Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA)

 - Class of 1936

Page 1 of 110

 

Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1936 Edition, Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1936 Edition, Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1936 Edition, Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1936 Edition, Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 110 of the 1936 volume:

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Pearce . . . from the time he landed at Bellevue, Pennsylvania . . . until he sank into obscurity . . . as President of Geneva College, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania . . . Cby himself . . . under compulsionb .... My first four years . . . spent in Bellevue . . . left no memories . . . except the tragedy of a stubbed toe . . . and the terrible disappointment when a toy balloon got away . . . and was seen no more . . . Another year on a farm . . . yields memories . . . of a very tame dog . . . a very cross cow . . . a faint odor of buckwheat cakes for breakfast . . . and cornmeal mush for supper. . . . The next year brings a clearer memory of life in Beaver Falls . . . the build- ing of the college that is now "Old Main" . . . the sad experience of the Hrst day in public school . . . marred by the tragedy of Wearing a Scotch kilt suit . . . which looked like a girl's dress . . . and made the day a sad one . . . for a very self-conscious boy . . . Later . . . when serving on the "Evening Journal" . . . as a newsboy . . . a prize watch was earned for carrying more papers than any other boy . . . The watch never ran. . . "Lives there a boy with soul so deadg he never to himself has said, 'I would like to have a date with that girl! " . . . A few dates were surreptitiously se- cured . . . but none seemed to count except those with Carrie Bell McKaig . . . who Hnally rescued this lad from his moonings . . . and actually married him . . . There was no registrar in college in those days . . . so after five years of labori- ous study . . . Cthere was a "prep" departmentj . . . I slipped into the graduat- ing class . . . probably "unbeknownst" to the faculty . . .land was handed a diploma . . . After three years . . . I graduated from the Reformed Presbyterian Seminary in Pittsburgh . . . My first pastorate was in St. Louis . . . which was a time of close study . . . because both the American and National League teams gave complimentary tickets to ministers . . . Hence a close study of our great national pastime was made .... Two years were spent in a pastorate in Pittsburgh . . . and six years in another one in Philadelphia . . . Another period was spent in editorial work with the American Sunday School Union, of Philadelphia . . . Finally in 1923 an elec- tion as President of Geneva College was accepted . . . Of the hopes and fears . . . the happiness and friendships . . . the successes and failures . . . the joys and sorrows of these days . . . much may be thought in the quiet of one's own study . . . but little needs be written . . ."That is all." SENIORS JEANNE LARIMER, Sec. GILBERT LEVINE MARY E. MACPHERSON KENNETH GRAHAM, Pres JUNIORS BELLE ADAMS HAROLD RIMBEY SOPHOMORES PAUL GRAHAM JEAN WORK FRESHMEN VIRGINIA DAMASKA J OHN MOYER They serve as a committee of the entire school The Student Senate The Student Senate of 1935-36 prepared to continue the active Work started under the new constitution adopted in 1934. This work was interrupted in its initiation 'by the absence of the president, Sidney Bliss, who was unable to be back in school because of a severe illness. Kenneth Graham, the new president, sought new controls and powers for the Student Senate and proved to be a capable leader. Serving as a committee of the entire school, the Senate under- took a noteworthy piece of Work during the latter part of the 'first semester by initiating a drive to increase the enrollment of Geneva. Advertising and canvassing was done by all of the members for several Weeks before the second semester registration. All of the activities sponsored by the Student Senate were successfully completed, and All-Star Night may be said to have been a bigger success than ever before. KENNETH GRAHAM SIDNEY Buss ,"- , . . Ll F E BEGINS AT GENEVA COLLEGE 'Q' -l"l""l"i"il"l'Ti"'T"?- -F"""':l" " " TIME BEING MORE THAN THE TICK- ING 0F A CLOCK... JACK FORSYTHE... HOURHAND OF THE 1936 GENEVAN 8. HIS, MAIN-SPRING... HCDWARD ELLIOTT... RECORD THE PASS- INGOE EVENTS... ON THE CAMPUS... 'lfiT""' 'iii' 1' 'O' 'i""'if'4fil""l"il"'If"l""'P"'l""7'1-' 'lfii' T X 5: ux,:"M-'121 : M f-argl' , 5 E 3 1137! .14 .Jil If fy' W M' X , 01. w w O 5,1 , V' '55?E595issf1ww'U M. ,1 ,, w U J-'F w , ,Juv I V5 E . 1' If . ' DC H67 :rage 4 Fa :fn 15 N, , 1 Pi? f, ,553 Xia' ' " sw as . .ww w- ats? " 111 1 r' . 1 -A - "i-1 -arf ,NX J .F :M WM.. :if--+t... 'iff F4 f H ' vi fM,,jf'L'f5fN" w G2 'jwwl A ' ' ., ...L 4"3Q'-U 6""'7"'1f?:a- : - f L ..- ' '- 57-4 f--1. .Q..ft:" ?"---1g MN' "M . W ,Q L 1 --Y 1 .T M -1 M , ff-.AJ fi T fd" ' ' fr,-W. 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' , , "5 " '11 . , "" ". mgiivww: ,wg H g,w"', M ' my H I U 1 ?f,ffSlQ' W M 3 31 - ,f N. lf t i f? ,Nw F. W' ,. V if "'-'. fp-- ,I Y V , fgxx , , , 'fi v',2,5' ,HM . L N v Mig. f 5 j w' W ,-aa' ,Z A , MMM? JH ' - 955' fm - . w N H H ' " :Q G , wwfgufgjg Egg gL'5'9ir'Mu'T ,iii-3 ' 1 ' ' 'L' - . , :I V X W Y 5 X ' , "' ' ug-lr! . ,mr "' "ft " W w., wzfgf .M , F, gil. Li wig, 5 . Wiexglsig r.. Ja V ff L - W H V' M Q , . , ' 572' 4,-t ,M 2 f' I+ FACULTY DYVIGHT V. Bsnms, B.S. Coach of Foolball MARJORIE A. BEESON, B.S. Assisfanf Physical Direclor for W amen GORDON B. BENN, B S m P F Coach cf Baskelball and Track ANDREXV B. CALHOON, A.B., B.M. fissislanl in Violin Mas. HAROLD CAMPBELL, A.B., A.M A istanl Przjessor Q' Romance Languages .U VVILLIAM E.. CLELAND A B A M Ph D M .flomalzcs and Physics Prrjessorzy' a 1 ROBIQRT CLARKE, D.D., A.B., A.M., B.D. Assislanl lo Ihe President Mus. JOHN COLEMAN, A.B., A.M. fissislant Professor of Bible JOHN COLEMAN, , Professor of Religious Education Prdessor of Polilzcal Science PHILIP L. COON, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. Professor of Chemislry WILLIAM T. DAVIES, Professor of Physical Education ELEANOR G. DUNLDRLEI A B Assistant Librarian ARTHUR C. EDGECOMBE, B.S. in C.E., M.S. in C E 1' clM lhemalics and Engineering Professor U flpp ze a D RUTH A. FIIIOR, A.B., A.M., Ph Associate Prdessor of English I nsfruelor in German VERNON B. FLEHAR1 Y, B S M S Ph D dssislanl Professor of Chemzslry and Malhenzalzcs EDNA M. GEORGE, A.B. Physical Direelor for Women PAUL H. GILMORE, B.M., A.B. I nslructor in Speech MIRIAM GROSH B S Librarian LLOYD A. HELMS, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. Professor cy' Economics and Business Adrninislra lion ELISABETH D. JOHNSTON, B.S Assistant in Piano WILLIAM G. Director of Publzcily CHARLBS MARSTON LEE, A.B., A.M. Liberal Arts ofin and Greek Dean of the College of Przy'essor fy' L B.S., MDE M. CQYLA MACDQWELL B S A B , . .,A.M.,Litr.D. D ff can W' ll Omen Professor of English MRS. Jour: MADORY, A.B.. M.A. Alssistant Professor of H islory Coach of Deorzlc JAMES S. BI.-XIi'I'lN., D.D., A.B. Executive Sccrctfzrj' GEORGE A. MCCALMON, A.B. P rofessor W' Speech W. WALLACE MCCORMICK, B.S. M S ,f- a -f 1,01 ' , W ' ' .4 .V V , xl' , 1 1:25 A fkikf' 1 i H 'EIL -5-111, ' Y - I , A A A A 1 x , f--I . V 1. W i H . fa. 3 4 I X c 'B 5... .1 .. .. if ' W., ,v . -'. L 4 N ...gf Xb w - 5. 7-iff vs .8 ' .ge mf P. .11- us. 5 ii sc. A y a Alssistont Professor ay' Molhcmntics and Physics Q.. .1 - I MAllGUERl'l'E IVICCREARY, A.B. V N . M 'A Q Gmawz College Booksforc 4 gr! 3 il "W, ' JOHN S. Mcls.-mc, A.B,, A.M. ' . 4, , Alssislnnt Prdessor of Education .Q X , Lu1.u J. NICKINNEY, B.S. I 4 I I Dix 3. Regijlmr 6 H I R N THEODORE M. MCM1l,LION, AQB., A.M.- ., -2, is "W 1 dssocialc Prrybssor qf Biology . HA W4 ' JAMES A. NEWPHER, A.B., A.M. 'd vi X' E I Assislzznl Professor of Psychology ond Education ' In ef'-1' " N Ronxsm' PARK, D.D., A.B., A.M. N N In g Ay, W Prdcssor cy' History K" ' ,- fig WILLIAM I. SCHLATTER, A.B., B.S., A.M. M35 VT - if Instructor in Business zldminislrcztion ' K1 'A BEULAH L. VVILSON, B.S. 4 J V V Prdcssor W' Spanish JOHN A. IVI. STEWART, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. I' zg' ' , Prdessor 4 Biology . , QL, Axh ' .rg-5.x .P Deon of Men CORNELIUS A. TII.GHMAN, A.B., BA. -I ,NSU 'ISK " flssistzmt Professor of English 2 .k X, 1 W'-.Rl M 2 . 'X ':'4" 1 J , J. Bovn TYSVEED, A.B., A.M. s ' A E 41 R Professor of Bible WA , 1 ,-,: ' 'r"' " jf" J. C. TQWINEM, Ph.B., A.M. L Q E-AE . Prqfcssor tj Eclucoiion X V L X libll . FRANCES E. XVADDLE, A.B., B.M. N f '17, XAA. " "ff X YA Piano V3 if Qi 'N 1 CAss WARD VVHITNEY, B.S., M.S. "::' k: 'W H E Voice .L .5553 ISABELLA STEXVART, A.B., A.M. ' .E gg Prqcssor M Modern Foreign Languages W Don M. Wo1.rE,B.S.,A.M.,Ph.D. ' fb Associate Przyessor cy' English Mus. H. H. WYLIE, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. Przjcssor of Psychology ,rs I 'si 5-5424.5 ,N .. J SENIOR OFFICERS , 41 1v"1y1jI'T Q J r . gif? L 95? H 1 5 rj S., President Vice-President . ROBERT SCOTT HUGH MCKNIGHT Treasurer Secretary PHILIP ROBB BETSEY Ross A Carpenter Black Beitsch Bcgolly Batteigcr Barnes Allen Acree MARY LENORA AGREE, A.B. Freedom, Pa. MARY GRACE ALLEN, B.S. Hopkinton, Iowa BETTY JANE BARNES, B.S. Sharon, Pa. RHoDA BATTEIGER, A.B. Beaver Falls, Pa. JOHN BEGOLLY, B.S. Vandergrift, Pa. CLIFFORD WILLIAM BEITSCH, New Brighton, Pa. JOHN WILLARD BLACK, A.B. New Brighton, Pa. ANNA MARY CARPENTER, B.S Ambridge, Pa. B.S. CLASS OF '36 "Merry" Mary . . . came from Freedom . . . to Geneva . . . to learn to teach French . . . and broadened her interests to include . . . writing for the Cabinet . . . membership in the English Club . . . and the W. S. A. Cabinet . . . Took part in intramurals . . . Senior Class Play . . . and accepted dues for the French Club . . . She enjoyed school greatly . . . but played hooky during the flood . . . to float around Freedom . . . in a rowboat . . . "Gracie" Allen , . . red-headed Covie from Iowa . . . President of the Math Club . . . and of her class in McKee Hall . . . mem- ber of the Y.W. Cabinet . . . C.S.U .... and Activities Committee . . . Hopes to teach theorums . . . in high school . . . and practices on any poor freshman . . . who gets stuck on his assignment . . . Betty Barnes . . . from Sharon to Geneva . . . had Spanish Club . . . Volley Ball . . . and May Day . . . to keep her from her books the first two years . . . English Club the last year . . . Movie-goer deluxe . . . ther uncle is manager of the Rialto? . . . knits with zest . . . and wants to be a "schoolmarm" . . . Rhoda Batteiger . . . that little girl . . . from way up on the hill . . . who kept a football 'player in training . . . by making him walk two miles . . . from the last bus stop . . . Helped plan the VV. S. A. formal the last two years . , . played intramural volley- ball and basketball . . . and was a member of the Historical Society . . . "Johnny" Begolly . . . the football player who kept in training . . . by walking two miles from the last bus stop . . . to visit a certain girl . . . played four years on the varsity . . . participated in intramural basketball and mushball . . . played third base on the baseball team . . . and was Vice-President of the Y.M.C.A. "Cliff" Beitsch . . . came to Geneva as a basketball star . . . and continued as such for four years . . . When he's not running around on the basketball court . . . he could be seen escorting a certain blonde . . . but to be brief . . . Brighton . . . basketball . . . blondes . . . suit Beitsch . . . John Black . . . from New Brighton to Geneva . . . where he enthusiastically entered into four years' activity in the Historical Society . . . two years in the Y.M.C.A .... three years in thc Mathematics Club . . . and then won his way into the exclusive Economics Club . . . where he helped initiate the business survey which that club carried on among the industries of Beaver Falls . . . Anna Mary Carpenter . . . went through Geneva . . . in three years . . . and yet found time to read for highest honors . . . a member of the French Club . . . Y.W.C.A .... the English Club . . . and President of the Spanish Club . . . a glee girl . . . who writes for the Cabinet . . . plays the piano and rattles the drums . . . and dissects beasties . . . for her major subject . . . " 5- .s aj li , E I: L .'-W., .ad . 1 iii., L, .. Y- . E . f . !,'7EfA..-. - , Q.-1 . .515 '?:..'-'-' " , f N . V, , . . 3-. '1. -1-'17 ' x . 134, 5 , ' . . . -,.. ,' .1 .j,. f , ,TH W.. .y,,.-Q, . -.., .4 4. ,. JAH., Liv,-1,555 J-, - .43-,415 ' . ' 1 :Y--5, : . .. .2 .au 52--my ' .-gr? 3.-2'--,igffsi-13-55J,wi , I .. f gf- 552 , MH: ag,.,,.. ,w..1z-gf.f3,:,,Q,gQigI'i.fiff, 1 i,,z,f-. i, ., ,Z v 1. 1 . df.,..:.LL..,: -- . ..,,... -y J' : ' ' 1 2' , -.1 ' " . "Hi,-' 'J"-.555 ::z's:ff:'s: J" 9 IT' JH' Y' ' "'TJF,fn ' , ' f -LFS" I --1'.- ' Q' 1 ' Ji.-V: .. ' ' 5-'13-5'::.f " wf' :TIA . V.. f ,,f.5,i,.,. N ,gi ,- . . - . 7 ?:?55,,..fY..gE'1 N ...L My ..,,.1Xl ,gx5:',, , U U N Li-'Eli ?"f1':x ' V ' 27 . -::'F.ii?21.. iff-"5?fls1"'u41Lffrf5?:f?W' ' '1'4fF1E3i. w2Q-Aft'-V-5 riff 1 -.. .. -...LL--wg. Hgif- ,'..f- 4:-1-'ew-.--.QL ' ,:awrz45f'!1E---'- .,. ,...- V ff ig-ry' W, -...,f-- .5 11.1 - -- 'L E Doak Duncan Dunn Early Cumming Carothers Christy Coleman BERT FRANKLIN CAROTHERS, JR. Beaver Falls, Pa. A JAMES ROBERT CHRISTY, A.B. Shippingport, Pa. MARY ELIZABETH COLEMAN, A.B. Beaver Falls, Pa. ' GRACE JEANNE CUMMING, A.B. Rochester, Pa. MARJORIE OLIVE DOAK, A.B. Enon Valley, Pa. ROBERT DUNCAN, A.B. Monaca, Pa. RUTH ELDA DUNN, A.B. Beaver Falls, Pa. ELLA MAY EARLY, A.B. Beaver Falls, Pa. J CLASS OF ' 6 A.B. Bert Carothers . . . thinks that gentlemen prefer redheads . . . one of whom keeps him quite busy . . . when he's not working as night watchman . . . at the Ing-Rich Enamel Co .... was trombone man in the band . . . and quite active in intramurals . . . exposed to four years of Economics . . . but declares that he is immune . . . "Bob" Christy . . . a "skipper" born and bred in Shippingport . . . owns a ferry-boat . . . that was almost swamped in the flood . . . cast anchor at Geneva . . . where for four years . . . he sailed through to an A.B. in History . . . continually chewing the rag . . . with intramurals . . . and Y.M.C.A. as sidelines . . . "Mary Lib" Coleman . . . of the Political Science Colemans . . . President of the Pep Club . . . Vice-President of the French Club . . . and Y.W.C.A. Cabinet . . . managed the Girls' Glee Club in '35 . . . acted for the Frill and Dagger . . . and in the Senior Class Play . wrote "Aux Femmes" for the Cabinet and directed pub- licity for the 1935 Genevan . . . in her spare time she was active in the German Club . . . the Historical Society . . . and the C.S.U. . . . spent last summer in Europe . . . and rumors say that she nearly fell out of a Venetian gondola . . . Jeanne Cumming . . . found coming to Geneva . . . a bothersome task on cold mornings . . . until a couple of pre-meds came to her rescue . . . in a Plymouth coupe . . . she pays dues to the German Club . . . the English Club . . . and participates in intramural sports . . . is interested in broadening her knowledge . . . by a business course at Carnegie Tech . . . "Margie" Doak . . . soloist in the Glee Club . . . and Secretary- Treasurer of the same . . . member of the C.S.U .... and English Club . . . Wants to go to the Westminster Choir School . . . to study sacred music . . . but is prepared to teach English . . . "just in case" . . . "Dunk" Duncan . . . from Monaca . . . who declares that the students in his practice teaching classes taught him more than he taught them . . . kept himself busy . . . not by studying . . . but by serving sodas . . . at Monaca Isaly's . . . and trying to in- terest . . . a certain girl in Beaver . . . Ruth Dunn . . . every freshman's "big sister" . . . majored in Psychology . . . in preparation for social service work . . . but changed her mind . . . and will change her name to Park . . . in June . . . meanwhile she keeps busy . . . by being President of the Glee Club . . . Secretary of the Pep Club . , . active member of Y.W.C.A. Cabinet . . . Historical Society . . . and German Club . . . Ella May Early . . . who is sometimes late . . . even though she lives but a square from Old Main . . . was a member of the Junior Ring Committee . . . Historical Society . . . and Y.W.C.A. . . played intramural volleyball and basketball . . . and worked on the Senior Tea Committees . . . 'P 8 , HSL -an ig-'ff V ,. f' " ww fu" n 1.5, ' 4.1! ..,,,A,. 4, I W4 ' 5 ' L w' V Q' w .W ' 91:23 ' X Q f 7j 3q f . ' 1 . ' K 5 f 31 ' ' ' - - .. " 1-5 , f 12 gil ' Z A4 4 , f 53,332 5 L' '- ,Iii i V - iw., I-,rr : . I. - .v "1 . - ,- ffsze .if - Garda Fulton Frank V. Franco A. Franco Farmer Fallon Ewing Y MARGARET MILLER EWING, A.B. Beaver, Pa. LESLIE DoDDs FALLON, B.S. Rochester Mills, Pa. CLARENCE FARMER, A.B. Rochester, Pa. ALBERT HUMPHREY FRANCO, A.B. Rochester, Pa. VICTOR H. FRANCO, B.S. Rochester, Pa. FREDERICK Ambridge, SHARP FRANK, B.S. Pa. ROBERT FULTON, A.B. New Brighton, Pa. EDWARD J. GARDA, B.S. Union City, N.J. CLASS OF '36 "Marg" Ewing . . . President of W.S.A .... and friend of friend- less freshies . . . got her A.B. in Psychology . . . is a member of Y.W.C.A .... French Club . . . C.S.U .... and Pep Club . . . She has also earned her "G" . . 1 in girls' athletics . . . delegate to Quadrennial Student Volunteer Convention in Indianapolis in '35 . . . zealous in C.L.A. work . . . leader of Campus Prayer Group . . . "Les" Fallon . . . a quiet unassuming lad . . . from Rochester Mills . . . who came to Geneva to give her four years of wailing and woe . . . because of his unusual . . . and odorous , . . chem- istry experiments . . . Vice President of Mathematics Club . . . member of Chemistry Club . . . was Physics lab assistant for two years . . . has made his friends proud . . . by accepting a position as Chemistry lab assistant . . . at Yale , . . Clarence Farmer . . . favorite letter is "R" . . . he Wears one on his blue sweater , . . for Rochester . . . his home town . . . and "rapid runner" . . . four years on the track varsity . . . captain his senior year . . . ran through his A.B. in History . . . with Pre-Medical Society . . . Y.M.C.A .... Historical Society . . . and intramurals . . . as side activities. "Hump" Franco . . . of the Rochester Franco's . . . was active in German Club . . . Y.M.C.A .... baseball . . . and football . . . also entered the intramural program as a member of touchfoot- ball . . . mushball . . . and champion basketball teams . . . reg- ularly receives dainty envelopes from Muskingum . . . which he is curiously eager to open . . . but not in the presence of friends . . . "Vic" Franco . . . of the blue Chevy automobile . . . fsubject to change without noticeh . . . and the brown fur jacket . . . played both intramural and varsity basketball . . . took his B.S. in Chem- istry . . . joined the Chemistry Club for three years . . . and Pre- Medical Society for one . . . his chief diversion was driving the basketball team on their various trips . . . "Freddie" Frank . . . whose home is in Ambridge . . . but who commutes from Beaver . . . A pre-med for four years . . . also a member of chemistry club . . . Spanish club . . . and Pre-Med basketball team . . . has been accepted at Hahnemann . . . where he will study homeopathic medicine . . . his pals swear that he is crazy about liver and onions . . . and an unknown girl in Am- bridge . . . "Bob" Fulton . . . of golf fame . . . who once defeated Grove City . . . by sinking a thirty-yard-approach shot . . . which sur- prised him as well as everyone else . . . was business manager of the Glee Club for two years . . . business manager of Senior Class Play . . . assistant business manager of 1935 Genevan . . . in fact the only thing that he can't manage is "Dottie" . . . and we've heard that she manages him . . . 4'Nick" Garda . . . from New Jersey . . . who romped the grid- iron for four years . . . worried the basketball coach for three years . . . swung a baseball bat for two years . . . and tore up the track in '33 . . . a member of the Y.M.C.A .... and Spanish Club . . . and in his senior year blossomed forth . . . as a dance club maestro . . . and basketball coach . . . for a college hill quintet . . . which won several tournament championships . . . he is look- ing for a coaching position . . . nw 'J rd' Y" ' 3 'ggi ' - lf -."W? " 1 ,ZA .X VV ,- 4Q,.,j Y 8 . 519-4 V 'I-su. wqy 5651, I-Iagadorn Harris Hemphill Grifiiths Hartung Gardner Graham Golletti JAMES LARIMER GARDNER, B.S. Enon Valley, Pa. VINCENT FRANK GOLLETTI, A.B. Freedom, Pa. KENNETH NEILSON GRAHAM, A.B. Midland, Pa. JOHN A. GRIFFITHS, A.B. Freedom, Pa. FERN AGNES HAGADORN, B.S. Johannesburg, Mich. PAUL M. HARRIS, A.B. Beaver Falls, Pa. MARJORIE THELMA Beaver Falls, Pa. ERNEST RAYMOND HEMPHILL, A.B. Belle Center, Ohio HARTUNG, A.B. CLASS OF '36 t'Jimmie" Gardner . . . who gets up in the wee small hours of the morning . . . to deliver milk to the dorm . . . in time for breakfast . . . which is the reason Why he takes those cat-naps in the library . . . between classes . . . A biology major . . . with four years as a Pre-Mad . . . President of the Historical Society . . . member of C.S.U .... and Y.M.C.A. "Vince" Golletti . . . drives from Freedom . . . in that red Chevy coupe . . . in which there always seems to be room for one more . . . took his A.B. in Economics . . . so that he could better man- age the Golletti Novelty Shoppe . . . which sells everything from soup to nuts . . . took part in Intramural Basketball . . . Y.M.C.A. . . . and dramatics . . . "Kenny" Graham . . . of the Midland Grahams . . . President of the Student Body . . . He wrote . . . in collaboration with his East Palestine Pal . . . a supposedly subtle column for the Cab- inet . . . "Damon and Pythias, Voice of Inexperienceu . . . and on his own initiative . . . not so subtle "Mammy Goose" poetry which had no rhyme or reason . . . likes all sports . . . took part in in- tramurals . . . intends to study law at the University of Pennsyl- vania . . . "Johnny" Griffiths . . . debater extraordinary . . . who believes in argument for argument's sake . . . let's off his excess steam at debates . . . so that he could keep Kuhl at home . . . Member of the Student Senate for three years . . . Business Manager of the 1935 Genevan . . . emoted in the Frill and Dagger . . . Wrote for the English Club . . . took part in Y.M.C.A .... and swears that he'll turn rank communist if he doesn't get a job . . . Fern Hagadorn . . . came to Geneva . . . from a farm in North- ern Michigan . . . Participated in sports . . . of many kinds . . . earned her "G" . . . joined the Historical Society . . . the Y.W.C.A. . . . and the Germans Club . . . she loves farm life . . . so much that she would like to go back . . . to the farm. Paul Harris . . . a local boy . . . who came to Geneva to study the past . . . in Prof. Park's history courses . . . in preparation for the future . . . which is teaching what he learned about the past . . , when he was a member of the Historical Society . . . the cast of the Senior Class Play . . . the German Club . . . In- tramurals . . . and track manager . . Thelma Hartung . . . another P.K .... Cpreacher's kidb . . . An English Major who really appreciates English . . . and whose am- bition is to relay that appreciation to her future pupils . . . was active in Glee Club . . . Frill and Dagger dramatics . . . C.S.U. . . . English Club . . . Y.W.C.A .... and hostess of the very suc- cessful W.S.A. Valentine Tea . . "Ray" Hemphill . . . interested mainly in his majors . . . Bible and History . . . outstanding in religious activities . . . Secretary of the Western Pennsylvania Student Volunteer Movement . . . representative to the S.V.M. Quadrennial Convention in Indian- apolis . . . member of Y.M.C.A .... Historical Club . . . President of the C.S.U ..,. Chairman of the Junior Ring Committee in 1935 . . . played soccer and intramural basketball . . . and found time to be Santa Claus at Pennys and work in the Library . . . pr Emi?- Jackson Howells Houk Horten Hopkins Holtzman Holt Hlista. -sail 1 H 1 W .-gg sa JOSEPH FRANCIS HLISTA, A.B. Ambridge, Pa. CLYDE I-IoL'r, A.B. Beaver, Pa. CATHERINE E. HOLTZMANN, A.B Beaver Falls, Pa. JOHN ROGER HOPKINS, A.B. Pittsburgh, Pa. CARL FRANK HORTON, B.S. East Palestine, Ohio CLAYTON L. HOUK, B.S. Ellwood City, Pa. ALBERT HENRY HOWELLS, A.B. Ellwood City, Pa. ELEANOR LEONE JACKSON, B.S. Wampum, Pa. CLASS OF' 6 "Moe" Hlista . . . a product of Ambridge . . . whose great achievement at Geneva was the acquisition of thirty pounds of avoirdupois . . . which came in quite handy during many football games . . . "Joe" was a member of the Y.M.C.A .... chairman of the committee for the Amelia Earhart lecture . . . and President of the elite French Club . . . Clyde Holt . . . started out to be a soldier . . . at Virginia Mili- tary Institute . . . but got tired marching after one year . . . and transferred to Geneva . . . where he became interested in Spanish and Economics . . . likes to hunt and fish . . . particularly when it requires a cut from classes . . . Catherine Holtzmann . . . of Beaver Falls . . . a Latin major . . . whose primary interest is reading or writing or teaching . . . Latin . . . Cicero . . . Virgil . . . Ovid . . . other interests include . . . Y.W.C.A .... Spanish Club . . . "G" Club . . . intramural volleyball and basketball . . . Historical Society . . . and chauf- fering the girls to their Glee Club concerts . , . "Cy" Hopkins . . . packed his saxophone . . . and came to Geneva four years ago . . . where his chief interests were syncopa- tion . . . and brunettes . . . with other activities including Spanish Club . . . Y.M.C.A .... the Geneva Band . . . and the Senior Class Play . . . can be seen working in a Pittsburgh department store during Christmas vacation . . . "Skip" Horton , . . class president in his freshman and sopho- more years . . . member of the staff of the 1935 Genevan . . . is one of the boys who write "The Voice of Inexperience" for the Cabinet . . . spends his mornings and evenings coaxing his car to and from East Palestine . . . his afternoons in the chemistry labs . . . and his nights selling gas at a Palestine service station . . . "Clayt" I-Iouk . . . a sprig from a family tree of teachers . . . and intends to branch off into that field . . . took his B.S. in Education . . . is a member of the Spanish Club and active in intramurals . . . during the summer he is quite a fixture . . . at the Shelby Tube Mill . . . or at Finley Lake Camp . . . which is frequented by Ellwood City Genevans . . . "Al" Howells . . . a soda-jerking artist from a drug store in Ellwood . . . who came to Geneva . . . to delve into economics . . . to become a "good fellow" . . . in the Economics Club . . . En- gineering Society . . . German Club . . . Spanish Club . . . Frill and Dagger Society . . . and intramurals . . . and who claims that the most liberal part of his education was gained "thumbing" his way home from school . . . Eleanor Jackson . . . likes to cook . . . and is good at it . . . which may or may not make any difference to a certain history teacher in Aliquippa High School . . . was a member of Glee Club for two years . . . served on Mother's Day Tea Committee in '35 . . . enjoys vacation trips with her family . . . and expects to start first graders on their A B C's . . . 2 WM ww rel? W Y , H I' V , -- , n 1 .,.1 U U' 1 .V I-M.: M., - ,N wp. , 2: L y- F ia? PMYuulLNQ'y.,a mm Zi- N - f H M ' - 4 V 1 Y r A V I 1.5Z',ifj 1 Tuff .N H' N' " ww" vw H , ' " 'y ' Z is Larimer Klein Kaste Johnson Q Jordan R. Jones H. Jones Jannuzi EUGENE FREDERIC JANNUZI, B.S. Beaver Falls, Pa. MARGARET VIRGINIA JOHNSON, B Beaver Falls, Pa. p HARRY BRADFORD Aliquippa, Pa. RICHARD LLOYD JONES, B.S. Pittsburgh, Pa. Lois CAROLYN JORDAN, A.B. Derry, Pa. MARGUERITE ELIZABETH KASTE, Beaver, Pa. RUTH KLEIN, A.B. West Aliquippa, Pa. JONES, JR., B.S. .S. AB JEANNE ELIZABETH LARIMER, A.B. Aliquippa, Pa. CLASS OF '36 "Gene" Jannuzi . . . sophisticated laddie . . . unofiicial gossip of the Cabinet and writer of "Nameologues" . . . one of the five men in the French Club . . . a racqueteer on the varsity tennis team . . . and a cut-up in the Pre-Med Society . . . lends his voice on rare occasions to the Glee Club . . . and is a connoisseur of dance music . . . Margaret Johnson . . . interested in everything . . . especially writing . . . had a story accepted in New York . . . was writer of t'Genevantiquities" in the Cabinet . . . member of Y.W.C.A. . . . and the Glee Club . . . worked on the committee in charge of the Geneva radio programs . . . joined the English Club . . . partici- pated in intramurals . . . likes dogs . . . and Brady's Lake for summer resorts . . . Harry Jones . . . who drives every day . . . from Aliquippa to Geneva . . . in a Plymouth coupe . . . a member of Geneva's golf varsity . . . the Chemistry Club . . . and the German Club . . . Treasurer of the Pre-Medical Society . . . and hopes to follow his father in the medical profession . . . "Osh" Jones . . . campus cut-up . . . doggeral poet .' . . "Mayor" of "the Ritz Apartments" . . . reputed star member of the Girls' Pep Club . . . and "ham" actor deluxe . . . whose activities as . . . captain of the football team . . . captain of the baseball team . . . letterman on the basketball team . . . secretary of the Y.M.C.A. in '35 . . . member of the Spanish Club . . , Student Activities Council . . . Radio broadcast committee . . . Cast of Senior Play . . . and Senior Day Committee . . . show him to be one of the most active and popular fellows on the campus . . . Lois Jordan . . . from Derry, Pa .... who took her A.B. in Education . . . so that she would be prepared to teach the three R's . . . Reading . . . Writing . . . Arithmetic . . . following the footsteps of her aunt . . . who taught many Beaver Falls Genevans in grade school . . . while here Lois enjoyed a membership in the Spanish Club . . . and a trip to Arizona . . . Marguerite Kaste . . . came to Geneva . . . to learn to teach French . . . joined Y.W.C.A .... and Frill and Dagger . . . par- ticipated in intramural volleyball . . . sang in Glee Club . . . acted in "Scrap of Paper" and "Brittle Heaven" . . . served on Senior Class Play Committee . . . and in French Club . . . as Secretary... and almost slipped through college without anyone's knowing she could play the piano . . . Ruth Klein . . . a "G" girl . . . who came to Geneva . . . and majored in French . . . so that she could teach that subject . . . joined the French Club . . . and the Spanish Club . . . took part in intramurals . . . likes to swim . . . has definite ideas . . . and follows them . . . Jeanne Larimer . . . with an A.B. in English . . a membership in the English Club . . . and an interest in dramatics . . . main prop of the Frill and Dagger . . . Secretary of the Student Conn-- cil . . . helped choose the Senior Play . . . and then acted in it . . . Vice-President of the Woman's Student Association . . . and a good person to have around when you want something done... H 1 um , , NM .4--. Hrdjp.. I' e 'Bw V we use w w ww ,w H if Molter Marello Mamula U52 few! Martin Manasterski Locke 1 w, ,MN ww C - H M Wu H M ,ww M .- X H w W H N 4 -- Je: wk x e .mls .' LA ' " miami-5 t T1QfJ5TT,?,QI'.w1 , , Af, , gg: 1 '2.fb- fx . ul ,Q-mir. J.i:1l1:E"fEi'?f- JY .gh '..4 :M i seem..-Q5-13, ,HH Y , F-.Bali - ' 'L 15: : f., . ' iii' ,5 e f-flesmf -' 1.,- .'A' ' we-'gg . 'fl :nf - , 1 ,I-inf . jf, .f 'S' xf.f'i'r'f2-1 .,. 55511 z Wg. ' ,ggi ,nf Aw- -:xzyu ' 1 - -' , fe " F .uf-5l'e.Cf,':-75 me K ,I 55.5, -3-lf., er Y--:nl , 'f ' og. 1 M f ,' il i A i VV , ' V- "'- ' - Q' mg-, Xu,--eu, x X. amNl- 5.4, ' - Lee Levine CLASS OF '36 JONATHAN STEWART Beaver Falls, Pa. IJEE, B.S. 'GILBERT D. LEVINE, A.B. New Castle, Pa. DAVID LLOYD GEORGE Monaca, Pa. LOCKE, B.S. .JOHN WALTER MAMULA, AB. Aliquippa, Pa. CHESTER MYRON MANASTERSKI, A.B. Aliquippa, Pa. fi MARY CONSTANCE MARELLO, B.S. .New Kensington, Pa. 'RENWICK GARRETT MARTIN, A.B. Beaver Falls, Pa. HOWARD A. MOLTER, B.S. New Brighton, Pa. "Johnny" Lee . . . of the Dean Lee's . . . on the executive com- mittee of the Glee Club Treasurer of the Y.M.C.A. Snapshot Editor for the 1935 Genevan . . . member of the Junior Ring and Pin Committee . . . Frill and Dagger . . . French Club . . . and Mathematics Club . . . member of the Chorus of the Chautauqua Opera Association for two summers , . . an amateur radio oper- ator . . . and a potential artist . . . "Gil" Levine . . . Whose hobby is asking professors embarrass- ing "why's" . . . Vice-President of Debate Club . . . member of Economics Club . . . Forum Committee . . . Treasurer of Student Senate . . . and varsity debate team . . . helps his father in his livestock business in the summer . . . and would like to go to law school next fall . . . I "Dave" Locke . . . of the Monaca Lockes . . . an education major . . . who wants to follow in his father's footsteps in the teaching profession . . . did his practice teaching in Chemistry . . . was a faithful member of the Y.M.C.A .... and has a passion for blue-grey hats . . . although he seldom wears one . . . "Mamrny" . . . the type who can show men how to use up their time without the help of women . . . is kept quite busy working at Isaly's in the summer . . . participating in intramurals in the winter . . . and playing his violin in between times . . . which after all is a good means of "fiddling" his time away . . . at pres- ent is planning on applying for a civil service job in the Aliquippa Post Office . . . "Chet" Manasterski . . . like a steel product . . . molded in Ali- quippa . . . came to Geneva . . . where he withstood the wear and tear of being goalie on the soccer varsity . . . and intramural athletics . . . member of Y.M.C.A .... and Historical Society . . . while at the same time he worked at J.8zL .... where the clang and bang of steel bars . . . inspired him to become the director of a Serbian band . . . in the "old home town" . . . Mary Marello . . . member of the famous hikers club . . . win- ner of a "G" . . . member of the French Club . . . Glee Club . . . and Y.W.C.A .... took part in intramural basketball, volleyball, and pingpong . . . tried dorm life for a year . . . then decided life on the hill was greatly preferable . . . would like to hear of a school needing a French teacher . . . "Ren" Martin . . . whose father was President of Geneva some years back . . . and whose college career is marked by outstand- ing accomplishments . . . such as being President of the Y.M.C.A. . . . Editor of the 1935 Genevan . . . Sports Editor of the Cabinet . . . Varsity Basketball Manager for three years . . . Editor of the Freshman handbook in '34 . . . member of the Glee Club . . . Economics Club . . . French Club . . . German Club . . . and inter- collegiate debater in '33 . . . spends his Saturdays helping Pennys turn nickels into dollars. "Ham" Molter . . . participated in intramural basketball . . . mushball . . . volleyball . . . and varsity football . . . in spite of a trick knee . . . acquired in high school athletics . . . a member of the Chemistry Club . . . and the Pre-Medical Society . . . is planning to continue his education at Temple Medical School . . . McSta11Worth McKnight McCready McCarI:er MacPherson Moore Metcalfe Montini CLASS OF '36 JOHN MONTINI, A,B, John Montini . . . whose favorite color is red . . . especially red . . hair . . . an excellent musician . . . played in the Geneva Band for Ahqulppa, Pa. four years . . . and sang in the Glee Club . . . majored in History . . . and became a member of the Historical Club . . . the C.S.U. . . and the Y.M.C.A . . . JACIQ DONALD MOORE, 13.3. Jack Moore . may be seen almost any night . . . serving P h t P sundaes . . . or mixing milkshakes . . . at the Palace of Sweets in 'OC es er' a' Rochester . . . was Class Treasurer in '32 . . . three year member of the Chemistry Club . . . Treasurer in '34 . . . four year mem- ber of the Pre-Meds . . . Vice-President in '34 . . . President in '35 . . . his spare time was taken up with Bill Davies' intramurals . . . and he plans to get his M.D. at Temple Medical School . . . ROBERT M, MET-CALFEJ B.S. "Bob" Metcalfe . . . writer . . . scholar . . . Editor of the Cabinet C 1 . . . intercollegiate debater . . . pre-med . . . Eastvale teacher . . . Denver, 0 - member of the Y.M.C.A. cabinet . . . writers' Club . . . and C.S.U. . . . was born on a cattle ranch . . . and spent twelve years of his life there . . . thinks Denver is the most beautiful city he has ever seen 1. . . and wants to return there to get his medical train- ing at the University of Colorado . . . MARY ELIZABETH MACPI-IERSON,A.B. "Betty" MacPherson . . . a sports enthusiast . . . especially - when it comes to tennis . . . a member of the English Club . . . New Brighton' Pa' the student senate . . . and Secretary of the Spanish Club . . . Assistant Sports Editor for the Cabinet this year , . . and Organ- ization Editor for the 1935 Genevan . . . likes to drive along Seventh Avenue . . . and watch the people . . . was an excellent chauffeur for the Girls' Glee Club . . . KATHRYN JANE MCCARTERJ A-.B. "K" McCarter . . . very blonde . . . usually seen with "Cliff" . . . took part in Miss Beeson's intramural basketball . . . and volley- Beaver Fans, Pa- ball programs . . . thinks that there is no place quite like Lake Erie . . . for a summer vacation . . . would like very much to teach school . . . in Rochester . . . HELEN FRANCES MCCREADYJ A,B, "Fran" McCready . . . hiked to Geneva from Steflin Hill for a year . . . then moved nearer the college . . . and enjoyed C.S.U. Beaver Falls, Pa. . . . Y.W.C.A .... and volleyball . . . was Vice-President of His- torical Society in '36 . . . noticeable for her red hair . . . which helped capture Johnnie's heart . . . likes to spend her summers at Lake Chautauqua . . . and hopes to teach in elementary school . . . HUGH PATTERSON MCKNIGHT, A.B. Hugh McKnight . . . "Pat" to his friends . . . endowed by nature - - with an unconquerable nonchalance . . . and an enviable "gift of Wllklnsburg' Pa' gab" . . . which may appear in any form . . . from a Scotch brogue . . . to a Bowery bark . . . is Treasurer of the Glee Club . . . Vice- President of the Senior Class . . . Assistant Business Manager of the Senior Play . . . member of the Y.M.C.A. Cabinet . . . English Club . . . French Club . . . and Spanish Club . . . PAUL MCSTALLWORTH, A'B. Paul McStallworth . . . likes sports . . . especially tennis and track . . . a member of the Historical Club . . . the Cabinet Staff Monongahela, Pa- . . . and the Y.M.C.A. will graduate with honors . . . interested in graduate work in Psychology . . . plays the banjo . . . likes jazz . . . and wants to be an Educational Director of a C.C.C, Camp... 1. 4 1 ' e 1 ": ' ' e ax Q'L' 4'i?": fw - 5 , , 53. ' - a ' An: - 4. , ' ins'fg5 i KN -r ,Yu 159' gvwm 1 s 1447 ,hfyag rf .by Q-H k ,, F ii' ...N J 4 f 4v-B, m ll' rfb' Oberg Plummer me Vein' ? 4 4 -4 . -vg- - 1 - f:'33'xP' Q , Pitcher Reese Potter Rhodes Robb - A mf .yyl ,KF CLASS OF '36 KARIN CECELIA OBERGJ 13.5, Karin Oberg . . . from Midland . . . took her B.S. in Education . . . so that she could teach school . . . played intramural basket- Midland, Pa. :MARY LoIs PITCHER, B.S. Vanport, Pa. ball and volleyball . , . was a member of the Y.W.C.A. and the "G" Club . . . transferred to Indian State Teachers' College for one year . . . but returned to Geneva for her degree . . . Lois Pitcher . . . who traveled from Vanport . . . to Geneva . . . in spite of floods and snow . . . so that she could major in Pro- fessor TWinem's Education Department . . . and become a teacher . . . was a member of the Glee Club . . . and the Y.W.C.A. . . . played intramural volleyball . . . was on the committees for the Mother's Day Tea in '35 . . . and the W.S.A. Breakfast in '36 . . . LUCILLE MCFARLAND PLUMMER, AB. Lucille Plummer . . . likes Geneva . . . and is liked by Genevans Beaver Falls, Pa. PHILIP J. POTTER, A.B. New Galilee, Pa. GEORGE T. REESE, B.S. East Palestine, Ohio MABEL ERMA RHODES, B.S.. Beaver Falls, Pa. PHILIP M. ROBB, A.B. Walton, N. Y. . . . particularly one . . . enjoyed the Y.W.C.A .... played in- tramural volleyball . . . joined the English Club . . . and Spanish Club . . . was a member of the Glee Club . . . and of the Glee Club Sextette . . . in her last year she was chosen to play Emily Dickinson . . . the lead in the Senior Class Play . . . "Phil" Potter . . . from New Galilee . . . took part in intramural sports . . . and one year of football . . . joined the Y.M.C.A. . . . and enjoyed the fellowship of the Economics Club . . . even if he wasn't able to attend many meetings . . . because of night work as tube inspector . . . at the B 81: VV Tube Mill . . . George Reese . . . who believes that great things come in small packages . . . and that good jokes never grow old . . . was a mem- ber of the Engineering Society for three years . . . and played intramural basketball . . . likes to listen to the radio while study- ing . . . particularly if the program is Ozzie Nelson's Band . . . learned all about china . . . by working a year in a pottery . . and has hinted that he may secure a teaching job in Ohio . . . Mabel Rhodes . . . will be remembered for her splendid voice . . . which gave her a prominent part in the Glee Club . . . through all her college career . . . joined the Historical Society . . . and earned her "G" . . . likes swimming and tennis . . . interested in dramatics . . . and plans to teach . . . "Phil" Robb . . a Pre-Med . . . who changed his mind . . . and joined the French Club . . . was a member of the Glee Club. . . . Y.M.C.A .... Mathematics Club . . . Historical Club . . . German Club . . . Treasurer of the Senior Class . . . and on the Senior Class Play Committee . . . was born in China . . . but the only Chinese that he knows . . . is a well-known passage from the Bible . . which he mumbles at every opportunity . . . gf MI" dig- de gg q aw an '-.,. 5-an-1. g-n--1 -QQ, ,ww ' V 225-F5 ,Q--as H H yy g . 51- ' ,N f Waziii ' , f T553- L . Z FJ, 4 "V" - , Robinson Rose Ross Rosenberger Rudolph Sawyer Scantling CLASS OF '36 J. MORTON ROBINSON, B.S. Wallkill, N. Y. EVELYN JEANNETTE ROSE, B.S. Beaver Falls, Pa. BETSEY Ross, A.B. New Brighton, Pa. RUSSELL SAMUEL ROSENBERGER, B.S. New Brighton, Pa. RHODA IRENE RUDOLPH, A.B. New Brighton, Pa. JOHN NEVIN SAWYER A.B. Darlington, Pa. l THOMAS RICHARDSON SCANTLING, B.S. Monaca, Pa. "Robby" Robinson . . . from Wallkill . . . whose list of worries . . . does not include his studies . . . was President of Chemistry Club . . . member of Mathematics Club . . . a Pre-Med . . . who was active in track . . . soccer ...- and cross country . . . likes to swim . . . skate . . . and spend his summers at Lake Geneva . . . Evelyn Rose . . . another math shark . . . whose recognized ability led to her election as Secretary of the Mathematics Club . . . met "Art" . . . her main interest . . . early in her college career . . . also interested in the Girls' Glee Club . . . of which she was Student Director her senior year . . . Betsey Ross . . . from New Brighton . . . member of Y.W.C.A. . . . and French Club . . . Class Secretary in '36 . . . graduated in Music . . . with a very successful recital . . . prominent in Glee Club as accompanist and piano soloist . . . regular organist in a local church . . . "Russ" Rosenberger . . . was a member of the Historical Society . . . Secretary of the Chemistry Club . . . and driver of a black Chevy automobile . . . which carried him from his home near Unionville . . . to Geneva . . . where he prepared to teach . . . practicing on New Brighton High School Civics and Chemistry classes . . . Rhoda Rudolph . . . spent two years at Grove City . . . and then transfered to Geneva . . . which was Grove City's loss . . . and Geneva's gain . . . a preacher's daughter . . . who set the boys running around in circles . . . until they found out that they were getting nowhere . . . joined the Glee Club . . . and the English Society . . . "Johnny" Sawyer . . . whose chief interests at Geneva were de- bating . . . economics . . . and a blonde . . . whose summers were spent Working in a brick yard . . . or breaking stone . . . who likes to play the piano . . . who wants to be a lawyer . . . and who while at Geneva was President of the Debate Club . . . Mem- ber of the varsity debate team . . . Vice-President of the Eco- nomics Club . . . member of the Writers Club . . . Business Man- ager of the Cabinet . . . active in intramurals . . . member of the Forum Committee . . . and Chairman of the Invitation Commit- tee of the Senior Class. "Tommie" Scantling . . . of the "Skeeter Hill" Scantlings . . . came to Geneva to take up engineering . . . and stayed for four years . . . during which time he was active in the Engineering Society and the Mathematics Club . . . spent his spare time teaching underclassmen the fine art of surveying . . . and showing his devotion to a little lass from Ambridge . . . Schleiter Schuler J. Scott R. Scott Siriani Steele Storey MARY 'ELIZABETH SCHLEITER, Freedom, Pa. JOHN LESTER SCHULER, B.S. Baden, Pa. JEANNE MAE SCOTT, A.B. Beaver Falls, Pa. ROBERT EUGENE SCOTT, A.B. Beaver Falls, Pa. AMELIA LOUISE SIRIANNI, A.B. Ellwood City, Pa. MARTHA JEAN STEELE, A.B. Beaver Falls, Pa. GEORGE GILBERT STOREY, A.B. Scottdale, Pa. CLASS OF '36 A.B. Mary Schleiter . . . spent four years at Geneva . . . quite on the "Luce" . . . talking . . . playing the piano . . . and as a mem- ber of the Glee Club . . . Frill and Dagger . . . Historical Society . . . Y.W.C.A .... Cabinet Staff . . . Senior Class Play Cast . . . and Vice-President of the English Club . . . she returns to Free- dom . . . and to a teaching job in the elementary grades . . . "Johnny" Schuler . . . missed a week of school during the flood . . . because his home contained seven feet of river water . . . his father is Lockrnaster at Lock No. 4 near Baden . . . Was a member of the Engineering Society . . . the football team . . . and the cast of the Senior Class Play . . . interested in Boy Scout work . . . and is the Swimming Director at camp in the sum- mer . . Jeanne Scott . . . of the "chic" Outfits . . . and the successful W.S.A. dinners . . . which she helped put over . . . a member of the spring formal Committee in '34 . . . Chairman of the W.S.A. Christmas Banquet in '36 . . . active in Spanish Club . . . His- torical Society . . . Senior Class play . . . member of cast of Girl's Glee Club play . . . and Secretary-Treasurer of Frill and Dagger . . . after college she will teach history . . . or follow up her in- terest in "Reppie" . . . ' "Bob" Scott . . . with interests ranging from a four year mem- bership in the Glee Club . . . to three years of track . . . and including such varied activities as Tennis . . . Assistant Business Manager of Cabinet . . . Sports Editor of 1935 Genevan . . . mem- ber of cast of Senior Class Play . . . Vice-President of his Class for three years ...I and President the fourth . . . when not busy at school he likes to play his violin . . . or prepare speeches for the Mount Washington Mission . . . Where he conducts services every Sabbath . . . Amelia Sirianni . . . attractive brunette . . . who looks like a Spanish senorita. . . . a member of the Glee Club for three years . . . of the Spanish Club for two years . . . of the French Club . . . and the Y.W.C.A .... made the long trip from Ellwood City every day . . . to prepare herself for a job in the elementary grades . . . Martha Jean Steele . . . with an A.B. in English . . . and mem- bership in Spanish Club . . . English Club . . . Glee Club . . . Frill and Dagger Dramatic Society . . . and the Cabinet Staff . . . was W.S.A. representative in Y.W.C.A .... a friendly girl . . . who spends her spare time knitting . . . or helping Mr. Woolvvorth rake in the nickels and dimes . . . and who hopes to get a teach- ing job in the elementary field . . . George Storey . . , spent three years in the Glee Club . . . two in the Math. Club . . . and one in the C.S.U .... Assistant Editor of the Cabinet . . . Secretary of the Y.M.C.A .... President of the English Club . . . and likes to play the piano . . . received so many "A's" that he ran out of numbers . . . and then to prove that it wasn't a. fluke . . . took a job in the English Department of Duke University , . . with an opportunity to continue his studies in graduate school . . . Je? 5 I .ng,,,lg3 I Y , l , I , V, 245.341 .2 " yu w ,I Yagi, Taggart Vigalix Trbovich C. Wilson Weiner Weiskopf M. Wilson ' r ROSS EDGAR TAGGART, JR., A.B. Pittsburgh, Pa. MICHAEL N. TRBOVICH, A.B. East Pittsburgh, Pa. FRANK ANTHONY VIGALI, B.S. New Castle, Pa. BERNARD B. WEINER, A.B. New Brighton, Pa. THOMAS MANNIX WEISKOPF, A. Massillon, Ohio. CHESTER BROOKS WILSON, A.B. Ellwood City, Pa. MARY ELLEN WILSON, A.B. Beaver, Pa. CLASS OF '36 Ross Taggart . . . with a keen interest in all the arts . . . and Margie . . . clever worker with snapshots . . . and photographic tinting . . . member of the Glee Club . . . Y.M.C.A .... German Club . . . French Club . . . Co-Editor of Freshman Handbook . . . active in English Club . . . Chemistry Club . . . and Senior Class Play . . . delegate of Indianapolis convention in '35 . . . after col- lege . . . on to Princeton . . . to take up archmological research... "Turby" Trbovich . . . rotund and jolly . . . always accused of "putting on a big front" . . . because of his avoirdupois . . . really was noticeable in intramural basketball and softball . . . two years of football . . . Y.M.C.A .... Pre-Medical Society . . . the Y.M.C.A. Minstrel . . . "Last Daze of School" . . . and as a somewhat noisy proctor of North Hall . . . "Vigie" . . . a four-year member of the Pre-Medical Society . . . three years in the Chemistry Club . . . and three years in in- tramurals . . . very interested in sports . . . active in independent basketball in the winter . . . and mushball in the summer . . . likes to go to the movies . . . but usually prepares his lessons first . . . is going to Temple , . . to become a doctor . . . "Bernie" Weiner . . . active in intramural basketball . . . and speedball . . . took part in the oration contest . . . and track . . . spends his Saturdays Working in a butcher Shop . . . a pinochle fan . . . who would like to get a teaching job . . . but may change his mind and go to law school . . . B. "Tommy" Weiskopf . . . Geneva's number one golf man . . . con- ducts classes in the Stadium and on the golf course . . . for those interested in lowering their scores . . . played in intramurals for four years . . . and varsity basketball for one . . . took his A.B. in Economics . . . and got some practical experience in the busi- ness survey conducted by the Economics Club . . . of which he is a member . . . "Chet" Wilson . . . one of the Ellwood commuters . . . spent one year in the band . . . another one in the Y.M.C.A .... and then settled himself as an Economics major . . . took out a member- ship in the Economics Club . . . and became its president in his senior year . . . looking for a teaching job at present . . . but has visions of himself as a real estate and insurance agent . . . Mary Ellen Wilson . . . Spent her summers in school . . . so that she could graduate in three years . . . a history major . . . who Won the Freshman English Prize . . . became President of Y.W.C.A .... and of the German Club . . . a member of the Chem- istry Club . . . and Historical Society . . . is going to continue her studies in graduate school . . . after a summer at Yellowstone . . . ?Lf4EQ7fN5Ji'Aif?:f'i?' EMKZY' GG 1 W in ' . ,.,wm,fMgg,j2S 1,--53 'mf ?Q WQWMWWNVMKM SP F''11'T35!c17b?f.'7ff"K7'f WL, M ,,.3VM,nw ,am-Ni, N, x nn "w.1W+N H1593 A K M1 .Q -1, 5 W A ,,,. is W, iw fqjweFv'2sz.-K f wif . q I WWQA L rs Q., 5 if 542 ' vv 3,3 New ff: if P' MW: ip R x S1 iz,- , Ha' ., H1--1 - f .qaggwvmw 1'-i'A'Zf 'Mi?'E?f'5'? ' '. :Sax fly 5:1352 ggg3,g5gxaf,ig55gf znm .is Ii ,g,:fyzgf -Q5iizz?,3,:!'AL,,hQTg 1 2-gw'siZf w"- -5. A5 -:sa --57,55 4 yi - x ' "Y 2,-1. ..:,1, :WiEiz.El':'Yi 2:2 . vs xx x , ,, . .LV , fu f-ra Q , WY J E5- ' x ,Men :XE lr MK ef? - P ia. ,, Ai, ,J-QV? gifiz - LT: wif: 51221 f?1'f,w'? ,. ,X 1 1 gi, x v f.. .Q ,r 5, X, 4 Ll, TT Egg , ,-gm fynrj 42 3:- 1-23 ag: ' . ,-1'- ,,s15. , ,- I I . 3. wwf . I 2 -1m'??f'w,W ee ' ,Q 1 .. wi fliv umifaa My 311 - yu. W -- I in N, lg .if A MQ? :vw Mm., K, in M 2 ,sw .fn .E az 'sa QQ 55 gif f , .VI K um ' r 'E g 1519-3- . El ' .' ww M 3,54 . . 8 , ' 5 ,JV A ,, F' ,- if 11 . 3 K ,Ag r gg K I ww ' 5 3 M " - Q22 wffmsszi ag sy V' iss '51 2- 2. I ,Q .,,, 2,12 1. r Q QQ :Q . . me w 11,5iffag:p5fz Q 1 If ,ui U, .,I'a'21,f:.,3L. if 525551 Lg j"fi,,-:f Y iff E- ,E :E 'Aff , fiiflf , .M1...vm..,.,p,,q,,- at IJ-- v as CLASS OF '36 John Wylie . . . the chap with the "golden voice" . . . who came from Elizabeth . . . to Geneva . . . where the peace and quiet was at once disrupted . . . by his "haunting" melodies . . . which were usually heard in the Glee Club . . . but sometimes in the Christian Service Union . . . and on rare occasions . . . in in- tramural sports . . . is preparing to enter the Ministry by ma- joring in Bible and History. SAMUEL JOHN WYLIE, A.B. Elizabeth, Pa. Polly Hall . . . who hasn't been seen around school since January . . . and who has been missed by her friends . . . she finished her four year course at that time . . . and has been in extension the second semester . . . while at school she was a member of the Y.W.C.A .... and the Historical Club . . . also took part in intramural volleyball and basketball. POLLY M:AY HALL, B.S. Aliquippa, Pa. GRACE BRADEN, B.S. Enon Valley, Pa. Extension Student NAOMIE MAE GOODBALLET, A.B. East Liverpool, Ohio WANDA HELENA DUBIS, B.S. Aliquippa, Pa. EDITH MARY ELSEY, A.B. Beaver Falls, Pa. I Extension Student LoIs MARGARET FAWCETT, A.B GEORGE MCANULTY, B.S. Freedom, Pa' Coraopolis, Pa. Extension Student FLORENCE M. LAING, B.S. Aliquippa, Pa. HELEN M. CLAYTON, B.S. R,OcheSteI', Pa. GRACE W. LECATES, Extension Student Beaver Falls, Pa, MARGARET ANN BLAKE, A.B. Ravenswood, W. Va. LAURA BELLE BOULDEN, B.S. Butler, Pa. LEOTTA A. CALDWELL, B.S. Aliquippa, Pa. LOUIS JOHN CASSERLY, B.S. Harmony, Pa. MARY HELEN DAVIDSON, B.S. Beaver Falls, Pa. EDITH PARFITT DAVIS, B.S. Aliquippa, Pa. NATALIE M. MANASTERSKI, B.S. Aliquippa, Pa. ELVIRA K. MCDONALD, B.S. Aliquippa, Pa. HELEN H. PHILLIPS B.S. Aliquippa, Pa. I PAULINE MAE SABOL, A.B. New Brighton, Pa. GENEVIEVE M. SCHUGARS, B.S. New Castle, Pa. THOMAS P. SMATHERS, B.S. New Castle, Pa. JUNIOR OFFICERS President Vice-President HERMAN RONEY REBECCA LEE Treasurer Secretary FAUST D'AGOSTINO BESSIE BURROWS ,-..,,,. I gg A-31 I Q 2 Ni 1 F. ,L ' ggi " 'H H uv gg -,gigs-ji "FQ , 5 'iw lik-' , SNAPS J . uvx XL ,- ff 'f 'E' ., f 1 w ' 'rl Y r 1 f 1 mv A H - ' Q , ,1 . -f'-" . l. Q, Y ' if .J "' - 1 A I F . "e -I Q' ' f , uri gl-' J' il V . :fl if f ,.. -'4gg-,eEu- ' 4971 - ,H EH ' " ww.:- f lu, iw 14 " f .,.."1 A .X "fl, STH", Y' w . -L.:-. haw 1, . 3 4 ,N -ff' V ,. if 'fl -Q, 1 ,141 5 .5 x ' fg. " A Faux ,l ,. ' an in I, ., I ' . .-I V V it - i ,S-" H: 'EMR' "Wie .l f 1- -. gif: A., an i f5iTsv"v,g, , ,M 1 P ' ., iii . 'A .. ,Q'f1 L-.l l P, M MffrT'5 gf 5 , ,f ,, ' 5, fm .V fifffgg . - QL- , 5 'E , -' A 1 , -.. A. ... 2- 'f A , 'f...522V1 xi " , 1 ' 1 I, I 'Q-ff-, - '4KCQi5:'f.i1fe" '---lu ,-sf., 1 J. 'ERI Z 1 : .-.' I ' - 1 A if he 4 if , J ,' -g 1 sm . as I X Q55 jr. l . M. . ,if . mf A Q. ef -v "" 5,5 . , -I , .pl .ls - - A , ag " 5 F M M .mn Huw, ui 'wg Mlllull X M v 2 l Q Q 5952 Q 1 Is' 5. B fe, 7 Q- V , si if if 5 , U r' u 1' .1 , f Inf E 5, 1 fi ii W, , f Pk Belle Adams Aliquippa, Pa. James Bickett New Castle, Pa. Martha Brierly Beaver Falls, Pa. Bessie Burrows Ellwood City, Pa. Jean Carnahan Utica, Pa. Anthony Conte Rochester, Pa. Nicholas De Piero New Castle, Pa. Robert Duey New Brighton, Pa. Martha Edwards Rochester, Pa. CLASS Glen Anderson Beaver, Pa. Sara Bingham Wampum, Pa. Sara Brock Beaver Falls, Pa. Ferndetta Caldwell Beaver Falls, Pa. Ella Jean Clark Monaca, Pa, Louise Cooper Ben Avon, Pa. Esther Dinsmore Monaca, Pa. William Duff Darlington, Pa. George Baker Wampum, Pa. Pauline Boots Ellwood City, Pa. Lawrence Brown New Brighton, Pa. Nicholas Calvanese New Castle, Pa. Sara Cochran Aliquippa, Pa. Faust D'Agostino Beaver Falls, Pa. Arthur Dubbs New Galilee, Pa. Robert Eberle New Brighton, Pa. OF '37 Beulah ,ffl Q ai if A 'iii Q., in ' X 1 - ' , ll., Mae Ewing Dorothy Elsey Howard Elliott ' H it .-,.' . V Je Beaver, Pa. Beaver Falls, Pa. Pittsburgh, Pa. A ' ":-"1" J " A f-V' A, o dj,':, are A John Forsythe Mary Fontanella Jesse Feick K A Beaver, Pa. Wampum, Pa. Finleyville, Pa. " ,H ,V ' .., . ,,.,. l ie vii ' Elizabeth Gilmore Mary Gilchrist Robert Frazer if ' o -if , Beaver Falls, Pa. Beaver Falls, Pa. Portland, Oregon "'l ' 'A ' P 4 " ' ,, "9 , ei, 'i5frllQ'E79' if fl. X Y , J 'N , - 2 .J 'I-My -V ' midi William Greenawalt Dorothy Grant Eugene Goll ,V Afifl . ,ffl 'Q - Manor, Pa. New Brighton, Pa. Beaver, Pa. A 9 , t i ff-A 1 ,:. . 1 it fi ,,i.f . , V. it a-o in i? ' for , Evelyn Hilberg John Hempstead Martha Greer LLL' ' New Brighton, Pa. Beaver Falls, Pa. Philadelphia, Pa. ,,,,,, ,, :--:-: ii J Edna King Clifford I-Iutzley Elmer Hum "1" ELQ YJ' l'fi2iL " 'N X, ily-c" i H" Beaver Falls, Pa. New Brighton, Pa. New Brighton, Pa. 'f i -1, :Q ':. I A ' . ' 4 - e.: 1 YXTHQQ, if 53" X. -. 1- Y ., e ' .i ,A Robert Kramer V Wanda Kowaleska Eleanor Kornman 5 Lai, , A X e Bridgewater, Pe. Ambridge, Pe. New Brighton, Pa. 'A ' 'f H' . Tl" " . -' Sill? l' GPN..- z v- -- 'fa xl Rebecca Lee Katherine Lauderbaugh Elizabeth Laird f ,WL li i , , Beaver Falls, Pa.. Ellwood City, Pa. Beaver Falls, Pa. ' Paul L' iscomb Bea ' xer Falls. Pa.. V :Q-rig? ' X i . - i -: wail iz' - s w 'i Y Af il .nge Ein ' '-K ei , r ,ac A " l 55. H m .,,.,,,..u lu lu m m ww u uw new -H H1 .--,,-,J - 1.-5 :E: E:- . ,. f?'T:- is fig 1 .1 if Ll 'X W 122'-5 ' -Y .QU '. . 75225 JI- 47 I .. 2 -1 .1 ., 5 -a."'.". ' .." i"'h-Y 1 ..... . ... " S, .-1: J -fl- A - 'S Ag I r ill ll 1 K 1 ml I --- I,.-.:.:.:u:.. - -- ,A I w E, 1 -.J . 'X T' ii! ' , ,.,. . ix It 1 J J in -- fl W w ' mn ' ' - . uw 3 if ,, .fl " ,-, P.. 'Hoff Bs fl 1. -: ,f , 3 3 :-' 1' FEA, .pr L J.. if 1' e is 74" ,' -r V: .- 'r B' "1 .Ma .. .. H. H, .H 1 w H w . zZ,f5Zi --milfs ... Q' i- -- wwe - Q' y I lv l , F N r J!! 1 H 2? . "-.-, L nqilaxl M V N sl ' .V is-:Ya l' Gp 1 f' ,Y n x ,i Q1 .NAL V IVA -.ln ,ffjflirv 5 .-.,,.,, EW F' 1. jr., 1 D 1 V 1 1 ttf- Y i " .. xllu .:3,:i5,g-5-f-4 . 2 -5, --'-- 'LJ -C. -'Z . . ,..e'i1" ' E23 .,. E,E A F, E . A .- f 4,35 7.51 ,lx may -, 2- 1 gn :L i ,r , - U 7 5 ' .:.: V, ,F-R K - ..,.. . nf! it 3- ,X 5235 1'- 'gr ,lf ' . s-1-if .. - 1 , f . "aff ne. .ri B . J 'fi . -P , 5' 1,- ,gx V . . A HN 1 2 ,X . . , i WJ: - .r , , J. - K.. a. . -.fx 4- ee J fy-fnegf A9 Mary Longfellow Midland, Pa. Sara Belle MoCaslin Ellwood City, Pa. Ellen McFeeters Asiut, Egypt Robert Mehaiey Valencia, Pa. Jean Moore Rochester, Pa. Ethel Park Syracuse, N. Y. George Penebaker East Liverpool, Ohio Donald Powell H' ,PTQF Monaca, Pa. I ' 'll Q-. l " Q 'xl If .. A247 " ' 4, ...H E gy xi l' -. - f Q X . . . I it gl-2 5-f...,9t, . ffm H . ' Y ' L ., W. W .. .. . 5- F N 1.-. H52- 3 xg .J .- .ff . . 7:33 . 1' li '-. - 'Y'-. .' - '1---A ,--' Q , ... " 5 ' tggfgft if,Ttf7 1 ' ' , - :": 1 Hit- . ' .Y e" .-: .... Ea2?5'p5-Q V EL , 1.7-V V 511- J: '-'1 ,1.gJ.-:.... .F il 1 as if 1"-.... -1 -. ww 5r,lll'ilf."""'532g.,! .. A f: " 'M' W - --ee iv if "H F ifi :' -"F .25 v 'i "Mi .3721 if 1, ..t1. .-'..f f R its tl ,, u. - P 1 . 1 1 I .731 . CLASS Charles McBurney McDonald, Pa. Robert McChesney New Galilee, Pa. Henrietta Mackay Coraopolis, Pa. Fred Milanovich Aliquippa, Pa. Earle Myers New Brighton, Pa. Elmer Parks Beaver Falls, Pa. Mike Poiarkoff West Aliquippa, Pa. Elizabeth Pritchard Washington, Pa. Milton MoBurney Denver, Colorado Robert McConaughy Pittsburgh, Pa. Donald Martin Beaver Falls, Pa. Glen Moltrup Beaver Falls, Pa. Gottlieb Myers New Brighton, Pa. Robert Patton New Brighton, Pa. Mildred Polovina West Aliquippa, Pa Mary Radakovioh Ambridge, Pa. OF '37 Jeanne Reilley Ellwood City, Pa. Herman Roney Beaver Falls, Pa. Ray Reeder Beaver Falls, Pa. Harold Rimby Beaver Falls, Pa. Anna Reed Beaver Falls, Pa. Marion Richards Glenfield, Pa. l il sri if J WV, Til VA il. E2- ' 1 9 Wigs -. 9' X K ! 1 1 Ar' .' WS' 5 . -4 rr 1 'ft ' V i ms, itll' J wt ll ' Q: 1 M573 , lf H it Faith Samson Raymond Sams William Roush ' Morning Sun, Iowa New Brighton, Pa. New Brighton, Pa. ' 1 , 5 Vx ,l ,- , ,l W xl 2, , ff? ' , ' l gg A ll , - , -1: lj George Shugert Mary Louise Schnubel John Sautter al I ' Rochester, Pa. Beaver Falls, Pa. Valencia, Pa. Will? --.- A l Ji, ,J H sf, l Eugene Steiner Jack Smith Helen Shumyla. "ffl ie' fl L ' Monaca, Pa. Beaver Falls, Pa. Ambridge, Pa. 1 , ' il - ' A SKK ' E'-1 ' - ' Alice Wilson Willard Webster Martha strong ,B 9, K .. Wampum, Pa. Beaver Falls, Pa. Elizabeth, Pa. a 'E "f 12, ,. J Kathryn Wright Grace Wlnterburn Bruce Wilson - ' 3 Beaver Falls, Pa. Beaver Falls, Pa. Canonsburg, Pa. f H 4 -,SEM ' ,S Lulu Zimmerman John Yanko ' New Brighton, Pa. Ellwood City, Pa. "X i Evelyn Amberson, Edinburgh, Pa., David Craig, Bellevue, Pa., Don Hamer, Beaver Falls, Pa., Mrs. Mary Hawkins, Beaver Falls, Pa., Paul Huston, East Liverpool, Ohio 5 Mary Kane, Darlington, Pa., Harold Webb, Darlington, Pa. 'li ' 'l J' rc K Y E l Sf . t 1 l as I V ll' lil, l " , , ,gf 1- it l 'f X 1 l -ll fl 1 ..,. R, 0 , N . .r . -tl ,si x, I, u ' W1 f 4 l n P V J LI N 1 1 fx .v i 1 , I , ,. H -, ,n -1 l 1 1 J -If i H lf- gl , 4 ri. is fr President, Edwin Carson Vice-President, Edson Rodgers Dorothy Balentine Robert Balph Alma Banks Virginia Barber Ida Beatty John Belichick Winifred Bliss Harriette Bogman Anna Boyde Sara Brock Anne Bryan Ellen Byers Edwin Carson Samuel Chambers Winifred Coleman George Deep Chester Delon Charles Denko Rosamond Elsey John Fatula Jean Gardner Dale Gilmore Andy Golubic Paul Graham Meyrick Green Joseph Gustovich Glen Haswell Dorothy Hawthorne Irene Hedish Ellsworth Henderson ' Norman Hetzler Lyla Howe Thomas Hurley Daniel Jackson Lucille Jackson William Jacober Marvin Jones Thelma Jones Burton Kennedy Herman Keppen Lewis King Mary Jo Klanick George Komara Jennie Ksiazek Naomi Kuhl Judd Lamson A l X w". x . L Secretary, Sallie McCready T1'easu1'e1', Paul Graham Anthony Larnish Norman Lewis Christ Lobinger J Dorothea Lurting Sallie McCready Donald McCune Roland McDonald Robert McFa1l Clark McKee John Maratta Lawrence Marovich Arthur Mayer William Milliron John Naugle Blanche Orpelli Jean Orr John Overholt Bertha Pohley William Powell John Read Grace Richards Edson Rodgers William Ronan Wylie Rutherford Mary Margaret Sandt Lovella Scott John Shugert Ilse Sonneborn Mildred Spratley Jean Springer John Stevens Thomas Svilkovich John Swartz John Swetka Myrta Jean Todd Sara Jane Van Ryn Charles Wagner Ruth Walton Grace Willson Zelda Wilner Donald Wilson John Wilson Roy Wilson Stanley Wilson Jean Work Stanley Zaremba ly, .V N P1 esident, Robert Morrow Vfice-President, Paul Smith Jane Ashman Ethel Baird Mary 'Baker Genevieve Barron Dorothy Bauer Jack Beeson Virginia Bell Robert Blevins Scott Bliss William Bounds Jack Boyle Anna Butz Andrew Campbell James Carnelly Victor Carosiello Merritt Carson Jane Causer Blanche Cook William Cool Mary Lou Crago Eugene Crippa Eleanor Cupp Virginia Damaska Frances Daquila Thomas Davidson John Davis Elizabeth Dice Saul Dizenfeld Frank Donatelli Frederick Dunlap Madeline Eberle James Elliott Jane Elliott Peggy Emler Marguerite Engle Ray Eugott Arlene Fleming Helen Fullerton Frank Fulton Edward Gallagher Gilbert Gallagher Yondall Goodnight Estelle Gordan Clarence Graham Robert Grant Sidney Grossman Homer Haarbauer John Habrle Paul Hazelwood Nora Highberger Harry Hobaugh Elizabeth Hood John Hough Marjorie Hufman Mary Alice Hunter Della Ingles Kenneth Irons Lisabeth Irwin Helen Kennedy Mary Kerr Mildred Kerr Irene Kirchner Donald Kratzert Michael Kravirt Kenneth Kuiken Charles Laing Kathryn Lathom William Leivo Dorothy Levin Grace Lewis Robert Liebendorfer Byron Luce Secretary, Maxine Rhodes Tre0Lsm'e7', Jane Stevenson Howard Ludwig Carl Lutz Harvey McC1ung Evelyn McGowan Rose Magyar Marie Manning Bernard Margileth Goldie Marshall Melville Martin Marie Milanovich Duane Mitchell Jean Molter Biviana Monaco James Moore Lee Morrow Robert Morrow Donald Mosholder John Moyer William Murphy James Musgrave Virginia Napoli Florence Norris James Orbendorfer John Olsen Thomas Palmquist Merl Perry Virginia Poiarkoff Sophia Polovina Mary Poydock Helen Prunkard Andrew Rabel Clarence Rarick Agnes Reedick Frank Reese Harry Reid Maxine Rhodes Francis Richards Raymond Reiser Dominic Roselli Robert Royal Ellen Sayre Gerson Schaffel Alfred Schmohl Sara Belle Scott Robert Self Ruthalene Schaffer Eleanor Smith Paul Smith Benjamin Soodik Bessie Southard Jack Spangler Roznaine Spengler Michael Stasko Marion Steele William Stein William Sterret Jane Stevenson Olen Stevenson Robert Stockton Charles Turek Jean Turnbull Henrietta Ulatoski John Wahl Alvin Walker EDWIN WEBER Charlotte Weinberger Anne Wilner Raymond Wilson Eleanor Wolfe Ruth Wylie Carl Zerke in Memoriam ALLEN WEBSTER WHITE Allen Webster White, born in Erie, Pennsylvania, on September 23, 1917, was killed with his parents in an automobile accident on December 20, 1935. While a newcomer to the Beaver Valley, having moved here in the summer of 1934, many students were well ac- quainted with his pleasant, genial character, and his never failing good humor. Allan's interests were varied, including aeroplanes, automobiles, music, and radios, but judging from his mannerisms, character, and studies, he would doubtless have followed in his father's footsteps in the ministry. Genevans can truthfully repeat Halleck's lines: - None knew thee but to love thee, Nor named thee but to praise." ' T91 ,..--- .. - . fgwkfsw H .. 1,.,ffasy,,, ,Z gf .,3E.,.,.m- . - , -::g3g9,,g,1 11 H ,V , vw :Msn 1,1 ,, H ,, W .H W: U, A- v, ir H , fl' my Y Vg I damwu Pgfziir ,1 miggg Egpigqmw512421222 H ww 1, jx qw' fi, A f '55 ' f" 12 , ,zz Y ' A' ' ' Ev, 1--L ,2i1'fS1- ai , 1 F- , " - - in ,X ,, . ' Y-.yr ' ' 1 . H "-- --fiwfi . 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A v H, ' f 'X 3 -5 ' 'Z - f ' ,A , . -' W, - , ' - . ,- W bf 4. 2+ W L ... M 7 '-, .-V." ' ,. - V - W f ' W 4 4 . N . . ,. . S - ' - H V . , .- 0, rw , H -W - 4 , ' N . .' x " E W W X gp ' ' ' . " ' 5, 'P 1 ,gf W., .V W 7 ,E if ,,33,:,1,.1-5 : ,a .fi-if ,,.I X ,,, Y- u. Vw' A -A W," ------ - , - . - 1, N ww V ,W 'M '- ' ' W' "ik ' 'L ' , M' Q K ,Mix 1 "' " "' 'M,fs52f"" WW' w , " ' " S 'if H' W X ' , gfvy x , , V. 1251"-W? W we 1 f ' 'LVM 1 . YE- 3753" - ,N ' Q 2 ' W 1 'T S' ' --x 'L'-J 5.11 'x"' any - ,, , M . . .Q , M V ' F ls ' N. ' Y ' K 47 5 'Y' 7' Q 'x 41 -5.5 . 1 Q . ' . " E- -" ,V V - .. , - - 1-4 2 2' - ff f ,f ... f H ' Q ' aim, ' " . f 2 " , ,. ' ' sNf,p,,.' , ,f ' H N F K M Q1 ,A was .gg A mx 7-,I 49 m N +59 R ,, NJN-, Wyf., -.. W H A- 1 W W ' ""f 5+ , " JL H" ws+fsW?5? lf' " ,ww , W ,, ff :3 Liz: 1 ww v ' 'f -3- E- 5::1' 1 ' ' "5 5-Lf' H 1' EV' N' 1 W ii -' N , fb wifi mg: 'H-, ra 'Vu 3 ' W , --:mm:lp1c,, -'f-. , ,Affinia g,- M N m- W dw' 'M--' ,X . tr Qs? W Q ' we M ' N 4, W nf 46 w ww 1: -Vw, W wx "K, 'ALMA , 11 , 4 x ,, - .X ,X 'Hn A 1 I ' ' V-if-f .Qi ' if , , , , , , ' ,. ., 'Jiw v- ' . R - ' Q ' - . P ' A Q' I' , J ' " J nl if '42 is 4 M W Dovvr Rosnnu CAPTAIN Dick Jorras MARVIN Jomcs Quai ter Fullbaclc Tackle Football Season of 1935 The 1935 football season has been a success which was not thought possible by even the most enthusiastic rooter at the beginning of the year. The mythical Class B football championship of the Tri-State district was brought back to college hill. At the same time Coach "Dyke" Beede completely silenced those critics who were skeptical of his coaching ability. The problem this season was to build a team from material which last year had Won only two victories while tying two and losing five. The success which Coach Beede has had in doing this is evidenced in the scores for the year. One defeat was more than offset by the eight victories. The outstanding feature of this year's Golden Tornado was the deadliness of its passing attack. Led by the sharpshooting Dom Roselli, the Geneva eleven won game after game through the aerial route. Not a contest passed but what long gains I me were made by accurate forward pass- ing. The most notable example of this was in the Franklin and Marshall game when, heavily outweighed, Geneva re- sorted to the air to gain over 250 yards by that method alone. This great pass- ing attack would have been useless, however, if it had not been strengthened by a powerful and deceptive ground game. Such backs as Joe Trn, high scor- ing Captain Dick Jones, Chet Delon, Andy Golubic, Nick Garda, and Bruce Wilson were always dangerous. The Golden Tornado sweeps into action l 151, H, v wx, MW M sz . Z , VINCENT RANEY ANDY GOLUBIC JOE HLISTA JESSE FEICK, Co-Captain Elect Guard Fullback Guard End Geneva 6-Indiana 0 A new team . . . started a new season . . . with an old handicap . . . and made a new record . . . The old story . . . of last year's team . . . plus this year's improvements . . . making this year's goals . . . next year's goal . . . Indiana . . . with last year's record . . . unbeaten and un- tied . . . made a thing of the past . . . as Bruce crossed the line . . . to put over a 6-0 victory . . . for the Gold and White . . . Filled with the stuE that it takes to get along . . . our boys outplayed . . . outfought . . . and outpointed the Teachers . . . and taught them something . . . about foot- ball. Geneva 33-Slippery Rock 0 The Slippery "Rocket" . . . missed fire . . . in spite of the warm hopes . . . of home-coming alumni . . . as Geneva took to the air . . . with a few rockets of its own . . . lit by Dom Roselli . . . and shot to Wilson . . . or Jones . . . or Lobinger . . . to roll up a score of 35-0 . . . on the right side of the record . . . Komara . . . was the wet blanket . , . who iizzled the rockets . . . when they attacked from above . . . our line . . . smothered everything on the ground . . . Geneva capitalized in star- gazing . . . to break up a threatening shower of passes . . . and give the Gold and White its second victory . . . which kept the record clean . . . and gave the boys renewed confidence . . . that their "star" was on the rise . . . and that they were destined to "go places" in the re- maining games. They seem to be up in the air about something Y A , . , Y x nz ' in gg 1 , 'Y ' lic? ,. 1 we VV1LLARD WEBSTER ALVIN Pnauzzr JOHN BEGOLLY Trainer Student Manager E-nd Geneva 39-Bethany 7 Geneva Vs. Bethany . . . Friday night . . . and the better team Won to the tune of 39-7 . . . First quarter was nobody's game . . . Rosselli was the nobody . . . who made the game Geneva's . . . by passing the pig- skin . . . to the right pace . . . at the right time . . . Delon was the no- body . . . who caught the pigskin . . . in the right place . . . at the right time . . . Then the moon came out in time . . . to watch four more touch- downs for us . . . and one for them . . . before the final whistle blew . . . and the people down town heard the news . . . that Geneva had come through . . . for the third time . . . when the bell of Old Main . . . clanged out the Vi ctory. Geneva 12-Franklin Sz Marshall 19 Geneva vs. Franklin Sz Marshall . . . The Golden Tornado against the Diplomats . . . and the Diplomats Won . . . but not by diplomacy . . . A courageous Geneva eleven went down 'righting . . . in the greatest game Yea Gold! ! I Yea Wh-ite! ! ! ever seen on the F Sz M gridiron . . . A bewildering attack of daring football . . . dazzled . . . and dazed . . . a huskier and heavier F Sz M team . . . who recovered . . , in time to save it's wavering repu- tation . . . by a single . . . heartbreaking . . . touchdown . . . which gave Geneva its only taste of defeat . . . as bitter- sweet . . . as greatly deserved victory . . . perhaps they will have better luck next year. ' JW11' l 1 ' - .111 , e 1 111 1 11 111W ,J 11 1 ez - 4 - .1 ,- , f , 1' 11 ' , 1 L ,1 11 , , 1 W .,1 ,11g, 1 . . N111 W. 1 DWIGHT Bmznn BRUCE WILSON, Co-Captain Elect JOHN SWETKA Coach, Halfback Geneva 26-West Virginia Wesleyan 8 Everybody came home for Homecoming Day . . . including the well- known and much-prized bacon . . . won on the ield of battle . . . by a victorious Geneva team . . . The Wesleyans had made themselves on favorites . . . by previously holding West Virginia University . odds- . . to a scoreless tie . . . The Golden Tornado didn't seem to have heard . . . that they were underdogs . . . for the second straight week . . . They ended the game with a three touchdown lead . . . garnered as a result of a bewildering mixture . . . of long passes . . . and short plunges . . . plus a timely interception by Captain Dick Jones . . . and protected by a bril- liant line . . . which might bulge . . . and bend . . . but never break. Geneva 7-Washington Sz Jeierson 6 The most glorious victory of the year . . . when the Golden Tornado took the Little Presidents into camp . . . in spite of the loss of Rosselli, Lobinger, and Trn . . . due to freshmen regulations . . . The upper men upheld the record of this year's team . . . by pulling an iron man stunt . . . and playing the entire game with but two substitutes . . . Main features: the touchdown pass . . . Garda to Feick . . . "Osh" Jones' successful kick for extra point . . . the defensive brilliance of Wilson and Komara . . . the rugged Geneva line saving the day . . . holding on their own six . . . for four consecutive downs. class- Hold them!!! Geneva,.'!! JOHN SCHULER Jon TRN Guard Halfback GEORGE KQMARA Center ED GARDA Quarter Geneva 27-Waynesburg 0 A championship game . . . to decide who was "the top" in Class B football . . . saw a determined swarm of Yellow Jackets blown off the field . . . by a resistless Golden Tornado still stinging from last year's defeat . . . The Jackets buzzed up and down the field . . . only to be re- fused the honey which lies behind the goal . . . when the Gold and White line held for four straight times . . . on their own one foot mark . . . Then they opened holes for the backs to slip through . . . and protected Rosselli when passes were thrown . . . until the score of 27-0 brought the championship back to Geneva . . . Where it belongs. Geneva 25-Westminster 0 The roughest game of the season . . . as the Blue and White stopped the Gold and White . . . in a scoreless first quarter . . . A desperate defense . . . by the Titan line 1 r -r -Y --fseufglgg, ' ' i 1 , w geggcg. ' ' H , 1, N f Q, egg-we N, it N "' 5' Mn ."' W. Hi -H' H -H, ' H H - ,. . lm ,um H' W 'H 'H W- fe f H H' mm- - ee -. , P 'ff ' wi gwg l Get Mm, Jesse!!! . . withstood Geneva's attack . . . until superior power pushed Golubic over for six points . . . and three minutes later . . . shook him loose through center . . . for thirty yards . . . and six more points . . . The second half saw the release of Geneva's deadly passing attack . . . when tosses from Rosselli . . . to Feick and Lobinger . . . ended the scoring at 25-0 . . . and clinched the Class B champion- ship . . . The last home appearances of Captain "Osh" Jones . . . Johnny Beg- olly . . . Joe Hlista . . . and Ed Garda . . . Their value will not be fully appre- ciated . . . until next year's team swings into action. J on GUSTOVICH CHRIS LOEINQER CHESTER DELQN Tackle End Halfback GENEVA 19-Newberry 0 A post-season game . . . at Youngstown, Ohio . . . for the beneit of tubercular children . . . But charity begins at home . . . so the Golden' Tornado gave their school a victory . . . The South Carolina boys were befuddled . . . by ankle-deep mud . . . and Geneva's aerial circus . . . featuring an all-star cast of eleven men . . . which passed . . . and punted . . . with the greatest of ease . . . in spite of a wet ball . . . and treacher- ous footing . . . Passes from Rosselli . . . ended in laterals . . . to any- body and everybody . . . wearing a gold jersey . . . as linemen became halfbacks . . . and halfbacks ran wild . . . to end the season with all the glory deserved by a smart team . . . and a clever coach. A The prospects for next year's team are unusually good. Coach Beede loses only five seniors: Captain Dick Jones, John Begolly, Nick Garda, J oe Hlista, and John Schuler. While these players will undoubtedly be missed, he has experienced reserves ready to step into their positions. Co-captains Bruce Wilson and Jesse Feick will lead virtually the same ' c ' team which this year became featured -. . - throughout the Tri-State District for its ini- e e A superb passing attack and deceptive ground plays. Coach Beede will probably be Well satisfied with the varsity ma- terial. His main problem will be to build up suflicient reserve strength to back up the power carried by his iirst string men. However, if the same spirit of coopera- tion and loyalty is carried from 1935 to 1936, the Golden Tornado should be set for another championship season. Into the Zine. A touchdown!!! 1 -ff' 5 GORDON BENN Coach of Basketball and Track Coach . . . Teacher . . . Athlete Gordon Benn . . . coach . . . teacher . . . athlete . . . Graduated from Mary- ville College in Tennessee . . . never had the thrill of wearing a cap and gown . . . because he got his diploma in absentia . . . while he was at Chautauqua . . . busy being Director of Land Sports . . . which he says sounds a lot better . . . than it really is . . . Started out to take up Business Administration . . . at University of Iowa . . . but reverted to the call of sports . . . which childhood associations with Ohio State athletes . . . had instilled . . . Changed his major . . . and had to hustle to get his degree in Physical Education . . . in two years and six weeks of summer school . . . The boys' favorite indoor sport . . . in Mary- ville College . . . was throwing bottles . . . at any unfortunate who dared invade their floor . . . and raiding the movies in town . . . before big games . . . They stole food . . . at the annual banquet . . . and had pajama parades . . . They called a school holiday . . . three times per annum . . . to go hiking in the Smokey Mountains . . . In between times he taught in Florida . . . coached the high school team . . . managed the land sports at Chautauqua . . . and Worked on a farm in Iowa . . . filling silos . . . His hobby is playing the organ . . . and knowing people . . . He is interested in Mental Hygiene . . . Likes the people up here . . . Thinks they're more sincere than down South . . . We're glad . . . because we like him, too. Penny" takes one off the bawlcboard et 'J L. T' A? Ni 7 Wi as CLIFF HUTZLP Y CHARLLS DELON DICK J ONFS RENT MARTIN MIKE STASKO Center F01 wav d Forwan d Manager F01 wan cl Basketball The 1935 36 basketball season was launched under the tutelage of a new coach, Gordon Benn, former athlete of the University of Iowa With six ex perlenced performers and three newcomers, the Benn court edition recorded victories in thirteen of its twenty six games Although no captain was elected, Cliff Beitsch was used in that capacity In most of the games The Covenanter campaign began with five independent games, in three of which the Genevans were victorious. The brand of ball played in the independent games was not uniform, being at times satisfying and at other times not so satisfying. Throughout the season this proved to be a characteristic of the team. Fol- lowing this Warm-up session of independent games, the team went on an Eastern tour on which the Genevans turned in victories over St. Thomas and C.C.N.Y., and dropped decisions to John Marshall and Long Island University. Returning to tri-state basketball circles, the Covenanters lost to Westminster and Carnegie Tech, then triumphed over Bethany and Wash-Jeff. Prior to its second Eastern trip, the Geneva quintet were forced to acknowledge Duquesne supremacy when they succumbed by a 40-23 score. On the second Eastern tour, Geneva yielded to Rider College and George Washington University before triumphing over Catholic U. Geneva then returned to sweep four victories from Thiel, Carnegie Tech, Bethany, and Waynesburg. In the next three encounters Duquesne, Waynesburg, and Westminster proved too strong for the Covenanter aggregation. The closing cage matches were with Allegheny and Slippery Rock, both of which proved easy victories for Geneva. The line-up remained prac- tically the same throughout the season. Captain-elect Pennebaker, an excellent shot and all-around player and Emrick, a dependable performer who was forced to the sidelines because of ill-health, served as forwards. Dick Jones later replaced Emrick at forward and proved himself an asset to the team. The center berth was shared by Beitsch and Hutzley, both of whom recorded some fine work. In the back court Milanovich, a good offensive pivot man, was paired with Hurley, a fine long-shot and ball-handler. Stasko, Delon, and Moyer, were used in relief roles. Six of these performers will return next year, which bids fair promise to successful campaigns in the future. if I ,,,f ,x N., I f . I A! .xx Eff?-XQI-f - - , . -gg-yr., -Y ,,.- - ., ,.x.- 1fm:,, 1: ,I "II . f Q. 5 . I " I "II : I ' P I cu X.-3' I C. A I T' Fi l I Maui I 1 I ' I V I 5 'I -hir 471 x ...s D MILANOVICH ToM HURLEX' ' CLIFF BEITSCH FAUST DIAGOSTINO JOHN MOYER GEORGE PENNL-:BAKER CAPTAIN ELECT Guavd Guard Center Ass't. Manager Guard Fmwand can 4 " 4 ff' ', F-X I. . I 213113, II. I ,Xi , 1,,. x eg-L. ,Va ' ' I E 3 'filly 51 . y I Basketball Season of 1935-36 Geneva .. 30 Geneva .. 19 Geneva .. 41 Geneva .. 59 Geneva .. 32 Geneva .. 36 Geneva .. 32 Geneva .. 17 Geneva .. 17 Geneva .. 16 Geneva .. 25 Geneva .. 46 Geneva .. 41 F--Penebaker G-Hurley . . G-Milanovich C-I-Iutzley . C-Beitsch . F-Ernerick F-Jones . . . F'-Stasko . . G-Moyer . . Wilmerding Y .... Akron Goodyear .... Y. M. H. A. .... . Shelby Tube ........ Ambridge Collegians St. Thomas ......... C. C. N. Y. .... . John Marshall .... Long Island Univ. .. Westminster .... Carnegie Tech .... Bethany ...... Wash-Jeff . . 35 43 38 18 44 35 28 28 44 35 28 21 25 INDIVIDUAL SCORING Geneva Duquesne Univ. 40 Geneva Rider College ......... 34 Geneva George Washington U. . 44 Geneva Catholic Univ. ......... 28 Geneva Thiel .........., 34 Geneva Carnegie Tech .... 32 Geneva Bethany ....... 40 Geneva Waynesburg 35 Geneva Duquesne Univ. .. 42 Geneva Waynesburg . 32 Geneva Westminster . 35 Geneva Allegheny .... 20 Geneva Slippery Rock . . . . . . 26 Games Goals Fouls Totals 26 34 194 24 38 166 22 29 117 26 19 113 26 22 72 16 21 59 24 6 48 21 6 30 19 7 25 D, .QI l ' QS 1 ' The 1936 track team. TFBCIC With the track strength for the season greatly weakened by graduation, the outlook for a successful 1935 campaign was far from encouraging. Mike Dunn, of Ellwood City, one of the three lettermen remaining under the tutelage of Coach Robert Park, was elected to the captaincy. The track squad under Coach Robert Park launched its 1935 season at Buchannon by clipping the claws of the Bobcats of West Virginia Wesleyan in a 79-61 victory. Dunn set a fine example for his mates by winning both the low and high hurdle events. "Red" Patton also recorded some excellent Work by winning the 100-yard dash and by his splendid effort on the winning relay team. In the second meet, the Yellow Jackets of Waynesburg carried too much sting for the Genevans, forcing them to bow to a heart-breaking verdict of 68 to 67. Prior to this set-back, Geneva had not lost a dual meet over a period of twelve years. The meet With Carnegie Tech proved to be disastrous. The Skiboes showed no mercy when they con- structed a 93-42 success over the Geneva trackmen. Rutherford placed first in both the one and two-mile events, while Patton raced to victory in the 120 yard low hurdles and placed third in both the 100 yard and 220 yard dashes. Rally- ing from the defeat by Tech, the Genevans came back to show great form in scoring an 81 to 59 triumph over the Slippery Rock Teachers. The current 1935 season under the new coach, Gordon Benn, assumes a more promising outlook than did the 1935 season. Seven veteran performers plus several newcomers will uphold Geneva's bid for the district track supremacy. The veteran group includes Bob Patton, Rutherford, I-Iutzley, Golubic, McCune, Farmer, and Eberle. The newcomers are Russ Curry, who features in the pole- vault and hurdles, and John Moyer, who expects to see service in throwing the weights. The 1936 golf team. Golf Spring of 1935 saw the introduction of the old Scotch game of golf in the athletic program of Geneva. The Genevans were led by Tommy Weiskopf, who coached and managed the team. Joining Weiskopf on the varsity were Ray Park, Harry Jones, Bob Frazer, George Pennebaker, and Bob Fulton. In their initial performance the team split a decision with Duquesneg the result being 3-3. The opening victory for the Geneva golfers came When they subdued Alle- gheny by a score of 4 to 2 at Meadville. The Covenanters chased back to home soil to meet the invasion of the Westminster golfers and to turn it to the tune of a 5-1 triumph. Weiskopf turned in some line work when he led all con- tenders With a 76. In the next match, which occurred on the home greens, the Covenanter niblicks shaded Grove City 5 to 4. The Genevans next met the invading Gators from Allegheny College but were unable to capture the verdict, the hnal result being 3-3. Remaining at home, the Genevans displayed too much power for the visiting Duquesne delegation, forcing them to succumb to a 5-1 score. Journeying to Grove City, the Covenanters came to grief when they were forced to accept a 7-2 setback. Only Weiskopf and Park Were able to Win their respective matches. At Westminster the varsity added another victory when they defeated the Titans 4-2. Tommy Weiskopf, undefeated throughout the season, recorded the best score for the match with another creditable 76. The match closed a successful campaign of Geneva's Erst golfing team. The prospects for a successful 1935 campaign appear very encouraging. With the exception of Ray Park the entire team will return to competition. New strength will be added to the team by Frank Fulton and Bob Stockton, sterling freshmen performers. An inviting schedule has been prepared with Carnegie Tech, Grove City, Pitt, Allegheny, and Westminster. Girls' Intramurals In the few years that Miss Beeson has been the Physical Education Instructor of women at Geneva, girls' intramural sports have gained wonderful popularity. The intramural season began with a tennis tournament, which, although there was no championship play-off, revealed some expert tennis playing by both Pauline Sabol and Jean Springer. Tennis was followed by volleyball, and many close contests took place before team "A" finally carried off the laurels. As was evinced by the keen interest manifested by the girls, basketball assumed the most important role in the program. After several weeks of shouting, bruises. and scratches, the members of team "A" blossomed forth from the seemingly mad medley as the tournament winners. The Pep-a-mints won the second volleyball tournament, which rounded out the winter sports schedule for the girls. The spring program has been planned to include such activities as tennis, ping- pong, archery, and badminton, the latter two being relatively new sports which Miss Beeson will organize as part of the intramural calendar. - em' . w M m ning ,rf H ' in m " " 5222 ww H w H N w H H S A M 1 m H M ww e H I I N- A.- S Boys' Intramurals Since their inaugural six years ago, intramural activities for men have developed to the extent that about ninety percent of the men enrolled at the college take active part in the program. Annually, Professor Davies, Physical Education Instructor, Works hard to present a program that is both entertain- ing and worthwhile. This year the intramural season was launched with a basketball tournament which lasted through most of the Winter months and was well supported by the men. In this tournament With the teams divided into two leagues, rivalry was at its maximum from the opening game to the conclu- sion of the championship game, which was won by the unbeaten quintet of the Pre-Meds. Intramural interests was next centered on the volleyball tournament from which the Ko-Ko-Mo's emerged as the champs. For the spring schedule Professor Davies intends to present quite a varied and extensive sport card with such features as tennis, ping-pong, horseshoes, mushball, and archery. The 1936 tennis team. Q Tennis Tennis at Geneva is one of the highlights of the spring program. The 1935 season saw such performers as Clarke, Sakraida, Riley, Ginsberg, Forsythe, and Jannuzi come to the fore to uphold Geneva in the intercollegiate tennis circles. The schedule included matches with Duquesne, Grove City, Westminster, and Allegheny. In the opening encounter, which occurred on the Bluff courts, the Covenanter netmen suffered a decisive six-one drubbing at the hands of the Duquesne performers. Greatly disgruntled by the setback given them by Du- quesne, the Genevans journeyed to Meadville where they set about rebuilding their record by winning from Allegheny College by the score of 4-3. Returning to the home courts, the Geneva racqueters were forced to accept a 7-2 trimming by Grove City. Only Eddie Clarke and Os Riley were able to post Wins for the Covenanter cause. In the next match the Genevans came back into form by atoning for a previous setback handed them by Duquesne, when they defeated the Dukes to the tune of a 6-3 triumph. Victories by Sakraida, Jannuzi, Riley, and Forsythe paved the way for the Geneva success. The Geneva courtmen next appeared at Grove City where they succumbed to a 5-4 decision. Eddie Clarke, leadoff singles star, and Forsythe recorded wins in their engagementsg while the Clarke-Sakraida, and Ginsberg-Riley teams won the doubles. At Westminster the courtmen swept through the match and won by the comfortable margin of 6 to 1. However, on their own courts, the "Covies" were compelled to acknowledge Titan supremacy by a close 4-3 decision. The Westminster tilt closed the 1935 season for the Covenanters. For the coming season, an at- tractive schedule has been arranged with Grove City, Washington and Jeffer- son, Waynesburg, Allegheny, Mount Union, and Westminster. Certain dili- culties are foreseen in the 1936 tennis campaign. Graduation has caused serious inroads on tennis strength, with such losses as Clarke, Sakraida, Ginsberg, and Riley. Quite likely, such contenders as Jannuzi, Forsythe, Scott, Balph, and Jacober, a freshman, will form the nucleus on which the Covenanter ranking in collegiate tennis will depend. 1 111 11, 1111 ' ,111 1215111 ,V11 1 1 1 1 4 F, :'. ' F ,qi ,- lf. 1 k Q ' 1 .-1,1-5 M if 11 1 1 11 1 1 1 -J -1 I 1 W 1 'Q 'S y, 21 5 ln? yi -4-1- 4 Q.-' ' I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ,,, ...- President JOHN SAWYER Vice-President GILBERT LEVINE S ec.- Treas. ZELDA WILNER They won six out of eight decisions Debate Club The Debaters opened a most encouraging season by winning six out of eight decisions at the Tri-District Tournament sponsored by Westminster. John Griffiths, Herman Roney, John Sawyer, and Gilbert Levine represented Geneva in the majority of the debates. They met teams from all parts of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. They also debated Houghton College, New York, Vermont College, Vermont, Erskine, South Carolinag and other schools in the southern part of the country. Other members of the club who participate in intercollegiate debates were Saul Disenfeld, Gersom Shaiel, Howard Elliott, and Charles McBurney. A lengthy debating tour, the annual intramural tourna- ment, a delightful banquet, and a basketball team added to the success of the year. The questions for debate were: limitation of the power of the Supreme Court, socialized medicine, and the employment of married Women. Mrs. John Madory directed and coached the teams. ' Economics Club This year the Economics Club, sponsored by Dr. Helms, has been very for- tunate in securing qualified speakers on economic, political, and social problems. Their semi-monthly meetings have been addressed by such men as Professor Davic, former instructor in the University of Vienna and later Austrian consul at Pittsburgh, Dr. John Coleman of the Geneva faculty, the Reverend Stevenson of Ellwood City, and District Attorney Andrew Park of Allegheny County. Other business as Well as social activities of the club in this sixth year of its existence have been the continuance of the survey of the industrial plants and economic institutions of Beaver Falls, the fathers' night, the annual club banquet, and the alumni banquet. C. Brainerd Metheny and Frank Jannuzi, honorary members of the club, have been of real assistance with their advice and coopera- tion concerning the business survey, club meetings, and selection of speakers. Mrs. Helms was of inestimable aid to the c1ub's various social committees. President CHESTER WILSON Vice-President JOHN SAWYER Sec.-Treas. CLYDE HOLT They had speakers on economic, political, and social problems Eastvale Teachers A The Y.M. and Y.W.C.A. organizations of Geneva have, in the past year, carried on their usual work in the mission Sabbath School at Eastvale. Besides teaching classes every Sabbath morning to a group of about seventy children, the teachers also supervised the young people's group meetings in the evening. Throughout the year Various social entertainments were prepared With the help of the students. It is an inspiring work and the teachers feel amply repaid. I . . Women s Student Association The Women's Student Association successfully fuliilled its purpose this year in promoting a fine spirit of friendliness and cooperation among the Women students. This was accomplished through the monthly social events, such as the "Get-acquainted-party" for Freshmen, the program of Famous Women, a luncheon at the Brodhead Hotel, the Christmas Banquet, a Valentine Tea, and a breakfast at the Hotel Kaufmann. Vocational Guidance Day proved very help- ful by giving the students an opportunity to hear the opinions and advice of authorities in various occupations. The peak of the year's program was reached in May, When, under the sponsorship of the W.S.A., the World famous aviatrix, Amelia Earhart, appeared personally in the College Auditorium to lecture on her adventures in the air. The year's unusually ine program was brought to a close with two delightful events, the Mother's Day Tea, and the Spring Formal. President ..... . . . . Vice-President JEANNE LARIMER Secretary ............. REBECCA LEE Corresponding Sec'y .... BELLE ADAMS . Treasurer . . . BESSIE BURROWS They brought Amelia Ea1'hm't MARGARET EWING They taught Sabbath School at Eastvale They discussed ethical moral, and religious questions President ......... RENWICK MARTIN Vice-President .. JOHN BEGOLLY Secretary .... .. GEORGE STOREY Treasurer .. . .. JONATHAN LEE Fall, 1935 Spring and Fall, 1936 President MARY E. WILSON ...... . . ETHEL PARK Vice-President MARY E. COLEMAN . . .... REBECCA LEE Secretary MARTHA GREER , , , , , ELLEN MCFEETERS Treasurer ETHEL PARK ,,,,,,,,,,,, JEAN WORK They sponsored the Big and Little Sister Party Y. M. C. A. Working in conjunction with the Y.W., the Y.M.C.A. inaugurated a new year with the orientation program for the freshmen. Later, a membership campaign introduced the activities for the year. The interest of the club in ethical, moral, and religious questions was demonstrated when the "Y" organization set aside two meetings for the discussion of such question by Dr. Pearce and several members of the faculty. Further activities included the usual support of Little Geneva, sending delegates to the Student Volunteer Conference at Indianapolis, and to a "Y" Conference at Slippery Rock, arranging for the Sabbath evening student meetings, and holding the "Y" banquet. Y. W. C. A. The interesting meetings every Wednesday evening and the projects it sponsored made the Y.W. one of the most active organizations on the campus. It cooperated with the Y.M. in the orientation program, and the "Thousand Mile Walk"g it sponsored the HalloWe'en Bonfire, "The Good Ship Lollipop," the big-and-little sister party, a carnival, several bake salesg and sent five dele- gates to the Student Volunteer Convention at Indianapolis. For the first time, new Oilticers were elected at mid-year. The definitely Christian tone of the Y.W. is stimulating and helpful to its members. Director EVELYN ROSE Aceonipanists BETSEY Ross MYRTA JEAN TODD President RUTH DUNN S ee.-Treas. MARJORIE DOAK Manager . . REBECCA LEE Assistant Manager JEAN ORR ' The eastern trip was the highlight of their year Girls' Glee Club About forty girls sang their Way into the membership of this year's Glee Club, Whose hrst choral event was the annual Christmas Concert presented with the Men's Glee Club in the college auditorium. The club, directed by Evelyn Rose, also gave concerts in several of the Valley High Schools as well as in many of the churches in the vicinity. The annual eastern trip, which is the highlight of every glee club year, began on April 21 with all the usual rush and excitement. Dr. and Mrs. Pearce, as chaperons, accompanied the girls to At- lantic City, Philadelphia, Sunbury, Lamont, and Windber. The audiences were very appreciative and complimented the girls on their ine Work. Last year the Psalms were so favorably received that a group of three were added to this year's program. Among other special features were a vocal sextette, a play, a reading, in addition to piano and vocal solos. M2n'S Glee The Men's Glee Club enjoyed one of its most successful seasons this year. At the beginning of the season, the club elected Chester Kyle as its student director, but Mr. Kyle was forced to Withdraw from school because of illness, yielding his directorship to Thomas Svilkovich. Instructed by Mr. Whitney and led by its student director, the club presented various concerts locally and in the Pittsburgh district. Its varied program included solos by John Wylie, Robert Scott, and Milton McBurney. Each program featured numbers by the string quartette, which consisted of Thomas Svilkovich, Robert Scott, Howard Ludwig, and Thomas Mitchell. After its annual home concert in March, the club left for its Eastern tour, which this year was extended to include Boston and Wash- ington, D.C., in addition to the usual visits to Philadelphia and New York City. Upon returning home, the men gave a joint concert with the glee club of the Pennsylvania College for Women in Carnegie Music Hall in Pittsburgh. The annual banquet in the spring concluded the c1ub's activities for the year. Director THOMAS SVILKOVICH A ccomp :mists ROBERT STEVENSON MEYRICK GREEN President JOHN WYLIE S ec.-Treas. HUGH MCKNIGHT Manager ROBERT FULTON President .. MARY E. COLEMAN Treasurer .... RUTH DUNN President MARGARET EWING Secretary FERN HAGADORN Organized "Pep" They have earned their letters Pep Club Organized PEP-that's what this club represents. It is composed of a live group of young Women who are interested in Geneva as a participator in inter- collegiate athletics and have made every effort to instill that same spirit Within the hearts of their fellow students. Before each major contest a chapel pro- gram was prepared consisting of some uniquely original speech, skit, or even a "hill billy" band and then was impressively concluded with 'finely organized cheering under the direction of Howard Elliott, Edwin Carson, John Moyer, and "Andy" Campbell. ' G Club The G Club is made up of girls who have earned their letters by participat- ing in hiking, horseback riding, basketball, volleyball, ping pong, and tennis to the extent of having earned five hundred points. Though the G Club this year is small it has been Very active. Each month there has been a meeting in the form of a picnic, a party, or a dinner. Nor have the girls forgotten that their's is an athletic club. Miss George, the sponsor, has kept alive the girls interest in athletics. The "G's" participate in as many sports as possible and canvass the freshmen for prospective future "G's." ' Friii anci Dagger Dramatic Society The Frill and Dagger Dramatic Society's purpose is to further Geneva's interest in drama by producing plays. The Hrst production was "Murdered Alive," given November 1, under the direction of Mr. McCa1mon. "Dust of the Road" and "The Third Ingredient" were given before members of the faculty and speech department. This spring the society entered "The Terrible Meek," by Charles Rand Kennedy, in the Fourth Annual Drama Festival sponsored by the Beaver County Federation of Women's Clubs. The casts for -the four pro- ductions were chosen by tryouts from the entire student body. Membership in the club was then extended to the persons who were in the casts of these plays. Historical Society The Historical Society has had another successful year with a membership of about fifty students. The Erst meeting of the year was a steak fry at Wal- lace Rung with the. usual baseball game following the supper. Another feature was the annual banquet held at Bethel Church in January, instead of at Christ- mas. The rest of the meetings were held on the iirst Monday of every month in the Little Theatre of McCartney Library and consisted largely of travel talks and their association with history. These were followed by a social hour and refreshments. The club has been very ably sponsored by Mrs. Madory and Dr. Park. Their purpose 'is to further Gene11a's interest in drama They heard travel talks President .... . . . . . Vice-President . . . Corresponding Seo. . President .......... JEANNE LARIMER . BELLE ADAMS Sec.-Treas. ........... JEANNE SCOTT MARY E. COLEMAN . JAMES GARDNER Vice-President FRANCES MCCREADY Secretary BETTY PRITCHARD Treasurer . . . . EDWIN CARSON President JOSEPH HLISTA Vice-President PHILIP ROBB Secretary MARGUERITE KASTE. Treasurer MARY AGREE They encourage French conversation French Club The members of the French Club participated 1n every program which Was given at their monthly meetings. Plays, readings, songs, peasant dances, and musical numbers featuring French customs and traditions, were presented. The cardinal principle of the club is to encourage French conversation, and the rule for the speaking of French at the meetings gave the prospective linguists valuable practice. The December meeting, which has become an annual event of the college, Was open to the public, and the enjoyable program Was followed by a reception. Miss Stewart, by her inflagging interest and untiring effort, kept the club up to the high traditional standards for which it is noted. Formal dress, formal programs, and formal conversation made the meetings unusual and festive. In the Spring, the annual banquet was one of the most pleasant events of anhighly successful year. Spanish Club Under the inspiring direction of Miss Wilson the members of the Spanish Club have enjoyed a meeting each month amid appropriate decorations and an atmosphere of friendliness. Of primary importance was the participation in Spanish customs which included the breaking of the pinata at Christmas, mak- ing love to a young lady at the balcony and patronizing a typical Latin American cafe. At this cafe members willingly gave coins to the beggar woman, young men brought Bowers for the senoritas and all indulged their innate love of gambling in the purchases of lottery tickets and celebrated the pre-lenten season by throwing serpentine. Among the other meetings at which various plays were presented perhaps the most impressive was the one at Ha1lowe'en. The year's activities were appropriately brought to a close at the festive spring banquet. ' I They operated a lottery President ANNA MARY CARPENTER Vice President VIRGINIA REICH Treasurer ELLA J EAN CLARKE Secretary GERALDINE EBENSBERGER .President .... Vice-President Secretary . . . Treasurer . . President ....... Vice-President Sec.-Treas. . . . . . . . . MARY SCHLEITER . . . . . MARGARET EWING A new club on the campus . . . GEORGE STOREY . . .. BELLE ADAMS .. MARTHA STRONG RAYMOND HEMPHILL . . . . . ETHEL PARK They sponsored gospel teams English Club A new Club on the campus-the English Club, made up of the English majors and minors and including the members of the Writers' Club-has had a very successful beginning this year. Its purpose is three-fold: to further the friendly association of those students interested in English, to discuss matters of interest in our chosen subject, and to encourage the creation of original compositions. Organized at the close of the Hrst semester, the Hrst program was a Kipling Memorial Serviceg While Plato and his theories were subjects for discussion at the Plato Tea in March. The banquet in the spring Was greatly enjoyed by all the members present. Christian Service Union The Christian Service Union for the past year has carried out its program in a sincere and enthusiastic manner. Two special projects have been sponsored by the club. Several gospel teams have been sent out to many valley churches for the purpose of discussing religious question. Evening services have been conducted in other churches to bring reports of the Quadrennial Student Vol- unteer Convention at Indianapolis. Ten Genevans with Professor and Mrs. Mc- Million attended this convention during the Christmas vacation. The social features have also been a vital part of the program in addition to the regular Tuesday evening meetings. These meetings average an attendance of about twenty-five members. The Mathematics Club The Mathematics Club was organized in 1927 with the purpose of creating a deeper interest in this science among Geneva students. The club meets regu- larly once a month at which time subjects relating to mathematics are discussed byclub members, by professors of the Department of Mathematics, or by other speakers. At the December meeting Professor Taylor of Pittsburgh University, who is noted for his research in the field of Probability, addressed the club. The years' activities were brought to a close at a banquet, following which officers for the coming year were elected. Dr. Cleland and Professor McCormick are the sponsors of the club. The Chemistry Club The purpose of the Chemistry Club, under the sponsorship of Drs. Coon and Fleharty, is to create a deeper interest in chemistry and to further the fel- lowship among the chemistry students of Geneva. Membership is confined to those who are taking or who have taken courses in chemistry. At the monthly meetings papers dealing with various chemical subjects were presented by club members. The club being noted in former years for its skating parties continued its repu- tation by sponsoring two parties at Evans City. As a successful culmination to its activities, the club held a picnic at an outstanding recreational center where rowing and skating were enjoyed. They were addressed by Professor Taylor President ..... Vice-President Secretary .... Treasurer . . Vice-President Treasurer .... Famous for their skating parties President ......... .. GRACE ALLEN .. LESLIE FALLON .. EVELYN Rosr: JOHN YANKO MORTON ROBINSON JOHN YANKO FAY STEELE S eoretary ..... RUSSELL ROSENBERGER McKee Hall After giving the freshmen a "feed" in the parlor the iirst day of school, the upperclassmen proceeded to harass them with the traditional initiation, which, traditionally also, was not only comparatively mild, but exceedingly entertain- ing. A period of inactivity, with the exception of a few minor riots because of the usual misunderstood rules, followed. When the freshmen had been sufficiently orientated and enough time had passed for them to buy curtains, the annual fall house-warming Was given. Ethel Park was elected House Presi- dent, and under her able leadership, the party was a great success. A Christmas party for the Eastvale children, a Christmas formal dinner, and the traditional carol-singing on the eve of vacation comprised the Yuletide activities. "Charm School," a new innovation this year, brought such able speakers as Mr. McCal- mon and Dr. Wylie to tell the girls how to "charm." The results of this train- ing Were demonstrated at the Spring Formal in a delightful atmosphere of Japanese lanterns, cherry blossoms, and soft music. The rare privilege of hav- ing a prized "eleven-thirty" on a Week night made an already pleasant evening perfect. The Motherls Day Banquet brought an enjoyable year to a close. North Hall Shakespeare's observation that "All the wor1d's a stage" might, in a man- ner, be applied to North Hallg for certainly it is from the first, second, and third stages Ci.e., iioorsj of the dorm that the most amusing farces, the most ludicrous pranks, and the most unearthly inventions emanate to pervade the campus. The only stem to the ever-continuing parade of frolics is "Ma" Robin- son, whose valiant stand can no better be described than by pointing out her ever-graying hair. These comedies of North Hall should not be comtemplated as reactions to profound meditation over textsg for books, Whose rightful design has been construed as iles for billets doux, are undeniably the pet aversion of the boys. To insinuate to a Geneva dorm boy that he should more diligently devote himself to the acquisition of knowledge is to insult him, dfor, in his de- ductions, a person attempts to acquire something only when he does not have it. Furthermore, his only purposes at Geneva are to acquire "culture and re- finement," and maybe a girl or two. The prime farce of the year occurred when "Ocean" Jones was elected president of North Hall. Supplementary farces were the proctorships of "Turby" Trbovich and Jesse Feick, both of 'Whom should be commended for their efforts to hatch mischief in order to fkeep themf selves busy as "guardians of the peace." And, o11! for the life at the dorm, where men are men and only professors have heard of bookworms. . L .w it in www W T HE Y It CABINET Top: Bottom: Editor-in-Chief .... BOB METCAIIF Assistant Editor . . . . . . . GEORGE STOREY Copy Editor ....... .............. B LANCHE ORPELLI Business Manager . . . ................... JOHN SAWYER Assistants ........ . . . JOHN HEMPSTEAD, PAUL LISOOMB Campus News Editor .... ............... B OB MCCONAUGHY Newshawks .......................................... MARGUERITE KASTE, 'ELLEN MCFEETERS, ETHEL PARK, PAUL GRAHAM, BELLE ADAMS, HERMAN RONEY, MARY AGREE, ELLEN BYERS, JEANNE REILLEY, CHARLES DENKO, DOR- OTHY HAWTHORNE, ZELDA WILNER, SAUL DIZENFELD, ANNA MARY CARPENTER Sports Editor . ............................................ . DON POWELL Assistants . . . BETTY MOPHERSON, BYRON LUOE, REN BARTIN, JOHN FATULA F6Cbf'M'I"6 Editor ................................. MARY ELIZABETH COLEMAN Assistants . . . . . . MARY SCHLEITER, GENE JANNUZI, MARGARET JOHNSON, SALLY VAN RYN, JENNIE VAUGH Because Geneva is small and because frequent publications are impossible, it would be useless, if not somewhat ludicrous, to attempt to publish the Or- dinary type of newspaper. Hence the staff of the GENEVA CABINET has at- tempted tO develop more and more a news magazine and less and less a news- paper. The CABINET, then, has avoided the formal recording of incidents known to all. It has attempted rather to interpret the news, to tap the less-known scenes behind the well-known news, to present intimate but usually harmless a higher plane it serves as a record Of Opinions, a battle ground for of ideals. On even a higher plane the news Organ attempts to aid in feeling that he is an active part Of the changing world Outside The style is seldom literaryg the Organization Of material is usually gossip. On the conflict the student the campus. unorthodoxg but students usually read their CABINET. Left to Right: JANNUZI AGREE GRAHAM MCFEETERS COLEMAN SCHLEITER STOREY ORPELL1 POWELL SAWYER METCALE T H GENEVAN Top : Bottom I KOWVALESKA FRAZER LEE PARK ELLIOTT FORSYTHE EWING D'AGOSTINO . RONEY KRAMER Editor-in-Chief . . . Copy Editor ......... Photographic Editor Sports Editor ..... Activities Editor .... Associate Editor . . . Associate Editor .... Business Manager . Editorial Staff Business Staff Assistant Business Manager . . . Assistant Business Manager ............................ . . . . JACK FORSYTI-IE WANDA KOWALESKA . . . . ROBERT FRAZER . FAUST D'AcosT1No . . . . . . ETHEL PARK BEULAH MAE EWING .. . . . .. REBECCA LEE . . HOWARD ELLIOTT . . . ROBERT KRAMER . . . HERMAN RONEY We believe that a yearbook should be a cross section of college life, depicting and recording as accurately as possible those highlights which Will be pleasant memories in the years to come. In our eiort to follow this ideal we have planned the 1936 annual with the idea of carrying our readers through a day at Geneva and representing in that day all the important events of the entire year. If, in the years to come, a glance at this book brings back happy thoughts of college days, we shall consider that We have succeeded in representing a true "Day at Geneva." President THOMAS SCANTLING S ecretary T J oHN YANKO Treasurer ROBERT DUEY Prospective Engineers Engineering Society The main social events of the Engineering Society were held at the home of Professor and Mrs. Edgecombe. The November meeting began with a 1-ish fry, which included sea bass, doughnuts, and coffee, and ended in a football game. The regular monthly meetings of the society were held in the Little Theater or in Old Main, at which time various student reports were read. Some of these meetings were addressed by outside authorities on subjects vital to prospective Engineers. The two trips taken to Pittsburgh the latter part of May Were Very interesting and included a visit to the annual exhibit at Car- negie Tech. In addition to this, an opportunity was provided for the society to Visit the local factory of the Armstrong Cork Company. These various Held trips Were taken in order that the members might see the practical application of various fields of engineering. Pre-Medical Society The scientific interests of the members of the Pre-Medical Society were dis- played in the type of programs chosen throughout the year. At the opening meeting Professor McMil1ion addressed the club on "Medical Schools and En- trance Requirements." At a later date Dr. Stewart spoke on "Medicinal Plants of Western Pennsylvania." In the Little Theatre of the McCartney Library the Pre-Meds were entertained by such prominent speakers as Dr. Ruth Wilson of Beaver, who spoke on "Allergy," Dr. R. T. Hance of the University of Pitts- burgh, Who spoke on "Pigments and Pigmentationsf' and Dr. McKee of Beaver Falls, whose subject was "Animal Parasites." Social activities were not lack- ing in the society. The December meeting was held in the home of Professor McMil1ion, and in February the'Pre-Meds were royally entertained at the home of President Pearce. Culminating a successful year was the annual picnic held jointly by the Pre-Medical and Chemistry Societies. President JACK MooRE Vice-President GEORGE SHUGERT S ecretary JAMES GARDNER Treasurer HARRY JONES A z V1 . 5 re, , 1 They were entertained by Dr. Pearce RE AND THE Acknowledgments We take this opportunity to thank the following persons and business enter- prises for their help in making possible the publication of this 1936 GENEVAN. To advertisers who gave their financial support we commend the patronage of all GENEVAN readers. Dr. Martin's wise counsel in his position as Faculty Adviser enabled us to avoid any serious financial trouble. Professor McCalmon gave the use of his typewriter and typist to help us prepare the copy for the GENEVAN. Mr. Russell R. Benson of the Indianapolis Engraving Company was of great aid in supplying ideas and making suggestions. Mr. H. B. Weaver of the Pittsburgh Printing Company helped solve our print- . ing problems. ' Mr. W. Raymond Kerr of College Hill deserves particular recognition for supply- ing photographs for the entire football section as Well as several views for the backgrounds of three senior panels. The Pittsburgh Press supplied the basketball action picture of the Geneva-Tech game. Boylin's Studio of Beaver Falls gave unsparingly of their time and cooperated in every possible way to make this GENEVAN outstanding. - Dr. Pearce, Miss Grosh, Miss McKinney, Mrs. Scott, Miss Girvin, and the entire oiiice force cooperated in helping us publish this annual. And lastly, we wish to express our real appreciation to those students Who Worked with us on the staff. Without their help it would have been physically im- possible to publish a book requiring as much time and effort as was put into this "Day at Geneva." JACK FORSYTHE Editor-in-Chief HOWARD ELLIOTT Business Manager. BEFORE YOU DIE C. BRAINERD METHENY "Geneva 'l9'l'I'i Manager Fidelity Mutual Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia, Pa. 1212-14 Grant Bldg. "Home of KDKA" Pittsburgh, Pa. 3123 Filth Avenue Beaver Falls, Pa. FIND THE ANSWER TO YOUR EDU- CATIONAL NEEDS IN GENEVA COLLEGE SUMMER SESSION Nine Weeks-June 15 to August 14 A college Where one may pursue courses in both Secondary and Elementary Education, Liberal Arts, Science, Mathematics, I-listory, English, Music, and other subjects. Practice teaching in both the Secondary and Ele- rgentary Fields, given during the first six weeks of um ' n. t e s mer sesslo Nine semester hours may be taken in nine weelcs. Address: J. C. TWINEM, Director of Summer Session Geneva College, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania GoRDoN CAMP Cleaner and Dyer GNMWD 1427 'lth Avenue Penn Beaver Hotel Beaver Falls Rochester Phone 588 Phone 2450 "Where Price and Quality Meet" Cluality 'I'AYLOR'S Shop Specializing in Smart Young Men's Apparel 1209 Seventh Ave. Beaver Falls, Pa. JOSTEN'S NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP JEWELRY Factory-Owatonna, Minn. Quality, Cleanliness, Reasonable Prices, Good Service malce the SERVICE DAIRY 3205 FOURTH AVENUE PHONE B.F. 280 DAMBACH'S Blue Tea Room Quality Food Served Best Sandwiches in Town Baslcets Paclced for Picnics Buy our Electric Balced Goods H?" 1308 SEVENTH AVE. PHONE 9932 BEAVER FALLS, PA. ENGLISH NEWS DEPOT "Tl-lE LIT-TLE STORE ON Tl-lE SQUARE" 0 '49 KODAKS ICE CREAM NEWSPAPERS CONFECTIONERY 0 -' Q 606 Third Street Phone 9149 B P eaver, a. Compliments of RIALTO THEATRE Do you like Clothes? What? You Dorft? Then clon't see Lisle T. Miller 910 SEVENTH AVENUE For he has only Clothes Men Lilce Compliments of First National Banlc BEAVER FALLS, PA. UZSQ GENEVA COLLEGE BOOK STORE P520 -Q-.....,. Incorporated 1893 THE FARMERS NATIONAL BANK RESOURCES OVER s4,ooo,ooo.oo ole DR. J. S. LOUTI-IAN, President EARNEST RICHARDSON, Vice President WALTER G. BERT, Vice Presidentand Cashier W. W. DOUDS, AssistantCashier McMuIIen-Hoffman REffQ1FfQfffRE INCORPORATED ' ' H?" Q . The Best in Entertainment for your CHRYSLER Money at all Times ancI PLYMOUTH SALES AND SERVICE Choose your Footwear for Comfort and Appearance Q 1110 EIGHTH AVENUE BEAVER FALLS, PA. The Flower Shop CAMPBELL'S ag-1 720 13th St. Phone B. F. 122 Tlwe Combination OI Style and Quality are Features OF all Our Footwear C566 Hartley 8: Hood SHOES AND HGSIERY ROCHESTER, PA. The STUDENTS' STORE Clover Farm Stores 80016, Greeting Cards Fine Stationery F'3nCY Canned Qtfice SuppIies Fruits and Vegetables EHSFGVIHS, Embossins Fountain Pens QUALITY PLUS SERVICE REEDER,S BOOK STORE "A Store In Your Neighborhood" K3:soT1IEIjnLIIe ST' BEAVISEOZZAISISZ Compliments of BEAVER VALLEY WATER COMPANY NSF 1425 EIGHTH AVENUE BEAVER FALLS, PA. AND COMPANY SUPPLIES REPAIRS Bankers O ReaI Estate IUSULGUCC I 1813 SEVENTH AVENUE 1217 7TH AVE. BEAVER FALLS, PA. BEAVER FALLS, PA. Compliments of Leeclers in Value CHEVROLET FRIGIDAIRE J, ORVILLE SCOTT RCA VICTOR RADIOS EASY WASHERS EASY IRONERS PHILCO RADIOS HOOVER SWEEPERS CHAMBERS RANGES SAM E. BURNS Q DRUGGIST ' l Q Sahll Motor Co. 1910 SEVENTH AVENUE Brodhead Hotel Bldg. BEAVER FALLS, PA. Beaver Falls, Pa. Phone B.F. 1440 CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1936 J. B. Lytle Co. WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS OF ' m -.1-U..-.n BEAVER FALLS, PA. J. D. McAnlis 8: Son JEWELERS and Graduation Gifts 1108 SEVENTH AVENUE BEAVER FALLS, PA. O Compliments of J. L. MIKSCH BEAVER FALLS, PA. Thos. F. Daquila 1401-1403 SEVENTH AVENUE BEAVER FALLS, PA. THE DAILY TIMES ROCHESTER AND BEAVER, PA. E. L. FREELAND, Publisher We Never Lose or Pass By an Opportunity to Say a Good Word For Geneva X Compliments of the GENERAL BRUDHEAIJ HOTEl Careful attention given to Student Activities and Parties We invite your consideration. GRENOBLE HOTELS INC. SPECIAL COACHES Anytime Anywhere Harmony Short Line Motor Transportation Co 210 Tenth Street Pittsburgh, Pa. COURT 4500 THE ALPS T. M. GILCHRIST, Prop. lce Cream and lces Fresh Roasted Nuts 913 Seventh Ave. Phone B.F. 1998 BEAVER FALLS THRIFT CORPORATION BEAVER FALLS, PA. Your Doctor, Dentist, and Merchant are your Friends. If they carried you when you were in need. Pay them now. We loan up to 5300.00 ancl charge only 512.00 per 5100.00 for 13 months. The cheapest rate in the city. YOUR CLOTHES ARE CAREFULLY HANDLED at Fame Beaver Valley Laundry BEAVER FALLS, PA. Geneva Paint 8: Glass Co. 1021 Seventh Ave. Beaver Falls, Pa. Phone 3330 Paints, Varnishes, Brushes Glass of All Kincls The Wallhide and Waterspar Store HOWARD INGLEY, Manager Boylln's BEAVER FALLS, PA. HAIL GENEVA! A spirit of faithful service in developing tl1e youtl1 of the Beaver Valley ancl tl1e nation has marked your progress. WE are striving to emulate this spirit in faith- ful service to tl1e residents of College Hill with xoy-xESTQo SNWZ2- MONARCH ,E if-Q FINER FOODS x 1 ' I ' 'WY' Q20 E 'Y 'Man neGt5 QUALITY MEATS swwfa College Hill Market "Reliable,' uffourteousn "Convenient" 3207 FOURTH AVENUE Free Delivery Phone 101 Ns 1-A Q , ,1vi.11.1l. , nE -3 - 412. ,- ii' ' V A. , . 44, ,L H 'A4'mI'.1z3fgKi?5fY A , MWF, W. nge wifi? 51-is yu wfzggmgg H Q, V, H N ' fi Qggsw-5iwii?Ss?f.s' " "H ' 'g3f?fL- if 15, , .eq - 1, V- Y ww 1 -aww - ,zilifxx-A A. 'A maui ' H' OKI rr' 2 1 ' "V'lm. , ihfffwizfi. M 1, U z -3 Q --M ' Q QQWWQ' Si MM L . -if, W "A Good Impression" Is not only a printer's phrase, but when an impression is made upon the memory or upon the lives ot individuals it proves of great importance. W s THE IMPRESSION WE WOULD MAKE UPON THE MINDS OF THOSE WHO "GO FORTH" FROM THEIR STUDIES HERE INTO THE STERNER THINGS OF LIFE IS THAT WHEN THEY NEED PRINTING OF WHAT- EVER CHARACTER, THEIR FIRST THOUGHT WILL BE OF Pittsburgh Printing Company 53O-4 Fernando St.. ' Pittsburgh, Pa. 'x


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Geneva College - Genevan Yearbook (Beaver Falls, PA) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 1

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