy occupants to the activity of their daily routines, and, at eventide, caresses both earth and sky with a glow of rosy warmth . . . WHERE the sound of carefree, youthful voices can be heard as. it is carried high on a canyon breeze to all corners and crevasses in the mountain wall . . . WHERE, when early autumn comes, the streets become gay with brightly attired lads and lasses . . . WHERE is centered the home of learning -the home of the stalwart eagle- mffarcf cgcfwof .749 uefdgg fqdicfe Summer in the valley means cool, green lawns stretched lazily under the decorative shrubs and trees that make the Millard Campus one of the most beautiful in the state. E. Carling F. Chesley But summer cannot last forever, and in early autumn Millard High School threw open her doors to her students, both old and new. No longer were her halls dim and empty, her classrooms barren. The faint odor of closeness from having been shut during the summer months was dispelled. Now her halls resounded with the laughter of merry young people who were looking forward to their year at Millard with minds resolved to give her their best efforts, her classrooms filled with those who brought with them books to study, and fun that were part of their school life. The custodians who kept Millard l-ligh the loveli- est spot in the valley gave freely of their time and energy. Cold winds brought snowflakes in icy flurries which clothed the valley in shades of winter. Millard lay peacefully under her downy blanket, un- harmed by frost and sweeping northern blasts. True, her gentle flowers and delicate shrubs were no longer green with waxen leaves, or colorful with healthy blossoms, her lawns and buildings had lost their stately air, but a new kind of beauty had settled over all: the campus sparkled as though it were sprinkled with millions of flashing diamonds .... The dried, yellow, flower stalks bowed, as though young again, under the weight of their snowy crowns. , The buildings' eaves draped in icicles, T and walls supporting billowy snow drifts, took on an air of warmth and friendliness. Everyone around Millard was caught in the atmosphere of good fellowship that comes only when people are shut in to- gether, thrown on their own resources for their living and happiness. This was the valley in winter! youngest group of eogles ot Millord ore o shy, homely lot. They begin their first yeor with doubts os to whether they will like this new life. However, they soon moke friends ond find their ploces in the regulor routine of school. During this yeor they ore colled ljlfedknflefl . if W . Q .W-.11 a1T:'-1:2f"R- 4':Wi'.. srfffg,-5 'I "la VIC. ,teh-. - :?,.,Q!Z1g535, ,f .. Ya- 4' 4 . ,sT'l3-4. "..f , ,7-?4,' :.'. lp.. 4 - , .-JS., ,,g.,,.,v .'.-,a . 5 35,1 P-:Qi wg-4-mg .ggyf ' ' 415143. f-5,:fEa.Q w 3311543421 lla:-Falifk, Q"Z?:..- -f ,.- 1: -: .:-. l f..-Q4, -' -v2fe?-Sf!':f??x'-f- 4 ,,,t,s, ,.Q,,,.1., ,,,,,, "5.3.?'Z,2f-'DQ-.':f' ' "it :-fx-1?-11.35-SiHE"?, 'X . N. .ref-my-nh.: 5551 ian? ',1i:'4"Z ' 1 mf.t9"'.-g.?- 2 :K54-7f'if' si-T w ','.15:1.i4i. , iff' Q ".,F?Lff!:' 2 Y -rf 2-3 - 1 L Q .. . Q I K? f -9. 1 f Z , 1 . f ' M+5a',. H. M-A .N ... XC' ii I ff gy ' - -5 ' ' -3 f ' ' fd, if ff' Q L gfcwii far? P815 lflflfdlfl, Ward Adams Larry Anderson Therald Beclrstrand James Bennett Leland J. Birch Helen Blondin Gaylen Brown Maughn Christensen Del Clothier Duane Cooper Maynard Crosland Ted Davies Bryan Day Carl Dearden Joyce Esklund Elaine Anderson George Badger Stanley Bennett Carol Black Waldo Brunson Stanley Christensen La Reta Cortensen Bill Davies Marie Day Ralph Duncan Lola George Sheridan Hanseen Yvonne Huff Carene Ivie Darrel Jackson Leslie Johnson lla M. Kenny Evelyn Kesler Larry Labrum Margaret McBride Earl Frampton Udine Greenhalgh Sherman Hanseen Colleen Hanson Lynn Ireland Melvin Ivie Loraelle Iverson Eldean Jensen Lavoy Jones Margo Jorgensen Etta Jean Kerr Reed Kesler Carol Kimball Gladys Lee David Melville P815 IWLQVL 1 Elvin Mitchell Duvene Paxton Byron Penney Boyd Peterson Carl Probert Joshua Robinson Edith Robison LaRetta Rogerson Norma Spencer Milton Staples Mary June Stephenson Rayma Stevens Aldean Stewart Joan Stewart Shirley Swallow Robert Mitchell Faye Penney Earl Peterson Jo Ann Peterson RuJean Rogers Dennis Shaw Ross Starley Wilber Stephensen Ella Mae Stewart Gayla Shallow Gordon Thompson Floyd Trimble Marian Warner Evelyn Watts Donald Turner Glen Whatcott Betty Williams Dick Warner Lee Warner Peggy Whatcott Lenard Wilden Q? 9.6 during their second year show o good deol of growth since they storted ot Millord. They lose their shynessg their bodies ore less owkwordg their mon- ners ore somewhot schooled ond they now toke their turn ot putting the Freshmon in his proper ploce. They ore eoger to explore the world outside the nest, even though still unoble to protect themselves were donger to come neor, or to choose wisely were problems to oriseg thus the nome given them is 52,0 0WL0l"815 1. Connie Bement Dorothy Abraham Claudine Anderson Joan Brunson Ronald Anderson Kent Beckstrand Beverly Davies Clea Bird Foe Brinkerhoff Faye Chambers Virginia Crosland Joyce Day Robert Frampton Dorothy Bennett Dixie Carling Helen Davies Maurine Allen Neva Ashby Bonnie Lou Brunson Vernon Christensen Max L. Day Burton Giles La Rae Hatton John Jackson lla Mae Kelsey Sterling Nixon Omar Gillespie Preal Holly Beth Johnson Harold Lee Shirley Payne Gordon Hclterman Deck Hunter Beverly Johnson Bertha Lyman Harold Penney Cleve Halsey Joy Hutchinson Utahna Johnson Jack McBride Georgia Penney Gerald Hansen Leora Hanson Melba Ivie Clark Jackson Bonnie Keele Vance Keele Luana Robison Charley Stewart Val Peterson Linford Stepenson Mell Stewart Ronald Robins Deon Snyder Dan Speakman Winifred Stephenson Kathleen Stevens Patricia Rogers Edith Peterson Beverly Rasmussen Nels A. Stephenson Leo Robins Anita Robison Thayne Robinson Florence Starley Willis Stephenson Joyce Stevens Darlene Stott Celia Stowe Bill Tomkinson Ronald Wade Marilyn Watts Byron Wilden Grover Wilden Alan Wood George Stott Melba Sweeting Jeanne Trimble Vella Wade Evelyn Whitaker J. Ralph Wood William Wilson Yvonne Esklund Venez Teeples Leland Thompson Delores Warner Bruce Wasden re amlfion for the flight is the important thing. The eagle understands this when he begins to view things from a worldly inste-ad of a valley standpoint. He realizes that the long years of study have helped prepare him for the time when he must consider himself a contestant in the game of living. His task is to choos.e a course and follow it to the end. His happiness and well-being depend on how wisely he chooses and how well he is prepared to participate. Success will come not from proper train- ing alone, but from such constant virtues as: honesty, unselfishness, ambition, and perseverance. As long as life endures these traits will exist in truly good men, and to be such is an attainment worth striving for. The eagle of three years has a great de- sire to do well in life, and he works hard to prepare himself. One more year, then he will make his flight. Though partly pre- pared already with strong wings, sharp eyes, and mighty claws, he cannot leave the valley for he is yet only one of the omiom X ,X-Q!! jf' NA JT! Carol Abraham Evelyn Allen Ethel Anderson Madge Anderson Louise Ballard Jean Bartholomew Barth Beauregard Delyle Beckstrand Gordon Beckstrand Beth Black Elaine Bradfield Jacqueline Bottomfield Gorman Day Gwen Day Roween Day Lester Dobson Dean Duncan Don Duncan Pearl Duncan Camille Frampton Gwenivere Frampton Cecil George A Elmer George Dean Gillespie Maxine Hunter Marie Hansen Jack Iverson Beverly Jackson l-U VUY JENSEN Lou Jean Johnson Claude Johnson Melba Johnson Dan Kimball Carol Labrum Nelda Lawson Melba Martin Madelyn Mathews Riley McKee Ella Dene Memmott Jewell Memmotl' Beulah Monroe Barbara Mundy Norman Nielson Bernice Paxton Bonnie Paxton Lar Mar Payne Alice Penney Maevonne Penney La Rene Peterson Ross Peterson Dean Phelps De Voun Rasmussen Nada Robins Parley Robison Mark Staples Earl Steiger . 4-' :.' ' yy lzbu .1 Q K uf ff s of . .... , Henry Stevens Lawrence Stevens Fae Swallow Preston Thompson Beryl Trimble La Grande Wasden Ray Wasden Dean WhiCker Stanley Whitaker Corrine Brown Easton Robison Shirley Bartholomew Don Quarnberg Marion Kesler Tommy Anderson Hope Harding his fourth year the eagle reaches matur- ity, and, symbolically, he dons the white, feathered headdress which marks him with the rank and dignity he must now assume. Being the oldest of his associates, he naturally acts as leader and counselor among them. Finally, the day comes when the eagle, feeling his own might, longs to test him- self against the world and the challenge it puts before him. Adorned in his legal headdress, he sets forth. His flight is not the flight of chance, he has. a definite purpose: to gain knowledge, experience, and under- standing. Now he will put to use all that he has learned. His earnest, school-day endeav- ors will allow him an abundant store of information, his clean habits will make him a desirable person with whom to work and play, and his fine sense of fairness will win him many friends. Millard High helped him prepare. She told him of the wise and unwise in life. She so prepared all the 8lfLLOlf'fl 27 Warren Ahlstrom Colleen Anderson Phyllis Ashman Evelyn Avery Lynn Bennett Mary Black Marie Frampton Leah George Laura George Christine Rogers Stanley Harmon Ruth Holmes Cleon Hopkins Janice B. Johnston DeLynn Labrum Rhoda Lyman Donna Brinkerhoff Lucy Down Brower Carol Davies Elaine Davies Joke Davies Alexa Day Elaine Day Von Nell Day Joe Duggan Stott Duncan Carol McKee Boyd Melvile La Vern Memmott Shirley Monroe Lorraine Neilson Jane A. Noall Rae Nixon Bill Palmer Helen Payne 4 5 R Bernard Prows Mary Ella Robinson Doyle Robison Alice Turner Don Warner Elaine Warner .lack Warner Ray Warner Shirley Warner Ivan Watts Ralph Watts Birdean Whatcott Eris B. Wilson Scott Speakman Robert Spencer Rhea Staples Milton Starley Ruth Stephenson Helen Stevens Donna Stott Grover Swallow Eileen B. Thompson Howard Tompkinson Paul Grosbeck Lloyd Hatch lNO'r pictured! Eudene Wood LET ME RECALL. forl know.. . I am a witness to the tradition and the change at Millard High School. I live in the cold class rooms where Pericles, Shakespeare, Rousseau and Washington come alive for students. I live on the steps of the high school or on its beautiful lawns, at noon, before, after, as well as between classes. Where ever students seek me I am. I have looked over shoulders of students laboring on exams and term papers. I have followed the football, basketball and track teams on their out-of-town trips. I have been pleasant company for tired teachers. I am a guardian .... I am the Spirit of Millard High School and was born of its students, for without their com- ing year after year I should die. I exist because of students like Fred. His life, his work and his own devoted spirit made me more alive and enduring. To him, lest we forget, I will set this 8lfl'LOI"L6L FRED STAPLES. .he lived well He was refined, generous, dependable, good-natured, intellectually witty, thoughtful in action and always deter- mined to bottle for a just cause. He rejoiced in knowing people, he made not a single enemy. Gifted with a real sense of value, he looked at student affairs from a popular standpoint-the standpoint of friend- ship. With an insuppressible weapon-an engaging smile- he fought the battle of life. His unselfish service to his school and comrades burned with equal brightness throughout the years. Few students towered higher in public opinion than he. Jan. 30, i927 Nov. 4, i944 33 0lfL5Ci8lfLLli00L.'5 members of the home of the stalwart eagle know the true values of such terms as: self-reliance, self-con- fidence, the willingness to back one's judgment as well as the willingness to submit to the authority of the majority. They have been exposed to the teaching that the business of true education is to help pupils to form opinions for themselves, that subject-matter is valuable only in so far as it leads to the formation of intelligent attitudes. Direction of activities is the definition of teaching at this home of learning, equal cooperation, the essence of its government. Here a person is never looked upon as a means-to-an-end but treated as an end. The right to weigh evidences pro and con impartially and objec- tively is accorded to all. ln order to enable knowledge to come through the gateway of individual experience, a school must tit to the individual, not the individual to the school. This, how- ever, can only be accomplished with builders of men, with leadership full of personal integrity, fair judgment, trust- ed wisdom, and fruitful, long experience with people. Such a group of servants is usually known as cfgafmilfahlfralford Superintendent Behind the scene of school government is a group of silent directors, known as the Board of Education. These men were represented through Superintendent Maughan. Superintendent Maughan has helped improve the democratic functioning at all high schools through- out Millard County. In so doing, he has contributed to our fuller enjoyment of school life. A. M. Maughon Principal Always near at hand, ready and willing to help and advise, was Principal Donald Wright. Friendly and energetic, he helped all students with equal vigor. He was not only a counselor but also a prosecutor, as circumstances demand- . ed. He worked hard for the improvement of our school and its students. Norma Bushnell Secretary Donald Wright l Nona Brown Beth N. Crosland La Rue Hanseen Jay Peterson Frank Rasmussen Carl W. Verhaaren Taft Watts Jessie White Raymond C. Childs Ray Greenhalgh Don Hatton S. H. Spencer Horace F. Reid Homer Wakefield Thomas Whatcott Reed A. Wood ELEM, is their name, to direct and inspire students, their task . . . They are more normal than most students might suspect. Yes, they are even likeable people . . . Inspired by the same aim, to serve others, their un- selfish devotion permits not all to reach the same goal . . . Nevertheless, a feeling of spontaneous affection towards thos.e whom they teach engulfs alll. 37 CSQlflfC!8lfLf QMCQIWI5 together with class officers form the Millard Student Council-the nucleus for all student activities. Charged not only with the odious task ot looking after their electors' wishes, this group of servants, of, by and for the students, was also called upon to help the ad- ministration set up student-behavior-changing goals, tor the students' benefit. VVhat's more, they got down to talking cold turkey, and came up with a constructive piece ot work .... SQatedkShirIey Monroe, Don Warner, Ross Peterson Standing-Nada Robins, LaMar Payne, Camille Frampton, Joe Duggan, Scott Speakman Not Present-Gwenivere Frampton. STUDENT COUNCIL OFFICERS Don Warner, President Joe Duggan, Commissioner of Publication Ross Peterson, Vice-President Shirley Monroe, Secretary Nada Robins Gwenivere Frampton, Social Manager Camille Frampton Cheer Leaders Scott Speakman, Business Manager LaMar Payne 38 W J 1 X056 OMCQM lent much color and excitement to SOPHOMORES council meetings. It was they that had to recall that every voter is a part ruler . . , that fractional splits and FRESHMEN Sterling Nixon, President Leora Hansen, Secretary Linford Stephensen, Vice-President JUNIORS i l i David Melville, Vice-President Rayma Stevens, Secretary Ross Starley, President SENIORS -gf . J f , 'N-.. 5 Lawrence Stevens, President Junior Day, Vice-President LaRene Petersen, Secretary howls are healthy signs of democratic P government . . . that they, the officers Rm: :l.Zl:ii:'r"'xfifj':,f2:ident - elected administrators - are their Elaine Daviesl, Secretary lDt'Ofl19r'S' l4eBpGl' .... 058 who toke o long look ot life cind think of it os o morch toword unlimited ochieve- ment know there is no short cut to ony worth-while horizon. Through direction of octivities these truths become self-evi- dent to them: thot there is no monopoly on truth . . . thot true educotion is end- less . . . thot there ore some constonts in o chonging world.. . thot chorocter con't be built foster thon o mon lives, foster thon he goins experience, foster thon he leorns to cherish principles . . . thot the triol ond error method is o useful woy of prying 'into the unknown, but pointless ond foolish ond costly once focts ore defi- nitely estoblished . . . Led by the desire to toste the joy of ochievement, future musicions, writers, reporters, photogrophers, linguists, chem- ists, physicists, housewives, commuinity ond religious leoders, formers, octors ond orotors sought ond found the octivity they knew best ond wonted most. This record is preserved under CDRCAIXIIZATICDNS am! ACTIVITIES MJ" L lent sparkle and color to numerous campus activities, their support helped our sport activities tremendously. These musicians love every member of the football and basketball team .... They all have double-strength, blow-out-proof vocal chords and lungs . . . believe it or not. Under the direction of its talented director, Mr. F. H. Reid, this group went on to new heights. Truly, I944-45 was a banner year! Kneeling lfrom left to rightl: Shirley Monroe, Bernice Paxton, Barbara Mundy and Camille Frampton lTwirlersl. lst Raw-Jean Bartholomew, drum major, Luana Robison, Norma Spence, Lola George, Leah George, Elaine Davies, Bertha Lyman, Joan Stewart, Nadine Warner, Bonnie Huff, Marie Day, Evelyn Kesler, Carene lvy, Venez Teeples, Beverly Johnson, Beryl Trimble, F. H. Reid, director. 2nd Row-Madge Anderson, Udine Greenhalgh, Eldean Jensen, Elaine Day, Shirley Warner, Margaret McBride, Virginia Crosland, Gordon Halterman, Carol McKee, Neva Ashby, Jerry Warner, Bob Spencer, Gwen Day. 3rd Row-Ted Davies, Grover Swallow, Larry Labrum, Winifred Stephenson, Marie Frampton, Ivan Watts, Therald Beckstrand, Mell Stewart, Betty Wade, Loretta Rogerson, Ruth Stephenson, John Sweeting. 4th Row-Omar Gillespie, Floyd Trimble, Josh Robinson, Gordon Beckstrand, Harold Penney, David Melville, Ralph Duncan, Deon Gillespie. OFFICERS Bob Spencer, Captain Jean Bartholomew, Drum Major Ruth Stephenson, Lieutenant Coral McKee, Secretary Lieutenant Grover Swallow, Corporal Bernard Prows, Corporal MUSIC IS TI-IEIR INTEREST. QIWCAQIS DWL Our orchestra provided us with classic instrumental music , . . the beauty of harmony of many instruments of varied pitch, moving to the same tempo. Qiifa Delicate harmony of women's voices, found in our Girl's Glee Club, enthralled many .... 'Xe W CA Tenderness of women singing accompanied with vibrant undertones of deep men's voices offered our Mixed Chorus. Mr. Reid's hands brought out the music in their throats to delight his audiences. 0If'lfL5 Tl-IEIR TALENEVS ATHRILLED MANY OW 0,943 C!! Left to right: Standing: Hope Harding, Celia Stowe, Barbara Mundy, Shirley Warner Rae Nixon, Beverly Davies, Lorraine Neilson, Donna Stott, Coral McKee, Eileen Thompson Elaine Davies, Phyllis Ashman. Seated: Robert Spencer, Alexa Day, Joe Duggan, Ray Warner, Elaine Warner. Not Pictured: Bill Palmer, Carol Davies, RuJean Rogers, Margaret McBride, .lack Warner Howard Tompkinson. was spelled out by the tired, ink-smeared fingers of the staff. Reporters tracked down the latest fragment c-f campus news, while flying fingers typed literally miles of copy. Joe Duggan, the editor, rushed from place to place in the attempt to put the paper "to bed" on time. Our Advisors Barrels of credit go to the Office Practice class, who, when the zero hour approached, set to work with vigor-and the paper came out. Watching over all and helping in countless ways were the capable advisors, Mr. Wood and Mr. Rasmussen. Yes, that is the picture behind the scene, which you, the R. A. Wood Frank Rasmussen l'6CICl6l', Devel' See. EOR PLEASANT MEMORIES' SAKE I I 1 f7Ae 1945 WWW! Left to right, standing: Madge Anderson, photog- rapher's assistant, Mr. Verhaaren, advisor, Beverly Jackson, assistant artist, Mr. Wakefield, photog- rapher, Maxine Hunter, assistant business manager. Seated: Joe Duggan, commissioner of publications, Alexa Day, artist, Bill Palmer, business manager. is a panorama of a host of high school people, their world and their life. lt is a continuation in the tradition of tale-telling: an attempt to recall the story-the drama-of the Spirit of Millard High School through another year .... ln this drama of high school life the campus is a stage, the people, players, and the story they enact is life itself: vivid dreams, exciting loyalty, dynamic activity, sincere heartache and earnest work. Interests flame, personalities change, ties de- velop, even new philosophies are adopted. Some hold hands in assemblies and hallways, others argue about religion, art, dates, and the fitness of the faculty. But all have fun, the loafer, the cheater as well as the hard-working student. If you can spare a few minutes you are cordially invited to reminisce, to remember high school friends and high school hours of I944-45, for it is for this reason that we compiled this, your "l945 Millard." '45 Millard Staff. To a gallant little group of faithful, hard workers-known and unknown-goes all honor and glory of being responsible for this book. Their bubbling enthusiasm, quick brain and deadly serious deter- mination to succeed, overcame all obstacles: a yearbook was ordered Editor . . . a yearbook had to be delivered. . . . To this exceptional worth-while campus force, led by Alexa Day, Marie Frampton, Joe Duggan and Bill Palmer, goes my sincere thanks and appreciation. Their accomplishment speaks for itself. C. W. Verhaaren, Advisor. Marie Frampton MlLLARD'S LEGEND oi '44-45 WAS RECCRDED 8 QVC 8 If'0LlfLCOLL15 ' C Z fl? united old members and brought new ones into the close bonds of friendship which surround those who are learning a new language. We studied and talked and read and worked and played together in this eventful year of l944-45. Left to right, standing: Mr. Verhaaren, Gordon Beckstrand, Donna Brinkerhoff, Beverly Jackson, Maxine Hunter, Madge Anderson, Ray Warner. Seated: Gwen Day, Alexa Day, Ross Peterson, Bernice Paxton, Rulean Rogers. Not pictured: Marie Frampton. A cheery "bonjour" or perhaps "vous etes en retard" rang out in the halls in greeting a fellow member. Rappelle-toi the initiation party . . . the display for American Education Week . . . the French movies . . . "Sept D'un Coup" and all the other things that were enjoyable And, rapelle-toi the customs we read about-the expressions we thought strange . . . the richer meanings of words . . . and at last the dawning of a new understanding of another people-their customs and way of life. Lf: livre cle la vie ust le livre supra-me Quan ne peut ni fermer ni rouvrir a sou cl om, Le passage attachant ne s'y lit pas deux isis, Mais le feuillet fatal ae taurno de lui metric- On voudrait revenir a la page ou l'on mimi-, Et la page ou l'on meurt est deia sous 'los doigts' FRENCH CLUB OFFICERS Alexa Day, President Marie Frampton, Vice-President Maxine Hunter, Social Manager Initiation of new members MODERN LANGUAGE STUDY 46 mfarc! modcmfar m0fl:0IfL5 brought together students who were held by a common interest . . . science. Some tinkered with test tubes and left scars of spilled acids behind them . . . others found satisfaction in investi- gating the mysteries of magnetism, electricity and other physical phen- omena. M.M.M. members played an active part in school activities: a great num- ber of science films were shown to the student body, there was the display during American Education Week, the initiation party, and all the other large and small things that made member- ship enjoyable and interesting. Our advisors, Mr. Verhaaren and Mr. Wakefield, led the way in showing us the things that we might gain through scientific knowledge. Our display. Left to right, standing: LaMar Payne, Joe Duggan, Gor- don Beckstrand, Doyle Robison, Jake Davies, Bob Spencer, Don Warner, Lynn Bennett, DeVaun Rasmussen. Seated: Shirley Monroe, Alexa Day, Christine Rogers, Shirley Warner, Melba Johnson, Madelyn Mathews. Not pictured: Bill Palmer, LaRene Peterson, Marie Framp- ton. SCIENCE CLUB OFFICERS Marie Frampton, President Alexa Day, Vice-President Christine Rogers, Secretary Bob Spencer, Reporter SCIENTIFIC KNCDWLEDCE ome colfwmicd OFFICERS the science and art of dealing with home-making, brought these girls into closer bonds of fellowship. Some donned aprons and investigated the intricacies of boiling water. Others delved into the art of dressmaking. Guidance in the prescribed allowance of food, with reference to a particular state of health, became the subject of special interest to one group, while healthful living con- ditions, the use of an income, care and proper training of children caught the attention of another. Theory and practice never clashed in this organization of future housewives, for Mrs. Beth Crosland, the advisor, saw to that. Home projects, banquets, fashion revue all helped to realize that home eco- nomics can and must be an applied science, for otherwise it will never retain its enchanting force of attraction toward the "realistic" opposite sex. HOME ECONCDMICS and SERVICE Coral McKee, President Rae Nixon, Vice-President Merlyn Watts, Secretary mfwz 43,46 Cm is something new in the line of organizations at our high school and represents a "service club." Its members are called "Eagles" The purpose ot this representative group of student leaders is to talk over pressing school problems and their solution, to ease the strain of high school lite with understanding and to make common cause with earnest students. lt was through the gathering of many-their varied opinions- that problems of importance to different groups were discussed and to some measure solved. Members of this club gained happiness through one of the best known means: service to others. Front row, left to right: Jean Bartholomew, Carol McKee, Helen Stevens, Robert Spencer, Junior Day, Warren Ahlstrom, Elaine Day, Sterling Nixon. Second row: Rae Nixon, Delores Warner, Gwenivere Frampton, Gwen Day Camille Frampton, Bernice Paxton, Nada Robins, Shirley Monroe, Mr. Whatcott advisor. Third row: Linford Stephenson, Lawrence Stevens, Ross Peterson, Joe Duggan David Melville, Doyle Robison, Don Warner, Jack Warner, Jack Davies, LaMar Payne HELPED sofvxii to ENRICH LIFE I we Q94 CAayolfer jj. has experienced this year, the year of i944-45, a year of growth and development. Mr. S. R. Greenhalgh Seated, left to right: William Wilson, Wilber Stephenson, La Voy Jones, Mr. Greenhalgh, Lawrence Stevens, Howard Tomkinson, Henry Stevens, Bill Palmer, Jake Davies, Warren Ahl- strom, Gorman Day, Leland Birch, Sterling Nixon, Earl Frampton, Byron Wildon, Grover Wildon, Jewel Memmott, Ross Starley, Earl Peterson, Milton Starley, Leland Thompson, Ronald Robins, James Bennett, Scott Speakman, Nels Stephenson, Reed Kesler, Ward Adams, Darrel Jackson, Deck Hunter, Burton Giles, Paul Martin, Preal Holly, Linford Stephenson, Don Quarnberg, Leo Robins, Dick Warner, Val Peterson, Bill Davies, Willis Stephenson, Cleve Halsey, Lenard Wildon, OFFICERS Warren Ahlstrom, President Joke Davies, Vice-President Lawrence Stevens, Secretary Bill Palmer, Treasurer Howard Tomkinson, Reporter Gorman Day, Sentinel Henry Stevens, Athletic Manager Advisor AGRICULTURAL LEADERSHIP Placing their future in the hands of an energetic advisor and a group of hard-working club officers, the chapte ieved goals even beyond their highest expectations ,... Recall' the Harvest ball: its decora- tions, the queen, her attendants, the turkey raffle, etc? . . . the radio programs over KSUB and KOVO? . . . the public speaking contest of the F.F.A. and the tremend- ous success Lawrence Stevens scored? . . . the Annual F.F.A. State Con- vention, held for the first time in southern Utah-through our efforts? CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT l l l vumwcfmfifw wah Wmdmn I' mg 5 ,J 1 flu! P 3 ' ' ,glhikifkmmaswwlemttg Q :ALA Wlfef' ,wma ,,J,1i. , b . Ml litem A tug.. . A l fum 1lfW ' ? .u l 11' . in ef Msg u A rf qi . 'Mig t.zL-.- W "'5Mr! 'mmf I ' A 74, L, Ch M in ,,H,f,,,i .ii igli. Ywl an 4 m .ml W. 1 limi of i 'tl swim, 'dawg M ,quam an ,M .4 if if I ,ima , ,f s uf Hmmm j ml! jk LMP 14.111 nu 1, ff M4 g nm' Ililvler Stuarts 5, ,, -A ,..,f A rf lv f A 'NN-M-N-M..19 'X 'll A, . ,v-v"m,., l ' 2, 1-.,.j- " ' ' , Q. t is V Q -l .1 .p . 'fr "wJY5H1:sawtz ' I R e ' H , ' ' new-W --W Mau , R Wgkcvrnumla ,fps 11, B 1 .swift Lu -wzmfhil 4,17 of li: Qi., , X I mi I . . 4 1 1 Q Mn: .ml ,:,- I 4 A ,. Roig, M1 is N . I f ' .WM wwf v g Q nf I' 'Emu 7l'f5?TVD -' , . ' Y SMU " Nyndaru an aefalfu 5, Q - . f, -Q ' M zacmgmw df . 5 . H ff-f---. rw K -M , ,, K, . - Q- V V , Q - , . , UAV V. Q' ' .A K 4 Q in ' 'WT 1' i ' . sgiif- 4. 3- ffm , - f M' ' . N V ' , VV it . ' f' . In return for their accomplishments of the past year, the chapter received the Silver Bee Hive Cer- titicate. Individual students who met requirements for separate Bee Hive rating were as follows: Milton Starley Howard Tomkinson Leland Thompson Ronald Robins Leo Robins Linford Stephenson Sterling Nixon Grover Wildon Deck Hunter Jewel Memmott Bill Palmer Lawrence Stevens Hand in hand with the extra-curric- ular activities marched the curriculum: the F.F.A. classes brought the farm to the school, and in return, the school to the farm, This progressive outlook on class instruction could not help but produce results and special recognition. and USEFUL CITIZENSI-llP To create more interest in the intelligent choice of farming occupations, to develop com petent, aggressive, rural and agricultural leadership, to strengthen the confidence of farm boys and the young men in themselves and their work, all of which represent part of the aims of the Future Farmers of America, brought over 75 faithful leaders to Fillmore to become guests of our chapter, the host of the l7th annual F.F.A. convention. Being host is not only an honor, but also a great responsibility. But let it be said in honor of our Millard Eagle Chapter: the success of the convention must, to a great extent, be credited to you, your efforts put forth to serve and live up to the aims of your organization brought you high into prominence. Truly this has been a year of achieve- ment for your chapter. AG l l l l A l l Top: Officers in charge of convention Middle: State F.F.A. officers of i944-45 Lower: Convention Group Delegates WERE TO OTHERS l-llCl-l IDEALS zz, fm members are Friday's children carrying the stamp of loyal, enthusiastic Millard rooters They are fun-loving Romans: they can march and run, sing and shout, laugh and weep, yes and sometimes even whisper .... But whatever they do they do well, and are liked for it Kneeling: Nada Robins, LaMar Payne, Camille Frampton. Standing: Shirley Monroe. Phyllis Ashman, Beverly Davies, Celia Stowe, Elaine Davies, Beulah Monroe, Helen Stevens, Madelyn Matthews, Jean Bartholomew, Rae Nixon, Bernice Paxton, Joyce Stevens, Rhoda Lyman, Gwen Day, Bertha Lyman, Hope Harding, Elaine Warner. CHEER LEADERS Although twenty in number, this group of young little ladies rose to lofty heights of popularity-from which they never descend. Dignified, intelligent, sweet, self-assured, and full of temperament, they could not fail to be successful in their undertakings and win wide admiration. "Come on Millard, let's go!" FCDSTERINC SCI-IOCDI. SPIRIT There was never a game-football, basketball, or a track meet-at which the school was not represented by them. They were always ready with a stunt and a supply of yells. They always did their part to make the opposing team feel welcome at Millard. When the Eagles paid a visit to some ot her school to show their ability, the Pep Club girls were there to spur them on to victory and to keep up their morale. Yes, these dynamic girls did their task well: our school spirit exists and has grown because of them. May your service given return to all of you a hundred-fold. MAIN... ' ' PROVED to be THEIR l-IGBBY 6055 -cggcfion of the student body was the emilfwzyrg With the aims of gaining in spiritual as well as educational knowledge, this group bonded together under the leadership of Mr. S. H. Spencer. They studied and worked together, each growing toward a richer and fuller life under the glorious banner of religion, ". . . Religion has been called the refuge of weak minds. Psychologically, weakness lies rather in failure to recognize the weakness of all minds. The mind, coupled to religion, is a stronger mind for it, a mind not so readily swayed by the passions that parade as reason. ln deifying the mind, we become the fools of reason and the dupes of scientific truth." Quoted from "The Return to Religion," by Link. MANY LEAN toward REl.lClGlNl . c7fLe5yoicufL gfnd Grease-paint, stage costumes, scripts and a keen interest in the cultural values of school life became symbols of the members of the Millard Thespian Chapter. First row: Rae Nixon, Phyllis Ashman, Shirley Warner, Elaine Day, Elaine Davies, Mr. Rasmus- sen, Elaine Warner, Madelyn Matthews, Barbara Mundy, Beulah Monroe. Second row: Ray Warner, Bill Palmer, Gwenivere Frampton, Gwen Day, Camille Frampton, Bernice Paxton, Nada Robins, Helen Stevens, Warren Ahlstrom, Robert Spencer. Third row: Preston Thompson, Lawrence Stevens, Ross Peterson, Elmer George, Joe Duggan, Grover Swallow, Doyle Robison, Henry Stevens, Don Warner, Cecil George, Jack Warner, Jake Davies, LaMar Payne. The Thespians made their debut on January l2, l945, when they, for the first time, not only participated in our fine school play "Behind the 8-BaIl" as members of the cast, but also took over stage management and ushering. No finer beginning could have been mo de by any group. We are sure that under the capable leadership of Mr. F. Rasmussen, their advisor, a promising future lies ahead. May the aim of this young theatrical group to promote better school entertainments prove of real value to our school, that in days to come fine showmanship and polished cict- ing will continue to please our audience, including the most cynical customer. OFFICERS Elaine Day, President Jake Davies, Vice-President Rhea Staples, Ray Warner, Social Managers Joe Duggan, Business Manager Shirley Warner, Reporter Lawrence Stevens, Secretary Few toward MAKE-UP and MEMORY WORK Weeks of rehearsal and hard work on the pa rt ot many students and their energetic lead- er, Mr. Rasmussen, resulted in the success of the school play, "Behind the 8-Ball " This production was well received by the students and general public at both Millard presentations as well as the one given at Delta High School in March. Acclaimed by many as the best Millard l-ligh School play in many years, this 'super colossal' production is a tribute to all who took part in its presentation. This year many varied and interesting events took place in support and tribute of the Millard Championship Football Team. Among the events were the Football Banquet, the Assembly hon- oring the team and the election of o Football Queen, and other highlights recorded by the camera. Helping to make lite more bearable and interesting at Millard were various indoor and outdoor activities, participation in which helped to improve our well being and to develop a fuller cultural and social lite. As individuals vary, so do their interests in activity, some found enjoyment in outdoor sports such as softball and tennis, others' interests turned to participation in school assemblies, and oratorical contests, while many enjoyed just posing tor yearbook pictures. P8 you 6L !00lf'f15IfIfL6LlfL. FOR PLAYERS Do you play the game for the game's sake? Do you play for your team and not for yourself? Do you obey the orders of your team's captain? Do you recognize the decision of the referee without dispute? Would you prefer to lose rather than do anything dishonorable? Then you are on the right way to become a sportsman. FOR SPECTATORS Do you refuse to applaud the good play of opponents? Do you whistle at the referee when his decision displeases you? Would you prefer to see your team win even if it has not deserved to do so? Do you seek to quarrel with spectators who applaud the other team? If so, then you are no good sportsman! Try to be one! Honor is the first virtue of a sportsmanl Self-control is the first duty of every sportsman! Lacking fair play, a sports encounter is not attractive! The spirit of chivalry creates the moral value of sport! 63 PROTECTORS of OUR FAME Under the glowing sun in Nevada our Regional champions opened their sensational football campaign of I944 with a 25-6 victory over Panaca. These are the spirited, determined, Friday afternoon entertainers who protected Millard's rich heritage: ai! me Kdampionri Seated, left to right: Lester Dobson, Lawrence Stevens. Standing, first row: Assistant Coach Hatton, Bob Spencer, Gorman Day, Jr., Jake Davies, Warren Ahlstrom, Stanley Whitaker, Paul Grosbeck, Jack Warner, De Lynn Labrum, Cecil George, Ross Peterson, Don Warner, Howard Tomkinson, Coach Taft Watts. Second row: LaMar Payne, Ronald Anderson, Bill Tomkinson, Junior Stott, Henry Stevens, Cleve Halsey, Fred Staples, Preston Thompson, Ray Wasden, Elmer George, Gordon Beckstrand, Jewell Memmott, Mark Staples, Dan Speakman, Jack McBride, Omar Gillespie. ikay Warner not pictured.l UNE of the SCHCDOUS BEST YET . invading our home grounds after the Nevada trip were the "Dons" of Spanish Fork. Coach Taft Watts had his boys on the warpath and the snarling Forkers spent most of the afternoon in the shad- ows of their own goalposts. 32-0 read the scoreboard when the final gun sounded. We skinned the Delta Rabbits without showing any trend of mercy, stopped North Sanpete in a thriller and ran wild when the boys over from Richfield showed up to offer opposition. . A l' ' l F'd ff However the climax of our league Wm " ay G emom' scene games was reached when our Eagles met Wasatch Academy to settle last year's defeat. lt was during this game that the feverish spirit of the team boiled over, not one man remained on the bench .... Determination, ability and a high-flying spirit of revenge united to humble the opponent by a score of 55-0. Spurred by the cries of the excited Millard rooters even the third stringers lived up to the chorus: "Our team is RED HOT". . . The Eagles' fortune however had run too long its regular course, Miss Fortune decided to turn her smiling face at least once .... That is at least the way the story goes .... For our boys trekked to Cyprus to taste their first defeat, and to our greatest chagrin, the most costly one, for with it fell Millard's aspiration to the state championship. Running into this northern football-giant--the later state champion-was more than our team could handle. Handicapped by injuries and nervousness the Eagles, holding their own in yardage gained, were unable to carry the ball into pay-dirt. All exciting demonstrations of interference running, end-sweeps, swings and side-steps through proverbial "holes" in the opposing line were smeared and smothered. Cyprus had made up its mind to win and did just that. . The Eagles had their wings clipped, but only after a terrific struggle. Bench-warmers-Ray Warner on the .injury list. WE LICKED 'EM ALL.. 1 M While these pictures record thi highlights of the darkest scene of our football history of i944-45 let us add a little sunshine by re calling all other performances: Millard vs. Panaca .......... 25-4 Millard Sp. Fork Millard Delta ...,,.. Millard Richfield Millard N. Sanpete Millard Wasatch Millard Cyprus ,.... BUT CYPRUS To Coach Taft Watts who trains the boys and then directs them from the bench, goes this song of praise: Our undisputed regional champion- ship since way back in l938 fittingly crowns your devotion to your boys and your profession .... You demonstrated to us how to handle a formidable supply of dyna- mite, how to activate it with cool de- liberation, and how to bring state recognition to your players. For this and many more unnamed deeds we respect you. Your actions talk louder than words. To share in this song of praise is Assistant Coach Hatton, who, unas- sumingly, in his own quiet way, did what was asked of him, as best as he knew how. Warren Ahlstrom DeLynn Labrum ALL-STATE CHOICE INDDOR HERDES . Placing first in our division, contrary to all expectations of even the most loyal supporter these Millard boys became truly "high-flying EagIes" .... THEY ARE TOPS . First row, left to right: Ross Peterson, Gorman Day, Dean Whicker, Bob Spencer, Don Warner, Coach Taft Watts. Second row: Paul Grosbeck, Gordon Beckstrand, Jack Warner, Cecil George, Lester Dobson. Not pictured, Ray Warner. Equipped with strong wings, sharp eyes, and mighty claws they went into battle and came out victoriously. Only once a "Rabbit" slipped luckily by . . . but never again. Starting the season out comparatively slow, our basketeers reached their height during league games, only to fade out again in the regional play-off tournament. However, to those who saw Coach Watts' hardwood floor artists in action, this record holds many unforgettable thrills: Millard Delta .... ...... 3 5 Millard Beaver . Millard Beaver .... ...... 32 - Millard Hinckley Millard Milford .... ...... 2 6 Millard Milford . Millard Hinckley ..... ...... 3 7 Millard Delta Millard Delta ...... ...... 2 8 THEY TDD FINISHED FIRST A band of Sophomores who could not but help to follow the example of their "big brother," also made basketball history .... Yes, Greenlings they were . . . but ferocious. . . . Meeting all members of our district in competition, they too left the floor only once beaten. As beginners, they showed promising signs, delighted the spectators and should partly relieve the coaching staff of the headache to find replacement for our leaving graduates. lf basketball scores are meaningful, historical documents, let's not forget these: Millard vs. Delta ..... ....... 3 3-24 Millard vs. Delta ,..... ...... 3 O-28 Millard vs. Beaver ....... ....... 2 l-32 Millard vs. Beaver .... ....... 3 2-30 Millard vs. Hinckley ....... ....... 3 4-21 Millard vs. Hinckley ..... .,.... 2 7-20 THE SQUAD PUTS ON ITS BEST BEHAVIOR First row, left to right: Coach Taft Watts, Gerald Hansen, Vance Keele, Dan Speakman, Leland Thompson, Dean Gillespie. Second row: Ronald Wade, Connie Bement, George Stott, Jack McBride, Cleve Halsey, Bill Tomkinson. " PCDTENTIALITY . . PLUS . Physical fitness, a prerequisite to healthful living, brought this small group of female Eagles recognition as the first girls' basketball team of our school. Under the capable leadership of Mrs. M. Melville, who later had to be substituted by Mrs. White, the girls quickly united to demonstrate the merits of this new phase of physical educa- tion work that brought the "weaker sex" one step closer to the much-admired, high-flying male basketeers. Although both of the girls' attempts to be victorious against the Rabbits from Delta failed, no complaints have ever been registered against their form .... THE BRAVES Back row, left to right: Mrs. Melville, Evelyn Avery, Jean Bartholomew, Ethel Anderson Laura George, Mrs. White. Front row: Bonnie Paxton, Hope Harding, Margo Jorgensen, Celia Stowe, Clea Bird. Kneeling: Darlene Stott, Beverly Davies. BEAUTY, BRAINS and Biafxwm The muscle boys, a mighty group of warriors, who strain their ligaments, hit their noses, but come out better men for it . . . Back row, left to right: W. Ahlstrom, B. Giles, H. Stevens, E. George, R. Warner, M. Staples, L. Stevens, R. Wasden, L. Hatch. Second row: Mr. Hatton, L. Bennett, S. Speakman, B. Wasden, E. Peterson, L. Robins, R. Wade, D. Warner, Mr. Verhacren. Seated: R. Watts, L. Stephenson, P. Martin, J. Memmott, M. Kesler, V. Christensen, and L. Payne. This aggressive and impulsive boxing and wrestling elite gave three shows of vigorous fight- ing spiriti two locall and one at Delta. A full house ot spectators reeted them each time. Y 9 Refreshing and amusing ring scenes demonstrated not only the fact that boxing makes one strong and his opponent weak, but also that one can die a thousand deaths, and that muscles could be made out of jelly .... Lett hooks, upper-cuts, straight rights to the chin, etc., were rare sights. A resolute will to win carried by many a "dead man" gave more than once a true concep- tion of how it must feel to be an oyster. However for the sake of pleasant memories let us recall that the Millard boys came out on top, whether the opponent was from Hinckley, Delta or Richfield. The Eagles' team could always sing: "Millard will shine tonight, Millard will Shine .... " 7l GUI? CINDER ARTISTS . Track and field events have always typified the purest and finest type of competitive sport. ln it only the most valiant, among the many valiant, can hope to win. The struggle for supreme- acy is almost without limit. Manly virtue counts, record performances be- come individual accomplishments. A group of returned Iettermen, most of them last year's state track meet winners, united with a new crop of sophomore talents to form our sc:hool's bloom and glow of perfect health ot modern days. They were sun-tanned, open-air-beauties, determined to mon- opolize all contests they entered . . and never failed. By their surprises and thrilling success stories we will long re- member them as another champion- ship outfit, that never let old Millard falll These are the names of the squad members whose abilities were molded Long-distance runners Our 440 men Participants in field events by Coach Watts and Assistant Coach Don Hatton into a top-flight outfit: The Nucleus Our Iettermen A HNEVERQSAY- DIE" GANG J , ,gc ,Wie ln the field events: High Jump, Cecil George, Jack Warner, Gordon Beckstrand and Ray Wasden. Broad Jump: Preston Thompson, Robert Spencer, Ray Warner, Vance Keele, Dean Gillespie. Shot Put: Ray Warner, Stanley Whitaker, DeLynn Labrum and Mark Staples. Discus: Jake Davies, Ray Warner, Robert Spencer, Ross Peterson, Elmer George, Stanley Whitaker. Javelin: Don Warner, DeLynn Labrum and Robert Spencer. Pole Vault: Ronald Wade and Don Warner. ln the track events: lO0 Yard Dash: Junior Day, LaMar Payne and Preston Thompson. 220 Yard Dash: Junior Day, LaMar Payne, Preston Thompson and Jack Warner. 440 Yard Race: Paul Grosbeck, Gerald Hansen, Gor- don Beckstrand, Ray Warner, Lynn Bennett, Thayne Robison, Vance Keele and Jack Iverson. 880 Yard Race: Doyle Robison, Howard Tomkinson, Bernard Prows, Lawrence Stevens, J. Ralph Wood and Clark Jackson. Mile Race: Doyle Robison, Cleve Halsey, Parley Rob- ison, Henry Stevens, Earl Steiger and Scott Speakman. Low and High Hurdles: Warren Ahlstrom, Ray Was- den and Bruce Wasden. Relay Teams: W. Ahlstrom, LaMar Payne, Preston Thompson, Junior Day, Lynn Bennett, Gordon Beckstrand, Gerald Hansen, Ray Warner, Don Warner, Paul Grosbeck, Ray Wasden and Doyle Robison. I l l Some train, others rest . . . 73 , . 1 I I ju Aopreciafion to those who helped in making this book, we wish to extend our most sincere thanks. . . . To. Mr. l. Donald Wright, our principal, who permitted us to embark upon an undertaking of this kind. . . . To Mr. S. Ross Fox, assistant superintendent of the Deseret News Press, for his excellent cooperation, and to the rest of the staff of the News for their printing and binding. . . . To Mr. Chas. G. Matthies, who, in spite of unforseen difficulties, kept his word and did this fine engraving work. . . . To Mr. Wakefield for his outstanding photographic work, and all the time he spent on the pictures. . . . To Madge Anderson, Mr. Wakefield's right hand, and to Maxine Hunter and Beverly Jackson, his left hand, for helping print the pictures. . . . To La Mar Brunson for the negatives of last year's pictures, and especially for the picture of Fred Staples. . . . To the Salt Lake Tribune for the sports pictures of the Millard- Cyprus game. . . . To Geraldine Rasmussen, who carried the tiresome burden of repre- senting our staff in all its Salt Lake dealings. . . . To all our advertisers for the support they gave us which helped make this book possible. . . . To the Fillmore City Council, whose interest in our school we welcome. . . . To Kenneth Nyman for his donation. . . . To these students who brought in ads from their home towns: Rhea Staples, Kanosh, Gordon Beckstrand, Meadow, Rae Nixon, Holden, and Phyllis Ashman, Scipio. . . . To the Student Council, who generously appropriated S100 for the yearbook. . . . To Mr. Owen Dugmore, of Steven's Store, for the cardboard we needed for mounting our pictures. . . . To Mr. Childs, who unselfishly lent us his car for our business trip to Salt Lake City. . . . To Marie Frampton, for her great effort and suggestions from her sick bed. We take this opportunity to express our appreciation. . . . To Maclelyn Mathews for her help. . . . To Mr. Verhaaren, our advisor, for the unselfish devotion of his time and efforts. Without his help this book would have been a pale comparison of what it is now. lf you have enjoyed this volume, please stop a moment and join us in expressing gratitude to the people mentioned above and to those who are not mentioned, but contributed help also. '45 MILLARD STAFF Joe Duggan, Comm. of Publications Bill Palmer, Business Manager Alexa Day, Artist IHHLIL MQRIE CIVIVY J4 gina! Pfam fo Wa,Le MW Mme UPIPIPURTUINIITY PILIEASANT CILIIMMVIE IBIEST Ui? SCIHUOILS -- -- A Fast Growing Progressive Cnty 1hH fuhs Wd d BFhgdH gfsx We appreciate the MILLARD HIGH SCHCDOL lik CLUFF CHEVROLET COMPANY Fillmore. Utah Phone 191 CONGRATULATIONS Compliments of the TO M H S Flllllltll GHULUEHS IHC UHHIN F. PETEHSEN h AGENCY Floweli, Uta COMPLETE INSURANCE on E. Brower' Mgh SERVICE FILLMORE UTAH Wade's Barber Shop extends its sincerest congratulations to the MILLARD HIGH SCHOOL tor their fine achievement VIVIAN WADE. Proprietor We Wish to thank the faculty! the student body and espec- ially those who have helped to harvest our crops, We appreciate your service and hope to maintain your good Will. J. FRANCIS KELLY Q item DRY GUDDS GRCICERIES FURNITURE jillnwla, wah graduates . . COMPEEVIENTS We B E N N E T T n eovors! Hmm GRUCERY 1vn1.1.rNG COMPANY W Fillmore, Utah MEADGW, UTAH lll QlQll3Rl BHHEHU HUTU Ladies' one-Cl'1ildren's lecxoly to wecxr gfome of gine Beals M1ll1nery-Speclclltles Newest Styles ond Colors Iohn Rogerson M R D M 1-'11 U h Manager NEW SHAW ff 11 1 WMU? CAFE fo Sm W' 9204 306145 UTAH Oll im! Spit? Cjlfclm HOME COOKING'S Q OUR SPECIALTY PF ELMO LOWDER Fillmore, Utah Lessee and Operator 'WE recognize that the greatest resources our county, state ancl nation have are their fine young men and Women, pro- perly trained, so that they can properly and successfully carry on the true principles of our great democracy. We congratulate our schoolsl XJ? MARK PAXTON Distributor TEXACO PRODUCTS gpmpzmnfi pg the STEV N'S MERCANTILE COMPANY FILLMORE'S FRIENDLY STORE Headquarters for Quality 33737547243547205050547S4b24bCD4P50375OZOC7Cb20CDCPi4i4b2C734DCX7lCfD17S1PZOi4D?f READY TO WEAR DRYGOODS GENTS' FURNISHINGS SHOES GROCERIES 6 IVIEAT FURNITURE MACHINERY HARDWARE UTAH POULTRY PRODUCERS COMPUMENTS CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION of I X Swallgjum Full line of Poultry 6. Turkey Feeds I- W- SWALLOW' prop. 6. Supplies Fillmore, Utah Happy memories of days past. Compliments and hopes and expectations of better days to come for Millard High School DAY HUTEL by Culbert Robison "' Of STOTT'S STORE Best WMM to Tnillarcf glzgh FILLMORE CASH STORE KANOSH CASH STORE Your Pcftroncrge is Appreciated WITHOUT TEETH There can be no chewing ,QQ WITHOUT CHEWING There can be no nourishment WITHOUT NOURISHMENT There can be no health WITHOUT HEALTH WHAT IS LIFE? Jn Um, Sfudenhi, ol flue, 'Wldlafwl Jflyll, 5CflD,0.L.' Your pioneer forebearers have left you a wonderful heritage. Keep alive this pioneer spirit, Pioneering will nev- er end except to those who have no vision. The world is teeming with op- portunities and undeveloped resources. Seek out these hidden treasures. Build new industries, and under your own proprietorship. Don't be the "hewers of wood and carriers of water." You have a greater destiny. XT HEAR THE CLARION CALL OF THE J- 3. UHHUUHCH Munn Demist TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY Congrc'g:lations Millard School I Dealer In KIMBALL 5 Q A 3, J sm wcf sm rlou M L 7 ee A Kanosh, Utah le? B. Y. Kimball, Prop. J. C. RASMUSSEN PHONE 92 Fillmore. Utah E ARE GLAD to contribute our ad to the Millard High School Yearbook of l944-45 and feel tree to boast it's for a Worthy cause .... With the spirit of '76 We work for and with the school .... We Wish the school success in all their activities and would like to stand in line with GI. loe for tickets to the basketball tournament before they are passed out to the non-supporters and be sold on the black market .... ROBISON TERRELL PACKING CO. "The Packing Co. of Millard County" Fillmore. Utah DH. JAMES Nl. ALEXANDER, NJJ. Complete X-ray and Clinical Laboratories p Day or Night Kelly Bldg. Hours: 1 to 5 p.m. Fillmore, Utah daily Eifi ' k cl ds sifgfiofoiquifxl SCIPIO MERC. 81 SERVICE We will furnish the Equipment You fumish the work UTAH'lDAHU SCHUUL SUPPLY CU. Everything lor Office and Schools 155 So. State Street Salt Lake City Our compliments to THE MILLAHII HIGH SEHIIIJI. on the effort they have put forth in publishing this splendid Year Book 43' PHUEHE55 PHINTINE EUNIPANY ANTELOPE HOTEL 8. CABINS It pleases us To please you In Merchandise As in Service Mr. and Mrs. B. I. Sorensen Managers, Owners and Operators Scipio...Utah AVA L O N THEATRE Fillmore, Utah 0 YOUR HOME OF OUTSTANDING PICTURES The Best Entertainment at Lowest Prices 9 Air Conditioned and Steam Heated 0 MAY MCBRIDE, Manager Mmm, for a Higher Education. the Key to a fuller and better life. t tl it STEVENS HCITEL Fillmore, Utah 'WIQQL Munir, ,?hl:QI'l,6lA, FOUN'I'Al LUNCH MILLABD BRANCH BANK Fillmore, Utah 'Cf Deposits Insured BY The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Washington. D.C. S5,0U0 Maximum Insurance tor Each Depositor WE congratulate the students and faculty of Millard High ior an excellent school. We es- pecially commend the students who have gone and are going into the armed services. We wish them the best of luck. PARK HIGHWAY GARAGE General Repairing Ford Products RIESIEIRWES Start early to build up your own personal reserve of ready cash. in a savings ac- count. Your account here is cordially invited. 4 THE CONTINENTAL NATIUNAL BANK AND TRUST CUMPANY oi Salt Lake City Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation FILLMURE FRUZEN F0005 THE CDCILEST PLACE IN TDWN Alonzo Brunson. Mgr. Melville 6 Hobbs. Owners GENERAL MERCHANDISE McCORMICK-DEERIN G IMPLEMENTS jlfw Grant L. Thompson. Mgr. Scipio, Utah Congratulations CONGRATULATIONS To The from MILLARD HIGH SCHOOL TEXACO SERVICE . . . Complete for the effort 1t has put forth in publlsh- Automotive Service FILLMORE, UTAH ' Phone 631 ing this splendid Yecxr Book! Congratulations to Millard High' Meet your friends at McBride Lumber Company W., Fillmore, Utah Cabins-Coniection--Service Station mcg pface gf CS8I'Ut.CQ is tlze Qasis of Cglliencfslzzp then We are "A IFRIIIENIDILY CAIFIEH "THE BEST OF SERVICE TO EVERYONE" SIHIAI YS CPXIFIE ADMINISTRATION INDEX B H Brown, None --...w-.-.. ....--.. 3 7 Hanseen, La Rue .................... ' .......... 3 7 Bushneul Norma WW36 Hatton, Don ........................ 37, 64, 7I C M Maughan, A. M. ........... ......... 3 6 Carling, Ernest ........... ........ 6 Melville, Perniece ........, ......... 7 0 Chesley, Fred ................ ........ 6 P Childs, C. Raymond ...... ............ 3 7 P J N 37 cfaaiaaa, Beth N. ..... ......... 3 7, 48 e'e'S0"f GY - -'--"----- '---------"---- - G R Rasmussen, Frank ................ 37, 44, T Greenhalgh, S. Ray ....... ......... 3 7, 50 Reid, F. Horace ........ .............. 3 7, 42 A Brunson, Bonnie Lou ......... ......... I 2 B J . ............... ........ . Abraham, carai .................................. 22 81322221 Vjf','1d0 ,,,,.,,,..- ,,,..',-- 1 O Abraham, Dorothy ............................ I6 Adams, Robert lnot picturedl ....... C Adams, Ward .............................. I0, 50 Allen, Evelyn ...................................... 22 Carling, Dixie .................................... I6 Allen, Maurine ....... ...........4..... ....... I 6 Chambers, Faye ............... .. ...... ...I6, 58 Ahlstrom, Warren .............................. Christensen, Lloyd lnot picturedl ............28, 49, T, 64, 67, 7I, 50, 72 Christensen, Maughn Anderson, Claudine ............................ I6 Christensen, Stanley ........................ I0 Anderson, Colleen .............................. 23 ghristensen, Vernon .... .......... I 6, Anderson, Elaine ................................ lothier, Del ............... ............. Anderson, Ethel ................... .22 58, 70 Cooper, Duane ......... .,...... . .IO Anderson, Larry .....,.......................... I0 Cortensen, LaReta ....... .......... I 0 Anderson, Madge .... 22, 42, 45, 46, 58 Crosland, Maynard ....... ................. I O Anderson, Ronald ........................ I6, gg Crosland, Virginia ........ .......... I 6, 42 Anderson, ommy .................... . ........ . Ashby, Neva' .................. 32 D Ashman, Phylis ............ , , , , -2 70 Davies, Beverly ............I6, 44, 54, 70 A"e'Y' Evelyn 8 oavaas, Ban ...................,,............. io, 50 B Davies, Carol ................................ 29, 44 B d G ,O lggvies, Elaine .... 29, 39, 42, 44, 542 gg o ger, eorge .................................. - I 1.11 '-..".......--.----..-...'.llhl 1 I Ballard, Louise ............................ 22, 58 50322, mek? ,".'.,..-.-.--'--.-.-.".......,-.'--- Bartholomew, Jenn ---. 22, 42, 49, 54, 70 ................ 29, 47, 49, 50, 57 64, 72 Bartholomew, Shirley ---------------------- --25 Davies, Ted ............................... f ..io, 42 Beauregard, Barth ............................. .22 Dey, Alexa ..-.......-l..,. 29' 44, 45, 46, 47 BeCIfSff0fIg, gilt:-9 --------------------------- 22 Day, Bryan .......................................... I0 Beckstran , r on .......................... Dey, Home .-.'....-... 29, 42, 49' 57, 58 B na., ..... 42, 45, 47, 64, 68, Ig gay, Cgorman 2222, 39, 49, 20, 57, 58, ec s ran , en ................................ I ..'. ,42, 46, 4 I 4, 7, Beckstrand, Therald .................... IO, 42 D222 15,22 '.'...-..-'.,......-'---,,.-. --IU ilthn 1 6 Bement, Connie ............. ......... I 6, 69 Day, Marie I,.,.,,-,.-,-,.-,.,-..--,-',..'Ih- I0 42 Bennett, Dorothy .............................. I6 Dey, Mex --..-'-.'.- -.-'.....- H16 Bennett, James ............................ IO, 50 Day, Roween '-'.-l...,. ..'-'--.-"...-.- 22 Bennett, Lynn ................ 28, 47, 71, 72 Day, VonNelI ........... ..................... 2 9 Bennett, Stanley ................................ IO Deerdenl C011 QUA-..-...---.-..--.'-.'..,...'-.--. IO Birch, Leland ........... ................. I O, 50 Dobsenl Lester .-..--.-.'-'--...-.... 22' 64, 68 """' "I6' guggan, George lnot picturedl ....... . , 6 --------- ------------ u ggan,Joe .......... ........ S:aClI:, Sxarol ......... ........ 5 gl D ---'.----.-- gg, 38, 44, 45, 47, 49, 57, gg OC , Gfy .................... ........ hvu'-'V4-"'..-..-----.'.-'e..--.--. Blondin, Helen .................. ........ I 0 08222: Dian --".'....-.l----.-"".'..--.-""... 22 Bottomfield, Jacqueline ........ ........ 2 2 Duncan' peO,,1 ".".' e -A-....-'.e. 22 Bradfield, Elaine ................ ............ 22 Duneen' Re1Dh .---.-.--' eevhnlhll- 1 O 42 Brinkerhoff, Donna ..........,......... 29, 46 Duncen' 51011 --'--',,Y"'-Ae -A-4..-.-' U29 Brinkerhoff, Fay ................................ I6 ' Brinkerhoff, Jimmie lnot picturedl E Brower, Lucy Dawn ........,............. 29, 58 Brown, Corrine .................................... 24 Eskland, Joyce ........... ......... I C Brown, Gaylen ..... ........ I 0 Eskland, Yvonne ....... ......... I 9 S Spencer, S. H. .............. .......... 3 7 V Verhaaren, Carl W ..... 37, 45, 46, 47, 7I W Wakefield, Homer C ............. 37, 45, 47 Watts, Taft .................. 37, 64, 68, 69 Whatcott, Thomas A. ................ 37, 49 White, Jessie .............................. 37, 70 Wood, Reed A, ............. ........... 3 7, 44 Wright, Donald ........ .............. 3 6 F Frampton, Camille ............................ 38, 49, 54, T, 58 Frampton, Earl ............................ II, 50 Frampton, Gwenivere .... 23, 38, 49, 57 Frampton, Marie ........ 28, 42, 45, 46, 47 Frampton, Robert ................. ......... ......I6 G George, Cecil .......... B, 57 64, 68, 72 George, Elmer ......... 23, S73 64, 7I, 72 George, Laura ............................ 28, 70 George, Leah ................................ 28 42 George, Lola ......... ...... .. ....... I I, 42 Giles, Burton ........................ I7, 50, 7I Gillespie, Dean ....... ., .......... 23, 42, 69 Gillespie, Omar ......... ......... I 7, 42, 64 Greenhalgh, Udine ...................... I I, 42 Grosbeck, Paul .................... 64 , 68, 72 H Halterman, Gordon .................... I7, 42 Halsey, Cleve ............ I7, 50, 64, 69, 72 Hanseen, Sheridan .............................. II Hanseen, Sherman .............................. II Hansen, Gerald ........ ........ I 7, 69, 72 Hansen, Marie ........ ...................... 23 Hanson, Colleen ............... .. ...... .. ....... II Hanson, Leora ............................ I7, 39 Harding, Hope ............... 25, 44, 54, 70 Harmon, Stanley ............................,,. 28 Hatch, Lloyd .............. ...................... 7 I I-latton, LaRae ...... .......... I 7 Holly, Preal ........... ....... I 7, 50 Holmes, Ruth ...... .......,..,., .28 Hopkins, Clean ...... .................. 28 Huff, Yvonne ...,... ............... I I, 42 Hunter, Deck ............,................... I7, 50 Hunter, Maxine ................... 23, 45, 46 Hutchinson, Joy .................................. I7 I Ireland, Lynn .... .... .................. I I Iverson, Jack ......... ........... 23 , 72 Iverson, Loraelle ...... .............. I I Ivie, Carene .......... ........... I I, 42 Ivie, Melbo ...... .............. I 7 Ivie, Melvin ........ ..II Johnson Jackson, Jackson, Jackson 7 Jackson, J Beverly ......,...........,. 23, Clark ......... Darrel ....,. John .,......, Jensen, Eldean ......., Jensen, LaVoy ......... Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Beth ......... Beverly .,.. Claude ......... Leslie ........., Lou Jean Johnson, Melba ...... 45, 1, ii, 42 7, I Utahna ..........., Johnston, Janice B, Jones, Lavoy .......,....... Jorgensen, Margo ....... K Keele, Bonnie .......... , 28 1, 1, Keele, Vance ,....,,. .A...... .l 7, Kelsey, lla Mae ........... ,,.,...,..... Kenney, lla Malien Kerr, Etta Jean ..,.....,.. ..,,,.v.. Kesler, Evelyn ...,.,. Kesler, Marion ........ Kesler, Reed ........,.,. Kimball, Carol ......... Speakman, Scott ..., 555, ii, 25, ii, Paxton, Bonnie .,,...,, ......... 2 4, 70 Paxton, Duveen .,...,..,.............., ..,,,,... I 2 Payne, Helen .........................,............ 30 Payne, LaMar ...............,......,..........,,. ....,...24, 38, 47, 49, 54, 57, 64, 71, 72 Payne, Shirley .....,.,......,...................., I7 Penney, Alice ............................,......, 24 Penney, Faye ............. .....,... l 2 Penney, Georgia ........ ..,............. I 7 Penney, Harold ....,,......... ......... I 7, 42 Penney, Maevonne ,.,,,.., ,........ ....... 2 4 Penney, Viron ........,... ...............,.,., I 2 Peterson, Boyd ......... ,.........,,......., .... l 2 Peterson, Earl .......... .......... l 2, 50, 7l Peterson, Edith ......... ..........,.....,... l 8 Peterson, Jo Ann ..... ,...........,..,..., l 2 Peterson, laRene ...,......,....... 24, 39, 47 Peterson, Ross .................,..,,,......, ...... ....24, 38, 46, 49, 57, 58, 64, 68, 72 Peterson, Val ............,..,......,....... l8, 50 Phelps, Dean ...............,.......... ,........... 2 4 Probert, Carl .....,,.,.. ...........,.... l 2 Prows, Bernard ......., .,....... 3 0, 42 Q Quarnberg, Don ...... ,,,,...,. 2 5, 50 R Rasmussen, Beverly ..,,.... ,,...,.......... l 8 Rasmussen, De Vaun ..........,,........ 24, 47 Robins, Leo ............................ l8, 50, 7l Robins, Nada ............ 24, 38, 49, 54, 57 Robins, Ronald ............................ l8, 50 Robinson, Joshua ........................ l2, 42 Robinson, Mary Ella ....,, ............ 3 0 Robinson, Thoyne ,..,,,,..........,,,.,,...,... I8 Robison, Anita ,,..,,.,.....,,.....,............... l8 Robison, Doyle .,.. 30, 39, 47, 49, 57, 72 Robison, Easton ........,....................... 25 Robison, Edith ....,,............................., l2 Robison, Luana ....... ,........ l 8, 42 Robison, Parley ......,.... ......... 2 4, 72 Kimball, Dan ........... ..... L Labrum, Carol .,,v..,.......,........,............ Labrum, DeLynn ............ 28, 64, 67, Labrum, Larry ............................ ll, Lawson, Nelda ......... ................ Lee, Gladys ......... ................... Lee, Harold ,,....,...... .,...............,..... Lyman, Bertha ........ ........, I 7, 42, Lyman, ............. ........ ,.... 2 8 , M Martin, .Melba ................,................... Martin, Paul LaMar .................... 50, Mathews, Madelyh ...,.... 23, 47, 54, McBride, Jack ,s ,...,..,.....,....,.... l7, 64, McBride, Margaret ,..,,,,..,.,.. l l, 42, McKee, Coral .......... 29, 42, 44, 48, McKee, Riley .............................,........ 23 Melville, Boyd ...............,.......,............ 29 ' ' 49 Melville, David ................ I l, 39, Memmott, Ella Dean Memmott, Jewell .... ....... Memmott, LaVern ......... Mitchell, Robert ........ .25, 42, 7l 50, 54, Rogers, Christine Rogers, Patricia ...,.. Rogers, RuJean ,..,.. Rogerson, La Retta S 48 is Y-N-U-N-'nnnlu-uu',46 12, 44, .42 Shaw, Dennis ,.....,.... .. Snyder, Deon .,,.... Speakman, Dan ....... Mitchell, Elvin .............,.............. 1 ....... l2 Monroe, Beulah ..................,. 24, 54, 57 Monroe, Shirley .... 29, 38, 42, 47, 49, Mundy, Barbara ........ 24, 42, 44, 57 N Neilson, Lorraine ........................ 29, Neilson, Norman ..........,.,.,,,............... Nixon, Rae .........,.......,.,.................... 44, 48, 49, 54, 57, 58 Nixon, Sterling ................ l7, 39, 49, Noall, Jane A. ................,,,................ . P Palmer, Bill ........ 30, 44, 45, 47, 50, Paxton, Bernice ....,...................,,,..... 42, 46, 49, 54, 57, 58 Spencer 69 l8, 64, 38, 50, 7l 42 Norma .............,...,......,.., l 2, Spencer, Robert .,.............,................ .,....3l, 42, 44, 47, 49, 57, 64, 68, 72 Staples, Fred ...............,.......,........ 33, 64 Staples, Mark ........................ 24, 64, 7l Staples, Milton ...... .....,.............. l 2 Staples, Rhea ..,,,,,,., ................ 3 I Starley, Florence .....,.. ............. l 8 Starley, Milton ....... ......... 3 l, 50 Starley, Ross ,...................,....... l2, 39, 50 Steiger, Earl ...............,...,......,,.. 24, 72 Stephenson, Linford .... l8, 39, 49, 50, 7l Stephenson, Mary June ......,............... l2 Stephenson, Nels ,.,,......,...,,......., l8, 50 Stephenson, Ruth ........... ...,...., 3 I, 42 Stephenson, Wilber ....... .....,,.. l 2, 50 Stephenson, Willis ,........ ........, I 8, 50 Stephenson, Winifred .,..... ........ l 8,42 Stevens, Helen ...,............ fl, 54, 57 Stevens, l-lenry ........ 25, 50, 64, 7I Stevens, Joyce ....,...,....,.,....., ...l8, 54 Stevens, Kathleen ..,.,....,,,...,...........,.. lS Stevens, Lawrence ..,,.,.,...,.. t...... 39, 49, 50, 64, 7l Stevens, Rayma ..,..,.......,.,............ l2, 39 Stewart, Aldean .,,,.,.,,..,.,.....,..........,. I2 Stewart, Charlie ....,,,. ....... l 9 Stewart, Ella Mae ...,.. .,.......,...... I 2 Stewart, Joan ......t.t. ......,.. I 2, 42 Stewart, Mel ........ ..,...... l 8, 42 Stott, Darlene ....., 4. ........... I9, 70 Stott, Donna Mae ,,,.,.,.....,......,..,. 3l, 44 Stott, George .......... .....,.... 64 , 69 Stowe, Celia .,.....,. ,,....,. l 9, 54, 70 Swallow, Foe ......... ......... ....... 2 5 Swallow, Gayla .........,.......,.,.............. I2 Swallow, Grover ............ 3l, 57, 58 Swallow, Shirley ,....,............ ,.,.... l 2 Sweeting, Melba ....,......,........ ..,..,. l 9 T Teeples, Venez ........... ,......... l 9, 42 Thompson, Eileen B, ......,..... ...3l, 44 Thompson, Gordon ...,....,,...........,,..... I3 Thompson, Leland ......,,,..,.... l9, 50, 69 Thompson, Preston ..t..... 25, 64, 72 Tomkinson, Bill .................... 64, 69 Tomkinson, Howard ........ Eli, 50, 64 Trimble, Beryl t.....,...........,.........,. 25, 42 Trimble, Floyd ........ .,........,.. l 3, 42 Trimble, Jeanne ........ ....... l 9 Turner, Alice ........... .....,.,.. 3 0, 39 Turner, Donald ................ ......, l 3 W Wade, Ronald .,......,....,.. l9, 7l, 72 Wade, Vella ........................ ....... l 9 Warner, Delores ..............,....... l9, 49 Warner, Dick ......,......,.. I3, 7l, 72 Warner, Don ...... 30, 38, 47, 57, 68 Warner, Elaine ......., 30, 44, 57, 58 Warner, Jack ,,..,.. ...... .... .......,.......,... 44, 49, 57, 64, 68, 72 Warner, Lee ...,,,.....................,.......... I3 Warner, Marion .....,....................,...,. I2 Warner, Ray .....,.,.....,,...,.,.............,..... 30, 44, 46, 57, 58, 64, 65, 68, 7l, 72 Warner, Shirley .... 30, 42, 44, 45, 57, 58 Wasden, Bruce ...,,,....,.,.., ....,,..... l 9, 7l Wasden, La Grande ,.,................. 25, 58 Wasden, Ray ........................ 25, 64, 7l Watts, Evelyn ......t. .,......,.,.... ..... l 3 Watts, lvan .........,. ......... 3 0, 42 Watts, Marilyn ,....., ....,,.... I 9, 48 Watts, Ralph .,....,.,....,. .......... 3 0, 7l Whatcott, Peggy .,,..,.,., .,,....,..... l 3 Whatcott, Birdean ........ ............. 3 0 Whatcott, Glen .......... .........,...... l 3 Whicker, Dean ........ .......... 2 5, 68 Whitaker, Evelyn ..,.,,.. ........,.,,..,,.... l 9 Whitaker, Stanley ............,... 25, 64, 72 Wildon, Byron .............. ...,,.....,... I 9, 50 Wildon, Grover .....,. ,,..,..... l 9, 50 Wildon, Lenard ...... ....,..,. I 3, 50 Williams, Betty ...... ............. I : Wilson, Eris B, ,...... ....,....,....,. 3 0 Wilson, William ..,.... ..,......,..t. I 9, 50 Wood, Alan .,,.......................,...,..,..,,.. I9 Wood, Eudene ..............,..,........,..,...... 3l Wood, Joyce inot picturedl ............ Wood, J. Ralph ..,....,,.,...,..,......,,...,..,. I9 INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS A K S Alexander, Dr. James M. .................. 83 Kimball Se, -C Smfion H --...-','. 81 , A Avalon Theatre ........... , ........ .......... 8 4 . Kelly, J. F5135 .-......-- , .,..---.. 77 gpgflygoiaf B Sorenson, Boyd ......... L ST H f I ............. Bakery Hotel ............ ......... 7 7 4 5122523 MZ.-24 ,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,, h Bennett Store .......... .......,. 7 7 l-0Wd9I', Elmo ---------4----- ---'------ 7 3 SfOn'5 Sfgre ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,.., Brunson Milling ............ ......... 7 7 A M SwaIIow's Confectionery ......... C . T Chadwick, Dr. 1.5. .............. .......... 8 1 'WCS We -----------------4---'-'---------'---- 86 Cluff Chevrolet ............................ .... 7 6 QAAQEfgeBlifJ':lS'ef3CgLf iijixizijxS232 Texaco Service .,.,,.. SZSLEWEIIRSFS'Si3STfff?g..2Q332iiiii33?2 MM Tewphonef Tewgfoph CO 4---- 83 Thompson Mem- ---'-' D P U Dame's Store .......... ......... 7 7 - L- Day Hotel ................ ......... 8 o E2f'Q,S'f,'Q,ghgfQf,, """"" """"" 53 3 U- V 5- 5' CO- ------------- - Dov, R. N- ..-.-.-...---------. ..--...... so Paxton 'Mm ..133Q311. Qigjiijiiivs Ufoh POM C0-on -..-- F - W R Flowell Growers .......... ......... 7 6 ' Fountain Lunch ........ ......... 84 Rasmussen, J. C. .......... ...... ,... 8 1 W0deS Bflfbef 571013 ------------ - Frozen Foods ...................................... Robison and Terrill .......... .......... 8 2 Wilson, E. Vance ............. ow Q of 0' .0 1 QW 79517 rip Wvfjmfj WW 053 6 fftti de 0. Q I 50 xp '0 to Aaah if N65 MMM W if wwf ,wax 0' Xobbpg 059,05 Q00 Q30 elf' tw" "7 fi?-f,4iff44'i7my A TU, .Xt'f7Kg M774 ,ffwf fazffgff faf figlff' 4471K f'47""' Y fyfrffgfl ,171 fl , K fiffgf JM nf: I , .... X , WWF ' + 45 9 W f u' - M W ' 5 'A YJ3 5 W f ' ' W WWW l l WWWWWWWMMf ,l T -A A 3 1 wa 15 . X ,595 T' 70M Q 7 :fa , ggglloclciss 511416 dill pa I 5 A 'iw 4' ., fw Qing? is Q QR ,WW if My NS A i 'N L f W MM ww .vw M W W WV ' EWU in W' WW M M Wim wwf ig WM ia W df W MMI - Li if 51,52 jggjifffww, , V W1 W jp 1225 W W W M 7 M .ff W 525 C91 2 1 5 ff W il 1+ X ly 'l U WW f .!4wf0?ra,9A:i i" A U W Sf Q QZQQMQQWKW if ggi W WW VM L fs? WM fwfffff 'I NN we W Ob iw X , Q Wk QW My LUwzu+jew1M JMM-aff 4 0-W 7W a MQ Mf'HLbJh,L..2f , W Wwlfwwwm MMYNM gy MQ V wc X WU 'u ,v qu "'! ' 'hm ,1 W' Q , yu!! "1 U A , + . f f wi 1 1 , ff ,f ff ,zz , ,, V 1 VW , . QM M W W f . f . M 1 N ' W 'VV if ff A f XM! pil MW Qwzjyf my u ' ' I ir . XJ! ' . JM ' L02 QW QW gifpfflf my A410 Q ' Q MJ MP Wjfjwf WM 3 Ew 5gu QL - ' . if Q? xt' W M gy M W W fbi! Wwjjgg Q TV A 'L' O W '- , Wi W i V, 'wwf , M , VL .4 W 1Nl +V g f , , u f Nl + M Ql s .W , h w,M f um :lm ,JIJAUV Jfbv- Q 1. ,wg sph' J4uf09m,9A4 VJ2f?+fzf7Effff2xA wlxowfhm Q-?""f2TZ'W'fQ. 4Z2iff2f'PQQ4 2 ' Wa? 43 MQWW Ewa ef! JXKRPZZQ Mi gf '22 N5 ca pf. , Ng' Q3 ' ff W cj 2 Q fifbf, ' 'FW flea, M J fWKW M 4'Z'Z7 W f AQ M6927 w A ,gvdm m A4 71,f411?Jf5Ql'fTfsN g 'Q Wffwlwf Mijwgff Mwgwmfi pgjwf-Qaff QWVM M WPG?" ww SWW4 WMAMWM ffifkfifxi W Wwe AQMJJ' ,5WQ,eM-fd M15 Zinxfwd ffff H gp? nv WW. ig Q V N' W1 lx Qi? -,ww wx S Q ,' Wye U' Q1VxfwJi'5Vy if Q? Wiwwlf W5 M W? M , Ww fxgv uJjflmdf4f-1. gr, I lui W' ' .!4Mt0gPaPA5 .JwM f?,-lmlffvfti 1fA4.wwMaM'- A-Jig WMWWV' lux M'0'q4f'WE: af'--4 .J CZQ ffimmfffw SQ W if 'Q 522436 wmjfizgaig ., ' fd iff ca"'jj 2fKJWf9f0f My ' "Q MM if W Af M if KW Wfb my X gg! 65' kgffff 'V , W UWUM- A5 ,zfA.2,gc52,ZWJ,Z-J ,F Qgoijlif 4,01 Q27 1? M QR E W, M0549 Vmgap M QE wif A QW Q WW ff 193, M WZ J ,Eze W WQW' My 655 VW JWJOXM K Q 6 g4wfz,,m,0A5 QF? KZWAQL. W NNT f -. x 11 5-lawgzagl A',4Bf24!4..,Qa,,.,, F' gmfw KWWW my WW' Wwa Saga 71. Q M33 mf M3 W fffwfnwfj 35 My . mfiffniz we-iz Zfbmfgfgmw f yvuspm I J4b,,f0g m,QA5 Q jijfm ?,4,1 Wf,. ww M MTWW wgfivjf QV We-JW. ,w Mofgffy QAJWMA2 ff A W zziwfgiki A9 !j 4gCf',fQ.gO?7fg,zwZ 5L2'ff'j 1iE332 ,V+ W fe Q M1 fficifxfgsx S V54 U92 by J1J flgyfijfj x X5 NR MQM5 W MN A X UK M U, E cg if M wJf'CjW Q? Ab,f W? qi! WWW Jim-c .5041 4441, 4' wffaxzi AJM ffm ,Q , 7st 1313? I iq Xe? vw Fixfgifftbfh N X sq M3921 gk gi QE N A331 xi if f 5555 hm W , LVL 'M'?S1f'Jf fgfflbbwu WW Mi? Lwfw wiz Meg, QUfj1'Zij!X6f5f5V'U 4, 'QQWA If 3, 5i f - fffiwsfeiifa Q 3 E I . .wg 8 -4 52.


Suggestions in the Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) collection:

Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

1938

Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection, 1943 Edition, Page 1

1943

Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

1946

Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

1947

Geneva High School - Aquila Yearbook (Geneva, OH) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Page 1

1949

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.