Garrett High School - Aeolian Yearbook (Garrett, IN)

 - Class of 1956

Page 1 of 92

 

Garrett High School - Aeolian Yearbook (Garrett, IN) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 92 of the 1956 volume:

' AU. irJilU, W®i!||!jj iiiilil , I M. V., ' li PiiSiiiiiii piipip iliwiili yf:. iSsi w i ,V ' ' iiipifii !iiiill»i@i iPPSi Plifli feo iSiSfii! ! [Wig ' ii That little fellow on the cover is Aeolus, king of the winds. He is blowing to you the message of this school year. The first G.H.S. annual appeared in 1912 as a result of the senior class’ desire to do something different. The project of a class play was set aside and all efforts turned to the annual. Not until 1916 was another produced—both books were named after the respective class colors. A large part of the early annuals was literary —there were few pictures. Snapshot and joke pages were in abundance. Since 1918 every senior class has produced a yearbook. In 1919 the name Aeolian was chosen and became a tradition. The content of the Aeolian was to be, like the Aeolian harp, noted for its beautiful and prolonged notes. Aeolus, in silhouette, brings to you the message of the 1955-56 school year. When you see a shadowy outline or hear the wind sighing—let it recall this year. GARRETT HIGH SCHOOL GARRETT, INDIANA 1956 organizations pages 25-42 JUNIOR HIGH pages 49-56 AEOLIAN pages 57-79 SXiiul “Oops! Your knees are showing!” Bermudas appeared at first football game. SEPTEMBER . . . Old faces, new faces, amused faces, confused faces—first day of school . . . Junior kick-off dance dubbed “Football Frolic” . . . “Exec’s” elected in each class . . . Frosh girls “given the works” by sophomore girls at Blue Triangle initia¬ tion . . . “The Old Ark’s a-Moverin’ ”—Mr. Charles A. King led group singing at first assembly program . . . “All set? You bet!” New yell leaders and pep are synonymous . . . Bermudas prevail at “Hop- Scotch Hop” . . . Linda Duerk elected “prez” of GAA . . . Peanuts and cotton candy, judges and blue ribbons—Auburn fair time again . . . Horns? No, it’s only motions to “Rolled Away” at first assembly program. 4 OCTOBER . . . Magazine sale launched . . . “To work, seniors”— Aeolian staff announced . . . Dale Holmes and Mary Alice Minniear stepped into the spotlight as “Teens of the Week” . . . Charcoal gray and white were chosen as the colors of ’58’s sweaters . . . “Sing, boys, sing”—boys’ octet organized . . . “May I have a name card please?” . . . “Hobo Hop” was well attended by appropriately-clad students . . . Again, Blues were “blue” after magazine sale: Linda Harman, high salesman; Tom Burtch, mystery day winner; Charlotte Atkins, mystery student . . . Teachers’ Association meant a “breather” for “overworked” students . . . Auburn’s jinx was broken—yells, snake dance, speeches, singing—exuberant Garrett fans celebrated in t he business district . . . , VH e took. XnT a Sip Progress can’t be stopped. The ground-breaking ceremony for the J. E. Ober Elementary School was held June 7, 1955; work started that week. 5 Introducing—Railroaders! Larry Getts stepped through the hoop at first basketball game. “Shine on, harvest moon, on me and my gal.” Stu¬ dents svyfayed to the music of John Bishop’s Band at “Fall Fantasy.” „„e, aownV Cards presenred , Ow-W " ' " ’ ' NOVEMBER . . . “Rah! Rah!” Pep Club organized and officers elected . . . Sore anatomies followed skating party . . . Johanna Heinzerling was chosen DAR Good Citizen . . . “Come and join in song to¬ gether”—Alma Mater introduced by boys’ octet . . . “Eall Fantasy” theme of Hi-Y-Y-Teen-sponsored dance . . . “Which shall it be?” seniors pondered at College Night . . . Junior High yell leaders elected . . . “Pro’s” Louis Easterday and Eston Hathaway named on “All Conference Football First Team” . . . Chorus participated in Thanksgiving program . . . “Snowman’s Ball” enjoyed by all who attended . . . Linda Harman and Pat LaCroix featured as “Teens of the Week” . . . Victorious Maroons entertained by Blues at magazine party. DECEMBER . . . “Delicious—can’t be beat!” Lavish praise for Y-Teen sandwich sale . . . Teachers enjoyed Christmas party at Garrett Country Club . . . Annual Blue Triangle Christmas card sale a success . . . Several seniors suffered through scholarship tests . . . Juniors proudly displayed long- awaited treasures—class rings . . . Students celebrated another victory over Auburn at “Rudolph’s Rendezvous” . . . Spotlight focuses on Tom Farrington and Linda Duerk as “Teens of the Week” . . . Program by chorus enthusiastically received by PTA . . . Blue Triangle took gifts to Allen County Children’s Home . . . Band entertained students at Christmas program . . . Long-awaited vacation with all its festivities arrived . . . Railroaders’ were “champs” of holiday tourney. Entertainment was provided by sparring partners Louis Shutt and Rival McBride after sandwich sale. No fair load¬ ing his glove, Mr. Parks! bunny This v as the leeting- Daydreaming students watched progress of the elementary school from class¬ room apertures. 7 Holiday-tourney champs! Dale Holmes cut the last strand on the victory basket. JANUARY . . . Brand-new year and many broken resolutions as students returned to school . . . Long- awaited Leap Year arrived! Go, girls, go! . . . Whew! Rotten eggs! Chemistry students were at it again . . . “Be-Bop Sock Hop” enjoyed by shoeless students . . . Jinxed! First semester ended Friday the 13th . . . Fritz Feick and Eston Hathaway were exclusive members of crutches crew . . . “Rhythm Rendezvous” was a “real cool jewel” . . . Junior class and sponsors chose banquet co-chairmen, who then chose committee co-chairmen . . . Spotlight was turned on Kenneth Severson and Sharon Dicki- son as “Teens of the Week” . . . Vocal and piano contestants landed many superiors at district contest —on to state! Tha.-s our boy! Garrett Ians cheered the team to victory at the Churubusco gym. Half-time! Hard-working juniors sold concessions to crowds at basketball games. 8 FEBRUARY . . . “Hepcat’s Hideaway,” last basket¬ ball dance, was “real smooth” . . . Captain Paul Dry told of his experiences in the Merchant Marine at assembly program . . . Kenneth Severson and Karon Leech reigned as King ' and Queen at the Hi-Y “Queen of Hearts” dance . . . Instrumentalists rated many superiors at district contest . . . Beverly Fulk and Rex Freeman stepped into the spotlight as “Teens of the Week” . . . Two ensembles received superior at state music contest! . . . Sectional time again—Garrett defeated Auburn but went down in the last game . . . “In learning, live, and in living, learn” was chosen as senior class motto, and yellow rose was chosen as class flower. ban Cr, ow. 3nd iss -eivis. sponsor shaped Robert Wiant assisted Mr. Paul Dry in demonstrating how to send an S. 0. S. Louis Easterday and Robert Wiant pantomimed “Two Black Crows” at “Queen of Hearts” dance. 9 Contestants in the regional contest at Angola were Judith Tooman and David Ober, Latin I and 11, and on the right, Garl Zimmerman, algebra. MARCH . . . Eighth-grade basketball team, with an out¬ standing seasonal record of seventeen wins and two losses, were proud champs of four-way tourney . . . Alfredo Cava¬ lier! presented an excellent violin concert for assembly . . . Several teachers were stiff and sore following Teachers- Lions basketball game . . . Irish superstitions and lepre¬ chauns were pictured at “Shamrock Serenade,” freshman party . . . Faye Ashenfelter and Fred Andrews were high¬ lighted as “Teens of the Week” . . . Silvermoon rink was scene of gay, school skating party . . . Davies of Canada thrilled all with theif vocal renditions . . . Noon choir per¬ formed for veterans at Veterans’ Hospital ... A carnival with all the trimmings, sponsored by the PTA, provided fun for everyone . . . “Swing your partner and do-si-do!” sang out the caller at Y-Teen square dance . . . Difficult Latin and algebra tests were tackled by “brains” in the regional contest . . . Concert band performed before judges at Angola . . . Spring vacation held promises of “sleeping 10 The windows are in! Progress continued on the elementary school building, to be completed during the summer. S33 03124 APRIL . . . Sophomores celebrated spring’s awakening at “Springtime Serenade” . . . The senior class play, directed by Mrs. Schlecht, was presented April 12 and 13. Jeff and Hugo answered a very innocent ad which simply said “Ghost Wanted” and got themselves in a tangle of ghosts, zombies, secret service agents, secret passages, and inter¬ national intrigue. All this and romance, too, for they met some very charming girls on the desolate island. P.S. The butler did it! ... A medley from “South Pacific” and folk songs were featured at the vocal concert . . . George Gro- man entertained students in a program of dialects and col¬ loquialisms . . . Music by the band, ensembles, and seventh and eighth-grade choruses constituted the band concert. Rex Freeman (the Professori ,• • restrain - " - “iHsthesleepLg ' yS” " tta) ieverly Fulk (Troddy) registered horror as iae Anne Trainer (Ginger) peeked at Frank ohnson (Hugo, alias the Ghost). Janet Atkins Gale) and Louis Easterday (Jeff) seem mused by the whole situation. CN fN. to O M.. A„ee Mi„ P ay was block MAY OF ’55 . . . “Come-a-Roamin’ ” spelled excitement, intrigue, romance, and adventure to Juniors and their guests, the Seniors, in the high school auditorium May 6, 1955. Hawaii, Japan, Arabia, Holland, Spain, Italy, France, Scotland, Switzerland, and Egypt were the lands of en¬ chantment on Flight ’55’s schedule. The travel bureau at the entrance of the auditorium was the first clue to the even ing’s entertainment. Stepping inside the door, the huge Colosseum in Rome caught the eye, as did the large globe suspended from the ceiling. Six-feet high murals around the auditorium depicted scenic backgrounds of each coun¬ try. Table decorations were miniatures of outstanding characteristics of the corresponding country. “Off-we-go” music was furnished by Dick Showalter’s Quintet. Flight pilot Louis Easterday guided the tour to its destination. Beverly Fulk and Faye Ashenfelter rendered vocal solos, a How was the water, girls? A few of the brave people who ventured into the cold waters of Lake James at the picnic. Japanese hospitality was extendel head .able was .he .ahe-C pCn. 0 .he ..a., D.ch ShowaUe.s Qain.e. provided .o.ic lancing. Waterloo girls’ quartet sang, and Bobbie Foster presented a panorama. After a western hoedown at the Elks and a movie at the theater, the group trekked to the Eagles for breakfast. Jean—and bermuda-clad students enjoyed themselves at the annual picnie at Pokagon State Park, where fun, frolic, and food abounded. Several brave, adventurous persons went swimming (hrrr!), while others played softball or watched the activities. As usual, a few, with playful force, gave others an impromptu swim. Jokes and wise-cracks mingled with laughter around the tables laden with a bounteous spread. As dusk descended, tired, but happy, students headed for home — another treasure for life’s memories. j " g with banquet co-Sairmet Stenb Heinzerling. Stephen Gaw and Joh railing juniors and seniors. Servers of ten different nationalities catered m ti. j catered to the needs and whims of hosts and their 13 MAY OF ’56 . . . The high-school auditorium hecamc a “Fantasy Fair” as Disneyland people came to life for the Jr.-Sr. ban(]uet, May 4. The sophomore servers rep¬ resented characters out of eight different Disney books . . . Track and golf highlighted the sports scene . . . Incoming Y-Teen officers were installed in a beautiful candlelight ceremony before mothers and friends . . . Blue Triangle mother-daughter tea was reminiscent of spring . . . Baccalaureate was an impressive occasion when seniors first wore their caps and gowns and re¬ ceived inspiration from message and song . . . G ood times, consisting of softball, swimming, jokes, and food, were in abundance at annual picnic . . . Honor was given to deserving students on Recognition Day ... At the dinner preceding Commencement, seniors heard their futures prophesied and the names of “most” were announced . . . The goal was attained—Commencement, beautiful and solemn. Dr. A. C. LaFollette of Ohio Uni¬ versity addressed the seniors . . . “In learning, live, and in living, learn.” “Sign my Aeolian, please?” Nancy Ely watched Fred An¬ drews autograph hers. Teenettes sang for many events durinu ft. 14 DANIEL FULLER WAYNE BARTELS ESTON HATHAWAY JACK BEEBER I Seniors SIEVE GAW ICHARD WARNER NplAC fjrijt T6 •n S NEI AC‘ " Seconfd f earn ♦ Jk. • ' ! il ! Feick stops Doerffler on run through the line for a five yard gain The fighting crew o f G.H.S. gridders can be proud of their 1955 football season. The Railroaders dropped their first game, to a tough New Haven eleven but only after a hard battle. The following week, how¬ ever, the Railroaders roared back to take a decisive victory over Hicksville, 35 to 0. A second bid for the conference championship was made as the mighty Railroaders clashed with Concordia. Rl fate struck in the last 25 seconds of the game when the Cadets pushed over for a touchdown after the score had been tied 13-13 through most of the last half. Garrett won the next three consecutive conference games from Decatur, Kendallville, and Columbia City with little difficulty. Bluffton, a power in the conference, invaded Gar¬ rett’s field with thoughts of avenging the shellacking they had taken the year before at the hands of the Railroaders. They succeeded in beating Garrett 20-6. The game was very close until the last few minutes of the final quarter when the Tigers scored two fast touchdowns. As the season neared an end, the Railroaders traveled to Nappanee only to be held scoreless for the first time in the season by a powerful team. Garrett, having won three and lost three conference games, finished the season in fourth place in NEIAC standings. Steve Gaw , Louis Easterday , Eston Hathaway , Wayne Bartels . Front row: Thomas Farrington, Manager; Daniel Hutton , Ronald Weimer , Fritz Feick , William DePew, John Hile , John Richter, Ralph Wilcoxson, Adrian Thomp¬ son , Robert Livergood , Frank Felke, Manager. Lettermen Back row: Assistant Coach Smith, Don Thompson , Rick Williams , John Soudah , Frank Mossberger , Kenneth Car- roll , Lynn Andrews , Gene Barrett , Michael Manges, Steve Gordon , Paul Ridenour , Larry Matthews, Coach Capin. Middle row: Will Eastes , Daniel Fuller , Tom Ely , Richard Warner , Robert Wiant , Kenneth Severson, Jack Beeber , 6 Garrett 13 Columbia Garrett New Haven Garrett Hickssfill Cofifc ia 35 Garrett 0 Bluffton I. 13 Garrett 19 Nappanee 20 Garrett 0 Auburn , Garrett Decatur Auburn Bows tc ' l Garrett_ _14 Kendallville _ . 0 Garrett_ _20 New Haven 14 Garrett_ _20 Columbia City 0 Garrett __ _ 0 North Side 20 Garrett - 13 Auburn G Garrett.. . - 14 Howe Military 0 Garrett-..- . - -15 Hicksville 7 Garrett — 13 Kendallville —. _ 7 Assistant Coach WARD SMITH Coach RICHARD CAPIN Easterday stops Roemer on the four astray and was intercepted by the Auburnites. Both teams had to punt numerous times before the Red Devils finally completed a pass for their only TD of the game. The score stood 6-0 in favor of Auburn at the half. RESERVES Back row: Harry Jackson, Edward Maurer, Fred Salerno, Steve Steward, Daryl Severson, James Malcolm, Paul Griffin, David Karr, Tom Beeher, Dick Rowe. Front row: Walter Beeher, James Helbert, John Kobiela, Ran¬ dall Steffen, James Maurer, James Getts, James Steinmetz, Dave Vander- bosch, John Simon, Danny Shumaker, John Hutton, Dale Feick. It was a determined Garrett team, attempting to revenge the defeats of previous years at the hands of the Red Devils, that rushed onto Auburn’s field on the night of October 26. The Railroaders received the kick-off and with outstanding ball-handling moved the ball to the 10-yard line. At this point a rarrett After 12 Years Athletic Director PAUL BATEMAN Managers FRANK FELKE and TOM FARRINGTON Midway in the fourth quarter Coach Capin’s lads made their first touchdown. The last of four suc¬ cessive plays resulted in a 23-yard romp around left end by Lynn Andrews. Three minutes later Garrett punted to the Auburn 16-yard line. On the first play that followed, an alert Don Thompson re¬ covered a fumble. Only ten seconds remained in Wrecker Andrews starts a 23-yard jaunt to Garrett’s first touchdown against Auburn the game when Andrews scored the second and deciding touchdown. His spectacular zig-zag scamper around right end went through and around half of the Red Devil squad. Wayne Bartels made the successful plunge for the extra point. The Railroaders had a thrilling 13-6 victory in a game that will long be remembered. Senior Cheerleader BEVERLY FULK CHEERLEADERS—Dorothy Crow, Marilyn Fulk, and Donna Crow. Railroaders Have Successful Severson is high in the air for a jump shot. Will Eastes and Larry Getts close in for possible rebound. Garrett had one of its most successful basketball teams in the history of the school by chalking up a 204 record during the 1955-56 campaign. Under the guidance of Coach Ward Smith the Railroaders compiled a 22 home-game winning streak extending over two seasons. It was finally broken by a powerful Nappanee team. Starting the season with two wins but then losing the third game to New Haven, the inexperienced Railroaders soon caught fire. Such formidable foes as Auburn, Angola, Fort Wayne CC, and Bluffton were beaten as the Garrett team steadily improved. The fans of Garrett were given a thrill as the locals scorched the nets with 102 points in the Ligonier game. The Railroaders proved they meant business when the much-talked-about Avilla Panthers, having a seasonal record of 18 wins and one loss, came to Gar¬ rett. Playing brilliant ball in a record-packed gymnasium, the Garrett team defeated the Panthers to avenge last year’s loss. With only two conference foes standing in the way of a repeat performance as conference champs, the Railroaders dropped a 47 46 thriller to Concordia in an overtime. Decatur was added to the already long string of wins to climax the record-breaking season. Garrett drew Churubusco in the upper bracket of the sectional to be played at Churubusco. Because of the Railroaders’ fine sea¬ son, they entered the tourney as one of the favorites. Continuing to show fine ball-handling and shooting, the Railroaders eliminated the “Busco” Eagles from the tourney. From there on, however, it was a different story. Playing the Hamilton Marines the next night, the Railroaders were almost derailed. The Marines cut an 18-point lead by the Railroaders to finish only one point behind at the gun. Garrett next was to play Auburn who had advanced to the semi¬ finals by defeating Angola and Waterloo. With never more than 5 points separating the teams, the traditional rivals succeeded in completely unnerving the fans. With 20 seconds left Getts made a basket to put Garrett in the lead to stay. The Railroaders had had to work too hard to reach the finals with Fremont. Garrett played a poor shooting game while Fre¬ mont was hitting from all over. The Railroaders were upset by the Fremont Eagles 67-52. First Team Cheerleaders: Beverly Fulk, Dorothy Crow, Donna Crow, and Marilyn Fulk. Opponents Garrett Ashley __ __ 38 60 Huntertown .. _ 49 59 New Haven __ _ 63 50 Riverdale ____ _ 32 56 Waterloo _ 40 66 Auburn __ ... 37 45 Kendallville .---.. 44 75 Butler ... . . 39 48 Angola ___ __ 49 63 Central Catholic .. 48 60 Bluffton ... 47 75 Metz . 33 74 Ligonier __ __65 102 Nappanee __ 55 48 Avilla _ .. 46 58 Albion _ 57 Concordia . 47 46 Decatur _ .. 53 63 Conference games 20 Season on the Hardwood LETTERMEN OF 1955-56 Clockwise: Charles Refner 30, Ronald Weimer 33, David Ober 40, Keith Fee 35, Stephen Gaw 34, Larry Getts 55, Kenneth Severson 50, Wayne Bartels 54, Will Eastes 43, Dale Holmes 53, Danny Hutton 44, Frank Mossberger 45. kii % 22 All eyes are on the ball as Severson and Getts battle with Eagles for the rebound. Help is on the way from Gaw and Holmes. Dale Holmes drives for a lay-up with Getts and Sev¬ erson ready to help out. Handcars Are Up and Coming Opponents Garrett Ashley _ _ 18 47 Huntertown _ 33 40 New Haven _ 35 32 Riverdale ... 33 39 Waterloo .. 25 55 Auburn _ _ 40 35 K’ville _ _ 36 35 Butler —.. (O.T.) 28 27 Angola _ __ 45 49 CC ... .. 36 45 Bluffton _ _ 33 55 Metz _ _ 32 61 Ligonier . _ 38 48 Nappanee .. __32 48 Avilla _ .. 30 39 Albion _ . 35 34 Concordia . 53 43 Decatur _ .. 32 36 First row: Coach Ward Smith, Thomas Guthrie, Tony Kolbe, Melvin Culler, Richard Rowe. Second row: Thomas Leonard, Stephen Gordon, Fred Salerno, Lynn Andrews. Second Team Cheerleaders: Janet Moses, Suzanne Stroman, Karen Leech, and Sondra Musser. Freshmen Have Great Season First row: James Helbert, James Maurer, Robert Cattell, Daniel Schumaker, Wayne Rowe, Walter Beeber. Second row: Coach Richard Capin, Melvin Maggert, Dale Feick, James Getts, Fred Hall, Paul Mettert, Harry Jackson. 23 TRACK LETTERMEN OF ’55—First row: Rob ert Bowman, Stephen Gordon, Lynn Andrews, Louis Easterday, Adrian Thompson, Ralph Wilcoxson. Second row: Charles Tooman, Stephen Gaw, Larry Getts, Richard Warner, Keith Fee, Eugene Barrett. TRACK SCHEDULE FOR 1956 April 3—Butler, H April 5—Albion, Avilla, H April 10—Huntertown, H April 13—Kendallville, T April 17—New Haven, T April 19—Concordia, H April 21—Goshen Relays April 24—Auburn, H April 26—Central Catholic, Angola, H April 28—Kokomo Relays May 2—Conference, Columbia City May 8—Invitational Track Meet, H May 11—Sectional May 18—Regional May 26—State Spring Sports Are Outlined Champion Golt Team of ’55—Thomas Ely, Louis Easterday, Kenneth Severson, Sherman Lewis, Tad Schmidt. Under the guidance of facul¬ ty manager, Paul Bateman, the newly-organized golf team had a successful ’55 season; they won 9, lost 2, and tied 1. The team won the NEIAC golf championship and, hy placing third in the sectional, were eligible to take part in the state tournament. GOLF SCHEDULE FOR 1956 April 16—New Haven, H April 20—Angola, H April 25—Elmhurst, H April 27 —Angola, T May 1—South Side, H May 3—Kendallville, T 24 The House of Representatives Louis Easterday, President; Stephen Gaw, Vice President; Sue Ann Smith, Secretary; Danny Hutton, Treasurer. First row; Charles Wentland, John Flora, David Casey. Second row: Melvin Maggert, Gordon Holmes, Carolyn Ridenour, Daniel Hutton, Robert Cattell, Frank Conkle, Sue Smith. Third row: Michael Kock, Vicki Sithen, Tony Kolbe, Fred Salerno, Gary Leggett, Barbara Dembickie, Mrs. Schlecht. Fourth row: Suzanne Stroman, David Ober, Charles Tooman, Larry Getts, Stephen Gaw. Louis Easterday. Under the leadership of Louis Easterday, the Student Council this year prepared a Code of Ethics, which was discussed in homerooms. The Council also sponsored an assembly program of school work and talent. Dem¬ onstrations were given by science classes; the music department provided some musi¬ cal numbers; the speech department produced some entertainment; and other depart¬ ments arranged displays. Council members assisted the principal in the drawings for basketball tournament tickets and in other school functions. 26 k Operators’ Club- Shutter Bugs Stephen Gaw, President; Eston Hathaway, Reporter; Thomas Ely, Secretary-Treasurer; Tom Farrington, Vice President. First row: Eston Hathaway, Tad Schmidt, Daniel Fuller, Stephen Gaw, John Cox, Louis Easterday. Second row: Fred Knott, Adrian Thompson, Randy Bickel, Don Thompson, Thomas Ely, Daryl Severson, Mr. Bateman. Third row: Thomas Farrington, Thomas Guthrie, Paul Dell, Ted Thrush, Richard Rowe. Room 4 is a familiar room to all members of the operator’s club, since that is the headquarters for audio-visual instruction. Two of the club’s most important services are running the motion picture machine for the teachers and setting up and taking down the loud speaker during the football games. The operation of the juke box, tape recorder, slide projectors, and opague projector are also some of the duties which the industrious members learn to specialize in. An operator from this group is available at all times for the teachers’ convenience. 27 I I People With Late Books Don’t Library Well The members of the Library club, all of whom have vol- ' unteered as student librarians, have one single year-long project: to improve library service for students and teachers. To attain this goal each member gives one hour or more of his study time each day doing the many varied tasks that arise in a very busy library. First row: Carole Swander, Sandra Bickel, Mary Scott. Second row: Mrs. Sweeney, Patricia Riden¬ our, Larry Beverly, Rae Anne Trainer. Absent from picture: Harriet Howey. First row: Rodney McMillan, Richard Reynolds. Second row: Michael Lewis, Mars Wolford, Theodore Jay, Robert Riedhart. Third row: Richard Murley, Aaron Smith, John Smurr, Roger Kees, Richard Smith, David Teegardin. Fourth row: David Vanderbosch, Wayne Malcolm, Stephen Steward, Daniel Schu- maker, Jerry Kugler, Mr. Woodcox. Absent from picture: Dale Feick and Ralph Wilcoxson. Each a Good Scouts No Doubt “Be Prepared”—is the motto that every Boy Scout tries to live hy. This idea has heen very well demonstrated by the scouts as leaders in the community activities and through their group projects. About 100 badges can be earned to help the boys choose different occupations, hob¬ bies, and pastimes. The club has worked on projects in pioneering; leather craft; citizenship in the home, the community, and the nation; personal health; public health; and safety. The troop took part in the Klondike Derby and Operation Deep Freeze at Poka- gon. The troop set out trees south of Garrett as a community project. The assistant Scout leader and sponsor of the scout club is Mr. Woodcox. 28 First row: Nancy Smith, Johanna Hein- zerling, Sharon Dickison, Nancy Har¬ man, Patricia Ridenour, Donna Smith, Patricia LaCroix, Joan Peters, Nancy Martin. Second row: Norma Hixson, Mary Alice Minniear, Rae Anne Train¬ er, Jana Lee Opdycke, Laura Liver- good, Deloris Smith, Janet Hathaway, Judith Dembickie, Faith Getts. Third row: Joyce Smith, Robert Bowman, Dallas Opdycke, Dennis Porter, Dallas Wolf, Frank Felke, Suzanne Burtch, Harriet Howey, Marilyn Shirk. Fourth row: Carol McDermott, Sharon Cordes, Anna Moran, Nancy Gripe, Norma Mowrey, Violet Smith, Sharon Felke, Sue Ann Smith, Janet Thrush. Garrett scores!! And with that an enveloping, roaring cheer exploded from the Railroaders’ fans, filling the hard¬ wood haven to the rafters with a deafen¬ ing display of school spirit. “That’s our boy! Go! go! go!” rebounded the ever- ready pep club. The massive block of white-shirted fans was newly organized at the be¬ ginning of basketball season through the endeavors of the yell leaders and M iss Lewis. Each Friday noon of a home game, the hungry throng of pep- clubbers trooped to the gymnasium to eat lunch and have card drill. At the halves of the varsity games, the cardboards went into action: “Two, three, up! Two, three, down!” To this count the card section raised and low¬ ered blue and white cards forming ap¬ propriate letters and symbols. As the season progressed, spirit in¬ creased, new yells were adopted, and heartier cheering prevailed. Many vic¬ tories and new friendships resulted. A representative was named from each class to make up the executive com¬ mittee and these appear in the pic¬ ture. First row: Miss Lewis, Gloria Tincher, Norma Brown, JoHanna Simon, Elnor Livergood, Julianne Burtch, Jean Star- ner, Judith Reed, Belva Gerber. Sec¬ ond row: Nancy Ely, Sharon Cordes, Patricia Goepfert, Susan Ruhland, San¬ dra Godwin, Anita Morrison, Suzanna Runion, Judith Helbert, Sharon Hoff¬ man. Third row: Eleanor Thurman, Carole Johnson, Nancy Shafer, Mar¬ garet Farrington, Gail Grogg, Charlotte Atkins, Jacqueline Johnson, Nancy Gradeless, Carol Chisholm. Fourth row: Judith Detrick, Christine DePew, Mar¬ cia Shreve, Linda IJarman, Janice Houser, Carol Sue Reed, Barbara Ger¬ ber, Kay Sithen, Judith Reeves. Fifth row: Dora Deihl, Sydney Blair, San¬ dra Wilcoxson, Renee Obendorf, Nancy Workman, Margaret Ort, Charlotte Shipe, Susan Hollis, Beverly Jordon. SPELLS PEP! PEP! PEP ' Dennis Porter lpre -dents!i? . " ■y■Treasurer,• Johanna Heinzerling Eleanor Th " ” union. Second row; President. Thurman, Nancy Smith, Vice First row: Sally Carlson, Violet Esselburn, Mary Jo Mitchell, Dora Delhi. Second row: Carole Johnson, Karen Jackson, Deanna Dillon, Shar¬ on Claxton, Rosalie Parker, Christine DePew, Sharon Oherlin. Third row: Marilyn Fulk, Olivia Cleland, Mary Haynes, Judith Helhert, Lin¬ da Hixson, Gail Grogg, Re¬ becca Nelson, Pamela Mountz. Fourth row: Karen Leech, Mavis Howard, Myrna Knapp, Phyllis Kruger, Judith Reeves, Barbara S h u It z , Anita Morrison, Marjorie Patrick, Wilma Harris, Janet Moses, Charlotte Shipe. First row: Carol Sue Reed, Sheila Bickel, Linda Harman, Susan Ruhland, Susan Hol¬ lis. Second row: Kathleen Nodine, Renee Obendorf, Margaret Ort, Ruth Ann Por¬ ter, Jacqueline Johnson, Kay Sithen, Glenda Hazelton. Third row: Mary Scott, Mari¬ lyn Reynolds, Anita Thomp¬ son, Eleanor Thurman, Gloria Tincher, Judith Tooman, Bev¬ erly Jordan, Mrs. Sweeney. Fourth row: Nancy Work¬ man, Judith Detrick, Sharon Cordes, Sydney Blair, Suz¬ anne Stroman, Sharon Reiter, Margaret Farrington, Dolores Christman, Charlotte Atkins, Patricia Goepfert, Sandra Nielsen. Absent from pic¬ ture: Kay Akers, Mary Ann Burns, Joyce Smith. First row: Barbara Gerber, Donna Smith, Nancy Shafer, Joyce Hollis, Sondra Musser. Second row: Louise Fields, Nancy Gradeless, LaCleeda Hathaway, Janice Houser, Peggy Hunter, Charlene Lov- ette, Nancy Ely. Third row: Judith Morgan, Sandra Nicholson, Nancy Harter, J udith Thomas, Rosemary Vogel, Phyllis Groves, Phyllis Boyd, Sandra Wilcoxson, Miss Eldridge. Fourth row: Mary Louise Yingling, Linda Shilling, Cleota Warstler, Marcia Shreve, Belva Crager, Sandra Godwin, Sharon Pfierman, Suzanna Bunion, Sally Kel- ham, Carol Chisholm, Sharon Hoffman. A reflection of initiation week tells Olivia Cle- land and Deanna Dillon that they were almost full-fledged memhers. Oh! Oh! Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus were caught under the mistletoe again at Blue Triangle Christmas party. First row: Mary Jo Mitchell, social; Sharon Cordes, service; Karen Leech, president; Sondra Musser, song leader; Kay Sithen, vice president. Second row: Charlotte Atkins, treasurer; Ele¬ anor Thurman, program; Sandra Wil- coxson, devotions. Third row: Anita Morrison, secretary; Sandra Godwin, devotions; Judith Reeves, program chairman. Blue Triangle—Little Girls With Big Hearts Blue Triangle is a club for girls in grades 9 and 10. They met every Wednesday afternoon, activity period. The club is a very active one. This year, as for four years, they adopted the same Greek orphan girl through the plan for War Orphans. Evryklia received many things from the Blue Triangle: food, clothing, and at Christmas a gift of S25. They also gave gifts to orphans at the Allen County Children’s Home at Christmas. They sold Christmas and all-occasion cards. This is an annual money-raising project and as usual was a huge success. The total sales came to $918.95. Cleota Warstler was high salesman with $70.90. Among their programs were films on dating, manners, and pictures of trips that some of the girls had taken during vacation. The more talented gave pantomimes and talent shows. Take-offs on such programs as This Is Your Life and Truth or Conse¬ quences were given. The social highlight of the year was the Mother-Daughter Party. At this party new officers were installed. First row: Violet Smith, devotions; Faith Getts, sunshine; Jana Lee Opdycke, president; Faye Ashenfelter, song leader; Janet Atkins, social. Second row: Marilyn Gump, vice president; Rae Ann Trainer, treasurer; Patricia Walker, service; Judith Reed, secretary; Mary Alice Minniear, program chairman. SB ■ mm t " m 1 ¥ t " ! I JL W-- 1 i£. 1 First row: Faye Ashenfelter, Nancy Diederich, Janice Kruger, Norma Mowrey. Sec¬ ond row: Laura Hensinger, Julianne Burtch, Jane Hosier, Janet Steffen, Martha Shutt, Marilyn Shirk. Third row: Mary Helen Kohiela, Suz¬ anne Burtch, Darlene Bock, Betty Fields, Patricia Walk¬ er, Deloris Smith, Miss Gump. Fourth row: Sharron Wolf, Sally Pence, Patricia Yeiser, Jana Lee Opdycke, Darlene Treesh, Nancy Mar¬ tin, Joan Peters, Peggy Wil- coxson, Norma Hixson. First row: Belva Gerber, Vio¬ let Smith, Darla Delhi, Carol McDermott. Second row: Sandra Bickel, Rose Swank, Harriet Howey, Norma Brown, Faith Getts, Janet Atkins. Third row: Janice Freeman, Mary Bonkoski, Betty Baker, Carolyn Wells, Sheila Beber, Ann Cutshall, Carole Swander, Miss Lewis. Fourth row: Janet Thrush, Jean Starner, Dorotha Bow¬ ser, Nancy Cripe, Alice Im- body, Sally Carper, Janet Knapp, Marilyn Christman. 4L “Pokey-Huntus” was the play presented at joint meeting of the Hi-Y and Y-Teens. The feminine angle was evident in the October style show, Ideas and Ideals Y-Teens—Girls With The Y-Teens, girls of grades 11 and 12, met every Wednesday during activity period. The club’s func¬ tions were cultural, social, community service, and fund-raising. In the club’s regular meetings, the girls learned ev¬ erything from How To Choose a Boyfriend to How To Wrap Christmas Gifts. Quite often combined meetings with the Blue Triangle were held and style shows were given. One of the liveliest meetings was that of the Hi-Y and Y-Teens combin ed. Everyone had a great time trying to teach the boys to play Rhythm and how to dance the Bunny Hop! The biggest social event of the season was the formal dance given jointly with the Hi-Y. Fall Fan¬ tasy was the theme and everyone had an enjoyable time dancing to the music of the John Bishop Band. King Steve Gaw and Queen Johanna Heinzerling and their court were honored. Another social event was the square dance. Every¬ one who went had fun whether he knew how to square dance or not, but when the dance was over, all were pros at it! The service committee made favors for the hospital at Thanksgiving. One of the most popular events was the annual sandwich sale. Under the leadership of the co-chair¬ men, Nancy Smith and Sally Carper, the club made this year’s sale one of the biggest, yummiest, and most profitable! Martha Shutt was high salesman. First row: Shirley Wappes, Barbara Dembickie, Rae Ann Trainer, Anna Moran, Sharon Felke. Second row: Johanna Simon, Beverly Fulk, Nancy Smith, Dojana Crow, Carolyn Williams, Marilyn Salerno, Johanna Heinzerling. Third row: Dorothy Crow, Sue Ann Smith, Patricia LaCroix, Pa¬ tricia Ridenour, Sharon Dick- ison, Judith Reed, Elnor Liv- ergood. Fourth row: Janet Hathaway, Marilyn Gump, Mary Alice Minniear, Nancy Harman, Linda Duerk, Judith Dembickie, Laura Livergood, Elizabeth Rist. First row: David Heffelfinger, Larry Funk, Jack Wappes, Ted Smith, William Berry, Ray Burnis- ton. Second row: Ted Christlieb, Roger Kees, Melvin Christlieb, Thomas Harmon, Kenneth Feight- ner, Leonard Shaffer, Eugene Shirk, James McKeefer, Jerry Chisholm. Third row: Mr. Bateman, Fred Knott, Richard Maggert, Rival McBride, Eldon Menges, Don Chisholm, Robert Harmon, Cal¬ vin Carnahan, Phil Grogg, Larry Yarian, Clifford Maggert, Carl Kratzman, Ted Thrush. Fourth row: James Knott, Paul Kennedy, Frank Johnson, Lee Christlieb, Charles Tooman, Marvin Houser, Donald Alwood, Louis Shutt, Richard Griffin, Arnold Robke, Gerald McBride. F.F.A.—Gentlemen With Hoes First row: Marvin Houser, reporter; Charles Tooman, president. Second row: Fred Knott, vice president; Richard Griffin, treasurer: Lee Christlieb, secretary; Arnold Robke, sentinel. The Future Farmers of America is a national organization of agriculture stu¬ dents. The local chapter, under the ad- visorship of Mr. Bateman, had many activ¬ ities this year. The chapter earned money by selling milk to the students at noon; selling gar¬ den seeds; and joined the Lions club in sponsoring a donkey basketball game. They also sponsored, as a service project, a contest for ridding crops of harmful pests. The losers of this contest held a basketball party for the winners. Three members, with the advisor, at¬ tended the F. F. A. camp last summer. Representatives of the local chapter par¬ ticipated in many district contests includ¬ ing: Public speaking. Chapter, and Chap¬ ter Meeting Contest. They were also fea¬ tured on a television program on the brooding of chicks. “To transact such business as may come before us—to fortify our high purpose through conference and Bible study—to strengthen the ties of friendship that bind us together—and to make the Garrett Hi- Y club and ourselves of greater service to our fellows.” These are the words in the opening ceremony of the weekly meetings. Among their programs were movies on manners and readings by Mr. Pugh. Rev. Walter E. Myers, the religious advisor, was pres¬ ent at many meetings. The club gave boos¬ ter pins to the pep squad. They gave $50 to the Retarded Childrens’ Fund. The boys made $71.18 from the sale of candy. The Fall Fantasy dance, November 12, of which Hi-Y was the co-sponsor, is des¬ cribed in the Y-Teens story. Kenneth Sev¬ erson and Karen Leech were King and Queen of Hearts at the semi-formal dance February 4. Frank Mossberger, treasurer; Rex Freeman, secretary; Louis Easterday, vice president; Charles Tooman, president. . ■ - i ' -ii- ' ' ' -- ' ■ is’ i ' • ■ ■ :-a-. ' L ' - How HI the Y First row: William Shenk, Edward Mahnesmith, Robert Wiant, Randy Bickel, William Snider, Tony Kolbe. Second row: Mr. Allyn, Edwin Maurer, Rex Freeman, Lynn Andrews, Daniel Fuller, Jerry Arrants, Charles Loomis, Harry Manges, Eston Hathaway, Mr. Pugh. Third row: Fred Salerno, Paul Ridenour, Ronald Weimer, Tad Schmidt, Charles Tooman, Larry Getts, Bruce Crager, Kenneth Severson, David Ober, Dale Holmes, Louis Easterday, Frank Mossberger, Peter Mountz. Ifs Mutiny GIRLS’ CHORUS First row: Ann Porter, Marilyn Gump, ' Donna Crow, Dorothy Crow, Belva Ger- her, Carolyn Wells, Marjorie Patrick. , Second row: Dorotha Bowser, Rose Swank, Janet Knapp, Sally Carper, Nancy Gripe, Darlene Treesh, Alice Imbody, Sharron Wolf. Third row: Shirley Wappes, Carol McDermott, i Carol Chisholm, Sharon Cordes, Mar¬ garet Farrington, Marilyn Fulk, Kay Sithen, Mary Scott, Violet Smith. Fourth row: Betty Fields, Norma | Brown, Mary Bonkoski, Barbara Dem- ! bickie, Judith Reeves, Sandra Godwin, Patricia Yeiser, Jane Hosier, Darla Delhi, Norma Mowrey, Carole Swander. First row: Mary Jo Mitchell, Sandra Nicholson, Judith Morgan, Beverly Jor¬ dan, Mary Haynes, Pamela Mountz, Charlotte Atkins, Eleanor Thurman, Judith Detrick, Glenda Hazelton. Sec¬ ond row: Janet Moses, Suzanna Runion, Sydney Blair, Belva Crager, Rebecca Nelson, Suzanne Stroman, Phyllis Kru¬ ger, Karen Leech, Wilma Harris, Gloria Tincher, Sondra Musser, Mary Louise Yingling. Third row: Susan Hollis, Sandra Nielsen, Judith Helbert, Charlotte Shipe, Joyce Smith, Renee Obendorf, Anita Morrison, Nancy Workman, Donna Smith, Phyllis Groves, Phyllis Boyd, Jaccjueline Johnson, Kay Akers. Fourth row: Violet Esselburn, Carol Sue Reed, Sheila Bickel, Mary Ann Burns, Sharon Hoffman, Sandra Wilcoxson, Nancy Gradeless, Patricia Goepfert, Barbara Gerber, Sally Carl¬ son, Charlene Lovette, Nancy Ely, Deanna Dillon, Susan Ruhland, Linda GIRLS’ CHORUS First row: Marilyn Christman, Carolyn Williams, Norma Thompson, Janet Hathaway, Mary Alice Minniear, Judith Reed. Second row: Jean Starner, Nor¬ ma Hixson, Jana Lee Opdycke, Nancy Harman, Judith Dembickie, Nancy Martin, Joan Peters. Third row: Mary Helen Kobiela, Beverly Fulk, Nancy Smith, Patricia Ridenour, Patricia La Croix, Faith Getts, Sharon Dickison, Marilyn Salerno, Johanna Heinzerling. Fourth row: Anna Moran, Ann Cut- shall, Sandra Bickel, Deloris Smith, Rae Anne Trainer, Darlene Bock, Pa¬ tricia Walker, Janet Atkins, Suzanne Burtch, Harriet Howey, Martha Shutt. m the High C SPECIAL GROUPS First row: Faith Getts, Nancy Martin, Jana Lee Opdycke, Joan Peters, Donna Crow, Judith Reed, Dorothy Crow. Sec¬ ond row: Sondra Musser, Suzanna Runion, Janet Moses, Judith Reeves, Rebecca Nelson, Dorotha Bowser, Kay Sithen, Deloris Smith, Beverly Fulk. Third row: Mrs. Flora, Karen Leech, Rae Anne Trainer, Patricia Walker, Margaret Farrington, Marilyn Gump, Norma Brown, Carole Swander, Betty Fields, Sandra Bickel. Fourth row: Marilyn Fulk, Robert Bowman, Paul Griffin, David Ober, Larry Getts, Will Eastes, John Soudah, Rex Freeman, Robert Weesner, Violet .Smith. Absent from picture: Faye Ashenfelter, Janet Thrush, Belva Gerber. [ The High School Chorus has increased in number this past year. Under the super¬ vision of Mrs. Flora, many of the younger high school students have taken a definite interest in chorus. Students join because they like to sing and enjoy spending their free time doing so. The junior and senior girls with the boys’ chorus combined to give the annual Thanksgiving program for the school. One of the main highlights this year was a special Christmas program which all the choruses gave December 12 for the P. T. A. It featured novelty Christmas songs ap¬ propriate for the occasion. The special groups and a few soloists entered in the solo and ensemble contest held January 28 in Fort Wayne. Those winning a superior rating competed in the state finals February 18 at Indianapolis. March 22 a selected choir presented a program at the Veterans’ Administration Hospital in Fort Wayne. The annual spring concert was held April 20 with all the choruses participating. The special groups were featured in special selections. BOYS’ CHORUS First row: Charles Tooman, Daniel Schumaker, Larry Getts, Kenneth Sev¬ erson, Will Eastes, David Ober, Charles Loomis. Second row: David Cook, James Getts, Melvin Culler, Thomas Farrington, Robert Weesner, Harry Jackson, Alfred Hazelton, Carl Kratz- man, James Helbert, Harry Hornett. Third row: Joe DeWitt, Edward Allen, David Brown, Robert Anderson, Rod¬ ney Knisley, Robert Cattell, Jerry Free¬ man, Robert Peters, John Hutton, Rob¬ ert Bowman, Adrian Thompson. Fourth row: William Snider, Stephen Gordon, Paul Griffin, Rex Freeman, Dallas Opdycke, Rick Williams, Dennis Por¬ ter, Dallas Wolf, John Soudah, Ronald Weimer, Paul Mettert, Ted Thrush, James Staley. Absent from picture: Tony Steller, Hans Heinzerling. BAND DIRECTOR, Raymond H. Cole Doing things on BRASS AND BASS SECTION—First row: Shirley Wappes, Michael Lewis, Shelia Bickel, David Ober, Richard Abbott, James Carper, David Casey. Second row: Charles Loomis, William White. LOW BRASS AND PERCUSSION SECTION—First row: Larry Lung, Sue Ann Bock, Robert Cattell, Rex Freeman, Stephen Noble, Ronald Burtch, Marvin Snook. Second row: Richard Cordes, David Crowe, Ted Smith, David Caw, Sharon Reiter, Carolyn Wells, Sally Kelham. 38 The Garrett High School Band, un¬ der the direction of Raymond H. Cole, had a very successful year even though it was handicapped earlier in the year by the loss of many members through graduation. The band now consists of 45 members in the concert band and 53 members in the marching band. The marching band had many activi¬ ties this year including performances before and at the half-time of all home football games. It participated in the Auburn Fair, Halloween and Armistice Day parades. The band furnished music between halves and between games for all home basketball games. The twirl- ers also played an important part by furnishing entertainment during the in¬ termissions with their various routines. The band furnished the music for the annual Christmas program which was given for the entire student body. 2 grand scale TWIRLERS AND COLOR GUARD—First row: Sharon Claxton, Lu Ann Myers, Violet Esselburn. Second row: Carolyn Wells, Rebecca Nelson, Olivia Cleland, Pamela Mountz, Norma Thompson, drum majorette; Charlene Lovette, Deanna Dillon, Jacqueline Johnson, Darla Delhi. BAND OFFICERS—David Gaw, librarian; David Ober, vice president; Rex Freeman, secretary-treasurer; Norma Thompson, president. Many of the students participated in the solo and ensemble contest this year held in Fort Wayne. The finalists were competitors at Indianapolis in the state finals. The annual band contest, a highlight for any high school band, was held at Angola in March. Due to the size of the vocal and in¬ strumental departments, separate spring concerts were held again this year. The band concert was held on April 27. The band will also provide the music for the commencement in May. Summer activities planned for this year include band instruction lessons, and a series of three public concerts. WOODWIND SECTION—First row: Diane Miller, Lois Gump, Marcia Bickel, Sandra Kelham, Charles Tooman, Sharon Pfierman, Mars Wolford, Peggy Hunter, Donna Hosier. Second row: Gloria Hall, Doris Miller, Marilyn Kennedy, Sandra Gaff, Gary Kruger, Judith Tooman, Robert Weesner, Vicki Sithen, Sandra Bickel, Jane Hosier, Janice Free¬ man. 39 These hit the beat for the Maroon and Blue: Danny Hutton, Sports Editor; Joan Peters, News Editor; Patricia Ridenour, Advertising; Patricia LaCroix, Editor-in-Chief. MILDRED EVARD These met the Aeolian deadlines: Thomas Far¬ rington, Photographer; Sharon Dickison, Business Manager; Johanna Hein- zerling, Editor-in-Chief. Super Such goals as “The mirror of school life,” “The eyes and ears of G. H. S.,” and “If it was in the Maroon and Blue, it’s true,” are constant aims of the journalism students. Writing stories is only one part of journalism and the production of a self-supporting paper. Others of equal importance are acquiring subscribers, soliciting advertisers, getting story leads, typing, bookkeeping, editing and distribution. Each plays a major role. This year fourteen students wrote, rewrote, complained, rewrote again, complained again, “burnt the midnight oil,” and met the final deadline. Marooning the Blue I First row: Harriet Howey, Betty Baker, Carolyn Williams, Faye Ashenfelter. Second row: William [ Shenk, Wayne Bartles, Kenneth Severson, Richard Warner, Danny Hutton. Third row: Patricia ■ Walker, Joan Peters, Darlene Treesh, Nancy Martin, Patricia La Croix, Darlene Bock. Absent from picture: Patricia Ridenour, Dennis Porter. t )cribhlers On each page of the Aeolian is a picture snapped hy Tom Farrington. Through Mr. Bateman’s effort, student photography was possible. Sharon Dickison, business manager, super¬ vised the securing of financial aid from the merchants; the selling of individual pictures to students; and the taking of orders and making collections. In all these activities she was aided by an industrious staff. Ann Cutshall gave of her talent in styling pages. Marilyn Salerno proved useful in ar¬ ranging both boys’ and girls’ group pictures. Fred Knott was the editor for hoys’ organiza¬ tions. The music department was scored by Faith Getts. The calendar journal was kept by Patricia j Walker. Faculty life was delineated by Mary I Alice Minniear. Senior life was recorded by j Faye Ashenfelter. Robert Wiant was junior high editor. Research was made by Patricia Ridenour to secure quotable quotes. Dale Holmes drafted headlines on copy sheets. Peter Mountz and Louis Easterday carried the ball in the sports section. Official typists, Jana Lee Opdycke and Beverly Fulk, were aided by others. Planning the book from page 1 to page 81; visualizing the pictures for the photographer to take; allocating the money produced by the business staff; prodding, encouraging, and aiding all other members of the staffs was the i editor-in-chief of this 1956 Aeolian, Johanna ! Heinzerling. Proudly we present the Aeolian production staff—the hard-working, enterprising young journalists who have remained calm and sane until the end. Mrs. Sweeney and Mrs. Schlecht offered much-needed advice and guidance. Thornes’ Studio took individual pictures and developed and enlarged all others. They Make Yearbook Your Book MARVOLINE SCHLECHT HILDRETH SWEENEY :HK iiii lllS c ■ First row: Johanna Heinzerling, Patricia Walker, Patricia Ridenour, Mary Alice Minniear, Faith Getts, Nancy Smith. Second row: Ann Cutshall, Faye Ashenfelter, Fred Knott, Robert Wiant, Louis Easterday, Peter Mountz, Thomas Far¬ rington, Marilyn Salerno, Janet Hathaway. First row: Rae Anne Trainer, Laura Livergood, Nancy Har¬ man, Sharon Dickison, Judith Dembickie, Darlene Bock, Janet Atkins. Second row: Paul Sparks, David Jay, Wayne Bartels, Richard Hays, Harry Manges, Dallas Wolf. First row: Susan Ruhland, Christine DePew, Linda Har man, Sheila Bickel, Charlene Lovette, Sharon Cordes. Sec¬ ond row: Peggy Hunter, Sharon Claxton, Dora Delhi, Judith Detrick, Darla Delhi, Julianne Burtch, Glenda Haz- elton, Nancy Ely. Third row: Marilyn Reynolds, Gloria Tincher, Ann Cutshall, Nor¬ ma Hixson, Janet Hathaway, Darlene Bock, Marilyn Gump, Patricia Yeiser, Suzanne Burtch, Harriet Howey. Fourth row: Elnor Livergood, Norma Brown, Marcia Shreve, Janet Thrush, Sandra God¬ win, Sharon Reiter, Sydney Blair, Myrna Knapp, Phyllis Kruger, Judith Tooman, Ja¬ net Knapp. ii ‘i I —GIRLS WITH GOALS G.A.A. G. A. A. is an organization for girls in the upper four grades, who are interested in par¬ ticipation in sports. The first of the meetings saw the girls choosing captains for volleyball teams. A round-robin tourney was played until every team had played one another and Salerno’s team was the victor. When volleyball was completed, basketball started. The girls went through the same pro¬ cedures for choosing captains, teams, and playing tourneys. A banquet was held in the spring. Awards were given to best guard and forward, best sport, and high scorer in basketball. The win¬ ning teams and captains were honored. Sen¬ iors received chevrons for the years they had participated. This year Garrett was invited to two play- days, one at K’ville and the other at Auburn. Laura Livergood, secretary; Janet Thrush, vice president; Linda Duerk, president; Mar¬ ilyn Gump, treasurer. First row: Sandra Bickel, Belva Gerber, Sondra Musser, Sharon Felke, Shirley Wap- pes, Violet Esselburn. Second row: Kay Sithen, Rae Anne Trainer, Suzanna Runion, Ja¬ net Moses, Joan Peters, Ju¬ dith Helbert, Anita Morri¬ son, Janet Atkins, Sally Carlson. Third row: Joh¬ anna Heinzerling, Nancy Smith, Donna Crow, Judith Dembickie, Sue Ann Smith, Dorothy Crow, Jean Starner, Judith Reed, Charlotte At¬ kins, Jane Hosier, Miss Lew¬ is. Fourth row: Marilyn Sal¬ erno, Mary Alice Minniear, Faith Getts, Patricia La- Croix, Nancy Martin, Dar¬ lene Treesh, Linda Duerk, Nancy Harman, Laura Liver¬ good, Jana Lee Opdycke, Patricia Ridenour, Sharon Dickison, Beverly Fulk. J Administration May stalk, a silhouette sublime Across the canvas of his time 1 I Emory Heitz, secretary; Harry Heinzerling, L. Dale Green, president; D. L. Haffner, Harold Dannenberg, Treasurer. The Garrett- Keyser- Butler School Corporation Board ) I GWYNETH MANGES Clerk for Principal V The Faculty Listened for What | Fractions, formulas, and fun with 0. B. Rose, Gray Woodcox, and Richard Capin. The BUSINESS EDUCATION Department pre¬ pares students for office work by offering book¬ keeping, typing, shorthand, and business law. Royalty is just their type—Marvoline Schlecht, Sarah Jean Eldridge, and Effie Gump. The VOCATIONAL ARTS Department includes homemaking, agriculture, and industrial arts, stressing safety and skill in every-day pursuits. Hi 1 i A spade, a spatula, and a spike—Paul Bateman, Mar¬ guerite Fouch, and David j()nes. Vas Sometimes Never Spoken Robert Pugh, Norma Crow, and Marie Thrush find what a Wordsworth. Mrs. Oow is ref)laeing Russell Sherman who is on a leave-of-ahsence. Members of the journalism class present bi-weekly news reports of the school. The annual is the best effort of the seniors to give a pictorial account of the year. The ENGLISH Department strives to improve the power of written and oral expression, and to ac¬ quaint the student with better forms of literature and poetry. Harping on the Aeolian, Hildreth Sweeney; .Streamlining the Streamliner, Mildred Evard. Through the teaching of Government, World His¬ tory, U. S. History, Indiana History, and Econom¬ ics, the SOCIAL SCIENCE Department gives a firm foundation for good citizenship. Edward Kult, Cameron Parks, and R(d)ert Harman ponder political problems. The SCIENCE Department, offering biology, physics, and chemistry, increases the knowledge of this fascinating world. I I i i i i I I Geniuses at work—Richard Ober and John Allyn. Hidden talents are brought to light in the MUSIC and ART Department, providing many hours of enjoyment through choral groups, instrumental music, and creative art work. Three hep-cats and a kitten on the keys—Gilbert Coble, Raymond Cole, Larry Endress, and Jeanne Flora. The PHYSICAL EDUCATION Department includes gym, health, safety, and driver training. Team¬ work, co-operation, and sportsmanship are stressed. Wheeling for sportsmanship—LeNore Lewis, Ward Smith, and Edward Meyers. Junior High If you will observe, it doesn’t take A man of giant mound to make A siont shadow on the wall AQ Junior High Seventh grade officers are: Donna Buckles, treas¬ urer; John Flora, secretary; and Vicki Sithen, president. Eighth grade officers are: Sandra Dickison, vice president; Carolyn Ridenour, president; and Jac¬ queline Gingrich, secretary. JUNIOR HIGH FOOTBALL First row: Gaylord Shaffer, Gary Leggett, David Gaw, Charles Wentland, Kenneth Flora, Myron Smith, James Short, David Schurr, Carson Culler, Marvin Snook. Second row: Richard Murley, Philip Miller, Wil¬ liam White, David Crowe, Victor Cleland, Raymond Hen- singer, Wayne Peters, Thomas Burtch, Mars Wolford, Ernest Barrett. Third row: Robert Riedhart, John Flora, Michael Kock, Benny Ricketts, Dennis Whittington, Harold Harvey, Richard Reynolds, Richard Reeves, Thomas Foar. Fourth row: Robert Gravlee, Dean Young, John Smurr, Charles Dennison, David Teegardin, Lynn Sebring, Richard Smith, Dean Brumbaugh, Michael Lewis, Coach Harman. Absent: Warren Herendeen. JUNIOR HIGH BASKETBALL Cheerleaders: Jeri Snider, Adele Miller, Donna Buckles. First row: Kenneth Flora Manager, Thomas Foar, John Flora, .Michael Kock, Raymond Hensinger. Second row: Lynn Sebring, William Moree, Richard Reeves, Philip .Miller, William Seigel, Victor Cleland. Third row: James Short, James Helbert, Mars Wolford, Jerry Smith, Harold Harvey, Charles Wentland. Fourth row: Ernest Barrett, Marvin Snook, Thomas Burtch, David Schurr, Carson Culler, David Gaw. Fifth row: Gary Leggett, Robert Fee, .Myron Smith, William White, William Knott, Coach Robert Harman. Cheerleaders: Sandra Dickison, Linda Mitchell, Jacqueline Gingrich. •Is Not Overshadowed Grade 7 ! Nancy Akers Betty Anderson Alice Andrews Joan Arrants Shirley Banks Kathryn Bauman Dianna Bherns Mary Bishop David Blair Mary Lou Bock Dean Brumbaugh Donna Buckles James Carper David Casey Carol Christlieb Victor Cleland Carol Conkle Joyce Conrad Richard Cordes John Cramer Howard Curtland Thomas Davis Charles Dennison Sunny Dickison Dale Egly Verneda Fields John Flora Thomas Foar Linda Freeze David Frost Sandra Gaff Paul Gerber Nyda Gillespie Marcia Gingrich Larry Gravlee Robert Gravlee Not present when picture was taken k::: Kathryn Johnson Sue Ann Kern Michael Kock Gary Kruger Patricia Lemish Michael Lewis Larry Lung Wilbur Maurer Teddye McDanel Imogene McPherson lice f-f Ha, Cl ff ensifl get Hi atd mh A dele Miller David Miller Diane Miller Doris Miller Philip Miller Gary Mitchell William Moree Joanne Myers Lu Ann Myers Eugene Nodine Carol Sigler Lynn Simon Vicki Sithen Darlene Smith Jerry Smith Richard Smith John Smurr Gary Snider Jeri Snider Betty Stimman Julia Swander Nancy Talley David Teegardin Gloria Traster Sue Ellen Walker Michael Warstler Dennis Whittington Margaret Williams Mars Wolford Dean Young Grade 8 Judy Davis Patricia Davis Steven Davis Sandra Dickison Estella Egly Thomas Faulkner Robert Fee Martha Feightner Carole Fike Gerald Fike Kenneth Flora Sandra Funk David Gaw Jacqueline Gingrich Paul Griffin Barrett atricia Beck Ware,a Bichet 1 “ ' ’ Ann Bock ' ' ard Botrman Janice Brovn Robert Chris, S ' Frank Conkle David Crowe Carson Culler Daniel Custer Jack Davis William Knott Gary Leggett Carol Lemish Evelyn Long Freda Long Dennis McLeland Rodney McMillan Larry Miller Linda Mitchell Richard Mitchell Jean Morrison Sue Morrison Richard Murley Ronald Murphy Bonnie Myers Stephen Noble Janet Nodine Linda Owen Jane Parker David Peck , ... I Nawv ISra Donna James HosJeT Hoyet rteodore JaV rr, f.. w ■■ a ! The Child Overshadows the Greatness of the Man, Christine Perkins Wayne Peters Charles Quinn John Reed Carolyn Ridenour Linda Riley William Rippe Cynthia Robbins Suzanne Rodebaugh Steven Roy David Schurr Gaylord Shaffer Dixie Shipe James Short Robert Shutt Myron Smith Marvin Snook Sherry Staley Michael Steenbergen Richard Steenbergen Linda Steffen Dorothy Stover Mary Swank Janet Tuttle Clarence Warstler Naomi Warstler Charles Wentland William White Deena Whittington Suellyn Wilmot Diana Wood Sharon Woods Martha Ann Yarde Annette Zimmerman First row: David Heffelfinger, Joe DeWitt, James Helbert, James Getts, Fred Hall. Second row: Deanna Dillon, Mary Haynes, Joyce Hollis, Phyllis Groves, Linda Harman, Larry Funk. Third row: Gordon Holmes, Judith Detrick, Nancy Harter, Jerry Freeman, Donald Graham. On the left are the chairmen of the freshmen party held March 16. First row: Gordon Holmes, Marcia Shreve, Peggy Hunter, Charlene Lovette. Second row: Suzanne Stroman, Robert Cattell, James Helbert, Dale Feick. . Freshmert CLASS OFFICERS—Hans Heinzerling, presi¬ dent; Sally Kelham, secretary; Deanna Dillon, vice president; James Getts, treasurer. These freshmen sold more than three hundred dollars to make their homerooms tops in the annual magazine sales cam¬ paign. As a reward they enjoyed a theater party and drug store treat. merge as Impressive Kay Akers Edward Allen Robert Anderson Walter Beber Ronald Beeber Larry Beverly Sydney Blair Gary Botteron Phyllis Boyd David Brown Ray Burniston Ronald Burtch Robert Cattell Jerald Chisholm Melvin Christlieb Dora Deihl Christine DePew Judith Detrick Joe DeWitt Deanna Dillon Dale Feick Kenneth Feightner Louise Fields Jerry Freeman James Freeze Theodore Christlieb William Christman Sharon Claxton Olivia Cleland Ronald Conrad David Cook Belva Crager Robert Cuckler Donald Curtis John Davis Figures p Larry Funk James Getts Garth Gillespie Donald Graham Phyllis Groves Fred Hall Linda Harman Nancy Harter Mary Alice Haynes David Heffelfinger Hans Heinzerling James Helhert John Hile Linda Hixson Joyce Hollis Susan Hollis Gordon Holmes Harry Hornett Jerry Houlton Peggy Hunter Dean Huth John Hutton Harry Jackson Carole Johnson Beverly Jordan Sally Kelham Rodney Knisely John Kobiela Larry Laisure Larry Loomis Charlene Lovette ■ Melvin Maggert J James Maurer 1 Jerald McBride James McKeever Linda Shilling Charlotte Shipe Marcia Shreve John Simon Aaron Smith Donna Smith Joyce Smith Randall Steffen James Steinmetz Anthony Steller Suzanne Stroman Judith Thomas Eleanor Thurman Judith Tooman David Vanderbosch William Walton Lawrence Weidler Sandra Wilcoxson Nancy Workman Garl Zimmerman Constdnce Jean Robbins not present when pictures were taken Paul Mettert William Miller Judith Morgan Sandra Nielsen Renee Obendorf Sharon Oberlin Margaret Ort Gary Parker Perry Edward Pence Kenneth Perkins Sharon Pfierman Wayne Rowe Bernard Schnepf Daniel Schumaker Nancy Shafer Sophomores Cast Shadows on Large Stage Their ,1 t CLASS OFFICERS—Kay Si then, treasurer; Wil¬ liam Snider, president; Nancy Ely, secretary; Karen Leech, vice president. The numerals on those svvfeaters read ’58. The class chose charcoal grey and white and donned their new duds in November. Lloyd Andrews Glenda Hazelton Judith Helbert Owen Hensinger Sharon Hoffman Janice Houser Violet Esselburn Margaret Farrington Frank Felke Marilyn Fulk Barbara Gerber Larry Getts Sandra Godwin Patricia Goepfert Nancy Gradeless Paul Griffin Gail Grogg Phil Grogg Thomas Guthrie Wilma Harris LeCleeda Hathaway Thomas Beeber William Berry Sheila Bickel Mary Ann Burns Sally Carlson Calvin Carnahan Everett Carroll Carol Chisholm Dolores Christman Phillip Conrad Sharon Cordes Melvin Culler Paul Dell David DePew Nancy Ely 17 - Mavis Howard Donald Hoyer Karen Jackson Jacqueline Johnson Roger Kees Myrna Knapp James Knott Tony Kolbe Carl Kratzman Phyllis Kruger Jerry Kugler Gilbert Lawhead Karen Leech Paul Lemish Thomas Leonard Robert Livergood Edward Mahnesmith James Malcolm Wayne Malcolm Edwin Maurer Mary Jo Mitchell Anita Morrison Janet Moses Pamela Mountz Sondra Musser Rebecca Nelson Sandra Nicholson John Nixon Kathleen Nodine David Ober James Owen Rosalie Parker Marjorie Patrick Robert Peters ,1 Eugene Shirk Charles Shoudel Barbara Shultz Kay Sithen Theodore Smith William Snider James Staley Patricia Steenhergen Stephen Steward Ned Teegardin Edwin Thomas Anita Thompson Don Thompson Ted Thrush Gloria Tincher Rosemary Vogel Cleota Warstler Robert Weesner Larry Yarian Mary Louise Yingling Ann Porter Jack Porter Carol Sue Reed Judith Reeves Charles Refner Sharon Reiter Marilyn Reynolds Keith Robbins Richard Rowe Susan Ruhland Suzanna Runion Ered Salerno Michael Scheuerman Mary Scott Daryl Severson CLASS OFFICERS—First row: Ronald Weimer, vice presi¬ dent; Paul Ridenour, president. Second row: Donna Crow, treasurer; Judith Reed, secretary. Juniors Impression on G.H.S, Was Like Black on White BANQUET COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN—First row: Lynn Andrews, Paul Ridenour, Kenneth Carroll, Frank Moss- berger. Second row: Donna Crow, Janet Thrush, Dorothy Crow, Judith Reed. Third row: Carole Swander, Sharon Felke, Jane Hosier, JoHanna Simon. Fourth row: Shirley Wappes, Fritz Feick, William Shenk, Violet Smith. Absent from picture: Carol McDermott and Belva Gerber. The junior executive committee selected rings in October and the gems arrived in December. Lynn Andrews Eugene Barrett Ted Bauman Sheila Beber Raymond Bickel Keith Bock Lee Bock Mary Bonkoski Dorotha Bowser Norma Brown Julianne Burtch Sally Carper Kenneth Carroll Donald Chisholm Lee Christlieb Bernard Cooper Jerry Cox Bruce Crager Nancy Cripe Donna Crow Dorothy Crow Darla Deihl Barbara Dembickie Nelson Deuitch Nancy Diederick Keith Fee Fritz Feick Sharon Felke Betty Fields Janice Freeman Belva Gerber j - 1 Stephen Gordon Richard Griffin fc " ■ ' ■■■ , ' -i A Louise Ford not present when pictures were ■ ' taken. V S 1 : Marilyn Gump William Harding Robert Harmon Thomas Harmon Clifton Hathaway Laura Hensinger Thomas Herendeen Jane Hosier i i ■, C- ■■■ ■• 1 ' j ; Y ' t MW ' .1 ■Hk ' -■■ ' 4 i ' . Richard Hoyer Danny Hutton Alice Imbody Paul Kennedy Janet Knapp Mary Helen Kobiela Janice Kruger Elnor Livergood Michael Manges Larry Matthews Carol McDermott EJdon Menges Russell Miller Anna Moran Frank Mossberger Norma Mowrey Dallas Opdycke Ronald Rathert Judith Reed DONALD ALWOOD . . . Agn- culture . . . Riverdale 1, 2. FRED ANDREWS . . . Indus¬ trial Arts . . . Track 1, 4. FAYE ASHENFELTER . . . Academic . . . Blue Triangle, Devotional Chairman 2 . . . Y-Teens, Co-Editor Y-Wire 3, Song Leader 4 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4, Triple Trio 3, Teenettes 4 . . . GAA 1 . . . M B Feature Editor 4 . . . Aeolian Senior Editor. JANET ATKINS . . . Business . . . Class Secretary 3 . . . Blue Triangle, Vice President 2 . . . Y-Teens, Social Chairman 4 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4 . . . Aeolian Business Staff. BETTY BAKER . . . Business . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . M B Business Manager 4. WAYNE BARTELS . . . Indus¬ trial Arts . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball 1, 2 . . . Track 3 . . . Junior-Senior Ban¬ quet Invitation Co-Chairman . . . M B Sports Editor 4 . . . Aeo¬ lian Business Staff. September ,,,In Days Hereafter ... Remember Then ... I JACK BEEBER . . . Industrial Arts . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Noon League 3, 4. SANDRA BICKEL . . . Business . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4, Teenettes 4 . . . Band 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Librarian 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4. DARLENE BOCK . . . Business . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . M B News Editor 4 . . . Aeolian Business Staff. ROBERT BOWMAN . . . In¬ dustrial Arts . . . Hi-Y 2 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4, Boys’ Vocal Ensemble 2, 3, 4, Quartette 2, 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . $30 Award Winner 2 . . . Basket¬ ball 1 . . . Track 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Noon League 2, 4. SUZANNE BURTCH . . . Home- making . . . Class Secretary 1 . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4. MARILYN CHRISTMAN . . . Homemaking . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 3. JOHN COX . . . Industrial Arts . . . Scout Club 1, 2 . . . Op¬ erators’ Club 4 . . . Football 1, 2. ANN CUTSHALL . . . Business . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Junior Art Award . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Aeolian Organiza¬ tions Editor. October.We Reaped a Harvest on Auburn s Field. JUDITH DEMBICKIE . . . Business . . . St. Joseph 1 . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 2, 3, 4, Captain 3 . . . Aeolian Business Staff. WILLIAM DEPEW . . . Indus¬ trial. Arts . . . Football 3, 4 Golf 3, 4 . . . Noon League 4, Captain 4. SHARON DICKISON . . . Gen- eral . . . Student Council 1, 2 . . . Blue Triangle, Social Chair¬ man 2 . . . Y-Teens, Vice Presi¬ dent 3 . . . Chorus 1, 3, 4 ... Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 4 . . . Junior-Senior Banquet En¬ tertainment Co-Chairman . . . Girls’ State . . . Aeolian Busi¬ ness Manager. rlS- ■ RICHARD DILLS . . . Academic . . . Basketball 1, 2 . . . Track 1 . . . Noon League 3, 4, Cap¬ tain 4. LINDA DUERK . . . Business . . . Class Treasurer 4 . . . Blue Triangle, Treasurer 2 . . . - Teens . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, Vice President 3, President 4 . . . Junior-Senior Banquet Food Co-Chairman. LOUIS EASTERDAY . . . Aca¬ demic . . . Class President 1 . . . Student Council 3, 4, Presi¬ dent 4 . . . Hi-Y 3, 4, Program Chairman 3, 4, Vice President 4 . . . Scout Club 1, 2 . . . Opera¬ tors’ Club 4, Camera Committee . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Bas¬ ketball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Track 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Golf 3, 4 . . . Junior- Senior Banquet Entertainment Co-Chairman . . . Boys’ State . . . Aeolian Sports Editor. WILL ROGERS EASTES . . . Academic . . . Hi-Y 3 . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4, Boys’ Vocal En¬ semble 3, 4, Quartette 3, 4 . . . Band 1, 2 . . . Scout Club . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Basket¬ ball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Track 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Golf 3, 4. THOMAS ELY . . . Industrial Arts . . . Operators’ Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4 . . . Football 2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball 1, 2 . . . Golf 3, 4 . . . Noon League 4. THOMAS FARRINGTON . . . Industrial Arts . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4 . . . Operators’ Club 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4 . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Manager 4 . . . Track 3 . . . Aeolian Photographer. November ... Pep Club.. .A New Arrange- • merit for an Old Enthusiasm! REX FREEMAN . . . General . . . Hi-Y 3, 4, Secretary 4 . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4, Quartette 4 . . . Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4, Librarian 2 . . . Basketball 1. BEVERLY FULK . . . Business . . . Class Secretary-Treasurer 2 . . . Blue Triangle, Song Leader 2 . . . Y-Teens, Song Leader 3 . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4, Teenettes 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 2, 3 . . . Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Junior-Senior Banquet En¬ trance Decorations Co-Chairman . . . Aeolian Typist. DANIEL FULLER . . . Indus¬ trial Arts .. . Hi-Y 2, 3, 4 . . . Operators’ Club 4 . . . Band 1 . . . Football 2, 3, 4 . . . Bas¬ ketball 1, 2 . . . Track 1, 3 . . . Junior-Senior Banquet Food Co-Chairman. STEPHEN GAW . . . Industrial Arts . . . Class Vice President 2, President 3 . . . Student Council 4, Vice President . . . Scout Club 1 . . . Operators’ Club 2, 3, 4, President 4 . . . Band 1 . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Track 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Junior- Senior Banquet Co-Chairman. FAITH GETTS . . . Homemak¬ ing . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens, Sunshine Committee Chairman 4 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4, Triple Trio 3, Teenettes 4 . . . Band 1, 2, 3 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Aeolian Organization, M u s i c Editor. CARL HANDSHOE . . . Indus¬ trial Arts . . . FFA 1, Bas ketball 1. NANCY HARMAN . . . Busi¬ ness . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4 . . . Magazine Sales Team Man¬ ager 4, |30 Award Winner 1 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Junior-Senior Ban¬ quet Stage Co-Chairman . . . Aeolian Business Staff. CARL HARTER . . . Industrial Arts . . . Road-Eo-District Win¬ ner 3 . . . Noon League 4. JANET HATHAWAY . . . Busi¬ ness . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 2, 3 . . . Aeolian Classes Editor. December, ..We Repeat! Another tor Over Auburn! ESTON HATHAWAY ... In¬ dustrial Arts . . . Waterloo 1 . . . Hi-Y 3, 4 . . . Operators’ Club 4, Reporter . . . Football 3, 4, Honorary Football Captain 4 . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Track 1, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD HAYS . . . Academic . . . Operators’ Club 2, 3 . . . Aeolian Business Staff. ALFRED HAZELTON ... In¬ dustrial Arts . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4, Boys’ Vocal Ensemble 3, 4 . . . Football 1, 2 . . . Basketball 1 . . . Track 1, 2, 3, 4. JOHANNA HEINZERLING . . . Academic . . . Class Vice Presi¬ dent 3 . . . Student Council 1 . . . Blue Triangle, Program Chairman 2 . . . Y-Teens, Pro¬ gram Chairman 3 . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4 . . . Band 1, 2 . . . Maga¬ zine Sales Team Manager 2, 3, $60 Club 2, 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . Librarian 3 . . . GAA 4 . . . M B Feature Editor and Editor-in-Chief 3, Quill and Scroll 3 . . . Junior-Senior Ban¬ quet Co-Chairman . . . Girls’ State . . . DAR Good Citizen 4 . . . Aeolian Editor-in-Chief. NORMA HIXSON . . . Business . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . $30 Award Winner 2 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4. DALE HOLMES . . . Industrial Arts ... Ft. Wayne Central 1 . . . Class Treasurer 3, President 4 . . . Hi-Y 3, 4 . . . Basketball 2, 3, 4 . . . Noon League 3, Captain 3 . . . Junior-Senior Banquet Program Co-Chairman, Program Cover Designer. HARRIET HOWEY . . . Busi¬ ness . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 ... Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . M B Circulation. MARVIN HOUSER . . . Agri¬ culture . . . FFA 1, 2, 3, 4, Reporter 4 . . . Noon League 4. DAVID JAY . . . Industrial Arts . . . Band 1, 2, 3 . . . Scout Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Football 1, 2 . . . Noon League 3, 4 . . . Aeolian Business Staff 4. January ... The Be¬ ginning of the Last Reel ... FRANK JOHNSON . . . Agri¬ culture . . . Riverdale 1, 2 . . . FFA 3, 4. FRED KNOTT . . . Agriculture . . . Student Council 3 . . . Hi-Y 2 . . . FFA 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3, Vice Pres¬ ident 4 . . . Operators’ Club 2, 3, 4 . . . FFA Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Noon League 4 . . . Aeolian Boys’ Organizations Editor. PATRICIA LACROIX . . . Busi¬ ness . . . Student Council 2 . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens, Y-Wire Columnist . . . Chorus L 2, 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . .Magazine Sales Team Man¬ ager 3, 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3, 4 . . . Cheerleader I . . . M B Editor-in-Chief 4. LAURA LIVERGOOD . . . business . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, Triple Trio 3 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4, Captain 2, 3. CHARLES LOOMIS . . . Busi¬ ness . . . Butler 1 . . . Hi-Y 3, 4, Devotional Co-Chairman 3 . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4 . . . Band 2, 3, 4 . . . Noon League 4. RICHARD MAGGERT ... Ag¬ riculture . . . FFA 1, 2, 3, 4, FFA Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Noon League 1, 2, 3, 4. NANCY MARTIN . . . Home¬ making . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4. Triple Trio 3, Teenettes 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3 . . . M B Col¬ lector. RIVAL McBRlDE hi re . . . FFA 1, Basketball 1, 2, 3, League 1, 2, 3, 4, . . . Agricul- 2, 3, 4, FFA 4 . . . Noon Captain 4. February ... Behold His Shadow on the Floor! MARY ALICE MINNIEAR . . . Homemaking . . . Student Coun¬ cil 1 .. . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens, Program Chairman 4 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Magazine Sales Team Manager 1, 2, 3, General Manager 4, $30 Award Winner 3, 4 . . . Junior- Senior Banquet Stage Decora¬ tions Co-Chairman . . . Aeolian Faculty Editor. PETER MOUNTZ . . . Academic . . . Hi-Y 4 . . . Band 1, 2 . . . Magazine Sales Team Man¬ ager 3, General Manager 4, High Salesman 3, $60 Club 3 . . . Basketball Manager 1, 2 . . . Noon League 3, 4 . . . Aeolian Sports Associate Editor. JANA LEE OPDYCKE . . . Business . . . Blue Triangle, Service Chairman 2 . . . Y- Teens, President 4 . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4, Triple Trio 3, Teenettes 4 . . . Band 2, 3 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Secre¬ tary 3 . . . Aeolian Typist. CHARLES PECK . . . Industrial Arts . . . Garrett 1, 2, 4; Metz 3 . . . Noon League 4. JOAN PETERS . . . Business . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4, Triple Trio 3, Teenettes 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3, 4 . . . M B News Editor. DENNIS PORTER . . . Business . . . North Side 1 . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4, Boys’ Vocal Ensemble 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4, President 4 . . . Track 3, 4 . . . Noon League 4 . . . M B Circulation 4. JOHN RICHTER . . . Academic . . . St. Joseph I, 2, 3 . . . Noon League 4, Captain 4. March ... Your Future Comes but Days at a Time ... PATRICIA RIDENOUR . . . Business . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Band 1, 2 . . . Librarian 3, 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . M B Advertising Solicitor . . . Aeolian Literary Editor. MARILYN SALERNO . . . Busi¬ ness . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4 . . . Junior- Senit)r Bancjuet Hall Decorations Co-Chairman . . . Aeolian Girls’ Organizations Editor. KENNETH SEVERSON . . . Business . . . Class Vice Presi¬ dent 1, 4 . . . Hi-Y 2, 3, 4, Vice President 2, Treasurer 3 . . . Chorus 4 . . . Scout Club 1 . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Track L 3, 4 . . . Golf 3, 4 . . . Junior-Senior Banquet Clean-up Co-Chairman . . . M B Adver¬ tising Solicitor 4. h ' CHARLES TOOMAN . . . Agri¬ culture . . . Student Council 4 . . Hi-Y 3, 4, Devotional Co- Chairman 3, President 4 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Band 4 . . . FFA 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4, FFA Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Football 3 . . . Basketball 1 . . . Track 2, 3, 4 . . . Noon League 2. NORMA THOMPSON . . . Busi¬ ness . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Majorette 4, President 4 . . . GAA 1, 2. RAF ANNE TRAINER . . . Business . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens, Sunshine Committee 3, Treasurer 4 . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4, Triple Trio 3, Teenettes 4 . . . Pep Club 4 . . . Librarian 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 1 . . . Junior-Senior Banquet Entrance Decorations Co-Chairman . . . Aeolian Busi¬ ness Staff. MAX SNYDER . . . Industrial Arts . . . Garrett 1, 3, 4; Lima 2. PAUL SPARKS . . . Business . . . Hi-Y 2 . . . Basketball 1, 2 . . . Track 1, 2, 4 . . . Noon League 3, 4 . . . Aeolian Busi¬ ness Staff. April,..A Player Struts and Frets His Hour Upon the Stage ... MARILYN SHIRK . . . Home¬ making . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 2, 3 . . . Pep Club 4. DELORIS SMITH . . . Business . . . Class Secretary 4 . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4, Triple Trio 3, Teenettes 4 . .. . Pep Club 4. NANCY SMITH . . . Business . . . Student Council 2 . . . Blue Triangle, Secretary 2 . . . Y-Teens, Secretary 3 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Pep Club 4, Vice President . . . GAA 1, 2, 3, 4, Capta’n 3 . . . Drama Club 2 . . . Junior-Senior Banquet Hall Decoration Co-Chairman . . . Aeolian Class Associate Editor. WILLIAM WILCOX . . . Aca¬ demic ... St. Joseph 1, 2, 3 . . . Boys’ State. PATRICIA WALKER . . . Aca¬ demic . . . Class President 2 . . . Blue Triangle, President 2 . . . Y-Teens, Devotional Chairman 3 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4, Triple Trio 3, Teenettes 4 . . . GAA 1 . . . Junior-Senior Banquet Table Decorations Co-Chairman . . . M B Editorial Editor 4 . . . Aeolian Activities Editor. RICHARD WARNER . . . Gen¬ eral . . . Student Council 1 . . Football 1, 2, 4 . . . Bas¬ ketball 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Track 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Noon League 3 . . . M B Circulation 4. ROBERT WIANT . . . Industrial Arts . . . Student Council 3, Vice President . . . Hi-Y 2, 3, 4 . . . Football 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball 1, 2, 4, Manager 3 . . . Track 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Decorations Co-Chairman . . . Aeolian Junior High Editor. May ... The Year Goes by... Like a Shadow ... Where All Was Delight. CAROLYN WILLIAMS . . . Homemaking . . . Blue Triangle . . . Y-Teens . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . GAA 1, 2 . . . M B Circulation. DALLAS WOLF . . . Industrial Arts . . . Chorus 2, 3, 4, Boys’ Vocal Ensemble 4 . . . Pep Club 4, Secretary-Treasurer . . . Aeo¬ lian Business Staff. In Line for Awards 1956 Honor Students Fred Knott Sharon Dickison, Louis Easter- day, Jana Lee Opdycke, Richard Hays, Patricia Walker, Rex Freeman. There are many outstanding lead¬ ers in this class, but just as im¬ portant are those many quiet ones who worked on committees, mak¬ ing successes of every project. As seniors the 79 students produced a yearbook and a class play. They were entertained by the juniors at “Fantasy Fair,” the Jr.-Sr. banquet. As juniors the successful “Corne¬ a-roamin ’,” the 1955 Jr.-Sr. banquet, was a result of concession stand super-salesmanship. “April in Par¬ is” was the theme chosen for the sophomore class party. The fresh¬ man class party had a Valentine theme. Linda Duerk, Dale Holmes, Rae Anne Trainer, Harry Manges, Betty Baker, Peter Mountz. Dale Holmes, president; Deloris Smith, secretary; Linda Duerk, treasurer; president. Kennetli Severson, vice 79 PTA EXECUTIVES—Sitting: Frank Brechbill, second vice president; Rev. Glenn Mulligan, first vice president; Donovan Aplin, president; Robert Pugb, secretary; Mrs . Vere Peters, treasurer. Standing: Mrs. and Mr. Lauren Smith, social cbairmen; Ray Gripe, program co-cbairman with Mrs. Gripe; Mrs. Herman Cordes, assistant secretary; Jon Buckles, hospitality co-chairman with Mrs. Buckles; Mrs. D. E. Conrad, assistant treasurer. The PTA was organized in the spring of last year. As its first public service effort, the group sponsored a fund-raising campaign for the purchase of an Executone sound-system for use by Phil¬ lip Conrad. Mrs. Herman Cordes served as chairman of the committee for this project. Special programs throughout the year included demonstrations of modern devices in everyday teaching, a presentation by teachers during American Education Week; “Christmas in Song” by the high school choral groups directed by Mrs. John Flora; a demonstration of a replica of the battlefield at Gettysburg, which was made by David Walton; a demonstration of a resuscitator by Daryl Dalrymple and Harris Hoeffel, members of Garrett’s Volunteer Fire Department; and a play¬ let, “The Night Watchman,” written and directed by Mrs. Harry Tandy. Other committee chairmen this year who were not in the picture above were: Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Smith, membership; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Heinzerling, publicity; Mr. and Mrs. Edward Shenk, pub¬ lications; Mr. and Mrs. Donald Dickison, devotions; Mr. and Mrs. Jack James, child study group, elementary; Dr. and Mrs. Perry Reynolds, child study group, secondary; Mrs. Dale Menges, budget and finance; Mr. George Staley, parliamentarian. Behind th Janitors: Estelle L. Getts. Carl H. Sartor, William J. Longergan, and Lawrence H. Lung. Wyatt’s B 0 Lunch Garrett Bank Best Pharmacy Wilhelm T. V. Abey Abram, Inc. Owen Glass Shop Simon’s Grocery Dr. N. M. Niles Patrick J. Purdy Sebring Cleaners Studio of Beauty Garrett Dairy Bar Hughes Drug Store Vanity Beauty Shop Smith’s Drug Store Burtch Printing Shop Machlik’s News Stand Barcus Shell Service DePew’s Dry Cleaners F. 0. Eagles No. 1357 Olds’ Grocery—Altona Sacred Heart Hospital Smith’s Texaco Service Gerig’s Furniture Store Limpert’s Jewelry Store Marathon Service Station Brinkerhoff Brinkerhoff Freeze’s T. V. Service Shop Seifert Paint and Appliance East Side Grocery (Lehner’s) Baltimore Ohio Railroad Co. Hardware Engineering, Inc. Walter Kerns Service Station Thornhill Oil Co.—Ashlands Helen Starner Beauty Shop Johnston Insurance Agency Dolphin Craft of Ind., Inc. American Legion Post 178 Midwestern Foundries, Inc. Blue Moon Custard Stand Zimmerman Funeral Home Dalrymple Barber Shop Don’s Filling Station Riedhart’s Homestore Zern Service Station Landy’s Dept. Store Hall, Veterinarian Service Finance Co. Dr. D. M. Reynolds Garrett Lumber Co. Lewis Shoe Repair The Catherine Shop Hubbard Spool Co. Needlecraft Shop The Squeeze Inn Chas. Ort Co. Frank’s Garage Clipper Office Turney Coal Co. Heitz Grocery Boston Store Gala Theater M. L. Bunn The Clinic Clark Co. Dr. R. A. Nason Thorne Studio Central Market Superior Dairy City Dairy, Inc. Felke’s Florist The Pet Milk Co. Williams Grocery Schurr Curl Shop A P Food Stores Lantz Barber Shop Stern Clothing Co. Blair’s Shoe Store Burtch Machine Shop Superior Drive Inn Gingery Dept. Store Strock Motor Service Garrett Country Club R. Perry Reynolds, M.D. Superior Coal Company Drs. Bernard Jeffrey Heinzerling’s Hardware Kott’s Standard Service Haffner’s General Office The Garrett Telephone Co. Garrett 5c to $1.00 Store Culligan Soft Water Service Garrett Coal Co.—A. W. Pierce Gamble Store—H. W. Benn, Owner K. P. Sithen, General Contractor but Part of the Play Lynn’s Home Appliance The Creek Chub Bait Co. Luzier’s Cosmetic Service Roger G. Eberhard, Optometrist Miscellaneous This and That Shop Garrett Flexible Products, Inc. Gala Beauty Shop—Mayme Fish Economy Cleaner—Economy Laundry Mozelle Griffith Grocery—Altona Sweeney Realty and Business Service Northern Indiana Fuel Light Co. Electric Motors Specialties, Inc. Haffner’s 5c to $1.00 Stores, Inc. Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post 1892 Bernard R. Brennan—Insurance Trustees Butler Center Service Station and Grocery Wilmot’s Accounting and Insurance Service DeKalb Co. Farm Bureau Cooperative Assn., Inc. Cottage Pastry Shop—Mr. and Mrs. Donald Furnish Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., F. J. McDermott, Agent Robert C. Harman, Representative, Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States LITHOGRAPHED BY LOR PUBLISHING CO. DALLAS • TEXAS The Best Yearbooks are TAYLOR-MADE ■ ‘ ■ ' ■■■■ " - ' ? ' i. ' fc’ ' --i ' j ' 5’. 7 ' -‘ ' ' Vv’V:. .fl PSRP If - .A} . ►:;;v. • .; ' ' Mr ' ■ t A ■ ' X. .■ i.-: I ' rWW ' i. r ' l. ' .V. « , 4 » • ■ ' V » .., -; i %9Q jf i- ' | (‘ ' r F BO..; PPP|B1K i3u


Suggestions in the Garrett High School - Aeolian Yearbook (Garrett, IN) collection:

Garrett High School - Aeolian Yearbook (Garrett, IN) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

Garrett High School - Aeolian Yearbook (Garrett, IN) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

Garrett High School - Aeolian Yearbook (Garrett, IN) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

Garrett High School - Aeolian Yearbook (Garrett, IN) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

Garrett High School - Aeolian Yearbook (Garrett, IN) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

Garrett High School - Aeolian Yearbook (Garrett, IN) online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.