Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA)

 - Class of 1947

Page 1 of 172

 

Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1947 Edition, Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1947 Edition, Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1947 Edition, Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1947 Edition, Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 172 of the 1947 volume:

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D Z h A Haig! 1 Y... 1'1 ' M QWWKQSQQF 1 . I J 37- Uma-as fg'-14' fi' .5 5 Wiz" 511.5-, 'Q ' " , we. an , '- 11 ' . ' . .. - ' N 5-'wiftblf "QL H .mf 1 -N L 1 ' ' 'via V 1 F1 , . , 'Z' 41 " . -2' w'..Eig.g . an pn: ..- . -1 . ". ' I 'law ...V - I ' B' wx W 1:45 -11 ' L . - .,-.- . V lynn. N 5 , Jw.. Y . . we-..,, .5 - .fix I "-fig? .. r'w"'. , 'J ,' V "' "5 -P ff., N-Wig: ' .UQ .. ,f- -, . . , -A' fr'-. 1 ' 7' -1.511 MC" uw' H. if ,L 1 A - 1'- As, -1,2-A ' pe 1'--2 ,f SINCE 1923 - A GENEVAN TSUMMA CUM LAUDE William E. Cleland, head oi the department of mathematics, may appear to the casual observer as a veritable "William the Silent," but not to his many past assistants and math students. With them he has always been most pleased to hold helpful discussions of abstruse mathematical subjects outside oi regular hours. Yet his is no one track mind. Like Butler's "Hudibras": "Por he by geometric scale Could take the size of pots of ale. 1 And wisely tell what hour o' the day The clock does strike, by algebra. Beside, 'tis known he could speak Greek As naturally as pigs squeaky That Latin was no more diiiicile Than to a blackbird 'tis to Whistle." This coming year Will mark Dr. Cleland's twenty-fifth as a member of the Geneva faculty. From instructing classes in virtually every branch of mathe- matics to mastering the intricacies involved in plotting the schedules ot courses, Dr. Cleland has served the school and its thousands of students Well. ln grateful appreciation of his contributions, the 1947 Genevan salutes Dr. William E. Cleland, "since l923, a Genevan summa cum laude." l U HOW many times in each ot our lives has some familiar tune brought back memories of some pleasant incident that may have happened years ago'-or only yesterday! Music gives us that power: the power to recall in our minds asso- ciations it has with events in our past. So it is that the 1947 Genevan presents this group ot song titles, and seeks to portray, pictorially, and through Words, the meanings they hold tor those who attended Geneva during the past year. Perhaps these phrases and photographs will offer different meanings and lead to still further memories for each person who sees them. It is the sincere hope of the staff that these pages may serve as a musical bridge to the happenings, both great and small, that were a part of lite at Geneva College during the l946-1947 term. BLISHED BY Tl-IEIUNIOR CLASS ll G ACK Llllll A -0 ' Still Lifee-"By the Bend of the River" ' The College-"Through the Years" ' Activities-"lsn't lt Kinda Fun" ' Residences-"Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning" ' Beauties-"A Pretty Girl is Like a Melody" ' Music-"Say It With Music" ' Athletics-"You Gotta Be a Football Hero" ' Publications-"Good News" Owen Simon, Editorg Iames Bowers, Associate Editor, Robert Tweed, Business Manager STILL LIFE "By lhe Bend of the River" . . . picturesque setting lor a college . . . building draped in ivy and tradition , . . modern additions io provide for increased enrollments . . . campus leaves in reds and browns as football fans tramp io the stadium . . . hidden by a blanket of while in Winler . . . covered with lounging students in spring . . . Geneva, beside the Beaver Vale. 3' ,, 5 - ss .z 5-1-., . -.M ' 1 4 J n -32Q,n ., .--: ..x.x- , . xr. Au.: W- . ,'D K .'f9"f -X L. ..'.1.,x fo- A-',...-f.-,-- ' - ' " 5 ' lx Q 4 ' ' . 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Sn ,A . .',,-gg. X,- Y '51, wgf T "hip ,. -niirsumasfwfz ,X QM -V-yn' . 131.-.Q -' ' V -- V' 8 -aiigx-:V jg' ..,!.- 'Maw 44-:V Q ' 'nu 1' -S V- E5-sl ' 'K 'a-"Wa " 'M' -I , ' r ':.:"L5":f:,.:1:f: LI 3' - , M, .,x,m.,-- fsiwnm E K ' 5 .'Q'L,:,1, ' --- www ' ' MIZT' M " b '5'V"H7'Q f.,..-.- -- - .-,Z Vwiuf .. 1' K - W '- 4, -' -' 'Ti'-rf1"Q'1ffP'5f ., ...H 'M w mf - -.J ,,4'--f . -- f J . if ' ' ,"'?f'-. 1 , - 'Q 4 My ' . .215 NORTHWOOD HALL FERNCLIFF KI" L is kept in trim by the inimitable Fred "Fritz" Scliaal, superintendent of buildings and grounds, and his staff. For "Fritz" the past year represented his thirty-fifth at Geneva. Like the many preceding years, it was spent in maintaining the green slopes, shapely trees, flowering shrubs and attractive flower beds. In addition, "Fritz" had a hand in the construction of the science hall addition and the fieldhouse, just as he helped in the work for McKee Hall and McCartney Library nearly two decades ago. Addison Boggs and Clarence Fallon centered their activities around "Old Main," and always found time for a friendly greeting or corny remark to students and faculty. Sam Edgar had headquarters in McCartney Library, and in his spare moments could always be found with his amusing collection of puns, "Sweepings by Sam." Meanwhile Bruce Elsey could often be seen working outdoors, possibly raking the leaves or planting a new bush. Tommy Laughlin was kept busy with the College repair work in the carpenter's shop. 12 ALUMNI HALL A GEORGE MANOR . PATTERSON LODGE 5, ,Q f ,Nm 5" 1 7: .Ks gm, , .. ,,' .mx 3.5. . . 'tN',,3:1--,- . ,.,,, jj '-1 , i. if -W..,Zl'L2'1i'f-P12611 A 355, f'.7:v" if '- f'f:..',:-1.57 53 "V j ' rf If hw: -5' 1 N' -wife'-,-lk J". ,1"- " J " -i--Q '. '.. ,' K' J -1 AQ V. vkg--,-V..-.-. . 1 Y Q- 'Tia ', --'F .VJ fl '1 "- '-"' I '45 , ,-, -an T '15 .lc 'QQ H , ... in-ng N'-ff-v-'d -. 1,1 . v.. 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N ,:. -1-V ' ' f,, -, . -' ya. - if - 4 1s 'P U - '15 f,' ,4.4 f,, XJ r 'I 5.lL?Ag4 ,vw : 'fc' ' V' E my ' ,J . -.-tf'.g'yix' Yi -:L qt , ' Pm" f- H' 1 J ' .. 4' f'jhf'v'b "Q A 5- I' - -H I ' 3" Vvl, Q. 1 -f x 5' ' -. 914 ' J "Y, F4 I' .- "" ,., K A 'gf I' in ying: ,,,' pkiwf. gr V J i g , I ,f Y -Z .. H Vt.. zz' , M Wu if LJ , F ? , I, J - ,J Q .A Juggg Y - . f V, , . fi, fl ' 14,47-' . 1- -5 .ffl I . df' ' iffy, "M -', ' f - ' 9- ' " 1 - - - ' V . - ' ' ' 1 175 , . -. ,, , ff? . riff-A., " f 1f.f.u21f-.' .f .K+ Sl1','.hJ1L,. GR f X gif., SCIENCE it HAI I RETURNING FROM A WAR WHICH HAD TO BE WON IN THE scientific laboratories as well as on the battlefields, veterans were aware of the vast opportunities a peaceful World presented to those with proper training in the varied fields ot science. And so it was not strange that Geneva's science department was the first to feel the need for physical expansion. - One year aqo, work was begun on a three-story addition to the Science Hall, and by tall, Geneva students Will take advantage of the increased classroom and laboratory facilities. Classes in biology, chem- istry, enqineerinq, and physics will share in the use of the building. Cost of the project is estimated at more than two hundred thousand dollars, With a thirty thousand dollar qrant by W. H. Coverdale, of the class of 1891, coverinq the cost of laboratory equipment. 9 Y . l in 16 JOHNSTON GYM UNCLE SAM-WITH AN ASSIST FROM DR. ROBERT CLARKE, Dr. Charles Carson and Walter Landgrai-can take credit for the field- house erected on the east side of Reeves Stadium this year. Formerly used as an officers' club at Camp Reynolds, the building was obtained through the United States Bureau oi Education. The army surplus building is slated for dual purposes: as a gym- nasium tor the men's physical education program, and as an auditorium for special college programs. For its tirst capacity, the iieldhouse offers a large basketball floor, showers and lockers. As an auditorium, its value has already been proved by accommo- dating large crowds at both May Day and graduation exercises. I7 THE COLLEGE "Through the Years" . . . the same ideals . . . the same purposes . . searching for knowledge . . . training tor the future . . . many veterans returning with a desire to further their educattons . . . but also high school graduates facing Q strange, new World . . . capable officers to lead them . . . an experienced faculty to instruct them . . . keeping tn mind the motto, "Pro Christo et Patriot." I pflff f 1' ' I X XX Always seeking to increase his vast storehouse of knowledge, Dr. Pearce can speak with authority on a wide variety of subjects. Serving longer than any previous Geneva president, Dr. Pearce has com- pleted twenty-four years and can take pride in his schools high standing. Hundreds of Geneva graduates follow- ing the ideals of Christian living attest to his spiritual leadership. Something you Want to get OH your chest? . . . Worried about school? . . . A pleasant chat with "PreXy" will straighten you out. AIDMINVI IQTOHN. PREXY" VICE-PRESIDENT ROBERT CLARKE, B. A., B. D., M. A., D. D. Dr. Clarke's life has been dedicated to Geneva College and the principles for which it stands. During the past thirty-eight years, he has served the college as both instructor and assist- ant to the president. DEAN OF THE COLLEGE CHARLES M. LEE, B. A., M. A., Ph. D. As Dean of the College, Dr. Lee comes in close Contact with 'the student body. An understand- ing of young men and Women and their prob- lems makes him a wise counsellor. is as nik ' H Seas - W, HQ DEAN OF THE FACULTY ALLEN C. MORBILL, B. A., M. A., Ph. D. The problem oi securing instructors with the highest qualifications and standards falls mainly upon the shoulders of Dr. Morrill, Dean oi Faculty. ,H , w',4,f DIRECTOR OF EXTENSION IAMES C. TWINEM, Ph. B., M. A., Ph. D. An increased interest in extension classes has multiplied the Work of Dr. Twinem, who also handles veterans' affairs. Out-of-town, night and summer classes are all under his careiul supervision. HELEN B. REAGLE, B. A, Women HAROLD A. BRUCE, B. A., M. A., Ph. D. Freshmen ROBERT PARK, B. A., M. A., D. D. Men DEANS An ability to deal with fellow stu- dents While at Geneva earned Mrs. Helen B. Beagle her present position. She has given freely of her time to promote activities. A veteran track coach, Dr. Rob- ert Park has long associated with young men. As Dean of Men, he is able to put his knowledge to prac- tical use. Dr. Harold A. Bruce, as fresh- man advisor, devotes himself to see- ing that incoming students get the right start on their College careers. The many records needed tor each past, present and potential col- lege student call for etticient organi- zation. Miss Lulu I. McKinney, regis- trar, has handled the task ini that manner. Officially News Bureau director and Alumnus editor, Mrs. I.. Vale Downie prefers the title students have affectionately bestowed upon her-Aunt Ianet. To Dr. Charles T. Carson has fallen the responsibility of managing the business end of the college as well as acting as alumni secretary. OFFICERS MISS LULU I. McKINNEY MRS. l. VALE DOWNIE DR. CHARLES T. CARSON mmm as A mmm mmmm m mm E mm ,Hmmm mm mmm mmmm mx mmm m ,W E mmmmm mm mmmmmm .M ,mmmm mm mmm 1-4,m-m mmmgmm W.m.m.,m.m m -mxm wmmmgmmmmbmm-hmmm MMM ' mfmim gzgm mmm mmm-mm-mmm F1-mmmmmmmmm im-mi -rs:-fgmmmmm -mzj'G?-mmm mlm E FM -Vwmifmg is ms mm mm- mm---xmmxm mm mm gym m Sig Hfmiws Emma-km mmmmmm mmmm mm , :mmm NME mms E mmm m.mm.,mm mmm mmmm mgm E' mm mmmm mm HB HB B mmm mmm mm mmm m Q M H AEQH .mg mmwmm m mmmmm n zmlmpiimu M mmmmmm HE 5155 H HWFBW .2 mmmymmmmmm mm mmmmmmmmmm mlmmmmmmm mm mmmmmmfmm- mm-WE mm mm mfzmmmm mmmmmzamwmmm mmgmgwm mmmmm Hmm Hgmwm mm mmmmmm mmmm mmm m mmm mmm mm -m mmm mm m mmm: m Icxmes Bowers, crssistcml to the directory Icme Reed, cxssistontg Mrs. I. Vale Downie, directory Mcxrlhcr Irwin, secretary. 901 em YJLCXGO Q9 QXGQXX 5 . X QGQQ .X 6 'Hoax 1'5- . ww- W 5. .SQLGY l YM geggxevegcoxr. ws Z6 XX Y 05? mm' X Front Row: Albert Hardie-s, Lois Lemmon, Carolyn Booth, Mrs. Willis Weoqly, Elsie Hordies. Second row: Stewart Lee, Icrck Boggs, Mrs. Marguerite McCreury, manager. L GK STORE SUS, 'U lv' SSS EO'z1cSmpbJ7LOf0b6'.' M Of' . Ewroigh Om 'S. M671 ' CQ.. Q1-d AQ? s Soto SECRET RIES 7' 23081-lrer, sale S , Ogyx ' Ss Lo1:9h1?.S Cs ' E QQC. fvq riicuirr EDWIN CAMERON CLARKE Assistant Professor of Business Administration H9371 . . . B. A., Geneva College . . . Princeton University . . . University of Colorado . . . University of Pittsburgh. WILLIAM E. CLELAND Professor of Mathematics H9231 . . . B. A., West- minster College , . . M. A., University of Pitts- burgh . . . Ph. D., Princeton University. GEORGE S. COLEMAN Associate Professor of History H9361 . . . B. A., University of Pittsburgh . . . M. A., Ph. D, Har- vard . . . Reformed Presbyterian Seminary. IOHN COLEMAN Professor of Political Science and Religious Edu- cation H9Z01 . . . B. A., University of Pittsburgh . . . Reformed Presbyterian Seminary . . . M. A., University of Wisconsin . . . Ph. D., University of Pittsburgh. ESTHER K. BLACK Assistant Ashland College . HAROLD Associate Professor of Speech H9411 . . . B. A., College . . . B. of Oratory, Ashland . . M. A., University of Michigan. ETI-IEL M. BOWDEN Assistant Professor of Secretarial Work H9411 . . . B. S., M. Ed.. University of Pittsburgh. A. BRUCE Professor of Biology H9371 . . . B. S., Geneva College . . . M. S., Ph. D., University oi Pittsburgh. DAVID M. CARSON Instructor in Bible and English H9461 . . . B. A, Yale University . . . Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary. MARTHA A. COOK Professor of German tI946l . . . B. A., Geneva Col- lege . . . University of Wisconsin . . . University of Pittsburgh. PI-IILIP L. COON Professor ot Chemistry tt92Ol . . . B. A., Milton Col- leae . . . M. A., Ph. D., University of Wisconsin. WILBUR P. DERSHIMER Assistant Professor of Mathematics tI946l . . . B. S., Geneva College . . . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ANN HOVEY DODDS Instructor in Art tI945l . . . Bachelor of Fine Arts, Pratt Institute. l " .e'5lf?g'lff, if J 'ii I, t.,"-"'li1 ' --f' f f fr ' rv l -4 Es- 'EF 43 . :P ' f Q '5 :serv E' . , 'Q- , Q ""?1sro fl A. IOHN DODDS Assistant Professor of History tI946l . . . B. A., Geneva College . . . M. A., University of Pitts- burgh. LESLIE D. FALLON Professor of Physics t1939l . . . B. S., Geneva Col- lege . . . Ph. D., Yale University. LILLIAN RUSSELL GA ULT Assistant Professor, Accounting and Secretarial Work t1936l . . . B. S., University of Pittsburgh. ELIZABETH M. GISSEL Assistant in Chemistry tl946l . . . B. S., Geneva College. L REBECCA LEE Instructor in French H9461 . , . B. A., Geneva Col- lege . . . M. A., Syracuse University. EMILY P. MACKALL Instructor in Business Administration C19-'i6l . . . B. A., Westminster College . . . M. A., North- western University. IACK MALONE Instructor in Journalism Cl946l . . . Geneva Col- lege . . . Editor-in'Chief. Beaver Valley Times, Aliquippa Evening Times. DOROTHY S. MCCOY Instructor in English H9465 . . . B. A., Allegheny College . . . M. A., Iowa State University. ROBERT M. HALEY Professor oi Economics and Business Administra- tion ll938l . . . B. A., Harvard College . . . M. S. Oregon State College . . . Ph. D., Northwestern University. ALFRED H. lOl-INSON Assistant Professor ol Music 619463 . . . B. A. M. A., Carnegie Institute of Technology. WALTER E. LA NDGRAF Professor of Engineering tI946l . . , B. A., Geneva College . . . M. A., University of Pennsylvania . . . Massachusetts Institute of Technology. CHARLES M. LEE Professor of Latin and Greek tl9l8l . . . B. A. Miami University . . . M. A., University of Cin cinnati . . . Ph. D., University ot Pittsburgh. IOHN s. Mciszizxc ' Associate Professor of Psychology and Education H9285 . . . B. A., Geneva College . . . M. A., Uni- versity ot Chicago . . . Ph., D., University of Pittsburgh. . THEODORE M. MCMILLION Professor of Biology H926l . . . B. A., M. A., West Virginia University . . . Ph. D., University of Pittsburgh. Q BETTY MAE MILLER Instructor in Spanish H946l . . . B. A., Geneva Col- lege . . . University ol Mexico . . . University ot Colorado. ALLEN C. MORRILL Professor of English H9385 . . . B. A., M. A., Brown University . . . M. A., Ph. D., Harvard University. P, ,.i, .J. 1 "r ""r "' fjrt ti".'i,fl-.lfl.Tlii i ELEANOR MORRILL Assistant in English H9467 . . . B. A., Whitman College . . . M. A., Radcliffe College. C. MAY OVERTON Assistant Professor of English H946l . . . B. A., Hastings College . . . M. A., University of Iowa . . . Oxford University , . . Harvard University . . University of Washington . . . Bread Loaf School of English . , . University of Colorado. ROBERT PARK Professor of History and Bible H9223 . . . B. A.. Syracuse University . . . M. A., University of Pitts- burgh . . . Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary . . . D. D., Syracuse University. EUNICE CLARK PETERS Instructor in Home Economics H9463 . . . B. S., Car- negie Institute oi Technology. -- FACULTY A 1 1 RUSSELL S. ROSENBERGER Assistant Professor of Chemistry 119463 . . . B. S., Geneva College . . . M. A., University of Pitts- burgh . . . University of Iowa. OLGA M. RUSSO Instructor in Spanish 119443 . . . B. A., M. Litt., University of Pittsburgh. MARY LOU STEWART Physical Education Director for Women 119453 . . B. A., Oberlin College. GEORGE G. STOREY Assistant Professor of English 119383 . . . B. A., Geneva College . . . M. A., Duke University . . . M. A., Harvard University. ALURED C. RANSOM Coach of Varsity Sports, Physical Education for Men 119413 . . . B. S., Geneva College . . . M. A.. University of Pittsburgh. EWART REAGAN Instructor in Piano 119423 . . . University of Kansas . . . Kansas City Conservatory ot Music . . . Iuil' liarcl School of Music. GENEVIEVE RICHARDSON Instructor in Speech 119463 . . . B. S., University of Illinois . . . MacMurray College . . . Northwestern University. MARGARET HUM RIPPER Assistant Professor of French 119463 . . . B. A.. 'Geneva College . . . M. A., Pennsylvania State College. lAMES B. TWEED Professor of Bible H9091 . . . B. A., Geneva Col- lege . . . Reformed Presbyterian Theological Semi- nary . . . United Free Church College, Glasgow, Scotland . . . M. A., University of Pittsburgh . . . D. D., Geneva College. IAMES C. TWINEM Professor ot Education H9231 . . . Ph. B., M. A., University ot Chicago . . . Ph. D., University ol Pittsburgh. WALTER I. WEST Assistant Coach, Physical Education for Men H9461 . . . B. S., University of Pittsburgh . . . Uni- versity of Southern California. GEORGIANA WYLIE Professor ol Psychology H9141 . . . B. A., Geneva College . . . M. A., Ph. D., University oi Chicago. 'K' K , Q . . ft sits rivt 5 I ' M .Q-ft-sf rrrt . 1f"" F f ,.. ,S .H ,, Q ,aj-l' -'fits cl' i iff ,. '16, , , A t, .Q .- t t ft.'5 .F-. t 1 1, , . . t L. w ""' ' DONNA E. FENNER A lit A Librarian H9461 . . . B. A., Geneva College . . B. S., Carnegie Tech Library School. EDNA M. GEORGE Librarian H9161 . . . Chautauqua School of Physical Education KN. Y. U.1 . . . B. A.. Geneva College. ELEANOR DUNKERLY LEIGHTY Librarian H9301 . . . B. A., Geneva College . . B. L. S., Syracuse University. N Ol' P l Cl' U R ii ti ALICE STEINMARK ANDREWS - Assistant in Voice H9461 . . . B. A., Pennsylvania College for Women . . . M. A., University of Pittsburgh. ELIZABETH D. JOHNSTON Assistant in Piano H9111 . . . B. A., Geneva Col- lege . . . B. M., Mercer Academy of Music. ALBERT G. SMITH Assistant in Biology H9461 . . . B. S., St. Vincent College . . . M. A., University of Pittsburgh. JOHN YOUNG Assistant in Speech H9461 . . . B. A., University of Texas . . . M. A., Carnegie Institute of Technology. Left to right: Iane Steel, secretary Eugene Bray, president Richard Garber, vice-president Shirley Stewart, treasurer 34 ltiw 95' LION. 565-Bl? . . O6 P'LOLLC3 Qi Utlllttl . THE CLASS OF l947 was a good cross-section of several former freshman classes. Many veterans were back, setting things back in order again. At least the proportion of men and women took steps in the right direction. After experiencing three years oi Geneva sans football, sans men, sans nearly everything except Work, this year was a real treat. For the seniors, the return of football and the normal rnaelstrom of activity was a Very suitable climax tor a college career. Bruno, Budimir, Perz, Ross and Small did the honors for the class in toot- ball, with Bruno going right to the top to make the All-American lists. On the basketball floor, DeVenzio, Niesslein, Poclbielski and Rayz kept the scores climbing. The class abounded in capable leadership, with Bray, Garber, Steel and Stewart serving as its officers. Meanwhile, Morrow and Snodgrass efficiently headed the Student Senate. ln the realm of journalism, the Cabinet bore the Hardies banner and featured lively topics ranging from Willard McMillan's legs to the national political scene. "Family Portrait" was chosen as the senior play and proved a suitable showcase for the dramatic talents of a large number of the class. And with all the activity in extra-curricular lines, the class had twelve to represent it in Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Even considering the bareness of the first years, there has been a great deal that only college can give-and that only Geneva can give best. t ROBERT MCCREADY AGUE, lR. IESSIE LOUISE BOWES Bob . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of arts . . . English lessie . . . Birmingham, Mich .... bachelor ol science . . . transfer from Washington and Ierferson College . . . biology . . . YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . C. S. U. 2, 3, 4 . . . Eco- English club 2, 3, 4 . . . goli 3 . . . student senate 3 . . nomics club 3 , . . premed club 3 . . . Genevan business Chimes business manager 4 . . . Spanish club 4. manager 3 . . . "Rainbow on the Bio Grande" l . . . Cabinet . . . W. S. A. committees . . . W. A. A. ADDISON STRUTT ANDERSON Anderson . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of science . . VIVIAN IRENE BOWLES ClT9mlSlfY' Toni . . . Mclieesport ...' lu achelor of science in business administration . . . YWCA l, 2, 3, 4 . . . French club l, 2, 3, 4 . . . W. A. A. l, 2, 3, 4 ...economics club ROBERT EVERETT ATKINSON 3. 4 , . . mu and dagger 3. 4 . . . cabinet 3 . . , chrm- Bob . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of science in industrial mem May day 3 . . . immmumls . I A Whds Who. engineering . . . member 1942 senior class . . . football manager l, 2, 3, 4 . . . intramurals l, 2, 3, 4 . . . engineer- ing society l, secretary Z, vice-president 3. president 4 EUGENE BERNARD BRAY . . . YMCA 1, 2 . . . class day committee. Gene . . . West Bridgewater . . . bachelor of arts . . . social science . . . class president 2, 3, 4 . . . debate club SARA LOUISE BARRORD president 2, 3, 4 . . . YMCA . . . French club . . . radio broadcasting . . . athletic publicity director 4 . . . Cabinet Sara . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor ot science in business A . . Whds Who. administration . . . accounting club 2, 3, 4 . . . Spanish club 2 . . . YWCA 2, "big sister" chairman 3 . . , economics club 3, 4 . . . W. S. A. cabinet 3, vice-president 4 . . . DOROTHY MAE BROWN May queen Conn ' ' ' Whos Who' Dorothy . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of arts . . psychology . . . transfer from Cornell University, CAROLYN GRAHAM BOOTH Boothie . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor ot science . . . chemistry . . . math club l, 2, 3, 4 . . . summer activities LAWRENCE FRANCIS BRUNO committee Z. 3. 4 - - - PTe'1'Hed Z. 3 - - - YWCA 2. 3 - - - Larry . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of science in busi- chernistry club 4 . . . Cabinet 4 . . . spring formal com- ness administration . . . football 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . basketball mittee 4. l, 2, 3 ,... track l . . . YMCA Z . . . class president 3. Agile Anderson Atkinson Bdrrord B00Tl'1 Bowes Bowles BIGY Brown Bruno 36 l tl t ,tv '4 ,-i l 1 . ,yt 1 l t JOHN DEE BUDIMIR , VVILLIAM RAYMOND DAVIE Iohnny . . . Ambridge . . . bachelor ot science . . . Bill . . . Aliquippa . . . bachelor of science . . . chemistry biology . . . class treasurer 3 . . . Genevan . . . YMCA , . . math club Z, 3, 4 . . . chemistry club president 4 . . . . , . track . . . debate club . . . football 2, 3, 4 . . . intra- German club president 4. murals. NORMAN MATTHEWS CARSON ' Q ROBERT BOGGS DERFLINGER Norm . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of arts . . . English Bob . . . New Brighton . . . bachelor of science . . . mathe- . . . YMCA vice-president I, 2, 3, 4 . . . Genevans 1, 2, matics . . . math club 2, 3, president 4 . . . Spanish club 3.4...bandl.2,3...frillanddagger2,3,4... 2,4...YMCA 4. pre-medical society vice-president l, 2 . . . C. S. U. 4 . . . English club 4 . . . radio broadcasting club 4 . . , "Children of the Moon" . . . "Yes and No" . . . "Rainbow on the Rio Grande" . . . "Papa ls All" . . . "Feathers In a CHARLES ANTHONY DSVENZIO Gale" . . . "The Desperate Pilot" . . . "Family Portrait." Pappy . . . Coraopolis . . . bachelor ol science . . . economics . . . vice-president of class 2, 3 . . . basketball l,Z,3,4...YMCAl,2...Spanishclub3,4... JOHN EVANGELOS CHRISTON track . . . economics club . . . intramurals. lohnny . , . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of science . . . mathematics , . . engineering society 3 . . . math club l. MARGERY IEANNE DODDS MARIAN PROSSER COON Margie . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of science in ele- Marian . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of science in educa- mentary education . . . YWCA l, 3, 4 . . . Spanish tion . . . YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . band 3, 4 . . . Genevans club 2, 3, 4 . . . Genevans l . . . May queen court. . . . radio broadcasting club. PHILIP LESLIE COON, IR. ELIZABETH SCRIPTURE ECKLES Phil . . . Beaver Falls . , . bachelor of science . . . Libby . . . New Brighton . . . bachelor of science in ele- chemistry . . . Genevans l, 4 . . . chemistry club 1, 4 mentary education . . . transfer from Missionary Training . . . pre-med club I ,... French club l . . . orchestra l Institute, Nyack, New York . . . C. S. U. Z, 3, 4 . . . . . . band 4 . . . string ensemble 4. Gospel team 3, 4 . . . Genevans 3. Budimir Carson Christon Coon Coon Davie Derllinger DeVenzio Dodds Eckles 37 Ellis Evans Fi tch Forney Garber Garber ,, Gilchrist Graff Graham l-lardies FLORENCE EVANGELINE ELLIS RICHARD H. GARBER Flossie . . . Beaver Falls. . . bachelor of arts . . . English Smoky . . . Beaver Falls . , . bachelor of science . . . . . . radio broadcasting l, 2, 4 . . . French club l, 2 . . . biology . . . YMCA l, 2, 3, 4 . . . lrill and dagger l, Z, 3 frill and dagger 2, 4 . . . YWCA l . . . English club 4. . . . Genevans l, 2 . . . track l, 2 . . . basketball l. 2 . . . football 3 . . . president oi M. S. A. MAHLON RICHARD EVANS Mahlon . . . Ebensburg . , . bachelor of science in business ANN KATHRYN GILCHRIST Udmlnlslfcflion - - 1 YMCA It 21 3' 4 - - - French Club 1' Zf Annie . . . Greeley, Colo .... bachelor of science in busi- 3 . , . football manager l, 2, 4 . . . economics club 3, 4 . . . ness administration , . . pep club 3, president 4 . . . "G" GQUQVUUS 2' 3 - - - GGUGVUU 3 ' - - GCCOUUUUQ Club - - - club Z. president 4 . . . W. S. A. cabinet l, secretary 4 basketball maaaaaf- . . . W. A. A. vice-president 3 . . . c. S. U. 1 . . . eenevfm . . . YWCA 4 . . . Genevans. LATI-IAM NEAL FITCH Lath . . . Ft. Wayne, Incl .... bachelor ol arts . . . religious DQRA MABLE GRAFF iduCQl1Z?e'rLigl:3r?i3r igiigtyvgeqlon College ' ' ' Genevcms Dora . . . Ellwood City . . . bachelor of science . . . biology. . . . ' 1 1 . ALBERT I. PORNEY CHARLES HOMER GRAHAM I A 1 A1 . . . Leetsdale . . . bachelor of science . . . chemistry Chfml? ' ' j Darlington ' ' ' bachelor af Spence m business I . ' Chemistry dub 1 I u ' French Club 1 I I I YMCA 1. administration . . . transfer from Grove City College. BETTYE GILCHRIST GARBER ALBERT CARL HARDIES, IR. Bettye . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor ol science in busi- Al . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor ol science . . . engineering ness administration . . . transfer from Colorado State Col' . . . engineering club l, 2 ,3. 4 . . . rnath club l, 2, . lege ot Education . . . W. A. A. 2, 3, 4 . , . "G" club 3, Cabinet 2, 3, 4 , . . tennis team 3, 4. . . "Family Portrait 4 president 4 . . . YWCA 2, 3, 4 . . . student senate 4. . . . YMCA . . . Genevan. 38 l-lardies Hartford Heckerman l-lill l-lmiel Howard Kennedy Kirchner Linton McClurkin ELSIE JOAN HARDIES LELAND EDGAR HOWARD L. C ,... Beaver Falls . . . bachelor ol arts . . . English Leland . . . Beaver . . . bachelor ol science . . . . . class secretary l .,.. French club 1, Z, 3, 4 . . . maihematics. YWCA l . . . frill and dagger 2, 3 . . . Genevan editor . . . Cabinet editor 4 . . . May queen court . , . who's who. IAMES NELSQN KENNEDY Nels . . . New Galilee . . . bachelor of science . . . en- KATHRYN ADELAIDE HARTFORD gineering . . . engineering society l, 2, 4 . . . intramurals Adelaide . . . Hillsville . . . bachelor oi arts . . . history 1' 2' ...W.A.A.l,2,3,4...YWCAl,2,3.4...French club 1, 2 . . . irill and dagger 3, 4 . . . moth club l, 2 . . . BETTY L' KIRCHNER Genevans l. 4 . . . pre-medical society 1 . . . "G" club Betty . . . Kansas City, Kansas . . . bachelor of science 4 , . . Spanish club . . . intramurals. . . . psychology transfer from Sterling College . . . YWCA 2, 3, vice-president 4 . . . C. S. U. 2, 4 . . . women's Gospel team chairman 2 . . . Gospel team, vice-president 4 . . . RAYMUND OTTO HECKERMAN bend 2, 3, secretary 4 . . . Genevans. 3, 4 . . . W. A. A. 2, 4 Ray . . . Monaco . . . bachelor oi science . . , biology . . . . . . pre-medical society 2, 4. pre-medical society 2, 3, 4 . . . band l, 2, 4 , . . engineer- ing society l , , . orchestra l . . . student senate 2 . . . FRANCES IRENE LINTQN German Club 4' Frannie . . . Denison, Kans .... bachelor of science in busi' ness administration . . . YWCA 1, program chairman 2, sec- IQSEIDH ALLEN HILL geiczry 3, gresident 4 . . . CWS. 15ro4gram chairniaai - 5- , ospeteam.. .... ,, ...pepcu Joe.. . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor oi axis .l . . religious cdu Z' 3' 4 b Q I ,,G,, Club 3' 4 ' l l accoummq Club treasurer 3 cation . . . band l, Z, 3, 4 . . . pre-ministerial club l, 2, 3, 4 S , h 1 b M t h , h . U D Genevuns 2' 3. .. . panis cu . . . ay queen cour . . . w os w o. LOUISA IANE MCCLURKIN STANLEY EDWARD HMIEL McClurk . , . Morning Sun, Iowa . . . bachelor ol science Stush . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of science . . . . . biology . . . YWCA l, 2, 3, 4 . . . W. A. A. 2, 3, 4 chemistry . . . basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . math club 3, 4 . . . . . "G" club 3, 4 . . . pre-medical society 4 . . . intra- engineering society 1 . . . chemistry club 4. murals 4 . . . band . . . C. S. U .... Genevans. , . -Y - .f ,, ., xi... ' ' ' f'i'L 'il lf' L""l' fl' " ff' Ul""'i t!l""' -.1 L' X1 L-'a L' ' L ,a Q, -gig Q.. ,L .,-s.g.- ,, L, Q- V: .. . .rib 1,1 , j 39 - 1' 'rw f . -, .,. , l FRED B. MCCORMICK DAVID B. METHENY Fred . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor oi science . . . biology Dave . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of arts . . . history . . . chemistry club l . . . pre-medical society 3. . . . football 1, 2, 3 . . . YMCA 1, 2, 3 . . . Spanish club l . . . golf l. 2. MARILOIS MCFARLAND JANE MILES Marilois . . . Latrobe . . . bachelor oi science in elementary june , , A East Liverpool A l , bachelor of cms . l . history education . . . C. S. U. 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Gospel team 2, 3 . . . U . . Spanish Club I , . YWCA' W.A.A.2,3,4...YWCAl. JANET MILES VIRGINIA MAE MCGILL Ianet . . . East Liverpool . . . bachelor of arts . . . history Ginny . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of arts . . . psychology . . , Spanish club , , , YWCA. . . . transfer from Valparaiso University . . . W. A. A. 2, 3, 4 ...YWCA 2,3 . . . debate club 2, 3 . . . Spanish club 3 . .. "Hills of Bataan" . . . Dickens' "Christmas Carol." IOHN DWIGHT MORROWI IR. - Iohnny . . . Butler . . . bachelor of science in business ad- ministration . . . basketball l, 2, 3, 4 . . . irill and dagger MARY ELIZABETH MCILRATH l, 2, 3, president 4 . . . YMCA 1, 2, 3, vice-president 4 Mary . . . Verona . . . bachelor ol arts . . . religious edu- , . , Cabinet 1, 2, Sports editor 3 . , . Genevans l . . . CCIUOU - - - Y1'Cff1Sf9f fF01'H Wh9Gl0H College - - - YWCA 4 class vice-president 2 . . . student senate 3, president 4 . . . - - - GGDQVCIHS 4 - - - C- S- U- 4- golf 3, 4 . . . economics club 3. 4 . . . Spanish club 3 . . . Who's who. WILLARD GAULT MCMILLAN Willard . . . New Concord, O .... bachelor of arts . . . ROBERT JOSEPH NIESSLEIN Bible . . . transfer from Denison University . . . pre- Bob . . . Pittsburgh . . . bachelor of science . . . biology . . . ministerial society 4 . . . C. S. U. 4 . . . Gospel team 4 . . . basketball 1, 2, 3. 4 . . . track l . . . frill and dagger 2. 3, 4 cheerleader 4 . . . Genevans vice-president 4 . . . YMCA. . . . Genevan. McCormick McFarland McGill Mcllrath McMillan Methehy Miles Miles Morrow Niesslein 40 tl tv -', , ,,,M. if,--7' -"l.L:Ll': .. ' ur ic 1,-'i . , 1- t , t ADDA MARIE PARRIS DOROTHY HELEN POIARKOFE Adda Marie . . . Rochester . . . bachelor ot arts . . . Bible Dorothy . . . West Aliquippa . . . bachelor ol arts . . . cmd psychology . . . French club 3, 4 . . . C. S. U. 3, 4 mathematics . . . Spanish club l, Z, 3, 4 . . . English club . . . Gospel team 4 . . . radio broadcasting 4. 2. 3. 4 - . . f11Clth91TlC1tiCS Club 2. 3. 4 . - - YWCA 1, 2. 3, 4- DOLLY ELIZABETH PATTERSON , ERACE POPETNICK13 h 1 f cms S Chow Dolly . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor ot science in business Gligcgclnllcgmige eespclgrehgkl Ciijeiofz O3 'eegniuzics dig administration . . . transfer from Kent State University . . . 3 Vice-presidgnk '4' GcCOumig1q'C1ui3'geCremry 1 in . . radio broadcasting club 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . May day activities band 3 4 YWCA' ' W A A Genevcms I - ' pre, l, 2 . . . English club 4 . . . YWCA . . . "The Desperate medicci S5541 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' Pilot." Y' MARY ELIZABETH RANEY CHARLES WILLIAM PERZ Molly . . . New Galilee . . . bachelor of arts . . . English Charley . . . Staunton, Ill .... bachelor of science in . . . W. A. A .... "G" club . . . English club . . . math business administration . . . football l, 2, 3, 4 . . . student club . . . pep club . . . trill and dagger . . . Cabinet 3, senate 3. business manager 4 . . . Genevans 3 . . . Who's Who. NICHOLAS JOHN PETERS JOFN NORMZN RAY? H b 1 1 i , Nick , . . Steubenville, O .... bachelor ot arts . . . his- Eqglrgngnigh' eulfcilnsifersflfolfli'thembisgrsit Sgegiimlck ' tory . . . transfer from Ohio State University . . . intramurals. . . . bcsketzclu' 3A 4 I l . Spanish dub 2,2 . G ' YMCA, 2, 3 . . . engineering society 2. DAVID IEREMIAH PODBIELSKI Dave . . . New Brighton . . . bachelor of science in busi- HOWARD EARL ROOSA ness administration . . . basketball l, 2, 3, 4 , . , debate Connie . , . Aliguippa . . . bachelor ol science . . . chem- club 2, 3, 4 . . . economics club 2, 3, 4 . . . YMCA 2, 3, 4 istry . . . engineering society l, 2, 3, 4 . . . intramurals . . . frill and dagger 3, 4 . . , track 3, 4 . . . Spanish club 1. 2, 3, 4 . . . math club 3, 4 . . . chemistry 3, 4 . . . 4 . . . Genevan . . . football trainer 4 . . . student senate. Genevan. Parris Patterson Perz Peters Podbielski Poiarkoil Popernick Haney Rayz Roosa 41 ROSS Rurnisek Russell Scripture Smqlt SI'1'1CIllWOOd Smilll Snodgrass Steel Stewart WILLIAM A. ROSS CHARLOTTE GENE SMALLWOOD Bill , . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor ot science . . Charlotte . . . Aliquippa . . . bachelor ot science . . . biology . . . transfer from Davis and Elkins College . . biology . . . Genevans l, 4 . . . Cabinet 2, 3 . . . class football 3, 4 . . . basketball 3 . . . YMCA 3. treasurer 2. IOHN R RUMISEK EMERSON PERRY SMITH ' I Smitty . . . Kent, O .... bachelor of science in education lohnny . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of science . . . I u . football 1 2 track 1 2 buskeibcu 1 2 chemistry and mathematics . . . engineering society 1, 2, ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' pl'eSldeI1t 4 . . . SpClI'tiSl'1 Club 3, 4 . . . band 1, 2 . . . LILA HANK SNODGRASS math club 3, 4 . . . YMCA 4 . . . chemistry club 4. Lila . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor oi science in elementary education . . . YWCA 1, 2, treasurer 3 . . . pep club 2. ROGER EARL RUSSELL secretary 3 . . . trill and dagger 3, 4 . . . student senate 3, Roger ' . . South Fork ' U . bachelor of cms . . 1 religious secretary 4 , . . basketball queen attendant 3 . . . Genevans education . . . YMCA 1, 2, 3. 4 . . . Genevans l, 2, 3 . . . 3 ' ' ' Spanish club ' ' ' Cabinet ' ' ' May queen' irtll and dagger 3, 4 . . . pre-ministerial society 3. 4 . , . C. S. U. l. 2 . . . Gospel team 1 , . . cheerleader 1 . . lANE WILSON STEEL "Family Porn-gig" 4, Ianie . . . Greensburg . . . bachelor ot science . . . biology .. . C. S. U. 1, 2, 3, 4. . . YWCA 1, 2, 3. 4 . . . preemedical society 1, 2. 3,4 . . . W. A. A. 2, 3, president 4 . , . Genevans FAITH HONOR-A SCRIPTURE 1, 4 . . . "G" club 3, president 4 . . . W. S. A. council l Faith . . . New Brighton . . . bachelor of arts . . . English - - - EHC1liSl'1 Club 4 - - - "Rainbow OH the Rio GYGnd9'l . . . C. S. U, 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Gospel team 2, 3, 4 . . . Genevans . - - iHlfG1'f1U1'GlS- 2, 3 . . . string ensemble 2. SHIRLEY I. STEWART Stew . . . Niagara Falls, New York . . . bachelor of arts IOHN MCKELVEY SMALL . . . economics . . . transter from Mount Allison University lack . . . Wexford . . . baclieloi ol science in business acl- . . . YWCA 2, 3, 4 . . . economics club 3, 4 . . . accounting ministration . , . iootball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . intrarnurals l, 2, 3, 4 club 3, 4 . . Irtll and dagger 3, 4 . , . French club 2 . . . . . . YMCA 1, 2 . . . track 3, 4 . . . French club 2 . . . Cabinet 3 . . . Genevan 3 . . . McKee Hall president 4 . . . Genevans 2 . . . Genevan 3 . . . accounting club 4. VJ. A. A. 42 Storey Strock Sullivan Swasey Tanner Thompson Walker Weir Wilkofsky Wilson PAUL SARVER STOREY DOROTHY HAMILTON THOMPSON Paul . . . Scottdale . . . bachelor ol scienco . . . biology Billie . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of arts . . , psychology . . . Genevans 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . frill and dagger 2, 3, 4 . . . . . . YWCA 1, Z, social chairman 3, 4 . . . cheerleader pre-medical 1, 2 . . . radio broadcasting club 3, 4 . . l, 2, 3 . . . French club 2, 3 . . . W. S, A. Christmas formal president of class 1 . . . orchestra 2 . . . track 2 . . chairman 3 . . . Cabinet 3 . . . class treasurer 1 . . . May chemistry club. queen court. LEONARD OREN WALKER ROBERT SEHENE STROCK Leonard . . . East Palestine . . . bachelor of science . . Bob . . . Arnbridge . . . bachelor of science in business history and biology t . t immmumls 1' 2, administration . . , economics club 3, 4 . . . accounting club 3. 4. RICHARD BAIRD WEIR Dick . . . Larnaca, Cyprus . . . bachelor of arts . . . English YMCA1 2 3 4 C S U. 1 2 3 4 ROBERT M' SULLIVAN Spanish club 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Genevans l. 3, 4 . . . English Bob . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of arts . . . history . . . Club 1' 2' 4 , D I Tennis 3' 4 . . , Track 1, 3 . u , Gospel transler from Grove City College . . . German club l. 2 team 1' 2 . . ' French Club 1 I . - debme Club 4 A I h . . . band 2, 3 . . . YMCA 2, 3 . . . engineering society 2 Chimes ediior 4. . . . Genevans 2 . . . Cabinet 3. LESTER WILKOFSKY Les . . . New Brighton . . . bachelor of science . . . chemistry HELEN SATHMARY SWASEY fn . . . engineering society 2. 3 . . . chemistry club 4 . . . math Helen . . . Beaver . . . bachelor oi science in education club 2, 3. . . . intramurals. LORETTA ZA NE WILSON Loretta . . . Ellwood City . . . bachelor ol science in business administration . . . transfer from Westminster Margo . . . Aliquippa . . . bachelor ol science in education. College. MARCO IEAN TANNER 43 . I Yates Yee GLORIA I EAN YATES Yates . . . Aliquippa . . . bachelor of science . . . psychology . . . French club 1,Z,3,4...W.A.A.I,2,3,4... pre-medical society l, 2 . . . English club 3, 4 . . . Chimes editor 3 . . . Cabinet 2 . . . W. S. A. president 4. IOHN WILLIAM ANDERSON. IR. Iohn . . . Pittsburgh . . . bachelor of science in business administration. RUTH HELLING BECK Ruth . . . Steubenville, O .... bachelor of science in education . . . transfer from Kent State University, ROSE LEE BLINN Rosie . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of arts . . . speech . . . transfer from Uni- versity oi Pittsburgh , . . irill and dag- ger 2, 4 . . . radio broadcasting 2, 4 . . . English club 4. FRANK M. CASEY Frank . . . New Brighton . . . bachelor of science . . . mathematics . . . varsity track 1, 2, 3 . . . math club 1, 2, 3. HOWARD GERALD CURRIE Howard . . . Wampum . . . bachelor of science in education . . . football . . . track. WILLIAM PAUL ELLIOTT, IR. Bill . . . New Brighton . . . bachelor of science . . . biology . . . transfer from Villanova University . . . debate club 4 . . . French club 4 . . . preemedical society 4. .tc Q t Nl 5' l I Zachrnan WILLIAM REES YEE Bill . . . New Brighton . . . bachelor of science . . . chemistry . . . engineering society l, 2. 3, 4. . .YMCA 1.2, 3 . .. math club 4 . . . chemistry club treas- urer 4. HELEN ZACHMAN Helen . . . Freedom . . . bachelor oi arts . . . mathematics . . . Spanish club 1, 2, 3,4...mathclub1,2,3,4...Gen- evans 1,2 . . . C. S. U. 1. l'!lMIlllfl flly YOLANDA GIAMMATTEO Yolanda . . . Ambridge . . . bachelor of science in business administration. IOHN I-l. MOYER Iohnny . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor of science in education . . . member oi 1943 senior class . . . basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . track l, Z, 3 . . . historical society I, 2 . . . pep club 1,2 . . . student sen- ate l . . . class president 4 . . . who's bachelor oi science in education . . . who. transier from Fredonia State Teachers College. LOUISE GUGINO Louise . . . Falconer. New York . . . ETI-IEL B. RICI-IEY Ethel . . . Steubenville, O .... bachelor oi science in education . . . transfer from Ohio University. IUANITA D. HASTINGS Iuanita . . . Rochester . . . bachelor of science in education . . . transfer trom Indiana State Teachers College. MILDRED IRENE SARGEANT Mildred . . . New Castle . . . bachelor of science in education . . . transfer from Pennsylvania State College. IACK HENSEL lack . . . Beaver . . . bachelor ot science . . . chemistry . . , transler from Antioch College' CLIFFORD BURTON SNOWBERGER Cliff . . . Beaver Falls . . . bachelor ol MARGUERITE L. LODGE science in education. Marguerite . . . Steubenville . . bachelor of science in education. IAMES E. TANNER, IR. Iim . . . Aliquippa . . . bachelor ot science in business administration. KING W. THOMPSON King . . . West Bridgewater . . . bachelor ot science . . . engineering lCarnegie Institute of Technologyl. eneva, out count: an the tight." 44 gn fomfmi-eiqlif .... well celelvfzafe ALL THIS TIME WONDEBING what "state" was and as juniors We discovered-it's political science Well seasoned With Dr. Iohn Coleman. We rate him one of the great possessions of our class. But our junior year was more than just "stale" It was Otis Holloway's "rat races"g Evelyn Bergan chosen Daisy Maep major check sheetsp the Dodie Anderson "elopement"p Buddy Kre-pp's swing band at Club 145 Lee Gi1lespie's affinity for flying cindersg the three Hills-Kay, Margie and loep yearbook sales at the gamesp Bill lersey's heighty Guy Bennetts accur- acy and Chuck Guginds speed on the hardwood: George Coleman and emphasis on Pennsylvania history via Cambridge, Mass. 'ss ef-is Iunior Class Officers. Front row: Eleanor Gross, irecrsurerg Evelyn Berqan, secretary. Second row: Dick Kelso, presi- dent: George Murphy, vice-president. First row: Donald Allen, business administration, Beaver Falls . . . Dona Anderson, biology, Beaver . . . Michael Anthony, biology, Monaca . . . Anita Astmann, English-speech, New Kensington . . . I-lazle Balser, history, lndustry . . . Second row: Amelia Barjuca, French, Ellwood City . . . Guy Bennett, history, Wampum . . . Ralph Bennett, history, Wampum . . . Evelyn Bergan, mathematics, Beaver Falls . . . Twila Black, sociology, Denver, Colo .... Third row: Roy Blackwood, chemistry, New Concord, O. . . . lames Blaine, engineering, Ellwood City . . . Melvin Blair, history, Beaver Falls , . . lack Boggs, mathematics, Beaver Falls . . . August Bot- tonari, engineering, Donora. , '-'lvifbiii Y -- 4" N TLV , Q' ' Y, wif' 'Q ,J ,Jl ,Fe-A , "ix First row: Iarnes Bowers, English-speech, Beaver Falls . . . lack Boyd, re- ligious education, Edinburg . . . Paul Breen, religious education, New Brighton . . . Frederick Bright, mathematics, Emsworth . . . Wayne Bryner, business administration, Rochester . . . Second row: George Burt, pre- dental, Ellwood City . . . Donald Carlon, pre-medical, Beaver . . . Mary Daniel, Latin, Monaca . . . Richard Davis, English, Freedom . . . Gilda DeSena, chemistry, Aliquippa . . . Third row: Charlotte Dirnitroff, biology, Bulger . . . Richard Eckhardt, business administration, Beaver Falls . . . Edith Ellis, business administration, E. Springfield . . . Ioyce Engelhardt, biology, New Brighton . . . Daniel Erdelyan, education, Ambridge. ' it r ,ll ti or rf-jx 41,1 , .J i ' ' Wi First row: lames Evans, history, Tyrone . . . Harriet Ewing, history, Baden . . . Rudolf Forsberg, business administration, Ernsworth . . . Emil Forsyth, engineering, Ellwood City . . . Iames Gault, religious education, Pittsburgh . . . Second row: Thomas Gault, physics, Pittsburgh . . . Glen George, en- gineering, Zanesville, O .... Raymond George, history, Beaver Falls . . . Anthony Geronimo, chemistry, New Brighton . . . Lena Gillespie, psychol- ogy, New Brighton , . . Third row: Robert Gillespie, engineering, Ellwood City . . . Gloria Giovannini, biology, Ellwood City . . . Barbara Goehring, biology, Beaver Falls . . . Emmy Lou Goldsmith, history, Beaver Falls . . . Howard Graham, chemistry, Beaver. ,V .'iGEi,1g:',5 f-1' -X 1' Q I ,. . 1 N 15, .3 ,'g,',fj :4,:fx3gtA ' X J, , l Qt , Y , ".3,t' 5.31" ' Yi' ' W v fs-V Ft -A ' 1.21 X Xl xgji' I . iiqixg! L .- 1 . fx, ,t:e:,vn- ,Q ' First row: Margaret Graham, English, Ambridge . . . Eleanor Gross, his- tory, Beaver Falls . . . Charles Gugino, biology, Falconer, N. Y .... lohn Haddad, history, Beaver Falls . . . Dale Hamilton, pre-dental, Mars . . . Second row: Kathryn Hill, French, Beaver Falls . . . Marjorie Hill, English, Beaver Falls . . . Charles I-linzman, mathematics, Beaver . . . Philip Hirschy, mathematics, Evans City . . . Otis Holloway, economics, Rockwood, Tenn. . . . Third row: Clifton Hood, pre-legal, Beaver Falls . . . Hugh Houck, Eng- lish, Aliquippa . . . Margaret Houlette, biology, New Brighton . . . Mary- anne Hurley, English, New Brighton . . . Oscar Iackson, biology, Beaver Falls. fy' A ,ifik 1 :gt i llwg t 32, Q , .g,, ,,.j - First row: Willard Iersey, engineering, Rochester . . . Richard Kelso . . . history, Murrysville . . . Herman Kochanowski, mathematics, Aliquippa . . . Paul King, engineering, Beaver . . . Louis Krepps, business administra- tion, Beaver Falls . . . Second row: Elmer Kross, economics, New Brighton . . . Mary LaRitz, Spanish, Bllwood City . . . Lois Lemmon, science, New Brighton . . . Harry Lodge, history, Steubenville, O .... Richard Luce, political science, Beaver Falls . . . Third row: Laurella Majors, Spanish, Ellwood City . . . Iames Martin, economics, Beaver Falls . . . Rudolph Massa, engineering, Koppel . . . Charlotte May, Spanish, Beaver . . . Ioan McCarter, biology, Beaver Falls. .1 rf.. Yi , 47 ll 5' 1 rf 7 First row: Ioseph McCaw, mathematics, Beaver . . . Dorothy McDonald, religious education, Beaver . . . Robert McDonald, biology, Rochester . . . Martha McFarland, French, Latrobe . . . Iohn Mclsaac, economics, Beaver Falls . . . Second row: Maribel McKelvey, biology, Gibsonia . . . Donaldp Mclvlurdy, chemistry, Beaver Falls . . . Donald Mumford, economics, Beaver Falls . . . George Murphy, business administration, Beaver Falls . . . Harry Nehrig, religious education, South Heights . . . Third row: William Orr, engineering, Beaver Falls . . . Miriam Pennell, English, Beaver Falls . . . Alice Perkins, education, New Brighton . . . Kathryn Perry, English, Bed Oak, Iowa . . . Homer Portman, engineering, Beaver. VA.,-,-QU 'ff' 511.- igw tee we Af , 'A,, P , .hfifiu x First row: Paul Price, engineering, Ellwood City . . , Iames Ramsey, en- gineering, Beaver Falls . . . Thomas Redick, history, Beaver Falls . . . Russell Reed, business administration, South Fork . . . Warren Renner, engineering, Monaca . . . Second row: Elmer Rex, psychology, Rochester . . . Betty Roe, mathematics, Beaver Falls . . . Florence Rosser, education, Portersville . . . Eugene Rumisek, economics, Beaver Falls . . . Milton Scrip- ture, religious education, New Brighton . . . Third row: Charles Sebring, engineering, Knoxdale . . . IoAnn Seidel, psychology, Ellwood City . . . Kathleen Sheldrake Townroe, English, Beaver Falls . . . Ernest Shoop, business administration, Springdale . . . lohn Shoup, business administra- tion, Beaver Falls. ' fy ,jf-f-sf, ,," 'f -fl X: Nl, Q5., -. H , W 'ii 7 rl -'L il l lr--'.' , 2 W 1, 'ffg,'giQe--59, Aff ' ' '-,"J.1-ell:-1 ', -.7 'rwh f First row: Owen Simon, history, Beaver Falls . . . Samuel Simpson, Kittan- ning . . . Lowell Smith, economics, Beaver . . . Rose Sovalo, economics, Ellwood City . . . lean Shroads Spratt, chemistry, New Brighton . . Second row: Greta Steflan, business administration, New Kensington . . Deane Sterrett, business administration, Beaver Falls . . . Rebekah Stewart, English, Harmony . . . Cora Sunetaro, English, Ellwood City . . . Francis Swain, English, Beaver . . . Third row: Kenneth Thompson, pre-dental, Beaver Falls . . . Robert Tweddell, science, Beaver Falls . . . Robert Tweed, religious education, Beaver Falls . . , Fae Wahl Hirschy, education, Evans City . . . Iames Waite, business administration, Beaver Falls. cf: F! R .V gig-' Q t--lu 1 ,, T, gn TJ., I N ,Hi tial 5 l ' Fl ' F N. 'px :2:?1' 55 1 ,Mg 1- sift' O First row: Charles Weirner, engineering, New Brighton . . . Donald Weim- er, engineering, New Brighton . . . lohn Weinzettle, psychology, Beaver Falls . . . Iessie Why, Beaver Falls . . . Iohn Wilson, engineering, Beaver Falls . . . Second row: Marjory Wolf, education, Aliquippa . . . Iohn Yorke, business administration, Beaver Falls . . . Margaret Zahn, English, Free- dom . . . Robert Zinkham, engineering, Rochester . . . Lawrence Zorza, engineering, Beaver Falls. t li K0 4iVVrmzAl'v fy 04151054 f 1 u ! l SOPHOMORES ARE ANNUALLY responsible for freshman initia- tion and true to tradition, we really initiated the freshies. We think they were actually more unrecognizable than we were. The quartet ot sophomore officers-Lodge, Hamilton, Twinem and Towcimak-helped keep things in hand. And We Were quite proud of our contributions to the football squad: Bright, Capozza, McDonald and Smith. Colavincenzo, Firestone and Meyerdierks displayed their Worth in basketball. Andrews and Craw- ford proceeded to burn up the cinder paths with their speed. Lodge, Panas, Pugh and Vochko won honors for the class by tak- ing the Intramural Debate Tournament. The problem was: who was a sophomore? We all claimed to be juniors. Sophomore Class Officers: Left to right-Harry Lodge, presi- dent: Sally Twinem, treasurerg Martha Towcimak, secretary: Dale Hamilton, vice-president. First row: Carl Anderson . . . Chester Anderson . . . Murrel Andrews . . . Betty Bable . . . Alice Bailey . . . Victor Bango . . . Second row: Paquita Barreiro . . . lohn Barrett . . . Cleo Bartlett . . . George Basile . . . Kenneth Bechtel . . . Ralph Becker . . . Third row: Frank Bennett . . . Eugene Berriw gan . . . Raymond Best . . . Rebecca Blair . . . Richard Boyd . , . Paul Braun . . . Fourth row: Robert Brent . . . Robert Brewer . . . Irene Brown . . . lean Brown . . . Dorothy Burry . . . Eleanor Cable Kennedy . . . Fifth row: Charles Campbell . . . Angelo Capozza . . . Daniel Carling . . . Robert Carnahan . . . Thomas Carnahan . . . Carl Carothers . . . Sixth row: Robert Carothers . . . Frank Carroll . . . Nicholas Carroll . . . Walter Carter . . . loseph Caskey . . . Arthur Catt. 56 t t l vi it I tl lf 1 V tt Qt t li tt tl Il l V irst row: lames Church . . . Denny Claypool . . . Walter Cochran . . . Robert ole . . . William Cole . . . Virginia Coon . . . Second row: Florence Cooper . . Donald Crawford . . . Lois Crawford . . . David Crozier . . . Mary Culp . . Martha Dainton . . . Third row: Donald Davison . . . Archie Dennis . . Iohn DiRolobio . . . William Dodds . . . Richard Doud . . . Kenneth ouqlass . . . Fourth row: Henrietta Dowler . . . William Doyle . . . Earl roqus . . . Elva Dufour . . . Verd Dunn . . . William Edwards . . . Fifth row: leanor Faris . . . Frank Fazio . . . William Fee . . . lean Fenton . . . Robert irestone . . . Leroy Fisher . . . Sixth row: William Fleeson . . . Roscoe orney . . . Mildred Fritz . . . William Funk . . . Ernest Fusco . . . loseph usco. 57 First row: Charles Gallagher . . . Arthur Goettman . . . lack Goodman . . . Elaine Graham . . . Raymond Gratz . . . Thomas Grosqlass . . . Second row: Ioseph Gutierrez . . . William Haddad . . . Martha Hamilton . . . Alic Hardy . . . lean Hays . . . Helen Haywood . . . Third row: Betty Heidrick . . . Myrrel Hendricks . . . William Higgins . . . Robert Hilberq . . . William Huber . , . Edward Hum . . . Fourth row: Fred Iackson . . . Richard Iarrett . . . Thomas Iavens . . . Charles Iolley . . . Albert Iones . . . Leo Iones . . . Fifth row: Roberta lones . . . Constance Iudqe . . . Iames Keen . . Iacqueline Kerchner . . . Helen Kieler . . . Emil Kindelberqer . . . Sixth row Iohn Kochalka . . . Iames Kolb . . . Iohn Kovalcheck . . . Sam LaRitz . . . Lamartine LeGoullon . . . Chester Lesinski. 58 t Q 1 w I i1 t H M It I vt 'I t t t First row: Robert Lewis . . . Richard Lindley . . . Robert Linn . . . Iames Locke . . . Anqelo Lordi . . . Rosemary Malloy . . . Second row: Pearle Malone . . . Rita Manning . . . Edwin Marsh . . , Robert Meyerdierks . . . Samuel Mich- ael . . . Felix Mikon . . . Third row: Audrey Miller . . . Betty Mink . . . Melvin Molt . . . Rhoda Montaq . . . Iohn Monyalc . . . Donald Mulhollen . . . Fourth row: Wilmer Mulik . . . Dale Musselman . . . Harold Myers . . . Vera Myers . . . Shirley McClain . . . Mary McCullough . . . Fifth row: Nancy McCul- lough . . . Roy McDonald . . . Ieanne McNary . . . Grace Napoli . . . Mar- garet Noneff . . . Albert Nusser . . . Sixth row: Louise Ohle . . . Marcel Okon . . . Iohn Orsag . . . Anthony O'Tousa . . . Elizabeth Owen . . . Arthur Padgett. 59 First row: Ierry Panas . . . Howard Parson . . . lane Patterson . . . Ianet Pat- terson . . . Sally Patton . . . lean Petrone . . . Second row: Robert Pickens Bernard Piotrzkowski . . . William Pitts . . . Glenn Platt . . . Donald Portman . . . Robert Powell . . . Third row: Paul Puqh, Ir .... Frank Quinn . . . George Rattetto . . . Sylvester Rape . . . lane Reed . . . Ray Rex . . . Fourth row: Alan Richard . . . Harry Richey . . . Thomas Redick . . . Thomas Riddel . . . Elsa Roque de Escobar . . . Aloha Roush . . . Fifth row: Charles Rowe, Ir. . . . Theodore Ruscitti . . . Willard Russell . . . Iudith Ryan . . . Andrew Sario- chek . . . lohn Scherer . . . Sixth row: Leslie Shelley . . . Iohn Sherloa, Ir. . . . Iohn Short . . . Laura Small . . . Calvin Smith . . . Esmond Smith . . . Sev- enth rowz Ioan Smith . . . Kenneth Smith . . . Lena Smith . . . Robert Smith . . . Emily Snead. 60 First row: Barbara Snodgrass . . . DeWitt Snodgrass . . . Frank Speidel, Ir .... William Speidel, Ir .... Robert Springer . . . William Stone . . . Second row: Harold Stouiter . . . Ioseph Steel . . . Lawrence Strutt . . . Victor Sturm . . . Meredith Sutton . . . lohn Swank . . . Third row: Christine Teale . . . Howard Thorne . . . William Thorpe . . . Bruno Timpano . . . Martha Towcimak . . . lohn Trembath . . . Fourth row: Aubrey Turbeville . . . Sally Twinem . . . Louis Vayo . . . Paul Vochko . . , Martin Voyvodich . . . Theo- dore Voyvodich . . . Fifth row: Kenneth Walker . . . Lois Walters . . . Bar- bara Weaver . . . Charles Weido . . . Margaret Weir . . . Martha White . . . Sixth row: William Willner . . . Glenn Wilson . . . Thomas Wilson . . . Wil- liam Wilson . . . Daniel Windle . . . William Wylie . . . Seventh row: Doyal Yaney . . . Harold Yonlcee . . . Roy Yorns . . . lohri Zitzman . . . Audrey Zohosky. 61 H7142 eatin, of flte Cifzeenn i SQ H mgw i S WHAT A SWELL SCHOOL, We thought after those first few days. Dinners, parties and everything. Then suddenly it came: initiation. We managed to sur- vive the ordeal, and even put on a pretty good chapel prograrn, if We have to say so. After settling down, We Went right ahead and started to put Geneva back on its feet. Football came first, and We furnished three-fourths of the team, including starters Carbone, Fondrk, Karcis, Letteri, McElhaney and Ornogrosso. Our class Wasn't exactly overlooked in basketball either. Wasn't Milich the leading scorer? Not to mention the Work of Harr and nearly a dozen other trosh. Owen, Gianakos, Reed. and McCracken Were Wise selections for our officers. ei --7' w pf' tg gi t is 5 or QV U 'I Freshman Class Officers: Left to right-Don McCracken qqfifllff treasurerg Bob Owen, president, Mary Reed, secretary: Gus Gicmakos, vicerpresident. A de-Muir M. C. Freshman looks like Morrow Freshman looks like Proxy Freshmen look like ? nL,4.A First row: lames Allen . . . Eugene Altoloelli . . , Ianet Anderson . . . Mary Ann Armstrong . . . Robert Ayers . . . lack Badger . , . Frank Bagamery . . . Second row: Gayrielle Bailey . . . Lyle Ball . . . Richard Balph . . . Iohn Balzer . . . Sam Barry . . . Bertha Bartosch . , Luriinq Beatty . . . Third row: Frieda Bearnan . . . Mabel Beltsch . . . Thomas Berg . . . Merle Billig . . . Robert Black . . . 'William Bloom . . . William Bollinger . . . Fourth row: Grace Bowes . . . Chester Bowser . . . William Bright . , . Betsy Brown . . . Iames Breen . . . Morros Brumrnitt . . . Paul Burrows . . . Fifth row: Iames Carson . . . Ierry Cartwright . . . John Cartwright . . . Nikitas Chrysostornou . . . Roger Clark . . . Lynn Cleary '. . . Ralph Cochran . , . Sixth row: Thomas Cochran . . . Iames Boyd . . . Iames Cole . . . Iohn Cox . . . Thomas Craig , . . Iohn Cunningham , . . Viola Curtis . . . Seventh row: Mary Dan . . . Mildred Daugherty . . . Dale Davis . . . Virginia Davis , . . Dinos Dickos . . . lohn Dixon . . . Fern Drexler. 64 -1 First row: Norvan Druarnand . . . James Duncan . . . Donna Lee Early . . . Mary Eckhart . . . Willried Elliehausen . . . George Emrick . . . Edwin Erath . . . Second row: Edwin Eyles . . . Donald File . . . Vera Fleeqer . . . Harry Flinner , . . Lyle Flinner . . . Andrew Fondrk . . . Charles Ford . . . Third row: Iohn Fox . . . Robert Fruth . . . Stanley Galanski . . . Edward Gallagher . . . Allen Gardenhour . . . Raymond Gasper . . . Allan Gastfriend . , . Fourth row: Richard Gauqler . . . Robert Geiser . . . Harold Geist . . . Rachel George . . . Gus Gianakos . . . Max Giovannini . . . Alma Griffith . . , Fifth row: Mildred Groth . . . Robert Haddox . . . lohn Harr . . . Harold Harrington . . . Willard Harsh . . . Margaret Hartford . . . Keith Herbert . . . Sixth row: Fannie Hoffman . . . Spencer Horton . , . Robert Howarth . . . Joanne Hughes . . . Marlowe l-lumerick . . . Mary Lou lrwin . . . Shirley Iameson . . . Seventh row: Fred Iohnson . . . Walter Kalicky . . . Paul Kimmel . , , Ruth Kind . . . liuaone Kirk . . . lohn Koziar . . . Kenneth Lambert. 65 First row: Paul Lambert . . . Ioan Lamont . . . loseph Lathom . . . Stewart Lee . . . Richard Lescallette . . . Lois MacDonald . . . Nina Main . . . Second row: Odette Manchefi . . . Edward Mariah . . . Iris Marmaduke . . . lames Marshall . . . Mervin Marshall . . . Robert Marshall . . . Charles Mason . . . Third row: Percy Mauney . . . Barbara McBride . , . William McComb . . . Donald McCracken . . . Howard McDanel . . . David McElhaney . . . lames McKee . . . Fourth row: Philip McManus . . . Anna McMillin . . . Martie McMullen . . . Esther McMurdy . . . Mervyn Means . . . Genevieve Meigs . . . Evelyn Meine . . . Fifth row: lohn Metheny . . . Iohn Milich . . . Geneva Montgomery . . . William Mooney . . . Andrew Moranz . . . Thomas Muir . . . William Myers . . . Sixth row: Robert O'Neil . . . Iarnes O'Neill . . . Robert Owen . . . loAnri Parris . . . Mancel Paton . . . Betty Peirsol . . . Gena Pesci . . . Seventh row: Donald Pierce . . . Ernest Pocsik . . . Mary Reed . . . Patricia Reese . . . ,lohn Richards . . . lerry Richter . . . Evelyn Riedel. 66 First row: Nancy Roberts . . . Richard Rogers . . , Albert Ruhe . . . Dawn Russell . . . Dorothy Russell . . . Robert Salzman . . . Anne Sartwell . . . Second row: lack Saylor . . . Bernice Scheible . . . Paul Schenker . . . Beatrice Scholl . . . lanet Scobie , . . Doris Shaffer . . . Marlen Shaffer . . . Third row: Raymond Sheets . , . Richard Shingler . . . Thomas Short . . . Roy Shoup . . . Hobart Siegel . . . Lillian Simpson . . . Theodore Skacan . . . Fourth row: David Smallwood . . . Harvey Smith . . , Lowell I. Smith . . . Robert A. Smith . . . Vernon Smith . . . Robert Somers . . . Robert Spagnoli , . , Fifth row: Eugene Springer . . . William Springer . . . l-'larold Slang . . . William Stewart . . . Floyd Stinson . . . David Strizzi . . . lesse Swaney . . . Sixth row: l1Valter Taylor . . . Doris Tebay . . . Ioan Tepper . . . Mary Thorpe . . . George Toth . . . Gertrude Townsend . . . Edsel Trimble . . . Seventh row: Joseph Tritschler , . . Warren Weakland . . . Iohn Tucker . . . Enzer Weaver . . . lames Wharton . . . Anna White . . . Rosalie Vfhiie. 67 First row Wendell White . . . Eunice Whitford , . . Robert Wh1tten Iohn Wick . . , Sylvia Wilson . . . Second row: Walter Wilson Theodore Wirginis . . . Clara Woznicki Paul Vvright . . William Young. IUNIORS Ioseph Baggs Ioseph Bagosi Iohn Battles Harry Beitsch William Belke, lr. Iames Cook Charles Croft Ioseph Kirkwood Albert Martin Iames McKee Iune Owens Edwin Pugh Francis Snyder Alan Thompson Russell Thompson lames Vannoy Frank Wagner Fred Willner David Wycoif SOPHOMORES Harold Baldwin Clifford Beattie Ezra Best, Ir. Harold Blinn Donald Bruckner Daniel Carling Herbert Colavincenzo Marie Crano Rex Crawford lack Deeley Raymond DeLay Edward Dickey James Dickey William Doty Arthur Ellis Iames Erwin Richard Fox Paul Gallagher Tom Gardner Iohn Good, Ir. George Haley Edwin I-Iargate, Ir. Lawrence Hays, Ir. lohn Holland Iohn Honatke Rodney loll Guy King CAMERA SHY Frank Klirnek Carlisle Kohl, Ir. lose-ph Kolter Rosalie Lebowitz Franklin Leidigh Bernard Linder Frank Lordi William Manning Paul McCoy Edith Morris Robert Morris Ioseph Nardone Robert Nemec Arthur Nesbitt Omer Newton, Ir. Ralph Nye Michael Parahus, I r. John Pavlovich Harold Perkins Vincent Piccola Iames Schlahta Paul Schmunk Harold Schuler Thomas Shelter Robert Sipple Carl Sturm, Ir. Iames Todd Howard Wentley Arthur Whittaker Margaret Why David Wiley Frank Williams David Wilson Patsy Zingaro FRESHMEN Harry Anderson Michael Arbutina Walter Arbutina Iarnes Baker, Ir. Iames Bartley Iames Bauer Iames Bissett Iohn Boggs Ioseph Boggs Clifford Boyer Michael Burkus Sanford Busang Donald Coleman Frederic Cook 68 Harry Craig Frank Cummings Ioseph DePaolis Harry Dickos LeRoy Drogus Thomas Fitzgerald Albert Garcia Ernest Gardner Wylie Graham Peter Haines Franklin Hallman, Ir Leonidas Hardy Raymond Heist Edward Hendrickson Charles Hinds Henry Hineman George Hood, lr. Eston Husted Martha Irwin Delbert Kapp Adam Karcis Ralph Kelley William Kelly Ralph Knauss Anthony Krancevic Anthony Lordi Harold Mangel Iohn McCaw Albert McClurg Ribhard McGeehan Donald Murray Arthur Otto Harry Palmer Thomas Patterson Carl Pelino Margaret , Petrak Donald Powell Iames Rugqles Iacob Sakulsky Albert Schaffer Edward Segenwald David Seymour Frank Shelter Barrie Siegel David Strizzi Nancy Tanner Frederick Townroe Howard Trautman Iohn Wehner Harry Wolfe lames Woodrow AMBRIDGE-ALIQUIPPA CENTER First row lleft to riqhtl: Francis Matilza. Evelyn Graebner, Patrick Napolitan, loseph Durniak, William Bartoe, Samuel Walker, Owen Thompson. Second row: Arnold lvliklos, Ernest Fallcowskt, Elmer Fonda, Roy Delaney, Kyles Boyd, Richard Carl. Third row: Norman McCormick, Iohn Gdula, William Thom, Larry Doroshenk, George Anthony. Charles Maupin, Iohn Eeley. First row Ileft to riqhtl: Robert McCabe, George Ponticello, William Gross, Charles Lehn, William Smith, Robert Katus, George Shrewsburq, David Price, William O'Neil. Second row: Thomas Hoskins, Gus Ccmtakis, Samuel Walker, Owen Thompson, Gerald Tomb, lohn Wylie, Iames Kelly, Mike Yorqin, Donald Bray. Third row: Bernard Jacob, Clarence Glovier, William Ponticello, Frank Ristelli, Edward O'Neill. Donald Musgrave, William Stewart, George lanicki, Eugene l-lrychk, Alfred Tkatch. 69 COLLEGE LIFE "Isn't It Kinda Fun" . . . club meetings that mcxke you forget the days and nights of study . . . all-school pcxrties where students and profs join as one in the gcriety . . . specicxl Chapels with nationally-icxmous figures . . . formal dinners featuring the co-eds in cr display of the latest gowns and beuus . . . college fun? . . . there's nothing to compare to it! lSN'T IT KIND rascHA'!51Ew":fljp,f3gRs Gsm: HJE!:fMf?k'5TElN 2K ff' W 6? Crf3.Q3gQ?? A'. 'iqff fr., 'h Q11 L.. X LVM g ' ii,' ' V? fjirff !5HRKm'H,, Knx,-WMV H: LV? 'QW ffm W4LTEF-T ,LANG my gamma Gene Rumisek, Margaret Weir, Bettye Garber, Iohn Morrow, Lila Snodgrass, Dave Podbielslci, Marjorie Hill, Dr. Robert Park Not pictured: Robert Ague. functioned as the student government body under the leader- ship of Iohn Morrow, president, and Lila Snodgrass, secretary. Noteworthy among its achievements was the establishment of a permanent flower fund. The Senate suggested freshman initiation rules fthe sophomores 'think up the Hcwaziest things"l. Under its supervision, school activities and elections were "run off" efficiently. lts executive board contained two members from each of the four classes and the president and secretary elected by the student body. Dr. Robert Park served as advisor. In manner, appearance and actions, Iohn- nie Morrow possessed all the qualifications for the position he held as president of the Stu- dent Senate. Duties of the head of the student body attained greater significance this year in view of the record enrollment. At all times, Morrow fulfilled them with the boundless en- thusiasm he devoted to the many College activ- ities in which he participated. 72 i Front row: Viola Curtis, Mrs. I-lelen Reagle, Miss Mary Lou Stewart, Dr. Georgiana Wylie, Chris Teale. Second row: Florence Ellis, Gilda DeSena, Gloria Yates, Ann Gilchrist, Margaret Graham. I was distinctive in that ill every S girl in school belonged, i2l no dues were required and l3l it carried on the most comprehensive program oi any Geneva group. The girls opened the season with the freshman party and tea, and continued with the Spook party, Sadie Hawkins party, theatre party, Valentine tea, Erika Mann lecture, swimming party, Vocational Guidance day, Spring Formal, Mothers Day tea and May Day. The executive com- mittee consisted ot Gloria Yates, presidenty Sara Barrord, vice-presidentp Ann Gilchrist, secre- tary: and Gilda DeSena, treasurer, with Mrs. Helen Beagle, Dr. Georgiana Wylie and Miss Mary Lou Stewart, advisors. Presenting an analysis oi present day Ger- many before a capacity audience in the Geneva chapel, Erika Mann appeared as this year's lecturer in the W. S. A. Famous Womerfs Series. Author, foreign correspondent and analyst, Miss Mann had only recently returned from a tour oi war-ravaged Europe. Through her address, she revealed herself as a keen interpreter of current affairs and a vivid speaker. 73' YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION Wed its year ot activities by electing Dick Weir, president: Ed Pugh, vice-presidenty Roy Blackwood, secretary: and Mahlon Evans, treasurer. Wednesday evenings brought on discussions, movies and guest speakers on current, religious and campus problems. Typical of the meetings were Iohn Rumisek's first-hand account of the United Nations organization, Larry Bruno's experiences in the East-West football game and advisor Dr. Iohn Coleman's and Rev. Robert McMillan's inspirational messages. loint meetings with the Y. W. C. A. were approved! Again Y. M. provided an opportunity for men students to enjoy certain values which their college experience Would otherwise lack. Front row: lim Duncan, Don Crawford, Ed Pugh, Dick Weir, Dr. Iohn Coleman, Mahlon Evans, Roy Blackwood, Ierry Panas, Frank Kliniek, lim Gault. Second row: Bob Firestone, Rudy Forsberg, Harry Lodge. Iohn Budimir, Dick Kelso, Harry Nehrig, Paul Vochko, Dave Podbielski, Russ Reed, Spence Horton, Harold Harrington, Iohn Rumisek. Third row: Bob Derflinger, Art Catt, Fred Bright, Ken Smith, Esmond Smith, Lyle Flinner, Roger Russell, Bill Dodds. Mel Molt, Torn Wilson. Norm Carson, Bernard Piotrzlcowski. Fourth row: Don McCracken, Ioe Steel, Eugene Bray, lack Boggs, Ray Gratz, Art Goettman, lack Goodman, Dale Hamilton, Paul Braun, Dale Musselman, Ray Gasper. Willard McMillan. 74 Front row: Mary Iane Culp, Millie Bariuca, Kay Perry, Betty Kirchner, Fran Linton, Toni Bowles, Marjory Hill, Ann Gil- christ, Sally Twinem. Mrs, C. M. Lee. Second row: Ianet Patterson, Anita Astmann, Mary Mcllrath, Edith Ellis, Betty l-Ieidrick, Grace Bowes, Geneva Montgomery, Kay Hill, Marion Coon, Bettye Garber, Margaret Graham, Sylvia Wil- son. Third row: Ruth Kind, Louisa McClurkin, Lila Snodgrass, loan Lamont, Rosalie White, Doris Shaffer. Shirley lameson. Iessie Bowes, Shirley Stewart, Betty Mink, Margaret Hartford, Adelaide Hartford. Fourth row: lane Steel, Rita Manning, lane Patterson, Fern Drexler, Nina Main, Laura Small, Iacqueline Kerchner, Laurella Majors, Florence Cooper, Dorothy Burry, Margaret Weir, Greta Steffan. Fifth row: Martha White, Martha Irwin, Roberta lones, lane Reed, Eleanor Gross, Martha Dainton, Clara Woznicki, Donna Early, Becky Blair, Alice Hardy, Viola Curtis, Flo Prosser, lane Miles, lanet Miles. YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION had as its objective this year, putting the "C" into Y. W. C. A. Women students who desired to discover and accept the full meaning of Christian living for themselves were welcomed into membership. Discussions on dating and mar- riage Were appreciated by the girls, as were "Aunt Ianet" DoWnie's reviews ot Sunday School lessons. Geneva sent several delegates to the YM - YW conference at Camp Cheerio. And the annual fashion show proved interesting to all including the "big brave men." I-leading the Y. W. C. A. were Frances Linton, president: Betty Kirchner, vice-president: Toni Bowles, secretaryp Kay Perry, treasurer: and Mrs. C. M. Lee, advisor. 75 Front row: lim Gault, Jessie Bowes, Betty Kirchner, Dr. I. Boyd Tweed, Kay Perry, Marilois McFarland, Martha McFar- land, lane Steel, Bob Tweed. Second row: Margaret Graham, Eleanor Faris, Kay Hill, Florence Cooper, Dorothy Burry, Edith Ellis, Sylvia Wilson, Third row: Margaret Weir, Viola Curtis, Betty Bable, Grace Bowes, Pearl Malone, Maribel McKelvey, Fran Linton, Laura Small. Fourth row: Dick Weir, Martha Hamilton, Laurella Majors, Bernice Scheilole, Doro- thy McDonald, Faith Scripture, Martha Dainton, Iudy Ryan, Martha NVhite. Fifth row: Ioe Steel, Nikitas Chrysostomou, Anna lean White, Rachel George, Rhoda Montag, Roy Blackwood, Marjory Hill. Sixth row: Cleo Bartlett, Verd Dunn, lim Keen, Norm Carson, Willard McMillan, Harold Harrington. Seventh row: Glen George, Enzer Weaver, Don Craw- ford, Ken Smith, Roger Russell, lim Duncan. Eighth row: Don McCracken, Iim Carson, Harry Flinner, Tom Wilson, Lyle Flinner, Ioe Caskey, Will Harsh. CH conducted its weekly meeting with its purpose, "Witnessinq for Christ," always in mind. lt carried on studies of religious literature and dis- cussions oi Christian life problems with the aid of special speakers. Officers included Iirn G-ault, presidentp Bob Tweed, vice-presidentg and Kay Perry, secretary-treasurer. Dr. I. Boyd Tweed, noted for his sound inspirational lead- ership, acted as the sponsor. cornposed of C. S. U. members, held services in num- erous churches in the district. Included on the itiner- ary were New Concord, Ohiog Portersville, Ohio, Slippery Rock, Darlington and West Bridgewater. President Bob Tweed was assisted by Betty Kirchner, vice-presidentg Marjorie Hill, secretaryy and Roy Blackwood, treasurer. 76 Front row: Dr. I. Boyd Tweed, Martha McFarland, Betty Kirchner, Kay Perry, Hoy Blackwood. Second row: Anna lean While, Margaret Weir, Margaret Graham, Betty Bable, Iudy Ryan, Mar- jorie Hill. Third row: Mariloel McKelvey, Eleanor Faris, Rachel George, Laura Small, Faith Scrip- ture, Dorothy McDonald. Fourth row: lim Carson, Ioe Steel, Nikitas Chlysostornou, Willard Mc Millan, lim Gault, Bob Tweed. Fifth row: Enzer Weaver, Cleo Bartlett, Tom Wilson, Verd Dunn Harry Flinner, Ioe Caslcey, Lyle Flinner. PRE-MINISTERIAL SOCIETY grew considerably in the last two years to be a large and active club on the campus. The organization, typical ot many which suffered heavily during the war, enrolled many new and returned young men to assist in training them for future pastorates. Main subject for the year's study was "Discussion on the Problems ot the Min- ister." Rev. Milton Scripture was elected president with lim Gault, vice-presidentg Torn Wilson, secretary-treasurerg and Dr. George Coleman, advisor, sharing in the leadership. I it 'Q row: Dr. George Coleman, Latham Fitch, Rev. Milton Scripture, Breen, lim Evans. Second row: Enzer Weaver, Roger Russell, Wilson, lim Gaull, Harry Flinner, Willard McMillan. Third row: ol.: Tweed, Lyle Flinner, Meredith Sutton, Rev. Harry Nehrig. 77 I Front row: Dr. Harold Bruce, Dale Hamilton, Paul Vochko, Frank Klimek, lean Hays, lerry Panas, Esmond Smith, Al Gastfriend, Ray Sheets. Dr. Theodore McMillion. Second row: Mary lane Culp, Elaine Graham, Ioyce Engelhardt, Lois Crawford, Helen Kieler, Barbara Goehring, Dodie Anderson, Theda l-loulette, lane Steel, Betty Kirchner, Louisa McClur- kin. Third row: Nick Carroll, Tony O'Tousa, Roberta lanes, Henrietta Dowler, Ioan McCarter, Connie Iudge, Carolyn Booth, Bob McDonald, Howard Graham. Fourth row: Al Ruhe, John Metheny, Walt Wilson, Spence Horton. Chet Bowser, Dave Crozier, Paul Braun, Dick Eckharclt, Ray Heckerman. PRE- composed of future pill prescribers, butchers, bone pullers and microbe hunters, adopted a new charter this year and elected the following officers: Esmond Smith, president: Prank Klimek, vice-president: lean Hays, secre- taryg and lerry Panas, treasurer. Dr. Harold Bruce and Dr. Theodore Mclvlillion were advisors. lane Houlette, a member of the club and a former otiicer in the U. S. Army Nurses Corps in the South Pacific, gave an authoritative talk on dengue lever. Another memorable meeting was the lecture by Dr. L. Wilson, New Brighton physician, concerning the Army Medical Corps. "Research on Protein Mater- ial" was the topic tor March with Dr. Carpenter leading the discussion. ' ..?,'7s,. They'1l get bilologylt 78 Front row: Art Goettman, Marcel Okon, Chuck Mason, Don Weimer, lohn Rumisek, Ralph Pickens, Bill Orr, Dale Mus- selman, Bill Yee, Edsel Trimble. Second row: Vernon Smith, Chet Lesinski, lack Goodman, Paul Braun, Iim Blaine, Har- old Harrington, Ioe Steel, Iohn Christan. Third row: Hugh Houck, Rudy Forsberg, Tom Grossglass, Dave Wycoit, Mar- lowe I-lumerick, Chuck Weirrier, Howard Roosa, Ray Rex. Fourth row: Wiltried Elliehausen, Lowell Smith, Alan Rich- ard, Bill Bloom, Al Gardenhour, Felix Mikon, Anthony Geronimo, Walt Carter, Iim Kartalia, Larry orza. Fifth row: Art Catt, Bob l-lilberg, Iack Cox, Bob Brewer, Paul Wright, Bill McComb, Bill Speidel, Iohn Trembath, August Bottonari, Bill Funk. Sixth row: Dr. 'William Cleland, Bob Lewis, Emil Forsyth. lim Ramsey, Al Nusser, Frank Carroll. Norvan Drugv mand, Bob Whitten, Bill Thorpe, Herman Kochanowski, Ted Voyvodich, Mr. Walter Landgraf. Bob Linn. E N G I N members can now speak with author- ity on Armstrong Cork products, Bab- cock and Wilcox metallurgical processes, the complex steps in making Buta- diene at Kobuta, U. S. Steel's seamless tubing and heat treatment and also the tempering of steel. These have been the subjects on the busy program tally of the engineers when a representative of each process was present for the dis- cussions. The society had for its officers this year: John Ptumisek, presidentg Bill Orr, vicefpresidentg Bill Yee, secretaryg and Ralph Pickens, treasurer. Dr. William Cleland and Mr. Walter Landgraf acted as advisors. Draw your own conclusion! 79 CHEMISTRY CLUB l i l i l li it l Front row: Herman Kochanowski, Bill Yee, lack Goodman, Paul Braun, Roy Blackwood, Second row: Nick Carroll, lean Spratt, Elizabeth Owen, Lois Lemmon, Les Wilkofsky. Third row: Anthony Geronimo, Virginia Coon, Carolyn Booth, Evelyn Berqan, Dr. Philip Coon. Fourth row: Murrel Andrews, Bill Davie, Howard Roosa, Stan I-lrniel, Vince Borsani, Phil Coon. CHEMISTRY CLUB, after a war-time hibernation, was re-organized to meet the new surge of chemistry' majors. Under the leadership of Bill Davie, presidentp Phil Coon, vice-presidentg Lois Lemmon, secretaryg Bill Yee, treasurer: and Dr. Philip Coon, advisor, the monthly meetings enabled the potential Curies and Pasteurs to tie in their "book larnin' " with the newest chemical advances. Outstanding meetings-Dr. Fallon's talk on ine intricacies of adhesive tape production, Mr. Moore's lecture on ceramic processes and Bill Davie's and Stan I-lmiel's accounts oi steel analyses- illustrated the unending uses oi chemistry. Many members were affiliated with the American Chemical Society and attended monthly meetings in Pittsburgh. S0 MATH CLUB Front row: Howard Roosa, Evelyn Bergan, Lois Lemmon, Bob Derflinger. Second row: Mr. Wilbur Dershimer, Carolyn Booth, Elizabeth Owen, Helen Zachman, Lois Walters, Dr. Williani Cleland. Third row: Herman Kochanowski, Rudy Massa, Les Vxfilkotsky, lack Boggs, Bill Yee. Fourth row: A1 Hardies, Chuck We-imer, Don Weimer, Bill Davie, Torn Gault, Fifth row: Stan Hlniel, Vince Borscmi. MATH CLUB members found the solution to the program problem with a series of lectures by rnatliernatics professors and students. Dr. Edwin A. Whitman, Carnegie Tech, presented a lecture and movies on "Differential lntegrals" as one ot the highlights of the group's successful year. Mr. Rob- ert McCready, a Geneva graduate now on the University of Pittsburgh faculty, demonstrated various problems, while Dr. William Cleland, club sponsor together with Mr. Wilbur Dershimer, illustrated false conclusions at two of the monthly meetings. "Probability" was explained by Geneva graduate Vincent Borsani. Ioining with the Chemistry Club, the "Mathter- minds" concluded the year With an outing at North Park, Pittsburgh. Club oiiicers for the year included: Bob Derflinger, presidentg Howard Roosa, vice-presidentg Evelyn Bergan, secretaryg Lois Lemmon, treasurer. 81 ECONO CS CLUB Front row: Dr. George Haley, Grace Popernick, Shirley Stewart, Edith Ellis, Miss Ethel Bowden, Mahlon Evans. Second row: Bob Smith, Louis Krepps, Rose Sovola, Sara Barrord, Aubrey Turbeville, Roscoe Forney. Third row: Clif Hood, Dan Windle, Bob Walker, Dave Podbielski, Bob Strock. Fourth row: Ernie Shoop, Leroy Fisher, lack Yorke. Iim Waite, George Murphy. ECONOMICS CLUB found itself 1n tip top shape this year with a large part of the membership consisting of Uncle Sam-tutored economists. Addresses by faculty mem bers-Dr. Charles, Carson, Mr. Edwin Clarke and Mr Wal ter Landgraf-were highlights ot the local meetings Trips were made to the offices of the International Business Machine Corp. and to the Saint Barnabas Free Home A dinner at Hyeholde, Coraopolis, clirnaxed the year s activities. Active participants in the club are those voted into the organization by the members and ot-ticers Serv ing as the latter Were: Mahlon Evans president Grace Popernick, vice-president, Edith Ellis, secretary and Shir ley Stewart, treasurer. The club was under the guidance of Dr. Robert Haley for the last time Dr Haley has accepted a position at Linfield College and Will begin there next semester. 82 ACCOUNTING CLUB, original sellers of hot dogs, coftee, donuts, and Easter eggs between classes in Old Main, used the profits to advantage this year, and held a number of unusual and interesting meetings. Club mem- bers dined at Tippicanoe Country Club, Youngstowng Kaufman Hotel, Zelienoplep William Penn Hotel, Pitts- burgh, and McKee Hall. They heard chief auditors from the B. F. Goodrich Co. and the Carnegie Illinois Steel Corp. A former Genevan, Marjorie Guyton told of her work with the International Business Machines Co. Virgil Bennett, Pittsburgh, and Stewart Snodgrass, Beaver Falls, acquainted them with the work of the public accountant. Accounting for much of the club's busy schedule were the officers: Bob Powell, presidentg Arthur Padgett, vice-presi- dentg Grace Popernick, secretaryy Mahlon Evans, treas- urer: and the sponsor, Mrs. Lillian Gault. Front row: Mrs. Lillian Gault, Audrey Miller Audrey Zohosky Edit Ellis, Sara Bcrrrord, Shirley Stewart, Miss Ethel Bowden Second ro Ed Hum, Art Padgett, Mahlon Evans, Bob Powell Bob Firestone Thxr row: Elmer Kross, Don Mulhollen, Tom lavens, Chet Anderson Russ Bee Fourth row: Bob Walker. Bob Strock, Bob Springer Inn Waite Bosco Forney. Fifth row: Iohn Orsag, Martin Voyvodich Bruno Ttmpano Fran Speidel, Iohn Shoup. ACCOUNT G CLUB 83 ENGLISH CLUB received an injec- tion oi new ideas this year, and pro- vided education as well as entertain- ment. Discussions oi Russia, early American Writers and contemporary drama were included in the season. Publication oi Chimes, school literary magazine, ranked as number one project with Dick Weir as editor and Bob Ague as business manager. Credited with the club's success were the officers: Becky Stewart, presi- dent: Kay Perry, vice-president, Mir- iam Pennell, secretary-treasurer and the sponsors, Dr. Allen C. Morrill and Miss C. May Overton. Front row: Becky Stewart. Second row: Miriam Pennell, Kay Perry. Third row: Margaret Graham, Ieanne McNary, Laurella Majors, Kathleen Shel- drake, Chris Teale, Miss C. May Overton. Fourth row: Norman Carson, Dick Kelso. lane Steel, Anita Astmann, Bob Ague, Dick Weir. ARTS AND CRAFTS GUILD offered ample proof it had a busy year with the exhibition oi paintings, sketches and clay modeling-all the work of club members. The new group was organized by Mrs. Iohn Dodds, and helped revive interest in a iield long neglected at the college. Officers were: Anna lean White, presidentp Nick Peters, vice-presi- dentg Margaret Weir, secretaryp and lean Brown, treasurer. Slit ii' Front row: Anne Sartwell, Kay Perry, lean Fenton, Mrs. Iohn Dodds, Mary Lou Irwin, Laura Small, Iean Brown. Second Row: Genevieve Meigs, Shirley Stewart, lane Patterson, Margaret Graham, Margaret Weir, Dorothy McDonald, Maribel Mclielvey, Anna lean White, Marion Coon. 84 Front row: Harry Flinner. Frank Klirnek, lim Gault. Second row: Margaret Weir, Laura Small, Laurella Majors, lean Brown, Chris Teale, Gilda DeSerra, Marjorie Hill, lean Spratt. Third row: Miss Rebecca Lee, Eugene Bray, Grace Popernick, Martha McFarland, Dodie Anderson, Peggy Zahn, Martha White, Harriet Ewing, Shirley Stewart, Vir- ginia Coon, loan Lamont, Millie Bariuca, Carolyn Booth, Sally Twinem, lim Bowers, Mrs. Margaret Ripper, I, y under the new sponsorship oi Mrs. Margaret Ripper l H A H V and Miss Rebecca Lee, initiated Gilda DeSena as president: lim Gault, vice-presidentg Chris Teale, secretaryp Margie Hill, treasurer. A group oi the members attended "The Eagle Has Two Heads" at the Nixon, Pittsburgh. Annual project of the club-the showing of a French rnovie-was again carried out this year. Three performances, given in the chapel, attracted French students from the college and Beaver Falls High School. LR 85 Front row: Helen Zachman, Charlotte May, Lois Crawford, Dick Weir, Marjory Wolf, Elsa Rogue de Escobar. Second row: Elaine Graham, Evelyn Bergan, Rose Sovola, lane! Anderson, Miriam Pennell, Betty Heidrich. Third row: Millie Barjuca, Irene Brown, Audrey Miller, Kay Thorpe, Becky Stewart, lean Hays, Laurella Majors, Miss Betty Miller. Fourth row: Bob Derilinger, Margery Dodds, Mcrry LaRitz, lacqueline Kerchner, Bernice Scheible, Alice Hardy, Russell Reed. Fifth row: Art Goettman, Iohn Mclsaac, Harry Lodge, Iohn Rumisek, lack Boggs, Paul Braun. Sixth row: Iack Goodman, Meredith Sutton, Dave Podbielski, Bob Springer, August Bottonari. SP or to the los senores y las senoritas, "El Circulo Espanol" enjoyed a very active season. The youth- ful sponsors, Miss Olga Russo and Miss Betty Miller, and the officers: Dick Weir, president, Marjory Wolf, vice president, Charlotte May, secretary, and Lois Crawford, treasurer, proved a strong backbone to the club. Among the activities the members don't discuss are the movie parties and hayrides. The grand finale ot the year was in the form of a spring banquet. Theme of the affair, which was held at the Van Manor Tea Room, Vanport, Was "Magic Cafe," and the program featured Senor Williams, Ellwood City magician. Members of the club were invited to help him with the act and furnished some hilarious moments. 86 Front row: Bertha Bartosch, Mary Daniel, Elizabeth Owen, Howard Graham, Lois Lemmon, Bill Davie, lane Houlette, Lois Walters, Evelyn Beidel, Genevieve Meigs. Second row: Bob McDonald, Vernon Smith, Bill Funk, Chris Teale, Mary Ann McCullough, Spence Horton, Doyal Yaney. Third row: Paul Pugh, Edsel Trimble, Chuck Mason, Don File, Dale Mussellrnan, Ray Heckerman. Fourth row: Boy Blackwood, Wilfried Elliehausen, Hugh Houck. Warren Benner, Art Catt, Nick Carroll, Murrel Andrews. M B sought as its goal better understanding of the prob- lems of postwar Germany. Organized in October, the new-corners to the activities list, held a series of round-table discussions on the German issue that proved both interesting and informative. In lanuary, the club heard Robert Lewis speak on the government of Germany. Members participated in a question period following the talk. Bill Davies, presidentg Howard Graham, vice-president, and Lois Lemmon, secretary-treasurer, led the organization under the guidance of Miss Martha Cook. Membership was open to all interested first or second year German students. 87 Don Mcfracken, Norman Carson , . , , . Q fulfilled its obligation oi promoting "drama in all its phases" in a manner unequalled since pre-war years. The produc- tion oi two plays including an original musical, theatre parties, special dinners and monthly meetings kept members oi the dramatic group constantly active. Chosen as officers were: Iohn Morrow, presidentg Vivian Bowles, vice-presidentp Eleanor Gross, secretary, and Mary Haney, business manager. Drama instructor Genevieve Richardson, who has served as club advisor since Ianuary, 1946, again handled the directorial reins with skill. Her warm personality made long rehearsal hours ily swiftly. Her dramatic "know-how" made pages oi dialogue into an evening of lively entertainment. "Desperate Pilot" stands as a memorable highlight in the Geneva theatre's season. De- lighted audiences went away whistling the Gallagher tunes, marveling at the Gallagher set, and praising the non-Gallagher cast. Charles Gallagher, sophomore, wrote the musical, basing its plot on Donizetti's opera, "l..'Elixir d' Amour" and bringing it up to the present time. Meanwhile, Brother Ed Gallagher and crew went to work on a modern set. Try-outs were held, and Geneva soon had its first original production since 1940, when another brother, "Gil," presented his original show. Romantic leadse-Sally Twinem, Elizabeth Owen, Paul Storey and Ken Smith-revealed trained voices as well as dramatic ability. Dolly Patterson, the team oi Walter Kalicky and Mary Lou lrwin and the chorus added pleasant dance routines. Show-stoppers were Ray Gasper and puppets Don McCracken and Norman Carson in the hilarious "Sideway" number. Fi Paul Storey Direcioi rx. .eve Richllfdso GQHQVX 88 Mary Lou Irwin, Walt Kalicky, Elizabeth Owen Front row: Toni Bowles, Shirley Stewart, Adelaide Hartford, Elsie Hardies, Rose Bltnn, Florence Ellis. Seated at Piano: Eleanor Gross, Paul Storey. Second row: Miss Genevieve Richardson, Lila Snodgrass, Sally Twinern, Becky Stewart, Dick Kelso, Mary Haney. Gloria Giovannini, Bill Fee. Third row: DeWitt Snodgrass, lim Gault, Roger Russell, Iohn More row, Dave Pcdbielski, Norman Carson. 5 . V X if ff rg 4 S' rf, 5 Q '- - :IZ - I ,.,.,.,. X ,, u.:J'qglr-if I lv l vb 7 , SQL!- Standinq: Ken Smith, Ray Gasper, Sylvia Wilson, Eston I-lusted. Seated: Laura Small, Don Mumford, Sally Twinem, H.. 2, ' in , l VF, . flange. K ,,,.. N gggmm M SS ra mass rf -mMmsmi cr,Q,.,O Aurh . AS Gall O' Gnd Qgqhef, omposer 89 K .. -W 4 2 an i M 5 4, -- 1. rm rs fa f Q if im M wr H 'wr wir it Q Y , 2 r Laura Small, Harold Harrington, Elizalnellt Owen "Good Night Ladies" by Edwin S. Day was the fun-filled play presented by Frill and Dagger in the spring of 1946. With Bill F ee, Dave Podbielski, lim Bowers and Bob Niesslein portraying maiden aunts, the comedy had as its theme the inherit- ance of an old house and its subsequent transformation into a girls' dormitory. Eleanor G-ross, Iane Patterson and Sally Twinem had major roles in the proceed- ings. At right is a scene from the Thanks- giving, voice-choir setting of "The Court- ship of Miles Standish." Good Night Ladies ii , , -xi EB Hn "' Uris W mi migm E s ,Q . .Ex 'bw Ray Gasper, Ierry Panos, Sally Twinem, Paul Storey. Laurella Majors. Ban fee. 'nem' -mon. Isuuyjwxowen Si X ' 1 Sim BOWeriliesSleln' dbieiskii Sul Y Toilxom' Bob DOVE PO O I GYOSSI X Gnor ?y-iinem' Fe In G athers h ale at 3' r Q , hm, V Q 'fir-if: 'gif -5.3 if is -if ff: er's 1 " Frill and Daqq "Feathers in a Ga e, delightful farce of an fall offering, made a early-American custom, the "WidoW's Ver1due," whereby impecunious widows were auctioned off once a year as domes- tic servants. Eleanor Gross, Ioan Tepper and Elizabeth Owen appeared as three Widows who found themselves destined for the "Vendue." Norman Carson, Wil- lard McMillan and Paul Storey had male n-Lawrence play. leads in the Iarnerso 3 4 'QM ,-'-,1 1 - " "Nl if if -3:3 A 2 .ff ffl ,sf Q rf. fig: ' K' Qu f :',.m.t 3 . is et rf D.: l Hag' "' -ref A 3.05-lg. r:,:iZ3,?,rq wx .Q - is gl ":i::f:"R.v pq: V32 - if iss! 2' gas H i' 5.23 sf " b Tones . landing: Willa d M Storey efh Cjwileqnor GFOSQ SCMUIQQ Pa n, Ioan Tepper gated: Elzzs Oflom: HIGH C Gross Efrson' PQu1 ' , rzabeih O Storey E1 , Sqn Esmond Smit We n, Ioan Tepper h, lane Patterson F? Nor Seated: Lyle Flinner, Mrs. Esther Black, Dick Kelso, Anita Astmann. Second row: Rose Blinn, Geneva M t . . . on gomery, Ioanne Hughes, Betty I-Ieidrrck, Sally Twinem, Charlotte May, Dolly Patterson, Flor- ence Ellis. Third row: lim Bowers, Martha Irwin, Lurting Beatty, Norm Carson, Leroy Fisher, Paul Storey, Paul Pugh, Bill Huber. I Y ,A , T'.L,,. 1' y 4 . enjoyed a post-War re- vival with Dick Kelso, presidentg Lyle Flinner, vice-presidentg and Anita Astmann, secretary-treasurer, serving at the controls, and Mrs. Esther Black directing operations. Missi Astmann told oi her experiences in radio as a feature of one ot the several meetings which included discussions of broadcasting. "For the love oi mike," members toured station KDKA, Pittsburgh, viewed a broadcast of "Brunch with Bill," and heard their own Guy King exchange quips with radio's Ed King. Lacking facilities for an actual broadcast, several model programs were presented from backstage in the College chapel. Insiders insist the most in- teresting part ot Geneva radio was "What went on behind the curtains." Led by Mrs. Esther Black, head oi the speech department, an extensive pro- gram oi clinical speech work Was car- ried out during the past year. Emphasis was placed on correcting speech de- tects ot incoming students. Oi con- siderable aid Was the sound mirror pur- chased by the College for use in this field and in advanced speech courses. 92 I si composed ot Geneva's brilliant political, social and economic C authorities, furthered the College's forensic reputation through participation in district and state tournaments. Among the highlights on a full schedule was the annual Debaters' Convention at Penn State, with six Genevans joining in the discussions on socialized medicine and labor-management relations. Climax of the year was the re-enactment of a model state legislature at the Pennsylvania Capitol, Harris- burg. Dr. Iohn S. Mclsaac guided the debaters through their discourses. Serving as otti- cers were: Dan Windle, president, George Murphy, vice-president, Bruno Timpano, sec- retary, and Dave Podbielski, treasurer. At the close of the year, the group presented a trophy to Eugene Bray, Gene-va's "Golden-Voiced Orator," for his outstanding accomp- lishments while a member of the club. Front row: Eugene Tom Wilson, Dave Podbielski, George Murphy. Third row: Bruno Timpano, Meredith Sutton. 'I J 'iw w.nPssw,ss's W 5 gems amfrjwdmsm . -. sexes smug was . K. , ' 1 ., .2 sms . .V tem, nn Bray, Chuck Gugino, Dr. lohn Mclsaac, Dan Windle, lim Gault. Second row: f,'aZwQL'X':QqJ f. it at witness 1 Bm-Z' x,n4sss mr: ' :QS jgggs mm News Wigan, W? xmwzzzgggsmgssmasx 2 kann sxxwuwm-mangas, sim mmsmwssmr-sis is Exfsw Knights Bvxknqisf sq-em an H games-Emfmmtti sits -egg,-fmmgs-mms nav Lf-5 but-7-re-.Miss fp ,, F. 'fqfi WHC'S WHO 'His 1 When Mary Haney began "painting class portraits" in the Cabinet several editors ago, she became about the most popular co-ed on campus. "Everybody Wants to get into the act." The lively English major certainly didn't dampen spirits with her Wit. While at Geneva, Richard Weir did every- thing from editing Chimes to giving out-oi- season fireworks displays. Dick furnished one-fourth of the voices in the Gentleman Songsters. With Wisconsin in mind for graduate Work, Dick received a B. A. in English. Dorm girls bowed in awe at the sight ot Shirley Stewart. "Stew" reigned as presi- dent of the dormitories. An economics major, her other activities this year cent- ered around financial matters, being treasurer of the Senior Class and the Economics Club. Mahlon Evans was a friend of all, what with a winning personality and a new Oldsmobile. Mahlon continued his pre- war job as football manager and also headed the Economics Club. He received his B. S. B. A. with the Iune class. . . . Among Students in American Colleges and Universities WHO'S WHO E. G. 'Lan Anyone who can survive not only a year as editor of the G-enevan but a year as editor of the Cabinet, too, either has no nervous system or answers to the name of Elsie Hardies. L. C. accomplished this feat while obtaining her B. Amin English. A Warm personality and proven ability Won for Frances Linton the presidency oi YWCA. Fran gained experience by Work- ing in the business office while earning her B. S. B. A. The Kansas lass has teach- ing in mind for the future. Working in the Education Office, Sara Barrord had the enviable position Cfrom a feminine standpointl of meeting all the veterans. She also found time to earn Highest Honors while securing her B. S. B. A. degree and to participate in numer- ous activities. The name ot Eugene Bray was constantly in the public eye this year. As student di- rector of football publicity, Gene's by-line appeared on many a "Geneva Terse- Verse" column. As a speaker, the social science major gained the title, "Golden Voiced Oratorf' QF . . . Among Students in American Colleges and Universities WHO'S WHO Dave ani Q3 Geneva will not easily forget the gallops down the hardwood, the Indian war cries and the impossible shots that distin- guished Dave Podbielski as a basketball player. Nor will memories of his chapel announcements fade easily. Dave earned a B. S. B. A. degree. Vivian Bowles became "Mother Toni" the girls at Alumni Hall this year. T was student house mother at the nev transformed girls' dorm. Throughout college days, Tony was kept busy v student activities and Work on B. S. B. A. Larry Bruno gained a national reputation as a football star by ranking among the country's leading scorers and playing in the East-West game. At Geneva earning his B. S. B. A., he remained the same well- liked, well-mannered fellow he always had been. Iohn Morrow was president of the Student Senate, Frill and Dagger and Patterson Lodge during the past year. Add senior basketball manager, golf team, a few other clubs and working for a B. S. B. A., and you have activity plus! A., if .fi-, fam O VIVH1 . . . Among Students in American Colleges and Universities Y. 851 RESIDENCES "Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning" . . . that long walk to -McKee for breakfast . . . gosh, it isn't even light yet . . . oh, for breakfast in bed . . . formal dinner tonight and not a clean shirt around , . . hey, who's wearing rny tie? . . . a swell gang, anyway . . . dorms, the best part of college life. no WON OF YEXTE-TRDAY 1 Uh! llml I llulr' 'l'n lirl I p lu 'Hn' Ilnruiug' I-x McKEE Front row: Betty Balnle, Ieanne McNary, Elsa Roque de Escoloar, lane Patterson, Nancy McCullough, Rita Man ning, Rhoda Montaq, Betty Heidrick, Paquita Barreiro, Pearle Malone, Roberta lanes. Second row: Fern Drexler Rosalie White, Ioan Lamont, Ruth Kind, Mrs. Irene Saxton, Florence Cooper, Martha Vtfhite, Margaret Weir. Third row: lean Fenton, lean Petrone, Dorothy Burry, Elva Dufour, lanet Patterson, Elizabeth Owen, Iacqueline Korch ner, Laura Small, Mary lane Culp, Sylvia Wilson, Marqaret Hartford, Audrey Miller, Chris Teale, Nina Main Fourth row: Iudy Ryan, Rachel George, Henrietta Dowler. Eleanor Faris, Viola Curtis, Martha Hamilton. Life was not always easy for Mrs. Irene Saxton. There Was Willard McMillan cloinq his early morning yoclelinq outside McKee. And Gloria Yates' bed hanging from a distant telephone pole. Did Ieb Brown really live at McKee or did it just seem that Way? vu is s We is Gab Session in McKee "Black" Coffee? 5 MGHALL Front row: Margaret Graham, lane Miles, lane Steel, Mary Haney, Marilois McFarland, Betty Kirchner, Laurella Majors. Second row: Louisa McC1urkin, Fran Linton, Adelaide Hartford, Iariet Miles, Shirley Stewart, Mrs. Irene Saxton, Grace Popernick, Ann Gilchrist, Becky Stewart. Third row: Anita Astmann, Maribel Mclielvey, Florence Rosser, Greta Stetlan, Mary LaRitz, Gloria Giovannini, Kay Perry, Mary Mcllrath, Gloria Yates, Edith Ellis, Dor- othy McDonald, Martha McFarland, Rose Sovola. Won't they ever grow up? Now it's firecrack- ers at the dinner table. Gloria Giovannini sit- ting on Rudy Forsberg's knee listening to his version of "The Three Bears" wasn't enough. One thing sure, there was always something exciting at McKee. 1. as K Christmas Formal dignitaries Dates tonight, tests tomorrow Front row: lessie Bowes, Miss Donncr Fenner, Toni Bowles. Second row: Iocm Tepper, Doris Shaffer, Genevieve Meigs, Ncmcy Roberts. Third row: Alice Bailey, Eunice Whitford, Geneva Montgomery. Fourth row: Shirley Iczmeson, locmne Hughes, Mctrthcr Towcimcxk. Fifth row: Grace Bowes, Bernice Scheilole, Charlotte Dimitrofi. Sixth row: Mrs. Sally Patton, Mcxrthcx Irwin, Mcxry Lou Irwin. "Daisy" stole the show at Alumni Hell this year os the former music building was converted into cr girls' dorm. The Heinz pup t57 vclrietiesl gave Toni Bowles and Martha Irwin- not to mention house mother Donner Fenner-more than one l sleepless night. I , N'kxX Daisy cmd friends from Alumni I-00kif1Q Shfrrp Gi Fofmfil Difmef t Compliments of Der Puehrer l Dorms stage "tug-of-war" in mud Mrs. Ava Wylie had two dozen upperclassmen to keep in lnandeno easy job as even an upperclassman will admit. Dick "Pretty Boy" Kelso's clothes made the rounds. 'Tis said that Rudy Forsberg received a door prize-bolts and all-in bed, Probably an award for that collection of German swastikas, hel- mets and assorted War souvenirs adorninq the Bright-Forsberq room. Front row: Rudy Forsberg, Tom Wilson, Mahlon Evans, Mrs. Ava Wylie, Iohn Morrow. Second row: August Botlonari, Bob Firestone, Bill Funk, Roger Russell. Russ Reed. Third row: Bob Niesslein, Dave Fodbielski, Doyal Yaney, Bill Davie, Glen George. Fourth row: Esmond Smith, Ken Smith, Dick Weir, Dick Kelso, Fred Bright. We ,, V - is W-: ' . . ' fl' e Hg - W Q me s W W NOR TH HALL Front row: Art Catt, Don File, Paul Vochko, Harry Lodge, Dale Musselnian. Second row: Iohn Swank, Vernon Smith, Chuck Gugino, Dale Hamilton, Sam Simpson. Third row: Dan Erdelyan, Bill Higgins. Ange Capozza, Nick Peters, Charlie Perz. Fourth row: Howard Roosa, Sam Michael, Mrs. Mary Storter, Roy McDonald, Bill Speidel. Fifth row: Lou Vayo, Harold Huber, Norvan Drugmand, Bern- ard Piotrzkowski, Nick Carroll. The North Hall gang played nursemaids to a mother and her tive puppies, and loved it-even though college authorities may have looked slightly ask- ance at the affair. "Queenie," the dog in question, chose North Hall as a home tor her young family, and Chuck Gugino and Roy McDonald became guard- ians for Eenie, Meenie, Minie, Moe and Mary-the latter named for tolerant house mother, Mrs. Mary Storier. Ask ller if she has a couple of iriends 106 NORTNHWCOD HALL Front row: lim Allen, Cleo Bartlett, Enzer Weaver, Mrs. Clinnie Patterson, Ioe Caskey, lim Carson, Nick Chrysosiomou. Second row: Harold Slang, Spence Horton, Wilfried Elliehausen, Verd Dunn. Chuck Mason, Warren Weakland. Third row: Gena Pesci, Allen Gardenhour, Don McCracken, Lowell Smith, Willard Harsh. Fourth row: Frank Quinn, Walt Taylor. Chuck Sebring, Marlowe l-lumerick. sr ff W-: 5 is view its Northwood Hall was the birthplace and home of an unofiicial addition to the campus organizations, the Bachelors Club. Purpose: the thwartinq of de- siqninq females upon its members. But depriving Geneva co-eds of such a handsome lot seemed too cruel, and by the end of the year, even officers loe Caskey and Enzer Weaver appeared ready to burn the charter. Mrs. Clinnie Patterson was house mother. Sl 31 "'! R :EEE 2 5 Q . 5 Q l is-is S., . is Northwood Hall trio in scientific study of feminine fashions 107 BEAUTIES "A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody" . . . cmd Geneva has its share . . . Homecoming Queen greets returning alumni . . . Daisy Mae comes to life . . . nominations . . . elections . . . finally the big day . . Geneva's loveliest senior is crowned Queen of the May . . . eight charming co-eds in the court . . . a display of beauty. in ,aaiw 1 ff X, 1'lmi3 'g2YAN!3,1nQ" iflflfiiw Ur- r fy :V HX mm MAY QUEEN QU with all the loveliness that exemp- lifies the "typical Geneva girl," was crowned the 1947 Queen of the May at regal ceremonies held May 15 in the new iieldhouse. Lila, the first married student to Win the coveted honor, is a senior educa- tion major irom Beaver Falls. The Queen was crowned by her Maid oi Honor, Sara Barrord, Beaver Falls. Senior women who were chosen to comprise the court were: Toni Bowles, Mclieesportg Frances Linton, Denison, Kansas, Billie Thompson, Beaver Falls, Ann Gilchrist, Greeley, Coloradog Elsie Hardies, Beaver Fallsp Shirley Stewart, Niagara Falls, New Yorkg Margery Dodds, Beaver Falls. Preceding the crowning and the gala program was a concert by the College band. The Genevans, forming a "G" on the gym floor with lit candles, sang several College songs. On the arm ot senior men escorts, the members of the court entered. Viola Curtis and Margaret Graham were train bearers and Chris Teale, crown bearer, for the Queen. The theme of the festive ceremony centered about "America-the melting pot of the World." A program of dances depicted the Russian national dance, the Moravian dance, an English country dance, the American square dance and finally, an Indian ritual dance. The ceremony concluded with the acceptance ot the traditional Old Gold and White Coronation robe from the Queen, by WSA president-elect, Mariory Wolf. Miss Wolf, Becky Stewart and Miss Mary Lou Stewart, Wome-n's physical education instructor, with their committees, planned the affair. ill Sara Bcxrrord , Mcxrqy Dodds 4 Toni Bowles ouif O eauf Elsie Hcxrdies fi' Billie Thompson Shirley Stewart Frcrn Linton Ann G11christ HOMECOMING QUEEN -af.--1. - -4i---4 ----f f Y -' " -vw"-' You re Too Ile-autiful UYRIC sv LORENZ HART Music av, RICHARD RODGERS H A R M S I N C. EVELYN BERGAN Prim: SU! 'K A p pw, .,,. MUSIC "Say it W'ith Music" . . . say it with a choral arrange- ment by Waring . . . add sixty Genevan voices . . . Iohnson to conduct . . . or use a Sousa march . . . and start feet stamping, hearts pounding . . . maybe delicate strings . . . interpreting a light classic . . . best' of all: the student body in a stirring chorus ot the alma mater. .smf 1r WI J' rm, if. UNIX JXRIJ 5 TH Music' BAD Front row: L. McClurkin, L. Gillespie, E. McMurdy, F. Car roll, M. McCullough, G. Popernick, R. George, D. Anderson M, Coon, A. Zirat, B. Kirchner. Second row: L. Krepps, B McBride, L. Walters, M. Armstrong, V. Bongo, B. Peirsol, O. Holloway. Third row: L. LeGoul1on, C. Mason, I. Hays, R Gratz, M. Okon, R. Doud, N. Carson, I. Ramsey, I. Allen, I Cox. T. Short. Fourth row: C. Anderson, I. Caskey, R. Smith R. Heckerman, P. Coon, I. Kartalia, I. Shoup, M. Sutton, I Hill, W. Russell, R. Boyd. -ot Louis "Buddy" Krepp Director LAST FALL, THE BAND was only a handful oi musical instru- ments, mostly trumpets. lt has grown from a sextette to a well or- ganized military band of over titty pieces. Under the direction of Bud Krepps the band played the snappy, invigorating marches ot Iohn Philip Sousa, boosting the Geneva spirit which helped the boys to win over Akron U., Pitt, Carnegie Tech and others. When at the halt the band played sottly "The Campus Song," it meant something new to sing: "Come now to the campus True sons oi Geneva, With one accord in song your voices raise . . . New white sweaters with gold "G's" on them were purchased to replace the old gold sweaters which the moths destroyed while the band was inactive during World War ll. The band has grown large and has done well, and it is hoped that its music may soon be not only part of the spirit that is Geneva, but part of her everyday lite-like history and English-for fine music helps build fine character. 118 THIS YEAR FOR THE Geneva String Ensemble was one of re- organization and rehearsal. Meeting every Wednesday evening, the chamber group would work on "music in a lighter vein." Wil- liam Parrish took over the reins as conductor of the group and be- gan rebuilding a one-time top-notch ensemble. Dinners, civic club meetings and College plays drew the chief engagements for the ensemble. One of- the prides of the members was the self-sufficiency of the organization. A bake sale every month paid for the necessary music and replaced equipment. Even though the year wasn't such a busy one, the members all agree the experience gained was Worth il. They'll be "Stringing" along for a bigger year in the Pall. ENSEMBLE pictured: Dolores Pie-Her, Esther McMurdy. William Parrish Director 119 Lois Walters, Audrey Zirat, Rhoda Montczg. Ioan Boden Mary Anne McCullough. Elizabeth Owen, Phil Coon Not THE GENEVANS Front row: A. Young, B. Snodgrass, L. Snodgrass, I. McNary, M. Graham, K. Hill, M. Reed, A. Miller, M. White, S. Twinem, E. Owen, L. Majors, I. Fenton, M. Armstrong, B. Kirchner, K. Perry, I. Steel. Second row: M. Weir, V. Curtis G. Bowes, B. Scheible, A. White, M. L. Irwin, M. Thorpe, I. Lamont, F. Cooper, A. Zohosky, M. Hill, S. Wilson, E. Riedel, R. lones, D. Tebay, B. Bable, V. Coon, F. Scripture, M. Irwin, I. Hughes, Mr. A. Iohnson. Third row: P. Storey, D. McCracken, W. Harsh, P. Vochko, D. Crawford, M. Mcllrath, M. Coon, I. Brown, H. Harrington, R. Eckhardt. C. Gallagher, D. Hamilton, I. Evans, L. Fitch, C. Smallwood, T. Black, A. Hartford, R. George, M. McKelvey. Fourth row: S. Simpson, I. Swank, P. Coon, E. Weaver, D. Mumford, R. Blackwood, W. McMillan, K. Smith, W. Carter, N. Carson, W. Stone, R. Weir, C. Bartlett, V. Dunn. THE GENEVANS, the College a cappella choir, have completed a decade of song. They began the term as usual, With the regular afternoon rehearsals which prepared them for the Christmas concert in the College chapel. Among the fine renditions was the moving Christmas anthem from Handel's "The Mes- siah," "And the Glory of the Lord." Irving Barnes was featured soloist for the Winter concert. His program consisted of selections from "The Messiah" and sev- eral Negro spirituals. Latham Fitch, tenor, was heard in a Slovak carol, "Alleluia, Iesus is Born," while Sally Twinem lent her soprano voice to "Carol of the Singing Reeds." Audrey Young furnished the piano accompaniment. The program was repeated before the Women's and Iunior Womens Clubs, Beaver, the 'Outlook Club, Beaver Falls, and at several local churches. The Spring concert was a fine presentation oi folk songs, catchy little tunes, and two of Fred War- ing's choral arrangements-"The Brie Canal," fea- turing Dale Hamilton, baritone, and "The Battle DeWitt Snodgrass, Student Director 120 Sally Twinem. Soprano Hymn of the Republic" with a baritone solo by Donald McCracken. Sally Twinem was soloist for "Listen to the Lamb." At intermission, lane Knopf interpreted five piano selections. A beautiful new ar- rangement of the majestic Psalm XXIV, "Who is This King of Glory," climaxed the program. Elizabeth Owen and Dave Wiley were accompanists. The Genevans were conducted by Alfred H. Iohnson, who also headed the College music depart- ment. Professor Iohnson's new Easter anthem, "The Lily Lay," was chosen as one of the three best relig- ious compositions of the year. A New York critic said of the anthem: "lohnson's setting has a lilt and a freshness that is quite unusual: the words fit the folk-like character of the music perfectly." As student conductor, DeWitt Snodgrass dis- played promise of an important mfusical future. President of the choir was Paul Storeyg vice- president, Willard Mclvlillang secretary-treasurer, Kay Hillg business and publicity manager, Dick Weir: librarian, Ken Smith. Latham Fitch, Tenor , W t . f., yi I 'M E W W YS i tk .f :H .. Hg: sg' M . 0 nj, X it ,W it ,gs Irving Barnes, Earilono 121 FREDERICK GEORGE As its contribution to the College's musical pro- gram, the Genevan presented Frederick George, New York tenor, in an evening recital, March 28. Mr. George's voice revealed his wealth of train- ing in a variety of musical settings and his experi- ence as choir director, orchestral conductor and teacher. A baritone when he began his career, Mr. George combined the fine lyric qualities of the tenor with the vibrant power of a baritone. lncluded in his concert were "Comfort Ye" and "Every Valley" by Handelp "The Glory of God in Nature," Beethovenp "Ch'e1la mi credea," Puccinip "Because," d'l-lardelot, as Well as several other familiar songs and a selection from a Bach Cantata. Harold Wark was Mr. Georges accompanist. Dick Weir, tenor: Norm Carson, tenor: Don McCracken, bass: Ken Smith. baritone 122 GENTLEMAN GSONGSTERS The Gentlemen Songsters proved a popular campus group. The quartet, composed of a member oi each class, was constantly being called upon for College functions. DOUBLE QUARTET The Double Quartet was organized for the program presented at the annual Christmas dinner tor dormitory stu- dents, held at McKee Hall. The eight voices blended in popular Christmas carols. ROLAND HAYES Roland Hayes, famous Negro tenor, appeared at Geneva as a feature of the Co1lege's artist series. The chapel was crowded with an appreciative audi- ence which was held by Mr. Hayes' extraordinary performance of a varied program. His first group ot songs was of the 17th and 18th centuries: his second group was romantic English, German, and French songs, the third group was composed of Scotch and Afro-American folk songs. For his last group, Mr. Hayes chose religious Negro folk songs. His closing number was the Pte- cessional Song which he sang While leaving the stage and when oi-f the stage. Mr. Hayes was accompanied by Reginald Boardman at the piano. Marqy Graham, soprano: lim Evans, baritone, Marqy Weir, soprano Don McCracken, bass, Anna lean White, alto: Norm Carson, tenor Lolly Majors, alto: Latham Fitch, tenor. 123 ATHLETICS "You Goita Be A Football Hero" . . . carrying the ball right down the field or winning cheers with a determined goal line stand . . . fighting together . . . in basketball, too . . . and in track, tennis and golf . . . not whether you Won or lost, but how you played the game . . . always bringing new honor to Geneva. -,4 Youi Q0qyg Be A Footb Il Louc wrm 1 ms' "' 4 """'Nl If N. HE BEAUTUFUL GI 9 . . Mbit, r N .Tb N xqxv Q ,L ig AL SHEQMAN BUDDY FIELDS .W AL Lewasx .nl ' 4 ef! nz.: Ji li'u,a:!:+l'I'-- ilu. Hgh, Q M-. an m fans m m www .m mm Hr s v' Aug 4 M - m B . E s magma sim si E, Sn m m Sul H 'Q H . .. COACHES A Navy veteran and an Air Corps vet- eran teamed up to give Geneva a first-rate coaching staff for the 1946 football season. A. C. "Slim" Ransom returned to head coaching duties at his alma mater with four years of naval duty behind him. At the time of his discharge, Ransom was a lieutenant commander serving as Athletic Military Officer at Daytona Beach Training Station. "Slim" graduated from Geneva in l932 after earning twelve letters in football, bas- E mv swims mv r L I w t Q ms was m-mn gi B 58. B. is H45 md M si M mms , m y W mn m it -W is mt w W fi E m m ketball and track. For nearly ten years, he coached at McDonald and Beaver Falls high schools. ln l94l, he began his duties at Geneva. Serving as assistant coach, Walt West had been a physical instructor in the Air Forces during the War. Following his dis- charge in 1944, Walt played with the Cleve- land Rams, and was the team's leading ground gainer. Before coming to Geneva, he served as head coach at Leechburg high school. Larry Bruno For the first time in twenty years, Geneva found itself in the national foot- ball spotlight-thanks to the amazing exploits of Larry Bruno tpictured on the preceding pagel. A look at the headlines reveals his record: October 14-Bruno Tops District Scorers. October Z0-Bruno Leads State Scorers. October 26-Bruno First in National Scoring. November 3-Bruno Second in National, State Scoring. November 10-Bruno Third in National, State Scoring. November 25-Bruno Makes All-East Honorable Mention. December 4-Bruno Wins All-America Honorable Mention. December 5-Bruno Chosen on All-State First Team, Little All-America Second Team. December 13-Bruno Chosen for East-West Game at San Francisco. Larry had performed on both the football and basketball teams before serving in the army. ln pre-season practice last year, he loomed as the poten- tial backfield star. An injury kept him out of the opener, and his absence had a decided effect on the team, which suffered its only setback. His number, 27, will long be remembered by Geneva fans. 126 -, I '. I4 All l 'T n t I V' l t l 5 l I I I ',,. I I Q.. f',:.f,,. Intercollegiate football made its postwar debut at Geneva this year, as the Covies returned to the gridiron for the first time since Uncle Sam called a wartime halt in l942. A nervous opening night at Youngstown, minus the services of the star performer, was the only blot on the record which included a string of seven successful performances. "Slim" Ransom resumed head coaching duties, and was joined by Walt West in training a handful of senior lettermen and a host of freshmen grid aspirants. Together they molded an inspired football machine that ran up successive victories over Waynesburg, W. :St I., Grove City, Bethany, Carnegie Tech, Westminster and Slippery Rock. In recording these triumphs, Geneva permitted its opponents only nine points. 32 at Front row: E. Brumrnett, B. Wylie, R. Gasper, I. Small, B. Ross, R. McDonald, L. Bruno, A. Capozza, I. Budirnir, L. Iersey, A. Schaffer. Second row: H. Omogrosso, C. Pelino, D. Windle. C. Perz, H. Smith, I. Breen, W. Kalicky, R. Smith, S. Vinceguerra, A. Fondrk, T. Cochran, H. McDanel. Third row: A. Lepore, I. LaRocca, A. Carbone, H. Stang, I. Badger, W. Fleeson, B. Boyd, F. Bright, R. Frank, D. McCracken. K. Lambert, Coach Walt West. Fourth row: Coach "Slim" Ransom, F. Letteri, L. Vayo, E. Fusco, T. Wirginis, G. Kirk, R. McGeehan, D. Podbielski, M. Evans. Fifth row: E, Eyles, C. Fowe, A. Karcis, D. McE1haney, B. Campese, W. McComb, R. Bombini. Sixth row: F. Bennett, G. Bennett, B. Edwards, N. Sherman, R. Gaugler, I. Wozniak, L. Cleary, R. Chiodo, I. Pietro, I. Richards. 127 LARRY BRUNO IOHN BUDIMIR GENEVA 0--YOUNGSTOWN 26 Crippled by several injuries including Larry Bruno, the Covies fought a hard but losing battle against the powerful Youngstown aggregation. Although staving off a score in the first quarter, the Geneva line was unable to hold them from scoring twice in the second, once in the third, and once more in the final stanza. The fine punting of Adam Karcis saved Geneva from. suffering a more disastrous defeat. Remarkable was the fine fighting spirit of the team which made an interesting game until the final gun. GENEVA 13-WAYNESBURG 0 A neatly recovered fumble by Fred Bright on the Waynesburg six-yard line set up the first Geneva score. Bruno carried it over on the next play and fol- lowed with a plunge for the point. In the second quarter, hard-driving Iohn Small blocked a kick and Al Lepore picked up the rolling ball and scampered across for the second Geneva score. The conversion failed to hit the mark. The second half was a stalemate with the line turning in a fine performance in stop- ping all Waynesburg threats. AL CARBONE BILL EDWARDS nsm,.M,f..-4' 'X' it-if RTING LINEUP Line: McElhaney Chuck man Iohn Small Bill Iohn Budxrnir Andy tdrk Frank Lclteri. field Larry Bruno. y Omoqrosso Charley GENEVA 12-W. 6. I. 0 Geneva surprised the powerful W. :Sf I. Presidents who were rated victors by an easy margin. It was a game of fumbles, there being a total of eleven. The first Geneva score came on a pass from Ange Capozza to Bright who drove to the fifteen and then lateraled to Chuck Hinzman who carried it over for the score. Dan Towler, the Presidents' powerhouse, rolled up several first downs but was always stopped short of pay dirt by the fighting Covie line. With but a few plays remaining in the game, Karcis dropped back for a kick, and handed the ball off to Bruno on one of the cleverest plays used the whole season. When the Prexies finally woke up, Bruno was across the goal for the final score. GENEVA 30--GROVE CITY 6 ln a game played under the lights at Grove City, Geneva rolled to an easy victory, scoring one in the first, two in the second, one in the third, and one more in the final quarter. lt was Karcis's pitching arm that connected for four of the scores. Three of the TD's were scored by Bruno, one by Frank Letteri, and one by Bill Ross on a lateral from Letteri. The Grovers lone tally came in the last quarter when Supancik got loose and crossed the line. Seemingly none of the Covies could connect with a conversion, five attempts being made by as many different players. ,. ANDY FONDRK CHUCK HINZMAN . V. sa I I 1 I V' g Q 'FQ ' - m -W ' - "g'5pf' ' Q ' " N ,, ff. , '- . .-1, WT' Y . W A . ' ' W , a 1"5 ' R Y Y i -- tw , A L A . T- :' NA 1 QV. ' I 1 1 -5 1 ' A 'I x ' 'A X 'K H+ 7 XX 'lg 5. ' Ak 'V if ,KV . Q Y V J. N , -- - ""'f: 'a 5 l l Ill Ill Ill ,I HHIII m, 5 i i M f ,N Ill I sf img . t , A ,Q 4. ,I i .,.,, H ,A A 1 A X qml. -Kung , -' F- 1,5 7' ,A 5 1-H E22 1 wg., 1 5: -, - a x "J I 1 QQW f - QW .35 ix LLh:lL1'L li: J-,ji TQ? if Q .,.. ' ' Q ":'V 5 QTQ 5 Q f' it - ,J -7, 1 - F ,N X xxx F N52 V, ji.i?':-"""'-'- D RETURNS Former :zc Alvin Bo McMil- dtscussmg season with istant C o a c h Walt GENEVA 19-WESTMINSTER 0 In a brilliant display of passing, the Covies handed the Titans a 19-O loss. Geneva completed 13 out of 20 passes, two for touchdowns, and one for an extra point. Karcis hurled an aerial to Letteri for the only scoring in the tirst halt. After Bruno carried the ball across the goal on three nice runs, the Karcis-Letteri team again connected for the extra point. Karcis passed to McEl- haney, who made a brilliant catch to give Geneva its sixth win, 19-O. GENEVA 13-SLIPPERY ROCK 3 The Covies threatened often in the first half but could not penetrate the last iew yards to pay dirt. When the Rockets intercepted a pass in the third quarter and could not advance it farther than the fifteen in three downs, they tried a field goal. It split the uprights neatly, and put the Rockets ahead 3-O. With the team and the fans howling mad, the Covies roared back to score twice in the remaining minutes. The first came on a plunge from the two by Bruno after or brilliant 59 yard run by Harry Omogrosso. A dozen plays later, Letteri intercepted a Rocket pass and galloped 60 yards for the other score. FRANK LETTERI CHARLEY PERZ The problems of an athletic director are numerous as Dr. Iohn S. Mclsaac, who serves in that capacity at Geneva will testify. But as anyone who knows him will admit, Mclsaac handles them masterfully. E ' Scheduling games . . . chartering busses . . . threats of rain . . . postpone or play? . . . finding ticket sellers . . . "Can't you possibly spare two reserved seats for the Westminster game?" . . . tax reports . . . uniforms must be cleaned . . . "Where did you get those ref- erees?" . . . hotel reservations for the team . . . "How about a comp? . . . all will sound familiar to the guiding force behind Geneva sports. A graduate of the Class of l9l5, Dr. Mc- lsaac joined the College faculty in 1928 after several years of high school teaching. When A. C. Edgecombe took leave from Geneva in l944, Dr. Mclsaac was named director of ath- letics and has served since that time. Top-Student sports publicity directors Eugene Bray and Ed Pugh watch on as secretary Char- lotte Smallwood leafs through clippings scrap book. Left-Senior basketball manager lohn Mor- row minus assistants Al Gardenhour and lohn Cox. Right-Dave Podbielski looks doubtful, Dick Kelso happy as senior football manager Mahlon Evans points out some attraction. ..: 1-2 TE' .s l Front row: I. Milich, B. Black, B. Meyerdierks, B. Iersey, I. Harr, W. Weakland, M. Paton. Second row: B. Niesslein, G. Bennett, T. Skacan, D. Podbielski, A. Karcis, M. Giovannini, B. Firestone, D. McE1haney. Third row: C. Gugino, A. Moranz, I. Badger. Bolstered by the return of many former stars and a host of new talent, Geneva launched forth into her first post-war season under the guidance of service-returned, Coach "Slim" Ransom. Included in the group returning to school after seeing military service were such familiar names as Charley DeVenzio, Chuck Gugino, Bill lersey, lohnny Rayz and lack I-larr. An inability to win "away games" proved most disastrous for the Geneva quint and stamped them as a "hot" and "cold" aggregation. "Hot" on the home court and "cold" when playing elsewhere. Only two victories were registered in nine attempts on foreign courts While a complete reversal of form held true on the home floor, the "Covies" winning ten while losing only two. While the records give evidence of only a mediocre season, eleven wins and ten losses, every game proved to be a contest from start to finish. This fact led to the "Covies" often being referred to as "the hard to beat team." Too numerous to recall are all the thrills provided during the 46-47 season. 133 Above: Iohn Milich, Adam Karcis, Dave Mclilhaney, Warren Weakland. Right: Top to bottom- Bob Black, Bob Niesslein, Dave Podbielski, Bill Iersey, Bob Meyerdierks. However, long rem.embered will be the opening 54-52 victory over Youngs- town . . . lack Harr's last second basket which sent the Waynesburg game into an overtime, and a thrilling 64-61 Geneva victory . . . the inspiring play ot Dave Podbielski as he led Geneva to a great 57-56 victory over Pitt, the first in four long years . . . the flying trip to Boston for a game at the Boston Gardens . . . . lastly, the sensational 70-68 upset win over Akron, who had previously trounced Geneva by twenty odd points. - Many in number were the good basketeers playing during the 46-47 sea- son. Outstanding among them were Freshman lohn Milich leading scorer on the team, Dave Podbielski who will always be remembered tor his great unorthodox style of play, "Papa" Charles DeVenzio, noted for his fine ball handling and smooth playingg Little Chuck Gugino, the speed demon of the team, and Guy Bennett, the great one hand set-shot artist. 9' Meanwhile, Coach Wilbur Dershimer's reserve squad was compiling a sensational record of seventeen wins in nineteen starts. Only Akron U. and the Beaver Falls American Legion were able to stop the hard-fighting jayvees, and then by one and three point margins. Notable in the victory column were double wins over Duquesne, Pitt, Westminster and Youngstown. y The jayvee contests proved an important proving ground tor varsity tal- ent. After starting the season in the preliminaries, Iohn Harr became the Covies' regular center. Later in the season, Guy Bennett made the grade and joined the regulars. Bill Edwards showed fine form and ranks among the iayvees whose ex- perience this season will earn them important roles in Coach Ransom s plans for coming campaigns. 134 V u V 1, i 'w 1 1 1 1 11 land, B. Meyerdierks, A. Karcis. 1 ,. 1 GENEVA SCORING 1 B. Jersey, 1. Huff, J. Miuch, D. Mcxslhfmey, B. Block, M. Paton, D. Podbielski. B. Niesslem, W. Weak. . Fouls Points 101111 Milich ............... ' 73-38 186 Dove Podbielski 84-49 163 Iohn Herr ........................, ........... 4 3-26 150 Chuck DeVenzio ............. ......,.... 5 8-40 116 Chuck Guqino ............. ........... 5 3-38 112 Bob Meyerdierks 55-26 78 B111 Iersey ..................... 49-25 67 Dove McE1hor1ey .......... ........... 2 0- 9 43 Guy Bennett ......................... .........,. 1 5- 8 40 Warren Wecxklcmd 13- 7 33 Adam Kcxrcis ...................... ........... 2 7-13 32 Bob Block .................... 9- 7 29 Bob Niesslein ........ 16-10 24 Iohn Boyz .............. 9- 7 17 Mcmcel Paton ........ 3- 3 13 Bob Firestone ........... 5- 2 10 Ted Skcrccrn ........ 5- 1 9 Totals ........... 537-309 1122 Below: Chuck DeVer1zio, Chuck Guqino, lock Hcxrr, Guy Bennett V " MINOR SPORTS Left: Golf Team-Dick Luce, Bill Haddad, Bob Firestone, Don Davison, lohn Morrow. Right: Swimming Team-Front row: less Swaney, Ioe Caskey, Ted Skacan, Bob Marshall, Bill Wylie. Soc- ond row: Bill Bloom, Dick Gaugler, Coach Walt West, Iim Breen. The term "minor sports" could hardly be used this year to describe the athletic activities that ordinarily tall under that category at Geneva. The return of ex-servicemen brought with it increased College competition in golf, tennis, track and baseball plus the addition of swimming. ln golf and tennis, coached by Dr. Robert Clarke and Mr. Edward Clarke, respectively, the Covies found themselves with capable veterans, and won a good share of the matches. lt may be said that the other teams were "willing but green." Rain played havoc with the baseball schedule, allowing only tour collegiate contests to be played. The diamond, nine, coached by Mr. Walter Landgrat, won but one. However, in Beaver County League action, the team appeared to be gaining experience and shap- ing into a title threat. Geneva played host to the first post-war Intercollegiate Track Meet which was won handily by West Virginia. Murrel Andrews and Don Crawford paced the thinclads through- out the season. Despite the handicap of not having a practice pool, Coach Walt West organized a swimming team-the iirst ever to represent Geneva in a meet. Unable to score a victory in three tries, the tankmen nevertheless showed possibilities of developing into good com- petitive swimmers with proper training and practice. Track Team-Front row: Harold Stang, Iohn Richards, Ted Skacan, Fern Drexler CTrack Queenl, . Bill Bloom, Mel Blair, Murrel Andrews, lack Boggs. Back row: Coach "Slim" Ransom, Don Craw- iord, Bill Mooney, Dick McGeehan, Andy Moranz, Al Schaffer, Dick Lindley, Ioe Caskey, Dr. Robert Park. Top to Bottom: Dr. Georgi- ana Wylie, Margaret Weir, Sally Twinem ttreas- urerl, Evelyn Berqan tsec- retaryl, Martha Towcirnak, Marjory Wolf, Kay Perry, Fran Linton, Laura Small, Lila Snodgrass, Ann Gil- christ tpresiclentl. Not pic- tured: Emmy Lou Gold- smith, Mary Haney. CHEERLEADERS had no minor task this year, but the Stu- dent Senate-selected lassies came through admirably. Attempts to transform school spirit into tangi- ble form included the traditional homecorninq snake dance-Wendell Whites horses and all-funeral services for the "Geneva Spirit," chapel skits featuring the Willard McMillan stock com- pany, and numerous pre-game rallies. Center-Front row: Rudy Massa. Willard McMillan, Ralph Ben- nett. Second row: lim McKee, Gertrude Townsend, Evelyn Ber- qan, Roy Blackwood. WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATIGN Front row: Fran Linton, Ann Gilchrist, Charlotte Dimitroff, Iane Steel, Millie Barjuca, Bettye Garber, Louisa McClurkin. Second row: Toni Bowles, Mary Haney, Betty Kirchner, Miss Mary Lou Stewart, Grace Popernick, lessie Bowes. Third row: lean Brown, Adelaide Hartford, Martha McFarland, Kay Perry, Becky Stewart, Margaret Graham. Fourth row: Henrietta Dowler, Maribel McKelvey, Chris Teale, Mary LaRitz, Gloria Giovannini, Nancy McCullough. Fifth row: Audrey Miller, Florence Rosser. Roberta Jones, Pearle Malone, Margaret Weir. Martha Towcimak, Florence Cooper, Laurella Majors, Laura Small. THE GIRLS' INTRAMURALS, although less extensive than the boys' pro- gram, are quite varied and show the same spirit of enthusiasm. In addition to the sports activities sponsored by the Women's Athletic Association, the Physical Education department and the extra-curricular athletics sponsored by Miss Mary Lou Stewart, add more activities to the Women's program. In the warmth and sunshine of early Fall, tennis gets under way and the gay pursuers of this Wimbletonian happiness keep the courts well dusted . . . tournaments provide an outlet for the would-be Helen Wills' . . . nor did Chris Teale have to ofier an alibi for her style of playing. Activities turn inside . . . badminton holds the spotlight . . . wide popular- ity among both students and faculty Cwhat joy to set the faculty back with crushing defeatsllll . . . "Flossie" Rosser annexes her usual tournament vic- tory . . . Faith, girls, Flossie will graduate next year. Volleyball is a fast-moving, exciting game which by its very nature in- sures intensive participation by all players texcept when Charlotte Smallwood playsl, an advantage which does not hold for many games . . . highlight of the season was the All-Star game in which the Gold defeated the White by a 48-43 score. 139 W. A. A. Cabinet: Miss Mary Lou Stewart, ad- visor, Charlotte Dimilroff, treasurer: Miriam Pen nell, secretary, Mill? B lane Steel, president. ie arjuca, vice-president M., , WE'-1 ' Y .7 ,,-:,,,-.417 --kZg- .1 Y,-. W , . sau.. -it E214 K , H ' vt . . .fan-. A... ,.-.:: 3 -?i.i.L1"Q' Lu, ...-.,.4,4:-: ..-4-4.2:-.?:.iea 5 V Muscle control leads to coordination, coordination to reflex action and reflex action to skill . . . That's psychology . . . that, also is basketball, for all winter our co-eds practice diligently the funda- mentals of the sport in order to de- velop the skill and proficiency so neces- sary to win tournament games. The lure of girls' basketball continues to exert its influence as a major intramural sport for our feminine athletes . . . the formation of two leagues, the playoffs within them, and the final game to determine the winning league, constitutes the intramural set-up . . . Alumni Hall team downs the , .. :':L:,, Above: Exciting scene as Princeton downs Yale Q I in annual All Star girls' basketball game. Center: 'V . 1 li' Energetic Mary Lou Stewart who led girls through it 3 A 3 2 j active year in sports. o 3 f ig! iv in h t I . I- 5, i, . 140 :pcs-- , --.,..- -,T -, ,, .ez .,.,.-.L-es Ls:-.::.f+.s---e.l,1... 1 3-3, , , Above: Alumni I-lal1's championship hasketbc team appears fascinated at Coach Don Crawfo andfor the plays he diagrams for them in prc tice session. i N If CLUB Front row: lane Steel, Louisa McClurkin ttreasureri, Charlotte Dirnitroff, Fran Linton, Adelaide Hart- ford. Second row: Martha McFarland, Maribel McKelvey, Mary Haney Cvice-presidentl, Kay Perry. Third row: Grace Popernick, Bettye Garber, Miss Mary Lou Stewart, Ann Gilchrist tpresidenti, Mar' qaret Graham. Atomics . . . the climax of the season? . . . YaleePrinceton game between teams ot experienced players . . . amid screaming cheers lmostly from Coach Chuck DeVen- ziob the Princetonians trounced their game Yale opponents. After Winter comes spring . . . sports go outside once more . . . plans for golf in- struction at the Ellwood City Country Club caused quite a stir . . . fthe girls stir to find clubs and the boys stir to hide theirs? . . . mushball brings a small but earnest turnout . . . others seek the lonq bow competition of Robin I-lood's day . . . the season of girls' activities closes with the May Day celebration. . - --:y.:ia:.f-In-1:wee ff:f: rf.-2313-lfrvxr 1-:A , ,:-,:-,vr.:,:r- rqvaf-.L-i-5 141 Gym Class in action f I PUBLICATIONS "Good News" . . . of campus elections . . . of sports victories . . . criticism pounded out by potential Peglers . . . future Fidlers telling who was seen with Whom Where . . . occasional literary masterpieces . . . the yearbook staff re- cording in picture and in prose the events of the year . . . how memories of another year at Geneva "keep coming back like cr song." 4'9" Front row: Kathleen Sheldrake, Audrey Zirat, Doris Shaffer, Lois Lemmon, Betty Kirchner, Chris Teale. Second row: Margaret Graham, lane Reed, Charlotte Dimitroff, Becky Stewart, Gloria Giovannini, Millie Barjuca. Third row: Dick Kelso, Mary Ann McCullough, Maryanne Hurley, Carolyn Booth, Martha Irwin, Roy Blackwood. Fourth row: lim Bowers, DeWitt Snodgrass, Owen Simon. THE CABINET, Geneva's semi-monthly publication, provided many a laugh and many a serious thought during the year. Edited by Elsie I-lardies, the paper kept students abundantly supplied with the latest College corn and comment. Taking on a policy of "publishing the truth and letting the chips 'fall where they may'," the editorial staff sought correction of College malfunctions . . . George Haley's interpretations of current events gave students something to think about . . . DeWitt Snodgrass added a cul- tural note with "Plaza-Toro Lowdown." Ierry Panas and Mary Haney ended their "feud" with Panas going to Pitt and Raney con- tinuing her verbal portraits of campus characters . . . Roy Blackwood kept ex-G.l.'s informed ot Uncle Sam's postwar activities while Chris Teale kept students informed of the ex-G.l.'s war- time doings . . . And Dodie Anderson, Sharky Dimitrofi, Gloria Giovannini and Peqqy' Zahn played safe and used "Two Bugs and a Beetle" as a nom de plume for their gossip column. Becky Stewart and Eleanor Gross were to describe the latest feminine fashions, but E. G. found men's socks and bow ties far more fascinating . . . Ed Gallagher and Maryanne Hurley displayed their literary talents . . . The sports-writing triumvirate of Ed Pugh, Warren Weak- land and Ray Gasper reported the activities of Geneva's muscle men and entered into some controversial discussions of the athletic scene. ' 144 EDITOR -ra Elsie Hardie-s, after editing the 1946 Genevan, continued along journalistic lines as Cabinet editor. BUSINESS MANAGER Mary Haney displayed versatility as both busi- ness manager and columnist tor the College newspaper. EDITORIAL BOARD Y Ed Pugh, Mary Haney, Elsie I-lardies, Dick Weir, Ierry Panas. 145 Working with engravings and dummies tthe inhuman kind, particularlyl is not a new feature in the charmed life of Genevan Editor Owen Simon. ln fact, it has become a part of his daily routine. Simon is a journalistic pro- duct of Beaver Falls High, where the knack for feature writing became an incessant habit. lust who is to blame for the incomparable wit, is yet to be discerned. Be certain that the greatest part of the praise for blamei for this book can be laid on him. We of the staff learned to realize that "Simon is god!" Iim Bowers must have been born with a piece of lead in his mouth. in fact, the doctor once said he was seven ems, six picas high. Bowers and journalism have been bunking together since the former's elementary school days. He has edited elementary, junior high. and senior high papers and worked with the high school yearbook. At Geneva, he was as- sistant editor of the "All-American" Cabinet during his freshman year. His chief interest now lies in his work as assistant to the director of the News Bureau, which he helped organize. If anyone ever had financial worries, it was "Boss" Bob Tweed, who handled the dwind- ling supply of yearbook cash. Here-'s one preacher who should be able to drag in the collections. Whether it was hot dogs at foot- ball games, programs and ice cream at bas- ketball games or donuts in the hall, Bob was behind it, wondering if enough capital could be scared up to add another page to the book. His chief threat is yet to come. How can he divide his summer janitorial work between The Eagle Printery and the Cleveland Engraving. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor ...............................,........ ............... O Wen Simon Associate Editor ......,... ............... I im Bowers College Editor ...................................,.....................................................,................................................ Lois Lemmon Assistants: Norman Carson, Emil Forsythe, Charlotte May, Maribel Mclielvey, Bill Orr. Activities Editor ............................,....................................................................,............. Emmy Lou Goldsmith Assistants: Gilda DeSena, Eleanor Gross, Maryanne Hurley, Mary LaRitz. Music Editor ......................,.....,...................................,...........................................................,.................................. Ioe Hill Sports Editors ............. .................,.....................,........... P hil Hirschy, Marjory Wolf Photographers .,......... ............... I ack Boqqs, Bob Carnahan, Larry Zorza Typists ..........,.......... ....,.......... A melia Barjuca, Iane Reed, Rose Sovola BUSINESS STAFF Business Manager .................................................................................................... ................. R obert Tweed Assistants: Dona Anderson, Evelyn Berqan, Mel Blair, Charlotte Dimitrott, Marqaret Graham, Otis Holloway, Oscar Iackson, Laurella Majors, Rosemary Malloy, Dorothy McDonald, Martha McFarland, Iane Miles, ' Ianet Miles, Kay Perry, Betty Roe, Greta Stetian, Iim Waite. Advisory Staff .....,...................................................... Mrs. I. Vale Downie, Mr. Walter Landqrat Colleqe Business Manager ......... ..........................,........................................ D r. Charles Carson Lois Lemmon Emmy Lou Goldsmith Ioe Hill Eleanor cfs? i ii: eww' H-sm 's s 's 55 E -Es sg . H, " s -is w's s ADVISORS Mrs, I, Vale Downie Mr. Waller Lanclgraf Literary Advisor Business Advisor Like every preceding group and probably every future one, the l947 Genevan staff at times found the business of putting out a yearbook, a bit trying, and at other times, a lot of fun. Conditions still were not normal when production on the book began, and even before a staff could be named, the editors and business manager had to do much of the planning. Early ordering was the only Way to assure the Genevan of its share of a scarce supply of paper and cover materials. The staff Was named early in the school year, and actual Work was be- H 1 N C Evelyn Berqan, Laurella Majors, Melvin Blair, Margaret Gross, Charlotte May, Maryanne ur ey. orman arson 381,58 QQHEFNL' 2 s 'aw ss :si- B . as s sws my s . 2 ss-Es ass ,ss s sM3..g, is may E L, na EEE? s , is ms E M -mum ,555 ,Q QE--m E s il r E if sas , H . I s rum, sg ,sg'Et,Eg3. E 5 r if Program Printer Dave McCall, Owen Simon Marjory Wolf, Maribel Mclielvey gun. "P" Week as well as "P" Day was observed this year while each student was photographed. Board meetings and staff meetings had to be held to bring out ideas. Writing had to be done for football and basketball programs in addi- tion to the annual itself. Mounting pictures, sending them to the engraver, pasting the complete dummy and finally shipping the book to the printers kept the editors stepping. Meanwhile the business staff faced the Herculean task of raising the money to pay for the book. Football programs were adopted as the first project, and members soon found themselves selling ads and then selling the programs themselves. Basketball season brought a similar project: again it was selling ads and selling programs. Toward the year's end, the procedure was re- peated with the sale of extra yearbooks. Also included in the attempt to raise the necessary funds were the con- cessions at games, bake sales and the Frederick George concert. Thus it was that the twenty-eighth edition of the Genevan yearbook came to be. Millie Barjuca, Rose Sovola lack Boggs, Bob Carnahan, Larry Zorza ,, , . - as g-.,..k,g,g.4.. , it ' L H if-5,5 Q I I Q as H P 1. Eavitfees- New mt A -Ml? i. 'i if -.f. BOYLIN STUDIO Portrait - Commercial -- Illustrative OTEL BE PENN-OHlO- COAT, APRON 81 TOWEL SUPPLY COMPANY J. D. McANLlS 81 SON -- Jewelers Since 1869 -1 nth Avenue Beaver Falls. P u u ' COMMERCIAL STATIONERS OFFICE OUTFITTERS 9 BH UTICIAN - Distributors 1 A- B- DICK MIMEOGRAPH DUPLICATORS AND Suppugs ' - Sales 6. Service - Distinguished Individuality in Hair Styling Beaver Falls, Pa. Congratulations Class of '47 SEVEN UP BOTTLING CO. Phone Beaver Falls 3119 LISLE T. MILLER T "Clo'll1es Men Like" -- S25.00 to 555.00 Beaver Falls. Pa. Shop and Save at S I M O N ' S WALLPAPER and PAINT STORE 1003 Seventh Avenue. Beaver Falls, Pa. HEARD ANY FLASH NEWS? Tell It to the 728105 BLUZZGU Locaied in the Tower Room McCartney Library GENEVA COLLEGE 151 D. SNACKBAR ABC CREDIT, INC. mnsfildwiches Alex Bentley, Manager M'lk- ' Shakes 1617 Seventh Avenue, Beaver Falls, Pe. 3500 Fourth Avenue College Hill, Beaver Falls, Pa. Phone B' F' 81 Z I R T MCCURLEY FARMS DAIRY Electric 1821 Seventh Avenue Beaver Falls, Pa. - Carburetors - "Better Milk Our Specialty" Enon Valley, Pa. R. D. 2 MCBEATH MOTOR CO. 1902 Seventh Avenue Beaver Falls, Pa. Your Local Ford Dealer SAME.BURNS DRUGGIST - Agency lor - Rubenstein, Yardley, Lucien Le Long Prince Matchabelli Beauty Preparations Brodhead Hotel Building Beaver Falls, Pa. WILSON'S Radio and Appliance Shop Otarion and Beltone Hearing Aids Batteries for All Hearing Aids 917 Seventh Avenue, Beaver Falls, Pa. Phones: B. F. 4801 - Roch. 4097 Glen F. Wilson, Proprietor CAMPBELL 86 HEMPHILL CO. Wholesale Coniectioners 408 Seventh Avenue Phone 356 Beaver Falls, Pa. ' IN, I BENSON'S B N Department Store Beaver Falls. Pa. 620 Dmungkm Rd. of .gnc We Feature Nationally Advertised , Qunuw Brands ' . gem-6, pans, pq, X 1 For Men, Women and Children 1 You Buy Quality and Value JOHN T. REEVES 8a co. Markson- Furniture store 1- Bankers Since 1868 i Iarnestown. Grand Rapids and Real Estate Insurance Thomsville Furniture 1217 Seventh Avenue Beaver Falls. Pa. Wilson 6. Axminster Rugs 6 Carpets 818-820 Seventh Avenue BEAVER FALLS, PA. JOHN H- BROOKS F. W. WOOLWORTH and SONS COMPANY . SAMILSON'S Peter Luger 86 Sons, Inc. Exclusive Apparel Packers of Beaver Brand Meats F01' Misses and Women 1114 Seventh Avenue, Beaver Falls. Pa. fz of 'ffine fzintin IS INDEED IMPORTANT IN THE ATTRACTIVE CREATION OF Tteasufzea eafz goolzs . W Through the medium ot modern typography, pleasingly and accur- ately arranged by skilled craftsmen, this annual was produced in an establishment where fine printing is a tradition. '7!ze Eagle puffing EAGLE BUILDING BUTLER, PA. 154 0 evelanb Zngfzavin Gomimml Glevelcma, Ohio 9 Congratulations to the Class of 1947 J. B. LYTLE COMPANY WHOLESALE CONFECTIONERS Beaver Falls. Pa. as -f7 F F 0 25. , W,-ff ,?J:.gg. HEC? ' fs .s ,114 ' " ,,, . Trl fig fe J fr AU , 'V ,f-fb!!! -MWPUIA ll 51:2 . c. M. EICHENLAUB COMPANY y"!f-lg? fh l ' A BE 1lPub1ic Seating i f ,' ? 'RCFYLSCHOOL I - ' 1 jg DITORWM Empire Building Architects Building gl. A Pittsburgh Philadelphia Since -lBEl0" BEAVER VALLEY MOTOR COACH Telephone: New Brighton 1500 -- Special Coaches for Groups and Parties -- I ss if A , ,, Km-1 mei' -5. we X may -, We Have Served Genevans FLOWERS and the Beaver Valley For Over 25 Years FOR ANY Chevrolet Motor Cars G Trucks OCCASION Nationally Advertised Makes oi Home Appliances and Furniture l Z , SAHLI MOTOR CO. REEDER FLORIST 1910 Seventh Avenue , Beaver Falls. Pa. 1305 Eighth Avenue Phone 2000-1 Branches in Zelienople and Rochester JOHN KOHLMANN BEVERAGE COMPANY High Quality Carbonated Beverages 823-825 Third Avenue BEAVER FALLS, PA. Telephone B. F. 770 COOK-ANDERSON CO. Beaver. Pa. -- Builders of - SCIENCE HALL ADDITION Iwll xt if , X lllvlk ' ' 252- Ei u 2 T H E FARMERS NATIONAL BANK Beaver Falls. Pa. Resources Sl4,000,000.00 Our Complete Facilities Are at the Disposal of All in Need of Banking Service Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Member Federal Reserve System What Are You Going to Do? If you are interested in joining a live, going organization of young men and women. in the Business Profession of Estate Building. doing a world of good for their fellow men and for them- selves, get in touch with the C. BRAINERD METHENY AGENCY i ot the -- FIDELITY MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 1212-13 Grant Building AT 6592 Pittsburgh USD. Pennsylvania GENEVA MEN NOW MAKING GOOD Iohn T. Fox - Donald C. McCune Richard T. Metheny ACKNQWLEDGMENTS ' E' " ':1 ' f 1 ' "3 N '-I - Q A A "" 'X ' nfl lg " ' gm AA M Y Q- . 4 if .Q PRI . ' Q . . L lise za n l intergfff ,E J j g, Butler, who had "Patience and Fortitude" with a qreen staff. ' -. --'Ro ' ,. . ".n3 Ex, 'J -, .l,,E. K V . . I . . :gg N5 4. 2 6,1 ii - 5. -.4 ' Q' 1 lag- 1515: ,- :BSA W T i. Q3 Q -fl jr M 0 U e V P , . L ' C A r 1 ,Mi f I 'feng VfI"NG STAN D All 1 5 3 . . f- -- -fvlkah-1,-.zotzthez 4exceland:Enqra.vinq:Gompan.y:wheiT .9 s 1 . 1 " ' i WonderfullsuqqestionyarrdlerrcoUrargin2g'WaTd's'kep1t'uS'fR5rn hav' -j - , , " '5 "Blues in the Night." 'Z' 1 . l + -.f --- 1 - wg ' 5' , ? Y I l l ' 1 G O V F R S - ' fa ' ' ' , 5 9. A V - . . . to Mr. K. G. CVS : 45 ' 'r N ,I Q' ugl,,31li5'e Y, Cl'1iCCIqO,. "'YO11l1" A Z 5 '- ' the Tops." K' Rigid 554' , l 5 3 57.54 l l ' 2 ?? 5i?2IfHO'1lOGRAPHY , U, I ! . . to Mr. Fred EliCIg"lGi'lO0IllMUM,ilHfhG1l,f:OIHWGll, Howley ,,Studi" ' Q 55? A I laridqep Mr. Ralph Sherrill, Boylin Sludio, Beaver Falls: Mr. Schg . - aj Q35 'Mn Iames Marita Beaxg Fallsp Mr. G14 " A ' ' ann jMr. Henry Ver hid , NEW ork-and we tqpqhtl l ', WI, ye" Fool: was just cr snap. "It Ain't Necessarily So." l l I V RALPH RAINGER 1 w gif if l A D R T I QSM' ' -MF Har' Fnlim:-ine' .'11nuegevwn:s - I Tri I 5. Jw., I R Song!-' .... . . Z . V ...... 39 i f - - - 1PlE.ILifri?LffsiHssS'afdsfe?f'w3td'gIh?5i's'whqse Solid support for the thi? A f Qi pre lame Um reygearhibblc gave us. Something to Remember You Blul . 2 X ' Female Uruagrene QSSAA' ........ t5 'Q ,g H i llfiixedl Qggrtegrfx SATB: ....,.... '-1: Ie -ema e rm 1 ...,....... . -ii' ,sfsnvrcn l ' I " l--ie-KlPiAEEiiS6n'-B s'C1'r1 ll ' ' ' ' QFT I- I 1 l l' 0 H3 ijf, E 4 . -2'A- ' j Na gy , a ny 41-5.: f5!' 751 6 j 2 ,W '1 u in ,.: nffi. .. M' -:lm Q L - ,- 1, r cl Q. M510 : ' sl' - fig: of ...w h new gl ig , e A- . . . e , r ,mhifgafill kwa, i2a4fgfg221l2EfJi2LafQfQ?iidHgzv5cvgH1f ho pedalaled mmnsmnsswav+1i'arh'eesx,.vtbYIxArs. I . V - img, 'amkigl K "pf sniff- alf a! ggwp Ii O Dum 91. 245 wgqalajfi, 40- , ' Q -Fl: ,f fm :J :J .afilmhis -ti w FINIS 11:15. -N 1 A.-sau... a 4644: u . . x , 4...a.. .....-..1...a.-.........-L ,Sli W'-zu-'f- NEWS.


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