Garfield Junior High School - Gleaner Yearbook (Berkeley, CA)

 - Class of 1934

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Garfield Junior High School - Gleaner Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1934 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 62 of the 1934 volume:

3 ? ) 3023 576 £? JSlC| ir « r s- j 1 1 DECEMBER 1934 k GARFIELD GLEANER AARFIELD JUNIOR HIAH SCHOOL BERKELEY CALIFORNIA FALL TERM 1014 i A YYLerry Christmas and iA Happy dS[ew Year TO ONE OF Garfield ' s best teachers, ON LEAVE OF ABSENCE THIS SEMESTER, ENJOYING LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY, NEW YORK. IN FANCY WE CAN HEAR HER SINGING, ff CALIFORNIA, HERE I COME!” OUR NEW YEAR WILL BE HAPPIER BECAUSE SHE WILL BE WITH US AGAIN. WELCOME HOME TO Mrs. Helen Kleeberger! PRINCIPAL’S MESSAGE TO GRADUATES Usually the principal’s message to the graduates is written just before the Gleaner is printed, and is a message of farewell. This year, the situation is different. You will be with us for several weeks after the Gleaner is issued. A farewell at this time would not be appropriate. Therefore, we shall, instead, wish — ff A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year To the Prospective Midwinter Graduates of the Garfield Junior High.” May you return after a happy vacation, ready to enjoy three weeks of profitable, satisfactory school life, which will remain with you as pleasant memories of your closing days at Garfield. A great army of boys and girls — five thousand three hundred eighty-four — have preceded you as Garfield graduates. Many of them have made and are making notable success of their lives. May each of you find a place among the best of that goodly number. You can take no better guide for the conduct of your life than the ideals portrayed by the splendid words inscribed on the walls of our school court: Labor, Learning, Responsibility, Reverence; Courage, Integrity, Vision, Service! FACULTY Principal Secretary Hexxessey, D. L. . Cannon, M a Belle A. Archer, Mrs. Kate W. Arendt, Marion, Counselor Bagnall, Mrs. Franklin Barry, Margaret Boehne, Fred Brubaker, Emma Brush, Charlotte Collar, Gladys Corley, Flarold P. Davis, Mrs. Dorothy Dyson, Mrs. Margaret Fisk, Katharine Flanders, F. A. Fraser, Ann ie Mills Gavin, Mrs. Isabel Gay, Adella Goode, Beatrice Groefsema, Christine Grover, Harriet Hamsher, Alice Hughes, Samuel Kelton, Genevieve, Counselor Kidwell, Ruth Kilkenny, Mrs. Myrtle Laurens, Helene Leland, S. J. Lowrey, Mary McLeod, Annie Mally, Alfreda Martin, Helen Minzyk, John Montagne, Mrs. Alberta E. Morse, Blanche Mossman, Edith L. Xealson, ASTillis S. O’Neill, Mrs. Dorah D. Osgood, Mrs. Blanche Patton, Bessie Patton, Elizabeth Perry, H. D. Piatt, Mrs. Mona Skinner Riley, Irma Rowell, Mrs. Evelyn Rushforth, Robert Russ, Mrs. Helen, Counselor Shriver, Mrs. Edna Smith, Mrs. Iva Stone, Nell Stout, Harriet M. Whitney. Roslyn Mae Wilkes, Mrs. Emma Wilson, Flora Schwinley, Florence (substitute) Strong, Louise (substitute) SPECIAL TEACHERS AND ASSISTANTS Bellus, Mrs. Ruth Assistant Librarian Hibbard, Mrs. Mary Assistant Secretary Foster, Georgia P., Nurse De Witt, Carlton Playground Director Menefee, Mrs. Dolly P. Cafeteria M anager Petitt, Mrs. Bessie L., Natron Kimbell, S. B., Head Custodian Hoag, Jac k, Custodian Odom, Joseph, Custodian Post, C. C., Custodian CLASS STATISTICS The Fall, 1934, Class Statistics are more imposing than those of pre- vious years. Our heights, if we stood on top of each other, would tower approximately 821 feet 2 inches. Our average age is 14 1 ? years. The sizes of our boys’ shoes range from size 6 to size 12, and the girls’ from size 4AA to the unknown. Our weights if added together would ring the bell at 11,229 pounds for the boys, and at 8,478 pounds for the girls. The individual weight range is from 62 pounds to 210 pounds for the boys, and from 6 5 pounds to 160 pounds for the girls. Our ages if added to- gether would date back about 5350 years, to the year 1616 B.C. There are 96 boys and 109 girls in the class. Our class motto is " What we are to be, we are now becoming.” Ted Deetrich, High Nine. Carroll Abbott Avis Adams Junior Amonette Dorothy Anderson Edward Archer Jane Armitage Ruth Armstrong Harry Arnold Marvin Baker Fred Bacon Billivee Barlow Chester Berggren Barbara Biscomb Beth Bolin Barbara Bowie Muriel Boyd Anna Braun Clayton Brunsell Donald Buckland Virginia Bulmore Bob Busby Tom Caldwell Malcolm Campbell Jack Carleton Bob Carlquist Jean Christie Sheila Chandler Bob Clark Olive Clarke Virginia Clarke Ruth Cone Robert Clayworth Langley Connor Robert Cooley Adele Coughlan Eric Cresswell Dorothy Cross Patricia Danforth Roger Davidson Edna Dean Emmie Jo de Normandie Leonard Dechant Harold De Pue Ted Dietrich Randall Dingley Harold Dreyer Jim Dotson David Druhe Lucille DufTey Bernice Duffey Denton Duncan Ralph Dufour Helen Dunn Josephine Enas Betty Jane Elster Patricia Feyen Ray Finadore Mary Floyd Sue Fowler Bob Ford Mary Rees Fox Faith Franklin Leo Frentzen Margaret Freshwaters Roberta Fritz Bill Fulton George Gaebler Winifred Garretson Harry Graham Gwendolyn Gerken Glen Grey Harry W. Graham Janice Gray Helen Gunn Jackson Haggard Irving Hamilton Virgil Hamilton Mildred Hand Phyllis Hanson Dorothy Heck Estelle Hennigan Noreen Higgins Kathryn Howard Dorothy Hoyt Albert Huber Al’en Hurd Marshall Hunt Margaret Irving Armand Johnson Mary Keating Harold Kellam Lee Keck Vance Keyt Anita Kietzman Gerald Kincaid Dorothy Koford Floramay Lackey Calvin Larsen Arta Jean Lewis Leland Lawton Helen Lilly Bill Logan Muriel Logan Shirley Lundbeck Lee Mallory Billy Mann Jim March Gustav Marnofsky Dorys Maryon Bob McCarthy Marjorie McConnell Madelyn McGlynn Marjorie McKee John McKie Ruth Meigs Robert McNeil Bill Macdougall Jane McGowan Berneice Masters Sarah Mitchell Catherine Mitchelson Esther Moore James Moore Robert Moore Gordon Morris Jerry Nelson Shirley Newell Vern Ogren Dorothy Oyler Kenneth Owen Robert Patton Janice Pape Patricia Parrish Olive Peebles Jack Pendleton Gilbert Peterson Edwin Peterson James Porterfield Barbara Post George Prideaux Evelyn Prochietto Melville Puterbaugh Geraldine Rathburn Joyce Rhyne Robert Richardson Marjorie Roehm Marilyn Ricker Frances Rose Ellsworth Rouse Fred Rowley Frank Ryan Paul Ruedrich Henrietta Samuely Marion Sandner Elizabeth Sauer Owen Sawyer Geraldine Scheibner Fred Scobey Mary Elizabeth Scott Shirley Ann Schaefer Jeannette Sheppard Jack Selsted Conrad Sjobom Elinor Skimmings Norman Sloane Alta Smith Norwood Smith Richard Snyder Marie Solomon James Stanford Albert Steiner Kenneth Street David Streeter Barbara Strout Allen Sugd en Frank Swain Dev in Taber Harold Taylor Joanne Taylor Jack Temple Norman Terry Frank Thomas Margaret Thomas Donald Tyson Rosina Van Berkem Bob Warner Doris Welch Bettie Fou Wells Helen Weyand John West Rita Wightman Jacqueline Wind Ian Wishart Robert Wall Milton Woolf Robert Wykoff Chandler Young Brian Zamlock William Zimmerman GRADUATION As Commencement Day draws near and thoughts of the graduates turn toward High School, we are a little apprehensive as to what our future may bring. But we are not afraid; for though many problems may confront us, we know we shall be able to cope with them, due to our excellent training while at Garfield. The Class Day exercices of the mid-winter graduating class will be held at 9:30 o’clock Wednesday morning, January 23, 1935. The gradua- tion exercises will be held Thursday morning, January 24, at 9:30. The class song will be " The Song of Farewell” by Kountz, and will be led by Mrs. Iva H. Smith. Musical numbers will be given by Geraldine Scheibner, Sheila Chandler, and Bernard Knapp, a former student. Greetings will be given by Ian Wishart, G. S. A. President, and the farewell by a student yet to be selected. Fred Stripp Jr., recently chosen pastor of the Thousand Oaks Baptist Church, has been asked to give the invocation and benediction. Two distinguished alumni will be invited to speak. The school emblem, as u sual, will be presented to the graduates. Following a custom of long standing, the P. T. A. will give the grad- utes a party on Thursday afternoon. This is always a delightful occasion and we would like to take advantage of this opportunity to thank our P. T. A. for their generous thought of us. Ian Wishart, High Niue. AMERICAN EDUCATION WEEK IN BERKELEY A program given on November 4, 1934, at the Men’s Gymnasium in which the Glee Clubs, a Cappellas, and Bands from many schools partici- pated, marked the beginning of American Education Week in Berkeley. This program was sponsored by the Berkeley Public Schools and the American Legion, which presented the national colors. Vocal numbers by choruses of Elementary, Junior and Senior High Schools, and instrumental numbers by the combined Junior and Senior High School Bands, were included on the program. Dr. Monroe E. Deutsch gave an excellent address, and Dr. Smith spoke for a few minutes. Garfield had open house all week, and visitors were made welcome. On Friday, some boys and girls, under the direction of Miss Hamsher, presented a very entertaining play entitled " The Man Without a Coun- try,” which was appropriate for Armistice Day. Both the P. T. A. and Dads of Garfield held successful meetings. Barbara Biscomb and Gwendolyn Gerken, High Nine. ART WORK The art staff attempted a new medium of expression for its illustra- tions this fall. Clay statuettes and bas-reliefs were modeled and photo- graphed. Hinsdale Latour modeled the frontispiece and the heading for Music. Virginia Clarke did the one for Literature; Dorothy Alldredge, Dra- matics; Robert Aldea, Activities, and the small cartoons were done by Patricia Danforth, William Fontenrose and Gordon Connell. We give special thanks to Mr. Hughes for his kind aid in photo- graphing them. Jim Waesche, Low Nine. G. S A. OFFICERS President Ian Wishart Vice-President Howard Cook Secretary Junior Amonette T reasurer . Jackson Haggard Social Secretary Barbara Post Boys’ Athletic Manager Bill McDougall Girls’ Athletic Manager Jean Christie Yell Leader Allen Hurd honor society officers President Vice-President Secretary High Eight Director Loiv Eight Director . Fred Scobey Martha Webb Roberta Fritz Dick Raftery Bob Meckel 4 GLEANER STAFF GLEANER STAFF OF FALL 1934 Editor Assistant Editor Literary Editor Poetry Editor Art Editor Joke Editor . Business Manager Marjorie McKee Kay Mitchelson Sheila Chandler Janice Gray Hinsdale Latour Norman Sloane Jim Beale GLEANER ASSISTANTS Bob Aldea, Dorothy Alldredge, Jane Armitage, Chester Berggren, Barbara Biscomb, John Bogard, Muriel Boyd, John Brenneis, Bob Busby, Jack Carleton, Olive Clarke, Virginia Clarke, Ruth Cone, Gorden Connell, Patricia Danforth, Betty Drury, Ralph Dufour, Patsy Feyen, Bill Fontenrose, Susie Belle Fowler, Gwen Gerken, Mildred Fland, Dorothy Heck, Noreen Higgins, Marshall Hunt, Mary Keating, Berneice Masters, Bob McCarthy, Madelyn McGlynn, Jane McGowan, Dallas Noble, Janice Pape, Patty Jane Parrish, James Porterfield, George Prideaux, Marilyn Ricker, Constance Robinson, Marjorie Roehm, Frank Ryan, Henrietta Samuely, Jack Selsted, Elinor Skimmings, Joanne Taylor, Frank Thomas, Jack Webber. EDITORIAL " New occasions teach new duties, Time makes ancient good uncouth. They must upward still and onward. Who would keep abreast of truth. Lo, before us gleamed the campfires, We, ourselves, must Pilgrims be, Launch our Mayflower and steer it boldly, Through the Desperate Winter Sea, Nor attempt the future portals With the past’s blood-rusted key.” Those were stirring and primitive times when they discovered an America, launched a Mayflower, or founded a mission in the wilderness. They needed, and had, great leaders. Today we need leaders, just as strong and courageous, to lead us out of a period of economic stress. We ourselves may not have suffered during this period, but we have seen its distress and unhappiness reflected in the lives of those about us. Perhaps this may help us to become more thoughtful, prudent men and women, more mindful of the welfare of others. The problems of the future can be solved only through education and we know that the training we have received for the past three years will always stand us in good stead. Now we go forward to new experiences. Let us do so confidently and courageously, for " We, ourselves, must Pilgrims be, Launch our Mayflower and steer it boldly” Through an unfamiliar sea. The Editor. LITERATURE This term Garfield sponsored a short story and poetry contest. A committee of teachers decided on the following as the winners of the poetry contest: First, Vers Libre, Marjorie McKee; second, The Storm: A Sonnet, Patricia Parrish; third, Homesickness, Barbara Matthews; April, Patricia Danforth; Trini- dad, Betty Ricker. Honorable mention: Catherine Mitchelson, Janice Pape, Emily Stout, Frank Ryan, Elinor Skimmings, Allen Sugden, John Brenneis, Gwendolyn Gerken, Jack Selsted, Madelyn McGlvnn. The winners of the short story contest are: First, Flanders Field, Phillip Taylor; second, Mystery in the Storm, John Brenneis; third, Chornie, Betty Ricker. Honorable mention: Marjorie McKee, Bob McCarthy, Melville Puterbaugh, Madelyn McGlvnn, Olive Clarke, Mercedes Stroube, Nancy MacCaughey. Vers Libre It often makes me smile to think How in another time l used to think that poems were poems, And so, as such, must rhyme. But things are different now, you see; No longer do I frozen, And when I needs must rr poe a poem,” With smiles 1 sit me down. For some kind friend of mine indeed, Invented modern verse, So now I write the following stuff, And sometimes even ivorse. My soul. Exposed to the cruel, hard sunlight, it cringes. Yet ’tis depant. I watch it curiously, lying in the siveet Lush Grass, The winged beetles make their way towards home. Making Tiny paths. 1 love the sea. Retrospect Marjorie McKee, High Niue Sonnet: The Storm Swirling, twirling , round me whirling, Th rough the air the raindrops fly From a sad and sombre sky That weeps great bitter tears. Flashing, lashing, loudly crashing, The lightning breaks and thunder roars. As cries within grim Hades’ doors Are heard midst whistling winds. Oh tempest! wreaking vengeance On this Earth with raging force, Abate that hate and fury so deep within your soul, And return to heaven’s dome again your cruel and mighty lance. So let Apollo with his faery steeds once more o’er heaven’s course Go forth and with a joyous sun this dreary Earth, condole. Patty Jane Parrish, High Nine. Homesickness Beyond Fort Sherman’s palm trees Red glows the dying sun, And in the blue arch overhead The stars shine one by one. (g We dream of tropic waters, Of friendships strong and true, Blue sky, soft mist, and friendly stars Panama, we dream of you ! Barbara Matthews, Low Nine. April Sidewalks drying from the cool April rain — Green grass springing between the blue and gray stones, A yellow tabby-cat dreaming in the sun. Daffodils and crocuses waving on the hillside — Green ivy blowing on worn gray trails — And the cool , rain-freshened wind Swirling the green leaves from the elm trees — Berkeley . . . in April. Patricia Danforth, High Nine. Trinidad The long, white sweep of a sandy beach Kimmed arotmd tuith cocoanut palms; The gold green flash of a paraquet , A purple perfumed orchid spray; The lazy drift of a butterfly Across a tender bamboo screen, The sweet hot scent of cinnamon Captain Kidd, and Tort O’Spain, Captured galleons — the Spanish Main — All these things are brought to me When I hear the surge of a restless sea. Betty Ricker, Low Nine. FLANDERS FIELDS In a nearby field the larks sang gaily; a laughing stream bubbled over the rocks and the roots of the giant aged oaks of the narrow, little glen. But a low rumbling sound that seemed to shake the very earth drew nearer, and little groups of terrified peasants hurriedly passed. Suddenly, the lark stopped singing, and the rumbling and roaring seemed to penetrate into us, numbing and dulling our senses. Then soon a steady tramp, tramp, tramp, was heard, and rows of grim-faced men filed past — all marching toward the roar. Every few minutes there was a rush of peasants, with all their possessions in little carts, which they pulled behind them. Another group of grim-faced men filed past; grim-faced, for this was a grim business — war. Still more passed, some dressed in the skyblue of France, others in the uniforms of England, with colorful banners flying above. Overhead, we heard roars; and looking up, we discovered " the eyes of the army,” the air corps, flying to their stations. Suddenly, a rising scream was heard, and the earth rose beneath our feet. But where was the stream? Where were the oaks? Instead, we saw a great gaping hole which the little stream was filling rapidly, as though ashamed of its wound. The roar could then be distinguished as the rattle of machine guns, the roars of the cannon; and still the grim-faced men filed past in ever increasing numbers. The time changes. The location is the same; the lark again sings; the stream bubbles and laughs, but the scene seems different. What can it be? Now we see. The harvest in the distant field is that of Death, not that of the peasant. The scene is one of almost indescribable beauty, and the hallowed place can not fail to impress us. » . », v . «», y Although our strife-torn world seems on the verge of another great catastrophe, we hope it will listen to the mute lesson this and countless similar places tell. We also hope it will not be necessary for Death to reap again a harvest, more terrible than the last. Then this poem will not have been written in vain: " In Flanders Fields” In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place, and in the sky, T he larks, still bravely singing, fly, Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the dead ; short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders field. Take up our quarrel with the foe, To you from failing hands we tljrow The torch-, be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields. — John D. McCrae. Philip Taylor, Low Nine. MYSTERY IN THE STORM A dim, sinister figure slips through the storm, stealthy, as though it feared it could be heard or seen through the rushing rain and the rolling thunder. It slips toward a dark forbidding house. A light flashes on in the house, and the figure freezes, as immovable as the rock by which it stands. The light goes out. The figure moves on. It is almost at the house now. A flash of lightning reveals for an instant the form of a young boy. He cannot be over fifteen, and he looks honest. What can his purpose be that he steals so carefully, so stealthily? Crime? No, he appears to be an honest lad, and yet, so did Billy the Kid. Now he is at the house. He circles it slowly, as if to locate an open window or a crack of light, but finds neither. He seems baffled for a moment; then a low laugh escapes his lips. He moves quickly toward a great tree which stands near the house. Up he climbs — up the slippery tree, which rocks and sways in the furious grip of the storm. Now he works his way out on a limb — out till it seems that the slim branch must break. Now he is at an unlocked window. He raises it slowly, an inch at a time. He slips in. He closes the window. He moves across the room; then, a board squeaks underfoot. A figure moves on the bed and lets out a low, startled cry. The boy leaps; there is a slight struggle. A low menacing whisper! Something glints in the hands of the intruder — then silence. The visitor stands and strides swiftly to the hall. He walks a few steps, then, turns and enters another room. He closes the door softly. Then he laughs, a low, nervous, shaky laugh, and mutters, " Whew! I made it! I am sure not going to stay out until twelve when dad tells me to come at ten again, and I’m sure glad Jimmy took that nickel. He won’t tell.” John Brenneis, Low Nine. CHORNIE " Hello! Anyone at home?” " I wonder where Mother can be.” " A note!” " Oh dear, oh dear, how could that dog have swallowed another wash- rag. That will make the third this week.” If anyone had told me that one small Scottie pup could possibly encompass the number and variety of things that Chornie does, I would have doubted his veracity. But one learns! Take for example today. The first cheep of the bird brings a little black head to the crack of the door. Then a flash and a bounce — a very wet, warm tongue and a wet, cold nose play indiscriminately from ear to ear, while four, small feet beat a joyful tattoo on your stomach. It’s morning! and of course you get up. You reach for your shoes and socks, put beside the bed the night before. One shoe may be under the desk but one will surely be half way down the stairs. And the socks? Look at them! If it were only the toes the mend would not show, but it’s alwavs the heels which seem to be the choicest morsels. So the red socks seek their fellows in the ragbag. You make a mental note to put the shoes and socks on the bureau hereafter. Hair combed; dress on at last. Down to breakfast? No. Where’s the belt? The back door slams. Across the muddy garden you see a flash of red trailing on the ground — the belt, but in no condition to wear. While you are at school, there are, of course, many things that need attending to at home. Mother collects the laundry first. " I’ll do a little helpful sorting of laundry,” thinks Chornie. Then — " Far too many corners on most towels.” So he co-operates, assiduously taking off the corners, giving the laundry the opportunity to take out the middle. The next interesting thing to be done is the mopping of floors. Both parties expend great effort on this. What matter if the poor mop is nearly bald at the end of the procedure? No bits of mop are to be seen. " What happened to them?” I wonder. " Oh Mother! You had better get that half inch of string hanging from Chornie’s mouth. Even a little string is bad.” " Did you say a ' little?’ After all, three and a half yards is only a small part of a ball of string.” At last school is over and one hurries home to find the note. " What could it be this time worse than another washrag?” Here’s Mother, at last, grimly clutching a rather gloomy little dog. " What was it?” I ask. " The pink washrag?” " No! Good heavens! The bath-tub stopper!” Betty Ricker, Low Nine. Sanctuary When cares surround me like a pall And days are gray with myriad ills, 1 turn my back upon it all And seek my cabin in the hills. ’Tis there I find my antidote For worry of the sort tJjat kills — Heartache and strife are both remote From that sweet refuge in the hills. Kay Mitchelson, High Niue. SUPER-COLOSSAL Bill Chapman and his publicity agent friend, Jeff Hardy, were deep in thought. You could tell this because their heads were close together, and they spoke in solemn voices. You could also tell that they had been in conference for quite some time, for the dense blue smoke hung in stagnant spirals above their heads; they were speaking on that eventful day, of Bill’s chances in the movies. They were in fact formulating that plan, which, in later articles, was to be known as " William Chapman’s Sensational Entrance Into the Movies!” That afternoon the Super-Colossal Movie Production Corporation was on location at an old ranch, which was the setting for a new Super- Colossal picture, " The Heart of the Cow-Puncher.” There was a little flurry among the actors and actresses as the star, De Lancey Cabot, approached. " The Most Romantic, Swashbuckling Hero Ever Seen on Stage or in Private Life” came hurrying up, apologizing for his tardiness, explaining that he had been a little late with his afternoon tea. Then came the terrible part of that momentous afternoon, for Cabot’s double could not be found, and the scene had to be taken before dark. It was necessary for Cabot’s double to ride a horse in the scene, but the double was not there, so Cabot must ride! But Cabot could not and would not do this, and finally had to be lifted, volubly protesting, to the saddle. All this time Bill and Jeff had been regarding the scene with amused smiles, for they were frequent visitors to the Super-Colossal set, although Bill came more often to see the leading lady, Gloria Furness, who repeatedly snubbed him, than to see the shooting of the scenes. But to return to Cabot. Down the trail the horse galloped, with Cabot on his back, cutting an ungainly figure. The camera men were following their flight with the cameras, and everyone on the set was watching them. Bill and Jeff watched, too, more interestedly, perhaps, than the others. At the bottom of the hill was a pool. The trail went close to the right of it, but today, to Cabot’s horror, there was a large pile of brush in the center of the trail. The horse swerved sharply to the left, but Cabot went straight on, into the pool. He waded sputtering to the shore, for the pool was shallow. This was lucky, for Cabot’s swimming was as poor as his riding. They brought him back to the ranch, the director complaining that the scene must be " shot” that very day. Perhaps, you have guessed the rest. Of course, Jeff suggested Bill for Cabot’s part, and the director, willing to try anything, did notice that Bill was a very presentable young man, did notice that he rode and photographed very well. In fact, he noticed these so much, that he mentioned them to Bill, and told him also to come to his office the next day and they would see about a contract. The director moved away, followed by cameramen and extras, one of whom said to Bill, " The Big Boss is stuck on you; you’re in luck!” And Miss Furness, in passing, gave him a sweet, sweet smile. Said Bill to Jeff, " Wonder who could have put brush on the trail!” Said Jeff to Bill, with a grin, " Come up to my house for dinner and we’ll try to figure it out!” Marjorie McKee, High Nine. Hidden Faces Under the grasses after the snow There do the modest violets grow; Hiding their delicate beautiful heads Out of the sunshine , in soft mossy beds. Touched by the fairies , as blue as the sky, Sweet as a rose, the violets lie, Hiding their faces to never be seen, Only the leaves know where they have been. Janice Pape, High Nine. Before Datvn The spider’s web is the jewelry store of nature, The clouds are fleecy lambs grazing in a meadow of blue, The trees are spectral sentinels in the gloom, The grass is a velvet carpet laden with dew, Apollo is preparing to draw his chariot Across the sky, as the icorld becomes bathed in light. Emily Stout, Low Nine. A MODERN TEARJERKER The other day, on my morning promenade, I happened to observe an old acquaintance who was sadly gazing at a popcorn wagon. I was sur- prised to note his usual jovial countenance faded to a frown. Being very sympathetic, I asked what might be the trouble. He sadly unfolded his tale of woe. It was such a story as one seldom hears. It seems that he had invested his life’s (wife’s) savings in an Arizona ranch of four hundred acres. Upon two hundred acres, he cultivated popcorn, while he used the remaining acres for cattle grazing. All was going fine with our friend on the ranch. The popcorn was progressing splendidly and the cattle were fat and sleek. It looked like a banner year for our hero and he had already ordered an elaborate popcorn wagon with streamlined chassis and a jazz-playing whistle which was to be the pride and joy of all Arizona. The wagon was well on its way when the inevitable happened. A hot blast of wind which i s common in this desert region swept over our hero’s farm. This occurrence, being filled with hot air like our story, proceeded to pop the corn on the spot. The cattle, observing the snowy white heaps and thinking that it was snow, nonchalantly froze to death. The corn popping attracted pigs who cleaned the field of the popcorn in a very short time. This terrible disaster wiped out our hero’s farm and his life’s (wife’s) savings, leaving him penniless and without his popcorn wagon. Moral: Don’t pop corn without a whistle; raise grapefruit in Arizona. Bob McCarthy, High Nine. NOTHING EVER HAPPENS " In a lake like this nothing ever happens,” said the old hermit, as he whittled on a stout, oak limb which he used to push his raft about. " A fool I was to abandon civilization and come to this dead place and — ,” his voice trailed off until the words were merely movements on his lips. The lake was about five miles long and about three miles in width. At the east end it backed up against a rocky shore which grew into a tall, slanting cliff in which were many caves. Here the hermit had his home. On the west end the lake widened considerably, but it was full of rushes and was quite marshy. On the north and south sides it met with glistening, white, sandy shores, and then came a deep pine forest which grew denser as it grew outward. From a bird’s eye view it was a most beautiful sight, a turquoise center with a border of white opal, and the final emerald circle. The old hermit looked up at the sun and calculated the time to be about eleven-thirty. " Guess I’ll drop my line and catch a fish for lunch.” One could sense the pain of hunger in his voice. Twelve o’clock rolled by, but no fish did the ravenously hungry hermit catch from the clear blue depths. All of a sudden, he felt a sharp tug on his line which he had tied to his big toe. The tug became very sharp, and the raft started to glide, with increasing momentum, toward the marshy end of the lake. Soon, the raft was flying through the water as though it was a surfboard. It was a queer sight to see the clumsy raft with the prostrate hermit on it roaring along at a terrific rate. As the raft neared the marshy part of the lake, a huge sea serpent arose to the surface of the water, with the fishing line hanging from its mouth, spitting a great amount of hre and smoke as the terrified hermit dived into the rushes. The poor hermit thought all was lost; but for- tunately the line broke, and he was tossed headlong into the mud. What happened to him after he got ashore is not known. But people in a town about ten miles away, say that they saw a white streak go through the main street. If it was the hermit, I do not know. A visitor at the lake was heard to say, " Nothing ever happens here, 5 ' but if he had only known of the experience that the unfortunate hermit had gone through, he would certainly have retracted his statement. Mflville Puterbaugh, High Nine. The Building Digging and delving a hundred feet down, Digging with caisson and spade, Piercing the soft mud dozen to bed rock, Thus the foundations are laid. Blasting and tearing while moving along; T oivers of steel now reveal, Now comes the roaring of hammers Pounding in rivets of steel. Rearing and plunging the riveters ride Skyward on slim strands of ivire, Clutching to eye beams a quarter mile zip, High over smoke and o’er fire. Stone work noiv rises o’er tumidt of tozvn; Rooms now appear in the ivall; See, the building appeareth at last, Appeareth noiv, never to fall. Frank Ryan, High Nine. WHALES I had known Captain Warshaw for sixteen years but had never gone on one of his whaling trips. Finally, he persuaded me and I promised to be ready at 6 o’clock the next morning. True to my word, I was stumbling along the Monterey docks in the fog at ten minutes to six. Getting under way just after the fog had raised, we set out into the bay on a small whaler. Most of the crew were Swedes, but they seemed to know what they were about. After losing my breakfast and the n lunch, we, or rather the look-out up in the crow’s-nest, sighted a school of whales, just what we were looking for. We at once started in pursuit. Following the mammals, I was nearly left behind a few times when the boat quickly turned in pursuit. The harpooner at the gun, after getting in position, shot the harpoon. Then began a merry chase. Another harpoon was shot and the water became colored a deep, vivid red. After two or three hours of fighting, we succeeded in killing a whale, and then set out after another one. With the one tied to the side weighting the boat to a slanting position, our speed was slackened, and we were unable to get in position for a shot at the second whale, and so headed toward Santa Cruz. After leaving our catch at the whaling station, we were overtaken by the incoming fog. Utterly lost, we finally and suddenly ran with a crashing, scraping sound upon the rocks just off Capitola. Signaling with flaming rockets did no good, so Captain Warshaw, deciding I was the jinx, put me into a life-boat with part of the crew. Of course, we had to scramble off the high side of the boat, but when that was accomplished and we had a good start, quite calmly we crashed over a submerged rock and lost the bottom of our frail craft. Wading in to shore, with visions of those whales just behind, my first, and probably last, whaling expedition ended. Madelyn McGlynn, High Nine. JUST FOR SPITE " On a day like this, ’most anything could happen,” said our neigh- bor’s dog to a yellow mutt from down the street somewhere. " Yes,” the mutt replied, " my master might give me a bath for a change, or it might snow, or even that dinky l ittle dog next door might come down off his high horse and play with us.” Now, I happened to be sitting on a silk pillow in the sun-room over- looking our neighbor’s garden, and I knew those two dogs could see me. So I, with my most disdainful manner, turned up my Pomeranian nose, gave my tail a flip, and waddled off. But when I got out of their sight I felt very different, indeed, and very angrily took refuge in my mistress’ lap. While I was sitting there, listening to her baby talk, a sudden feeling crept over me which I cannot describe, but which made me feel as strong as an ox, as big as an elephant, and as fierce as a lion; and I made up my mind right then that no one was going to call me a dinky stuck-up dog. The things that happened after that are almost unbelievable, but when that feeling left me, and I had fought almost every dog in the neighbor- hood, rolled in every mud puddle, and chased all the cars, I, instead of being a petted lap dog, was a very battered, be-draggled, but victorious Pomeranian, who had had his day. Olive Clarke, High Nine. UNMARKED GRAVES One day this summer, during my vacation in the Mother Lode coun- try, I chanced upon two crude unmarked graves. After considerable inquiry, my curiosity concerning these graves was gratified by the oldest man in the countryside, who related the following true story: Two Swedish sailors, Ole and Lars, deserted their ships in the San Francisco Harbor in 1850, and went mining. They were fairly success- ful, but as soon as each had a bag of yellow dust, the gold started to " burn their pockets” and they resolved to go back to San Francisco and have a good time. They felt very rich as they sewed the gold into their belts, slung their roll of blankets over their shoulders and grabbed a piece of bacon. However, after they had walked half a day in the hot Cali- fornia sunshine, they became weary. Upon seeing what they thought was a gray horse in the distance, they decided that, being such rich men, they should ride. They resolved to catch the steed, which looked rather wild. They pursued it up a canyon and, alas, discovered too late, that it was a Grizzly bear. Now Ole and Lars are buried, side by side, just a half day’s journey from their old diggings. Mercedes Stroube, High Eight. The King’s Mishap T he King was on his trusty steed, As he went to the fair. Alas! he did not know what fate Had sent to meet him there. Suddenly from the deep, dark wood The enemy’s army came. The King ’most fell from his trusty steed, As he clung to his horse’s mane. The battle ensued in wonderful style, But nary a man teas hurt-, Until the King fell off his horse And tore his silken shirt. r( Alas, Alack, and deary me,” The frightened monarch cried; " But is it note the Baron Blimp, Fourth cousin to my bride}” " It is, milord, and please accept My deep apology. We did but look for robbers here, And sadly mistook thee .” " I’ve lost my interest,” said the King; " For I’ve had such a scare That I’ve decided after all I’ll not go to the fair.” Elinor Skimmings, High Nine. THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF SAM, A CAT My real name is Samuel, but my mistress calls me Sam. My sister’s name is Sue. I am black with a white " bib” and white paws. When my mistress’ brother takes a bath, he always thinks I should have one also. But I hide under the sofa, until he is done. One day as I was taking my daily walk through the house, I had a very scary adventure. I am very curious about things and like to inves- tigate. I saw a little hole in the wall; so I jumped in. Thud! I fell on a pile of clothes. I blinked my eyes to be sure I wasn’t asleep and dreaming about " Alice in Wonderland,” which my mistress had been reading. I meowed but it did no good, so I sniffed around to see if I could find a way out. Soon I heard a voice crying, " I can’t find my kitty. Where are you, Sammy?” I meowed more loudly than ever and I soon saw some light. My mistress came to my rescue, picked me up, and petted me so much I was rather glad I fell into the hole. (I later found out it was the clothes chute) . Another time, I fell into the fish-pond. I was watching the gold-fish and put my paw in to catch one, when I found myself struggling to get out. Once, I went riding in the car to a farm. At supper time, I went to the barn with my mistress. We watched the men milk the cows. When they were done, I had a bowl of milk. That reminds me, I must go to supper. I would like to write to any cat that has adventures as I do. Nancy MacCaughey, Low Eight. Night T he sun has set Beneath the sea, Leaving the world In ecstacy. A star appears In splendor bright, Heralding forth The coming night. The great round moon Comes o’er the hills, Lighting even The smallest rills. And then the stars Come one by one, Until the sky Is over-run. Allen Sugden, High Nine. The Loveliest Thing (A Girl’s Idea) T he loveliest thing I have yet to see, Although I don’t know just what it will be, Maybe a flower so perfect and bright, Or it may be sunset changing to night. I’ve often thought when I saw the sunrise, That this beauty must be like a Paradise; Could it be stately trees reaching the sky, Or the mountain’s white crests that divide heavens high The loveliest thing I think I do see, Lovelier than all is friendship to me. Friendship that’s staunch and sturdy and bold, Friendship like this God gave us to hold. Emily Stout, Low Nine. The Loveliest Thing (A Boy’s Idea) T’was a cold and blustery winter day, And the children entering from hearty play, Into the kitchen so ivarm and good smelling, With boisterous whooping and howling and yelling. Then there suddenly settled a hush o’er the kids, A hush so loud you could hear the pot lids Yammering and Hammering as though from below The devil’s oivn helpers were tv anting to go. The cause of this silence was there on the table , Steaming and bubbling as best it teas able. From it was spreading in vapors so fine All through the room an odor divine. Though it may seem to you, so lowly to be, ’Twas as essence of beauty that moment to me. It may seem so common, so vulgar to you, But to me it teas heavenly, that good ol’ beef stew! John Brenneis, Low Nine. SOMETHING I LEARNED FROM A FOREIGNER This is a story of harvesting in the Caucasus as told to me by my father, who spent some of his childhood years in that country. His grand- mother lived in a little town called Gori. She owned a vineyard about five miles outside of this town. Every autumn she would take all of her belongings and pile them on an arba (a two-wheeled cart drawn by buf- faloes) . This done, she would climb up on top and sit there. Thus she journeyed to her vineyard. After she arrived, she unloaded and settled herself for a stay of about six weeks. A few days later, the harvesting began. When all the grapes were picked, they were put into a very large vat. His grandmother then washed the feet of the gardener, who immediately stepped into the vat and crushed the grapes, the juice running out from a spout and into a huge jar which was sunken into the ground. The grape juice was not allowed to ferment in this, so it was transferred into buffalo skins. Then they were placed on the arba and taken to Gori. It was then emptied into large earthen cracks buried in the cellar. After it had fermented, the cracks were capped until wanted. Grandmother always saved some of the juice to make a kind of candy called tschustschella. This is made by stringing nuts and raisins and dipping them in some grape juice that had been thickened with potato starch. This was allowed to hang up for a few days, and, when well set, put away to become a favorite sweet- meat for the children during the coming months. Thus ends harvest time in the Caucasus and my story. Sophie Zane, High Seven. At Noon A tray gives a clank, Down falls a spoon; A call for some food , — That’s Garfield — at noon. A rush to a seat, Food all gone too soon, A rush to get out , — T hat’s Garfield — at noon. Kenneth Coates, High Eight. The Happy T hi •ee Fitter, Fatter, Fitter, Fatter, Down the winding street Came three little children, In spite of rain and sleet. Thin ragged coats scarce kept them warm, But they just laughed with glee, For love they had, the greatest charm Of all — the happy three. Barbara Grenelle, Low Seven. SUN ON THE DESERT It was a hot day, a hot day even for the desert. The burning sands quivered and rolled as they lay unprotected from the scorching noon- day sun. The sky, blue as the mountain stream, was stained only by a small cotton-like cloud floating lazily about, but in the distance the sand and sky seemed to blend together almost as one. The only thing that broke that endless line was a small clump of trees away to the south. Beneath this grove, a lake spread far out over the land, reflecting the blue of the sky. The cool shade of the tall palms protected the patch of green grass nestled close to the trees. Then lake, trees, and grass all were gone, like a faded dream. A mirage! Hinsdale Latour, High Eight. My Grandmother’ s Garden 1 love to gaze out of the window At my Grandmother’s garden so fair, Seeing birds and butterflies flitting Around the sweet flowers dozen there. She has roses and stocks and carnations, There are hollyhocks graceful and tall That bloom in the summer and springtime, And chrysanthemums gay in the fall. Paul Eiben, Low Seven. ACTI VITI E S OFFICE AND NURSE’S ASSISTANTS A number of pupils assist in the office and coun- selors’ offices. Each receives one point for the Honor Society. The following assist in the office: Jean Ger- wick, Roger Davidson, Harry Graham, Bob Hoffman, Margy Hinton, Miriam Bronstein, Lily Mabey, Gor- don Ashford, Margaret Dutro, Lorene Turner, Marion Sandner, Sheila Chandler, Geraldine Scheibner, Berta Kessing, Marjorie Newdomb, Carol Hofmeister, Sarah Ellen Mitchell, Jack Temple, Nadine Foreman, Helen Weyand, Barbara Biscomb, Howard Cook, Virginia White, Peggy Heine, Sue Colvin, and Robert Barker. Andrew Foreman, Patsy Feyen, and Patricia Llewellyn help the nurse each morning. Each receives one point for the Honor Society. Mildred Hand, High Nine. FIRE PREVENTION WEEK " A fire!” " It’s next door!” " Let’s go and see it!” These were the exclamations of several talented boys and girls on October 9th as they heard the fire engine come whizzing down the street and stop at the house next door. Out rushed Marjorie KcKee, Patsy Feyen, Dorothy Heck, Noreen Higgins, Bob Busby, Bernard Wallace, Jerry Nelson and Bob Clark to see the fire next door. After they came in again, Dorothy’s mother consented to having Fireman Marshall Hunt inspect their home for fire hazards. Martha Webb, the mother, was surprised to find the number of things that could set fire to their home, so she planned to have a house-cleaning. This play was presented under the direction of Mrs. Schwimley, dur- ing Fire Prevention Week, which was held from October 7th to 13th. It was given for three assemblies, and at the Hotel Whitecotton the same evening. Captain Higgs also spoke at our assemblies and gave us the encour- ing report that Berkeley took first place for having the lowest fire loss and the best fire prevention activities in 1933. He asked us to try to help prevent fires in our own home and lower the loss by fires, which loss is five hundred million dollars in property and ten thousand lives each year. We can help Captain Higgs by keeping basements, attics, yards, and garages clean and free from rubbish. Sheila Chandler, High Nine. A rush to a seat, hood all gone too soon, A rush to get out , — That’s Garfield — at noon. Kenneth Coates, High Eight. The Happy T hi •ee Titter, Tatter, Titter, Tatter, Down the winding street Came three little children, In spite of rain and sleet. Thin ragged coats scarce kept them warm, But they just laughed with glee, For love they had, the greatest charm Of all — the happy three. Barbara Grenelle, Low Seven. SUN ON THE DESERT It was a hot day, a hot day even for the desert. The burning sands quivered and rolled as they lay unprotected from the scorching noon- day sun. The sky, blue as the mountain stream, was stained only by a small cotton-like cloud floating lazily about, but in the distance the sand and sky seemed to blend together almost as one. The only thing that broke that endless line was a small clump of trees away to the south. Beneath this grove, a lake spread far out over the land, reflecting the blue of the sky. The cool shade of the tall palms protected the patch of green grass nestled close to the trees. Then lake, trees, and grass all were gone, like a faded dream. A mirage! Hinsdale Latour, High Eight. My Grandmother’ s Garden I love to gaze out of the window At my Grandmother’s garden so fair, Seeing birds and butterflies flitting Around the siveet flowers down there. She has roses and stocks and carnations, There are hollyhocks graceful and tall That bloom in the summer and springtime, And chrysanthemums gay in the fall. Paul Eiben, Low Seven. ACTI VITI E S OFFICE AND NURSE’S ASSISTANTS A number of pupils assist in the office and coun- selors’ offices. Each receives one point for the Honor Society. The following assist in the office: Jean Ger- wick, Roger Davidson, Harry Graham, Bob Hoffman, Margy Hinton, Miriam Bronstein, Lily Mabey, Gor- don Ashford, Margaret Dutro, Lorene Turner, Marion Sandner, Sheila Chandler, Geraldine Scheibner, Berta Kessing, Marjorie Newdomb, Carol Hofmeister, Sarah Ellen Mitchell, Jack Temple, Nadine Foreman, Helen Weyand, Barbara Biscomb, Howard Cook, Virginia White, Peggy Heine, Sue Colvin, and Robert Barker. Andrew Foreman, Patsy Feyen, and Patricia Llewellyn help the nurse each morning. Each receives one point for the Honor Society. Mildred Hand, High Nine. FIRE PREVENTION WEEK " A fire!” " It’s next door!” " Let’s go and see it!” These were the exclamations of several talented boys and girls on October 9th as they heard the fire engine come whizzing down the street and stop at the house next door. Out rushed Marjorie KcKee, Patsy Feyen, Dorothy Heck, Noreen Higgins, Bob Busby, Bernard Wallace, Jerry Nelson and Bob Clark to see the fire next door. After they came in again, Dorothy’s mother consented to having Fireman Marshall Hunt inspect their home for fire hazards. Martha Webb, the mother, was surprised to find the number of things that could set fire to their home, so she planned to have a house-cleaning. This play was presented under the direction of Mrs. Schwimley, dur- ing Fire Prevention Week, which was held from October 7th to 13th. It was given for three assemblies, and at the Hotel Whitecotton the same evening. Captain Higgs also spoke at our assemblies and gave us the encour- ing report that Berkeley took first place for having the lowest fire loss and the best fire prevention activities in 1933. He asked us to try to help prevent fires in our own home and lower the loss by fires, which loss is five hundred million dollars in property and ten thousand lives each year. We can help Captain Higgs by keeping basements, attics, yards, and garages clean and free from rubbish. Sheila Chandler, High Nine. A CLASS PROJECT Having studied about homes, family life, love and interdependence among members of the family, and home responsibilities, Mrs. Montagne’s Low Seven English pupils felt that they had gained a much deeper affection for their parents and their homes. To express this sincere appreciation, they decided to put into words what was in their hearts. The following selec- tions are chosen from the contributions of the class: Dead Dad: I am writing this note to tell you how much I appreciate all the qualities that I have come to realize that you possess. If, when I become a man, I have absorbed the teachings you have tried to instill in me, I am sure I shall be a credit to you and a good citizen of my country. You have inspired respect and love and made me realize how much a good character is worth. You have made my home a pleasant place in which to live, and when I grow up, I will look b ack on these days as some of the happiest of my life. Lovingly yours, Marshall Van Duesex, Low Seven. Mothers Fathers I know that every child can think Most people who have fathers His mother is the best, Are always having good times, But every one I know has said, ’ Cause fathers are always so cheerful, rr My mother beats the rest A Help fid, generous, and kind. T o Our Parents To our parents we owe great kindness, And them we should always obey For their patience and toil to lead us, And help us to go the right way. And then can we frame the future, Look back to the time of today And remember their pains and toil, To help us ' upon our way. David Slick, Low Seven. Garfield Garfield is the happiest school I know. Where the boys and girls all love to go, Where the teachers help us every one To do our work and yet have fun every way, In what they do for us day by day. Our principal is to all a friend, With a willing hand ever ready to lend. No matter where ice all do dwell, We’ll cherish the memories of Garfield well. Gertrude Irma Howe, Loic Nine. THE COOKING CLASSES In the seventh grade cooking class the girls are taught the food- needs of a junior high school girl and her family, the order and cleanli- ness of the home, and the preparation and serving of luncheons. This semester one of the major projects of the Seventh Grade class was to make cakes for the tea served at the November meeting of the P. T. A. The lesson was interesting and the delicious cakes were enjoyed by all. The ninth grade class has been studying the value of foods in health and growth as their special project. An interesting experiment was carried on, using white rats as the experimental animal, to prove that the kind of food we eat really makes a difference in the way we grow and feel. We had two cages in which we cared for the rats. Cage " A” was for " Mickey” and " Minnie.” They were fed milk, water, meat, potatoes, raw fruits, and vegetables, and wheat germ. Such a diet furnished protein, minerals, vitamins and the right number of calories, and was a typical wholesome diet. In Cage " B” lived " Lost” and " Found.” They were fed the same diet as Mickey and Minnie, with the exceptions that coffee was given instead of milk, all vegetables and fruits were cooked, and no wheat germ was given. Such a diet would be lacking in vitamins and minerals which are necessary for good growth and health. The difference in ap- pearance of these rats is very noticeable. Group " A” has a very glossy soft fur, bright eyes, and always alert and good dispositions; while group " B” has very thin and straggly looking fur, dull eyes, and does not seem happy nor contented. The weights of the rats also show the difference in growth. At the end of one month, " Lost” weighed 70 grams and " Minnie” 105 grams, a difference of 35 grams, At the end of the month we fed " Lost” and " Found” milk and wheat germ. Immediately, they began to show an improvement in their health and growth. From this experiment we learned, in a very real way, that food really makes the difference in the way we grow and feel. Margaret Thomas, High Nine. GARFIELD RED CROSS Garfield Junior High has actively interested itself in the Red Cross. Two students, Norwood Smith and Emily Stout, have been selected to represent the school at meetings held each month at the Berkeley High School. These meetings are also attended by similar representatives from other schools in the East Bay area. Our school is aiding this worthy organization in as many ways as possible. One of them is the sending of ten boxes of toys, which it is hoped will be both a surprise and a treat, to the boys and girls of the Island of Guam. Money is being collected through small donations from the advisories for the Red Cross Magazine which will be available to everyone in the school and will keep us in touch with what other schools or organizations are doing and with the kinds of help that are needed. The school chapter of the Red Cross further plans to aid in local relief work by helping to provide food for the poor and needy in Berkeley at Thanksgiving time. It is hoped that those whom we are able to help receive as much pleasure as we do in helping. Jane Armitage, High Nine. Mrs. Dyson with a bouquet. PLAYS THE SHAKESPEARE PAGEANT Mrs. Dyson’s High Nine English classes presented a Shakespeare Pageant on October 5th. Love scenes from " Romeo and Juliet,” " Taming of the Shrew,” " As You Like It,” and " Much Ado About Nothing” were presented before Queen Elizabeth, who was played by Jean Christie. Then various scenes from " Twelfth Night,” " Macbeth,” and " Midsummer Night’s Dream” were given. The acting throughout was very well done and the costumes were beautiful. At the end of the performance, the pupils presented Eleanor Skimmings, High Nine. A MIDSUMMER’S NIGHT DREAM Shakespeare’s immortal " Midsummer’s Night Dream” was presented by Max Reinhardt at the Memorial Opera House in San Francisco, and in Berkeley; several performances being shown in both cities. The two per- formances in Berkeley were unique in the history of stage production in that an audience of several thousand people was transported from Faculty Glade to the Greek Theatre between acts, so easily that the program went on smoothly. Many Garfield pupils and teachers attended the presentations which were made doubly interesting by the fact that several classes were study- ing the play at that time. The productions were such a huge success that similar masterpieces are being planned for California every year. James Porterfield, High Nine. MRS. BAGNALL’S THEATRICALS A sparkling French comedy was given by Mrs. Bagnall’s High Nine English class on Friday, October 26th. The characters were ably por- trayed by Marjorie McKee, Norman Sloane, Robert McCarthy, and Allen Sugden. The students’ curiosity was satisfied when an Irish com- edy, " Gossip,” was given on Tuesday, the 27th, and Wednesday, Nov. 28th. The characters were: Frank Ryan, Jane Armitage, Fred Scobey, Janice Gray, Madelyn McGlynn, Ian Wishart, Lee Mallory, Robert Wycoff, James Porterfield, and John West. We appreciate Miss Collar’s kindness in arranging the scenery. Noreen Higgins, High Nine. ORGANIZATIONS THE GARFIELD DADS’ CLUB The Garfield Dads’ Club gave a theatre party this semester. The pictures, " Caravan” and " British Agent,” were shown on the afternoons and evenings of November 22nd and 23rd. On the following after- noon, " Peck’s Bad Boy” and " The Case of the Howling Dog” were shown. The Dads’ Club funds help Garfield in many ways and they deserve much credit for their work. The officers for this semester are: President, Mr. J. J. Weyand, and Secretary, Mr. Irwin Berry. Jack Carleton, High Nine. GARFIELD PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATION " Closer Co-operation Between the Home and School” is the goal for which the P. T. A. is working. Some interesting features that the P. T. A. sponsors are new curtains and equipment for the stage. Funds were raised by a rummage sale and a play. Room-Mothers Sponsors were organized by our chairman and her assistants. The speakers for this year are Mr. Hennessey, Dr. Virgil Dickson, Mrs. Harriett Eliel, the Garfield Counsellers, Mrs. Frank Mason Harris, Mrs. B. N. Coats and others. The officers of the P. T. A. are as follows: President Mrs. Henry Green First Vice-President Mrs. Eben Cameron Second Vice-President Mrs. Charles Bley Recording Secretary Mrs. Paul West Financial Secretary Mrs. R. H. Danielson Corresponding Secretary .... Mrs. R. R. Robinson Treasurer Mrs. R. E. Noble Historian Mrs. Carter Norris Parliamentarian Mrs. Frank Thunen Auditor Mrs. C. A. Turner Delegate to Council Mrs. Earl W. Wagy Muriel Boyd, High Nine. BOY SCOUTS This term, flag detail, which is usually held at 8 o’clock every morn- ing by the Boy Scouts, was postponed until a flagpole could be erected and certain Scouts detailed to do the work. Finally, a meeting of all Scouts was called, and the boys were told where to send their names if they wanted to learn to bugle. Many Scouts did so, and soon a class in bugling was started. Now we not only have flag detail but we have bugling to accompany it. John Bogard, Low Eight. CAMPFIRE GIRLS, GIRL SCOUTS AND GIRL RESERVES In Garfield there are three Girl Scout troops: Mrs. Bee Callow’s Troop i, Mrs. Rocca’s Troop 15, and the Girl Scout Mariners’ Troop 17. There are Campfire Girls of the Amadhi Group under the leadership of Mrs. Post, and, also, a troop of Girl Reserves. During October the Girl Scouts of Berkeley had a cookie drive to sponsor their camp, Far-Away-Mine, in Alta, California. In Girl Scout Week, from October 27 to November 3, Mrs. Callow’s troop had flag detail for Garfield. Mrs. Post’s Campfire group, competing against the Girl Scouts, joined in the annual October doughnut sale of the Berkeley Campfire Girls. They also gave a Hallowe’en party for the children of the Berkeley Day Nursery. The Girl Reserves, a social group, participated in the carnival by all the Girl Reserves in November. Friendships and good times are offered to any girl who wishes to join one of these organizations. Madelyn McGlynn, High Nine. GARFIELD ' S TRAFFIC POLICE Garfield can well be proud of its traffic squad with its enviable record of not a single accident in the three years it has been in existence. With the co-operation of the students, the boys have been able to make this fine record possible. Regardless of the weather, morning and afternoon squads are on duty to see students safely across the busy intersection at Rose and Grove streets. Members of the Junior Traffic Police are rewarded for their services with passes to Berkeley theatres, and are admitted to most of the football games at California Stadium. Following is a list of the members of the squads for this semester: Top Sergeant, Kenneth Owen; Sergeants, Robert Carlquist, Langley Connor, Armand Johnson; First Corporals, Bob Weirick, Robert Burns, Bob Bozarth, David Streeter; Second Corporals, Bob Hartkop, Burt Leschinskey, Don Monroe, Conrad Sjobom; First Officers, Bob Kirkbride, David Jones, Jim Quillen, John Flannery; Second Officers, Blythe Cavagnaro, Leonard Shelton, Clayton Brunsell, Joe Habib; Substitutes, Jack Ferguson, Ray Siegrist, Fred Rowley, Bill Johnson. These boys are to be commended for the fine spirit they have shown in the interest of public safety. Mr. Flanders, in co-operation with the Berkeley Police Department, is the efficient director of the squads. Marshall Hunt, High Nine. HEAD BANKERS OF GARFIELD There are two High Nine boys who are in charge of the school banking. These boys help Miss Irene Collins, who comes here from the bank. They enter the amount of money in each pupil’s bank book. The slips are then checked so no mistakes can be made. The two boys are Bob Warner and Bob Ford. Each year two High Nine boys are chosen for this work. Jack Webber, Low Nine. THE HIGH NINE HONOR SOCIETY The total enrollment of the graduating class at the present time is two hundred and four students. Of this number eighty-two are mem- bers of the Honor Society. This is a large percentage of the graduating class, and there is also a large number who have been members of the Honor Society for four preceding semesters. THE HONOR SOCIETY FIVE STAR GROUP Sheila Chandler, Janice Gray, Janice Pape, Elinor Skimmings, Patricia Jane Parrish, Marjorie McConnell, Dorothy Heck, Jack Selsted, Junior Amonette, Ralph Dufour, Gwendolyn Gerken, Geraldine Scheibner, Marjorie Roehm, Chester Berggren, Ian Wishart, Ruth Cone, Jack Carl- ton, Lee Mallory, Marjorie McKee, Noreen Higgens, Catherine Mitchel- son, Frank Thomas, Barbara Biscomb, Patricia Danforth, Roberta Fritz, Harold Kellam, Barbara Post, James Porterfield, Joanne Taylor, Jane Armitage, Ruth Armstrong, Faith Franklin, Kenneth Street. FOUR STAR GROUP Irving Hamilton, Mary Keating, Sue Fowler, Langley Conner, Leonard Dechant, Harry Graham Jr., Robert McCarthy, Fred Scobey, Shirley Newell, Patricia Feyen, Mildred Hand, Helen Gunn, Dorothy Koford, Jackson Haggard, Carroll Abbott, Madelyn McGlynn, Helen Dunn, Helen Lilly, Shirley Ann Schaefer, Ted Dietrich, Bill Macdougall, Marion Sandner, Muriel Boyd. ONE, TWO, AND THREE STAR GROUPS Tom Caldwell, Jean Christie, George Gaebler, Mary Floyd, Helen Weyand, Billivee Barlow, Virginia Clarke, Allen Sugden, William Zim- merman, Evelyn Prochietto, James Moore, Flora Mae Lackey, Robert Cooley, Ed Archer, Edna Dean, Doris Maryon, Olive Clarke, Jacqueline Wind, Barbara Bowie, Melville Puterbaugh, Olive Peebles, Elizabeth Saur, Estelle Hennigan, Sarah Ellen Mitchell, Berneice Masters, Leo Frentzen. Mary Keating, High Nine. THE HONOR SOCIETY BANQUET The banquet of the High Nine members of the Garfield Honor Society was given very successfully on the evening of October 18th. In addition to the High Nine members, their parents, and several of the Garfield teachers, many prominent alumni were present. Following the excellent turkey dinner which was served in the two cafeteria tents and the library, there was a program in the auditorium. Fred Scobey, our Honor Society President, presided. Fine speeches were given by members of the alumni, including Fred Stripp, Max Fiedler, Bob Seale and Roy Stephens. Besides the speeches, the guests were enter- tained by hearing Mrs. O’Neill play two enjoyable numbers on her harp, and were much mystified by " Twenty Minutes of Magic.” The evening wound up with a grand march and a splendid dance in the gvm. During the evening Matthew Duffy did a splendid tap dance. I am sure that the High Nines will remember their banquet as one of the most enjoyable social events of their school days at Garfield. Patty Jane Parrish, H igh N me. OUR SCHOOL LIBRARY Although we have been handicapped during the past year in having a bungalow for our library, much smaller than the rooms in our building, we have continued to give satisfactory service to the pupils and teachers. Several hundred new books added this year were on display in the library during Book Week. The book posters and the new books made the library look very attractive. All the pupils were given an opportunity to see the books in the library and to hear a very interesting talk by Miss Patton, the Librarian, about the Newbery Medal Books, the importance of reading good books, how to use the books, and their care. The New- bery Medal was awarded to Cornelia Meigs this year for writing the book called " Invincible Louisa.” A " Familiar Character Book Contest,” made out by the library assistants, created much interest. Student assistants find the library work very helpful and interesting. We learn the many duties in a school library, including service to others. The assistants are given an honor point for each semester’s satisfactory work. The following assistants helped manage the library this term: Nancy Bailey, Lydia de Lanoy, Phyllis Bass, Marcy Jean Harvey, Helen Weyand, Dorris Coulter, George Ward, James Bruce, Eleanor O’Dell, Jean Cameron, Elleo Hittell, Mary Emily Paddock, Jean Hockin, Jim Blakeman, Constance Robinson, Marguerite Notman, Helen Beisel, Patricia Browne, Elizabeth Turner, Jane Gale, Dorothy Layman, Lillian Eriksen, Lorraine Scott, Betty Berger, Ruth Sherman, Elizabeth Kemser, Eleanor Irish, Mary McCloud, Devin Taber, Dorothea Sickler, Aileen McCulloch, Muriel Boyd, and Catherine Mitchelson. I think we are all looking forward to the day when we shall be back in our large library in the building were we shall have more room. Re t th Sherman, Low Nine. MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS The Garfield Band and Orchestra, under the di- rection of Mr. Minzyk, have given several successful programs this semester. The band, consisting of a large group of enthusiastic members, gave a program at the University Elementary School and was received very cordially by the pupils and the members of the P.T.A., who sponsored the program. The Band-Hat-Benefit program which will fea- ture the band, German band, and a trumpet quartet, will be given early in January. As usual, the orchestra will play for the graduating exercises. Bob McCarthy, High N ' THE GIRLS’ GLEE CLUB The Girls’ Glee Club is an organization led by Mrs. Blanche Osgood. The girh sang in a program for the P.-T. A. the first time this year. They sang " My Old Banjo,” " Voices in Spring” and " Rain.” The girls also sang in the girls’ chorus at the Men’s Gymnasium. The Girls’ Glee Club has done very good work this term and are to be congratulated. We also wish to thank Mrs. Osgood for her service in teaching the girls their delightful songs. Janice Pape, High Nine. THE BOYS’ GLEE CLUB The Boys’ Glee Club under the capable direction of Mrs. O’Neill has appeared on two different occasions this term. The comment is that they are the best in years. Its sixty members sang in the chorus at the Men’s Gymnasium on Sunday, November 4, and on the following Tues- day for the Garfield P. T. A. John Brenneis, Low Nine. A CAPPELLA The A Cappella this term consists of about sixty members. Its officers are: President, Chandler Young, and Treasurer, Patty Jane Parrish. The main feature of the A Cappella this term was the singing at the Men’s Gymnasium, Sunday, November 4th. On November 14th, several mem- bers of the A Cappella sang for the Cragmont P. T. A., with Allan Sugden and Sheila Chandler as soloists. During November and December the group concentrated on Christmas songs and carols, under the leader- ship of Mrs. Ivy Smith. The final concert was before the P. T. A. on December 4th. Marjorie Roehm, High Nine. Famous Excuses from Famous Garfield Musicians on Solo Day Dorothy Heck: " Oh, Mrs. Smith, I was running to get my books when some silly boy came around the corner and ran into me, and gave me a terrible nose-bleed. I just stopped it, and I know if I try to sing today it will start bleeding again.” Ted Dietrich: " Do you know what I did last night, Mrs. Smith? I forgot to close my window and there was a terrible draught, and I caught the awfullest cold. I think I had better wait till next week to sing my song.” Geraldine Scheibner: " Do you know what I did last night, Mrs. Smith? I was helping with dinner, and I didn’t know the big knife had just been sharpened and I cut the fi nger I use the most in that new piece I was going to play.” Jerry Nelson: " Well, we played Willard last night, and I got so excited and yelled so much I got hoarse. I tried to do everything to help it last night, but I think I’ll have to sing some other time.” Bob Busby: " You said you would get me a piece to fit my voice, and I’ve been waiting for you to give it to me.” (Mrs. Smith is still trying!) Jack Selsted: " I was going to play my piccolo, but I lost one of the holes in it so I’ll have to wait ’til T find it again.” Bobsie Roehm: " I was going to give a ' current event’ but Miss Fraser took it as an ancient history report.” Dorothy Cross, High Nine. IS f£ liL SPORTS THE GIRLS’ ATHLETICS This term the girls’ athletic activities have con- sisted of the following: Noon Leagues. For Noon Leagues this term we have been playing volley ball. A mixed team of Mrs. Wilkes’ and Miss Fraser’s advisories won in the Low Nine. In the High Nine a mixed team of Mrs. Kil- kenny’s, Miss Martin’s and Mr. Nealson’s advisories won. Tumbling. The excellent tumbling team is made up almost entirely of seventh grade and eighth grade girls who are interested in tumbling. Block " G” Society. This society is made up of girls who have won their Block " G’s” by playing on some school team. The officers are: President, Joanne Taylor; Vice-President, Jean Christie; Secretary, Jean Underhill; Treasurer, Sylvia Berry. Volley Ball Team. The Low Nine and High Nine girls have chal- lenged some of the former Garfield girls and St. Joseph’s to several games in volley balk All who play will receive their Block " G’s.” Joanne Taylor, High Nine. BOYS’ ATHLETICS During the past semester, athletics has played a major part in Gar- field. There are many different teams that play after school, including those of football, volley-ball, and tennis. These teams meet under the coaching of Carlton De Witt, the playground director, and Mr. Corley and Mr. Nealson. Bill Macdougall, the Boys’ Athletic Manager, has done all in his power to make the teams successful. These teams have made very good records during the past four months. The high nine volley-ball team, and the hundred and ten exponent football team are undefeated so far this term. The hundred and thirty exponent team deserves special consideration. They lost their first game to Albany High School, but came back full of fight a few weeks later and won a great victory. The undefeated high nine volley-ball team will enter for the city champion- ship. The tennis team has also had many victories. They won from Richmond High School. The Lions’ Club sponsors a team under the coaching of Mr. McKevitt. This team has developed into one of the best teams on the Pacific Coast. They have played during the halves of many of the big games, including the California-Stanford game. They may go to the Rose Bowl game in Pasadena. All in all, I believe that Garfield has made a big step toward bigger and better sports. Jack Selsted, High Nine. BOYS’ NOON LEAGUES The Boys’ Noon Leagues this fall semester have been very much worth while. Response by such a large number of pupils to the noon league sports has been wonderful and shows that the students of Garfield appreciate the benefits obtained from such sports as we enjoy. The coaching staff has co-operated to the fullest extent in all our games. The good sportsman- ship shown by the students taking part in the games we have played have been a credit to the student body of Garfield School. With such loyalty and sportsmanship shown, the noon leagues could not be other than a great success. Dallas Noble, Low Nine. GIRLS’ BLOCK " G” ROWING CREW TUMBLING TUMBLING BOYS’ BLOCK " G” HIGH NINE VOLLEY BALL HIGH EIGHTH VOLLEY BALL m7TaJN0N7m7I wi4 o ? ££L0tf A8£ ACTUAL J r LWU£Tr£TCf mMOUf GANG GLD CNMACTJGRJ SACK GROUND and SOUND fjJMMMML WNTim o ad Gomr yjmmL ' ' 4T. FHA ‘ SEE LAST PAGE FOR ANSWERS Calendar Hasten my children and gather nigh And list to the tale of a Junior High. September the fourth — 1934, Is the day we start at the school-room door. September thirteenth — High Nine girls in the gym Entertained the scrublets, not one was a him. Two weeks later, the boys did the same And among their guests not one was a dame. September fourteenth — " Oh, boy,” some fun, Without any music our dancing’s begun. September eighteenth — P. T. A. held a meeting And all of the scrublets gave them a greeting. October the third — bigger bows were in style — Even some of the teachers found this fad worth the while ! Mrs. Dyson’s high nine did Shakespeare quite well. What occurred in rehearsals, you never can tell. October the ninth — a day among days. Captain Higgs explained how to put out a blaze. October eighteenth — the " oivls” came to boast, And everyone feasted on fine turkey roast ! Mrs. O’Neill on her harp did play. October nineteenth, I think was the day. A fine dance was given by the Block " G” boys, And everyone there made plenty of noise. November the fourth — in the Men’s Gym we sang, And all through the building our sweet voices rang. " A Man Without a Country” — a play full of ivoe, November the eighth, the day of the show. November sixteenth — Ali Baba ' s the attraction, He had us all fooled ’ most to distraction. November twenty-second — a lesson we learned, From a play which was given (many plaudits were earned ). December seventh and eighth — a show filled with fun, Now the fund for our curtain has surely begun. Now Christmas vacation is close at hand, And cheer is spread throughout the land. We’ ve had fun this whole year through, Noiv we end it, Merry Christmas to you ! Olive Clarke, High Nine. INSEPARABLES Mr. Hennessey and his whistle. Gunny Amonette and his appetite. Noreen Higgins and her " hosses.” Miss Arendt Amos. Bill Fulton and his " news poipers.” Mrs. Bagnall and Mitzi. Mary Rees Fox and Chico. Chandler Young and his Block G. Miss Fraser and her dictionary. Bill MacDougall and his snappy limousine. Janice Pape and her compact. Frank Ryan and Miss Groefsema. Miss Brubaker and Peter. Jackson Haggard and Frank Thomas. Ted Dietrich and the Fair Sex. Miss Laurens and her ducky accent. Jack Selsted and " That Schoolgirl Complexion. Bunny Masters and her horselaugh. David Druhe and his history book. The tents! and their leaks! JOKES Miss Riley: " What is the difference between Noah’s Ark and Joan of Arc?” Dorothy: " Noah’s Ark was made of wood and Joan of Arc was Maid of Orleans.” " What is your town doing about the crime wave?” " We have built a good stone jail with iron doors and window shut- ters.” " And if Dillinger comes along?” " We’ll barricade ourselves in the jail and defy him.” If you missed your mosquitoes this summer, the reason probably was that they had gone to a nudist colony. " John Lough ran of Providence, R. I., was injured in a leap from the second to the third floor in the City Hall.” — Neward paper. " Spider, in Bathing Suit, Bites Woman.” — From a San Francisco paper. A lady was entertaining the small son of her married friend. " Are you sure you can cut your meat, George?” she asked. " Oh, yes,” he answered. " We often have it as tough as this at home.” Janice Rudd: " Do you make life-size enlargements from snap-shots?” Mr. Hughes: " Yes, miss, that’s our specialty.” Janice: " Well, let’s see what you can do with this picture of the Grand Canyon.” " Two pennies worth of bicarbonate of soda for indigestion at this time of night,” cried the infuriated druggist, who had been aroused at 2 a. m., " when a glass of hot water would have done just as well!” " Weel, weel,” returned Bill MacDougall, " I thank ye for the advice, and I’ll no bother ye after all. Good night!” A recent show advertised a chorus of seventy, but some of them didn’t look a day over sixty-five. Clarence: " It is customary, I believe, to seal a proposal with a kiss?” Noreen: " It used to be, but nowadays I prefer a witness.” Jim Dotson (about to propose) : " Can you wash dishes?” Fair Maid: " Yes; can you wipe them?” Warden to new guard: " Did you wake up No. 1556 and take him out to be executed this morning?” New Guard: " No, sir, I couldn’t wake him so I took out No. 1444.” Friend to jeweler: " Aren’t you afraid to leave a lot of diamonds in your window unprotected?” Jeweler: " No. Before I go to bed at night I put a sign on them which says : ' Nothing in this window over ten cents.’ ” Mrs. Bagnall: " How would I punctuate the following sentence? ' I saw a beautiful girl crossing the street’.” Kenneth Street: " I’d make a dash after the beautiful girl.” Tired PWA Worker: " Say, boss, is you got a man on your list by de name of Simpson?” Boss: " Yeah, what of it?” Worker: " Well, Ise dat man, boss; I jes’ thought you might have it down as Samson.” Friend: " Why do you have such misspelled words and such bad grammar on the signs in your windows?” Storekeeper: " People think I’m a fool and they come in expecting to get the best of me. Business is the best in years.” Fred: " They say the King of Denmark lives a regular dog’s life.” Harry G.: " Of course. He is a great Dane, isn’t he?” Miss Fraser: " Why is George Washington called ' First in war and first in peace?’ ” Frank T. : " So he will have a stand-in with both the preparadists and the pacifists.” Mr. Perry: " Be careful or some day I’ll leave you.” Mrs. Perry: " Leave me how much, dear?” A wealthy society lady had just engaged a new maid and was in- structing her. " At dinner, Mary, you must always remember to serve from the left and take plates from the right. Is that clear?” Yes, ma’am,” answered the girl condescendingly. " What’s the mat- ter, superstitious or something?” Note from Miss Cannon: Found — A roll of five dollar bills. Will the owner please form a line at the office. Bob: " I cursed the day I was born.” Bill: " That’s funny; I didn’t curse till I was three.” Miss Stone: " I want to return this washing machine.” Salesman: " Yes, but what’s wrong with it?” Miss Stone: " Every time I get in the thing the paddles knock me off my feet!” Mr. Minzyk: " I am very sorry to hear of your partner’s death. Would you like me to take his place?” Manager: " Very much, if you could arrange it with the under- taker.” X-Cellent X is the Roman notation for io. X is the mark of illiterate men. X is a ruler removed from his throne. X is a quantity wholly unknown. X may mean Xenon, a furious gas. X is a ray of similar class. X mas is Christmas, a season of bliss. X in a letter stands for a kiss. X is for Xerxes, the monarch renowned, X is the spot inhere the body is found. ANSWERS TO " GUESS WHO” 1. Mrs. Russ. 2. Miss Arendt. 3. Mrs. Kilkenny. 4. Mr. Nealson. 5. Ian Wishart. 6. Bob Busby. 7. Jean Christie. 8. Marjorie McKee. 9. Fred Scobey. 10. Barbara Post. 11. Catherine Mitchelson. 12. Norman Sloane. 13. Frank Ryan. AUTOGRAPHS , ' YWW AUTOG RAP H S aXcJLo V ' w 2 ) Qisvw trcr,er


Suggestions in the Garfield Junior High School - Gleaner Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) collection:

Garfield Junior High School - Gleaner Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1931 Edition, Page 1

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Garfield Junior High School - Gleaner Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

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Garfield Junior High School - Gleaner Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

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