Gatling (DD 671) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1953

Page 1 of 87

 

Gatling (DD 671) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 87 of the 1953 volume:

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I J 'IU 9- ,vo NcW PORT 'Q -al f",l :I ..- G r s , mm sw' as 411 I 14 5 X 'SOUTH AMERICA .x 1 S 1 Z ii A sf-www ff 1 Mi. 4-,, Q , , , fu ,f xx AQ xx. 52 Sy 5 f ,, , ,ZW 'Avg 5 A x A W ww-ww ,, Mgym,xv.wNg.w f,,.,, , . N ,Q ffm x , ZW.. mm ,Aww f WZ Commander W. D. Owen, Henry C. Wilkinson, Chairman Armed Services Y. M. C. A., Newport, R. I., and the Hon Dean J. Lewis, Mayor of the City of Newport, Rhode Island boarding ship to ioin in "Operation Springboard." --W - - .G Ex ,J- K 1 CDR. W. D. OWEN, a native of Vermont, graduated from Green Mountain Junior College and the U. S. Naval Academy, An- napolis, Maryland, Class of 1941. During.World War ll he partici- pated in the following naval engagements: North Atlantic Patrol, 1941, Salameau and Lee, New Guinea, Marshall and Gilbert Islands, Battle ot the Coral Sea, Battle of Midway, Sicilian Campaign, Philip- pine Campaign, Iwo Jima, Formosa and Okinawa Campaign, Attacks on Japanese Mainland. CDR. OWEN is survivor ofthe sinking ofthe carrier YORKTOWN during the Battle of Midway. After World War II, he graduated from the Post Graduate School, Annapolis, Maryland, served on the Staff, Commander Battleship-Cruiser Force, Pacific Fleet, and later in London, England, on the Staff, Joint Ameri- can Military Advisory Group. On 2 July 1952 CDR. OWEN took command of the GATLING. LT. CDR. J. F. GAVlN was born in South Boston, Mass. but spent most of his youth in Albany, New York. He graduated from Holy Cross College in June of 1937 and was commissioned an Ensign in the U. S. Naval Reserve January 1942. During World War ll LT. CDR. GAVlN'S duty assignments, all in minesweepers, were: North Africa Invasion, Atlantic Patrol - 1942, Marshall Islands Campaign, New Guinea Campaign, Philippine Campaign, lwo Jima. ln 1945 LT. CDR. GAVIN was released to inactive duty, however, nine months later he returned to active duty as Inspector-Instructor, Naval Reserve Unit, Troy, New York and recently was in Pearl Harbor on the Staff, Commander Mine Forces, U. S. Pacific Fleet. He relieved as Executive Officer aboard the U. S. S. GATLING on 14 February 1953. CU S. Qatling 671i The U. S. S. GATLING fDD671j is the first United States Vessel so named. The name is in honor of Richard J. Gatling, American in- ventor, born in Hartford County, North Carolina, September 12, 1818 and died in New York City, February 26, 1903. This man is best known for his invention of the rapid fire machine gun which bears his name. Other inventions include such miscellaneous items as a screw propellor for steam vessels, a cotton seed planter, a hemp breaking machine, steam plow, and various other farm machinery improve- ments which have aided in greatly revolutionizing American farming methods. The GATLING was built at the Federal Shipbuilding and Dry- dock Company shipyards in Kearney, New Jersey. She was launched on 26 June 1943 and commissioned at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, N. Y. on 19 August 1943. LT. CDR. Alvin H. Richardson was her first Commanding Officer. The story of the GATLING for the next year and a half is the story of the Allied Naval penetration of the Western Pacific. The ship was assigned to the newly formed Task Force 58. Steaming west from Pearl Harbor early in January 1944 she performed screen for carrier air strikes against the Japanese sprawling Island Empire. 16-17 Feb. 1944 Invasion of Truk 27 Feb. Saipan March Invasion of Emirau Island April Invasion at Hollandia, New Guinea 10 June -July Marianas Islands 1 September Philippines October Battle for Leyte Gulf During the Battle for Leyte Gulf the U. S. S. PRINCETON CCVL-23D was hit by enemy aircraft and damaged so badly that she had to be sunk. The GATLING was among the ships assigned to the rescue operation with the PRINCETON and 326 survivors were taken aboard this vessel. For their heroic efforts in this work four of the GATLING'S crew were awarded the Navy-Marine Corps Medal and 2 Officers vvumf-No BOWL? SAYS WH0? GET LOST'-'NEV ER! X 4 I if x, 2 0 f C X I I 'Z Jones owne. SHARp A 1:1 S BOW ANS I WHAT'-NO BOWL? SAYS WHO? QETLOSTNNEVERQ N 11' MJ K Q f M 7 0 i of 'given Jones Norma SHARP AND BLUNT ENDS! 115 BOW AND STEQN if ,, . fy wx 4653" WATER BOY m c,enN' m and 14 men received the Bronze Star Medal. A handsome plaque was presented by the survivors of the PRINCETON to the crew of the GATLING. The next target was the Japanese homeland itself and on 15 - 16 February 1945 strikes were launched against Honshu Island with Tokyo as the main target. During February and March of 1945 the GATLING provided fire support for the Invasion of Iwo Jima. On 27 August the GATLING, as a unit of the Allied Occupation Forces entered Tokyo Bay. In the course of all these operations the GATLING traveled about 175,000 miles, her 5 inch guns fired 77 tons of ammuntion. Eight Japanese planes were shot down, two ships were sunk by her guns and thirty-seven pilots and crewmen, who were forced to take water landings, were picked-up. During her entire operations there was not a loss of a single' man either through sickness, enemy action or accident. The GATLING was retired from the active duty in 1946, to the moth ball fleet at Charleston, S. C. On 4 June 1951, the U. S. S. GATLING was recommissioned at Charleston Naval Shipyard, with CDR. W. J. KEATING as her Commanding Officer. In July of 1952, CDR. W. D. OWEN relieved as Commanding Officer. Since recom- missioning, the GATLING was 'modernized' during a yard period at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and was assigned to the U. S. Atlantic Fleet participating in training and manuevers. During September and October 1952, the GATLING, as a unit of the NATO Fleet, operated off the Coast of Norway in OPERATION MAINBRACE. On this operation the ship visted Scotland, Norway and Belgium. During January and February of 1953 the ship participated in OPERATION SPRINGBOARD in the Caribbean. Although the ship maintained a rigid training schedule, it was able to visit St. Thomas, Virgin Islands and San Juan, Puerto Rico. The GATLING has been assigned to duty, this spring and sum- mer, in the Far East. The trip promises to be interesting professionally, educationally and travelwise. Before her return, the ship should go around the world visiting the Canal Zone, Pearl Harbor, Japan, Korea, Formosa, Singapore, India, Arabia, Egypt and Mediterranean Countries- traveling about 75,000 miles. my "'4 Destroyers were developed from the early torpedo boats of the l890's. The Spanish War boosted the program for torpedo boats and torpedo boat destroyers. These vessels gradually increased in size and complexity until the tirst World War, when we had 52 destroyers of the 4-stack variety. Modern destroyers are multi-purpose ships, which conduct anti- submarine warfare, screening, anti-aircraft, escorting, carrier-plane guarding, amphibious operations, radar picket duty, and shore bom- bardment duties. They carry tive inch guns, and 40 millimeter anti- aircraft guns which provide anti-aircraft and highly accurate shore bombardment gunfire. The ship carries 5 torpedoes weighing about TM tons each. The gun mounts on the ship require over 150 men to man them during General Quarters. These men are made up ot gunners mates, deck personnel, stewards, and cooks and can be manned and ready to tire in a matter of minutes. The water that the people of the United States drink every day is not pure enough to make steam in the ship's engineering plant, therefore, she distills her own. The ship's two turbines can develop 60,000 horsepower, equal to 600 Ford automobiles. The propeller blades alone exert a force 225 tons against the ocean in order to drive the ship at 30 knots. During T952 the ship steamed about 45,000 miles. The radio equipment alone uses as much electricity in one day as the normal home would use in two weeks. The ship, if necessary, could communicate with ten different ships at the same time. Some of the transmitters are capable of reaching V5 of the way around the earth. The ship normally consumes T500 pounds of food per day, or 225 tons per month at a cost of approximately 5'l40,000.00 per year. ln the last year the ship's store has sold 525,000.00 worth of soap, candy and cigarettes. Pay allowances for the ship's crew totals more than 51,000,000 per year of which the cash payroll amounts to 5300,000. The ship carries about 575,000 in cash, and invests 52,500 per month in war bonds. The ship's laundry if operated day and night can accommodate 1,000 people per month. 1' N X 5 'L Compiled and illustrated by J. E. Kramer, Lf. G95 U.S.N.R Photographs by J. Davis, Ens. U.S.N.R. Printed by Wilkinson Press, Inc., Newport, R. I. n.-4..v 2 1 A '?"L1 --351. '..'1."T"' - - . xx ..-,-'v5-- -- .R ' lu. -,gy '. 2-f uh v -fix, Q-.35-5. ,M , , It I s , , ,,-,l3,,l-.CN "s 1 Y Qc..-fd -'..-Md 1 -Y, 5' -.X X :J 1 . at . ,ik ' 37' -1' ww- ' K A ,V D .xxx y X. L.. Q' x-. 'iffy r- Jfi Q 431' H v r, , If 'lf .1 'I' Q5-ali:-sg :f ' " ' ' -JH... -'llI'.L!1' 2-- x . y K USS GATLING nn-671 WURLD CRUISE 300K i april-december 1953 . I 'ff QQ , ff the GATLI G 1 v 1 4 4 b, E 1 T sf 5 fi 5, 1 1 ll ll N l l l 5? 11 5 ji 1 E i l l ! 1 x l s l A l R 'f 1 1 i 1 5 , .li I 1 'l 1 ,r l 1 I I ll is 11 :Z S i ll li .i V l 5 1 5, I 3 5 E t 4 2 2 9 4 F Cilmlllilliiiflil oeiviiiiiiitif CDR OWEN graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1941. During W.W.II he partici- pated in most of the major naval engagements, both in Europe and Asia. He is a surViV01' of the sinking of the Yorktown at the Battle of Midway. After the war ended, CDR OWEN attended the Post Graduate School at Annapolis, served on the staff, COMBATCRUPAC, and on the staff Joint American Military Advisory B02lI'd Group, London. Since July 1952 he has command- ed the GATLING on operations Mainbrace and Springboard, and throughout her tour of duty in the Far East. LCDR GAVIN is a graduate of Holy Cross College. He received his commission in 1942. During the war his service, all in mine sweep- ers, took him from North Africa to Iwo Jima. After a brief period of inactive duty following V-J day, LCDR GAVIN returned to active service as Inspector-Instructor, Naval Reserve Unit, Troy, N.Y. His next duty was on the staff COMMINPAC. ln February 1953 he be- came executive officer of the GATLING and served in this capacity during the world cruise. EXEEUEIEE EEEIEEE Lieutenant Commander James F. Gavin, USNR EMU' shlp s history The U S S GATLING QDD 6711 IS named for Richard J Gatling the inventor of the famed rapid fire machine gun which bears his name She was built at the Federal Ship buildmg and Drydock Company at Kearny New Jersey and in August 1943 commissioned at the New York Navy Yard Brooklyn New York From that time till the final defeat of the Japanese Empire she sailed as a un1t of famed Task Force 58 From the invasion of Truk to Saipan from the invasion of Emerau Island to New Guinea from the Marianas Islands to the Phillipines from the Battle of Leyte Gulf to Iwo Jima and even to the Japanese surrender m Tokyo Bay she did her job as screening ship, in shore bombardment, as rescue destroyer. During the Battle of Leyte Gulf, the men of the GATLING dis- tinguished themselves brilliantly when the GATLING rescued 326 sur- vivors of the U.S.S. Princeton from the sea. As a result, four crew members were awarded the Navy- Marine Corps Medal, two officers and fourteen men the Bronze Star Medal. In addition to this, the Gatling sank two enemy ships, shot down eight enemy planes, fired 77 tons of am- munition and rescued thirty seven American airmen from the Pacific -- all without the loss of a single crew man. The GATLING had served as a member of the most powerful navy the world has ever known. Then with the end of the war she was retired to the reserve fleet. For five years she remained in her status of watch- ful waiting. As a result of the Korean crisis the GATLING was recommissioned at Charleston Naval Shipyard in Jime 1951 She was modernized at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard then was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet During the summer and fall of 1952 and wmter of 1953 the GATLING part1c1 pated in Operations Mambrace in the North Atlantic and in Operation Springboard in the Caribbean Sea On April 27th the GATLING sailed from Newport RI on the first leg of the Journey that was to take her to Korea and eventually around the world Stops on the way to the Far East included Balboa in the Canal Zone San Diego Pearl Harbor and Midway Islands. While serving with Task Forces 77 and 95, and Task Group 96.7, the GATLING visited Yo- kosuka, Hokodate and Sasebo, Japan. The Korean Truce which came after the first tour with T.F.-77, didn't affect her employment sche- dule. The ports of call on the long voyage home were: Manila and Subic Bay, P.I.g Singapore, Colony of Singa- pore, Colombo, Ceylon, Cannes, France, and Lisbon, Portugal. Since her recommissioning the GATLING has .crossed the Arctic Circle, the International Date Line, the Equator and has circumnavigated the globe. The most significant of her travels -- though not miles steamed, elapsed time- or precedents set --was the crossing of the Atlantic to reach Philadelphia and home in time for Christmas. 'Q 0ffz XX. S. x0-'N NSY BCM sun GF-8 1001 ESL?-S-'Y F'-"W cfm 5899- 30 vafdoxw use msyil-,gxb 055 QOESGH 7, . aim me YBDOE'-E-D kdm: comma M01 was GATWSS or. 269000 mi MNYOECY, 3.1. ow 21 xx? 0.1.3 sm UYSGG, om... 'PEP-BL Worx fiona ml- TD DE? BOP., ? NS . KNIFE ws nm 019101 -. Xm men 919901 aoxm 'no spa. Massa, w: sa. 3 vuwwi xsmmoeg xowsoeuu, ae. qw- mama YXBST mimi of gms., Bxeyoac wzo com RN AL 101.05 ..1.,,,, i 2 i A l ! It was the Panama Canal, and incidentally, a long hot day at sea detail. The iron mules did all the work. What do they pay the Snipes for, anyway? N PANAMA CANA 1 A I A Ei I A i 1 5 A A 1 A Balboa and a 24 hour survey of the y tropical Canal Zone lie just ahead. To get underway again at 2200 3 tomorrow may be land wasl diffi- A A 'A cult. A A A California-1's highways lead to home, Hollywood or jai alai. ' This clean, gleaming city was Our last look at the Continental U.S. an Diego We had sailed thousands of miles when we reached San Diego, but we were still "home." Our far Westerners took a couple of days leave, some men look- ed over the situation in sprawling Los Angeles the rest went south of the border to Tiajuana the tour1st's Mexico All of us took an extra long look at our surroundings Though the whole world lay ahead of us there was a great deal that we would leave behind Ocean, palms, bright sun, people of many races -- these were Hawaii. There were famous names too: The Royal Hawaiian, Waikiki, Don the Beachcomber'S, Diamond Head. xxw M im gf I dgnwyyi L 5 if X f 5 We put on aloha shirts and bathing suits and tried to do justice to them all. History and the battleship Arizona went almost unnoticed. Perhaps they blended so well with thoughts of our future that we could not see them. MIDWAY W2 S ff fm y p IKE.. ,,f.,.,. .N lux: :Q 1 Q, N Wil, Q, , ff . -:R X Z! Q.,- The island was just sand and gooney birds, but pleasant. Our baseball team got out and did its darndest. So 'did a few enterprising crew members. Dis- satisfied with a two-can beer party, some used private capital to better their lot, the more indoctrinated merely arequisitioned' a case or two from stock. Never outdone, the shore fire control party had donned their short- pants and paddled to the beach. To the few nurses on the sands they were fascinating commandos. To the more cynical of us they looked like some- thing else. fx , ., f Xfff i X' . .s.. ,S x g If U . . f, X f Q 2 a as X "W, X X ' l Z X W '5 " ' J?si"Qfy:s , W , fs' ,-:gs -W 331 A- , ' -..fff11.'Z, ' , , x, Y, f 0 XV' 1 4, -l Q- ff , l , f f, ff: f 1 'ma A mv-i. mx,-, -- , 1 S-'N 221 X X 'f X f 1 N,-f pier. 1 W ...7,e'f'T5,, W' 'W .,.,ff,....-...f qw -My-JF: l 'W M 1 , A fm, 'V Q . "" "' " mram'-'wr ' 'lm,f,vf,, . M V In ,,,,,..:. bww W V .. M' iw, W X. My up -,. f ,.i f ...M u if' b'u.,.,, s- , , , , s..,.,.s , lf, M f- WX N xl pf ,.f,,,,.. N 'W ., .Q There's one of those birds and here we are at the fuel J W its if -4 5163 5' f x M, ' - - - - ..g.g.-...Q..i4.xQ,,4.....h1.4.4 4 5.4-4 L , 5 g I usxwzm 1 vf aw glO UpATE u I 1' f 1 .1 .X 0104 ro, e x In , I 9 X ' K ' was We re There ' v X U X f ,,, p ,. J xx ,youll . if LN 1' 'arf ,Z QW 2 ,a Z' -f , Csfn Q f N gk xxx I 4 --ng.. n-...W .MM Looks 0.K., just stay upwind. U I 5 , . ? o 4 l The new hasn't completely replaced the old. i i A F ssss, Q , ig.-. ny' 5 wi The kids were cute This is a kid? N0 doubt here. iii Japan is an overpopulated, under- nourished island nation that once chal- lenged the United States for control of the Pacific Ocean. The lives of its people have long been centered around the family group. Japanese institutions have emphasized this family unit and the glorification of the male as master. The sudden influx of American service- men in 1945 tended to upset the old mores. All phases of Japanese life, social, economic, as well as political, have felt the influence of the free spend- ing Americans QAmerican service men spend 51,000,000 a day in Japanl. to great pains to provide it -- atapl-ice Taxi dances thrive, street walkers and camp followers abound, Stateside music comes from every bar, on the street corners souvenir salesmen hawk their wares. We saw all this at the Casbah, the Cross Roads, Mike's Place, in the Sun Laundry and its fantail empire, in the thousand bum boats in every port in the strikers aboard ship. We of ,the Gatling were part of this peace time revolution. Glorification is now on the other foot-- r'-' 7 g H .. ,-, young girls have been attracted toward 9 ff T A A ' the sea ports and other military bases. t , L X ' In the cities, western dress has become . prevalent. Women are allowed to vote. p The Japanese are an ingenious ,-Mg people. They have learned what the A fi lonely Americans want and have gone M fx J I Af fri' --. were an - -r -. u i ,J e -R 1 The Ginza, center of Metropolitan Tokyo. Gil?" 1 ' V l il! They sketch your portrait while you wait. This one was taken with a tele- photo lens. Looks almost like the other pictures, doesn't it? It was the fourth of July and the ship was high and dry -- we were just high. I 4 These are the people who could give you an enlarged color painting of any photograph for 1000 yen. You can almost hear the cuckoos clanging out "China Night." vw--H.-- we 5 Ar 7.1 i We 0 Q 5 y r yafqmex .7 NX Lying' 11, Q i,g?MfMfvL,.,5zir S 3 :fr A an ' F ww, 1,37 if f xx ew- E X4 Q XV! if yf la sn - x A '-. 0021 'YT' f, ...all Th1s would be a hell of a 1 t Oncommg honey bucket P ace O meet an W1th the a1d of these mdustrxous gentlemen, any lnspectxon would be an absolute breeze o o ---.......... .. ,....g .-.L.. -4... 5,44-. ,,, - Y, A V nun- ,, V These chaps look like they were up late last night doing the "tongo-bush"-- coal digger dance to you. They ax'en't even giving her a tumble. This is her day off. See her tomorrow doing He's explaining that this is no ordinary the Lindy at the Grand Shima. beer-can lighter. No, it's an old family heirloom worth four times the price State- side. x 1 w El 5 x Y 3 i s L 3. E I E N N I1 9 i 1 i J 4 1 1 1 .1 l , 4 -.,..... .-..........,..-. .4-...- Z . "Zng,,,, :' W -X A N 1 x 1 , ,. 3:2 X? iii 1. X wi 23 33 Rx tl 9 wa - X ,L 3 , m , H x ix ...A+--. -+.a.a.....r 1...-., HOW much? Whaaatlll 1500 yen? Nah! QNegativeJ You'11 have to do better than that! I'm a poor papa-san! 1000? Still too much. Yeah! fAffirmativej Okay, 600 yen. . . .And we got what we came for :Til lk W ts , V w hy t 1 h t 4 5, Ng W H V 11 i W E U E r, H 5 1 5 11 9 I 1 N I - -,. , ,-v.... .-.--1 ff- -' f-f -f A-- - ,,--?,....., v..,,,.. ., , They bought hats. . . . . . How about them? With 77 and 9 CLP-SSXFYCP-HDR MS? NGN Nl MNA NDGBtHF1 'E S UORXCH nw 00000019 5 mm 00 memos 30 ww use 09.11100 Us 00? 02000 use 00501000 us 0900001 01030000 00? rm ioxsosum. 00 10 me mo 9000030 Nm. uw: our-axis 0900 maivma REPORT 10 'LOU P-RE 1 BDUTE.TO YOX MESS DXHBC 'WY 77 ,www We did just about everything a destroyer could be called upon to do short of direct combat, and then, we had to be ready for that too. We stood condition III watches that were so boring, they were painful. To add variety to the day we transferred mail, freight or personnel. It was just like the sign on the Princeton said-- twenty-four hour service. We even went so far as to refuel com- pletely blacked out one night. That was a pistol! When we were with the carriers, we steamed in circular screens -- and usually in circles. There were never more than four or five formation changes or ten or twelve course changes per watch. Then, of course, there was plane-guard and life-guard and guard mail to be taken care of. p ww-ff p N , gwqg 'W' ,.,,, T. I wx Here, just like everywhere, it was either a feast or a famine. When we were patrolling we had to stand on our heads to find something to do. We held inspections, happy hours and afishing contest in which no one caught any fish. As long as we didn't run over any Japanese fishing boats, we were okay. Our hunter-killer exercises were the most balanced operating we did, We lived through all of it, though, and we're better men today for having done so -- well, aren't we? 'HK Y ' lfliig, 13: Il-:H -ll f 1 -. , 31 v -..- j g . X L -Z ' K- X ,5 3-E25 l i' xx. T Y A xx - - it 5 fl X t ,1f:fj5 -g f X ,zu 31465577 g X X -. : i " 2 , x ' ,' ' ,. ' X 1'-fel --' gif:-' , ', 4" 172f:'.'y N --1 ff 2' 'i X-4 F 1? we-.5131 ' "lea, 'ifi-if . .12 '11, xi - f 5.4511 I f- 4r.i:f--i, .ss ' A 1' fl? S 1' 65" f 5 ,ff it 1 --gf 4 '-'N lf1::.'f ffl-' - ' 'ig 2- :-A---71 - , ,, i EE' ? :QQ , , 5 X -3- X Win -zgf' xx ' 455. ' ' I 11' 4? S ,,9.. X I ig - '21 '-Q4 3 'rw much coke aboard. ' DVB L f "1-j x 5-1-1' N ? I NB 4 J J 5 .v 'v I 4? 'il 3 2 X Tgxlgi Q Sfulfgl s "A O 0 9 Q f'5 L44 f ea Dog' been ln the Navy elght months l0ne of h1s brother's back ln '42J entral Park Commando' canoe shape for effect 7'- X? 'f 'Side Wheeler holes 1n s1de of head Paul" - covers corners lndes " ot' hgures headwill grow to s1ze x W Z 3 'LLP all 6 Borrowed' - too lazy to wash his own W .,, 0 'fra--...luf .- i"s'6-'x' OCS f0VeI' the CFIOPPY 'Carrier Sailor' -- espirit 'Hollander' -t- been over- Seas ' de COTPS- seas too long also keeps rain off ears. a HAT 0F l : if W3 1 X w i A h 'Joe ncouegetl -- wouldrft ana: 1t011gr" --for effects, 'Air Dale' -- wait nu he 2 have If RRY 0 el' Way- keeps insides clean. gets ashore, I I L R- 5115 "'-- 2'I3 r 0 'GJ - 0' f sqft! was Q 2 ' 1 N I 9 Q: 5 ' EJ- s K it R ! ' ' 1 Y I 'Sun Worship' -- must 'Hollywood' -- thinks hat 'Brand New -- can't do l watch his noseg usually cuteg girls love him. a thing with it very brown. g 4' XX K: llxl' "' xuul',n qmllfje ll ll ' .f U fffff" , S L 'All or Nothing At All' 'I Don't Care' -- uSl1211Y Magna ill' gsisgglagnow -- hides fact he's bald. makes out like mad. W S go g S l 2 'Happy Hour' and recreation WMU M I, , x X X f, W rf! X , Q. '- 5 Z y 'KW ff Q ', i fka f if x x S' ' 7, Q A Wm 7 2963 6 K 4 1, Km ' Y -Q. fm. ,Hg , 'L- XWW f mmsymw. SNK . X , N xii? Glling Home! W. S. NNN- NSYNW auo GEN 1007 Of cu-ssxmmou P11001 COYNAVFQ-:Zi- IIIIIV: W- I FF? .i , I A ACUON1 GO1mESg2Q,,',',,..,,,'.',, III? xggw ues Gmmxc, use CPLPEHYON, ues onsmm, use woman 0700002- 'IOU BRE- UXREOTED 'YO DE? P-YH SRS?-BO, JAPAN ON 3 OCTOBER AND PBDCEEU vu M051 Diem: mm 'ro 1-xmxu., P .1. 5 snsou, xuno-ouimg swap.- Povceg comm , cm-om sum smug amuse, gmlcag mason, Poem GAL P-NU ?X'U-LPvD'El-?YY1Ik. UPON IKRBXVIAL YHXLP-UELPYUJN, REPORT 'YO OOF , X X f , ff If me Phillipines Travel in groups of 3x or 4, don't wander around at night, don't discuss politics, and above all, don't change money on the black market. Except for these warnings, we would have thought Manila was a pretty nice city. "Shane" was playing on a wide screen down town. You could get a banana split at the drugstore. The beer hall at the end of the pier was selling potent San Miguel. Subic Bay was even more pleasant. "C" division beat "O" in softball,every- one had an outing. The swimming pool was great. Besides, we were on our way home. S1-lGO r 5 9 , A The pilot on the trip up the Saigon River was a real "hot-rod." We were racing the tide and we won with a little to spare. On the way we passed a royal yacht, French river forts and many strange fishing boats. ln the city itself, we were welcomed as visiting dignitaries. There were receptions and counter-receptions for the 1 brass. The division picture made the first page. Merchants were p glad to see us too. We had been told to exchange our money at thirty-five apastries' to the buck. It was rumored that the Indian shop keepers would have given sixty-five. Saigon had a few things that were the most expensive, little v that was the best, and one thing that was the biggest in the- world. We found the beer halls, bought a few souvenirs, hailed a rickshaw for a tour of the town Generally we were on our good behavior The people were watching us closely there was always a crowd of onlookers at the pier When fmal reports were m though all mght cabarets had been found too and the port's difficult lang uage barrier had been bridged many times we were m all respects ready to cross the lme N l S ga ff YQ aww 1 f W, W X say W, F X fX X MN W' N M fm , we-JW?" Q vm ' , ,-xW,,,.W,,m, ff 3 , N I M -if v j , xv , Q ' ,715 X 3. .. , ,V x A ' M, A . 4, SZ. -- ' K 1 The lookouts -- slimy pollywogs all -- were on deck in force. They manned their long glasses in search of King Neptune. Crossing Here they are in full regalia, that hardened group of salty, deep-water sailors, the trusty Shellbacks. Many unusual tasks had to be per- formed to test the po11ywog's readi- ness for shellbackhood. the Line A watery rebellion put the ship in the pollywog's hands. A portion of the captain's wardrobe was flown from the yardarm. Just punishments were metered out. Here is one initiate about to face the last' of hisordeals. H5594 The following day order was re- stored. The pollywogs, guilty of misconduct, were brought to court to face the king and queen. The English supp11ed us with Wide squat liberty barges handled by expert Malayan crews 'The tr1p to the beach seemed to take hours especlally when clean Smgapore 1tself was complex and the people strange We made a mental note of th1s and went mernly on our way we were worried about keeping Whi'C6S 5 f c ' xl 'N 7 la f 1 D O 0 t Q X ' 7 ' - av 1 " , d fp-' cgnnxxggjon you wouldn t stan a The f1rst stop was the Br1ttan1a Club Somet1mes that was as far as we got Food was reasonable w1th three Smgapore dollars to one Amer1can The Raffles Hotel the Cock p1t Room of the Hotel Europe and the Pr1ncess Restaurant all had great steaks In the out sklrts we took 111 the amusement parks the three worlds Th1s was the place the Lake Champlain Jomed us To the mev1table quest1on "Chl Are you from the earner?" we learned to answer qu1ck1y "No I have sea duty " When Fr1day mornmg rolled around we got underway n Q . ' o s , O . 1 a I , 1 0 . . - u a , ' a Q u o . - , I , g 0 Y 9 Q o . . Y Q Z '-A-am Such men looked as familiar as Arthur Godfrey. eu on The terrace of the Mt Lavinia Hotel at dusk. Where there were no streams, the daily bath was more difficult We squeezed into the harbor got onto the pier, passed the tea store and the bank, and fought our way through the guides and taxi drivers. Finally into the buses, we were on our way inland on a tour of Candie, coooanut trees, rubber plantations, elephants, exotic girls, tea factories, cashew nut venders, and lunch at the Queen's Hotel, then back again, all for four dollars. In Colombo when we werenlt buying sapphires, we were lounging at the Gaule Face or Mt. Lavinia Hotels. When it came time to leave, we packed our new carved elephants and put to sea. ' I P 5 I fe"- ' N I ' S 5 , , KH Q K :ah '11 I QU-.-'rs Q 'l6" f' D l an f - Q ,9 IH' 4 K N FQMAQ ' ', V I , ., i ' 'Ai - . I sfgfle' 2 gs- A A B fi A ulliinp fx A 5'i?jZ'5 T'-' " 2 ,X .f. fwiffffffiw .NAP .N"NA,-,"Xrj f f-7 ff'n'xr'XZ,.x,l r- S01 If you didn't ride the ele- phants, you hadn't really been ashore. Marked down '53 models with the new two foot power engine. The beer on Ceylon was good, too. Here's proof positive. D . ,S f I , 1 'W . -1 8 - , ,wg nb' ' Wig- wwwfffflaww Q5 mf 'x 514 " . ,, -Y A E Xiu ask za gfggvlgiw u MM., .WAT 11 M X, , . 'f .iw -an 'X ' 3- ' ' wwf f' .. ! .Q M .I 'I NVQ 4 xx, A I M I Sbywyffwyu ,, J V -. . 'Y I -rw - as ,MN-f f L 6 Ani jifie f ww , Q . . 1' ",. A . in -f 3573 K ff f' , QW ww f - -, 13 - i R 4 , "" w, , I--x - ,, ,. ' ,. xv, z M' .114 H'- In . . f , ,..-N, ,. , x! H' H ,, 1 ,f W' , 1 5-B - ' ' ' Qqx fg w ' .Y-5.3.-av fit' ' , 1 w"'w'fTW' .4- .,-,,..,,fj4 'Q .wif ' , H . F ,y X- 4,2 ,N ,, H P 1 in .I H . 'W' 1 ' , 1' W A Q W f xvx x , faggazgvgsfm A K A-v,gfw.a61f'," 'Wy 'X N . .X . I , ...., 3 s J, - f ' ' fm - - '- . 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W 6, Q 5 f- X M' ,Z , M-: u , 'f'f',,f?'-'g G 0 I, W Vw ' , my-'ff ' , .af 13, 5 'K Lv Q11 1,1 ng "' fa , ' ' Q," " K Y' "ggi, 3 ' ' f Yf"M'f' T 5' if ,, ' ,A 1. . Mun MMN 17. 8 1. ,4 .. -, .Q bx.f""'f F. vs . b M44-A ,, an -.. --N ' we-q,M , -1, Q4 if 'Isla xg-.ghfz XT? 'Qi-. X -4' --Q5-413' "5"-3 Fc., -jk A ' H-:ig Xh51.xw.,x. .. ' 05.3413 W- . in Q 1 K uez Canal , 1 and the Med ' ' X I f ffw ff Y my A9169 X 4 , M055 , 0 52 0 , as Q ,, I f 'Vi , 'Y' .fly WLAN You can't beat those French!! Fifteen minutes after we anchored in Cannes Harbor they hadjammed the quarterdeck with beautiful young ladies. They sold perfume, 400 day clocks, or the latest Paris fashions right there amidships. Gatling men went ashore and took a guided tour of Grasse, Nice, Monte Carlo, etc. The stragglers hired their own Renault cars, put in a cup full of gas, and drove to all those places on their own. Although it was off-season on the Riviera, most of the spots had opened their doors for us. 1 l All the leaves hadn't fallen. The weather was still that early autumn. In the harbors the boats were all tied up for the winter. France was one country that was almost exactly like we had seen in the movies. The people were very relaxed. They appeared unconcerned with the worries of the world. ff' , -W frigmyw , Q My TW ENTQSQ-N il ff W-W" 119' Lisbon was the last port we stopped at and it was the cleanest -- the build- ings and our wallets had that fresh scrubbed look. There were tours here too. Things we saw and heard about began to ring a bell. .., v,,,,n' Portugal The city looked like a cross between New Orleans and San Francisco. We all knew of Prince Henry the Navigatorg the name Columbus sounded familiar too. There was plenty of night life. Wine was as popular as in France. A funny thing though, the people of Portugal were kind of lifeless. They seemed content, but you never saw anyone smile. rfffff . " is 1 X f s . Zi " faqs . f f i SV XE, A 312 J I i g. i ,, 1 2 3 w 4 l l 1 I E . The Champ' We escorted the Lake Champlam halfway around the world We all grumbled a l1ttle about wa1tmg for her and about m1ssmg Naplf-JS but we were proud to have her along Let's face lt there 1S some thmg about those flyboys The ones that rode w1th us between ports Qto see what lt was l1ke to be underwayy LCDR J oralmon LT's Jomes Battens Clark ENS Veach were all regular guys They told some ha1r ra1s1ng stones too The U S S Lake Champlam was mlghty handy to have around If the weather got rough we could fuel from the Champ If we wanted to lmow about the next port we got the poop sheet fI'0II1 the Champ 1f we wondered why we were s1ng1ng 'Wa1t T111 the Slm Shmes Nell1e ' for the th1rd t1me We got that from the Champ too She had better radar more spare parts a real hosp1tal fme small stores and an honest to goodness gedunk stand These thmgs far outwe1ged the fact that the papers now read "U S S LAKE CHAMPLAIN and four other shxps arr1ved tod y Q 9 bi i Y l L N I 1 1 I y o a o ' ' N 9 1 Q . , - 1 0 , . ' , g I 5 J- 9 9 9 ' Y' J- 9 o o 2 . u 2 o a n 4 . Q! - Q , a . , 9 ' 1 I . Q Q e Q 1 ' 1 7 , ' , ' 7 ' ' , i P . , U , s I - s . . 1 4 . . E, IJ! n 0 0 a' ' 5 ' li 4 E ll In lx 1 3 Qi H A 1 Wm ' 1 L. 1 E I 52 1 zz 1 i Q 4 l 1 1, l R, l 2 1 1 I 1 il i N l '4 3 1, 5 54 , ii' PN , z 1 rs 1, , W. 1 ,fn I '14 I xx um XNQW, fr X .-w""'M,- - xx Keep it Coming n Now the pehcan hoo E ul - ni 1111. 1 11 111 111 W 1111 T There, Safely in the trunk. Start Pumping! I i J 1 C I ,+ . B-,, H How's the first division doin' ? okay, heave I ,gg Q N fs 1-13 1 e -n-I-"""" S 1 1111111 S ,A 111111 5 i J X N R i Up w1th the easmg out 11ne .si There was nuttm to lt! .--"" .1-lj """""'mp. Wm ,O Y Y rf-I 'W A 1 I 1 1. 'vi - ' . - - il. , SI ei , A Ek wx . Eau , fl , .....s ,, ,A,. 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Q-.-vi" fn, 4.7 14 E 1, K KG x gr 4 The Men of the Gatling 8 'A W Ng -- V F 1403 7153 Torpedomen x Fire Controlmen i?: r ?."3 ' A and onarmen . 6' 1 I I 2 Gunner Mate I ,Egg -A Q v4 f , 3 15 K if 151 i Q XX! WL 6 N 0 2:2-5 1 'L' Wu, .sf 4 -riff- f wa-1 fm 0,0 4 L., 3 -x ,V ,QZQZ NNN 292 ff- wr" 0' N. Q 2 4, I 1 Q f G x ' xp-"2 'G' Lg! Q 1 K -fy as 5 :f,' G G 5 1 I7 2 be I s A .X 54.1, 1 49 K I! 54 if ' Er' I ff , " , '3' ,.' " 2:1 xx " ' ' - 1' r Q 5 xx N, 4 ii 1: T ' , 4 .- '1' Q 5 , Qgfae 4 J 0 7 K ' '3 A Z5 1' we fi ff if 9 2 2. ' W K - IIEEA L' 'N Q qt,-'25, F" , ff: W. 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'53 -'M' p uh :by Al ' 9 t f'-- W, ' Qf I mxs , 54.4 ijnununse- QQO ' 'Yes, captain, we're just south of Omaha! 4-' Q Q O O O 0 Dlvl lon Q 'Q v 1 ,V j f M4 -.sf 1 fy If riff P i gf!! I ,af 5 . ky . X "7" Q5 0-Wk Wim 'D V. , 4 3 - 0' X TX wg-5,'L..,.w.'Q . 5 Ufflcers M ' 'Vw Q?' 'l I-I W1 -' V xx 3 O -2-:-3 Q-qv Q4 Q -a MEM! B 'x. px Dum K5v g M- Sasebo, Kyushu, Japan 4 K 27 April 2 May 2 May - 3 May 11. May - 16 May- 21 May - 24 May 27 May 27 May 2 June 6 June 7 June 27 June 29 June 11 July 12 July - 23 July 23 July - 24 July 25 July - 2 August 3 August - 22 August 23 August - 5 September 6 September - 17 September 18 September - 4 October 5 October - 9 October 13 October - 15 October 15 October - 17 October 20 October - 22 October 23 October 25 October - 27 October 1 November - 3 November 11 November 16 November - 18 November 21 November - 24 November 4 December ltiner ary Departed Newport, Rhode Island Transited Panama Canal Balboa, Canal Zone San Diego, California g Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii Midway Islands Crossed International Date Line Yokosuka, Honshu, Japan Operated with Task Force 77 Yokosuka, Honshu, Japan Operated with Task Group 96 7 Hokodate, Hokkaido, Japan Operated with Task Force 95 Operated withTask Force 77 Yokosuka, Honshu, Japan Operated with Task Force 77 Sasebo, Kyushu, Japan Manila, Phillipine Islands Subic Bay, Phillipine Islands Saigon, Indo China Crossed the Equator Singapore, Colony of Singapore Colombo, Ceylon Transited the Suez Canal Cannes, France Lisbon, Portugal Arrived Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Editor Photography J. 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Suggestions in the Gatling (DD 671) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Gatling (DD 671) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 46

1953, pg 46

Gatling (DD 671) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 21

1953, pg 21

Gatling (DD 671) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 82

1953, pg 82

Gatling (DD 671) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 84

1953, pg 84

Gatling (DD 671) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 52

1953, pg 52

Gatling (DD 671) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 5

1953, pg 5

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