Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL)

 - Class of 1942

Page 1 of 136

 

Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 136 of the 1942 volume:

Y'-f ff 6 XJ jf' 61' ff- 9.17 " , ef Ci? WU, J 0 QU ff! H ji' fi? X 'Fr xxx. XX 1 ly Q N N X.. Q F ri 9 , in 3 5 n 2 Q Q -f Q Q 4 5 F: I is E fl J.ii?,.,.t Presented by The Senior Class of Galesburg Senior High School, Galesburg, Illinois Covers by the Pfisterer Bindery Printing by the Wagoner Printing Company Engravings by the Pontiac Engraving Company Z if-f S- X ww J X xx' "N W. X Ji -ag? x li ' ,, N1 O E y MT' 'L E 'W X 'Mx - N . v '55 x'X'i?q ' W V' 5' A kg 'ag , 1" -' Y -. Q N' X-1 L I E? NWT'-"-N it f , "ill- Af? X WU'-" f X 'H hi, 'iz ij 1-1 11-9' -U To Mrs. lrma Gale, who is always passing on her vast knowledge and wisdom wrought from books, travel, and experience, we dedicate this book. Her students know her as an un- derstanding and thorough teacher, with a knack of combining history with travel stories, clever anec- dotes, and sound advice. F rom Mrs. Gale, a true American, we learn what it really means to appreciate the four great freedoms and their pricelessness. It is in honor ot Mrs. Gale, a sharer of limitless knowledge, a proud and loyal citizen, a lady in every respect, that we publish this book. l I1 llli Innumerable books stand on the shelf of time. Each one serves its purpose, and each has its inspiration. This year we add our book to that shelf in the guise of the l942 REFLECTOR, five books bound into one to record for all of us another eventful year- in Galesburg Senior High School. Characters in our five books have been the faculty and stu- dents of G. H. S., who, while the world teemed with battles for power, carried on their friendly combats in classroom or in field forknowledge. Proudly but sadly we saw many of our boys join the armed forces of our United States, where their patriotism will be written in a greater book. When our days at G. H. S. are only hazy memories and you add this REFLECTOR to your collection of valuable volumes, may you better remember a happy period during a historical year. EI L. I E 5 f. P- EV, If 5' sv-. E3 EI I I 5 I If P w-rg" ,-1 r 'A E. I QQNTENTS O AIDIVIINISTIQATICN O CLASSES O CRGANIZATICNS O ATHLETICS O SCI-ICCL LIEE I INDEX I L'-iq ADMINISTIQATIUN l m Tl SUPERIIXITENDENT AND BOARD OF EDUCATION SUPT. R. V. LINDSEY, who heads the editorial board of our volume, has devoted chapters toward the welfare of all who attend the schools of Gales- burg. Most noticeable to us is the chapter entitled "Democracy." During his four years in our school it has be- come the pattern of life not only to be discussed but to be experienced. After analyzing the chapters which are evidence of his thoughtful plan- ning of our activities, it is obvious that Mr. Lindsey has a genuine interest in students and their future. Continually observing the growth and develop- ment of the students aids him in further realization of their problems. The BGARD OF EDUCATION acts as publishers and editorial advisors, duties demanding the formulation of wise decisions. Too few of us are aware of the ceaseless efforts of this group to pro- vide Galesburg High School students a more comfortable and pleasant en- vironment. For all, we are pleased to express sincere gratitude. R. V. Lindsey Mrs. Louise O'Connor David P. Lindberg Iohn H. Cox Alfred Nystrom si. 1 A . i fn.. lyfffry K Mrs. Robert A. Chandler Ralph D. Lucas George C. Lofgren E. W. Mureen C. L. Hinchman OUR PRINCIPAL Qzwllfl twirl fwfii A X! WA f AND DEANS When MR. A. EDSON SMITH came to Galesburg High School, education leaders congratulated us on securing a most capable leader. ln the two years that Principal Smith has been with us, he has convinced us all of his execu- tive ability. Every student in Galesburg High School is reaping the benefit of his lead- ership. A real interest in our problems and an earnest effort to solve them fairly and squarely is reason enough for naming him the author of our book of school life. All good story books have heaven-sent angels, and while our deans, MISS ALICE IONES and MR. FRANK SNYDER, are much more real than an- gels, they are the ones who make our troubles fly out the window. No two people could possibly be designated to do so much work and do it so well. Sponsorship of our Girls' Service League and Boys' Forum, as well as Student Council, is but a part of their duties. We students are aware of their constant effort to counsel wisely, to help in every situation, from the loan of a nickel for the bus to the finding of a job. 'U' FACULTY IOHN AITCHISON . . . science . . . just speak to him to be inspired by one who enjoys life HARRY ALDUS . . . commercial . . . visual aids . . . being active as guicksilver is his virtue HAZEL ANDERSON . . . English . . . it she has a task, it's no sooner said than it's done RACHEL ANDERSON . . . librarian . . . she al- ways has a mirthguake of spontaneous laughter ROSS ANDERSON . . . the director oi physical education . . . his life begins with vitality MARIORIE BABBITT , . . English . . . she lets her light shine without turning it on herself HERBERT BEAN . . . English . . . he's one who is filled with undying, zestful initiative CHARLES BEDNAR . . . social science . . . he S has a humor which tickles without scratching BERNICE BEELER . . . commercial . . . bright as the dimpled smiles that spring enwreaths I. WALLACE BLAZEK . . . speech . . .he enters a room putting his very best voice forward THOMAS BROOKING . . . industrial arts . . . he's a genial gentleman full of sly witticisms DOROTHY CALKINS . . . physical education . . . bright as a golden cup in the ardent sun 47' AQIN4.. ' '+ - - --L, ,..f rlggtifg l ' ." t . f .1 t etzgttfgafyf if . , ,vwy A H-W--ee M -15? f--D,-,15,iA?g-H- sup.. .. FACULTY ' ' ROY DAMBERG . . printing . . nature gave him a beaming smile contagious as a sleepy yawn ARTHUR FISH . . . science . . . he is a speci- men of the most perfect complimentary remark IRMA GALE . . . social science . . . one of her many assets is the art of human kindness HARRY GARST . . . mathematics . . . he dis- plays a gruff exterior concealing subtle humor WILLIAM GOODWIN . . . social science . . . known to be as exact! as 'most precise clock-work IOHN GRIFFITH . . . social science . . . he needs no blaring trumpet for his great thoughts ROYAL I-IARSHBARGER . . . English, business he is always lively as a chirping cricket IEANETTE HILKER . . . languages . . . she turns on her music box of gay, tinkling laughter MARVIN HUMKE . , science . .like gold chains his eloquence binds wisdom and character ELLEN IRVINE . . . English . . . in her veins the sweet wine of a superb life serenely runs MILDRED IOHNSON . . . commercial . . . her life seems filled to the brim with refinement PAUL IOHNSON . . . social science . . . he is as direct as the straightest railroad track EDWARD IUDY . . . commercial . . , a glance that has the bright glint of thousands of gems ROY LANDON . . . industrial arts . . . every- one finds him popular as a recent Iilm drama LAURA MATLACK . . . art . . . artful as the most expert cast of the best trout-killing rod RAY PEART . . . agriculture . . . King of Humor is the title presented to him by us all 000 FACULTY VESTA KEACH . . . English . . . she's blessed by a personality as radiant as the morning sun ' ' FLORA LAMB . . . languages . . . her goodness, I Q - as the Warm sun, seems to enlighten everyone I EDWIN LANTZ . . . music . . . when he greets you his voice seems to sing around the edges NAOMI LARSON . . home economics . . her life's sewed permanently by the threads of happiness DONALD OI-ILSEN . . . music . . . the only rest he has the pleasure to know is a musical one HELEN OLSON , . . English . . . her exhuberance never seems to cease making people joyful GERALD PHILLIPS . . . physical education . . . he builds a foundation for many air-castles RICHARD RADKE . . . industrial arts . . . a tact of knowing what people wish not to learn ly bd-4 I 'tgirl It L. ld' lf' 6 ,, wx nr I , . es LQ, if ,112 flltt 5315520 , ,aff -1 tfli I 'V-r' -nj: :ff if gf ' 21 f 1 , lp V - v- ,-iq---4-W i Iiill' 17- Y . -, ,t,,,,9.,.,,,ffflM -. I H - A it '-.I.L. ,,-i f , I' " 5 i """',V ,e 3-5 Q'-:Ts - -'lki-I W,-,4+ E is xs- wef 5 S 51' f, I X 5 N. 13 FACULTY 0 ' 0 CHARLOTTE RONCA . . . language . . , a vers- atility well-supported by her willingness to do SYLVIA RYIN . . English , . as pensive moods come, spoken thoughts can't be far behind PRINCE SLAVEN . . . language . . . his fav- orite pastime is suddenly getting down-to-mirth CHARLES SMITH . . . mathematics . . . he's al- ways trying to find the unknown angles of life RUTH STICKLE . . . English . . . cooperative even though she is as busy as a telephone line MARTIN SWANSON . . . commercial . . .in his work he is as definite and emphatic as an oath HOWARD VANDER BEEK . . . English . . . one whose ingenuity even amazes the Reflector staff VELMA WHIPPLE . . . science . . . the slow honey of complete happiness pours through her VELMA PAY WHITE . . . mathematics . . . her face seems to be continually smudged with love ELSWORTH WOODS . . social science . . he has a deep humor understood by ones who think ALTA YOUNGBLOOD .. .home economics . . . sheds charm which binds all things with beauty BETTE ZERKLE . . . physical education . . . seems to radiate with an enticing vivaciousness CLASSES SEIXIIORS an , G. H. S.'s way of STAMPING ou! thc axis. 'logo-. ROGENE ABBOTT . . dimpled . , "Gene" is ever happy . . . merry chuckle and a winning smile IEAN ADCOCK . . . almost smiles out loud . . , fond of declamation . . . cherubic nature IAMES ALLENSWORTH . . . bass slapper . . . Marine enlistee . . . a Retlectavue bandman DONALD ANDERSON . , . "Gump" to us . . . lanky, easy-qoinq . . . master of the conversation ELEANOR ANDERSON . . . untroubled brow . . . candid blue eyes . . . companion cf wisdom IAMES ANDERSON . . . knows answers without study . . . "Blitzkreiq" . . . tom:rrow's farmer KENNETH ANDERSON . . . muscles galore . . . farm boy at heart . . . works without many words ROBERT ANGLUND...the life of the party .. "a" to "z" in novelty . . ticket for Hollywood MARIAN BAKER . , . happy blue-eyed blonde . . winning ways . . . personification cf grace IACOUELINE BARNES . . . a peppy lass . . . true athlete . . . third period library assistant BERNARD BARSTOW . . . cross-country man . . . with auburn waves . . . Reflector cameraman BERNlCE BELLAMY . . . speedy reader . . . al- ways qay, happy lass . . . make-up artist EUGENE BERNTSON. ., of Swedish stock . . . his quietness follows him.. .seeks to learn all ROBERT BICE . . . jokes and much laughter . . . a pornpadoured blond . . . scientific interests EDWARD BILLINGS . . . "Scoop" . . . no room for the fair ones . . . "hair gets in my eyes" 17 DON BIVENS . . . a wearer of the "G" . . .with camera and tripod . . . conversational master IAMES BIZZARRI .. mandolin player. .known for his Western style of dress . . . an Autry POLLY BONESTEEL . .the girl with the "pansy eyes" . . . sparkling personality . . . fun-filled r WARREN BOONE . . . drugstore soda-jerker . . . any job he can do. . . tastes the fun life offers FRANCES BOOSTROM. . .lovely raven locks . . . flashing dark eyes . . .is a pleasant friend LEROY BOOTEN. . . new at G. H. S. . .. "foot- ball's for me" . . . down on fingernail polish IOANNE BOWER . . . the original. . . energetic, charming, personable. .rnelodious Reflectorine IOYCE BOWER . .carbon copy. .Reflector too . . . individualistic voice and manners hers IACK BOWLES . . . "Tubby" . . . toter of the ball of pigskin . . . one Reflectavue zippinq zebra BEVERLY BRISTOL . . . heralds the latest in fashions . . . smiles and white teeth flash CARL BROWN . . . satisfaction. . .with a wisp above his upper lip . . . has genuine humor MARIAN BROWN . . . soft-voice, easy smile . . . jives in Reflectavue . . . interesting friend AUDREY BURCH .. .pleasant for acquaintance . . . future path-nursing . . . cheerfulness hers SHIRLEY BURFORD . . .always in her musical mood . . . sparkling . . . one we like to know KENNETH BURKE...talks little, listens . . . is dapper in a band uniform . . . complacent l8 "Meet yuh ul Old Abe tonight right aflrr school." SENIOR CLASS :gg :-- I i I Too many cookx won't spoil lhese pies. ed WW 'W tt BOB BUTLER . . . congenial . . . capable on the keyboard . . . is truly an optimist at heart RAY CAMERON . . . the curly-haired tackle . . . "Oh, you brute!" . . . one swell guy to know HERLYNE CAMPBELL . . . Girls' Service League talent scout . . . gay . . . a Reflectavue jiver DALE CARLSON . . . bicycles to institution of learning . . . dark-haired Swede . . . quiet LUVERNE CARLSON . . . nicknamed "Chick" . . . size of a minute . . . always a gentleman MARILYN CARLSON . . . makes and keeps friends . . . honey-tinted hair . . . vivacious DORIS CARLTON . . . happy when skating... a slow inward grin . . . one who has her likes WILLIAM CATRON . . . another jitterbug . . . gift of gab . . . wants to be an orchestra leader IACK CECIL . . . a man of varied interests.. . Student Council head . . . specialty's speech FRANCES CI-IAPIN . . . plays bass viol . . . busy Girls' Service worker . . . a bicycle rider RONALD CI-IERRINGTON, . . dark, wavy hair '. . . the farm is his world . . . quiet, unassuming IUANITA CHIDESTER . . . radiates good cheer ...smiling face . . . a prospective pedagogue ELIZABETH CHURCH . . . correct answers . . . music lover . . . marimba girl of G. H. S. KENNETH CLAUSEN . . . a hardwood "Spider" ...towhead . . . National Honor Society officer VIRGINIA CLAY . . . expert box-squeezer . . . G. A. A. board member . . . saxophone player 19 SHIRLEY CLENDENIN . . . racquet mistress . . . an amiable air . . . Girls' Athletic prexy DON COE . . Iohnny Weismuller ll . . mischief inventor . . . known as the "little round man" CATHERINE COFFEY . .. G.S.L. cabinet mem- ber . . .acquatic athlete . . . sweep of black hair MILDRED COHENOUR . . .a blend of silence and sunshine . . efficient worker . . happy lass RAY COLCLASURE . . . "l've been workin' on the railroad" . ..tall, dark and. .. unremitting MARTHA COOLEY . . remember her eyes . . . much happiness to share . . . writes for children SHIRLEY COWAN . . hobby-stars' pictures . . another who likes blue . . . enjoys good fun MARGARET COWMAN . . . dancing highlights in her hair . . , hearty laugh . . . and friends ELEANOR COZAD . . . "Cozie" as a bug in a rug . . speaks to all . . personification of pep MARSHA CRAFT . . . femme fatale . . . ping pong champ for three years . . . loves airplanes ALAN CRAIG . . . one of Uncle Sam's boys now . . . has a wicked hoof . . . social scientist IAMES CRAWFORD . . . physics champ . . . treasurer National Honor . . . basketball HM CREIGHTON . . nicknames galore . . future linotype printer . . . definitely a boy's boy ALBERT CROUCH . . ever a grin. .finds music a pleasure . . . amazes when he speaks aloud EARL CULVER . . . sublety in humor . . . a band and orchestra player . . . nonchalant fellow 20 An illuslrioux flusler ul the Cuslzfr. ,Aa SENIOR CLASS Wailirilq for Shorly fo uulofk fbr' doors of Ihr' brain mifl. it S IAMES DAUBARD . . . happiness will be his ...indefinite about his future . . . quiet grin ALBERT DAUGI-IERTY . . .full of old nick . . . a curl-twirler . . . in his heart a tinsmith BILL DAVIS . . . boyish good looks . . . is witty, tantalizing. , . "Life's a bowl of cherries" CORA DAVIS . . . fountain of cheerfulness . . . rugcutter . . . hopes to be a nursery teacher WALTER "MIKE" DAVISON .. happy-go-lucky . . from Henderson .. his future- --major league GERALD DEANE . . . hard-working cadet . . . drives a delivery truck . . . serious, pleases DORIS DENLY . . . loves to talk and laugh... good time . . . skates and dances with style MARY ELLEN DEXTER. . one-half of the Doran- Dexter duo . . . eye-catcher . . , friendly humor BETTY LOU DILLON . . . readings are super . . . a domestic gal, fellows . . . attractive miss FRANCES DIPRIMA . . . destined for design- ing fashions . . . charter Thespian , . . cute, petite MARIORIE DIXON . . . striking . . . what a grand nurse she'll make . . . a flash of sunlight HELEN DOBSON . , . outstanding is her olive complexion . . . fond of dancing . . . and joking SHIRLEY DORAN . , . is dainty and refined . . . other half of Doran-Dexter duo . . . twinkling BILL DOYLE . , . three year Student Council member . . . a slow grin . . . goal-Annapolis IAMES DOYLE . . . deep and resonant voice . . . seen on stage . . . steady, fair and square 21 TOM DOYLE . . . "Oh, those women drivers!" . . . Student Council chairman of homecoming MARY IANE DUGHMAN . . . plays any toy musical instrument . . . brilliant . . . a flicka MARIORIE DUNCAN , . . as merry as the day is long . . . friendly personality , . . declamster HELEN DUNKLE . . . a sweet, attractive grace . . ambitious . .a stock of smiles for everybody BETTY DURBIN . . . a quiet, gentle person . . . her words not spent in vain . . . industrious BETTE ENSLEY . . . "Happy am Ig from care I am free" . , . playful "Pam" . , . has class ROSALINE EVANS . . . serious about her tasks . . . expert seamstress . . . never troubles trouble EDWARD FARRELL . . . "Pappy" . . . plugs merrily along . . , efforts well-rewarded IEAN FIELDS . . . is half of charm and pep . . . athletic advocate . . . beautiful blonde hair IUNE FIELDS . . . the other half . . . dark-haired beauty . . . she brings sincerity into reality MARY IANE FISH. . .knows Latin from Caesar to Virgil . . . G.H.S. publican . . . energetic GWEN FISHBURN . . . easy on the eyes... good sport always . . more mermaid than "Fish" MARTHA FLETCHER . . . demon on the type- Writer . . . fond of journalism . . . equestrienne DOROTHY FLICKINGER , . . radio and movies are her hobbies . . , future stenographer GAYLE FLICKINGER . . .lover of sweet swing . . collects wishbones . . college history teacher 22 vr We are Ike boys from Ihr A. and P.', SENIOR Lvngfloy Ivg arf for fbi' mhz' of RE1fLr3cToR arf. CLASS FRED FOSTER . , . in the service for stars and stripes . . . teasing . . . monarch of jitterbugs DOROTHY FREBERG . . . auburn-haired Re- flector maiden . . , spunk and spirit . . . typist BETTY GABRIELSON . . . hobby' -that lad in New Zealand . . . beautiful handwriting BONNIE GANTZ . . , earnest in her work . . . sweetness itself . . . thoughtful and true IUANITA GIBB . . . she likes everything '. . . especially Student Council . . . a logician LUCINDA LEE GILBERT. . .piano never rests . . modesty is hers . . is domestically inclined ALBERT GILSON, IR .... senior class prexy ...football captain . . . he's an all-round star MARILYN GOFF . . . a maid so smooth and so small . . . charming . . . large, limpid orbs CAROLYN GUSTAFSON . . . her sports, fish- ing and swimming . . . courteous . . . aviatrix GLORIA GUSTAFSON . . . small blonde lass ...collects salt shakers . . . favorite-white PI-IILLIP GUSTAFSON . . . vice-president of the senior class . . . smooth . . , all-state football DORIS I-IAGAN . . . conscientious and capable student . . . flashy in red . . . short and dark IRMA I-IAGGENIOS . . . a whiz in declam . .. full of fun and jest. . . Fourth "R" co-chairman BETTY I-IAIGI-IT , . . dark attractiveness . . . a Working miss . . . distinctive personality SAM HALL . . . 'Swingin' Sam" . . . tall and good looking . . . a suave and mannerly gent 23 IOHN l-IALLSTROM . . . "What seat, please?" . . . handy . . . ambitions in the field of radio WARREN I-IALVERSON . . . a muscular male . . . fun is with him . . . mad about shekels DOROTHY HAMBLIN . . . silvery-toned voice . .. a hard worker at heart . . . gaiety her key MARGARET HANER . . . library's her castle . . . homelike girl . . . with excellent intentions IESS HANNA . . . speaks through smiles . . . a happy chap . . . dark, debonair appearance DICK HARMAN . . . an expert nickelodeon man . . . "Ie ne parle pas francais" . . . a jovial laugh VIRGINIA HARMON . . . known as "Stretch" ...terrific . . . our mellow-voiced songstress HAROLD HATCH . . . a handsome lad . . . good end on the football squad . . . has many friends TOM HAWKINS . . . one good-looker . . .straw- berry blond . . . not backward, just bashful IACK HAWKINSON . . . the "Shadow" knows . . a laughing schoolboy. .a sparkplug at play HARRIETTE HAYNES . . . tickles the ivories . . .laugh with the world . . . a bang out of life IOHN HEALEY . . . light wavy hair .. .never's at a loss for words . . .delivers evening papers IACK HEIMEL . . . "seeing is believing"... a witty optimist . . . hobbyelots of clothes ROBERT I-IENDRICKS . . . dancer of the adagio .. . a book lover. . .the outdoor life is for him KENNETH HENRICKSON . . . a good companion and a friend . . . "Spike" . . . he's no lone wolf 24 Last chance to get the dope for fomorroufs reporl. SENIOR Camcfra catcher rouplvs and kids in rofwrrsaiion. CLASS MARGARET HEPBURN . . . ever sweet . . . often shy and often silent . . . serious with all MARY JEAN HERMAN . . .possessor of a catch- ing giggle . . . dark-eyed miss . . . valuable WAYNE HEVLAND . . . flashing eyes and a broad grin . . . he'll get along . . . happy MARY IANE HILLIER . . . innocent of incorrect answers . . . eyes like brown gems . . . all A's RICHARD HOFFMAN . . . circus Lyin' Tamer ...nice eyes . . . enjoys friendly controversy KEITH HOLLOWAY . . . he's no sucker . . . friends innumerable. .try to trace his activities BETTIE HOUCHENS . . . poetry reader . . . a will to succeed...efficient at her cadet post MARTHELLA HOWELL . . . an earnest desire l to learn . . . dark, attractive charm . . . sincere DOROTHY HUBBARD . . . Wy man, haven't you heard? . . . senior baton twirler . . . skater BEVERLY HUGHES . . . a sweet little girl... interested in dramatics . . . lover of books DONALD HUNNICUTT . . . is destined for a happy future . . . conscientious . . . musician BOB HUNTER . . . trackster . . . mathematically inclined . . . pastime - tinkering with cars BETTY HURBUL . . . likes outdoor activities . . a twinderella . . four-year student of Latin AUDREY IENNINGS . . . graceful flag swinger . . . gave assistance in office . . . serene nature RICHARD L. IENSEN . . . "California, here I come" . . . car-crazy . . . good-natured fellow 25 RICHARD W. IENSEN . . . ushers physique ...Y.C.T.I.W.Y. cast . . . deep sense of humor DON IOHANSEN . . . Swedes are the best . . . an amiable personality . . . inclination for art DAVIA LEE IOHNSON . . . cute, freckled face ...a new girl with choir interests . . . jocund FRANK IOI-INSON . . . whistles like a canary ...his is a world of music . . . a regular guy , IEANNE IOHNSON . . . light brown hair and eyes that laugh . , the friendly sort . . agreeable KENNETH IOHNSON . . model airplane maniac .,.trotter of the cinders . . . a skilled tumbler LESLIE IOHNSON . . . pigskin player . . . easel and brush artist , . . Varsity Club officer SHIRLEY IOHNSON . . . always a pacificator . . . a prospective bookkeeper . . . a pleasing smile CLEO IONES . . . tray toter . . . at peace with the world . . . a valued fellow in the shops SALLYE IONES . . . a worker on many crews ...infectious laugh . . . everybody's he-lpmate IOHN IURIEVICH . . "Sam's boy" . . reputable caddy . . , everyone profits by knowing him BILL KEEEE . . . fond of flashy clothes . . . the girls brighten his life . . . swings a hot hoof IOAN KELLY . . . knows what the score is... news-hound . . . "Fragile: Handle With Care" IMOGENE KENNEDY . . . hazel eyes . . . aspires to be an organist . . . a lass with lengthy locks DORCAS KERR . . . dark and taIl's this maid . . . a good scout . . . hardworking Thespian 26 Watfs thai yozfrc' doing will: those Einsifins, Miss-Fil? SENICDI2 tik xt Aflrr fifth, the locker ir rc'1icl'f'rf of ifx load mzlil tomorrow ai cigbl, CLASS EARL KINAST . . . straight-forward . . . one of the "keenest" . . . deep and pleasing voice ELLA IANE KUNTZ . . . willful, with a mind of her own . . . refreshing as a coke . . . athletic FRED LAGERSTROM . . . baseball pitcher... a philatelist . . . girls included in his pals DOROTHY LAMBIE . . . a variety of friends. .. an outdoor friend , . . an active Girl Scout RUSSELL LARSON . . . one who's seldom heard ...willingness to work . . . his diversion - art DORIS LAWLER . . . worker among our books , . . happy . . . ambitious, but never complaining BEVERLY LEE . . . a girl to look at twice... sweet temperament . . . "Swell assistant"---Ed. CHARLES LEHMAN . . intrigued by the physics lab . . argumentative . . a lad who works hard NEAL LEIGHTY . . . a curly-haired blonde , .. blueeeyed too . . . he strives to conquer MARVIN LINDBLOOM . . . he has his own brand of fun . . . always driving his car HOLLIS LINDGREN . , . ever-charming . . . money-keeper of the League . . . business ROBERT LINDSEY . . . helmet and cleats . . , on the beam . . . 'tis music makes him happy WILMA LOI-IMAR . . . reticent by nature . . . an earnest girl . . . Reflector, G. S. L. worker LOUIS LONG . . . merry in his Ford . . . a pal to many boys . . . tops at tinkering with tools PLORAINE LOVITT . . . a kind word for all.. . help to the office force . . . a happy mermaid 27 IEANNE LOWE . . . soprano songbird . . . with a model's beauty . . . high school's her world ANDREW LUNDEEN . . . clever but not vain . . . future technician . . . is always on the move SHIRLEY LUTTRELL . . . Thespian cfficer . . . a nurse who'll quicken pulses . , . make-up head ROBERT LUVALL . . . artistic nature . . . cor- net swingster . . . his future- -commercial artist MARY LYNN . . . swing and sing . . . taps on her toes with speed . . . an active outdoor girl ANNE MCCLANAHAN . . home lover . , knitter . . . well could she qualify for tooth-paste ads MARY MCCLURE . . that head's far from empty . . . hair of reddish hue . . . she's a flag swinger SHIRLEY MCGAHEY . . . laughing eyes . . . soft, gentle speaker . . . still water runs deep DOROTHY McNAUGHT . . . lovely appearance .,.snappy in a band uniform . . . pretty locks PHYLLIS MARVIN . . . cute freckles and a pug nose . . . the little girl type . , . she's peppy IEAN MASON . . . "sweets to the sweet" . . . one swell pal . . . a diminutive, lovable lass NOLA MATSON . . . prefers "red" . . . raven black hair . . sweetness and quietness are hers EARL MAXWELL . . . "Squirt" . . . a slow drawl distinguishes this lad . . . fun's his diet HAROLD MELTON . . . here's a blonde, girls . . . "fill 'er up, Mister?" . . . he's a good sort CHARLENE METCALF . . . joyous as morning . . . pet diversion-wearing red . . . Budget 28 Work-shop upprfzzlirvs become more slzillva' in production of ufoctl-work. SENIOR E SM 5...-PGA at"N-...., CLASS Iuxf a quirl vrmiing iz! bonu' with Ihr' radio um! Pr'g's Iilflt' brother. EVELYN MILLER . . . an old-fashioned qirl at heart . . . competent booklceeper . . . little lady VIRGINIA MOON . . . active in Girls' Athletic Association . . . sports' fan . . . a Girl Scout BILL MORRISSEY . . . a qiant's strength . . . full of anecdotes , . . manliest of tumblers EARL MORSS . . . crowned by curly red hair ...skating enthusiast . . . tall and slim fellow EUGENE MOTT . . a jolly good fellow . . never at a loss for words . . . qreat in comedy roles TOM MUMMEY . . . handsome Coast Guard . . . he's a nifty dresser . . . enjoys many good times WALLACE MUNDY . . , "Rack 'em up, Mundy" . . .sports a blue coupe . . . void of any worry HOWARD MUREEN . . . a cartoonist at heart ...a mild voiced lad , . . lover of qood times GERALDINE MYERS . . . diminutive toe dancer . . . "Gerry" , . . has well-groomed appearance ALICE NELSON . . . jolly as spring . . . Girls' Athletic Association secretary . . . red-head BARBARA NELSON . . . best of sports . . . she can take it . . . is a tall, talkative "Blondie" GLENN NELSON . . . Reflector photo ace . . , to him college beckons . . . avocation hunting IRENE NELSON . . . interested in commercial work . . . drawing ability . . . tall and blonde MARCIA NELSON . . . senior class scribe . . . her middle name should be "Pep" . . . cheer- leader ALBERT NEWBERG . . . possesses dark waves ..."Al" is optimistic . . . an addict ot bowlinq 29 JAMES NORDBERG . . . "lim" keeps peace with the world .. . possessor of inexcitability KAYO NORRIS . . . busy business manager oi the Reflector . . . smooth dancer . . . playboy IOHN NORRIS . . . a super Boy Scout . . . rider of the "bike" . . . a quiet, mannerly chap EDIE NORTHRUP . . . the true girl athlete .. . laughingly she goes her way . . , a real pal GEORGENE OLSON . . a peck of fun . . bearer of office messages . . .a perfect sense of humor WAYNE OLSON . . . he grins from ear to ear .. .jovial . . healthy Future Farmer of America MARTHA ORWIG . . , many good ideas hatch in her brain . . . boss's scribbler . . , twinkling IACKIE OSMER . . . interested in the army ...dark beauty . . . an amiable, likeable girl EILEEN OVERDORE . . shy miss . . interested student . . . willingly enters a conversation KATHERINE OWEN . . . enjoys sewing . . . collects toy dogs . . . pet peeve---borrowers DALE PANTHER . . . has a way with him . . . a gay guy wherever he goes . . cadet president EDITH PARKER . . . lives in crowds of joy . . .never a dull moment when she's among us IAMES PARKER . . . "Iazz" . . . Whistles like a canary . . . here's a mischievous comedian CHARLES PEARSON . . agrarian enthusiast . . cute in a quiet Way . . . "Chucks" a boy's boy RICHARD PEARSON . . . a true thinker . . . with sandyfcolored hair , . .he'll make his mark 30 to A m11g10111rrufio11 of braming farm ul Ibn' brad of Ihr' main .vfuirx grvvfx 11151-Vllflllllt' urrizalx. SENIOR nd" After rlmrlvrftzing ufilx all day, kids gnlhvr al Ihr' R-sfand fo xalixfy xbarpvrtrvl aftprfilrs. CLASS BONNIE PECK . . . by a dimple deep we know this maid . . . she vacations in Rushville PEGGY PENNINGTON . .gracefully tally full of fun . . possesses much efficiency . . Reflectorite CLARISSA PERRY . . . happy and gracious . . . the love of doing for others . . . a will to win LLOYD PETERSON . . boatkeeper . . at swim- ming he's a shark . . "Pete" is happy-go-lucky MARIAN PETERSON . . , desires to balance trays in the future . . . tow-headed . . . gay MARILYN PETERSON . . . an ideal secretary . . . "Petie" . . . you'll never see her sulking MAX PETERSON . . one good sport . . National Honor Society president . . . always active RAYMOND PETERSON . . . "I'm hungry" . . . member of A Cappella Choir . . . a bowler SHIRLEY PETERSON . . . displays ease on the stage . . . a bibliophilist . . . business woman IESSE PONCE . . . a real guard . . . possessor of deep dark eyes . . . steadfast as Gibraltar IACOUELYN POTTS . . . true blonde. . . driver of cars and golf balls . . . an efficient typist FLORENCE POWLESS ...sweet and charming . . . she adores to trip the light fantastic EARL PUCKETT . . . big things come in small packages . . . the streak of the cinder path EUGENE RANDELL . . "Genes" a good natured little man . . . cyclist . . . he grins all over DOROTHY READ . . . capable cadet , . . new friend but one always . . . future stenographer 31 ROBERT REDFERN . . . eventually will become a scientist . . composed chap . . qcod-looking FRANK REED . . . Terpsichorean interest . . . he's efficient at his cadet post . . . curly thatch DICK REED . . . pedals to the institution of learning . . . vocation - tiller of the soil CHARLES REEVES . . . topnotch . . . DeMolay work holds his interest . . . "Chuck's" full of fun MAX RICHARDS . . . the perfect paper boy . . . is one hard worker . . . true and faithful MARY RILEY . . . a speedy whiz on skates . . . jubilant young miss , . . a whimsical cadet BETTY RITCHIE . , . variety dancer. . .a grand sense of humor . . . she knows her own mind CHARLOTTE ROBISON . . . dimpled seamstress . . . a good athlete . . . possesses much vitality RUBY RODICH . . . "Tony" . . . a friendly smile and voice . . .she possesses a will to win EUGENE ROGERS . . . math wizard . . . "Harpo" . . .efficient piqskin manager of the Streaks MARIORIE ROHR . . . transfer from Alexis.. . seamstress deluxe . . . commercial student ROBERT ROSENOUIST . . . "l..adies' hats have no place in movies" . . saves knives , . peppy ROBERT ROSSITER . . . publicity man . . . works behind the scenes . . . papersboy on wheels ROBERT ROYCE . . . nice-looking chap . . . first period cadet captain . . . manipulates a car IEANETTE RUDOLF . . . fond of the library. . . serenader . . . always has an armful of books 32 1 Z . Book-brdrrked sixlrrs vf song scurry to school. SENIOR Az'ron1moa'afing lbc ramcraman bvforr Nfllin' her up." CLASS Om SHIRLEY SANDEEN . . . animated fashion plate . . our class money "keeper" . . a real maiorette TACK SHARP . . . topped by a mop of curls . . . a waiter with a cheerful grin and manner WARREN SANFORD . . . a tall, stately lad . . . sensible , . . benevolent feeling toward all HAROLD SCHAUBERT . . . there's a twinkle in his eye . . . cute with wavy locks . . . active BETTY SCHRODT . . merrily she goes her way . . . dimpled damsel . . . likes to dance and skate LENORA SCHROEDER . . . her grin makes friends , . . her personality keeps them MARY SCOTT . . an enioyable friend . . locks any girl could be jealous of . . . humorous BETTY SEABURG . . . knows her "p's and q's" ,..guiet but friendly . . . dictation she'll take ROBERT SELF . . . second Don Budge . , .chief arguer . . . "Bob" cuts figure 8's on the ice ELEANOR SEXTON , . . automobilist . . . spent some time deep in the heart of Texas . . . shorty DOROTHY SHAFMAN .. . you'll find her bowl- ing duck -pins . . giggler . . ever ready for fun DOROTHY SHARPE . . . our favorite usherette . . . "Dot's" a dimpled darling . . . is unassuming IEAN SHOFF . . . "Snooks" . . .future lawyer's secretary . . . present hobby is traveling SAM SHOTTS . . . he prizes his tan flivver , . . a working man . . . Samuel is a great joker IUNIOR SHRIBER . . . cross country and track boy . . . grapple-r . . .known for purple sweater 33 BARBARA SLADER . . Warbler . . a speedster at shorthand . . . she delights in bicycling LESTER SMITH . . . allergic to girls . . . he's tranquillity personified . . . ternperance SHIRLEY SMlTH . . . the girl with the flashy cars . . . efficient . . . good sense-good nature HELEN SOWDER , . . vim, vigor, vitality . . . wonderful character . . . she-'ll go very far EDWARD SPERRY . . . goes around corners on two wheels . . . chief sport--vfun, more fun GORDON SOUlRE . . . muscular farmer , . . calm and cool . . . treasurer of his advisory MAXINE STANBERRY , , . tall and slender , . . those waves are natural . . . enticing smile FRED STEGALL . . . hotdogs and hamburgers are his specialty . . . handy . . , fair-haired lad EARL STEVENS . . . "You go your way and l'll go mine" . . , is brainy . . . with subtle humor BETTY IEAN STEWART . . . reticent . . . a member of the domestic realm . . . happy WANDA STAIRWALT . . sweet and earnest.. an industrious worker . . . has mental calmness RUTH STITES . . . a winning musician ..very modest and unassuming . . . sunny disposition MARIORIE STRICKLAND . . . never known to frown . . . perseverance . . . an earnest worker MERLE STRONG . . .he worries noty he hurries not . . . "MuZz" . . . nonchalantly goes his way BEN SUNDERLAND . . . never caught resting . . .his gaiety is contagious . . . stage manager 34 "Mrk", "Squirn'1" ami Bowles bowl, and Frrbwg rbulkx cur 7111. SENIOR CLASS Prvpariug lo flood lbw U. S. mail with P. T. A. inz'ilalf0nx. CARL SWANSON . . . "Ho hum! Why hurry?" ...debonair . . . Plymouth and Chrysler, Inc. EUGENE SWANSON . . Sportsman-hunter, fish- er and swimmer .. carefree. . willingly works HARLAN SWANSON . . . out for a good time ...potential poultry raiser . . . entertaining MARGARET SWANSON . . . enjoys hunting . . . saves compacts . . . aim-ambulance driver RUSSELL SWANSON . . a gentleman. . "Russ" with the rusty colored hair . . . determined CHARLES SWEGLE . . . leadoff man . . . a ruddy complexionecl male . . . laughing eyes VIRGINIA SWISECOOD . . . neat as a pin . . . the Les she worries the better.. .pert pianist GEORGE THOMPSON . . . fleet-looted back . .. a storehouse of knowledge . . . one swell guy HARRY ALONZO THOMPSON . . . at tumbling he's tops . . small but mighty . . accommodating WANDA THOMPSON . . surrounded by friends ...clarinet . . . looks on the sunny side of life DONALD TI-IORSEN . . a superior tackle . . . big man with the little voice...a railroader BETTY TI-IURMAN . . . pet peeve "'Shorty" or "Shrimp" . . . collects shells and arrowheads IRVIN TOLLE . . . small in stature only . . quick and witty . . .' resolute football man DAGNI TORNOUIST . . . always singing . . . nothing gets her down . . . big vocabulary THEODORE TOURTELLOTT . . . he spells with the best of them . . . deep, dark eyes . . .aimful 35 BETTY TRACY . . . many a giggle . . . cute as a bug's ear . . . member Twins and Tracy trio MARTHA TRACY . , . elocutionist . . . with grand personality. .enthusiastic and ambitious LOIS TRASK . . . a nice kid . . . cooperative ...she'll take things in her stride . . . ready IOANNE TREBBE . . , movie fan . . . she'll draw beautiful girls . . . steadfast friend to all ALBERTA TRULOCK . . . satisfied . . . she ex- cels in many sports . . .she always acts natural VIRGINIA TURPIN . . . Reflector worker . . . future will be "so wonderful in white" . .direct DEVERE TUTT . . . laurels on the track , . . his looks are an asset . . . package of dynamite LUGENE VAN ANTWERP . . . voice as clear as a crisp winter day . . . a bubbling merrymaker HENDRIK VAN VLIET . . . fond of test tubes and Bunsen burners . . . just discovered girls WYNETTA VAN WINKLE . . . amusing . . . better late than never . , . reckless, dashing RUSSELL WAGI-IER , . . "Russ" will go far as a tiller of the terra firma . . . dapper chap PERKINS WALKER , . . one swell sport . . . lover of iam and jive . . . the salt of the earth ROBERT WALKER . . . taciturn . . . conscien- tious Worker . . . good natured and handsome SARAH WALLACE . . . not superstitious . . . cheery smile . . . president of Girls' Service VICTOR WARD . . . masculine . . . "Mickey's" a whiz at bowling , . . good-looking sailor 36 Ifs a good idea to keep on the right side of ibe law. SENIOR Svnior commrrrialiies prclmre for future bosxm. CLASS VIVIAN WARD . . . charming smile . . . happy but responsible . . . she's a peppy cheerleader BETTE WATKINS . . . a hoarder of pennants ...pet peeve-gossip . . . a personal secretary PAULINE WATSON . . , versatile musiciane band and orchestra . . . rippling blonde hair ROBERT WATSON . . . basket-shooter supreme .. .just "Doc" to us . . . a dynamic personality ROXANNA WATSON . . . "Roxie" is sharp, not flat . , . she's not as bashful as she looks DOROTHY WATTERS . . . dark and beautiful ...happiest while skating . . , bewitching gal SHIRLEY WAY . . . prefers tall, blonde boy . . . a small, sweet package . . . active student LES WEBBER . . . powerful little man . . . clown prince of comedy . . . is ready for anything DOROTHY WEINBERG . , . domestic miss who likes to sew . . busy . . dislikes the color black ANNA WEIR . . . displays her loquacity with extemporaneous speaking . . . history wizard IOYCE WEST . . . desires to become swim- ming instructor . . . aversion-a poor sport SHIRLEY WEST . . . a friend to everyone... "Shorty" has a small voice . . . surprising CHARLES WHITE . . . "Charlie" is chuck full of fun . . . a real jitterbug . . . mischievous FRANCES WHITE . . . giggles galore. . . ready and willing . . . the library is her castle MADELINE WHITESIDE . . . full oi iollity... lives in a world of books . . . courageous 37 MARIORIE WILBUR . . . likes to warble . . . hair of golden sheen . , is stately and ladylike MARIORIE WILKINS . . . artistic ability . . . and has a joyous smile . , owns auburn tresses ZOE ANNE WINTERS , . . industrious student , . . debate, declam show her speaking ability RITA WINTERS . . . a gay, happy farrnerette . . . independent . . , her sense of humor is tops DOROTHY VIJITHERELL . . . "Oh, how I hate to get up in the morning!" . , her hobby is skating GALE WITHERELL . . . "Peewee" . . . exhibi- tionist on skates . . and the other zipping zebra DON WOOD . . . flashy dresser . . . the perfect escort . . ."Why worry?" . . .commercial artist MELVIN WOODS . . . his silver streak is a gray Plymouth . .calm , .as a runner he is fast SHIRLEY WOOLSEY . . office cadet who saves Flapper Fannys . . . feature ed. of the Budget EILEEN WORDEN . . she commands a captivat- ing glance . . an amiable person . . is energetic FRANCIS WRIGHT . . he's "Lucky" . , drawing is his hobby . , goal aeronautical engineering ROBERT WRIGHT . . . "Bob" has the makings of an artist . . . handy . . . modesty becomes him EDWINA YARDE . . . secretary of Thespians . . . "Ed's" loads of fun . . . Miss Fred Astaire BETTY IANE YOUNG . . . small in stature, but big in ideas . . . a keen sport --fun galore ROBERT ZEIGLER . . the "bread-boy" . . plays guitar and mandolin . , . a rambling cowboy 38 Commvrrial slurfrnls fbuf bvforc' flax' ball sigrmlr order. SENIOR FACINC5 TI-IE FUTURE i Backs to High School Days lune 4, l942! Graduation! At last the day to which we have long looked forward has arrived. Long will each of the three hundred forty-one members of our class re- member the thrills and chills of this big day and the little things that make it so- corsages and new suits, tassels and gowns, diplomas and honors, speeches and songs, smiles and tears, congratulations and goodbyes. Suddenly, as our principal calls our names and hands us our diplomas, we turn our backs on three of our happiest years. During these years we have received the knowledge to make bright the future which will come after the clouds of international struggle have disappeared. To obliterate these clouds, we will all work together. Already a few of us have gone into service for our country, many of us will offer our services now. lt is with those in arms that we place our hopes and trust. So it is that we stand with chins up and hopes high facing the future on this com- mencement day, our commencement day, the greatest, most thrilling day we have yet experienced. "Farewell, G. l-l. S., and thanks for everything. We shall never forget you." Graduation Walk Afternoon Rehearsal 39 JUNIOR Frm' hui xvrziu' xlrivlly for mulrx: lbrrvix aluuys roam for auofbvr guy 011 Ibn' fw1Jf'r'. Bob Abrahamson Alice Adolphson John Alderson Iohn Altine Celeste Anderson luanita Anderson Russell Anderson Shirley Ann Anderson Barbara Atwood Norma Averitt Alice Babbitt Bernard Bainbridge Homer Bandy Donna lean Barlow Russell Barstow Alden Becker Marion Benson Bonnie lean Berqe Donna Bevard Orna Binge Clettus Bledsoe Verna Blust Charles Bond Iune Bowles Eileen Bowman Willa Brashear Robert Brodine Barbara Brown Stanley Brown Garnet Brooks Helen Brownlee Ben Brunlcow Howard Burford Harold Burlchalter Beverly Burlchalter Donald Campbell Maxine Campbell Phyllis Campbell Wayne Camper Lois Carlson Norman Carlson Robert Cates Richard Champion lrvin Cherrinqton Harry Childers George Cills Beverly Clark Margaret Clark lack Cline Billy Cole Marilyn Collinson Arthur Cook Alice Cordell Barbara Corzatt Alice Courson Charles Cox Glenn Craiq lack Craig Pete Creighton Shirley Crouse Clay, t'of1n', l'l'1IjIHIX lllltl uulrrlt lffllll' fogi'llu'r In jiroliifi' rxlJt'1'I1'l1i'v for blltflliflg R4'Hll11'u1lJI,v. CLASS Ou! JUNICR Dl'ilIlZiIIg f!1IHlfdf7l.Y bold fmzglzwlir' ullraffizm for purr'bf'u' flwrnuix uflvr' dry flaxxvs. Geneva Cunninqharn Loretta Cunningham Charlotte Cushrnan Betty Danielson Wilbur Danner Herman Davis Shirley Davis Marjorie Dawson Barbara lean Day Audrie DeBois Betty Denniston lim Donaldson LaVerne Donaldson Bob Dredge lean Driscoll Lillian Dunkle Alta Dunlevy Betty Dutton Darlene Earel Alice Eclcwall loan Eddy Marilee Ehlen Barbara Ellickson Deana Erickson loan Erne Donald Ewing Ice Fairbairn Katherine Felt Charles Fifield Dee Finley Maxine Fogarty Annette Forstrom Nadine Frederickson Iackie Frymire Maurice Garman Robert Garrett Ianice Gawthrop Vl Jnty Gifford Vedamae Gilmore Shirley Gladfelter Wayne Glass Bob Goacl Adorea Goodman Virginia Gray Wayne Green Arthur Greenquist Bill Gregory Shirley Ann Gretta Robert Grogan loan Grossman Shirley Gustafson lack Haight Eugene Hallstrom Doris Hand lanice Hand Eunice Harding Dorothy Harris Naomi Harris George Hasselbacher Clarine Hasselquist S L 4 , t I ,litiax , ' g S .'... CLASS If only Ihr' fvflouw knvu' bon' lbw girls buh' lboxi' S'rAlu. xfvjrx JUNIOR A xplaxb in the pool, u lmxly xbowrr, and cloifacx url' cfonumf just in lime lo gd I0 vluxx bvfon' Ihr' bvll. Eileen Hatch Georqe Haich Richard Hawkinson Marian Healea Velda Healea Mildred Heilener Allen Herrington Glenna Herron Carol Higgins lack Hinchliff Myron Hinebauqh Roqer Hoffman Betty Hogan Bob Holcomb Lois Holloway Marilyn Holloway Rex Holman Helen Ieannette Holrnquist Alice Hoskins Dorothy Hurnes Iarnes Hunter Beverly Hurbul Irene Iacobs Donald Iacobson Lorraine lames Barbara Iefiords Betty Iohnson Dale lohnson Dean lohnson Elizabeth Iohnson Margaret lohnson Richard Iohnson Rose Iohnson Roy lohnson Virginia Iohnson Margaret Iones Dorothy Iordan Ted Iordan Pauline Iudd Lois Kemp Ronald Landon Chauncey Lang Shirley Larsen Norman Lester Alice Lieber Donald Light VVilliam Lindberg William Lindeen Alice Ling Harry Ling Carolyn Lopez Philip Lopez Rosalice Loring Florence Lowe Betty Lowell Rosemary Lundeen Phyllis Lundquist Edgar Luttrell Bob McCants Alan McClelland xv l 13- 'ir- w T Girly rvfaliuivil will! pigfuilx wbvn lmyx irzxixlctf on rrvu' l'lll'5 in Ihr mill-gi' mi1nm'r. CLASS liz JUNICDI2 "D0u'l Si! Umlwr Ibn' Applr' Trmhl' V' Y ,Q gr .., , f Isabel McGahey Patricia McKinney Helen McLaughlin Arlene McNaught Shirley lo Madigan Harold Magee Allen Mann Barbara Manwarren Harriett Manwarren Robert Marks Blanche Masterson Irma Mattson Peggy Megginson Don Melin Charles Miller Robert Miller Virginia Mitchell Betty Moran Ray Morling Betty Morrison Mary Ann Mortenson Helen Murray Frances Nelson Glenn R. Nelson Marye Nelson Richard Nelson Robert Nelson Vanece Nelson Ray Nemeth Harold Northrup AfI4'l0l1iUIl.Y waiJr'11.t inzprurixf' Ibvir own arrangt'm1'11l of Myrtle Northrup Ed Norquist Alice Ohlsson Eva Olin Ernri Mae Olson Ierry Olson t Margaret Osborn , Helen Padilla 1 Q- Q GJ Richard Palrnqren Q iiii P 1 Mazetta Parker , K W O Robert Parkinson H 5 , : ,.,:i P , Ann Parks 7 1.. - f M ,B Norma Payne Ruth Peabody A 1 I .Z we , , at b y LV, - J.. , .- Mary lane Peavy Paul Peck Bob Pennington Shirley Perardi Lawrence Peterson Marjorie Peterson Roy Peterson Shirley Peterson Virqinia Peterson Vincent Poe Leonard Olson t " Georqe Poole Thomas Poole in 3 Bob Portlock K lohn Prina A 1 Bill Pritchard " r 1 'llzlzzilmliug liglrliug lfngi liglll ill'-fail in nmrlj llhlllltlfil' f1r'0ifl1t'liu11.w. CLASS JUNICDI2 Thr' "Sunil: Muria"-Balboa- Plj'77lUIIfZ7 Rr1z'l2-Derlarafion of Irzrlvfvwlrlr'url'-"M0nilor" and flwl'l'7'i!lIdlk,,iGdl,Xl,l'17Y5 Purrhusf' Trvaly of Va'rmillvr-Corregizfor. Leola Rainey Phyllis Ransom Arthur Reams Virginia Reavy Fern Reed Gloria Richardson Shirley Riqqle Anna Rios Betty Roberts Gordon Robertson Dale Sackey Doloris Schrodt Gene Schwilck Beverly Scott Pearl Sellers lames Share Iack Sharp Glee Sherwood Walter Shofroth Phyllis Short Helen Shults Darwin Silver Kathryn Simons Maxine Sims Cecile Smith Bill Soderstrorn Richard Spehr Phyllis Staats Dorothy Stambauqh Brook Stanbary Richard Steqall Fred Stellar Mary Ellen Stewart Norma Stiqner Ralph Stinson Russell Stoerzbach Bill Stonekinq be 'S' Richard Stonekinq Richard Stoner Mildred Strader leanne Strickler Warren Strickler Shirley Sutherland Charles Sutton Everett Swaqert Winitred Swallow Evar Swanson Gloria Swanson Leona Swanson Marian Swanson Rosemary Swanson Beatrice Swartout Betty Swartout Leta Taber M Anthony Tabone ii' Iames Tabone lohn Tate Clarence Templeton Radah Telford Wendell Terpeninq M -1-vw rv is Marvin Yocum Rex Young Pat Younqren IYIII xhzrzing, !71j'Xl'lf' Dig tlfllfll in ffm! Img. CLASS JUINIICDIQS Tbv mm! llopular hingrs in the Illlilblillg brml ouf, and xfmlvnf sfrvukx xlurl homr'u'ard. Ruth Theobald Iarnes Tonkin Marjean Trait Marilyn Turner Yvonne Uhlmann lack Underwood Dorothy Wallace Bernacline Walters Bob Walters Wayne Webster Blanche Weir Donald Wells Everett Westberq Bob Westerdale Ioan Westeriield Charles Wetherbee lack White Norma White Martha Wilkins Rollin Wilkins Lois Willer Eleanor Wilson lack Wilson Karen Wilson Laura Lee Wilson Margaret Wilson William Witherbee Harold Witherell Duane Wriqht Betty Yarde TI-IE CLASS CDF 1943 On September 2, l94l, four hundred pupils starting their junior year re- turned tothe haunts of Galesburg High School with hardly an idea of just what accomplishments they would perform. Athletics held its popularity the year long. The boys almost immediately went out for football, and three juniors successfully made the varsity squad. With the end of an eventful gridiron season, no less than one-half dozen of our junior athletes were admitted to a top berth in the realm of the hardwood. As spring descended on Gl-lS's cinder path, ambitious members of the junior class shared the honors with their fellow tracksters. Play ball! These were the words echoed as our sub-seniors trotted across the green diamond of H. T. Custer Park to a very successful baseball season. lt was the juniors, too, who copped top honors in the intramural sport program as the school year drew to a close. As the curtain rose on the all-school extravaganza, the Reflectavue, one- third of the cast behind the footlights was seen to be juniors. Two other active school groups which the junior class helped support were the Girls' Service League and Boys' Forum organizations. We musn't forget either the ability of leadership which the junior members of the Student Council show- ed. The class of '43 also dipped its fingers into printers' ink to do its part in putting out the weekly publication, the Budget. As the stirring notes of band music drifted over the football field and the gym floor, we found that about one-third of the band was made up of juniors. Too, the juniors played an active part in the other musical organizations, the orchestra, choir, and small groups. Diligently discussing pro and con with the varsity debate squad were found four more members of the class. Not to be outdone by their fellow classmates, several other juniors shared the speech limelight in dramatics, extemp, and declam. At last, as the end of the year drew near, the National l-Ionor Society members were elected. This honor came to eighteen of our mid-classmen. Glancing back over the year, it seems as though the junior class has been a busy one. lt has, and we can heartily say that next year's seniors had a happy time all the time. Shirley Perardi Dick Spehr junior Reflector Apprentices iVIiz'r'o.wr1fn'.f, wzgrs, umm' mlrbx, anal Fish fMr.J SGP!-IQMGRE Mary Lou Adams Richard Adcock Shirley Adcock Gay Adkisson larnes Albro Harry Aldus Evelyn Allen Betty Anderson Bob Anderson Lydia lane Anderson Mary lean Anderson Richard Anderson Barbara Anneqers LeRoy Ayers Marvyn Baker Bill Baldwin Bob Barnes Helen Barrow Shirley Becker Kenneth Beebe Betty Benson Betty Berry Beverley Berry Putnam Biqqs Martha Bird Bruce Bishop Paul Bledsoe Bob Bloomberg lanet Boqard Leslie Bond Robert Bond Nedra Bouqhman Crosiar Bower Alberta Bradbury Carolyn Brodine Marilyn Braselton Dale Brownlee Bob Brubaker Benetta Brunkow Billie Io Brush Ie-an Buckingham Bob Burkhalter Harriet Cameron Logan Carlson Lynette Carlson Philip Carlson Patsy Carmodie Darold Cash Gail Cederoth Mary Ellen Chapman Barbara Christy Mary Cirimotich Constance Clapp Forrey Clay Arnold Clayton Harriet Cline Alfred Collopy Robert Collopy Kenney Cooper Bruce Cowan George Cridland Shirley Cunningham Bob Curran Marjorie Dahlstrom Donald Danforth Bob Dean Virginia Deal Ladonna Deming Bob Dilley Gloria DiPrima Paul Dixon Rose Marie Dixon Betty Dughman lim Dulaney Gladys Dupuy Louis Dysert Betty lane Eby Wallace Ehrenhardt Eugene Erickson Eugene Ferris Richard Firth Clarice Fleharty Edward Fletcher Helen Forsburg Audrey Foster Bill Frakes Raymond Franson Sylvia Freberg Robert Freese Richard Garrett Marilyn Gettemy Chuck Gibbs Eleanora Gibbs lean Gladtelter Doris Gladson George Glass Rodney Goff Robert Goudschaal Iusliug Wyliv jminfx an 11z'c'n.viug jingcr ax .mpbs un' flrmrvrl wills uxrirk. CLASS Early xpring sunrloim' l'Y!'t'!IX 1111 on Ihr barks of rvzvrul xlmlying xfmfvnls. SCPHCDMCRE Bill Graham Robert Green losephine Greenstreet Eugene Griffith Buck Grissinger Edward Gross Dorothy Gurnm Iuanita Hager Colleen Haggerty lack Hallas Betty Hallberg Bill Hallberg Lois Hampton Arlene Hallstrom Margaret Hardine Betty Harler Robert Harman Alice Haraldson Rodney Harris Patricia Harshbarger Charles Haussman Marjorie Hawthorne Maybelle Hayes Doris Hester Clark Highlander Lorraine Hill Virginia Hoaglund Betty Holcomb Wayne Hohl Iirnmie Holloway Paul Hoots Stanley Horton Dick Housel Dorothy Howard Bob Hoyt Gloria Hudson Arnold lmel Roberta Ingersoll Frances Ingram Catherine Iacobs Nora Iacohs Bettie Iohnson Charles Iohnson Earl Iohnson Lucretia Iohnson Phyllis Iohnson Virginia Iohnson Charles Keeling Mary Keene Patricia Kennedy lohn Kenney Mertie Alice Kepiord Marilyn Kipling Victor Kraft Donald Kuntz Charles Lafierty Shirley Lagerstrom Molly Larnpe lackie Landenberger Audrey Larson LaVerne Leaigreen Katherine Lee Bill Leibovitz Geraldine Lehman Doris Levenburg Marilyn Lindblorn Shirley Lindsey Marilyn Linner Leslie Long Billy Luker Bob Lundquist Bruce McClelland Carroll McClure Wayne McKinney lim McLaughlin Torn McLaughlin Lillian McNeil Mary lune McVey Victoria Maciel Don Marvin lack Masterson Mary Louise Mead Dorothy Mealrnan Betty Mercer Edna Mergenthaler Ianice Myers Donna Miller Elaine Miller Lena Miller Don Mills Esther Mitchell Marian Montgomery Torn Moran Margaret Morrow Clarence Murphey Evelyn Nape Margaret Ann Nelson Marjorie Nelson Broad smilvs and bvary bUllIL'll.'0l'k are rurriml lbmugli Ihr' mufb vnfrunrc fauurrl mlzrx um! hom:-. CLASS Wfbvlhrr il'.v a plug or a fwfr. lbrrv luzlx rlojw lo efixrzxxs "iff SCDPHCDMCDRE Richard Nelson Robert Nelson Marilyn Nuckolls Mary Louise Olson Mildred Orwiq Glenrose Pederson Alyce Peterson Bill Peterson Irene Peterson Mae Peterson lack Pihl lerry Pihl Kenneth Polk Phyllis Reed Bill Redfern Ioanne Reeves Mary Rentschler Wayne Richards Billy Robertson Alice Rodeffer Shirley Rosine Willard Rosine Robert Ross Esther Row Lillian Ryan Rosemary Sabol Kenneth Sallee Marilyn Sauter Anne Schenck 'Wanda Schwanlce Raymond Sedqwich lack Seyler Russell Sharp Wayne Sharp Norma Sheets Sophia Sherman Wylie Shimel Eugene Shipp Marjorie Shoff Lawrence Smith Donovan Spencer Iaclc Sperry Don Stables Mary Steqal Ioyce Stevens Margaret Stewart Carol Still Harold Stites Edward Stone Ifirsi yvar c5tIll'.tlIl1l'lQit,HIX join fbi' liozzwmzrziwig fmrudi' irilb a umrk lL'l'tltlf7Ig for Silzvr Slwufc NlIt't'l'XX. CLASS lirn Stout Ed Straus Marvin Strickler Helen Suydarn Iohn Swanson Shirlee Swanson Virginia Swartzbaugh , George Thayer Eloise Thompson Dick Thompson Mary Louise Tinkham Carol Tourtellott Eleanor Tracy Donna Lee Tut? Howard Upp Gertrude Van Drunien Esther Venlund Bill Wake Mary Ann Wallace lack Wallrich Gertrude Ward Mariorie Watson Robert Watson Marilyn Ethus Watters Ted Webber lean Weinberg Hugh Weir, lr. Warren Werner Lois West Mary Louise Westberg Vergene Whalin Betty Io White Hugh White Don Williams Alice Wilmot Don Wilson Kathryn Wilson Martie Winters Ned Wetherbee Phyllis Witherell Betty Woll Harriet Wood Kenneth Woodson Geraldine Vtfoolsey Marilynn Woolsey Louis Worrnan Everett Wright lanet Wynn DeWitt York loan Zelcles Arthur Zuiclema Tl-IE CLASS CF 1944 Like an anxious athlete waiting for the crack of the starter's gun, the soph- omore class had anticipated the l94l school year. Although all had come from different junior highs, they had a common goal for which to strive-rec- cognition by the upper classmen. Now they are a blend of the aloof superiority of the seniors and the humbleness of the middle men-the juniors. As if to make up for lost time in getting acquainted with good old G.H.S., the pony football team captured its first victory and went on to chalk up ninety-six points against their opponents' thirty-one. To climax a very suc- cessful season, they won a thirty-eight to nothing victory over Monmouth. The pony basketball team, by fast dribbling and fancy footwork, marked down its first game in the win column, and continuing in its winning ways, it easily annexed the sophomore Northwest Conference title by capturing their last six straight games. Swimmers and wrestlers of varsity ability ap- peared in the first year class. The tennis, track, and baseball teams were flanked with next year's varsity players. Many are the honors classmen have won in the band, orchestra, choir, declam, and debate. Dancers, pianists, singers, and dramatists from the soph- omore class held spotlight positions in the Reflectavue, the Fourth R, and all-school assemblies. Accepting their responsibilities as full-fledged high school students, a large number of sophomores entered whole-heartedly into the many and varied activities of the Student Council, Girls' Service League, and Boys' Forum. They served on different committees of these organizations and are now old veterans at putting things across. Sophomores' names dotted the Budget staff, serving as reporters, feature writers, and cubs. No game, football or basketball, would be complete without the flagswing- ers and baton twirlers, More than half of these groups this year were sophomores. Another indispensible factor at the games was our energetic cheerleaders, well-represented by four sophomores. There you have it! Athletes, musicians, actors, writers, twirlers, leaders. The sophomore class has them all! And, as juniors next year, the class of '44 will carry on with its usual vim and vigor. Helen Barrow Clark Highlander Sophomore Reflector Apprentices ,. ,, ,.,.,. J -,.. . ,. v - W. .M '- 4 v 1- -' 43' v A Q :Wm ,ig k V - 44. .QL,-,'.,.qa..y., u., 1, 2:5 ,My ,V fb ,wg 1, v--,WA , f jilqr, . , J, -: J 5 , . H , -, ,Y nw, 15 Wi, 1,23 H .,.q,r, .f- ,- . 44, -V -' Q-rgxgff . ' ' - P Joi?-56 J 1,f7'f'sEiE3v f' 51 1fw, - J'u'l.? .f, ff' ' - 1' .- :vw f' 4 X J, 1 "Sf "'W"'f:'4"?EfT34IiJfm Jw 1 ' :kj r,'1,?f.' ' -- f 1 , v , - Qiffii :: 5 Q12 r: :Qi . , f5:1:.g3ff - ifiiffi fqjg i MQ t , . , :fl ss -T125-1 J'::L.'?:f1 A 5,"f1JT-Z 'Q Pqzem.. v lkysfrlfii ." ,.',!i'fL- -kffigaie '.U:J,' 'Z 'di fffvlf 3f'.i'?'!'E?'1 .3573 4 3, gl .1 3 A a gm 'S 1 'I ,, , u mg QS? .5 f ,QFKQY T .' Lffff we L, ' 542, Q 7!f?f:ff: f51 li-Tia 35 . ,. 5 f, -3 ffga 1 gg. Qi L N'-fl! 31' 2 P, ' K Q42 g1'?:ff3' 721 . 5 2351 .,- QM W . 4, Hx . 1 , - .f,...: .1 ' H' ?yi'kF9f i 14 : .N , T'-Q.. f' if L f'i?9,..:- A OFTILTIYS Cur legislative body at Galesburg l-ligh, the Student Council, was again instru- mental in iurthering the de- sires ot the student body in matters concerning school ad- ministration. Many projects oi importance were undertak- en this year by the group. The season ot iootball brought a new feature in the form oi a homecoming cele- bration, which included a pa- rade, a bonfire, and a dance for alumni and students. For the iirst time the Council ac- ted as host to the District Stu- dent Council Convention. Iack Cecil serving as pres- ident was assisted by Ioe Fair- bairn, vice-president, Rose- mary Swanson, secretary, and Squirt Grogan, treasurer. The sponsors were Miss Alice Iones and Mr. Prank Snyder. Top Photo Row lt M. I. Fish, B. Anglnnrl, H. Sowder, S. Wallace, Row 2: D. Panther, S. Clendenin, K. Holloway: Row lt: I. Cecil, T. Doyle, I. Gilson. Second Photo Row l: R. Goff, D. Miller, B. Barnes, I. Zr-lcles: Row 2: I. Wynn, D. Firth, S. Swanson, VV. Shirnvlg Row 3: K. Cooper, M. linner, V. Kraft, B. Freese. Third Photo How li B. Iohnsun, I. Fairbairn, B. Swarthout, R. Swanson, ll. Holrrrquisty Row 7: Cv. Nelson, T. Poole, R. Lundeen, A. Parks, Row 3: T. lorclan, D. Champion, B. Grogan, G. Richardson. Lowest Photo Row l: S. Way, I. Hawkinson, H. Maxwell, H. Dunkleg Row 2: B. Doyle, H. Mureen, I. Gilahs, G. Fishhnrng Row 3: D. Hoitnian, I. Shoif, B. Davis, E. Rogers. Eil GALESBURC CHAPTER CF Thirty-one Seniors and Eighteen Iuniors Honored at Induction Assembly Row One: Bob Anglund, loanne Bower, Ioyce Bower, Bob Brodine, Marilyn Carlson, lack Cecil, Elizabeth Church, Ken- neth Clausen, Shirley Clendenin, lames Crawford, Marjorie Dixon, Tom Doyle, Mary lane Dughman. Bow Two: Helen Dunkle, Joe Eairhairn, Mary lane Fish, Dorothy Freberg, Albert Gilson, Sguirt Grcgan, lrma Haggenjos, Dorothy Hamblin, Glenna Herron, Mary lane Hillier, Keith Holloway, Marilyn Holloway, Helen I. Holrnquist. Bow Three: Marthella Howell, Les lohnson, Ioan Kelly, Beverly Lee, Hollis Lindgren, Florence Lowe, Ieanne Lowe, Rosemary Lundeen, Edgar Luttrell, Shirley Lutterell, Alan McClelland, Earl Maxwell, Glenn Nelson. Row Pour: Vane-ce Nelson, Kayo Norris, Edie Northrup, Peggy Pennington, Marilyn Peterson, Max Peterson, Shirley Perardi, Iacquelyn Potts, Gordon Robertson, Eugene Rogers, Shirley Sandeen, Gene Schwilk, Betty Seaburg, Row Five: Dick Spehr, Helen Sowder, Shirley Smith, Wanda Stairwalt, Rosemary Swanson, Badah Telford, George Thomp- son, Martha Tracy, Hendrik Van Vliet, Sarah Wallace, Shirley Way, Zfe Anne VVinters, Shirley Woolsey. NATICNAI. t-ICNCR SCCIETY A ceremony not soon forgotten by most students who witness it is -the annual National Honor Society induction. Being elected is the fulfillment of many a student's dream. For many seniors it is the climax of three years of striving toward the highest goal set by our school. luniors elected feel the weight of their responsibility to carry the torch in active participation during their senior year. Active members this year chose Max Peterson, president, Kenneth Clausen, vice-president, Shirley Way, secretary, and lim Crawford, treasurer. Besides their regular meetings, the Society engaged in many activities. Chief among these was the handling of the school assemblies. Something new was introduced this year when the schools in the Northwest Conference exchanged assembly programs which yielded both entertainment and exper- ience to our students. Members of the Society also combined their efforts with those of the advanced bookkeeping class to promote the sale of National Victory Bonds and Stamps. Their chief social function was the banquet held at the Galesburg Club, April 30. An organization that strives to give every Galesburg High girl an opportunity to Work successfully with others by the development of effective personalities is the Girls' Service League. lts advisors were Miss Alice Iones, Miss Ruth Stickle, and Miss Naomi Larson. During a year filled with Friday assemblies, happy social hours, special committee meetings, and the annual spring banquet, the League fulfilled its purpose of enlarging the four-fold life. Many girls who performed Well their duties in connection with GSL were honored by "We Salute," a special bulletin-board description of their activities new to the organiza- tion this year. Acting in official capacities were Sarah Wallace, president, Mary lane l-lillier, vice-presidentg Marcia Nelson, secretary, and Hollis Lind- -gren, treasurer. The Officers 'lhe Leagues Induction Committee GIRLS' SERVICE LEAGUE The Advisors Sophomore . . . junior Senior C b t 64 Sophomore The Officers The Advisors BOYS' FORUM A Group Sponsored By The Forum Discusses Occupational Interests With "free membership for all boys" as the slogan, the Boys' Forum provided this year op- tional membership to all Gales- burg High fellows. One representative from each advisory helped to make up the cabinet. This group of boys, forty in number, functioned on four separate committees, Whose executive heads Were Tom Doyle, presidentg Max Peterson, vice-president, Squirt Grogan, secretaryp and Ioe Fairbairn, treasurer. ln a school-Wide survey, boys were asked to name their occu- pational interests to enable the Forum to place emphasis upon the proper vocational guidance. Community agents were invited to speak to groups of boys to make these interests more mean- ingful and real. Mr. Charles Bednar, Mr. Frank Snyder, Mr. Herbert Bean, and Mr. Iohn Griffith guided the boys in advisory capacities. GAI.ESBLlRG'S Our school newspaper, the Budget, is a book made up of many interesting chap- ters. lt has constantly endeavored to keep pace with the countless activities of the school, to give equal representation to all school groups, and to strive for a courteous, friendly feeling within and outside the boundaries of our institution. The l94l-l942 Budget was much irn- proved by new type, interesting features, and the "Scholastic Roto" section. By the latter addition, we were able to become pictorially acquainted in the works and activities of other United States schools. F ine ratings have been given this newspaper in forrner years, this year's rank should surpass all those hitherto received. ' Bob Anglund Editor-in-Chief THE BUDGET Published weekly during the school year by the students of the Galesburg Senior High School. Subscription price-551.00 a year. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office of Galesburg, lllinois, under the act of October 3, l9l7, authorized October 7, l922. mmm -mf' i 'wfifnsswwl Makeup Editors McClelland And Dughman Plan Next Week's Issue With Advertising Manager Bonesteel And Business Manager Dunkle Left: Department Editors Woolsey, Metcalf, Lowe, Billings And Kelly Check Deadline Stories Right: Special Editors Church, Nelson And Fish Find Files A Source For New Ideas 66 BUDGFT Under the outstanding leadership of Bob Anglund as editor-in-chief and Helen Dunkle as business manager, the Budget staff composed of the reporters, typists, and mechanical staff, are to be complimented on their successful publishing of their lQ4l- l942 volume. The patience, helpfulness and good will of their advisors, Miss Keach and Mr. Damberg, contributed in a large meas- ure to the paper's progress. We will long remember the Budget and its hot dogs at the "Budget's Last Stand" on Lombard field, its colorful Yuletide release, its rollicking April Fool is- sue, its patriotic notes and its good humor. A vital part of our school organization, the Budget has offered to many the opportunity of expression through the pen. Mr. Damberq Miss Keach Top Bow: Adolphson, Barnes, Becker, Bow- er, Brooks. Second: Clausen, Cline, Cooper Duncan, Fletcher, Forstrom, Freberg, Gross man. Third: Haggenjos, Harler, Herman, Herron, Holloway, Iohnson, Lowe, Luttrell Fourth: Mergetnthaler, Pearson, Perardi, Rich ardson, Robertson, Rodeffer, Stambaugh Thompson. Fifth: Uhlmann, Weir, West Willer, Winters, Wynn, Yarde, Zelcles. Tl-IE 1942 STAFF A r Advisor Vander Beek And Art Assistant Editor Lee Helps Director Matlack Discuss Prob- Editor-in-Chief Sowder With A lems. Heavy Load Long hours of hard work, but happy ones, were spent by the twenty- seven staff members who have tried to make the thirty-fifth edition of the Reflector the proverbial "bigger and better" one. Under the splendid leadership of Mr. Howard Vander Beek, we have had a worthwhile year working together. Miss Laura Matlack has been our helpful art critic, Helen Sowder our very efficient editor-in-chief, and Kayo Norris, our business manager. Much credit goes to Frances DiPrirna and Bob Luvall for their art work and to Shirley Smith for her help in managing the finances in the capacity of business secretary. Reflectorians Nelson, Doyle, Planners Gustafson, Sandeen, Copyreader Thompson Checks Peterson And Swisegood Holloway And Cooley Sketch Over Material Submitted By Check Assignments New Layouts Bower And Bower QF TI-IE RFFIFCTGR Money Man Norris Checks Artists DiPrima And Luvall Reflector Lucre With Business Work TOQS-ther OI1Ths BOOk'S Secretary Smith Artistic Detail Many were the money-making projects entered into with much enthu- siasm by the yearbook staff. Matinee dances, the candy counter in the hall, the Reilectavue, the trigies and bars at the basketball games were only a few ot the group's business responsibilities. Highlight of the social season was the Budget-Reflector Victory Prom on April l8, one ot the season's prettiest parties. A hayride and a spring picnic brought unified spirit to the organization. So has the l942 staff prepared for you a book to keep as a souvenir ot this year at GHS. lt hopes that as the years go on the book Will gain Value to you. Typists Lohmar And Turpin Camera-clickers Barstow, Young Deadline-beaters Potts, Pen- Prepare Announcements For And Bivens Set Photo Equip- nington, Freberg and Carlson Hillier And Northrup To Post ment In Order Check The Pix 69 X l f, X 'ff .X ...Q . X mm. S. A A "So much from so little" rings true to the letter, for from what so small as the Student Activity Association membership book can you receive so much pleas- ure? No Galesburg High School student could afford not to join this yearg it would have meant that he was losing money had he not become a member. Imagine buying a separate ticket every time you attended a football or basketball game, a play or a pay assembly program. l-low you would have missed re- ceiving both the school publica- tions the cheaper Way. Small reason Why anyone should not take the opportunity to join this Worthwhile organization. Mr. T. V. Brooking again filled the faculty chair with the com- mittee composed of loe Fair- bairn, chairman, Dorothy lordan, and Hendrick Van Vliet. ,Kaiba Mr. T. V. Brooking, Hendrick Van Vliet, Dorothy Iordan, and Joe Fairbairn TI-IE FCDUIQTH R The Camera Catches A Seldom-sobers faced Bob Anglund And His Cofchair- man lrrna Haggenjos Polishing Up A Radio Script Under the vigilance of Miss Marjorie Babbitt and with the sincere in- terests of the active co-chairmen, Irma I-laggenjos and Bob Anglund, the Fourth B staff has this year successfully presented for the listening pleasure of students and GHS followers programs of great variety. Drama with patriotic and holiday themes, comedy featuring witty students, and music by each of the musical departments have all been featured this year. Sneak previews of GHS stage productions were an innovation. As the outstanding broadcast of the year, the staff presented its an- nual hour Fourth B Program on May l5 direct from the high school audi- torium With the student body as part of the listening and participating audience. . Ether-artist Haggenjos Signals As Barnes, Crid- land And Mergenthaler Clear Their Throats For "Galesburg High School ls On The Air!" 6 ATTEN T ION 5?- Q0 SVN: A yjfx W REF GLUHHFBED HE ennmoeun OF AN EXTRAVAGANZA T UNDER THE BIG TOP WAS BROUGHT TO HUGE AuDnzNcE3 5EATEovN THE 5n.EAcHans or me C-LH-S.AUO!TOR1UM ON FEB.25-26. rue mrvsmnsrea. Rfr LtcToR,ANo THE STAR OF THE HQPPODROME, GUNGER TYLER,WERE Ponrmwao ax' CLARK HQGHLANDER HND 'SHURLLY GRe1'Tf5,RE5PEcvuv:LY. i Revnescmmizve or THE uNu5uAL TALENT WERE THE 2nPPvNG ZEBRA5, BATON L YWQRLER3,AQROBAT5,AND rmosns. Fm-ou? A Q f N476 My 'LDP 'N I6-6 "e ,O ROMANTIC Q f -.J 7 , 2 X . .ff 4192 .ff I gf I' K V xN X 1 . 4, 51 r M if ff f I eg LECTUBR 'S CIRCUS 6 L , , '- 1" ' " I-Z-3-4--CONG'--A NOTE J' EXPRESSION -V Av ff I Z-il-A u fi is K fi 'z XSS L X5 Q33 , FK 55' lb. .5331 sX'S35'S"A',"9"'3!xx 5, f 11 G . x Y J J yToo, ALL SCI-ICDCDL PLAY "You Can't Talce it With You", a fast-moving comedy by Moss Hart and George Kaufman, opened the year's schedule of plays under Mr. Wallace Blazelds direction. The plot centered on the difficulties of two young lovers, but the charm of the play lay in the personalities of the Sycamore family and their friends. Their strange activities brought many laughs to the Galesburg audiences as they did in the Broadway and Holly- wood productions. Bob Anglund in the role of the wise- cracking and clever Grandpa Vander- hof, Paul Larsen characterizing Boris Kolenhov, the Russian ballet teacher, Anne McClanahan as Essie, and Dick Iensen in the role of Mr. Kirby, were only a few of the exceptionally large cast who gave life to the play. Tt-IE VCDUNCEEST Phillip Barry's three-act comedy, "The Young- est", revolving around Richard, the youngest of the domineering Winslow family, was the second of the dramatic department plays. lt played to an interested, one-night audience on December third. Oliver and Mark, older Winslow brothers por- Washing For Cues trayed by Bob Peterson and Gale Witherell, con- trolled the family's pin factory, all the money, and -Richard, convincingly played by Bill Pritchard, a junior. Only the entrance of the heroine, Nancy Blake, a charming busybody im- personated by Lorraine james, could assist in the remedying of the deplorable situation. With her collaboration and the assistance of his lawyer, poor Richard came out victorious, able to assert himself and to turn upon his oppressors in such a manner that made the comedy one typical of American life. Director of the fast-moving drama was Mr. Wallace Blazek of the speech department. Members of the junior class for the most part took roles in the play and took charge of all back-stage work. af The audience will remember as a contributing factor to the drama the colorful stage settings of the spacious Winslow mansion, designed by a junior, Winifred Swal- low, and constructed by members of the art department under the direction of Miss Laura Matlack, art director. Richard Pleads With The Family For Equal Rights The Family Portrait Under Gramp's Portrait 75 A Family Reunion Filled With Trials And Tribulations Tl-IE GREEN VINE "Can't you understand?" The new curtains on the stage of the Galesburg l-ligh School auditorium parted on the evening of March 27 to present the senior class play, "The Green Vine," a whimsical comedy by Nan Bagby Stevens. The cast, taking final bows on the high school stage, were introduced as they returned to the Green Vine, the old home- stead of the late George Brand, to try to find his money, some with the desire to use it to remake their broken fortunes. While relatives and friends of Cousin George Brand were searching for the hid- den money, Cousin George returned from the spirit world to control the destinies of the money seekers and was safe in his invisibility to say and do the amusing things necessary to make them see the folly of their ways. A letter of fate disclosed to the Brands that each one's share was left in the village bank. lt was then that George Brand in the spirit realized that his faith in the Green Vine had been well-founded. George Thompson, who stepped into the title role two days before the play be- cause of an emergency, was ably assisted by a cast composed of Gale Witherell, Shirley Peterson, Dorothy l-lamblin, Kayo Norris, Anne lVlcClanahan, lrma Haggen- jos, Eugene Mott, leanne Lowe, and Bichard Hoffman. Mr. Blazek directed. C ches Elazek And Anderson SPEECH comtrsts The Speech Squad. Front Row: M. Duncan, B. Hogan, M. I. Herman, B, Cl rne Par s ar e re u e dcock a en'os Back Row . .,. ,. ,. ,. ,. .. I E A k E Y d I T kb I A I H gg I Larson, S. Perardi, M. Nelson, D. Stambaugh, M. Nelson, A. McClanahan I Fy Z V t r mire, . v'iners, Iohn l-luston's "The Strange Road" was the GHS entry in the state contest this year. The cast traveled to Macomb with their director, Mr. Blazelc, where they received a class-B rating. Again top honors Went to the declam team of GHS under Miss Hazel An- derson's excellent coaching. After having Won second and seventh places respectively at Davenport, Irma Haggenjos and Marjorie Duncan became eligible for the district contest at Monmouth. There, lrma captured first place for her dramatic readingg Marjorie won second place in verse reading. Irma was, therefore, qualified to compete in the finals at Champaign in mid-April. We were well-represented in "Extemp" by Zoe Anne Winters, who Went to the state finals. Gene Schwilck tied for second place in the Northwest Con- ference, While Anna Weir served as alternate. Contest Players ln "The Strange Road" St d g---M. Bird, R. Barnes, M. Vfinters, M. Nelso S t d I. Alhro, D. Firth, B. Peterson. Herbert B n in St d g H. I. Holmquist, H. Burkhalter, G. S h l lc Trac C wio , D, Firth, A. Adolphson. Seated --L. Rainey, M, I. Fish, y Z A W t s I AdCock,C.Ar1dersor1, DEBATE While debating the timely question, "Resolved: that every able-bodied male cit- izen of the United States should have one year of full-time military training," the stellar GHS orators made a very creditable record for themselves under the able lead- ership of Coach Herbert Bean. ln the Northwest Conference tourna- ment at East Moline, the debaters argued their way into fourth place, as the negative team earned the unique honor of Winning all five of their debates. ln December, Galesburg again played host to eighteen schools at the third annual debate tourna- ment held here. ln the spring of the year, GHS entered the two-day Augustana tour- nament, where our team placed fifth in a large field of twenty-eight schools. The sophomore debate squad, also directed by Coach Bean, participated in several debates, and its members have proven themselves to be valuable as poten- tial varsity material. TI-IE A CAPPELLA CHCIR The well-blended voices of forty-eight Galesburg High School students came together this year in the form of the a cappella choir, an organization which reached its goal toward perfection only after many hard and cooperative rehearsals. Mr. Donald Chlsen, a new member of the music department, has spent countless hours with the group as its director. Many were the appearances of the popular group in the eyes of the student body and the public. lt appeared frequently in junior highs and in our own school. Knox College students enjoyed a half hour chapel program, various churches and social groups requested its appearancey it sang for Governor Green at the Galesburg Club early in February. During several occasions it has been able to come in contact with other musi- cal groups. Cn February twenty-first, it played co-host with the band to the district music festival, on May eighth, the Music Festival was held in Steele Gym. During the baccalaureate services, the choir made its last appearance, and anxious lower classmen wish for the opportunity to fill the vacancies left by the seniors. Climaxing the innumerable activities of this body of singers was the formal dinner-dance late in the year held at the Galesburg Club. The end of another successful music-filled year had come. Top Bow: I. Sperry, L. Peterson, B. Hallberg, B. Burkhalter, I. Cline, I. Doyle, R. Peterson, R. Lindsey, K. Cooper, P. Lar- sen, B. Anglund, K. Polk. Third Row: C. Bledsoe, G. Camper, I. Albro, B. Goad, H. Van Vliet, B. Hoffman, S. Gretta, L. Worman, B. Wake, B. Swan- son, D. Kiernan, I. Sharp. Second Row: I. Lowe, F. Lowe, R. Lundeen, D. Stambaugh, E. Yarde, D. Sharp, M. Lampe, D. L. Iohnson, M. I. Herman, M. A. Wallace, M. Cooley, S. Burford, V. Harman, I. Eddy. First Bow: I. Rudolf, M. Tracy, L. Van Antwerp, A. B. Cordell, S. Riqgle, Mr. Ohlsen, I. Bower, N. Harris, M. Osborn, L. Kemp, Io Bower, B. Yarde. MUSICAL GRCDUPS Front Bow: D. Starnbaugh, L. Van Antwerp, R. Rodich, S. Gretta, D. Sharp, N. Harris, A. Cordell, D. Iohnson, M. Wallace, Shirley Biggle. Second Row: A. Ling, B. Lundeen, I. Rudolf, E. Yarde, B. Swarthout, I. Bower, F. Lowe, I. Eddy, Io Bower, B. Swarthout, A. Leiber, M. Osborne, L. Kemp. Back Bow: B. Slader, I. Hand, E. Olin, M. Ehlen, B. Elliclcson, B. Morrison, D. Tornquist, M. Cooley, I. Bower, V. Harman, S. Burforcl, D. Harnblin, B. Telford, D. Hand, V. Blust, M. Lampe. Forty feminine songbirds have rnet this year to produce the Girls' Glee Club, an organization which has Worked on the many difficult and beautiful arrangements that have been presented throughout the school year. Although their appearances have been few, the school body has been Well aware of their presence. The girls' sextette, of which the music department is justly proud, has won the district and sectional contest. This group was organized with the idea of hard, outside practices and has received from its Work much deserved praise. The octette, consisting of four girls' i. Davie, P. Larsen. and four boys' voices, has placed first in their contest feats. Their public and radio programs have been frequent. The boys' guartette, a recently-de- veloped group, has won much admira- tion from social groups for its clever presentations of semi-popular arrange- ments of Well-known songs. Boys' Ouartette: E. Camper, B. l-lallberg, Girls' Sextette: I. Bower, B. Lundeen, I. Lowe, D. Stambaugh, I. Bower, M. A. Wallace. Mixed Octette: N. Har- ris, M. Osborne, A. Cordell, F. Iohnson, B. Goad, L. Van Antwerp, I. Doyle, R. Lindsey. MUSICAL MCDCDDS The operetta of former years was replaced on lanuary twenty-ninth by "Musical Moods," a tour-part presentation by the vocal students ot the music department. Songs both old and new and a student-written script were combined tor a full evening show. Appealing to various moods, the parts of the production were entitled "We Worship," depicting a miniature church service, "loe College," weaving in clever college music, "Deep South," filled with songs of the Southern plantation, and "l Hear America Singing," an especially apropos rendition of music stirring to patriotic Americans. By such a production, our music department is breaking away from old procedures and giving vent to the demand for pupil-planned productions, a scheme adopted by many lead- ing schools. Mr. Donald Ohlsen produced this outstanding entertainment, and Miss Laura Matlack directed the artistic settings which lent color to the moods. "We Worship" D ",loe College" 'D p S th CRC!-IESTRA Again this year, our orchestra has been an extremely busy and popular organiza- tion. On November 9, the orchestra played in the church program for National Education Week, and on November l3 it furnished the entertainment for the P. T. A. open house. lt played at the Student Council District Convention which was held in Galesburg, entertained the Women's Club in the Cus- ter Hotel, and played for the Honor Society induction. The orchestra's last appearance was an impressive one in the baccalaureate services. lts many successful appearances showed the fine leadership by Mr. Edwin Lantz. Cn page eighty-four is evidence of the ability of many individual members of the orchestra. Several of the groups won high ratings at the district and sectional contests and some of these qualified for the state. In early spring, the orchestra won a first division rating in the sectional contest in A dignified leader and an inter- esting instructor, Mr. Edwin Lantz wielded the baton as head of the music department. Not only did his. musical organizations delightfully entertain us, but on rare occasions. his fine singing brought audience. Peoria which entitled the group to enter delight- the state competition. First Row: G, Schwilclc, I. Eddy, E. White, V. Ward, R. Stites, B. Seaburg, E. Mathias. Second Row: H. Cline, B. Bloomberg, B. Dughman, I. Bogren, H. Holmquist, M. Peterson, M. I. Dughman, R. Firth, E. Swanson B. Dutton, B. Barnes, B. I. Brush. Third Row: B. Walters, W. Rosine, D. Carlson, H. Gillette, C. Baker, B. Baldwin, P. Ransom, P. Younqren, O. Binge, E. Culver, A. Adolphson, L. Peterson, L. D. Deming, N. Stigner, P. Watson. Fourth Row: Mr. Lantz, E. Church, B. McCants, B. Berry. BAND On numerous occasions -- football, basketball, parades, and assembliesethe flashy, uniformed musicians of the GHS band did their part to add pep to the scene. They added warmth at the chilly football games, at basketball games they brought cheer and encouragementg at parades the sixty-seven members march- T ed in military precisiony and at assem- "Band At-ten-TlON!" blies this popular group under the direc- tion of Mr. Edwin Lantz inspired every listener. lt, with the choir, was host to the district music contest, February 21, where several members of our band Won first places. Those who placed in this and other contests are pictured on page eighty-four. A colorful group is the band which on so many occasions has added fine enter- tainment to numerous programs. Starting at Bottom, Left: B. Dutton, G. Boone, M. I. Dughman, B. McCants, E. Church, I. Brown, Mr. Lantz, B. Barnes, C. Sutton, B. Peterson, H. Holmquist, M. Hawthorne, M. Peterson, S. Sandeen. Second Bow: B. Yelm, B. Lindrotli, M. Hinebaugh, B. Palmgren, B. Goff, Pt. M. Dixon, L. Hampton, D. McNaught, B. Bar Stow, I. Haight, W. Werner, T. Poole, V, Beavy. Third Bow: P. Watson, N. Stfgner, F. Steller, E. Culver, B. Luvall, O. Binge, M. Richards, B. Dilly, B. Walters, G, Crid- land, I. Craig, E. Hager. Fourth Bow: M. Winters, I. West, W. Schwanke, I. Stout, I, Donelson, M. Bentschler, B. Cates, C. Marquith, D. Finley B. Stoerzbach, V. Clay. Fifth Bow: G. Powers, P. Bansom, P. Youngren, M. Strader, A. Adolphson, E. Meyer, B. Butler, K. Burke, K. Mgulton, Sixth Bow: W. Sanford, B. Neilson, L. Peterson, Q. Sharp. 83 1 MUSIC WINNERS The string guartette composed of Gene Schwilck, Harriett Cline, Alberta Trulock and Ruth Stites won a first place rating in the sectional contest. t t Orchestra representatives chosen by Mr. Edwin Lantz to take part in the all-state orchestra were Pauline Watson, bass viol, and Ioan Eddy, violin. First Photo: The success of the French horn guartette at the district and sectional contests entitled Dick Powers, Martie Winters, Phyllis Ransom and Pat Youngren to enter state competition. Second Photo: Mary lane Dugh- man, Earl Mathias and Gene Schwilck won first places in district competition. At the sectional contest Earl won a first place which qualified him for state. Third Photo: The winning brass sextette group was composed of Warren Sanford, Bob Butler, Mary Rentschler, Dick Powers, Oma Binge and Earl Culver. Choir leaders all over the state chose rep- resentatives of their groups to sing in the all- state choir. Dale Rowen, lim Doyle, Ioyce Bower, leanne Lowe, Lugene Van Antwerp and Paul Larson were recommended to par- ticipate. Rosemary Lundeen, piano, Bob Lindsey, bass, Lugene Van Antwerp, girls' medium, leanne Lowe, girls' high, Dorothy Stambaugh, girls' high, Naomi l-larris, girls' low, Paul Larson, baritone, were individual champions at the district and sectional music contests. 84 .1 X - ATHLETICS FOOTBALL AT C. H. S WINS AND LOSSES NORTHWEST CONFERENCE Galesburq ............ 6 East Moline ........ 6 Galesburq ............ O Moline .................. O Galesburq ............ U Rock Island ........ l3 Galesburq ............ l3 Kewanee .............. l2 Galesburq ............ 28 Monmouth .......... 7 lLLlNl CONFERENCE Galesburq ............ 33 Woodruff .............. U Galesburq ............ 13 Kewanee .............. l2 Galeslourq ............ O Canton ....... ....... O NON-CONFERENCE Galesburq ............ 38 Galva .................... O Galesburq ............ 27 Macomb ................ O ,'lo f t"t' O 87 sir 4-ll hit U i NO 88 TACK!-E GUARD GINTER GUARD TACKLE IND it ,Sis Q an it quasvhasnc we HAl,BA,K 1 nALFsAcN np FULLOACK I, Gilson, D. Thorsen, K. Holloway, L. Iohnson, I. Ponce, R. Cam- eron, H. Hatch, I. Bowles, L. Webber, G. Thompson, P. Gustafson. VARSITY CCAC!-IES Here's Mr. Ross Anderson, from whose creative mind have come the plays, schemes, and dark Wizardry which propelled the Silver Streaks' football team to victory. He capably led his squad to its first place in the Northwest Conference. A graduate of Illinois Wesleyan, with a fine career of coaching behind him at Kewanee High before Galesburg lured him here, he has directed the expanding athletic program for the boys of the Galesburg schools. Look Who's next! It's Mr. Arthur Fish of Springfield, a truly fine performer in his allotted task of developing the Galesburg High School football reserves, as Well as coach- ing the swimming and Wrestling teams. He served very efficiently at Oquawka before coming here. His addition to the coaching staff in Galesburg High is a fortunate one. f K 5. f K' ' Q ' 9 C f 4' H if Q QLMA 5 'l "Q, fs I! Back Row: G. Thierry, D. Camper, I. Ward, I. Higareda, B. Wiese, l. Donaldson, W. Strickler, D. Underwood, C. Fifield, A. Cook, H. Ling, B. Brunkow. Third Row: Coach Fish, Coach Anderson, I. Stoneking, D. Ewing, A. Herrington, D. Wright, C. Bond, H. Hatch, D. Kendrick, G. Thompson, K. Iohnson, l. Tolle, L. Booten, B. Grogan, F. Reed, E. Rogers, Second Bow: B. Peterson, L. Webber, B. Stoneking, R. Cameron, I. Ponce, L. Iohnson, K. Holloway, D. Thorsen, I. Gilson, P. Gustafson, I. Bowles, B. Lindeen. Front Row: D. Carlson, B. Lindsey, A. Beams, B. Portlock, C. Wetherbee. THE VARSITY SQUAD With great pride Galesburg points to its football aggregation of l942. This year typified the ideals of any athletic group: companionship, sportsmanship and the will to work hard for something greatly desired. A spectacular record shows that the Varsity boys won every game except a thirteen to twelve loss to Bock lslandg three games were ties. By defeating Woodruff, playing Canton to a tie and smashing Kewanee, Galesburg captured top awards in the new Illini Conference. The Kewanee game was the deciding point of the season and this Galesburg win placed us second in the Northwest Conference. As ten men of the 1942 team turn in their football regalia and bid farewell to Lombard Field, they retain memories of games in the mud, playing under lights, parades of the bands and baton twirlers, and the applause of fans and the student body. The Boys Get ln A l-luddle . . . . . To Muddle The Opponents Play THE PCDNY SQUAD PONY FCDOTBALI. SCCDRES Galesburq Kewanee ,,,.,,,,,,.,,,,,,..,,,,,,,.,,,.,,, O Galesburq Canton ............ .......,, O Galesburq Rock Island ....... ......... l 8 Galesburq Moline ,,,,,,,.,,..,, ,,A,,,,,, l 3 Galesburq East Moline .....,,. ,.,,..,,. O Galesburq Monmouth ...... ...,,.,.. 0 CCDNFERENCE STANDINGS RTHWEST Th Fellows Who Will Fill The Varsity Sh Rock Island Galeslourq Kewanee East Moline Moline Monmouth lLLlNl Galesburq Peoria Woodruff Peoria Manual Canton TI-IE FUTURE VARSITY Taking, raw material and transforming it into a unified group of boys with a useful knowledge of the fundamentals of football are the jobs of Coaches Phillips and Aitchison. The experience the boys get from play- ing on the pony squad is the thing that makes for a successful varsity team. Therefore, the fact that the ponies did not Win all their games this season does not signify that their year was not a profitable one. On the contrary, these sophomores became hard blockers and vicious tacklers, and, probably most important, they learned to pull together with the suc- cess of the Whole team in mind rather than individual glory. Mr. Phillips' way with boys and his sincere interest in their athletic development and Mr. Aitchison's keen observance coupled with an ability to prescribe individual help made a fine combination of coaching to strengthen the team. To the remaining varsity squad, We give a word of warning: These boys have learned what it takes to play football and are prepared to do their best to make first string positions on next year's team. Coaches Phillips A d At his n Ponies Champ At The Bit Ready For The Stampede RUSSELL FOX Many a losinq score was tied by i'Red's" playing, either from center or forward position. IUNIOR GILSON , When "fight" was lacking, he supplie abundantly from his center posiiion. TOM DOYLE No one could block Tom's hiqh handed shot from right forward. left- I BOB "ffPQf5C?' 1J'v'1:kTSQN 3VfFf'ii?lOSS CNF? Sfscfecj were i:mitrik::utQd by "D:ir"' wimihcir he phyghd guard Gr BOE "Sf:3UiRT" GROGAN for wand, Clever hai?-haridiirxq and specftacula shots typified ihis guards style. 'IWHO if-afskf-t S09YTZOd ic be A mcmqn -sf if xv 5 T K x v .. QE "- J , x.,.,A KEITH HOLLOWAY Clean play and pluckirxess were dis- played when this forward and guard weni into the qame. - ,,, f . , , W 1- QQ TED IORDAN VVho swished that one? Iordan? Wlzy, he wasxft even near the baske1! KENNETH CLAUSEN We lost count of the baskets "Spider" kept the oppouenis from making. ITUANE "DEWEY" VVRIGHT dravwixzcg thew ball riqizi from his hands. PHXLI IP LCE EL H1112 SS Kid UTP I T14 ci I OTE: SCOT C52 1. fr uri in w ing pQir1is for this Smal? quam. 91, ,ww at G.H.S. D ing Mentor Gerald Phill p y he has coached many hasketlo ll h b ll d i tb ll t to remarkable victories. 1-hs squad h won one-hund d qhiy t i two-hundr d fifty-four qamesy four of his t h q t UT OO B state. Ei dI'1 OHS O F Sieberl h B R Nemeth Grogan, A. Herr inqton, l. Fairbairn, VARSITY BASKETBALL T1-IE SCCREBOARD Galesburq ,l,,..,,.. 21 Macomb ....,....ool.. 16 Galesburq .......... 24 Wheaton ,........... 22 Galesburq ........., 37 Sterling .,..,...oo.... 42 Galesburq .,..,..,,, 25 Kewanee ..,.,.,.,,.. 29 Galesburq ........,. 21 Moline ................ 27 Cfalesburq .......... 23 De Kalb ........,o,,o. 23 Galeslourq .......,.. 21 Corpus Christi H12 Cfa1esQburq .......... 26 East Moline .,i.,i 30 Cfalesourg .......... 32 Peoria Manual H23 Galesfourq ,....,.... 32 Rock lsland .,.... 42 Galeslourq ,..i...... 36 Canton .....,...t...,.. 31 Galesburq .......... 37 Monmouth .....,i,., 24 Galeslourq ....,...., 21 Quincy .u.............. 40 Galesfourq .......... 32 Kewanee ............ 53 Galesfourq .......... 13 Moline ...........,.... 37 Galesburq .......... 29 Canton ..,...,......... 31 Galesfburq .......... 27 East Moline ,..... 26 Galesfburq ..,..,.... 42 Peoria Woodruff 48 Galesburq .......... 23 Rock lsland ...... 29 Galesfourq ,..,.,..., 37 Monmouth ........ 31 REGIONAL Galesburq .....,.... 41 Princevi11e ....ii.,.. 21 Cfalesburq 1i111,..,. 17 Maquon .,1i,,,,1i.,,, 24 lt's Always A St Who Has The W ket In The Air On lt ay Into The B PCNY BASKETBALL lt's a comet! lt's a lightning boltl No, it's the superman-ing of basketball by the soph- omores. Greater and greater was the ava- lanche of sophomore basketball as the year progressed. Winning a game and then losing one typified the basketball activities of the ponies. As the season moved onward, more ac- curacy, better passing judgment, and less fear of the crowd helped the sophomores to chalk up more wins. From a low position in the bracket, the sophomores, with their in- creasing momentum, ability and accuracy, planted the Galesburg banner at the top of all entries in the Northwest Conference. A clever center helped control the bank- board, speedy guards displayed accuracy in shooting, and the forwards were gifted with the ability to handle the ball while closely guarded and to shoot ex- pertly to pile up bigger scores. Thus Coach Charles Bednar worked out a high- scoring team. To convert novice material into an organized team requires ability plus. For such work the pony coach deserves much credit. Coach Charles Bednar Back Row: R. Freese, W. Rosine, C. McClure, R. Nelson, C. Bower, V. Mannon, Coach Bednar. Front Row: M. Thomas, W. Shimel, C. Gibbs, C. Highlander, D. Williams, T. Moran. RCDNV SCGREBCDARD Galeslourg 27 Canton ...,.,.,....,,,, 31 Galeslourg Macomb ........ Galesburg 30 Monmouth ,......... 19 Galesfourg Sterling ....,..... Galesfourg 24 Kewanee ,,,,.,,,..,, 18 Galesburg Kewanee ..,...... Galeslourg 32 Moline ...........,.,.. 22 Galesourg Moline ............ Galesburg 19 Canton ................ 22 Galesburg Corpus Christi Galesourg 35 East Moline ...,.. 24 Galesfourg East Moline .. Galesourg 28 1 Peoria Woodruff l5 Galesfourg Peoria Manual Galeslourg 36 Rock lsland ...... 14 Galesourg Rock Island .. Galesburg 27 Monmouth .......... 25 RESERVES AND MANAGERS An essential and very often unnoticed part of every basketball squad are its reserves. The ponies this year found theirs especially capable, ready at any moment to force them from their harness. Much pony success, therefore, should be attributed to this group who forced the ponies forward into their best form. To Ronald Landon, lim Crawford and Bob Marks goes the sincere thanks of every member of each basketball squad. Acting as managers for all the teams, they have put in many hours of hard Work Without glory. They have been per- fect sports even though they have made no appearance in the public eye. F' t Row: 1. Stout, I. Seyler, D. Wilson, T. Web- ber, 1. Vallero. Second Row: L. Hiqaredo, E. Iohnson, 1. Swanson, M. Strickler, E. Ferris. Managers R. Landon, 1. Crawford and B. Marks CRQSS CCDUNTRV t Legs . , . Streak ln The Night S les And Sweat. Back Row. B. Hunter, I. Shriber, B. Barstow, Coach Fish. Front Row: I. Sharp, D. Tutt, I. Clnldus, E. Puckett. The '42 cross country team under Coach Art P ish, had one of the most successful seasons in the history of the sport at G. H. S. The team was composed of five seniors and two juniors. F or the second consecutive year these boys copped honors at the Northwest Conference held at Knox College. Other first places were recorded, one at the Peoria Woodruff Invitational meet and the other in the Illini Conference competition. G. H. S. was handicapped in these two meets by the absence of two regular runners. Earl Puckett, the harriers' ace runner, was undefeated in the seven contests and also set a new record of ll:48.6 for two and one-half miles at the Peoria meet. Bernard Barstow and Bob Hunter were co-captains this year. Since Puckett, Hunter, Barstow, Shriber, and Tutt make their exits from high school on lune 4, next year will no doubt be one for building a strong team for l944. Many soph- omores and juniors have hopes high for next year's success. TRACK Fleet-Foots Speed Around The First . . . And, Racing With Their Own Curve Of Lombard Track . . . Shadows, They Round The Final Bend Galesburg boys answered Coach Ross Anderson's call for trackmen in droves. F rom this bunch of speedsters the coach carefully selected the boys who enthusi- astically prepared for the tough competition which they faced. The boys in turn chose Bob Hunter as captain. The 1942 track season began with a dual meet in which the Streaks out-classed the Peoria Manual team. Then, at the Galva relays, under the flood lights, they came home with fifth place honors. Traveling to Rock Island for the Northwest Conferencehmeet, the thin-clads took fourth place. The mile medley record was broken by Thompson, Cline, Bivens, and Hunter. Their time was 3:47.3, bettering the old mark by 3.9 seconds. Gustafson in the 220 yard low hurdles and Hunter in the halflmile run took second places. At Kewanee, the District meet was held at night, the second one under light. There the boys qualified to go to the State meet at Champaign. Later in the spring the boys again went to Kewanee for the Illini Conference meet. There were two meets for the sophomores this season, the first with Knoxville, the second, the Did Someone Say Our Silver Streaks Weren't Fast? Not Even fI'GSl.'lI'lflaI'J.'SOpl'1 Conference. Almost as popular to Knox College students as to late-stay- ers at the high school' are the scarlet-suited followers of Her- mes who race upon the Knox cinders nightly. Many in the group are sophomores and jun- iors who will win laurels in the next two years. A Triple-Double-X Speed-Film Could Stop Them! BASEBALL The Strike The Curve Ball The Wind-Up Spring came early to l-I. T. Custer Park, and not far behind came the lads from Gales- burg High School who swung the bat and hit the ball. A lengthy list supplied Coach Phillips some "plenty rough" material to polish into brilliant diamond-men. Noteworthy among these sparklers were Mike Davison, Phil Lopez, Iesse Ponce, Bob "Squirt" Grogan and Ted Iordan. The initial performance, batted out on the Galesburg diamond April fifteenth, brought the hard-hitters a win over Princeville by a one-sided twenty-two to nine. They later swung in competition that bat- tered their bat record some- what when Woodruff, Pekin, Ke- wanee, Peoria Manual, Canton and Peoria Central handled the shillala, but, regardless of the other sides' hard-socks, the final score was a high one for Prince Baseball, a colorful sport spend- ing its second season with Galesburg. Front Row: B. Peterson, W. Ehrenhardt, B. Rosenquist, C. Gibbs, B. Bainbridge, B. Abrahamson, L. Worman, I. Prina. Second Row: B. Wright, I. Ponce, B. Stoneking, W. Glass, D. Wilson, R. Stoerzbach, A. Grogan, D. Parks, C. Sweqle, B. Nelson. Back Row: V. Mannon, I. I-Iigareda, L. Higareda, B. Walters, C. Leh- man, B. Grogan, T. McLaughlin, A. Zuidema, I. Dulaney, W. Werner, D. Stone, M. Davison, Coach Phillips, P. Lopez. 99 ILLINI CQNFERENCE Peoria Manual .,.... 35 Pekin ........,..,........., 29 Peoria Woodruff ,. 22 Galesburg .,..,.,....,.. 21 Back Row: P. Dixon, I. Sharp, I. Ponce, E. Maxwell, L. Smith, B. Hunter, I. Shriber, B. Hoyt, F. Clay, D. Housel. Second Row: Coach Fish, I. Ramirez, W. Strickler, D. Anderson, S. Stephen, P. Gustafson, B. Donaldson, B. Portlock, I. Underwood. Front Row: W. McKinney, D, Meline, B. Soderstrom. NEW CCDMPETITIVE SPQRTS For the first time in school history, wrestling and swimming have been insti- tuted as regular inter-scholastic sports at G.H.S. The grapplers made a remarkable record for novices. They won their first victory over Moline mat men, with a score of twenty-six to eighteen at the Moline High School gymnasium. The Galesburg boys won their second match with Moline with a victory of twenty-three and one-half to fourteen and one-half in the Galesburg High School Steele Gym. In the most exciting match of the season, the mat men of Galesburg won over Peoria Woodruff, nineteen to seventeen. Gustafson, filling the vacancy left by Strickler, and Shriber, Portlock, and Mc- Kinney proved to have spirit and strength. Mid-winter ushered in the indoor swimming season. The team engaged in four dual meets with Moline High School, and two with the Clinton team, one of the best in the mid-west. The swimmers were ably coached by Mr. Art Fish, tutor of both of the new competitive sports. ln the various swim races, Galesburg was represented by Les Webber and Al Collopy in the free style, Kenny Iohnson and Putman Biggs in the breast stroke and Iohn Lindroth in the backstroke. ln the diving competition, Bob Peterson and Harry Aldus were consistent point winners for Galesburg. I The squad also consisted of several juniors and sophomores, indicating possi- bilities for a successful continuation of aguatics. St d g V. Peterson and TENNI The boys' tennis players of G.l-l.S., coached by Mr. Charles Bednar, were successful in inter- scholastic competition during both the fall and spring seasons of the school year. ln the fall they en- gaged in four dual meets, splitting the wins and losses. The netmen finished in a tie for first place in the newly-instituted Illini Conference. Bob Self, captain of the team, won first place in the singles division. At the annual NWC meet, the Galesburg team placed fourth among a field of seasoned compet- itors. ln the spring, Cr.l-l.S. finished second in the district tournament at Monmouth. Bob Self and Ioe Fairbairn took second place in the doubles competition, qualifying them to enter the state tournament at Champaign. Northrup. Seated: A. Good man and B. Christy. S Last fall there appeared to be very little gloom lurking in girls' tennis, for the girls who came forth to compete for positions on the squad swung their rackets with such a will that before long a promising team took shape under Miss Dorothy Calkins' vigil eye. The regular squad consisted of a sophomore, Barbara Christy, two juniors, Adorea Goodman and Vir- ginia Peterson, and one senior, Edie Northrup. y Throughout the fall a number of matches filled the girls' sched- ule. Games with Bock lsland and Canton were played at home on the Knox College courts, and the squad traveled to the rival schools for the rest of the scheduled con- tests. The team appeared at East Moline for the Northwest Confer- ence games but was defeated in its only match. 1 Prospects sparkle for next year, because the team will have added another year of valuable experi- ence. The team loses only one racketeer at graduation time. St d g. B. Freese, B. Self, G. Robertson, A. McClelland: on, D. Firth. lOl GULF Golfers I. Holloway, W. Webster, T. Doyle, D. Parks d R Houlihan an . Coach Marvin I-lumke 102 The Galesburg l-ligh School golfers, playing their first match of the season on September thirteenth, won second place in a quadrangular meet on the Blackhawk Club course in Rock lsland. Mr. Marvin I-lumke, the new coach of the golf team, used five. men: Doyle and Park, seniors, Webster and l-louli- han, juniors, and l-lolloway, a sopho- more. ln the Northwest Conference golf meet at Aledo, the local club swingers copped third place. Doyle had a total of l47p l-loulihan, l57p Webster, l63y Parks, l72l. The high school team won the lllini Conference meet by eighteen strokes at Bunker Links. The team hit the winning stride which had been absent during the early part of the year. The locals ended up with a team score of 670, and a 688 score for Kewanee, a 727 score for Peoria Woodruff, Peoria Manual with a 737, and Pekin, 752. "Rich" l-loulihan took the honors with a total of l59. Tom Doyle cinched second place with a 164. G A. A. BGARD Front Row: V. Moon, I. West, B. Hallberg, B. Christy, A. Parks, A. Nelson. Second Row: H. Wood, V. Clay, L. Willer, D. lordan, A. Goodman, C. Robison, Back Row: E. Harding, D. Lambie, B. Ecklund, M. Linner, M. Peterson, S. Clendenin. Each fall brings with it girls eager to take part in the sports offered by the Girls' Athletic Association. This year Shirley Clendenin has served as president for the organization, officially assisted by Lois Willer, vice-president, Alice Nelson, secretary, and Virginia Clay, recording secretary. Miss Dorothy Calkins, girls' athletic instructor, proved to be a ready enthusiast of the already-proven success- ful sports and several other activities new to the girls' sports world at G. H. S. The officers and the various sports managers comprised the Association Board, which arranged interclass sports and awards. This board endeavored to create more interest in recreational sports as well as seasonal games. Because of their efforts and the great interest of the girls, the third consecutive year of G. A. A. proved to be its most successful one. Miss Dorothy Calkins Is Pictured With The G. A. A. Officers, G. A. A. Usherettes, Popular Seat-finders At Virginia Clay, Lois Willer, Shirley Clendenin, Adorea The Games, Gather For the Camera After Goodman and Alice Nelson. An Archery Drill. Who Killed Cock Robin? Spose They Did? The Battered Birdie Bounds Back As Belles Beat lt. G. A A. CHAMPS New hickory bows and arrows were purchased this year thus adding a new sport to G. A. A. Class lessons on "How to Become a William Tell" were given members of the Leaders' Club. ln the Steele Gym Round of twelve arrows at fifteen yards and twelve at twenty and the Double Steele Gym Round of twenty-four arrows at each dis- tance Shirley Crouse, Adorea Goodman, Mary lane Hillier, Victoria Maceil, Edie North- rup, and Gen Glsen recorded the highest scores. Despite numerous broken arrows the girls made rapid progress in this new sport. Batting the birdie proved to be good exercise and plenty of fun for the eight aerial dart teams that competed later last fall in the gym. During the first weeks of practice, the girls improved Ping Pang Prizewinners -M. Lilfelabgiam, . If If S h 7 R. L Cl , l ' 1 . fi. their eye and form, and then they held Sglgioffnore un een umm ra class tournaments. Team One came out on top with Rosealice Loring, Lois Willer, Marjean Traff, Shirley Peterson, and Molly Lampe as the members. The annual fall ping pong tourna- ment, sponsored by the G. A. A., was larger than ever this year. Competition was very keen with the final winners of the fast bracket tournament, Marilyn Lind- bloom for the sophs, Rosemary Lundeen for the juniors, and Marsha Craft for the seniors. Marsha won her third consecu- tive class championship and also defeat- ed the underclassmen for the title of school champ. lO4 A Kate Cuts Capers On The Six And A Half Meter Board A "V" Swim For Vim, Vigor, Vitality, And Victory G, A. A ACTIVITIES Swimming without diving is like ham without eggs. The advanced swimmers spent Tuesday afternoons practicing on the springboard. Naturally there was an occasional belly flop, but all of them came back to try again. ln the diving event of the swim meet, Catherine Coffey won first with Betty I-lallberg second. These mermaids are already in condition for lake swimming this summer. 'Tm learning to crawl" is no longer restricted to infant talk. This phrase was very popular this year among the beginning and intermediate swimmers who took advan- tage of the opportunity of extra hours of practice and instruction which the G.A.A. offered. Swimming cannot be all work and no play, however, so the girls participated - in thrilling games of water baseball and "keep away" as well as surface diving. Sueeeete HOW Te Better Their Netwertr- Their efforts were displayed this spring when the swimming meet was held. Cath- erine Coffey and Betty I-lallberg took the free style events, and the latter won the backstroke crown. Comic races were held with team competition. Many more G.A.!-X. members partici- pated in tennis this year with the addition of a new court behind the gym. The ad- vanced girls played on the tennis team, while the beginners learned fundamentals and court rules. Vivian Ward, Charlotte Robison, and Eunice Harding showed promise, and they pushed the girls on the team for their positions. ln a few years G. l-l. S. should turn out a team of girl tennis champions. Swatters Clendemn, Northrup, Goodman, Christy, Olson, Peterson and Willer Rest While Their Unseen-To-Us Coach Calkins lO5 1 "Future Bowlers Of America" Improve Form Terpsichorean Technique A La Tutor Calkins G. A A, SPECIALTIES This year the G. A. A. added more new activities to the already long list of sports in which the she-streaks excel. Bowling after school Was the added winter activity in GA. A. Besides learning to "roll 'em down the alleys but not in the gutter," the girls learned how to add those "plus tens" on spares and strikes. ln spite of many .heartaches over railroad splits, Gen Olsen, Harriet Wood, Betty Ecklund and Phyllis Witherell bowled "200" games, only a hundred short of perfection. Modern dance is not a new activity at G. H. S., yet it has enjoyed an increased popularity this year. Miss Calkins planned the exercises that gave this group of girls poise and charm. From these exercises, she and the modern dance class worked out the dances which they performed for the Business and Professional Women's Club, G. S. L., and the Spring Festival. lf Horses Talk, lust What Are These Equines Whinnyinq To One Another? Last fall, Adorea Goodman introduced Saturday horseback riding. The beginners discovered many unused muscles, but most of them are now posting like veteran equestriennes. A Canter over the long country roads and bridle paths and stop- ping for a rest and lunch in a shady farm- yard climaxed the activities of the riders this spring. 106 1: pn '-iff' Y"f'.1E":!',. , ffTfRiaQl,a.wQi,3prif''ilggiaui-"1.L:F.7i' 'zhf' 1 A , if ' f ' " K f . , 1 ... kv 5 ,, . ,ff mf 1 ML: er v .14 J Miss Mary Ellen Rennie Miss Betty Husted Miss Carolyn Haggenios Tl-IE I-IIGI-I SG-IQOI QFFICE Where is the heart of Galesburg High? lt is the office that is the center of all school life. Three popular ladies, Miss Betty I-lusted, Registrar, Miss Carolyn l-laggenjos, At- tendance Secretary, and Miss Mary Ellen Bennie, Secretary to the Principal, manage this most vital spot of all school activity. Six days a Week, they perform the tasks that keep our school ticking from day to day. No less than six days a week are they to be found typing, keeping records, checking attendance, planning advisory bulletins, taking letters, and "ad infiniturnf' A deplorable predicament is one that presents itself when We rush into the office and find the necessary secretary on a duty away from her post, indicative of their importance to everyone of us. Thanks are in order to Misses Bennie, I-laggenjos, and l-lusted "deep in the heart of high school." Mail, Bulletins, Slips, Grade Sheets, Advisory Many Laugh And Smile, But A Few Have Notes-V-'lust What Don't The Pedagogues Find Sober Countenances As They Wait To See The In Their Boxes? Busy Deans. lO9 1 J Worn Marble Noon Entrance Night Light Second Floor 7 LJ LJ I I. IJ I I NI KJ J 1 Churchill Building Main and Centra1iStee1e Gymnasium Home Economics 110 LEADERS Flagswingers' . g b g M t O g S Cl denin, M. McClure, Mil. Orwig, C. Still, V. Swartzbaugh, M. Tones, I. Bogard, G. Ward, G. Di- lt's the half! lf it's at a football game or a basketball game our flagswingers may be seen with many colored flags giving a rhythmic display to waltz music. This very fascinating activity started three years ago at G. l-l. S. and is now in full swing. The half Wouldn't be complete without our baton twirlers in their white and gold military uniforms parading down Lombard field in front of the band, or performing on the basketball floor for their admiring fans in Steele Gym. Hi-yo Silver! Away! That is the familiar cheer heard at the beginning of our football and basketball games. Our cheerleaders are kept busy not only at the half, but also during the game. Through their efforts our teams have been cheered on to VICTORY. Baton Twirlers: G. Adkisson, B. Danielson, M. Lindbloom, D. Hubbard, A. Forstrom, B. Dutton, S. Sandeen, C. Haggerty, P. Witherell, N. Harris, M. Woolsey, Z. Winters, B. Dughman. Cheerleaders: M. Nelson, B. Christy, G. Ward, B. Baldwin, R. Dixon, V. Ward. - . t l , Mr. Harry Aldus Operators R. Pearson, R. Morling, C. Haussman, I. Halstrom, D. lensen, B. Leibovitz, A. Clayton. VISUAL AIDS When a teacher calls class to order and announces that a film is scheduled for the period, every student immediately anticipates one of the most entertaining and en- lightening forms of education. Visual education has become such a vital part of class curriculum that a student seldom fails to see at least one a week, sometimes a "travel-talk" of a previously un- known part of the world, an explanatory showing of the marvels of electricity, or a cutting from a Hollywood film on aviation. More classes have been benefited from the movie program this year than ever be- fore, possibly due to a better selection of films. Many have at times filled into the course of study for three or four courses. lt is worthwhile to mention that "The River" came back this year, one of the most educational films, realistic- Even Cooper And Anglund Appear On The Screen, But lt lsn't Hollywood Yet-W lust The Reflectors Trick Photographers' Success. ally showing the results of soil erosion in the Mississippi River Valley. Another A-l film reviewed the causes and ef- fects of Warld War l. So, the list is long of films that brought a beam of light to the educational program of G. H. S. Supervised by Mr. Harry Aldus, a number of boys have operated the i "picture box." Some are pictured above. ll2 CADETS Sixty-three students have efficiently fulfilled their "cadetical" positions in the G. H. S. halls. Since the inauguration of the cadet system in Galesburg Senior High School three years ago, their accomplishments have steadily increased and they have helped in giving our halls a more business-like atmosphere. Duties of the "hall-watchers" are numerous as well as varied. Among these are collecting attendance slips, running errands, distributing special announce- ments to the classrooms and students, miscellaneous tasks for Mr. Smith, the deans and the office secre- taries. Acting in the capacity of president and presiding over all the meetings, Dale Panther has successfully led the group and served as their representative in Student Council. His assistant was Iean Adcock, vice- president. Georgene Clson, secretary-treasurer, was the keeper of the minutes and money. This year the fire drills were placed under the juris- diction of the cadets, who showed their managing ability by conducting the students promptly and in an orderly fashion out of the school building. President Dale Panther Where's Your Paddle? First Row: I. Mason, V. Swise- good, M. I. Herman, C Clapp, B. Houchens. Second Row: M. Goff, B. Ens- ley, S. Gladfelter, D. Hagan R. Swanson, D. Ericsson, B Dillon. Third Row: R. Evans, A. Eck- wall, M. Benson, R. Loring S. Woolsey, S. Gustafson. Fourth Row: I. Gibb, P. Mar- vin, B. Hurbul, I. Fields, D Hamblin. Fifth Row: G. Olson, B. Sea- burg, G. Fishburn, I. Erne L. Dunkle, N. Carlson. Sixth Row: I. Bizzari, M. Nel- son, I. Adcock, H. Brown lee, A. Dunlevy, W. Winqo I. Hawkinson, E. Kinast. Seventh Row: D. Bivens, L Long, R. Adcock, G. Deane D. Ewing, D. Panther, D Harris, H. Van Vliet, G. Her ron, I. Craig, G. Witherell B. Dredge. ll3 I 4 1 CHEMISTRY CLUB Test tube dreamers and atom smashers ot tomor- row are the members of Mr. Marvin l-lumke's Chemistry Club. Meeting with their president, Fran- ces DiPrima, on alternate Wednesdays, they filled their meetings with exper- iments beyond those of essential routine. A pot- luck supper served as a social diversion tor the club group. ll4 BIOLCGV CLUB With the laboratory as their kingdom and the white rats and micro- scopes as their subjects, Mrs. Velma Wliipple and her Biology Club reigned supreme. Turning their at- tention momentarily from the laboratory, the club gave a play, "The lnven- tion," to raise money to finance a trip to the lunior Academy ot Science Con- vention at Urbana. Clark Highlander capably han- dled the gavel. PHYSICS CLUB The enthusiastic "Redy- Kil-O-Watts" of Mr. lohn Aitchison's Physics Club delved into the many phases of physics as they made practical applica- tions of Ohm's and New- ton's Laws. Little escaped them as they proved their theories and built their projects for the lunior Academy of Science con- vention this spring. Hend- rick Van Vliet presided. TI-IESRIANS The Thespian Club, Galesburg Highfs dramat- ic society, met again this year under a new sponsor, Mr. Wallace Blazek. Mem- bers were required to have a specified number of points. These could be gained through playing in a major role, through sub- ordinate parts and through crew work. The many and varied activities of the club were interestingly led by its president, Marjorie Duncan. VARSITY CLUB Membership in the Var- sity Club is open to any boy who has been award- ed a letter in athletics. He may have Won his letter in any of several sports, foot- ball, basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, cross country or track. Managers receive letters, too. Athletic direc- tor Ross Anderson cap- ably acted as advisor and sponsor, and Keith Hollo- way carried the honors as president of the "G-men." wi' A' 5 :Qt ,gi FUTURE FARMERS QF AMERICA TomorroW's "Kings of the Soil" were to be found in Galesburg High Schools F. PA. Sponsored by Mr. Ray Peart, ag teacher, and led by President lim An- derson, they Worked in- dustriously with an eye to the future when the world shall again look to the farmers for food. One of the biggest events of the year for the club was the Father and Son Banquet on April 23. ll5 HOMECOMING Craning Necks, Vacant Stares And Solemn Count- Tongues Oi Fire Flicker And Tongues Ot Funster enances Are Found ln One Sector Oi The Chilled, Babble. October, Bonfire Crowd. P' hr "1Dl!'1.-3 Admiring Femmes "Back" The Boys Who Buck Father Time Lost No Precious Moments ln Carry The Foe, Nifty Steppers Led The Homecoming Parade Through Main Street Packed With High School Admirers. ing Off The Parades First Prize. 'Twas lime ln October When We Witnessed lr Assembly The Most Lavish Wedding Of The Season. T116 if M. Winter Fall Spring THE SEASCDINIS Students Hurry To School . . . . . . Any Season . , . . . . Students Hurry From School Winter . . . . . ln Standish Park . . . , . . Spring ll7 eqmnmq Direciing Waiting ENDEAVCDRING ACI-IIEVING Dancing - - - Skirrnishmg Swatting ' Q Editing - Clownmg Concentraiing Strolling - 7 Posing Encouraging 118 , Climbing Mystifying Cheerinq SCF-IEMING ENJCDYING Masking Performing Square-dancing . : f i x W A Q K Q St Ns X in 2 ff' if V ' 4 5 . x, -,K ,, ..g'xg Telephoning Acting Striking links. . . J Impersonating Hurdlinq Ending 119 T00 LATE TO CLASSIEV February brought with it Mrs. Valora Mclnnis to fill a faculty vacancy. Although we lost a very fine instructor when Mr. Edward ludy left, he was re- placed by a very capable one. She has been here but a short time, but she has already established her place in the commercial department. Mrs. Mclnnis received her Bachelor of Arts degree at lowa State Teachers' College and has had summer work in the University of lowa. lt has been her achievement to step into a new and difficult position-teaching bookkeeping, typewriting and office practice-and to carry on the work efficiently. ASSEMBLY TIME S es From Departmental Assemblies Mrs. Valora Mclnnis Noisy, happy classmates with necks craning to friends, questions like "What're we havin' today?" and a sudden sweep of quietness as the curtains part-that's a thumbnail sketch of another of our school adventures, assembly time. Thanks to clever planning, each of our year's assemblies has had the variety essential to keep us looking forward to the next one. Exchange assem- blies with Rock lsland and Kewanee hit just the right spot with everyone. The S. A. A. has offered to us pay assemblies of distinct value. Depicted below are scenes from two produc- tions, "Dust of the Road," the Christmas play, and "The lnvention," a biology department production, typical of the lengthy list of marvelous programs. STRANGE TI-IINGS i-IARREN WHEN TI-IE EDITOR CLEANS OUT TI-IE RI-ICDTOGRARI-IV DRAWER Livdy Lieder Lflgdsty H U M Shivley Vandzqey H B -v Crlav un 0 f' Man Killa' Eallegvo Oooh! A P51515 5360+ Sus!! 2 hoc Choo Tawau, Th f ll' fHa7- Heavy Dana -lj Uiyjclf Shoal On Ear-I-ll! Rubin' Lady 121 ERGM SEPTEMBER H I I l 1 - G. H. S. Main Entrance Doors. Tall, wide, wooden, strong, locked, little, inviting, immense, creaking, heavy, steel, slamming, intriguing, panel, locked, narrow and swinging doors are daily participants in our school lite. But the most popular of all are those of the main entrance. For every student and teacher the hinges of these doors bend in and out seven-hundred and twenty times each year. Tl-HQCUGI-I JUNE September, the new school year brought to G. H. S. Sloppy Ioes, sophomores, pressed trousers, new pedagogues, pig-tails, cords, hot weather. When we came back, our "heroes" had already reported for the grim grind of the grid, tutors Seiler and Free- man had reported for service. The rains came. CWas your basement full?l October, Indian summer ended with the first grading period. CMom said no more dates week nights-hadta study chem.l Gridsters moved on to victory. Bonfire, snake- dance, homecoming game and dance, fall parties. Remember "The Covered Wag- on?" Weekly vacations so our faculty could learn how to deal with us. November held its own because football reached its height. We saw you looking your best at "You Can't Take lt With You." Pilgrim holiday-everyone departed to de- vour drumsticks. Student Council played host to district convention. Autumn romances flourished in interesting, colorful blends. Request program filled with "Some One's Rocking My Dreamboat," "Miss You," "Tonight We Love." December, hardwood heroes came into view after weeks of diligent practice. Sober faces listened during third period on the seventh--we felt keenly the stab of war. G. H. S. was host to debaters deluxe. "The Youngest" appeared before the footlights. Ex- change assembly, last girls' dance, "Dust of the Road" and recess for Saint Nick. Ianuary, "Streaky" enrolled and attended all basketball games. Friars proved themselves swell sports with G. H.S. basketeers. Exchange assembly group found Rock Island perfect hosts. "Swing Stampede" fun for G. S.L., after-game dances well-attended, "Musical Moods." February, "Ref Lector's Glorified Circus" found its bleachers overloaded. With "Re- member Pearl Harbor" echoing in our minds, we searched for something to do to aid our country'-wrote on both sides of our papers, walked to school, even conserved paper and rubberbands by eliminating paperwads. Swimming and wrestling be- came new competitive sports. G. A. A. girls attended Camp We-have-fun. March, first day of spring-sniff, sniffp regional basketball tournament-Maquon ahead: district music contest-toot, toot, all held here. We won district declam meet, and the seniors presented "The Green Vine" the night before we took a week off to rest our weary selves. April, National Honor Society Vic Dance, impressive induction and banquet. Health queen crowned to rule physical education demonstration. Spring formals-Budget Reflector Victory Ball too - followed the trend of patriotic decorations, "l Don't Want To Walk Without You," "Tangerine," "Breathless," filmy dresses, gardenias, punch. The Cinder boys began to go 'round in earnest. May, everyone became busier and busier because of the choir meet in Peoria, senior day at Bracken, last minute reports, formals, sugar rationing, warm, moonlit eve- nings, baccalaureate, Fourth-R auditorium broadcast, and the Awards Assembly. Spring played havoc with grades. Iune, the first Week of this month quickly became the last week of our school year, but it will long remain a memorable one. Under the Lombard lights, seniors received coveted diplomas. Vacation next and, whoops!--this is where we came in. INDEX A Abbott, Rogene, 17 Abrahamson, Bob, 40, 99 Adams, Mary Lou, 52 Adcock, Jean, 17, 20, 64, 77, 78, 113, 114 Adcock, Richard, 52, 113 Adcock, Shirley, 52 Adkisson, Gay, 52, 111 Adolphson, Alice, 40,67, 78, 82, 83 Aitchison, Mr. John, 11, 90, 91 Albro6James, 52, 72, 78, 79, 8 , 81 Alderson, John. 40 Aldus, Harry, 52, 65, 72, 90, 116 Aldus, Mr. Harry, 11, 112 Allen, Evelyn, 52 Allensworth, Jim, 17, 73 Altine, John, 40 Anderson, Betty, 52 Anderson, Bob, 52, 90, 114 Anderson, Celeste, 40, 78 Anderson, Donald, 17 Bower, JoAnn, 18, 31, 32, 36, 62, 68, 73, 79, 80, 81,115 Bower, Joyce, 18, 31, 32, 36, 62, 68, 73, 79, 80, 81, 84,115 Bowles, Jack, 18, 72, 88, 89 Bowles, June, 40 Bowman, Eileen, 40, 113 Bradbury, Alberta, 52 Braselton, Marilyn, 52 Brashear, 'Willa Jane, 40 Bristol, Beverly, 18, 29 Brodine, Carolyn, 52 Brodine, Robert, 40, 62 Brooking, Mr. T. V., ll, 70 Brooks, Garnet, 40, 67 Brown, Barbara, 40 Brown, Carl, 18 Brown, Frances, 64 Brown, Jack, 73, 83 Brown, Marian, 18, 64 Brown, Stanley, 40 Brownlee, Dale, 52, 115 Brownlee , Helen, 41, 64 Brubaker, Bob, 52 Brunkow , Benjamin, 41, 89 Brunkow, Renetta. 52 Brush, Billie Jo, 52, 82 Buckingham, Jean, 52, 64, 113 Burch, Audrey, 18 Burford, Howard, 41, 43 Burford, Shirley, 18, 79, 80, 81 Burke, Kenneth, 18, 83 Anderson, Eleanor, 17 Anderson, Anderson, Jim, 17, 115 Anderson, Juanita, 40 Anderson, Kenneth, 17, 115 Anderson, Lydia Jane, 52 Anderson, Mary Jean, 52 Anderson, Miss Rachel, 11 Anderson, Richard, 52, 100, 115 Anderson, Mr. Ross, 11, 88, 89 Miss Hazel, 11, 77,118 Burkhalter, Bev, 41 Burkhalter, Bob, 52, 73, 74, 79, 80, 81,109 Burkhalter, Harold, 41, 47, 78, 114 Butler, Bob, 19, 83, 84 C Calkins, Miss Dorothyr, 11, 103, Anderson, Russell, 40 Anderson, Shirley Ann, 40, 75 Anglund, Bob, 17, 30, 61, 62, 66, 71, 72, 74, 80, 81,115,118 Annegers, Barbara, 52, 55, 74, 115 Atwood, Barbara, 40, 45, 46 Averitt, Norma, 40 Ayers, LeRoy, 52 B Babbitt, Alice, 40 Babbitt, Miss Mar'orie, Bainbridge, Bernardl, 40, Baker, Charles, 82 Baker, lvlarian, 17 Baker, Marvyn, 52 Baldwin, Bill, 52, 72, 82, 111 Bandy, Homer, 40, 47, 115 11,121 99,121 106 Cameron, Harriet, 52 Cameron, Ray, 19, 22, 30, 88, Collinson, Marilyn, 41 Collopy, Alfred, 53 Collopy, Robert, 53 Cook, Arthur. 41, 89 Cooley, Martha, 20, 31, 68, 79, 80, 81, 120 Cooper, Kenney, 53, 61, 67, 72, 79, 80, 81 Cordell, Alice Belle, 41, 79, 80, 81 Corzatt, Barbara, 41 Courson, Alice, 41 Cowan, Bruce, 53. 90 Cowan, Shirley, 20 Cowman, Margaret, 20, 113 Cox, Charles. 41 Cox, Mr. John H., 9 Cozad, Eleanor, 20 Craft, Marsha, 20, 72, 104,118 119 Craig, Allen, 20, 120 Craig, Glenn, 41 Craig, Jack, 41, 72, 83,113 Crawford, James, 20, 26, 63, 96, 114 Creighton, Jim, 20, 101 Creighton, Pete, 41 Cridland, George, 53, 56, 65, 71, 72. 83. 90 Crouch, Albert, 20 Crouse, Shirley, 41, 48 Crummer, Ray, 72 Culver, Earl, 20, 82, 83, 84. 113 Cummingham, Loretta, 42 Cunningham, Geneva, 42 Cunningham, Shirley, 53 Curran, Bob, 53 Cushman, Charlotte, 42 D Dahlstrom, Marjorie, 53, 64, 115 Damberg, Mr. Roy, 12, 66, 67 Danielson, Betty, 42, 111 Danforth, Donald, 53 Danner, Wilbur, 42, 98, 115 Daubard, James, 21 Daugherty, Albert, 21 Davis, Bill, 21, 61, 65, 72 Davis, Cora, 21, 64, 72 Davis, Herman, 42, 47 Davis, Shirley, 42 Davis, Shirley Jean Bednar, Barlow, Donna Jean, 40 Barnes, Bob, 52, 56, 61, 67, 71, 73, 78, 82, 83 Barnes, Jacqueline, 17 Barrow, Helen, 52, 58, 114 Barstow, Bernard, 17, 30, 68, 97, 98, 115 Barstow, Russell, 40, 83,109 Baughman, Nerlra, 52 Bean, Mr, Herbert, 11, 78, 109 Becker, Alden, 40 Becker, Shirley, 52, 53, 55, 72 Mr. Charles, 11, 65, 95 89, 114, 115 Campbell, Donald, 41 Campbell, Herline, 19, 24, 64, 72, 121 Campbell, Maxine, 41 Campbell, Phyllis, 41 Campbell, Robert, 82 Camper, Donald, 89 Camper, Gene, 79, 80. 81 Camper, VV1vne. 41 Carlson, Dale, 19 Carlson, lion, 89,98,115 Carlson, Dorothy. 82 Carlson, Logan, 52, 64 Carlson, Lois, 41, 116 Carlson, LuVerne, 19 Carlson, Lynette, 52 Carlson, Marilyn, 19, 29, 38, 63, 68 Carlson, Norman, 41, 113 Carlson, Philip, 52 Carlton, Doris, 19 Carmodie, Patsy, 52 Cash, Darold, 52, 72 Cass, Cecil Cates, Robert, 41, 45, 83 Catron, William, 19 Cecil, Jack, 19, 61, 63, 65, 109, 115 E Beebe, Kenneth, 52 Beeler, Miss Bernice, 11 Eellamy,BBernic-S, 17 enson, etty, 2 Benson, Marian, 40 Berge, Bonnie Jean, 40, 118 gerntsog, Euggene, 17 erry, etty, 2 Berry, Beverley, 52, 55, 82 Eevarcg Iglonaia, 40 ice, o , 1 Biggs, Putman, 52, 65, 90,98 Billings, Edward, 17, 66, 113 Binge, Oma, 40, 82, 83, 84, 118 Bird, Martha, 52, 78 Bishop, Bruce, 52 'Bivens, Don, 18, 26, 30, 68, 98, 113, 114, 115 Bizarri, James, 18, 113 Blazek, Mr. Wallace, 11, 74, 77 glegsoe, gletfuSb40, 79, 80, 81 e soe, au , iggoombarg, Bob,O52, 82 ust, erna, 4 fgogard, Janet,852 ogren, oan, 2 Bond, Charles, 40, 89 Bond, Leslie, 52, 72, 90, 114 Bond, Robert, 52, 90 llfignesteerl, Polly, 18, 66 one, 'race, 83 Boone, Warren, 18 Boostrom, Frances. 18 'Booton, LeRoy, 18, 89 'Bower, Crosiar, 52, 56, 67, 95 Cederoth, Gail, 52 Champion, Richard, 41, 42, 61 Chandler, Mrs. Robert A., 9 Chapin, Frances, 19 Chapman, Mary Ellen, 53 Cherrington, Irvin, 41, 115 Cherrington, Ronald, 19 , Chidester Childers, , Juanita, 19 Harry Jr., 41, 97 98 Christy, Barbara, 44, 53,, 64, 101, 103, 105, 106, 111 Church, Elizabeth, 19, 63, 66, 72, 82, 83 Cills, George, 41 Cirimotirh, Mary, 53 'Clapp, C onstance, 53, 113 77 Clark, Beverly, 41 , Davison, Walter "Mike", 21, 99, 115 Dawson, Marjorie, 42 Day, Barbara Jean, 42 Dean, Bob, 53 Deane, Gerald, 21, 113 Deal, Virginia, 53 DeBois, Audrey, 42 Deming, Ladonna, 53, 82 Denly, Doris, 21 Denniston, Betty, 42, 119 Dexter,'Mary, 21, 121 Dilley, Bob, 53, 83 . Dillon, Betty Lou, 21, 41, 113 DiPrima, Frances, 21, 23, 69, 72, 114, 115. 121 DiPrima, Gloria, 53, 64, 72, 111 Dixon, Marjorie, 20, 21', 63, 114 Dixon, Paul, 53, 90, 99, 100, 114 Dixon, Rose Marie, 52, 53, 72, 83, 111 Dobson, Helen, 21 Donaldson, Jim, 42, 83, 89, 100 Doran, Shirley, 21 Douglas, Shirley, 64 Doyle, Bill, 21, 61, 65, 68, 73 Doyle, Jim, 21, 65, 74, 79, 80, 81, 84, 115 Doyle, Tom, 22, 61, 63, 65, 92, 98, 102, 116 Dredge, Robert, 42, 113 Driscoll, Jean, 42 Dughman, Betty, 53, 82, 111 Dughman, Mary Jane, 22, 63, 66, 82. 83, 84, 114 Dulaney, Gene, 99 Dulaney, Jim, 53, 115 Clark, Fred, 113 Clark, Margaret, 41 Clausen, Kenneth, 19. 63, 67, 93 Clay,Forrey, 53, 90. 99, 100, 114 Clay, Virginia, 19, 73, 83, 103 Clayton, Arnold, 53, 112 Clendenin, Shirley, 20, 61, 63, 103, 105, 111 Cline, Harriet, 53, 67, 82, 84, 103, 114 Cline, Jack, 41, 79, 80, 81, 98, 115 Coe, Don, 20, 30, 115 Coffey, Catherine, 20 Coffey, Dale, 81 Cohenour, Mildred. 20 Colclasure, Ray, 20 Cole, Billy, 41 Duncan, Marjorie, 18, 22, 67, 77, 81, 115 Dunkle, Helen, 17, 22, 48, 61, 62, 66, 72 Dunkle, Lillian, 42, 72, 113 Dunleve y, Alta, 42, 74, 77, 113, 115 Durbin, Betty, 22 Dutton, Betty Jean, 42, 72, 82, 83, 111, 119 Dupuy, Gladys, 53 Dysert, Louis, 53 Earel, Darlene, 42 Eby, Betty Jane, 53 Ecklund, Betty, 103 Eckwall, Alice, 42, 113 Eddy, Joanl, 42, 79, 80, 81, 82, 84 E'hlen, Marilee, 42 Harler, Betty, 54, 67 Ehrenhardt, VVallace, 53 Ellickson, Barbara, 42 Ensley, Bette, 22, 72, 113 Erickson, Deana, 42, 45 Ericson, Eugene, 53 Erne, Joan, 42, 77, 103 Evans, Rosaline, 22, 113 Ewing, Donald, 42, 43, 89, 98, 113, 115 F Fairbairn, Joe, 42, 61, 62, 65, 70, 94, 115 Farrell, Edward, 22 Felt, Katherine, 42, 114 Ferris, Eugene, 53, 96 Fields, Jean, 22, 31 Fields, June, 22, 31, 113 Fifield, Charles, 42, 89, 114 Finley, Dee, 42, 72, 83 Firth. Richard, 53, 56, 61, 65, 78, 82, 83, 89, 97, 101 Fish, Mr. Arthur, 12, 52, 88 Fish, Mary Jane, 22, 61, 62, 64, 66, 78, 115 Fishburn, Gwen, 22, 61, 113 Fleharty, Clarice, 53 Fletcher, Edward, 53 Fletcher, Martha, 22, 67 Flickinger, Dorothy, 22, 113 Flickinger, Gayle, 22 Fogarty, Maxine, 42 Forsburg, Helen, 53 Forstrom, Annette, 41, 43, 66 111, 114 Foster, Audrey, 53 Foster, Fred, 23 Fox, Russ, 92, 116 Frakes, Bill, 53 Franson, Raymond, 53 Freberg,Dorothy,23, 62, 68, 111 Freberg, Sylvia, 53 Frederickson, Nadine, 43 Freese, Robert, 53, 54, 61, 95 101 Frymiize, Jackie, 43, 77, 114 G Gabrielson, Betty, 23 Gale, Mrs. Irma, 4, 12, 119 Gantz, Bonnie, 23, 113 Garman, Maurice, 43, 65, 115 Garrett, Richard, 53 Garrett, Robert, 43, 114 Garst, Mr. Harry, 12 Gawthrop, Janice, 43 Gettemy, Marilyn, 53 Gibb, Juanita, 23, 27, 61, 113 Gibbs, Chuck, 53. 65, 95, 100 Gibbs, Eleanor, 53 Gifford, Monty, 43 Gilbert, Lucinda Lee, 23 Gilson, Junior, 17, 23, 28, 61, 63, 88, 89, 92, 115 Gilmore, Vedamae, 43 Gladfelter, Jean, 53 Gladfelter. Shirley, 43, 113 Gladson, Doris, 53, 54 Glass, George, 115 Glass, VVayne, 43, 99, 115, 118 Goad, Bob, 43, 79, 80, 81 Goff, Marilyn, 20, 23, 72 Goff, Rodney, 45, 53, 61, 73, 74, 83, 90 Goodman, Adorea, 43, 44, 101, 103, 104, 105, 106 Goodwin, Mr. William, 12 Goudschaal, Robert, 53 Graham, Bill, 54, 57, 114 Gray, Virginia, 43 Green, Clinton, 30 Green, Robert, 54 Green, Wayne, 43 Greenstreet, gosephine, 54 Greenquist, rthur, 43 Gregory, Bill, 43 Gretta, Shirley Ann, 43, 73, 79, 80, 81 Griflith, Eugene, 54, 113, 114 Griffith, Mr. John, 12, 65 Grissinger, Buck, 54 Grogan, Robert, 42, 43, 61, 63, 65, 92, 100, 115 Grogan, Robert E., 43,61,89, 94, 99 Gross, Edward, 54, 56 Grossman, Joan, 43, 64, 66 Gumm, Dorothy, 54 Gustafson, Carolyn, 23 Gustafson, Gloria, 23 Gustafson, Phillip, 23, 65, 73, 87, 88, 89, 98, 100, 115 Gustafson, Shirley, 43 H Hagan, Doris, 23, 113 Hager, Juanita, 54 Hager, Eugene, 83 Haggenjos, Carolyn, 109 Haggenjos, Irma, 23, 63, 67, 71, 76, 77 Haggerty, Coleen, 54, 72 Haight, Betty, 23 Haight, Jack, 43, 83 Hall, Samuel, 23, 72, 121 Hallas, Jack, 54 Hallberg, Betty, 54, 64, 103 Hallberg, Bill, 54, 57, 72, 79, 80, 90 Hallstrom, Arlene, 54 Hallstrom, Eugene, 43 Hallstrom, John, 24, 112, 115 Halverson, VVarren, 24, 30, 117 Hamblin, Dorothy, 19, 24, 63, 64, 76, 113 Hampton, Lois, 54, 83, 114 Hand, Doris Mary, 43 Hand, Janice, 43, 64 Haner, Margaret, 24 Hanna, Jess, 24 Haroldson, Alice, 54 Hardine, Margaret, 54 Harding, Eunice, 43, 44, 103. 106 Harman, Dick, 24, 90 Harman, Robert, 54 Harman, Virginia, 24, 79, 80, 81, 119 Harris, Dorothy, 43 Harris,Naorni,43,79,80,81,111 Harris, Rodney, 54 Harshbarger, Patricia, 54 Harshbarger, Mr. Royal, 12 Hasselbacker, George, 43, 65 Hasselquist, Clarine, 43 Hatch, Eileen, 44 Hatch, George, 44, 115 Hatch, Harold, 24, 65, 89, 115 Haussmann. Charles, 54, 112 Hawkins, Tom, 24 Hawkinson, Jack, 17, 18, 24, 61, 73, 98, 116 Hawkinson, Richard, 44 Hawthorne, Marjorie, 54, 83 Hayes, Maybelle, 54 Haynes, Harriette, 24 Healea, Marian, 44 Healea, Velda, 44 Healey, John, 24 Heilener, Mildred, 44 Heimel, Jack, 24, 28, 65 Hendricks, Robert, 24 Hendrickson, Kenneth, 24 Hepburn, Margaret, 25 Herman, Mary Jean, 19, 25, 72 77, 79, 80, 115 Herrington, Allen, 44, 89, 94 Herron, Glenna, 41, 44, 63, 67 103, 113 Hester, Doris, 54 Hevland, Wayne, 25 Higareda, Cecia Higareda, Joe, 89, 99 Higareda, Lupe, 48, 96, 99 Higgins, Carol, 44, 52, 115 Highlander, Clark, 54, 58, 73, 77, 90, 95, 98, 116 Hilker, Miss Jeannette, 12 Hill, Lorraine, 54, 114 Hillier, Mary Jane, 25, 63, 64, 68, 104, 121 Hinchliff, Jack, 44, 65, 72 Hinchman, Mr. C. L., 9 Hinebaugh, Myron, 44, 47, 83, 114 Hoaglund, Virginia, 54 Hoffman, Richard, 24, 25, 61, 72, 76, 120 Hoffman, Roger, 44, 79, 80 Hogan, Betty, 44, 46, 77 Hohl, Wayne, 52, 54 Holcomb, Betty, 54 Holcomb, Bob, 44 Holloway, Jimmie, 54, 102 Holloway, Keith, 25, 61, 63, 68, 73, 88, 89, 93, 115 Holloway, Lois, 41, 44 Holloway, Marilyn, 44, 45, 63, 66, 72 Holman, Rex, 44 Holmquist, Helen Jeanette, 44 61, 63, 78, 82, 83 Hoots, Paul, 54 Hoskins, Alice, 44, 49 Horton, Stanley, 54 Houchens, Bettie, 25, 113 Houlihan,. Richard, 102 Housel, Dick, 54, 99, 100, 114 Howard, Dorothy Eileen, 54 Howell, Marthella, 25, 62 Hoyt, Bob. 54, 90, 100 Hubbard, Dorothv, 25 Hudgell, Bill, 113 Hudson, Gloria, 54 Hughes, Beverly, 25, 75 Humke, Mr. Marvin, 12, 102, 114 Humes, Dorothy, 44 Hunnicut, Donald, 25 Hunter, Bob, 25, 97, 98, 100, 115 Hunter, Jim, 44, 47 Hurbul, Betty, 25, 113 Hurbul, Beverly, 44 Husted, Miss Betty, 107 I Imel, Arnold, 54 Ingersoll, Roberta, 54 Ingram, Frances, 54 Irvine, Miss Ellen, 12 I Jacobs, Katherine, 54 Jacobs, Irene, 44 acobs, Nora, 54 acobson, Donald, 44 ames, Lorraine, 44, 75 Jefferds, Barbara, 44, 114 Jennings, Audrey, 25, 111 Jensen, Richard, 25 ensen, Richard VV., 26, 74, 112 Jewell, Poll , 64, 72,113,121 Johanson, Don, 26 Johnson, Betty, 44, 67, 114 ohnson, Charles, 54 ohnson, Dale, 43, 44, 65 ohnson, Davia Lee,26, 79, 80, 81 ohnson, Dean, 44 Johnson, Earl, 54. 90, 96 ohnson, Elizabeth, 44 ohnson, Frank,26,72,79,80,81 ohnson, Jeanne, 26 ohnson, Kenneth, 26, 89, 98 Johnson, Leslie, 22, 26, 30, 62, 65, 73, 88, 89, 115 Johnson, Margaret, 45 Johnson, Miss Mildred, 12 ,ohnson, Mr. Paul, 12 Johnson, Phyllis, 54 ohnson, Richard, 45 Johnson, Rose, 45 Johnson, Rov, 45, 61 Johnson, Shirley, 26 Johnson, Virginia, 45, 54, 113 Johnston, Grace, 10 ones, Miss Alice, 61, 64, 109 Jones, Cleo, 26 Jones, George, 115 Jones, Margaret, 45, 111, 106 ones, Sallye, 26, 115 Jordan, Dorothy, 45, 49, 70, 103 ordan, Ted, 45, 61, 93 Judd, Pauline, 45 Judy, Mr. Eward, 13 urjevich, John, 26, 30, 117 K . Keach, Miss Vesta, 13,67,109 Keefe, Bill, 26 Keeling, Charles, 54 Keene, Mary, 54 Kelly, Joan, 26, 62, 66, 115 Kendrick, Dale, 89 Kennedy, Imogene, 26 Kennedy, Patricia, 55 Kenney, John, 55 Kemp, Lois, 45, 79, 80, 81 Kepford, Mertie, 55 Kepple, Robert, 72, 119, 121 Kerr, Dorcas, 26. 74, 114, 115 Kiernan, Dick, 72, 79, 80, 81, 111, 118 Kinast, Earl, 27, 113 Kimpton, Dale, 73 Kipling, Marilyn, 55, 73 Kraft, Victor, 55, 61, 90 Kuntz, Donald, 55, 90, 113 Kuntz, Ella Jane, 27 L Lafferty, Charles, 55 Lagerstrom, Fred, 22, 27 Lagerstrom, Shirley, 55 Lamb, Miss Flora, 13 Lambie, Dorothy, 27. 103 Lamcpe, Molly, 55, 79, 80 Lan enberger, Jackie, 55 Landon, Ronal , 45, 96 Landon, Mr. Roy, 13, 109 Lang, Chauncey, 45 Lantz, Mr. Edwin, 13, 82, 83, 118 Larson, Audrey, 55 Larson, Miss Naomi, 13, 64 Larson, Paul, 74, 79, 80, 81, 84, 115 INDEX Larson, Russell, 27 Larson, Shirley, 45 Lawler, Doris. 27 Leafgreen, LaVerne, 55 Lee, Beverly, 27, 62, 68, 72 Lee, Kathryn, 55 Lahman, Charles, 27, 99 Lehman, Geraldine, 55 Leibovitz, Bill, 52, 55, 112 Leighty, Neal, 27, 113 Levenberg, Doris, 55 Lieber, Alice, 45 night, Donald, 45, 74 Lindberg, Mr. David P., 9 Lindberg, William, 45 Lindbloom, Marilyn, 55, 72, 104 Lindbloom, Marvin, 27 Lindeen, Bill, 43, 45, 72, 89 Lindgren, Hollis, 17, 27, 63, 64 116 Lindroth, John, 83 Lindsey, Robert, 27, 79, 80, 81, 89, 115 Lindsey, Mr. R. 9, 121 Lindsey, Shirley, Llng, Alice, 45 Ling, Harry, 45, 89 Linn, Paul Linner, Marilyn, 55, 61, 103 Llnroth, Robert, 113 Lofgren, Mr. George, 9 Lohmar, NVilma, 27, 36, 38, 69 Long, Leslie, 55 LONE, LOLliS, 27, 28, 113 Lopez, Carolyn, 45 Lopez, Philip, 45, 65, 93, 99, V.. 55 .115, 119 Loring, Rosalice, 44, 45, 103, .106, 113 Lovltt, Floraine, 17, 27 Lowe, Florence, 46, 63, 66, 67, 72, 79, 80, 81 Lowe, Jeanne, 28, 63, 64, 72, 76, 79, 80, 81, 84, 121 Lowell, Betty, 45 Lucas, Mr. Ralph D., 9 Luker, Billy, 55, 73, 114 Lundeen, Andrew, 28 Lundeen, Rosemary, 46, 61, 63 64, 79, 80, 81, 104 Lundquist, Bob, 55 Lundquist, Phyllis, 45 Luttrell, Edgar, 45, 47, 63, 114 Luttrell, Shirley, 19, 20, 28, 63, 67, 114, 115 Luvall, Robert, 23, 28, 69, 73, 83 Lynn, Mary, 28, 72 M McCants, Bobby, 45, 82, 83 McClanahan, Anne, 28, 72, 74, 76, 77,115,118,119 McClelland, Allan, 45, 47, 48, 63, 66, 101, 114 McClelland, Bruce, 55, 56, 90 McClure, Carroll, 54, 55, 90, 95, 98 McClure, Mary, 28, 67, 111 McGahey, Isabel, 46 McGahey, Shirley, 28 MCIQHIS, Mrs. Valora, 120 McKinney, Patricia, 46, 72 McKinney, Wayne, 55, 99, 100 McLaughlin, Helen, 46 McLaughlin, aim, 55, 90, 115 McLaughlin, om, 55, 90, 99 McNaught, Arlene, 44, 46 McNaught, Dorothy, 28, 83 McNeil, Harold, 115 McNeil, Lillian, 55 McVey, Mary June, S5 Maciel, Victoria, 55, 64, 103 Maklgan, Shirley Jo, 46, 72 Magee, Harold, 46 Mann, Allen, 46, 47, 72, 99, 114 Mannon, Vernon, 99, 114 Manwarren, Barbara, 46, 75 Manwarren, Harriett, 46 Marquith, Clarence, 83 Marks, Robert, 46, 96, 115 Martin, Leona, 24 Marvin, Don, 55, 90 Marvin, Phyllis, 28, 113 Mason, Jean, 28, 72 Masterson, Blanche, 46 Masterson, Jack, 55 Matlack, Miss Laura, 13 Matthews, Kenneth, 73, 75 Mathias, Earl, 82, 84 Matson, Nola, 28 Matson, Irma, 46 , 106 64, v 1 Maxwell, Earl, 28, 31, 61, 63, 65, 99, 100, 115 Mead, Mary Louise, 55, 83 Mealman, Dorothy, 55 Megginson, Peggy, 46 Melin, Don, 46, 99, 100 Melton, Harold, 28 Mercer, Betty, 55 Mergenthaler, Edna, 55, 67, 71, 114 Metcalf, Charlene, 18, 28, 66 Meyer, Edwin, 83 Miller, Charles, 46 Miller, Donna, 55, 61, 72 Miller, Elaine, 55 Miller Evelyn 29 Miller: Lena, 55 Miller, Robert, 46, 65 Mills, Don, 52, 55, 72 Minnon, Vernon, 95 Mitchell, Esther, 55 Mitchell, Virginia, 46 Montgomery, Chester, 81 Montgomery, Marian, 55 Moon, Moran, Moran, Virginia, 29, 103 Betty, 46 Tom, 55, 90, 95, 98 Morling, Ray, 46, 112 Morrissey, Bill, 29, 98 Morrison, Betty, 46 Morrow, Margaret, 55 Morss, Earl, 29, 33 Mortenson, Mary Anne, 46, 106 Mott, Eugene, 29, 76, 115 Moulton, Kenneth, 45, 73, 83 Mummey, Tom, 29 Mundy, Wallace, 29 Mureen, Mr. E. W., 9 Mureen, Howard, 29, 61 Murray, Helen, 46 Myers, Geraldine, 29, 72 Myers, Janice, 55 N Nape, Evelyn, 55 Nelsen, Robert, 95, 99 Nelson, Nelson, Nelson, Nelson, Nelson Alice, 19, 29, 103 Barbara, 29 Frances, 46 Glenn L., 18, 29, 68 Glenn R. 41 46 61 63 , 1 1 , , Nelson, Irene, 29 Nelson, Marcia, 18, 29, 64, 72, 77, 111, 113, 115, 119 Nelson, Margaret Ann, 55, 57, Nelson, Marjorie, 55, 78 Nelson, Mary, 46, 64 Nelson, Richard, 46, 56 Nelson,'Robert, 46, 56 Nelson Vanece, 46, 62, 66, 103 Nemetli, Ray, 43, 46, 94 Newberg, Albert, 29, 33 Norberg, James, 30 Norris, Kaye, 30, 62, 69, 72, 76, 116 Norris, John, 30 Northrup, Edie, 30, 62, 69, 101, 104, 105 Northrup, Harold, 46 Northrup, Myrtle, 47 Norton, Frank, 81 Norquist, Ed, 43, 47 Nuckolls, Marilyn, 56, 64 Nystrom, Mr. Alfred, 9 ' O Ohlsen, Mr. Donald, 13, 81, 83 Ohlsson, Alice, 47 Olin, Eva, 47 Olsen, Genevieve, 103, 104, 105, 106 Olson, Emri Mae, 47 Olson, Georgene, 30, 113 Olson, Olson, Olson, Olson, Olson, Orwig, Orwig, Osborn Osmer, Overdo Owen, Miss Helen, 13, 119 Jerry, 47, 48, 65, 113 Mary Louise, 56 Leonard, 47 Wayne, 30, 115 Martha 30, 111 Mildred, 56, 111 , Margaret, 47, 79, 80, 81 Jackie, 30 rf, Eileen, 30 Katherine, 30 P Padilla, Helen, 47 Pahlow, Luella, 103 Palmgren, Richard, 47, 67, 83 Panther, Dale, 30, 61, 72, 113 Park, Dale, 65, 99, 102, 115 Parker, Edith, 30 Parker, limes, 30 Parker, azetta, 47 Parkinson, Robert, 47, 115 Parks, Elizabeth Ann, 47, 61, 77, 103, 109, 114 Payne, Norma, 47, 72 Peabody, Ruth, 47 Pearson, Charles, 30, 115 Pearson, Richard, 30, 66, 112, 114 Peart, Mr. Ra , 13 Peavy, Mary Jyane, 47 Peck, Bonnie, 31 Peck, Paul, 47, 115 Pedersen, Glenrose, 56 Pennington, Peggy, 29, 31, 62, 69, 115 Perardi, Shirley, 47, 51, 63, 64, 67, 77 Perry, Clarissa, 31 Peterson, Alyce, 56 Peterson, Billy, 56, 78, 83 Peterson, Bob, 28 Peterson, Bob, 72, 75, 89, 99, 113, 115, 117 Peterson, Irene, 56 Peterson, Lawrence, 43, 47, 80, 81, 82, 83 Peterson, Lloyd, 31 Peterson, Mae, 56 Peterson, Marian, 31 Peterson, Marilyn, 20, 31, 63, 68, 103 Peterson, Max, 26, 30, 31, 63, 65, 82, 83, 114 Peterson, Raymond, 31, 65, 79, 80, 81 Peterson, Roy, 47 Peterson, Shirley, 31, 47,77, 103 Peterson, Shirley, 75, 76 Peterson, Virginia, 47, 72, 101, 105 Phillips, Mr. Gerald, 13, 94,99 Pihl, Jack, 56, 72, 91 Pihl, Jerry, 56 Poe, Vincent, 47 Polk, Kenneth, 56, 79, 80, 81 Ponce, Jesse, 31, 88, 89, 99, 100, 115 Poole, George, 47 Poole, Thomas, 47, 83 Portlock, Bob, 43, 47, 89, 98, 99, 100, 115 Potts, Jacquelyn. 31, 63, 69 Powers, Dick, 83, 84 Powless, Florence, 31 Prina, John, 47, 99 Pritchard, Bill, 47, 75 Puckett, Earl, 31, 97, 115 R Radke, Mr. Richard, 13 Rainey, Leola, 48, 72, 78 Ramirez, gc-rsse, 99, 100 Randell, ugerle, 31, 115 Ransom, Phyllis, 48, 82, 83, 84 Read, Dorothy, 31 Read, Phyllis, 56 Reams, Arthur, 48, 89, 115 Reavy, Virginia Ann, 48, 73, 83 Redfern, Bill, 56 Redfern, Robert, 32, 113 Reed, Fern, 48 Reed, Dick 32, 89, 115 Reed, Frank, 32, 113 Rennie, Miss Mary Ellen, 107 Reeves, Charles, 32 Reeves, Joanne, 56 Rentschler, Mary, 56, 64, 72, 83, 84 Richards, Max, 32, 83 Richards, Wa ne, 54, 55 Richardson, Glbria, 48, 61, 66, 73 Riggle, Shirley, 48, 72, 79, 80, 81 Riley, Mary, 32 Rios, Anna Marie, 48 Ritchie, Betty, 32 Roberts, Betty, 48 Robertson, Billy, 56, 115 Robertson, Gordon, 48, 63, 67, 101 Robison, Charlotte, 19, 32, 103 Rodeffer, Alice, 56, 67 Rodich, Ruby, 32, 81 Rogers, Eugene, 17, 32, 61, 63, 89 Rohr, Marjorie, 32 Ronca, Miss Charlotte, 14 Rosenquist, Robert, 32,65, 100 Rosine, Shirley 56 Rosalie, Willard, 56, sz, 95 Rossiter, Robert, 32, 115 Ross, Robert, 56, 90 Row, Esther, 56 Rowen, Dale, 84 Royce, Robert, 32, 48, 113 Rudolf, Jeanette, 32, 79, 80, 81 Ryan, Lillian, 56 Ryin, Miss Sylvia, 14 S Sabol, Rosemary, 56 Sackey, Dale, 48 , 36, 7, 115 72, 121 V Y Sallee, Kenneth, 56. 115 Sandeen, Shirley, 33, 36, 38, 63, 68, 72, 111 Sanford, NVarren, 24, 33, 83, 84 Sanford, Jack, 33 Sauter, Marilyn, 56 Schaubert, Harold, 17, 33 Schenck, Anne, 56 Schrodt, Betty, 33 Schrodt, Doloris, 48 Schroeder, Lenora, 33 Schwanke, NVanda, 56, 73, 89 Schwilck, Gene, 42, 48. 52, 63 78, 82, 84, 114, 115 Scott, Beverly, 48 Scott, Mary, 33 Seaburg, Betty, 33, 63, 64, 82, 113 Sedgwick, Ray, 56 Seiberlick, Foster, 72, 94, 115 118 Self, Robert, 33, 56, 101, 115, ' 11S Sellers, Pearl, 48 Sexton, Eleanor, 33 Seyler, Jack, 56, 90, 96 Shafman, Dorothy, 33 Share, James, 48 Sharpe, Dorothy, 33, 79, 80,81 Sharp, Quentin, 83 Sharp, Jack, 43, 48. 79, 80, 81, 97, 100, 115 Sharp, Russel, 56 Sharp, Wayne, 56 Sheets, Norma, 56 Sherman, Sophia, 56 Sherwood, Glee, 48 Shimel, Wylie, 53, 54, 56, 61, 95 Shipp, Eugene, 56 Shoff, Lean, 33, 61 Shoff, arjorie, 56 Shofroth, Walter, 48 Short, Phyllis, 46, 48, 73 Shotts, Sam, 33 Scriber, Junior, 33, 97, 98, 99, 100, 115 Shults, Helen, 48 Silver, Darwin, 48, 65 Simons, Kathryn, 48 Sims, Maxine, 48 Slader, Barbara. 34 Slaven, Mr. Prince, 14 Smith, Mr. A. Edson, 10, 119 Smith, Cecile, 48 Smith, Mr. Charles, 14 Smith, Lawrence, 56 Smith, Lester, 34, 99 Smith, Shirley, 29, 34, 62, 69 Snyder, Mr. Frank, 10, 61, 65 Soderstrom, William, 48, 65, 99, 100, 114 Sowder, Helen, 26, 34, 61, 62, 68, 72, 119, 121 Spehr, Richard, 47, 48, 51, 62, 72, 73, 114 Spencer, Donovan, 56 Sperry, Edward, 34 Sperry, Jack, 56, 79, 80, 81 Squire, Gordon, 34, 115 Staats, Phyllis, 48 Stables, Don, 56. 90 Stambaugh, Dorothy, 48, 64, 67, 72, 77, 79, so, 81 Stanbary, Brook, 48 Stanbary, Maxine, 34 Stegal, Mary, 56 Stegall, Fred, 34 Stegall, Richard, 49 Stellar, Frederick, 49, 83 Stephens, Albert, 90, 99 Stevens, Earl, 34 Stevens, Joyce, 56 Stewart, Betty Jane, 34, 49 Stewart, Margaret, 56 Stewart, Mary Ellen, 49 Stairwalt, Wanda, 34, 62 Stickle, Miss Ruth, 13,64, 109 Stigner, Norma, 49, 72, 82, 83 Still, Carol, 54, 56, 111 Stinson, Ralph, 49 Stites, Harold, 56, 57 Stites, Ruth, 34, 48, 82, 84 Stoerzbach, Russell, 49, 73, 83, 100 Stone, Edward, 56, 114 Stone, Richard, 99 Stoneking, Bill, 49, 88, 89, 99, 115 Stoneking, John, 89 Stoneking. Richard, 49 Stoner, Richard, 49 Stout, Jim, 57, 83, 96, 99 Strader, Mildred, 49, 72, 83 Straus, Ed, 57, 90 Strickland, Marjorie, 34 Strickler, Jeanne, 49 Strickler, Marvin, 57, 96 Strickler, Warren, 49, 65, 89, 98, 100 I s Strong, Merle, 34 Sunderland, Ben, 34, 115 Sutherland, Shirley, 49 Sutton, Charles, 49, 83 Suydam, Helen, 57, 113 Swagert, Everett, 49 Swallow, VVinifred, 49, 72, 114 Swanson, Bill, 79, 80, 81, 90 Swanson, Carl, 23, 28, 35 Swanson, Evar, 49, 73, 82, 117, 121 Swanson, Eugene, 35 Swanson, Gloria, 49 Swanson, Harlan, 35, 115 Swanson, John, 57, 96 Swanson, Leona, 49 Swanson, Margaret, 35 Swanson, Marian, 49 INDEX VVatson, Robert "Doc", 22,37 72, 92, 116 YVatson, Robert, 57 VVatson, Roxanna, 27, 37 VVatters, Dorothy, 37 Watters, Marilyn, 57 Way, Shirley, 19, 37, 61, 63, 72 VVebber, Les, 28, 37, 88, 89, 115, YVebber, '116 Ted, 57, 65, 90, 96, 98 Webster, VVayne, 50, 102 Swanson, Mr. M artin, 14 Swanson, Rosemary, 49, 61, 63, 64, 72, 81, 113 Swanson, Russell, 35 Swanson, Shirlee , 57, 61 Swarthout, Beatrice, 49 Swarthout, Betty, 49, 61 Swartzbough, Virginia, 57,111 Swegle, Charles, 30, 35, 99 Swisegood, Virginia, 35, 36, 68, 73, 113 T Taber, Leta, 49 VVeinberg, Dorothy, 37 VVeinberg, Jean, 57 Weir, Anna, 37, 67 Weir, Blanche, 50 Weir, Hugh Jr., 57, 115 1Vells, Donald, 50 Werner, XVarren, 57, 65, 83, 99 VVest, Joyce, 37, 83, 103 VVest, Lois, 57 VVest, Shirley, 37, 67, 103 VVestberg, Everett,- 50 XVestberg. Mary Louise, 57 Westerdale, Robert, 50, 114 YVesterfield, Joan, 50, 72 Tabone, Anthony, 49 Tate, John, 49 Templeton, Clarence, 49 Telford, Radah, 49, 63 Terpening, VVendell, 49, 115 Thayer, George, 57, 115 Theobald, Ruth, 50 Thierry, George, 89 Thomas, Melvin, 65, 90, 95 Thompson, Dick, 57, 65 Thompson, Eloise, 57, 67 Thompson, George, 35, 63. 68, 73, 76, 88, 89, 98, 119 Thompson Thompson , Harry Alonzo, 35 James 98 115 Thompson, VVanda, 35, 83 Thorsen, Donald, 35,88, 89, 98 Thurman, Betty, 35 Tinkham, Mary Louise, 57 Tolle, Irvin, 35, 89, 114 Tonkin, James, 50 Tornquist, Dagni, 35 Tourtellott, Carol, 57 Tourtellott, Theodore, 35 Tracy, Betty, 32, 36, 73 Tracy, Eleanor, 52, 57 Tracy, Martha, 36, 63. 78, 79,80 Traff, Marjean, 44, 50, 103, 106 Trask, Lois, 36 Trebbe, Joan. 20 7 Triplett, Wilbur, Wetherbee, Charles, 50, 89, 118 VVhalin, Vergene, 57 VVhipple. Mrs. Velma, 14 VVhite, Betty Jo, 57 VVhite, Charles, 37 NVhite, Elizabeth, 82 VVhite, Frances, 24, 37 YVhite, Hugh, 57 VVhite, Jack. 50, 65, 98 VVhite, Norma, 50 White. Miss Velma, 14 VVhiteside, Madaline, 37 Wiese, Allen. 65 VVilbur, Marjorie, 38 VVilkins, Marjorie, 38 VVilkins, Martha, 50 1Vilkins, Rollin, 50 Willer, Lois, 44, 50, 67, 89, 103, 105, 113, 114 37lilliams,Al?onal2l?57, 72, 90, 95 'i mot, ice, , wilson, Dont, 5? 96, 99, 119 ison, ac , 4 Wilson, Eleanor, 50 VVils0n, Kathryn, 50, 57 Wilson, Laura Lee, 50 wilson, ?.1al:gagSt, 50 1 o , , , . Vilirfgfll Vaibur, 113 Winters, Martie, 57, 78, 83, 84 Winters, Zoe Anne, 38, 63, Trulock, Alberta, Turner, Marilyn, Turpin, Virginia, 36, 82, 84 50 27, 36, 69 Tutt, DeVere, 36, 72, 97, 98 Tutt, Donna Lee, 57 U Uhlmann, Yvonn Underwood, Jack, 89, 118 e, 50, 67 49, 50, 65, UDP, Howard, 57 67, 72, 78, 111 Winters, Rita, 38 Witherbee, William, 50, 115 Witherbee, Ned, 57 WV'itherell, Dorothv, 38 Witherell. Gale, 38, 72, 75, 76, 113 Wlitherell, Phyllis, 57, 64, 111 Woll, Betty. 57 Wood, Don, 38 VVood, Harriet, 57, 103, 106 'VVobd, Melvin, 38, 98 VVoods, Mr. Elsworth, 14 Woodson, Kenneth, 57 Vallero, Joseph, 96 Van Antwerp, Lugene, 36, 79, 80, 84 Vancggr Beek, Mr. Howard, 14, Van Drumen, Gertrude, 57 Van Vliet, Hendrick, 26, 36, 63, 70, 79, so, si, 113, 114 Van Winkle, Wynetta, 36 Vogt, Beverly, 82 Venlund, Esther, 57 W NVagher, Russell, 36, 115 Wake, Bill, 57, 79, 80 Woolsey, Geraldine, 57 Woolsey, Marilyn, 57, 111 Woolsey. Shirley, 20, 38, 63, 64,13 66, 1 , 121 Worden, Eileen, 38 Worman, Louis, 57, 79, 80, 81, Wright, Wright, Wright, Wright, 99 Duane, 50, 89, 93,115 Everette, 57 Franc1s, 38 Robert, 38, 99 Wynn, Janet, 57, 61, 67 Walker, VValker, Wallace, Perkins, 36 Robert, 36 Doroth 50 Y Wallace, Mary Ann, 57, 79, 80, 1 Wallace, Sarah, 20, 36, 61, 63, 64, 109, 114, 116 Wallrich, Jack, 57, 90 VValters, Bernadine, 45, 50, 82 Walters, Bob, 50, 83, 99, 118 Ward, Gertrude, 57, 72, 111 Ward, Eze, 89 Ward, ict-or, 36 Ward, Vivian, 37, 82, 103, 111 Watkins, Bette, 37, 113 Watson, Marjorie, 57 Watson, Pauline, 37, 82, 83, 84 Yarde, Betty, 50, 79, 80, 119 Yarde, Edwina, 38, 67, 72, 77, 79, 80, 81, 115 Yelm, Robert, 83 Yocum. Marvin, 49, 50 York, DeWitt, 57 Young, Betty Jane, 38, 69 Young, Rex, 50, 113 Youngblood, Miss Alta, 14 Youngren, Patsy, 48, 50, 82, 83,84 Z Zeldes, Joan, 52, 53, 55, 57, 61, 67 Zeigler, Robert, 38 Zerkle, Miss Betty, 14 Zuidema, Arthur, 57, 99 -W5 .V , 'w 1 al- -ff: M'-W , -1, .1 4. Tffirwaac, " 2 ,? . I 14.- H ' Q A .. '. V. 'V , 5 V,fjiKx3g,,,,L 5 vlQQY3Z:kV Qi 4- '-3:.x:gr-.Qff 5w:f'HQf3.4-A., 5w,..4f'j1- I Dear Shirley: ,,,.qg'u1,9v,,QV,4.-V Av A - .K V ,:V . , V, I, " 5 , .nv 4- w w,7Vt,, 'X , V , , 1.4, , K if ' '- . ' ' . 'f ' , LL' , 1 ' , V f '- 1 V . 3 , , -,.f'.. I ' ' sr -af-I ,lm ' I ,1VSo ends our yearbook, and now it's the privilege pf you' if ' V and your staff to place upon the shelves the thirty-sixtha - "S, enjoy every minute as We have.i t S ii V ' Wereh't you thrilled when the April 50 BUDGET headlines' ,A announced your selection as editor-in-chief of the 1945 M .'v 4 HEETECTOR? I was very happy for you, for I recall exactly V how I felt last year, Even while you were overjoyed with o fa the honor, no doubt you were wondering, UHOW in the world Af?Q A .Vy Will we ever get everything in the yearbook?V Wwhat will epw our theme be?W HCan I work well with the new staff?n ' i 1 pa, Yes, Shirley, I know the questions you've been asking fr yourself and the ones you'll ask until the book's released.' rw .L , 1 You'll ask new ones every day,tand, finding solutions to sn them, you'll lead the production ofia yearbook of which your I senior class will be justly proud. A ' I w wx, v ,V rang "V'You're a girl who isn't afraid of hard Work, and you KQQW , if .L . have a fine staff, one capable of producing what it takes, V+ Youfll put in a lot of overtime, you'll have headaches over deadlines and Hdeadheads.U fBut it'shworth it, Shirley, for Q A, w v V . I 1425. V V ?the pleasure is all yours.V . V . 12 wiv , ,.,, . pf, A Sincerely, 'M 5.5 if . fi our " ul 4-iw .QQV Galesburg Senior High School 'mg June 4, l942 v, it ,., ..- , K. - J., ,,-,,. v a -AVE fk',aBe.if,w-2:25..igwi-.e'Lv.a.' .J 1 ,fi-i?.mwf2ae1 f.- ,, A , 'ng . 4 f ,-A V. mV . V . I+-J ek 'L L V n 5 V j ,yfgipfgiq - ' I I 29: ' ,ali ,PW . 'eff .. -,.i,,,V,- ,W ,J .?,VmVV,,.,5, V. rl f:,gf,pe': 'pry ry gr' 5, iw ' .,.oa"mr, - waitin fgtaii . ' 3 ra , ' ,qdg:Lg?5!5QF5py . V J ' ' W-Q Fi 3 . I W,-gifgf d., wx . f qw. 11: qv" .J gf v: ,- 4' fi- ff L" Qff I' it fvi - vfafwaagwwwwdw , Q . , , I gash?-lm, 1' i'.,fgzV:3.-133 ' ' - X HJW1Wr,5r23'?,a3t5Q!reeT5i:.A M S- I Iw+a amwwiwunmmvw ' f r V I ,I t fqigrggk :pt ' I nn ,'ffvw'1wJ ,Lf ' , f ., I 1 v ' j ' VV- I 4 SIL-0 1 'wT-,, ' I druid? . V , I, - ' fax W , ' , Y V , . I-. . ..' : ,A H.-'rf"w:1'.+p.1,'f fiffd' A f,-, ,. V1,.L,'f Q ,, M V 25,?'...f ,QW f..2i.z.m: A 2-1? Y iafaffga D ,ffl 1 REFLECTOR. You'll find it's a gigantic task, but you'll 'I ff? m 1' 5 W 1 e lm 6.


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