Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL)

 - Class of 1938

Page 1 of 146

 

Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1938 Edition, Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 146 of the 1938 volume:

1 I .,! C 'EH 3' qalsxl 9+ . V , I 1- ----f,L , ,,,,.i..-.. .-,.., . ..--v- '- 1,1 rn 4 I , , , ...., 7,7 ,A A Q --- '-f"'4r ' -I - ' ' --1-nl" f ' if L74 .4 .. 9 A 6,1 f P-- REFLECTUR ' E THE 195 , WE PRESENT O Of Q IN MERRIE ENGLAND . THE 1958 - J RIEIFLECTOR 7 . 7 , A COLLECTION OF REFLECTIONS BY THE SENIOR CLASS GALESBURG HIGH SCHOOL HERE ILLUSTRATED BY CHARLES LIPSKY MARGARET THOMAS RUTH LOZIER DALE FLORER AND EDITED BY LOUISE WEBSTER 'UP WITH THE KEEPER OF THE PURSE ROBERT MOWER HUS YOU SEE O O IN MERRIE ENGLAND f ' in dw 1 -1 U vu DEAR OLD GALESBURG HIGH SC'i-ICUCEE J 7- -' 1 - . .x , .l N W . .1 Q .A -If 1 t - - l ll lf, l' U R lf, XX O R ll? Oh, to have been in England in days that have long since faded beyond our short-sighted view. 0 Days of powdered periwig and full skirted coat, days of silk stockings and satin knee breeches 0 With the gentle- men, gallantry reigned supreme and the young ladies were the embodiment of all that bears the Surname of beauty. In that enchanting land of our imagination. let us for a moment fancy our school as a miniature of Merrie England in the eighteenth century, sophisticated, precise, fashionable. correct .er It is to the pleasant people of this England, that we dedicate this thirty-first Reflector, hoping it will catch in the net of your memories a few backward glances before facing the future. PROUDLY MAY YOUR COLORS FLOAT W? f' Xfx f W I N ' ' 1 If " A kid H' DEAR OLD GALESBURC HIGH SCE-3fi ,fE1Q'f gvZ -Q-41 fda 'fe cpl 3 HIE TABLE OIF' CONTENTS BOOK I BOOK II BOOK III BOOK IV BOOK V PRAISES TO THE From a famous Fleet Street bookshop in London, we collected this material which we hope reveals the savory elegance of the sophisticated wit, fashions, and intrigues of the eighteenth century in Merrie OldEngland. 9 The Sclinooll y King u- Prime Minister o- Oxford c- Cambridge ov Hampton Court 9 Tlhie Ciiaisses l Our Cabinet 0- Crown Princess 1' Crown Prince 1' House of Lords 0' House of Commons ov Middle Classes 'Peasants 9 .Acllsiiviiihli-es Coffee Shops 0' Covent Garden Theatre cv Symphony 0' Ridottos 0' "Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese" 0' The Tatler 0 zxtlzilnlieihics ' Cricket U' Rugby 0' Soccer U' Fencing 0' The Hunt 0' Handball 4' May Pole 3 Features Blue Stocking 1- Grub Street o- Lloyd's ev Sir Roger and the Mohawks 0- Pillions o- Snuff Box 0- Flea Circus SILVER AND THE GOLD -1. . z'- R Q4 1 QI. ---r --Y ww- 4 l W . . ,.- A A .fgjlva 2'i'-ip v . DEAR OLD CALESBU 5 HIGH .rw I, 'Ili' fl l fl 31 Sl 'fI7li1fR IINTIEZNDIEZNT Hail to thee, king of our royal dominionsl I We humbly bow before thy royal pres- ence to offer our praise to one Who has so successfully t guided our ship of state through its perilous Waters this year .0 Due to your sincere and noble efforts our foreign affairs have been skillfully managed and our great country placed on a basis of high academic accomplishment among the other great countries or high schools in this vast World, our country 0 Again We give our cheers for thee, Mr. Young, a supreme ruler of our small land. YOUR SONS WILL EVER BY YOU STAND U li R ll IR l N If l VA lo, To thee We offer homage, gracious prime minister of our realml 0 Thou Who managed with great and commendable results the domestic problems confronting this high school, our mother country, during the first year in thy new office 0 Praise and gratitude we offer thee . . small return for the service thou hast rendered me 0 Your name will long be 'remembered in the hearts of your many and newly-made friends and it is they who here' offer their sincere homage to thee Mr. Robertson, gracious prime minister. YOUR DAUGHTERS . gg. "ROUND YOU RALLY : gn-u'f - f?L't THJE PUBLHSHERS Editor-in-chief 0 0 0 LOUISE WEBSTER Assistant Editor 0 0 0 IDA ANN STAMBAUCH Business Manager 0 0 O ROBERT MOWER Assistant Business Manager O O O WILLIAM LEVINSON S T A F F Robert Bromberger Barbara Lewis Russell Brown Charles Lipslry Lois Cook Ruth Lozier Martha lean Crabtree lim Mclree Dale Florer Patty Miner Mary lean Frankenberger Eleanor Neilson Lorayne Friclrey Dale Nelson Harold Guenther Miriam Parks Charles Guthrie Ted Pihl Iud Harlan Margaret Thomas Clifford Heller Eloise Tupper Iohn Highlander Betty Wirt C Q Q Adviser Art Adviser Photographer Miss Babbitt Miss Belsllaw Mr. Damberg I Engravings by the Printing by the Pontiac Engraving Company Wagoner Printing Company Covers by Kover Kraft TO SHOUT YOUR PRAISES O'ER OUR LAND X BUUKM 5 1,0395 AND M9155 0 O IN MERRIE ENGLAND Y ,gg , , ,W , ,ff 'i'- W.. THE P Editor-in-chief Assistant Editor Business Manag S T Robert Bromherger Russell Brown Lois Cook Martha lean Crabtree Dale Florer Mary lean Frankenherger Lorayne Frickey Harold Guenther Charles Guthrie Ind Harlan Clifford Heller Iohn Highlander -O Adviser 1 Art Acl. Miss Babbitt Mr Engravings by the Q Pontiac Engraving Company Covers by TO SHOUT YOUR PRAISE - ' ' All Assistant Busine - .1.g 1' S GLASSES - 5 WIND The wincl in shameless cruelty. Tore up a small chilclqs lcite Then twitchecl a girlis soft flying hair Ancl tool: her hat from sight. He hlew the heggaris flimsy coat Until he shivering lay. I woncler if the wincl some clay Will hlow himself away! -Patricia Rogers SOUTH SEA SILHOUETTE A lunar target heclcs a foolish loon: A silver plate is the hlue lagoon: But a hlaclcer shadow than the hlaclc of night shatters the plate and clevours its light. The shaclow hurls and spears the moon With a lancing mast like a ghost spontoon. This is the picture that East of Day A lonely sailor on his lonely way Sees and misses in that coral hay. -Rupert Miller INTELLIGENSIA O IN MERRIE ENGLAND 0 ' M 'N '-v 'vl'f'l 'ls I r s uf J' f- J H H 8 If .L ,M 45,1951 ,HM v . N ff 1'N-4' -4, 5f'I:",' fa' Nilvffli UU swf at ' uv' HPTQ ws vi, S AM NA Ala AM Ala NA AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM Au BM AM M N4 Ata AM MAMA M ata MA Au AM A24 MA MA gg 1 l 1 1 v l w f gf QF E' ri 5' 'E' 75.5-.-..ve-I-'fh. H , V E' wa :fff 's Q m - ,jf V E' l.:'l':lelEf , u 1315 l'ill4G4i! if q ,2 M, ."' f-S,-',"'Qf:"' V Z' ,f ' M' ' ' N 'R sl QZ A N 3, . . . . . ,Q A i There 1S a gay merry plc- But why are we so interested in the social A 5. fi . - 7 ' .z 4 y , 'ri-.eg turesque vividness about the set-up of the England of a hundred years A 1 4 infff- my . . . v l Z' .,ye ' l Q romantic England of the ago? The reason is that our school associa- 'R l q . . . . u 12' eighteenth century, a dash- tions smack so very much of "Merrie Old 'R q 1, . . . . . v 2' ing brilliance that could Englandf, For our seniors are greatly like 'S E' never have been possible if those nobility, ruling at every chance oppor- 'S . . . . . . Y E' there had not existed a startling contrast be- tunlty, yet just as desirous of fun and merr1- 'S v . . . 2' tween the various types of people who made ment as their subordinants. And then there 'E 5' up history's "Merrie Old Englandf' are the happy, joy-seeking juniors, who both 'g 2' Of course there were, first of all, the con- rule and obey, are masters and subjects, carry 'S S' fident nobilit who ruled the reat Em ire out and command and are the friends 'Z 6 ya g P 9 7 B . . . . 7 ji not with the iron hand of suppression, but of all higher and lower. Cf course our if l ' with a entle hand of kindliness. For after school world would be absolutel incom lete 'Z 4 g Y P ? gg all, life to each and everyone in the English without those necessary constituents, the li iv kingdom, from the highest to the lowest, was peasants or sophomores, they who jump at 45 Ev one of gayety, freedom, and search for our every beck and call, yet whose customs, 45 if pleasure, on this front all Englishmen were fads, mannerisms, and styles are copied by 15 Ev united. everyone, and whose care-free search for 45 gi Next came that great middle class of pleasure IS joined by all. But who governs 45 Q people whose thoughts, desires, ideals, and and controls these classes? For this job, one .E E. wishes dictated the actions of those higher up group of people and only one answer the call 45 E, on the ladder of cultural England. These for governing efficiency-the Parliament of if ez, were the happy ones who instigated the England-here personified by the teachers of 1? if pleasures, mannerisms and customs of the our England or high school. 45 in throbbing throng known as England. Truly England was a joyous, pleasant 45 in But what would that nation ever have country to live in and our school too .5 gr been without the frivolous, care-free peasants, provides the same interest, gayety, and .E S, who conscientiously obeyed the happiness, not just in frivolitv, .Z 5 d f h h In England there were classes b - k h d I B it every WOI' O t C lg ef'uPS, gif thsgj' yegxlrshofnlpigiialgtoyl ut In Wol' QCCOYHP IS C , In is ll es lg 3 f 7 , , , it yet whose manners and cus- Of peasants D00f and low- desires satisfied, goals reached, 15 E, toms were copied in every part lfIj5flg3ff3XqXlEX:10jj:'ll0o ifgliz S honors won, and hopes ful- 45 Er of the great realm. rf,Q'i,,'lff',f,1fff ,ffong " filled. 45 W v ' ' ' A 4 A A 0 4 A A 4 A A 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 A - A A 1 rg 0 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 tx l 131 1 SAM AM AM AM All AM AM AM AM BM AM BM A!! B!! AM AM AM A!! AM AM AM AM All All A!! AM B!! B!! M M BM BM Q 1 Y 5, 4 . ETHE BUARD Ulf? EDUCATTUN'E if 1 it 1 1 rr- Q EI 0" . 1? in 45 E' E 5' 'E E' 'E E' 'E 1 Y ii ig Q bb 4 A Q z' 'E br 4 W E gb E Q . . . . . . . V Z' In every country there are both visible and cate this page in recognition of their constant 'E Z' invisible forces that really control and assure service, aid and advice. Truly, they are the N 1 . . . . . . E' success or failure to that particular country. invisible forces that have guided our school, 'g 1 . . . . E' . It 1S not always those in the foreground our England, through this past year with so 'E v S' h d h ' l h ' ' h Th b f h B d " A W o o t e most, not aways t e noisiest muc success. e mem ers o t e oar A: E' who steer the ship of state to a safe harbor of Education manifest much interest in our Ee . Y E' at the end of each year. schools and we appreciate what they do to 'Q . . . v E' We, too, have our invisible forces or help- help make our schools better. 'E V' ers, for without our Board of Education the The Board of Education consists of a re - 'E l 7 7 E' business end of our school life is unthink- resentative from each ward, the Superintend- if Q able. A good ship has a first class captaing ent of Schools, the Mayor. and City Clerk 'E E' a happy and contented country has a wise as Ex-Qfhcio members. This year the fol- 5 Ev and faithful leader. So, too, in our school lowing served as members: Mr. E. Ander- 'E 3' we have a Wise conscientious tireless leader son, President Ex-Officio, Mr. C. O. Youn , 'E 0 7 7 V Ev ever alert to the needs of his country and its Superintendent, Mr. A. L. Nystrom, Clerk ig 5- people, our school and students, our Mr. Ex-Ofiiciog Mrs. Louise O,Connor, First 1214 if Young. Ward, Mr. C. Lagergren, Second Ward, 'IQ Q With him as their leader, the Board or Mr. R. Chandler, Third Ward, Mr. G. 'E E. cabinet is able to efficiently tend to the man- Lofgren, Fourth Ward, Mr. C. Hinchman, 'gf' E. aging and business part Fifth Ward, Mr. R. 45 S, of Our educational sys- Tof Row-Mr. R. Hinchliff, Mr. A. Nystrom, Mr..E. Sixth Wards 45 6 . u NV. Mureen, Mr. G. Lofgren, Mr. R. Chandler. First V 3 rem and lt IS to them Rowgmf. c. Hinchman, Mr. J. E. Anderson, Mr. Mr. E. W. Mureen, 1g 6 , , O 0 Young, Mrs. Louise O'Connor, Mr. C. I. V gi. that we wish to dedi- 1. 1, g, en. Seventh Ward. .RQ 71 711 711 711 711 711 711 Z1 711 711711711711 711 711711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 7K 711 711 711 K1 R I 14 I 1 l i 5 737317iUiY7i17iV7iX'7iU'iV7i47iVHWiVW7ii7ZWiWK7ZWiYYZYYKYFSVYKVYSYYZWKVYZVYKWVZYYNVSV E151 MBMMAMAMMBMMAl!AA!AA!4A!H!4l!4B!H!4A!4A!4MAl!6M4MA!AB!5A!4A!4A!AA!AMH!4l!5l!H!H!4l!5AMl!0!5l!0!6M4l!4E PSBQFQEDE' '45P5l5T35'wES'935H'E8'535'I X' O9-Palicgg D-hmmffn O f:fVf'1'j"'O O R :S-'3"'v-x COQQL. S-'lHO,fVO 73 QQOSPQ Y M ,7"'E:g.Q,m"Em:,-: Cs O mm O 'E 2ggD""'Q- wma-5'.-,X2Hg'Ng'16h'.!'..9QXg-2 E y wfo,...rv v--5 F, 0 '-ro 5 4 ET?-FLQQEFBQ-3022-1-553.fi5O522 Z 'DLL 'Do'OfvfLS2Q- D'S2s'2O:15 ff"'U 'B f-+o,7-S-.95 -rn.-.9vS'fD'f:Ifv U-9.5 o"E- ,V EAQ'-1 rung-OQ5"UQ,,"-'D-xQQwg..'5"rb B02 g f-f'UQO- UQW ,hr-O09-7 Q-gmvpoo Z 'U7935'gUE.D.-,f'jTUUE-22-E..Ug,g552Q,2,'g 'Q Ego-S5,3'gE'o3li."g5-53,2QfE5'Q'g-33 Z R 3252.152-g?"vS 51094502 Hmovia-QF-W 'E m O ,.,mmvTjy:0.Q Q 53-'.3f+ v-1,., ff5g9E5L B2'OH,Tm25S22'P-75'v"3'Q WE 5-C P--Brux4""?'w"El3"':5Of-f O-rvw"'v-v'+- O 9 mv-:mm golgmarbn-n,.'l.D"g..m X4 Lv-eg m lg QR,-gt 0. wkwagg-QQEIQD 4g fwfssfm Sewage?-556.5553-2E'f9Lw W L fic 0-4 F'-ggi vm O mv U1 v- Q-tm O 1 , FQBEEQ mg-o2'3m35-.gp-93' NEQCSRQ- 5 gH--.:,45j:- m,,v-hm mfbqc: ,-,7T, V-'mn QR -1 Z H22 w :S '-1 0 Br-ng.. 53- 'V , H25-5 3.aTo,,P-7s.g,,,2,.wf+m,.mg22 .z avsfrqg-gona?-35-FA,:sQ.asn. bg Q 5' W2 A 5' -of v ...-., Em 41 : -3 su :no U1 :zz-v'-f-:uf-f :O""f'- Q A 3,35 QE,9:,ngf535S,'e+'.255ufsE5jg .z -1- aggsgggmxg-Q,a..QU2,.gf-vmafogxtfbgr. fi ,, va 2- D53-URN "mf,o3"E YES?-5 'F ' "UmmOQ20QQ'-'fbdg mm Z Q: . I"U,.,.-.,.,3Cmn.ax5- mn-vp-hUg2X4m G ab :."Om - fv 000000, 5250! --" wE7""P1 .1 21: .Z nmmsoogibxibd'-'f3fVB"'D-79-D'-' E wasp-LCf.HO-gms-gfvmfsme xg L 0'-oq', Q- . Dagcxg'-fnmne-nQ..gSnOgD"9:R-mmm- QP- DJf-rO:x5-Q- CDBCP-nxq UQ Cm 'N 'E dwg-5r,,g-gxqg52.32-Eh5:EggdE.gx4Qg'.D. .E OMUQW To Q-93-' w"' N5L,.".i.U"rvX4 D--Off-E."Osman-9Oa'rEE?B?'.WQFH 515 O .'- 0-D- fvamv- zz--Ca-wwzwss wma' V 25-Pmggw S3-5",,gS-ME 5-5355.2-"'?a'9,,E'8f, W '5 Ev 5.0,-hmmgg. g..mQrHaaQ-ST-97 6JQ..E'D.. .ss :D-542,-ggsao s,55R'2HQ.,5'oSC5Q,LE5' 9 .z O-aw"1'Q,in5 new HBfm8:-'P-2 ? Qwimaggom T SRTPBHQ' wil 'E Ffwahg. M9343 QQZ9Q3,5fn.,-4'g Z ,Q v-- UI S L Bmgggggg SIE-wOSw33'gS?-55119 .z o..mro.f,FvFvn.. 5039 .-.-.rnwex-vo.:s-v': CD S Ii A P' """' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 'V' 'V' v'1r'1r'1v' r'1v'1v'1'1 11 nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv nv vs gmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm ,Q 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 ii iQ H mv mmmmmmmmmmm F lA Q2 Li L, T JOHN ATCHISON, Physics Witty, clever, a regular guy With a deep respect for those who try. HARRY ALDUS, Commercial A brilliant fellow in a game of chess, A brilliant teacher, we will confess. I-IAZEL ANDERSON, English A basketball fan, loyal and true, A winning smile for me and for you. RACHEL ANDERSON, Librarian Books are her hobby, vocation in life, Most helpful to us in the thickest of strife MARIORIE BABBITT, English For several years past she has led the REFLECTOR, For which we have all learned to respect her. CHARLES BEDNAR, History Little in stature, not so in mind, A more excellent teacher is hard to find. FLO BELSHAW, Art For school activities she's clone her part With a willing smile and her lines of art. THOMAS BROOKING, Industrial Arts Over rough, untried roads, the S. A. A. Was smoothly guided in his efficient way. CLARA CYPREANSON, Pliysical Education Her classes she holds in the pool and gym To make some girls fat and other ones slim. ROY DAMBERG, Industrial Arts We appreciate greatly his printing art, His friendly smiles and congenial heart. MARIAN DUKE, Home Economics She teaches her girls to sew a Hne seam, Each one holds her in highest esteem. GRACE EGAN, English Eyes a-twinkle with fun and laughter, She'll be remembered forever after. mmmmg E Y 'S 5 E E E 'S Q E E E Q E E 'A E E E E Q Q E E '-5 'R Q E E E E E E E E E 5 5 E E E E WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWR i161 NMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM Mmm F xg Q2 E7 L, T at ROSS FREEMAN, Biology A leader in Biology and sports as well, Q Most easily described as just plain swell. E, IRMA GALE, Hillary HP Her wisdom she's gathered from Helds of thought. S' Her intellectual knowledge highly wrought. 4 MM HARRY GARST, Mathenlatics E With a hidden sense of humor, he passes around Q His mathematical knowledge of great renown. Z' S, JOHN GILLESPIE, Plvyrical Education 4 An athletical director beyond reproach gl Known far and wide as the Galesburg coach. 5 5 . Q WILLIAM GOODWIN, History W To a new member on our staff this year, as To students from Hitchcock he was already dear. MMMM ROYAL HARSHBARGER, Commercial 'Tis more than a mere rumor, He has a good sense of humor. MMM JEANNETTE HILKER, French Nexer judge this teacher by the smallness of size, But by the kindness, as seen in her eyes. S. ELLEN IRVINE, Engnfb A Hers is a gift that is quite rare, ED In everything she is more than fair. 5 S1 4, MILDRED JOHNSON, Commercial 2 In her we've found a pleasing blend S, Of a good teacher and a good friend. Q E, PAUL JOHNSON, History gp Again let us say, V We think you're okay. E 5 E. FLORA LAMB, Lain gg, A fine instructor in all her teaching, Z Lets actions speak instead of preaching. A!! All A!! All All ROY LANDON, Iriduslrial Arty Fine and splendid in a manly way: Stern, yer congenial through every day. 'Uwe +1- Q ,um VJ Z Y 6 V 'R Y E V 'R V 'R E V 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R E V 'R V 'R V 'R E 1 E Y 6 V 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R E V 'S E E V 'R V 'R V 'R Y Q E V 1 'Q R .Z B E V 'S V 'R E V 'S V 'R V 'R V 4 1 E A V 'R ZmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmR E171 SSM!MZMZMZMZNZMZMZMZNZNZMZMZMZMZMZMZMZMZMZNZMZMZMZMZMZNZNZNZNZMZNZE! 91' 'E 5, vu 5, 2 5, qv G 5, 5' 5, 5. E' 5. it SZ W al 5, 3 5, Zi Q, E ab 5, 91' E' 91' ii' E' E' in V 92 Q Z' Q 72' P E E' E' w 2' Fi IFAICUL EDWIN LANTZ, Music With an air of dignity he directs the band Which follows closely in every command. HELEN MOFFITT, Spanish Very charming, and oh, so neat, One whom all would like to meet. I ' I Q FRANCES IVIOSER, Commercial 1 , Best known by students in her class, With charm which few will ever surpass. is iins I EDNA NICKEL, English Willing to pause amid many tasks To aid in thought or a smile to cast. HELEN OLSON, English A competent teacher in every phase, To her we lift unlimited praise. RAY PEART, Agriculture A friend to all heseems to grow As each of us, he learns to know. GERALD PHILLIPS, Physical Education A quick and keen knowledge of basketball playg In the hearts of us all he holds full sway. LUCY RICI-I, History Clever and witty, as she is described by all, Her sense of humor we will forever recall. SYLVIA RYIN, English Miss Ryin,s acquaintance is one to be sought, She is liked very well by all she has taught. FRANK SEILER, Chemistry A chemistry teacher who is very well known, A friend and an adviser to us he has grown. FLORENCE SHELDON, Spanish A lovely lady, we will assure, Mem'ries of her will long endure. PRINCE SLAVEN, Latin With his fine personality and happy grin. The friendship of students, Mr. Slaven can win, '26 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E e 'E 'E 'E fi 'E 'Ei '26 'E 'E 'E ii 'E 'E 126 'E Y '16 'E Y '3 I 4 5 fs V 4 5 if 'E V is 'E +5 'E 'E 'E 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 7113 IISI 3!A!AB!0Ml!4l!H!L A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 AM A24 A24 A24 All A24 A24A24 A24 BM A24 AIA A24 A24 A24 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. EI 5. 5. 5. 5. Av 5. Z! 5. 5. 5. S4 A 5. Zi 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. ZZ 5. 5. 5. 5. 71 5 F JA C1 U L. T 'Y CHARLES SMITH, Mathematic: If you are dumbfounded with angles and spheres, Mr. Smith will erase your math'matical fears. RUTH STICKLE, Englixh A woman of great wisdom and wit, Our defects she cures in American Lit, MARTIN SWANSON, Commercial A man of ability who loves fung His greatest joy is work well done. WAYNE SWINTON, Economics For our hall of fame we will select, Mr. Swinton for his intellect. GRACE TERRY, Music The high school singing, Miss Terry leads, Her chorus supplies our musical needs. VELMA WHIPPLE, Biology As a scientist her views are wide, By her promises she'll always abide. V W Q fx 1 Wt 45, ' -.L 'Q ef 1 3 eJ.i,!72z,,,2,. El2if MELVIN WHITE, Dramatic: Expressions of emotion and of fearg Good plays produced by a director sin ere VELMA WHITE, Mathematics Ir is hard to say in two short lines What we feel in our hearts and know in our minds. ALTA YOUNGBLOOD, Home Economic: Liked better by students from day to day As she greets them all in her friendly way. CAROLYN HAGGENJOS, Clerk No matter what the task may be She willingly works, with generosity. BETTY I-IUSTED, Regixtrar Efficient, capable, what more could we ask Of our registrar, with such a hard task. TRESSIE PERARDI, Treasurer This attractive miss, will surely impress Every student in G.H.S. mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm U93 ? 'E 'E 'Ei 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E E 5 'E 'E 'E E 'E E 'E .5 'E .5 5 5 fi 5 E 'E 'E .5 'E 'E .5 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E R , M, IM AM :M AM BM Ava AM Ava Ava Na Ava Ava A24 AMNMMAMM Y 'E V 'Sf 'V 45 15 'S Y 'S V 'R 'V 'E 'E +5 'Ii Y 'Q V 'R 'Z B 'E 'E V T2 V E 'E V 4 5 if V '12 E V 'S P' 5 R E V 'R 'E-.4 'E xv N 'E Y ui v 'S IES .22 ili- 754 'rift 7 4 4 vp 4 WX 'wi "A A A A A KIAXIIXIAXWVIVNSZ MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM. I JMLJA gwvrwwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm5 R IN' LIX7ESS UI? And being very weary with a long day's toil at school, I laid me down to rest and having drifted into a deep sleep I dreamt this dream. In my dream I did wake and rise and be- hold myself in a strange land and I knew not how I had come there. I saw a man coming toward me and I stopped him saying, g'Friend, canst thou tell me the name of this place? I am Student and I know not where I am." And he an- swered saying, 'cThis is the land of I-Iigh School Days and I am Faculty." And looking about, I perceived that but for a few barren or rocky places, it was a fair land. Then I asked of Faculty that he would show me how I might return from whence I had come. I-Ie replied "There is no turning back, nor yet a tarrying here. Thou must pass on into Life through the land. There are three ways from which to choose. Yon- der lies the first, the Get-by Way. It is aim- less and passes through barren land. The second is more difficult, but it passes through places of beauty. The third is the shortest and most direct, although hilly and narrow. Its compensation lies in the exceeding fairness of its horizon and the reward at the end." I bade him good-bye, thanking him for his kindness, and set FQCDBIJEINIESS sign, SCHQLARSHIP, I was weary indeed. Sitting down to rest I discovered a book lying in the dust. I saw its title to be Knowledge, and I read therein words of wisdom. Being thus refreshed I proceeded on my way. A thick gloom had begun to gather, I found the path only with difhculty. Then I came abreast with a band of men consult- ing one with another, for ahead all was blackness and there was no guide. They im- plored of me to show them the way. Seizing a torch from one of their number, I plunged into the darkness. The way was hard but gradually the gloom lifted until we were again in the sun-light. And I saw a sign marked LEADERSHIP. I plodded onward. While engaged with my own troubles I heard the cry of a man. I-Ie had slipped on a stone and fallen into a pit. I thought to ignore him, but his cries grew so pitious I turned back to lend him a helping hand. Then it was that I beheld the last sign, SERVICE, and knew the end of my journey to be nigh. Lo, I looked and beheld the torch of the National Honor Society. Thereupon did I waken from my slumber and meditate upon my dream. And upon interpreting it, I knew that those who tread the path faithfully earn ' E. Ii k , G. I! I , R. I5'll' fi. fi. Ii fett. F. - - gl forth On the tl'11rCl camfffc. Cillsfnqlgii cifsnflfsiliiiipls. cooiliiin, J. the reward Whichls rec- 5 . Crabtree, M. Cramer, F. Dahlstrom, G. Davis, R. . . . an Path. S0011 I SPICCI the Fairbairn. E. Frankeberger. M. J. Frzmnkenburger, T. OgI11t10Fl the NIHUOYI' . l Freda, P. Freed, K. Freese, J. Gordon. H. Guenther. D E, fu-st Sign, Whlch was M. Qustatfson,'A. Harmon, C. Heller, J. Highlander. al Honor Soclety and I. Hinthliff. G. Johnson, M. Johnson, Elbert Jones, h T El J ., Ii. J. K ff , H. I' ss 'n, N. L' nrlon, Z' CHAR-ACTER' xx'in'feviii1Ilisi1, F. r.unfifei1r, E. niiiciriiiif, c. RIOSTE, I.. I at those who do not Nls,E.P ll,5I.P.k',E.I'tr.Y.l't ' " 5 Presently the road soiinoxl. I. H. Seicrreit, I. EX.CrS?I!l'il71lllgl'lt1 E recelve recognltlon are S'k , XY. S ', INI. S t, ls. Sxll ', R - is became rougher. When gfm 'fear Th iifiiis. TUDIIJT, i.. YitalilmHiIuYon- better for having as- La en L. XX let r. Il. XVes.t. L. NYhite, T. NYilson, . it I had reached the next ia. xx, n, 1: x lg, R. Mum qno paclmu. pired toward the goal. E Zmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmms E211 rf 'R v 'R Q 4 Q f 'R 1 u 'R V w E E E E Y 'S v I 'K Y 'S v E E E E E 5 E E E E E E E v 'N u 'R E Y 6 E E E E E Y E 5 E ' Q N' N4 B!! B!! B!! AM B!! All M4 N4 AM M4 B!-4 BM B!! AM M4 B!! BM All lf!! A!! AM MA B!! B!! B!! AM B!! B!! M4 M4 B!! M 'E Vllqllflllff. SENHUR Ship ahoy, matey! Haul up the anchor and we,ll be off! Pull in the gang plank! We're sailing! Ship ahoyl Ar the helm of the great liner, the S. S. Senior, during its great cruise of 1937-38, was Captain Thornton Freda, a capable master on any and all occasions, in storm and in sunshine, on land and on sea. First mate for the voyage was Mary jean Frank- enburger, first consultant and right-hand man of the Captain. A most efficient and business-like man this year was Louie Vitali in his office as purser of the S. S. Senior. Next ranking in importance among the great liner's officers was chief-keeper-ofbooks-and records, personified by Wanda Strawn, whose book-keeping abilities are to be highly praised. A very festive occasion was enjoyed by all the crew, officers and passengers when on May 10, the S. S. Senior dropped anchor in Bracken Bay and all debarked to spend a day at the greenbay of the Lake Bracken Country Club and surroundings. The ar- ranger, planner, and general "carrier-outer" of the excursion was enthusiastic passenger, Gene Swallow whose work in this office was applauded by fellow-passengers. Many of the passengers of the S. S. Senior aided in planning this gala occasion by being mem- bers of various committees for the day. As chairman of the refreshment committee Gale Benson worked with the following: Martha J. Crabtree, Elizabeth Stick- Q I g I g ney, Mary Stuart, Eloise E3,3ijh6.2al h'P F 'f Cl " . e mis gf Tupper, Lorayne Frickey, Whfn bay d th Y P Kenneth Freese, Clifford ijqjfingglnfgeir la ,pl g h d - f ' ' A t f r Heller and J0h11 Hlgll' wil.-n Tiff, ieilre us '1?'gha':'1Ye'TiS d S BHD ADHEU lander. Frederick Lundeen acted as chair- man of the boys, sports committee with helpers Herbert Willer, Bill West, Marcel johnson, Russell Brown and Sylvester Bly. Jean Scott acted as chairman of the girls, sports committee with Mary Stephens, Grabelle Lundquist, Harriett McVay and Rosemary Creighton composing her com- mittee. Genevieve Davis was chairman of the transportation committee and was aid- ed in her task by George Kemp, Marjorie Koons and Bob Mower. Assisting Louie Vitali on the treasury committee was Ida Anne Stambaugh, Barbara Lewis and Bill Levinson. Each and every member of this gay and happy party had a never-to-be-for- gotten time which was marred only by the thought the trip would soon be over and the good friends would have to part. As a frivolous farewell frolic the S. S. Senior let down her anchor at Galesburg High School, at which time the swing en- thusiasts gave vent to their feelings of rhythm at a dance planned by chairman Betty Wirt and assistants Floyd Moser, Charles Guthrie, Helen Culver, Carolyn Driscoll, Jud Harlan, Marjorie McLain, Russell Swise and Herman VonLangen. The S. S. Senior steamed into dock and dropped anchor on june 9 when graduation day was held for all of the passengers. On this gala occasion three hundred and seven- teen seniors were awarded their diplomas at the commencement exercises held in Steele Gymnasium. We bid farewell to one of the most outstanding classes the school has ever graduated. i sc oo an. 'E 4 E R 1? 4 5 Y '15 .YQ A V if +26 fi 'Ei N -Z6 1.5 E Y '16 'E V 5 'R Q L 4 5 4 42 L V 4 E 'N 'E 'E 'E .E 4 t 2 N .Z B 'E 'E V 4 R .Z S 'R v 45 'R '21 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 W 721 72121 fzz 3 my A!n!n!n-!n!4A!AA!n!n!n!4 A24 AM Ala AM ik AM AM AM Au i!4 Ala AM A24 sa AM BM AM ru Au AM AM 1: 5' A 5. 5' GI 5. 5. 5. 5. Zi 5. A 5. E' 91' 5. E' 5. 5. Ei 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. W as 5. 5. at 5. 5. E' 5. 5. E' 5. 5. 5. 5. 71 ENIOR ALLISON, ROBERT "Boys will be boys" the old adage states, But this boy's mischief nobody hares. ALVEY, DOROTHY Happy-goelucky, she goes on her way Trusting to luck from day to day. ANDERSON, EDWIN Short and quiet, but don't be fooled, In the art of learning he is well-schooled. ANDERSON, ETHEL A friendly lass as we all know, And when she leaves, welll miss her so. ANDERSON, SYBIL When you are gone we'll all feel blue, It has been fun just knowing you. ARMPRIEST, LEONA What's the use of hurrying: Why spoil life by worrying? AVERY, EILEEN Her love for fun is very great, Yet seldom is her work in late. BABBITT, 'IEANETTE "In my class I'll try to lead," Seems to be this miss' creed. BABBITT, MARCEL He always has a prank to play On anyone who comes his way. BARNES, LOIS With a quiet and unassuming grace, In the '38 class she takes her place. BARTON, FORREST A. Rah! Rah! Cheer! Cheer! Cheer! 'Tis Forrest Barton we show you here. BAYLESS, HAROLD In football this bright lad did do All that we had wished him to. BEADLES, ROBERT It was late in the season when into our midst Came Robert Beadles, a good physicist. BEAIRD, ETHEL MARIE She's full of pep, this Champaign lass, We're glad shels with the "38" class. BECKER, EILEEN We shall very surely miss Such a lovely girl as this. BENSON, GALE Words fiuently from his mouth do flow, With him "good sense" will always go. BERNTSON, ELSIE If favors of her are asked in haste, No time does she lose nor time does she waste. BERRY, PAUL He will surely gain renown For on his sax he goes to town. Q? W- G 1 Ha 'Pig I I .X .Z V 'R V 1 4 S 'E V O 1 3 'R V 'R v 'E V 16 V 4 1 S 'S '26 V 'R 'E V 'R V 'S V 'N V 'R V 'R V 'R 'E V 1 1 B .Z B 'E V 'S V 'R V 'S V 4 R V 'S V 'S v .g I 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R vzmvmvxwxwzwzwzvvzvvzoxwzvvzvvzvvzwxvmvxmv vxwgvvzmwxwxmvvzmvmvxmvmxs S!!!l!M!4A!4MMAB!!AMAMB!0!0!4AMMBMMMAAlum!!A!4A!4l!4l!0!AB!M!4l!4l!4l!0!0!5M 2' 2' V 2' 2' 1 2' 2' Q, 2 G 2' gr 2' 2' 2' Q 3 D E. 3 2 2' Q 2' 2' 2 2' 2' 4 2' 2 2 2' 2' 4 1 P A W 2' 1 2' K 2' 2' 2' 2 2' Q 2' Q E' E D 6 Y 2' 2' W 2' Q 5 P T. ri te Si gg X X, Q . i il Q s f j :lil I' xkvi lx 621 Q,fV fo? i 3 ENHORS BILLINGS, ROBERT Wit and humor, sage advice Give Bob's life its needed spice. BIRD, PHYLLIS Tall and serene, with grace to be praised. A murmur of awe when her name is raised. BJORK, FRANCES We know her by her jovial smile And pleasant expression worn all the while. BLAINE, GERALD A manager in sports, sturdy and erectg His personality has no points to correct. BLY, SYLVESTER A typical character of fun and laughter, A good model for us to follow hereafter. BONNEY, ROBERT Good spirits and happiness is his aim, With that for a guide he is headed for fame. BOTRUFF, RICHARD Quickly, quietly, he does his work, Never has he been known to shirk. BOWER, CLARA The sincerity of little Clara Bower Will always be her driving power. BOWERS, HOWARD Ready and willing to do his share, Heis never been known to be unfair. BOYD, RAY A loyal booster of G. H. S. He's a fellow you'll surely miss. BRASHEAR, GUY Everywhere a football goes, Brashear is there right on his toes. BRITT, RALPH He studies the soil in every condition, To be an agrarian is his ambition. BROMBERGER, ROBERT With his big bass fiddle by his side, Feelings of rhythm he cannot hide. BROWN, GORDON Full of wit and sage remarks, Gives good advice but never barks. BROWN, RUSSELL At REFLECTOR sales Russ' lungs are best, This book's the reason-you decide the rest. BROWN, THELMA To hear her sing is great delight, Her tones are so clear and bright. BRYANT, CARROLL A happy lad he seems to be, As' happy as anyone wishes to be. BURCH, DARLENE We'll miss your smiling face next year, Your pleasant words and bright, good cheer. 5 'E 'E E E 'EQ E E 'E 'E is 'E 'E 'Zi 'E E E 'E 'E V 'R fa fa 5 'E 's a ta a fa a AM mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmk f24 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 . 7:7 ummmmmmmmmMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMmmmmmmM ai a S E N ll U R S BURGETT, GRACE Her bright blue eyes and golden hair Give her that sort-of-angel air. BURRELL, ERNEST A chap who's high above reproach, For track ability-just ask the coach! CAMREN, VIRGINIA A jolly, likeable student, Efficient and ever prudent. CARLBERG, ROBERT If you know Bob you know what I mean, He is seldom heard but often seen. CARLSON, BERNICE A quiet young lady who rarely speaks, It's wisdom, knowledge and culture she seeks. CARLSON, DOROTHY Dorothy is, we wish to impress, A top-notch student of old G. I-I. S. CARLSON, GERTRUDE In years to come we will proudly state, She belonged to the class of "38." CARLSON, I-IARLO Everyone's friend is this happy fellow, Who can whistle all tunes whether swingy or mellow. CARLSON, ROBERT Friendliness, a jovial air Characterize this lad so fair. CARRICO, FRANK Frank is a gay boy and a friendly one too, But he newer plays till his studies are through. CEDERBERG, VIRGIELENE A singing voice as sweet as a bird, Some day in opera she'll be heard. CHASE, FLOY By dimples deep we know this maid, May her love of happiness never fade. CILLS, CAROLL To merely say she has joyous spirit Does not come anywhere near it. CLENDENIN, EDWARD Ed is gay and bright as the sun, Always ready where work's to be done. COATNEY, ROBERT As basketball center he piles up the s Calm, deliberate, six feet four. COBB, ALVIN We'll see him climb the ladder to fame, Since "fairness to all" is his middle name. COLE, MAXINE A book, a typewriter, a Hying finger, In the business world this girl will linger. COOK, LOIS So sweet and still And full of good will. core, 1 W' K fs 1? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 25 .Z E E E 5 E E E E E E E E E E 6 E E E E r E E E E E s E E E E 5 E E E R 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 E 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 X EZ 3, fi 5 E 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 gmmmmmmMMmmmmmmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmQ V W CRABTREE, MARTHA JEAN Modest efficiency is het possession, With time and hard work she makes no concession CRAMER, MARION When things are dull a sunbeam slips Into each corner of her lips. CREIGHTON, ROSEMARY Half stately, half shy, With a smile in her eye. CULVER, HELYN President twice of L. L. S. And many friends does she possess CUNNINGHAM, FAYE Specializing in all that's nice, She'd be a bargain at the highest price. CURLESS, THOMAS Here's to a favorite football star, Whose friendship's value is way above par. ft' DALTON, MARY Full of fun, a friendship true, With starry eyes that look like dew. DANEORTH, ADA Much mirth and no madness, All good, little badness. DARN ELL, ROSETTA DAVIS, GENEVIEVE Editor of the Budget, charming and smart In all undertakings, well done from the start. DAWSON, GALE A faithful friend is hard to find, But we've found Gale to be that kind. DIAZ, RUTH With gayriess that's disarming, And a sweetness quite charming. DORAN, MARGARET At swimming she's a "Shark,,' She considers high-diving a lark. DRISCOLL, CAROLYN We confess her giggle has quite won our heart, To be a success she has made a good start. DUERRE, STANLEY ' A happy smile is that of Stan, Spreading joy wherever he can. EMERY, FREDRICK Fred has one driving ambition it seems, Of being a linotypist he dreams. ENES, JULIA Lots of hair would characterize Miss Julia Enes, small in size. ERLANDSON, ELFREDA An elf in spirit and in size, A clever brain-and oh, so wise. SENHURS With a smile on her lips and one in her eyes, She's the kind of friend anyone would prize. V 'R Y is Y 4 S 'S Y si 'za te 5 'S K -a Q E 5 5 N Q E E V '5 E' is Q is Q Q E K E Q 'E K E 55HiHQWYWSWYHiWVR!WKWKZSHKHKEKEKWKWKWKWKWKWKWKWKMZHXWKHKWKZKW!WKZKNi i261 aA24AuA24A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 AM A24 AM AM A24 A24 A!4 A24 A24A!4A!4 A24 A24 A24 A24 AM AM A24 A2414 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 5' 53 5. E 5 5. 5. E' 5. 5. 5 5. 55 5. 5. 5. E' 54" if Ar 5. E' 5 if ei 94" qv 5 5 5 zu E' 5. ENTORS EYRE, ROBERT L He's full of mischief we'll admit, But also full of clever wit. i FELT, WALTER Short of stature, great of mind, Industrious in studies you will find. FEY, EDWIN Sense of humor with hearty laughter, A fellow we'll all remember hereafter. FIELD, CLELLA A comely miss, an amiable airg Topping it all-black raven's hair. FINDAHL, WAYNE He works with a will and a jolly smile, For a good baseball game he'd run a mile. FIROVED, WILMA If everyone worked as hard as she, A splendid place this world would be. FLICKINGER, CHARLES Charles is a boy we'll miss seeing 'round, 13 .fi A more willing worker will never be found. FLINN, HELEN Red is her hair, easy grace she shows, A gay, happy girl wherever she goes. p , FLORER, DALE f' ' 'i He's done his part in sports and REFLECTOR. Hels proven himself a good director. FOYE, HELEN Jolly and sensible, short and bright, One who always does what is right. FRANKEBERGER, EUGENE An interest in his work he shows, And cheerfulness where'er he goes. FRANKENBURGER, MARY JEAN All the way from Rio this girl came, Her hard work finds her in our hall of fame. FRANZ, MARY The golden blondness of her tressesg And oh, the style with which she dresses. FREDA. THORNTON Full of wit, his words are funny, In name and disposition "Sonny.', FREED, PHIL Anything about radio you'd like to know? If there is, to Phil you should go. FREESE, KENNETH This man Freese really has a brain, And what he does with it is "plana" FRICKEY, LORAYNE To speak of Lorayne quite specific, Not tall, not tan, but terrific. FRITZ, EDWARD A newcomer in our midst this year, Already great fame has he won here. 1 4 'E V 1 4 S 'E V 'R 'E 'E Y 'S V 15 'R 'E Z 1 B V4 'm Y 'E V 'R V 'R 'E 'ES Y 'E 'E 'E Y 'E 'E V 'E 1 E Y 'S Y 'E 'E if 'ZS Y 'E V 4 4 B V QF 'AQ V 'S Y 'E '26 'E' V 'S V 'R 'EQ Y 'ri 3 K1 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 W 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 R T271 N 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. .5 5. 5. 5. 5. S. 6 5. .3 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. .3 5. 5. .3 2. fd N4 B!! B!! B!! B!! BM B!! AM B!! B!! AM B!! M4 B!! BM M4 BM M4 B!! MA B!! M4 N4 B!! B!! B!! N4 MAMA MN! AM Z SENIOR FULTON, FORREST Forrest's a student of whom we're all proud, Our cheers for his work are many and loud. GATTERMIER, ROBERT Repairing Shoes is in his line, And at this work we know he,s Hne. GOTTRICK, ELEANOR After knowledge does Eleanor clamor, But in a composed and quiet manner. GUENTHER, HAROLD I-Ie's taken REFLECTOR and sports in his path, But he outshines himself when it comes td' math. GUSTAFSON, MAR-IORIE Brainy, studious and that's not all, Sometimes she may slip but never to fall. GUTHRIE, CHARLES Love of fun, doer of such, Yet all in all, he accomplishes much. HAGERSTROM, RAY Ray is surely a faithful friend, And his work we'll recommend. HALE, ROBERT In stature Bob is rather small, But he's a cheerleader for us all. HALLAS, HELEN Dainty, diminutive lovable lass, We're proud to have her in our class. HAMBLIN, DORENA A quiet voice, a friendly smile, The work she does is quite worth while. HAND, LEROY Always jesting and trying to tease, Yet always ready to do and please. HANNAM, PAULINE Although she may be silent and shy, She never lets her chances go by. HARDINE, RUSSELL Russell is a ladies' man, a Ladies' man is he, HARLAN, JUDSON Where Judson is, joy may be found, Because he never wears a frown. HARMON, ALICE All her studies she thoroughly enjoys, Her talent most industriously employs. HARSHBARGER, JEAN A friendly way, This fiddler gay. I-IARSHBARGER, WAYNE Always cheerful, seldom sad, Full of 'fun is this small lad. HATFIELD, BERNADINE It seems she is happy all the while, I Everywhere that Russell goes, the girls are sure to be. With merry laughter and a winning smile. 'E 'E is 'S 5 Ii 5 'E 'E 'E is 3? 'E 'E 'E E E 'E V 'N V 'R 4 E V F QE 'M V 'N 25 'E 'E 'E V 1 E E V 4 1 .Q 3 'N V 'N v 'S 71 711711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 7113 E283 gmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 5' 3 S E bllllb R S P Q HAZEN, MARY Z' A clever girl is Mary, a witty one is she, S' Her answers to your questions will quite surprising be. A HEIMEL, CHARLES 5 If you don't know Charlie you've missed great fun, S, For he's just that to everyone. 4 HELLER, CLIFFORD E' Tall, dark and handsome-that's he to a "T," gb And a debonair Sheik he aspires to be. l Ev HENDRIX, SHIRLEY 1 If you should hear a laugh and some chatter, E' It is surely Shirley that is the matter. Ev HENRICKSON, CAROL S When smiles are absentxfrom her face, A, A kind expression takes their place. Ev HIOHLANDER, JOHN Q Excelling in classwork, oratory, debates, W We're all very proud to be his classmates. 1. I 5 HOGAN, HERSCHEL W Care-free, merry, full of jest, gb Happiness at its jolly best. 4 HOLLOWAY, ROBERT Z' Just living happy is I1 fine thing to do, S, Looking on the bright side rather than the blue Q HOOTS, NELLIE Q' To what does talk amount? gb It's really work that counts. 4 1 5 HORTON, WINONA E Here is a girl who's a true blue friend A With a loyalty than will never end. gt HUBBARD, CLYDE 5 Clyde is capable, brilliant and tall, ' Willing industrious, pleasant to all. 4 , W. IMEL, BARBARA Z Quiet, reserved, not much to say, E' Yet she does much in her distinctive way. ' 5' INORAM, ROBERT E. Happy-go-lucky this fellow student, 5 Accomplishing much by methods prudent. 4' JACKSON, FREDERICK an Forever at work to do his bit, G Helping others when he sees fit. Z' JOHN, FLORENCE Eb lVliSs John is slender and very neatg S When she smiles it's quite a treat. an S. JOHNSON, CORRINE 4 This blond lass is very small, E' And very good in basketball. u JOHNSON, EVELYN 5 A lovely girl with a lovely face, iv To be like her is quite a race. gl. JOHNSON, GERTHRUDE A In classroom, in hall, or wherever you go, if Along comes Gertrude with a cheery 'KHellol" r E G 6 fl 'E 'E 'E E E 'EG 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E Y? 'ff v 'ii 'E 'E IE E V 's 'E 4 E '76 L if 'Zi V 's 'E 'E V 's V 's 'E E as 5 fk V 's V fs 'S E if Ia Z 711 Yi! m m 721 vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit YZ! vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit 711 wiv vit vit nt vit 73: nt m as 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 zu 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Z awwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmM E SENHO JOHNSON, HARRY His face we know spells cheeriness, But we're in doubt about weariness. JOHNSON, KATHRYN Kathryn so slender and very tall Has a word for one and all. JOHNSON, MARCEL This handsome young man whom we lose Responds to the nickname of "Moose." JOHNSON, MARGARET From Knoxville High comes one so fair, With sparkling eyes and wavy red hair. JOHNSON, MARIAN Marian is a lot of fun, But always busy and on the run JOHNSON, PEARL A "Pearl" indeed in every sense, With interests deep and quite intense. JOHNSON, ROBERT C. We each one know this boy we feel, For he shoots square in every deal. JOHNSON, ROBERT L. Without the acquaintance of Robert L., You have not been educated well. JOHNSON, ROBERT V. Robert Victor this lad was named, For red hair and freckles he is famed. JOHNSON, SAMUEL One good sport we'll all agree, Possessing fun enough for three. JOHNSON, SUMNER He's quiet and conservative in his way, Friends he, wins without delay. if M , JONES, ELBERT Not so active, yet full of pep, With: all his work he is in step. JONES, ELMER Dependable, capable man you'll find, W. With studious interests in every line. JONES, MARGUERITE We are proud to incorporate This girl in the class of "38." JORDAN, SHIRLEY Cheerful disposition and energy too, An all-around girl is this ingenue. JOSEFSON, EUGENE An intelligent chap with a sturdy frame Places Eugene in our hall of fame. KELLY, JOHN Morals deep with amplitude Directs his way to fortitude. KELLY, RUSSELL In the art of being a handsome sheik in 1 You'll find Russell Kelly reaches the peak. E E E E E E E Q E E 's 6 E E E 1 E 's r -a ea fa Qa v E V4 'S E E Y Q E E E E V 44 S 45 I 'R 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 7115 l30l mu AM A!n!4A!4 AM Au AM AM M4 Ma M4 su AM AM in AM AM in AM in A24 in AM i!n!n!n!n!n!a ima 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 5. 5. 5 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. E 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. ENIOR KEMP, GEORGE Though busy as a bee, A jolly chap is he. KOONS, MAR-IORIE A romantic, dark haired lass is this. To know her well is zo experience bliss. KRAHN, LUCILLE Charming, vivacious, fine disposition, Aspiring to heights of academic ambition. KUSSMAN, HELEN Tall, majestic, Helen is seen Every inch a regal queen. LACKY, DALE He's small in stature, not so tall, Full of fun and pleasing to all. LAMB, LILLY MAE Blue eyes and blond, Of studies sheis fond. LANNHOLM, JOHN Interest in all things he shows, Nlany good feelings and very few woes. LARSON, MARTIN Ever gay with a cheerful nod, Without that grin he,d seem quite odd. LAW, KENNETH A dependable fellow and always fraternal, In his senior class his name is eternal. LAWRENCE, RUBY Brilliant stones all Rubies are, Yet she is brighter than stones by far. LEIGHTON, ETHEL Bright and gay with a peppy walk, It's fully a treat when with her you tallc. LEVENBURG, RALPH Grand personality and always fit, With an abundance of clever wit. LEVINSON, WILLIAM Ever trying to do his share, Delightful, dependable and always there. LEWIS, BARBARA An intelligent person is this lass, One of the notables of her class. LIND, CURTIS Jolly and cheerful and happy all day, A likeable fellow in his way. LINDBLOOM, CONSTANCE Many words cannot express This young lady's cheerfulness. LIPSKY, CHARLES The gay young sheilc of school we see Personified by Chuck Lipslcy. LOZIER, RUTH She loves to draw, is fairly tall, Her favorite sport is basketball. 1 6. .. , :a ff 4' I .f,.Q:gf.-faifiifw fll ' v .aw I. .. fe" ,967 fp- '5. "Zf. ' in i Wig gin. FTWKWKWKWKWKWKWKWRWKWKWVWQWQWYWYWTWYWQWKWVKKHYWYHiHiKYW1K!WKKiHfHi I311 S! 'E 'S 'E 'E -E 'E' 'E 'E 'E 'E 'S 'E 'E 'S 'E 'E 'E 'E 'S 'E 'E 'E ZS Nl!!l!5Ml!H!4l!4l!4l!H!4N4B!4B!H!0!4l!H!4l!4l!4l!5l!4l!5l!0!5l!5l!H!iA!H!0!4l!5AMl!4 Q 2' 4 2' Y 2' Q 2' Y 2' Y 2' Q 2' Q 2' 2' 2' l 2' W 2' 2 W 'Ji' W 2' N! 2' W 2' P 2 4 2' Q 2' 2' 1 2' 2' 1 2' Q 2' 1 2' 2' 1 2' 1 2' N1 2' 2' 2' 1 V 2' 2' Q N! 2' X1 2' 2' Q 2' 2' XV 2' 2' 2' 71 . 'M A 1 Q-,K .':l1'32'27i'si1E41?. ,'.'-'Q-.,' 2' -',i:-2'l'f::1'-51-fs-'fEf.f Hifi l:71:5:'fffE5:. .1 -,-.:-,,..x,, .. .... ,., V .. --aw-:' -" IE N'I ID R S LUNDEEN, DOROTHY At work ambitious, At play facetious. LUNDEEN, FREDERICK Basketballs mean much to him, footballs are his friends, In the world of sports, much ability he lends. LUNDEEN, JOHN Who's the top in chivalry? It's "Peewee,s" shining face we see LUNDQUIST, ORABELLE Orry has trouble with her old Ford, But stick with Orryg you'll never be bored. LUVALL, RUTH A quiet miss with hair like honey, A place near her, you'll find quite sunny. LYNCI-I, PATRICIA Patty will be some great scientist, Not chemical but libraryiantist. McCARTI-IY, GERALDINE This Winsome lass is a friend to all, Next year we'll miss her in our hall. McCLURE, ERMA At handling money she does quite wellg Her friendliness catches us all in her spell. McCOLLUM, WILLIAM Playing tricks is his best game, His love of fun has brought him fame. MCCOMBS, VIRGINIA With her bright, shining eyes and her charming way, This wistful little girl will ne'er go astray. MCGAUGHEY, BERT A reddish hue is his hair, Glad and smiling without a care. McGRAW, MARGARET A home-maker fine some day she,ll be. As quiet a lass as you ever did see. MCKAMY, DONALD Although in music he does shine, In other work he's very fine. McKEE, JAMES Jim's a good sport through and through, With red wavy hair and freckles too. McLAIN, MAR-IORIE Dainty and sweet as any fairy, Always amiable, ever merry. McNEIL, MABEL Her pet diversion is wearing red, A pleasant contrast to her dark head. McVAY, HARRIETT For sophistication slick and sleek, Further than Harrier you need not seek. MALM, WALTER Walter is merry with hair so yellow, We all know he,s an ambitious fellow. 'i F 'cz 'E 'Zi 'E '25 'E 'Ei 'E 'K' 'E Ii V 122 Bi 'E 'E -E 'E 'E 'E 5 'ss 'E ? 'S E 5 E 'Zi E 'E 'Ei 2? fs 13: m :xv nv wiv vit vit vii vit vii wiv nv nv vit vit 73: vit wiv vit YZ! m 731 YZ! vit vit vit 721 ra vit YN vit ms 532 i QA24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 AM A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A!4mA!4 A24 AM A24 A24 A24 A!4A24A!4A24 5. 5 5 51, 5 E' 5 5. 5 91' W ED zu E' 5. 5. 5. 5. E' 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. E" 5. if 5' 5. E' 5. E' 5 5 91' 5. 5. E' 91' 92' 5. 5. 4 R MARSHALL, JEAN Rings on her fingers, bells on her toes, We shall have music wherever she goes. MASON, KENNETH He's a jolly, good fellow and chuck full of wit, With all who know him he makes quite a hit. MATHEWSON, ROBERT He goes through life with a smile on his face, Wherever you see him hels not out of place. MATTOCKS, HELEN Shels gracefully tall and full of fun, But never plays till work is done. MAXWELL, LAVERNE He's a dark young lad, not very tall, His tumbling acts are pleasing to all. MEAD, FRANKLIN A laugh a day Keep the blues away. MEAD, GEORGE Silent but sincere in all his work, There's nothing on earth that he will shirk. MEADOWS, ENID Charming, vivacious, full of pep, With her, you'll End, ir's hard to keep step. MERCER, JACK From far or near, it's hard to see A lad more interesting than he. MERRILL, DOROTHY Dorothy seldom utters a peep, But everyone knows "still water runs deep." MEYER, GEORGE An amiable fellow all of the day, To laugh with George, we'd go out of our way. MILLER, FERN She's filled to the brim with good spirits galore, If you want a friend-you need hunt no more. MILLS, MARNA JEAN Her studies, Marna Jean would never neglect For a hobby, movie stars she does collect. MINER, PATTY Fiery and small and full of fun, Typewriting by her is always well done MORAN, DOROTHY Jovial, jolly, we like her a lot, Her pleasant words always hit the MORRIS, LESTER Here is a lad who's small but smart, Many folks say he favors art. MORRISON, ELIZABETH Not so mighty, yet not so smallg She can talk her way through any wall. MORY, CHARLES A winning smile, a winning way, A pleasant chap from day to day. spot. A24 A Z nv m nv vit 71: vii wiv YZ! Viv wiv vii 711 YZ! 721 vii vit vit 13: vii m vii vii nv vii nv 71: vii wiv nv vii vii vii M V 1 4 S 'R V 'R -E V 4 4 A '56 Y 'E Y '16 E6 V 'R Y 'si Y if V 'R 'E Y 'S Y '16 Y :Q Y 'S 'E V 'R 'E V 'R' YN 711 7K YK 711 7K 71? YK 71 Q Q Y Q 4 Q 4 Q 4 Q W Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q, Q Q Q, 2 Q Q 4 Z' 4 Q Q N! Q Q Q Q Q 72' 3 4 Q Q Y Q 4 Q 1 Q 4 Q Y Q X' Q Q E Q Q Q S' Q Q Q Q X1 Q 4 Q X1 Q I fl 5 V4 RY Q :V A. p w In anMMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmg E Y IE PJ I O MOSER, FLOYD Lochinvar lived long years ago, But here's his double,--or we think so. MOWER, ROBERT Super-special-salesman fine Will sell you anything all the time. MUNDY, GORDON Of all amusements, he likes the best A good story book and time to rest. MUNDY, WILLIAM For a nickname, as usual, they call him Bill. In all his tasks he works with a will. MYERS, BETTY A charming miss from any view, Loves good times and has them too. MYERS, DAVID I-Iis crowning possession--red hair bright, A lot of fun, we'd say "All right." NEELD, SI-IELDON I-Ie does his work without a word, A quiet chap who,s seldom heard. NEILSON, ELEANOR Don't mix business with pleasure they say, But she does it well in her quiet way. NELSON, ADRIA Stately, gracious, ever charming With a smile that's quite disarming. NELSON, DALE I-Ie gives his best: in the musical line But in all other work he does equally fine. NELSON, JEAN A tall girl who is fun's best friend, In playing jokes much time sheill spend. NELSON, JESS A man whose interests vary, From study to being merry. NELSON, LLOYD Ambitious worker, football man too, G. I-I. S. bids him a fond adieu. NELSON, RICHARD Color and song and music, we seeg I-Iis hidden spring is simplicity. NELSON ROLAND With an ambition to go higher, To be a good lawyer is Rol's desire. NEMETI-I, LILLIAN An innate nicety reveals her mind, Enhanced by modesty and a heart that's kind. NEWCOMER, WILBERT A small and very quiet lad, A better friend could not be had. NORBURG. MAXINE Nicety is her middle name, Dainty' as a fairy and acts the same. IR S E E E 5 ,v s E 5 E 5 E E E E E E E 5 E E 5 E E 'R E 5 E E E E E 5 E E 5 5 E E E E Q 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711K U4 3!A!AA!4AMA!4A!AA!A A!4 AM AM A!4 A!4 A!4 A!4 Aya A!4 A!a A24 A!4 All AM A24 Ala A!4A!AA!AA!4A!AA!AA!a AM A24 A!4 5. M u 'H Y 14 R R V 44 NORQUIST, HELEN 2 Small of stature, big of heart, 'R gi In all that's work she does her part. .Z Q, OSBORNE, MURIEL 2 2' She likes to dance, and does it well, 'R gp With a nice bright smile that makes her a belle. Z 4 OWENS, KATHLEEN 2 5 In many sports she is high as an ace, is E, Friends find it hard to keep up with her pace. .E S1 PAGE, LELAND 'Q He plays a bass horn in the band, 9 H' For this, we think, he deserves a hand. 'R 5 PARKS, MIRIAM fa As hard-working a lass as you'll ever End, 9 E' Coal black hair hides her brilliant mind. 'S PARMENTER, HARRY 42 5, In baseball we know he often competes, S J Yet workls not neglected, for it he completes. is ' Z it PATTERSON, JAUNITA is 5 Quiet and ever pensive. Q E, With ways never offensive. 'Z PEARSON ROY 5 ty should be Roys middle name, 49 qv Gaie ' ' ' V 3 With it hd conquered as he came. E PEREZ, HELENA 5 gi Black hair and eyes for this senior mate, 45 5 Ever quiet and sedate. Z E W. PETERS DOROTHY .Z E This young lady of 102 5 Ev Keeps us all from feeling blue. 'k at PETERSON, ESTHER 4Q Q Dainty as an elf and twice as merry, Q 2' Quick as a Hitting, dancing fairy. 'S V E. EETERSEJN, LQOZIDISE W Q ient an reserv is s c V 2' Who seldom loses her locker key. 'R S V 4' PETERSON, LUCILLE 'F 5 Many books each year are read 44 - i R By her who in Home Ecs ahead. 7 5 4 4 PETERSON, MARC 5 Sr A fine historian he should be iz A A h a' 1. ' it ' A E, s e igests so muc in istory. Z PETTIFORD, SAM 5 gb Dark and tall describes this lad, tg Full of merriment never sad. A - v Ei 'S PIHL, TED V Z IG skating ability has to do the part, 'F is He could skate right into any girl's heart. as Q, PORTER, EDWIN U ,Z An orator we think this lad should be ? EV For he talks continually in advisory. 45 W PORTER HOWARD V 5? r A Hod is known for his blond, curly hair, 'F Q He's nice and tall and quite debonair. ei 5 .z 71m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m mmm m m m m m mmm m m m tx n 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Q 2' 5 5 E S, A Q Z' 5 Q 73' 5 E NY 2' 5 Q Z' 1 E 5 1 5 Q Z' 5 N1 Z' 5 5 E Q 'Z' Q Z' 5 E 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 71 ummmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmg E E S E BJIIID R S PUMFREY, CLIFFORD This boy is quiet and very reserved, Mean remarks by him are never heard. QUARTERMAN, CLYDE With his guitar held tight in his hand, Clyde should rate a famous band. RAAEN, KERMIT A basketball player you each should sse, Who also clerks at the A BCP. RANDELL, CECIL If it is true than silence is gold, Then this lad surely has riches untold. RANDELL, MARGARET Margaret is small and I have a hunch, Might well be nick-named "Honey-Bunch." RASMUSSEN, MYRL She's loved by her teachers and in all her classes Because she sees the world through rose-colored glasses. REAGOR, ROBERT - His name we predict in football news, When he plays, his opponents are doomed to lose. REVIS, CHARLES In English Grammar heis known to excel, But in all other work he does quite well. RILEY, EDWARD His Franklin brothers think he's grand- This boy who toots a horn in band. ROSE, JEANETTE Jeanette is "mighty like a rose,', Provides us joy where'er she goes. ROSINE, MARY I-Iere's a girl that was cheerful born, For ever since, a smile she's worn. RUTI-IER, LUCILLE Here is a girl that need never For we,re sure she really knows her stuff. bluff, SANDBURG, VIRGIL In printing this boy has a knack, Ambition never does he lack. SANDS, ROBERT I-Iere's to one who is nothing short ,ye Of our ideai of a perfect sport. 1 SARGEANT, JESSIE ,Mm She is quite bashful and also shy, fi But the fact that she's fun no one can deny. SCOTT, JEAN "Scotty" as she is more commonly known Is full of pep and seldom alone. SEIBERLICH, JANET Janet's quite good when it comes to taps, To this young lady we tip our hats. SELANDER, JANICE Janice never did anything wrong, Or made' an enemy all her life long. 4 E E E 4? E Y Q E Y 4? 6 Y 45 4? li 4 D 5 45? fg I 4? I 4 Z B 5 E 5 E E E E E E E e is e V 1 .5 AN Y fe -E mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmms i361 3 5' Y 5. 1 5' 5' 5. 5? Z9 5. 5 5, 'E' 5. 5. 5. 5 5. E? 5. 5 5, 4 5. 5. 91' 5. 5. 5. 5, 5, 5. 5, E' B!! lu L75 B!! AM MA AM All AM AM AM A!! B!! AM BM AM M4 AM B!! A!! LM All All B24 AM A!! A!! All A!! AM All A!! 14 S E PJIIID R S SHAW, BERNARD Such humor as he possesses is rare, As for the girls he doesn't seem to care SHAW, ROBERT If you are sad and down and out, just come for sympathy to this good scout. SHOWERS, MARJORIE She is very tall and also thin And the Annie President she has been. SIMMONS, JUNE Ever dignified, ever kind, As for "truclcin'," we know she,s fine. SIMONS, RICHARD He's a student of much And the master of such. SIMS, PAUL Dark, well-liked, and a dramatist too, As Sultan of a Harem he made his debut. SMITH, HELEN we know her as "Toots,' which is her nick-name, We hope her ambitions will lead her to fame. SOMSAG, MILDRED An attractive miss with raven tresses, Toward high goals she always presses. STACKHOUSE, BETTY ,lolly and sensible, slender, and bright, One who always does what's right. STAMBAUGH, IDA ANNE Ida Anne's voice is very sweet: With her singing we can't compete. STEPHENS, MARY JANE Tennis is mastered by her hand, Ready and willing has been her stand. STEWART, LOIS Of exceptional merit is this brunetteg Poor grades and she have never met. STICKNEY, ELIZABETH I.izzy's laughter is, oh, so gay, She's lots of fun in every way. STILLIAN, WANDA She's very quiet but I'm sure you'll see Something that charms both you and me. STRAWN, WANDA She never gives her piano rest- Her music is the very best. STRINGER, KATHLEEN Here's a girl who's a true-blue friend, With a loyalty that will never end. STUART, MARY "Small but mightyn can here be appliedg The art of speech from "Tag" is derived. SUNDQUIST, RICHARD In working Richard does his share, He's never anything but square. i ii iii. ii lf' Zmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm f37 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'S 'E 'S 'E 'E 'E 'E 'S 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'S 'S 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E V lg ' 1 KX sz AM A24 A24 AM MA A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 BM A24 A24 A24 AM AM A24 A24 AM A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24A24A24A24 A24M AVA 'E 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. E' E 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. P li E biiiib R S SWALLOW, GENE A brainy student, many facts he knows, A gay, happy fellow wherever he goes. SWISE, RUSSELL A grand physique, though rather short, A letter-man in many a sport. TATE, FRANK Musical-minded, prepare for treats, For here comes Frank with harmonious feats. TAYLOR., HERSCHEL The build of Atlas he does possess The looks of Taylor add sleek finesse. THOMAS, MARGARET A tiny girl with a Hare for art, Ready and willing to do her part. THOMAS, MARY JANE Efficient and capable is Mary Jane, And with a voice that will win her fame. TOMLINSON, DELENE With an air of quiet reserve, Always ready and willing to serve TONKIN, DARLENE She takes her work quite seriously, And will, no doubt, a stenographer be. TUPPER, ELOISE In high school she has won acclaim, A brilliant girl on the road to fame. UHLMAN, HOWARD Jesting forever and dubbed a tease, Yet his work is sure to please. VANCIL, MARK A student of mathematical glory, Track to him is an old, old story. VAN ETTEN, NELSON Quietly, swiftly he works away, The result is usually another A. VITALI, LOUIS A basketball player with plenty of grace, Lightning feet-not a step can you trace. VON LANGEN, HERMAN Herman is quiet but bright as the sun, Always ready when work's to be done. WAGNER, IDA MAE When smiles are absent from her face, A kind expression takes their place. WALLACE, PAULA LOU If you are lonely and feeling blue, For a bit of cheer, just look up "Poo." WALTERS, EUGENE He's ever joyous and divinely tall, And a "Boys' Sciencern if I recall. WALTON, JAMES This lad to all seems very witty, He always has some clever ditty. vit vit vitmvit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vit vitvitvitvitvitvitvit vit vit vit vi Us V 4? 4? f 15 'R 4? f. 'S 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E .E 45 45 'E 'S 'E 'E V 44 B V 'R V 'E 'E 'E 'E E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E v 'E 'R 'E 1? Z 'S V1 YN l 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 A 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm IE N'I O WATSON, JEANETTE Fond of home-making, as she can be, She's jolly and peppyg to that we'll agree. WATTERS, ILAH Often silent and very shy, Alluring though: perhaps that's why. WEBBER, LEO We present to you, Leo Webber, Many friends he will have forever. WEBSTER, LOUISE Hard work to Louise is lots of fun: She revels in simple tasks well done. WEST, BILL The grandest sport in every way, What more is there that we need say? WHIPPLE, JOHN An able scientist in his line, At playing a horn he also is fine. WHITE, ROBERT As electrician for plays he does excel, In oratory and debate he also does well. WILLER, HERBERT In typing he does fine workg In basketball he never shirks. WILSON, CARCLYN As a junior she became well-known. For in delcam her ability was shown. WILSON, LUCILLE Into sewing she puts her heart and soul, In that vocation she should reach high goals. WINCHELL, EVERETT Reckless, dashing and always gayg That is this boy through all the day. WIRT, BETTY Blond and witty is this little lass, Whom very few will ever surpass. WISE, MATTHEW Matthew is smart, his last name is Wise, Very tall is he in the matter of size. WOOLSEY, DONALD Humor is such a priceless gift, Nor does this boy far from it drift. WRIGHT, ROBERT In school assignments he cloes well, But the way he plays a sax is swell! YOUNG, BARBARA In school she always got straight A'sg In debate and extemp she won much praise. Zmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm E if ra w -a fa -E is 'a -a 1 1 R KX Z' Q Z' Q Z' 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 if gmmmmmmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmwmmQ 5 a B ,JUNHORS Abrahamson, Leonard Adcoclc, Joe Adlcisson, Mark Albright, joe Aldrich, Robert Allen, Martin Allen, Patti Anderson, Richard Anderson, Shirlee Andreen, Marion Andrews, Shirley Armpriest, Lucille Asbury, Lyle Atwood, Phyllis Ayers, Edwin Baker, Dorothy Barrow, John Bayless, Dorothy Bell, Robert Benson, Dorothy Bewley, Nelson Binz, Carl Bird, Cleo Birdsall, Betty Blixt, Vernon Bloomberg, Lillian ' Booth, Maxine Boughan, Harold 56, Bowen, Elizabeth Bower, Julia Bowles, Jo Anne Bowman, Merle E401 IQUHV7HHRiZRW6HW!EBSQ!YRHHXYRUWIWNPBHEQZKVRMWUWK7RHRiZK7RURiZR7RUWUWKEBSQ!WRii V 'N Q ,V R V 'B' E Y 4? 5' 41 E S 5 V N 42 B V 4 4 9 I 45 5 I QF I 4 .E B E E D4 44 S 'E E E E V 4 4 A V 4 .E E I k V 4 4 B BM Y S! AM AM AM B!! BM BM B!! AM B!! B!! AM B!! BM AM AM B!! A!! B!! AM AM M4 B!! B!! B!! B24 BM B!! B!! N4 B!! B!! B!! S, Z3 92 EC A gg. 5 Q 1 Q 5 bb D 5 71 J' ll' FQ' ll KD li E5 Boyd, Alice Boyd, Mary Louise Boyd, Ruth Bradley Ethel Brann Loraln Breedlove Shlrley Brown ames Brown Laverne Brown Margaret Bruner Marjorie Burch W1ley Burford Beverly Burkett Durwood Campbell Betty Carl Clarabelle Carlberg ean Carley Rodney Carlson Agnes Carlson Barbara Carusl ack Catron Florence Chandler Betty Chapman ack Clary Margaret Clme Mary Ahce Coe Max Coe Robert Cole Evelvn Colller Mar1on Cooper Mary Frances Corbin Wllllam Coughlm George 711 '11 '11 711 711 711 711 711 71' 711 111 71 1 11 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 I 41 3 E5 , V ia ES is . 7 E? , ' 1 EQ rl ea , 'S A 1 ew , Q, - 1 7 E5 f qv 4 wa E5 ' ew a ii r E5 'l 1 ia 4 ew f ii ' 65 ' , . S- ,J A qv Q 4 7 ii ' x ,J 5' , eg 7 3? , ra' , W 1 1 , qv 4 qv A . . ii ' W '. . . ew , E5 , W ew 5 . - - - 1 1 1 " vvvv A ag YI m 4 Q 'N .Z 'E L 'E 'E u 'R V 'K 1 V S O 'E 'S E5 'E E5 EE 'E 'S 'E 'E' 'E 5 L 's 'S' E 'E 'E -E 'E 155 'E 'E 'E R my AM AM AM AM AM Au Ayr AM A!4A!n!A MA A!AA!AA!AA!n!4 AM AM AM AM Ala AM A!n!n!n!A AM AM Almag Q K Y Z! 4 W I A, 14 A U N ll U R A Q W Xl 4 Q2 Vg . h . v 3, Courtng t, Grace Lllly ,E f . . 5, Coz1ahr, Ela1ne 'Z A Craft Anne A V ' . Z 5' Croz1er, James 15 Q ' i Q Q i V br 1 , Q G L Q M X Dahlstrom, Florence L bn , 'N . . 4g G i Damlfl, Dorrs P E' iw ,E , f , :Q Darrah, Duane 'E En gl . rj y U Derby, Dorothy 5 v no Eb 44 A E Sr l' . 42 0 6. ' Dlckenson, Jeanne 5 Q 7 Z' 9 Dixon, Betty 'S E' Q Doran, Ruth 'E it 6 Dowell, Frances 45 q V Z' 'F Z' ' Downre, Wllllam 'S v if Duerre, Dolores 'Q E. Dugan, Betty es E, Dunlap, Dorothy ,E E' 'E Ev Eccher, Betty Lea 'E E, Eckluncl, Beverly Jane 45 E, Elphick, Lisa ,E J Ensley, Dorothy y 'g 'R if 'E E, Eppsteiner, Margaret ,E xg Erlckson, Arlyne ,Z 'Z' - - N S, Erlclcson, .MHFIOH Z G Farrhalrn, Robert S 5, li 1 A G .z Z' - 5 Q Fmley, Dorothy ,Z 2' 1' 14 B b c 1 B v F xc lnger, ar ara arro V E' Fones, Darlene 45 2' Forstrom, Charles 'E E' 'E E' F ch J m 'E sb orsy e, a es 'Z 3 Foster, Bettle Anne 2 jp - 41 f Freese Ph lhs 5 Q .' Y . ,Q 2' Fmencl, Drusllla A q V jr 14 A B 1 V 5' 'S y . A AA 9 A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A 'A ammmm mm m nv m mmmmm nv nv m nv nv nv nv nv maya mmmmm nv nv nm f42 N B!! All A!! AM B!! AM All B!! All All AM AM AM All All M4 A!! AM AM A!! AM A!! AM A!! AM A!! A!! AM A!! A!! AM AM Il gg ii gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg ii gg gg gg gg gg E5 gg ii ii ii 5 an 3 gg w Z' E5 ii gg Zn gg gg ii Y EI gg 3 J' If 1FJ ll KD I1 ES Gannon, Kathren Gans, Juanita Gardner, Gerald Gardner, Harold Gibbs, Margaret Gladfelter, Kenneth Glasnovich, Anthony Glass, Cynthia Glass, Mack Goedelce, Orville Goehrig, Charlotte Goodman, Stanley Gordon, Jean - Grider, Paul 'Q . J Grogan, James Grogan, Roberta 1:1335 , Guenther, Robert Gustafson, Leone Gustafson, Stanley Hadden, Rosemary Hall, Willa Bell Hampton, Barbara Hand, James Hanlon, Jack Hanna, William Haroldson, Robert Harnest, James A Harris, Ruth Harshbarger, Alice Hast, Betty Hawthorne, Stanley Hawthorne, Stuart 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 R . f43J Q 'S v si EE E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 EE E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 ii E5 if E5 E5 E5 E5 EE E5 E5 E5 sz B24 MHZ!!! MM!! AMAMBMA!AMAMAMA!AA!Al4',A'A!4A!AA!aA!AA!AA!AA!AA!AA!AA!n.YAA!4N,1MBm!A1: Qi if J U N ll o R s is 2' . 'E g, Hendricks, Carl Q5 Q Hendricks, Claude E' Herndon, Leon is E' Hinchliff, Joan K E. 45 EI Hitchen, Anne 5 E Hoclson, Arlene gg 'Z' Holmes, Richard 'E E' Holst, Jack 3 72' A E' Howe, Mack V 'Zi 95' Hudgel, Kathleen 'E E' Hughes, Lloyd 'E E, Hunt, Bessie 45 92' 5 gg' J Hurbul, James , 'E in Hurlbut, Carol 5 E, Jacobs, Donald Q E, Janes, Helen E if Ev Jewell, Anna Loise , 'E E, Johnson, Bernyce Q S, Johnson, Clarence ,Xe gb Johnson, Donald E. tg A A s. Q gg, Johnson, Donald L. ,E 5. Johnson, Eric 'S 3 Johnson, Erlyne .5 3: Johnson, Frank QE Z S. Q Johnson, Ilah Mae if Johnson, Lois A Z' Johnson, Marjorie Q E' Johnson, Paul 5 xv, E Johnson, Phyllis Q A. . 5 3 Johnson, Shirley , Z' Johnson, Thelma 'S E' Johnson, Wayne 'E Er QE E' E 7174! m nv nv nv m m nv nv nv nv nv nv nv m 721 nc nv is nv nv 721 nv 721 nv nv nv nv nv m YZ! vim f44l S! 5. ai. V4 5, 5, 5, 5, 5. 5. 5, 5, 5, 5, 5. 5. 5, 5. 5, 5. 5, 5, 5, 5, 5. 5. 5. 5, 5, 5, 5. 5. 5. 5, 5. 5, 5, 5. 5, 5, P W W W W W W W W W W W NV W lY1b'4A'4b'4A-1'-I 544 L"4A'A Dvd L'AL-4L-ll'-4 , a 1 Joneson, Lloyd Josephson, Max Jurjevich, Kathryn Kahler, Maxine Kanan, Rosalyn Keefer, Sheridan Kelly, Eleanor Kemp, Robert Kenny, Chauncey Kite, Richard Klein, Dorothy Klott, Violet Koffer, Barbara jean Koons, Maribelle Kramm, Hartzell Landon, Ned Lane, Dorothy Larson, Elsie Larson, Jack Leonard, Earl Lester, Clarence Levinson, Curtis Lewis, Mary Louise Linclstrom, Barbara ' Linrothe, Donna Mae Little, Louise Long, Eldon Long, James Lowry, Ruth Lundeen, Shirley Nlcffullough, Eugene McLain, Gordon ,D Xl a .. lllx fi v S Q 11711 711 711 711711 711711 711 711 711 711 711711 711 713 rig: 21 2 ',-: Z1 1 T13 Z1 1' wg 21' 31: 711' 'A gr 91 . 45 if 5+ s J 3 P 14 Q D IA, NJ Z' V Z' .S AA Q 5 A, 1 ah- YA NS if P f A 9 74' W Z' Q 'Zi' YY Qs rn' K1 Z' V 5 A, Q7 Qv nl NJ Z' Nd 'Z' W 'Zi' NS Qs A' S, I -.E E, V' 44 S, A X1 72' N' Z' xv 71 W Z' xv 1-gf bl. "A DJ. ff. xv Dj - 114 LS. 74 RY Q, fa' K1 1- 5 fl Q L rl Z' P ZA 51 P- 1 fm 5' r'4 N1 Q- u ffl S. fl SY ir ld 1 ' 7 X Dr fl 57, rA Pi if: M4 wc :L ei A14 :M AM in in in ii: AM its AM A34 BM A14 Ma A24 BM :M Bild BM Atl. Ma AM AM AM BM AM A24 AM ?? GY ,X se . si J, 4 2 I owl , - t 2, my V U FJ H R McLain, Richard McLaughlin, Donald McMillion, Leonard McMaster, James Magnuson, Dorothy Mallery, Dorothea Lee Manley, Ruth Marshall, Doris Meadows, Ralph Metz, Carolyn Miles, Theodore Miller, Harry Mills, Ralph Mitchell, Dorcas Moon, Lyman Moore, Bill Moore, Cora Morrison, Bernard Morrissey, DeWitt Mudd, Kenneth Munson, Leo Mureen, Marian Mureen, Virginia Mustain, Rolland Myer, Robert Nelson, Edsel Nelson, Harriet Nelson, June Nelson, Katherine Nelson, Rosalee Nesbit, Grace Nicholson, Betty Lee E! 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E fi 'E 'E 'E' 'E 'E +5 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E Q 'E 'E nc :gc page :gc sg: was nt nc 71: wiv m nv nv vii m vii 71: 73: 711 YZ! vii m 731 vii vii 711 vii vii 711 73: YZ! vii is l46l sy AM AM AM BM BM BM BM AM BM BM AM AM BM AM AY: AM in Aya A84 AM :M BM M4 AM BM in AM it: AYA :Ya :Ya :Ya 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. Y 71 JUNHURS Nordhielm, Berndt Norquist, Betty Norstrom, Gladys Nyman, Fred Nystrom, Jane Oberling, Lois Olson, Bernice Olson, Dwight Ostrum, Percy Parkenson, Robert Parkinson, Dean Parkinson, Robert Parks, Barbara Parnell, Evelyn Payne, Edith Peabody, Phyllis Pearson, Willard Pease, Verna Pendergast, Bob Perschnick, Bernadine Peterson, June Peterson, Vincent Poe, Donald Poole, Betty Pople, Betty Powell, Audrey Puckett, Dorothy Pumfrey, Eleanor Quarterman, Norma Reem, Dorothy Reeves, Arlene Reeves, Le Clare 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 311 711 711 711 711 711 711 U71 16 L' 4 A w Y' A ' if L5 ff. LN .Z LN v xi' L4 'S V 'Lf FJ 1 as LN DZ AW 525, Ds bf 'EZ' P fi' 71 4 1 LN .23 Pa D4 'E V 'S' YI 'tiki' V 114 LN D1 'N V 4: 'rs V 'R Y 'S' V 'E V 'ii' V! 'E ty 4 'im V 'R L4 'S V Q 'n V 4 'AN Y! 'S' V 'S' Z, LN nf 440 Us V1 4 -.Q LN F5 Ds .YG LN 2.4 1 1-it N L VI .fy hi V! fg bi Y .4 Li F .4 EN li DFL fi F71 271 273 3-if D92 2525 Aff. Ili 2-'fi bfi bid 235 BM HL EM Mc bfi in IM B!! BM AM AM B!! BM B!! B!! Ii!! B!! Qs UNHOR Reimer, Betty Reinhold, Robert Reno, Hugh Renow, Doris Reser, Homer Reynolds, Alice Riley, Fern Riley, Vaughn Ritter, Francis Ritter, Wanda Raaen, Ralph Roberts, Ralph Rodenhouser, Cleo Mae Rogers, Patricia Ruth, Richard Ryberg, Dick Sargeant, Lloyd Sarver, Dale Saum, Mary Jane Sauter, Marion Scholes, Roy Harold Schultz, Bettye Schurtz, Jack Scneder, Ruth Scott, Mary Searl, Islea Searles, Orlie Secrest, Harold YI L4 V 'R S V 'sw 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'S 'E 'E 'E 'E 'S .f, Q 3,1 E11 711 ' , ' 'qi 211 741 21-Z Z1-I 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 71111 f48 l l I sy BM BM BM AM in in in Ma BM :M BU Ali A84 A84 :lc .WL Au in A74 :fc :fc Mc irc :fc Ya :fc V' 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. B!! lid B!! All B!! B!! 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 . 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 . 5 . 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 71 JUNJIOR Seifert, Edward Selle, Grace Sells, Clark .l Severns, immie Shafman, Henry Sharp, Ralph Sharp, Roy Shaw, Benjamin Sherman, Elizabeth Smith, Bernard Smith, Jean Smith, Marion Smith, Paul Smitts, Robert Snapp, William Snodgrass, James Somsag, Mac Sowder, Dorothy Sperry, Mary Starr, William Stegall, Frances Stites, Edward Stivers, Loretta Stoerzbach, Helen Stoneking, Edward Struble, Roy Suydam, Dorothy Swank, Charles 7-17-1 V71 fs H1 rf-r rg rtv YAY Viv rt v zfv r' -P . Ax AX Ax Ax Ax .Ax Ax AX Ax Ax Ax .ix A. .,. .. S KZ ,- 5-,Ctr rf. I , 1 lg? Igx Ibm ffl' lp. Qt". l' U93 on 5, . v j.,,X.,, a 'XIV 5.1 f 1 X1 33' IS. rn 'NY li F rm 5,1 Clif fl QS, rA V lb- ' fi' 1 A f 1'-A Q1 'Z' 9 he ri' D .15 ri GS. A ld 5 Ai r A G 'Z' 2. rim 'Y Jai r",f 'XF fn' I' YH 5,81 g, . , F Q N7 0-vs fig NIV Cf' VA N37 f"?' ffl Y A. vi Q1 06a fd 51' lf. L ff! Rf! bi' 74 31' f2' Ns nz, ,, -. U e . k 1 f. . Q. 0.7. fl X1 if V'-4 'fi ng, F4 XV Obs , 'i ' 'V .W-, 'T-ll NW ua . fs xg nf' fi 23, A QV 'Z' 'Lu gi r'-1 '-.1 o - . A gv pi. 1 , 1 Wil V x4 Q 'S' Wi bln Mi A84 A34 B24 BM BM N4 AM A24 H4 AM BM AM AM AM BM BM BM AM AM AM in mu AM ru iya AM AM AM AM T J If l U R. M Swanson, Alice Swanson, Lois Swanson, Robert C. Swanson, Robert L. V 'N V 'S V 'N V 'INT' V 'N V 'K 42 Tabbone, Jennie B Tabbone, Mike Taber, Beth Tapper, Raymoncl V 'R Ch V 'S V 'R V 'R V 'S V 'R Theobalcl, Phillip Thomas, Charles Thomas, Mildred Tolbert, Margaret Qs M V 'S V 'S V 'R 'E 'E' Tolle, James 'E k Tracy, Virginia Trafl, Virgil Trebbe, Eugene V 'N V 'N V 'R V 'S V 'R Treffer, Brough Trout, Hurlene Trulson, Marjorie Q Turnbull, Jack V 'R V 'N V 'N V 'E V 'R V 'S ' Turner, Lila Turpin, Evelyn Upton, Howard Vanell, Mary 'E E 'E 'E' 'E Y Van Gieson, Jim is Wagher, Dean Serio, Cully V14 'if xrixx, Y .4 sg1zs,s,'g,: :Q f snr igifziflsf : ac mf vga mf mm 73: Av as vm vga sir 71? :fir YN mf 7571? mis E501 l m sy AM BM AM AM bye :V AM M4 :V A24 :Ya AM Ala atc M4 Ni :Ya :Sc in an in :Ya in in :Ya :Ya in .- if ' Q 'fc .1 vc 'vc gg 4 ' 5. if Z. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. Z JUNHURS Wagher, Richard ,N Wainright, Harvey Waldron, Robert Wallace, Richard Wallich, Margaret Watson, Mildred Webb, Hortense Webster, Esther 06 A. K. Wedan, Carl West, Barbara Wheeler, Wanda White, Leonard 'N li ,231 Wilder, Lucille Willer, James Williams, Emma Williams, Warren Wilson, Theresa Windom, Caroline Windom, Eileen Witherell, Joyce Witherspoon, Shirley Wong, Elmer Wood, Donald Wood, Jeanne 5 . 'Fr Wynn, Barbara ,gm Zeffo, Marie Angela U 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711711 711 711 511 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 T11 715 Z1 L ' 1 S1 ' 4 , U11 1v',1 f-r' 111 152 1 4 b r'-v rl' fjbk 435. ljx :- V J t ag QW FQ' 4 .5 LN A 5 ., 1' ffl 4 5-,J LW U ! - sen hx: ,- If 'Q L- 1 ' 0 if .' ,a ' '-Q LFQ QI 4- V4 1:5 7 4 Qui AN E-', 4 wg L-S ffl. LN V +5 Ku -it 1 if'-K il 'Q WJ 4?fl bi q.m,4 4 .,-. L-N Y +4 AW ll 4fQ LN Y .4 LY Y .6 NY 1 'L AN V! if AN Y! 4.9 LN K1 4 iq Li P14 41g BN K1 'O LN YA 1 'Q LN Y! 4 Q KN f 4 ap 5-N 'e-,4 L s bv.- 1 'Q b '- s I Af, 1. -Ao Us Z- 43. u'l F.- . n A 4 .ik o-". ?: L'-2 :rv .--if Nfl ,sim :ck :Fi :ii i ii E36 Ma 4:24 A35 lid M5 A14 AM BM Nd 251: D35 :Za AM AM zz v 'R SUPHOMORES Adams, Duane Allen, John Allensworth, Ruth Anderson, Dale Anderson, James V 'S V 'R V '53 7 'S 7 'S Anderson, June Anderson, Lloyd Anderson, Lois Anderson, Robert Anderson, Wayne ? 'S' V 'S 'E V 'S Anderson, William Arie, Muriel Arnold, Albert Babbitt, Garnet Babbitt, Robert 'Ei Y 'K '25 V 'S Bandy, Martha Barker, Lloyd Barlow, Ada Barnes, Dale Baughman, Meredith V 'S' V 'fi' D4 'K 7 'S Baughman, Vesper Beckman, Irma Bell, Rosemary Benedict, Audrey Benson, Patricia v 'E' Berquist, Dale Berry, Norma Billings, Lee Boen, Vernon Bowen, Wallace 'F' F?-s BN 54' 'S' V7 Vi Bowles, Chiquette D' Boydstun, Charles Boyes, Robert Braclcer, Donald Bradley, Delvina V tg 7 'Q V 'E' W 441Q Brown, Evelyn AN Brown, James Burch, Cora Burke, Bernard Burton, Wayne ' '74 'if V 'S E4 'ii' V 141 Butterfield, Maxine P' Button, Edward Button, Kenneth Carley, David Carlson, Marian V 'K V 'S 7 'S Z Carlson, Martha Jean h Carlson, Willard Carmody, John Cation, Robert Cederoth, Georgene 'E 'S ' , ' ' xi 1 ' , , , , ig-Z' Di? 75,5 iii? 72,f HQ! 711 71? 751 711 7K 7517K 711 711 72124 .f"xV ..,,x '15 , mfs 'U L52 ,i' V1 G J- Q N4 LM AM AM A14 M4 Ng Nj 514 in AM N4 RM AVL N4 :YL AM AY4 :YA bfi :Ya N4 :YC :YL PM :YC 276 :YC if: Ill 'ii 274 If VA v ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' v v Q v - 'Q Q A. 5 1 4 'N Z' fi 'SUlRllillUlVllURlE,S Z' 3.1. L5 E' Chatterton, Margaret yi Q Cherrin ton, Isal lt - 5, g u u o A Clark, Virgmia - -v Q . bw Z' Cline, john ff. E, Cochran, Ruby Q: ' 1' if Cole, Betty Leone C, u 1 - 1 -Q q Colville, Edith .- or - . .,, G Conlon, Melvin l Y:- Z' Cox, Eugene 5:1 E, Craig, Daryl :I v f-4 gb Craig, Maxine Q Crandell, Dwight 'ff I Z Cratty, Jane ,'.Q. iz' Cunningham, Marilyn ff S, Cunningham, Wayne 11' 6 ,' S, Cushman, Alberta G Danforth, Joseph -Lf? QD A Danner, Sarah yi gy Davies, Willard 4 . f Davis jean "' Q 7 LX ji v1 . 21. S, Davis, lohn 'S g Davis, Margaret .Rt 2' Dawson, Lowell 7, , . . 1 9 gi, Dickinson, Maurice :N :Z Diefendorf, Robert 1555 wif ,. DiPrima, Agatha ,ff inf Dixon, Dorothy Q Ng Doyle, James wd :fx Duen'e, Janet ts. 1 Dulaney, Robert fe' ,. . if Duncan, Lena Mae -pf: 'Zi Durbin, Irene '14 E, Dutch, Henry ff 'S as Duvall, Ruth I h 'jf' K1 Eaker, Beu a 'I KY pw C155 , . . I 3 Elliott, Harriett . 5 'gq Elphick, Jeanette ,,., 51, Ensley, Madalyne M' A Erickson Muriel if Q ' L . Z' Evans, Raymond L3 Q LN Z' Evans, Robert 3 .3 Ev Ewalt, Richard f .gb Fassett, Robert f G Fields, Mabel 'Q 5 "' Firoved Robert T . v2 1 U, K' . . 2' Fitzslmmons, Robert A :IE S, Fleharty, Mary Louise --- G Foertsch, June ' if Z' ,Foote, Russell ' 3 it Foreman, Delores ff 1 1 ,. A - .. A A - A A ' , ' ' - ' 1 , V 1 Y ' U I V ' . ,w A--- - ,A ,f,--aff-,fqrqr qv wr 1Y'.1Y',1V-'VY wr,-vr.yv,v:,,.1?,1r,-H :f',:lF:,Q.,xJx,,,,Q,..y, ln7N7N7N7N7K1Nfu fax fo IAN Ax 10 IIN fu fu ww AWK fb ISL A lr 'fs f- 1 " ' 'l ' ' I 53 52 bid Ali A14 M4 All BM AM AM All AIA AM AM AM AM A!! AY AM BM AM AM AM A24 All AM All AU PM All AM AM AM RM M 4. P- V z. SUllDlHlUNlURlES's V7 . . V XIX' Fredrickson, Marjean 'S ISL Freed, Aaron ,Z 1 .4 . . by BG Friedman, Maurine V we f . 41 Z Frymire, Janet is gf,-' Fundenberger, Robert QE Gabrielson, Phyllis 45 Galloway, Robert ,Z :Q Gannon, Irene 2 GZ' Gannon, Maxine 'S -55, Garman, Wallace ,E 55+ Garver, Dale 45 'sg' Gatgrmier, Jtnth .E -' 4 ayman r ur NS . ' . , V 25' Gianakis, Sophie fg EZ, ' Gifford, Guinevere ,E 51, Glasnovich, John ,Z 3 Griffith, Donald S 4' Gre or Lillian lg C7 g Yr M . gg' Grimes, Leola QE vf Guenther Da zie vy , Y ,S Guenther, Lawrence ,QQ G h M 5 My uent er, aryann V 51 Hadclen, Louise 'S 37, Haines, Russell Z H '1 ll A at ami ton, Co etta 42 -fa . . . A S, Hamilton, William ,Z 'Q H l' C l 5 gg, an-in,I. arI QE: L it an in, mogene. P, gg, Harman, Marilyn jg if Harshbarger, June Q E55 1 2 Hartley, Clayton C: fi? Harvell, Charles lg Harvey, Marilynn 435 -,Q Hawkinson Dorothy ps Mb, r 7 it if Hazlett, Jean 3: 3' ' 44 0 Healey Marcile 5 57' , . V 'EQ' Henning, Hazel 'S gf, Hermetet, Marilyn ,E RS, Hertenstein, Phyllis 'Z 'ef Heule, Wendell B 4:-45 . Z 2. Hibbard, Imogene S 'wflxtf ,, Hickman, Eloise 4g 6:1 .ga Hicks, John ,Z "4 ' 'Wk Hicks, Joyce A 5' ' . V 'EH' "' Hitchen, Frances 'K 'mv . 'V' D D Q 'TH' , Hix, Alvin lg .1 ir- I .-f'4 - 5 sv- sgsgg' Hohl, Doris Holcomb, Richard Horn, Kenneth Horton, Lois V 'R V 'S V 'S A V 433 i.,.,,, .i.,...,...,i...... ..,.. 591 hi 511 E41 HC Lg -Y 'Mi' WEL 24.3 YN VR 751 741 YK YK YN YAY YK YR YAY YN YN YN 71? VR YN YK YN YK YR YN YK YK R t 1 54 3 AM AM N4 N4 N4 M4 M4 AM A!! BY4 AM N4 N4 AV bid N4 FV A34 AM M :Ya BM :Ya M: :Ya nyc :Ya Na :vc rv ,eva :Ya 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5. 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5. 5, 5, 5. 5, 5, 5, 5, Y! V! 4 fi LW .72 4 QQ LY Z! 4 -qv LN V! 4 fu A Q LJ' 4 .Q LN '14 . .Q LX y 4 4 :Q hi Yr' 4 AQ LN H,-4 4 L. L'i 5,4 4 -1 LN 41,1 4 --Q L11 ff' K! L-'- Y,A 4 -Q L Q lu 4 43 pN ff 4 .Q rs .Z :N 4 E3 A Q 4 -Q AN 'il' 454 LN 42 LN 'E' 4 fi A is 7 4 'LN v . 1.1 L s .Z A V1 4 'px 7.4. Ds vw 4 -Q rs .21 LN V1 4 4 an L W X1 433 BN JY, ' ll LN YI 4,-'Q In v.. 4 -1? A -4 VA 4 8 Us Ln 4-Ag b-xl YA 4--Q lv- 'Q " ,I 4 ,Q 5. D L '1- 1"--1 :va 'I 4 -9 n - 4. .1 If Q A 71 YK YK FN YK YN 71? 751 'IN YK Wi' HY YAY 'Af EN YA! Tj? D51 Hi' 14,2 75? 21 14,5 Z. fr ' '. yi ZH YJ 953 TQ, 2,541 i . J XTC 'gy 5 1 "J pb i "4 Q' Q- . WA Q1 Q- . fl gf 5 f f A N1 Q V4 XV lo V 4 5.1 . 0 . 0: I' A N1 0- f'4i 1 is i ra S L ri S. fl 3-J, K4 X1 2 ni' QE. fa ng! Q5 r F'-A R1 3 u FA L, 1 gr i A"-A '- Y Q, . O nl. xi Q- Y' 5 x1 me r'4 1-5- C.--f v'A N 1 vw , 1 2. -cj be ' f-A ' -1 'bl u 5'-1 N 7 gl.. I PQ 'nfl bv f K4 M1 ti-Sgr f'4 --1 It-Yr -"4 ur 1 1.. , ' 1 .l, ri- - K4 L -1 c,, f' 3 -. .4 4 . -af- f .. IT f 4 'n mwmmmmmNmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm SUPHUMURES Lohmar, Robert Lundeen, Jack Lundeen, Jane Lundeen, Robert Lutes, Robert Lyons, Shirley McAuley, Frances McCarthy, Jessie McClelland, Robert McClure, joan McGill, Earl McLaughlin, Edna Mae McNeil, June Malm, William Malmrose, Lois Mandel, Bernice Martz, John Mason, Lloyd Megginson, Corrine Mejia, Avelina Melin, Howard Merrick, Doris Merrick, Maxine Miller, Dorothy Miller, Earl Miller, Ruth Milroy, Lois Minniclc, Martin Mitchell, Bud Mitchell, Howard Moon, Ida Marie Moreland, Armor Morris, Betty Morris, Betty Eileen Morrison, Martha Morss, Kenneth Myers, Delwyn Myers, Marvin Nelson, Dale H. Nelson, Gene Nelson, Marjorie Nelson, Mary Nelson, Melvin Nelson, Richard Nelson, Robert . pi gig ,, gc 71: vu 71: 731 :fic sl: :lc Dil? :Qc ygv m 711711 Av :fir 73: E561 ? si 'E si 'S 'E 'E 'S 'E si si 'E 'E 'Z- -E 'E E5 AM R xv W W W W W W W W xy W X21 W xy! xy Ny X11 gyf QM gfg W W 311 N15 W W5 374 324 :Vg :V 3 : " 1 W Q-YC :4 5. 5, 5, 5. 5, 5. 5. 5. 5. 5, 5, 5, 5. 5, if 5. 5. 5. 5. 5, 5, 5, 5. 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5. 5. 5, 5. 5, 5. 5. 5, 5, 5. 5, 5, 5. 5. Y! Bt ' 1 N L 9 .I 11 L78 YJ ... 5.5 n. ' Q li 'Y LN Y! 1 C gs Pr' .4 Lx P,J . Q 5X Y,J -1-A LN r- 'O pw YI nl-1 bi Y,n Qi nw VJ A C gs VI ...g Li E , 'i LN vrl 14, .LN V! 1 gq LN .Z LN Y? 1 1 LN Y .5 LN Q -Q 'px Y .4 LN Y! 1 -Q AN Q -Q lx Y! 4 'LN V! 1 'xx '4 AN 4 Z LN Y -4 LN YA 1 Q LN 1 Z. LN LI 4 1 LN 'A I 4 AN 7,1 1 -Q AN PI 1 4 LN YA 1 4 LS Y J . 4 AN V1 4 L LN Y .4 1 -O NN Y! 1 i LN Y! 1 Li LN Y! 4 g DN 71711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 712 311 11 52 N1 Cf: P r" A -2, -'A .5 S. I ': ,Ei 51 . .5 .5 .5 gl, .5 ag. if as 5. ae, 5. 93. N! 'Z' Q' 2' ES, YA X7 Z' N1 Z' V Z' E1 'E X1 Z' :QS I 'Q QS, fl V 'Z' S. A X1 'Zi' 21 KA NJ me L f A X1 'fi' S di gg-w ' v 'Z S. ri S. r 4 xg Q-1 ' ra 5,1 bv s 6 IF' IA 25 f 'R bfi AM Aff! AY! AIG AM Ali W BM BM BM B24 AM AM AM BM BM AX!! All All B!! BM BM AM AM A!! AM BM AM AM BM BM SUPHUMURES Saville, Joyce Schlaf, John Schmiclt, Mary Schneider, Eugene Scott, Marjorie V 'S V 'N V 'N V 'S Z1 'S v Scott, Rosemary 'RQ Seaburg, Patricia Secrest, Bob Shafman, Myrtle Shamon, Josephine 'E 'E V I Shay, Eileen is Shelton, William Sherwood, Claire Ellen Showers, Glenn Sims, Forrest V 'F V7 'E V 'R' V 'K Smith, Marion Virginia Snow, Clifton Soper, Jane Spangler, Margaret Stephens, Minnie 'E V 'S Y 'S V 'N V Stevens, Charles lg Stiarwalt, Meda v Stiles, John Stites, Elizabeth Stoffel, Alice if 'E V 'N V 44 Straub, Carol B Strawn, Rosemary Strong, Luthella Stroops, Clarice Suyclam, Delmar V 'S V ig V 'S V 'N Swanson, Betty E Swanson, Delores Swanson, Doris Swanson, Margaret Tabbone, Nick V 'S 'E' V 'S V Talbert, Mary lg Tate, Betty Jane Teclerman, Rosemary J Terpening, Lyle Thierry, Roy V 'S '5 V lg V 44 Tinkham, Virginia A Torley, Margaret Turner, Marjorie Turpin, Betty Turpin, Howard V 'Q 'E 'E .z B 711 71: nv 711 Viv 711 Viv m wiv vii 71: 711 711 721 721 Viv Viv Viv Viv 721 Viv Viv YK A24 721 721 721 Viv 721 Viv Viv Viv R U81 B! B!! AM B!! AM B!! AY! AM All M4 AM BM N4 AM AM AM All N4 N4 All N4 BM BM H4 All lid Ili Hi DVC 2-YC 374 in H4 35 5. 5, 5, 5. 5. 5, 5. 5, 5, 5, 5. 5, 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 . 5, 5. 5. 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5 , 5. 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5. 5, 5 , 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, ii SGWDHKDNIOIQES Voight, Rosemary Vondelo, Vanessa june Wade, Raymond Wager, Georgetta Walberg, Gordon Wallace, Donald Wallace, John Walters, Carol Walters, Donald Ward, Victor Warner, Wanda Warren, James Wfasson, Helen Wasson, Katherine Watson, Leroy Watson, Mary Martha Way, Doris Weaver, Harry Webb, Maxwell Webster, Eleanor Webster, Gloria Webster, Joy Wedan, Wilbur Welsh, Robert West, Jack West, William Whiteside, Lydell Whalin, Betty Wiegert, Virginia Wignall, Evelyn Willis, Jearldean Wilson, Bill Wilson, Earl Q Windish, Dale Windom, Catherine hit Wingo, Evilo Winters, Harry Wirt, john Wischhusen, Robert Witherspoon, Bob 1,9 al. Wolff, James Woolsey, Esther ', Q Wright, LeRoy V Zeldes, Sidney Young, Harold mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm i591 iff 111 'N .. 7.0 a fi LN Y' .43 Li V,- n U LW P a -gt LN v,-' ,sg Bw 'Z-' 4-.Q AN fl 1 Q h-Xi sq,-4 14 Aw be 4 45 AN V .4 A s QA 1 -is In-N1 Y A " "1.l if 1 ms 1 iq Aki ny! 4 LN V2- 4 6 LN P .4 LN V .5 'N A. E5 1 A 'E- V 'S' YL-' 'S ny 1 5' E' .Z AN V 1 LN .21 Ds V 'ai' ig.: 4 10 AN Y .45 AN V 1 1 Q AN Kel 1 ag AN y ,4. Q 11, AN vga 4 47 is ,V A ' -Q AN Z A Y! 10 LN fl - f D I-N 4 'Ji 1 1 ,JY FV., AV W ' A ' YM X HTYS SUCH FU TU RECALL f60 , -- .f+.,- ..'-..", ' 1--7-4 sr" 'J '.-44 ww. X .Xml VAX 371 .. .x'Jgx. JL .,1J,f'x MQW. Jul . .5-fl NJ 2, 'J 41 I L'-'J V79 4--H3 I5: .. 4 , , 4 ZA? 5 1, -4 Rf 4 4 jj' .7 Ls "6 iff Q 1 --rf, .fi 5,1 Lx: Y ni 'Ax w z-tx . .J 4'-4 .Dfw T. ' ., N, x-'f'1 YQ: V .Q is 1 M ' fi 1 if I 7-,Q 114 I '1 .- - WA ff'-C2 Ab J ga f 41- 3 L- ' 4 GJ. X -1 ,Lx .Vi-, 12' .9 , -v .311 af!! X. - 1. r fl? MQ" ,'- 'l Eff-3 45:3 if: 3-5,1 G J if-1 Tig.,-1 4943 LF 4 3,41 1:10 ITA: 7 ,I 135: Q, F. "4 ., 1 vi :rl-:J L-A -I 14,1 4Q 2 .1 . f".-4 '11 2 1. '1 T42 4:13 I-is U51 d4X.i LL '4 E 1 1 - 'J Du V I giji 4,159 Z .1 Q42 w F" 1 Eff! 1 -flu Lx'-4 UA 1 -fl. P L- 'Q J T 1 if-1: I-1 ., A .V V AIXKJ A-H 'I ., .. ' -'J 'El L4 -'SD 'sw 1 Y' V3 S-'W ZH 4f'A' 'N '67 13? km 211 'AJ 'm W1 293 X BOOK HH - j COFFEE SHOPSO O IN MERRIE ENGLAND 4 A ' .Y -A if HY' W! W' W1 W W! W1 -XV! XV 'W X11 'W xi 1, . ,,' 4 sql-V+ Av-'U-t1v4hv.t 2'v4a,aL,i k-yxi11.A-V4Lv-Abv-451'-AL,-:Av-AA" D' A val- ' f l k - Rn' H V 9 1 -sv 4, V , A '-1 'L' f v m X 1 Q - , .A 11, 1 "F L . . LN.- fa 4 ' f u nj: of n " A N.. 4., N K . .v N 1 1 , g-- 1 , f 1 i . 1 1' N' fx.. fp.. . I' t mf! Bvrwp 7, A xy gn, , We 1.4 1---L 1 'Y '-fr ,,A., :Pr 7 -"n HJ' ,. v . A K1 gf-Ax n"-1 'wi 1 3 r F A ,xv 1- 7 K... ,, rw X., , 7- . 1 N Y Q, V P, .. .- , D i 5, . . . . ., K Q .- mx ,,.- , . Q- 1 v'Qg R-a Q..- 3 K4 A i Gs, I' 4 g v 1 U- Y V fx f KW is 1 , - 511 6 I fd 2 5,1 E ., . I I sq ' AL s ', .4 A . x-1 1 ' 1 rr fi Z, I 711 711 P11711 711 711 711 711 711 315111 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 i601 ',, f X p ACTWHTHES - j WINDOW PICTURES Jael: Frost visitecl us last night And he must have worlcecl with all his might For the lovely pictures he left hehind Anywhere else would he hard to find. lon the kitchen window thereis church with a steeple 'And gathered close are groups of people. There's a whole long row of sparkling trees 'That seem to he swaying in the hreeze. Then off in the distance there cloes appear Beside a winding river. two reindeer. Then there is the funniest little elf, rm sure itis a picture of Jack Frost himlelf- -Alice Harshharger DRURY LANE o o o IN MERRIE ENGLAND , A n 'HIL ' 1 ' u ' 1 , , I 4,,lf.'. ,, Q V ' 1, . ' a I N . . , I 'lo . X w s , 4 A 1' n " , A Tw, 4 . f .4 'v. v H?" ,, fi l. r ', J- V, A w, . , 'ff ,, ,, JN. , , ,wow WT' , 3 1 L MQ' .-v , ,J U A-up ' .K '7' L' ui A . , ' W Jun - . , -. fa ff ' . v X. ,- F, ws, X 1.11.1 6-, N l'. A',6. ""SJ" :'3w:i.'f" i M5 'Yi 1 . " -1 F. n v n 4 ' m , 1 4 f' , I .. 1 . ff X T W , . - IW, ., ,JV m "1" ,mpg N S! 5 5 5 E 5 5 5 E 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 H Z' E 5 E an qv 4 5 5 5 AI al 5 5 5 5 5 Al 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMWMMMMMMMMMWMMMMM . , - ,l..,l..Jl.:.5. , 1'. '-gel: Y ' '- 5 l N1 ' l ff D Q .1 l ff X K n i fffj v: -, '- ' r "'. - r' , .1Xs.'ll.'sLI.Ax,i H 1 ,1 it ff!! , x.N.W , ...K 3' 'lm ,- " fi l w lx v 5 ,Kiln ,v . N ' -s A. s u. , Merrie Old England! For more than a thousand years the subject of song and H- "" ' story, essay and poeml A in gay care-free romantic Eng- land full of color. Yet they, the English, of course, were not so different from us of today, for they, too, had their various clubs and organizations. In speaking of their clubs, who does not remember the famous clubs of the early eighteenth century whose headquarters were the immortal, never-to-be-forgotten coffee houses of London. Each group with its varied and divergent interests met at a cer- tain coffee-house, there to join and pass pleasant hours in the company of others of their clan, to learn of the news by the only means known to the people of that day, and to sip the deliciously fragrant coffee. The great essayist, Addison, patronized Button's while Samuel Johnson resorted to the Chesh- ire Cheese to sip his coffee. Who indeed has not become familiar with the great names which graced the roll of the immortal Samuel Johnsonis Literary Club and with their many and varied activities and pursuits, and then there were the aforemen- tioned, well patronized Oh, to he in England. Now that April's there, We, too, have our clubs in school as our agencies for promoting social and political life on a small scale. Although we do not spend our happy hours daintily sipping the juice of tree berries or interestingly discuss- ing the most recent developments in foreign affairs, still we do meet for the same reason, to develop socially, morally and mentally in contact with others who strive for the same goals as those set up by ourselves. There is such a great deal of stress today laid upon speaking and acting in its various phases that it is little wonder that before our mind's eye comes strutting the gallant image of David Garrick whose dramatic light has shown like a guiding beacon over the fleet- ing decades that have passed since his death. Qur dramatic productions today give the stage-conscious students the same oppor- tunities as were provided by Drury Lane theatres and Covent Gardens during the brilliant age of Samuel Johnson. Then we, too, have our Parliamentary system, known in colloquial language as the "student coun- cilng it is truly a representative government, members being chosen by popular vote. This year our government has been most efhcient. All in all the England of clubs and organiza- ff h h And whoever wakes in England - co ee- ouses-eac was 5... some m.,,,1.,,g, u,...w,, tions, as here represented, h f That the lowest boughs anal . t C resort O 3. 1 Cfeflt the brushwootl sheaf. WHS 1'lOt SO Very dlffefent l- d Round the elm-tree hole are in tiny leaf C lque an 1 efent types XYhile the chafhnch sings on the orchard hough from Our school of the In England-now. of people. RUEERT Ihzowxixn. Pl'CSCl'lt 3 721 721 7K 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 C mm M E E E E E E Q 5 E E E V K 5 E E E E E E E E 5 E 5 Q E E E E E E 5 E 5 E E 5 E E E E R W E W W Y W 4 W W NY W i W W W 3 1 3 6 X1 W xv Z' gg gg gg gg gg gg . X, Z' Q Z' q, Z 9 Z' G Z' Q Z' Y 'Zh E. A 'xi Z' X1 S-3 E fi X1 Z' X1 ?g' I' 1 5,1 P n' xv i l rn X1 s - fa 51" fa K1 1 ' YQ XV Z' X1 Cv 14' X' H- ra' 55 ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm TlllS Yl3AJR9S lPUl3LlSllEltS Extra! Extra! The thirty-first publication of the annual, CCTHE REFLECTORW, is now off pressl But first, before I get too enthusiastic we must stop and drink a toast to those who are responsible for this issue. To our editor, Louise Wfebster, with her thought and pen, our business manager, Bob Mower, with his financial ability and his super-salesmanship, to our staff, with their faithful work and original ideas, Mr. Robertson, for his co- operation and help, Miss Babbitt, for her experience and advice, Mr. Damberg, with his ever present camera, and last but by far not the least, Miss Belshaw with her artistic touch, taste ancl icleas. Without all of these it would have been extremely difficult if not practically impossible to present your 1938 REFLECTOR. Aside from candy sales, and matinee dances, the staff sponsored the H1938 Reflect- avue International Extravaganza" in all its Broadway splendor. Last year was our school's first attempt at anything of this kind and it was a brilliant Advifer, Miss BABBITT Top Row-D. Florer, I. Highlander, I. Harlan, R. Brown, H. Guenther, C. Lipsky, J. McKee, D. Nelson, Mr. Damberg. Scrond Row-Miss Babbitt, L. Web- ster, E. Neilson, R. Mower, C. Guthrie, T. Pihl, R. Bromberger, C. Heller, XV. Levinson, E. Tupper, R. Lozier, Miss lielshaw. Third Row-lf. Thomas, M. I. Franke-nluurger. I. A. Stambaugh, M. Parks, L. Cook, ll. XVirt, l., lfrickey, P. Miner, M. J. Crabtree. success. This year it was even bigger and better with a cast of one-hundred-fifty stu- dents on a world cruise aboard the steamship S. S. Hawaii which sailed to ten different countries. It was a magnificent performance and played for two nights before a packed house. In the midst of all their work for the year, the Budget and the REFLECTOR staffs com- bined in taking a little time out for relaxa- tion in the form of a dance. After it was all over both staH:s faithfully resumed their work and set about to complete their duties as quickly as possible. Now that the task has been completed and we are reminiscing all our work ancl play, our greatest aspiration is that you will like our year book. It has improved steadily since 1907, the first issue of the REFLECTOR, and we hope it has improved this year. We have tried to give you everything you desire in a year book, and we hope it truly reflects the many organizations of the school, so, with pride and joy we pre- sent the thirty-first REFLECTOR. mmmmmmmmmWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWR i621 Q V 5 w is fa ta -E is ts Qs E E E Q E E E Q E E E 5 E z B 5 5 E E v Q Q 5 E E E E Y Q E E 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 5. 5. 5 5. 5 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. my AM AM AM AM A24 AM AM AM AM AM AM AM A24 AM AM AM A24 Ma AM i!4 AM A24 in in in in AM in in A84 :ya 5. WEEK EY WEEK 'll"lHIE NEWS Of all the advisory periods during a school week, the one on Thursday is the most inter- esting and one of the most enjoyable, for it is then that the Budget is distributed to its sub- scribers. The Budget is one of the leading activities in school life. It announces dates of coming events, descriptions of high school's social and sport life, and the humor and gossip which runs through the school populus. The Budget is edited, composed and printed by the students of Galesburg High School. These few words mean a great deal of work on the part of many people. News must be accumulated by the staff members and written up in a permissable way for publication. It must then be sent to the printing room where the type must be set up and there printed. Many Bud gets are mailed to other schools, who in turn send their paper to the Budget. This year the Budget has been under the ed- itorship of Genevieve Davis, one of the many members of the staff who spent much time R. Billings, I. Harncs , Xl est, H. Secrest. -1 33 Adviser, Miss NICKEL Top Row-ll. YVynn. M. J. Sillllll, Bl. lliistafsrm. lf. Soper, A. llencrlict, Xl. Schmidt, C. fills. C. Moore, C. Driscoll, J. Conlon. Serum! Ron'-Mr. llamlmcrg, R. Harrline, R. Blcflellzmcl, V. Samllmurg, K. Freese. ' t R XYhite N lanlon Nliw Nickel. Third Rott'-ll. Carlcy. l.. Little. XY. Strawn, EL Beckv:r,'G. Davis, J, Dickinson, nl. l'linv:l1liH. ll. in the interest of the school and paper. The financial and business problems of the Budget have been met successfully by Russell Har- dineg Wanda Strawn, Marjorie Gustafson, and Barbara Wynn have officiated exception- ally well at positions of copy editors. While .lean Gordon ponders over the feature of the week, Robert Billings attends a football or basketball game for the minute details of the inter-school competition. Ned Landon has been the Bud getis make up editor, working very hard for the interest of the paper. When artistic touches are desirous, staff members look to lean Dickinson for her artistic ability. Helping Russell l-lardine with his business worries is Robert McClelland, assistant busi- ness manager. For long hours typewriter keys tap under the flying fingers of Carroll Cills and Carolyn Driscoll. David Carley has one of the many interesting tasks on the Budget staff, he is exchange editor. There are many reporters who deserve credit for mak- ing the Budget a suc- cess, and to our ever capable Miss Nickel goes many thanks. l, i. amf , A 55 I 3 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 7K 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 l l 63 Y! V 'R YA AN Yi 'R 9 'R V 'R 9 'R V 'R 9 'R 9 'R 9 'R Y 'S 9 'R 9 'R 9 'R Y! 'R V 'R V 'R V -E U 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R P 'S Y 'S V 'R V! 'R Q '52 Y 'E .Z SN V 'fe Y! 1 4 LN vz 4 Q LN .Z SN YI ' so AN rf . 4 AN 74 LN ' 1 N 1, , , VMZ ' fmmmmmwmmmmmmwmwmmmg OUR SALUTE FUR SERVHQE ' AA 4 4. -- .wmwwmmmmmmmmmmmmm fm E K E E E K 'E Q E E E E V 'R E 1 E V 'S V 'S V 'R E 5 'E E V K V 'R Z 'S 'R 'E fs as V 'R E V 'S 'E E V 'R V 1 4 A V 'S +5 5 Y E R' QAM A!4 A!a A!4 A!4 AM AM Ala A!a A24 A!4 AM A!4 A!4A!ffz7 ff A A LEAGUE UF lFRHlENDSlUIlIP X 1.1. . - ,A , . W - 4 5' Q 71' 1 5' w 2' 5. 5. 5. 5, 5. 5 5, 5. 5. 5. 5, 91' 5, 5, 5, 5, 5. 5. 5, 5, 5, 5. 5. 5, 5, 5, 5, 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5, E' ' 5, 5, 5. 5, 71 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 714 71-,7 ' Q A A E653 M 'E 'E E 'E '16 'E 'E 525 'E 'E 'E 'E E E 'E 55 'E QE 'Zi 'E 'E ii' if 'E vu R +5 E QE? 15 'E E E QE 15 'E 'E 'E xx :fm IZA? 23' 'V SW Wi' R 5 5 5 5 5 5 Q X Z' Q 2' 1 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 w E 0 ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmM THUSEXWHU WUULD SERVE "And now, will the meeting please come to order? First we will have the reading of the minutes by the secretary. Thank you, and now we are pleased to introduce to you l- And thank you. The meeting is now adjourned." I-Iow familiar are these oft-heard words to the many members of the Girls' Service League and of the Boys, Forum. These two groups, although organ- ized and meeting separately, have the same purpose and ideals to carry out during their existences. This purpose is "To create, main- tain and extend higher standards of living throughout the school and the community." Impressive induction services were held for the Girls' Service League at the begin- ning of the year. At this meeting the burn- ing emblem of the Service League was used. This emblem is made up of a white cross within a blue circle, which in turn is within a white square, all being framed by burning candles. The white square represents the four-fold life-social, physical, mental, and spiritual. The blue circle stands for service and growth in mind, spirit, and body, and the white cross is symbolic of the life of Him whose name we bear, the candles represent to us the life He burnt for us. This year, for the first time, all the girls in Senior High School were privileged to join the League as the sophomores have never before been allowed to join until their junior year. The induction services for the new junior members of the Boys' Forum early in the year were equally im- promoting and maintaining the ideals of the four C's-clean living, clean speech, clean scholarship, and clean athletics. Because of the large membership of these two groups, the influence upon the school and the entire student body is of a high and noticeable quality. At Christmas time the activities of these groups reached the highest peak for, as has been the case in the past, the Girls' Service League aided the Empty Stocking Club by filling boxes of candy to be given to the poor children, while the Boys' Forum did their bit by repairing broken toys. At this time the spirit of service and helpfulness was truly brought forth. Then, of course, came the Christmas play, put on and sponsored by the Girls' Service League and the Boys' Forum. This year the great and beautiful perform- ance of "Why the Chimes Rangl' was mag- nificent and impressive beyond the expression of words. Many interesting programs were presented for both groups. The Boys' Forum was priv- ileged to hear Reverend Freda and Judge Stuart, outstanding speakers of the year. The Girls' Service League lent an interested ear to Mrs. Glidden's intriguing oratory as well as to the melodious melodies of the harp as rendered by Miss Lochlin. And now, before we close, may we drink a toast to Miss Cox and to Mr. Crawford, these two without whose inspiration and guidance, the Girls, Service League and the Boys' Forum would ' Small service is true service while it lasts: Press1Ve7 an the rnern- Of humblest frienrls, bright Creature! scorn not on never have Succeeded bers vowing to live up The Daisy- "Y 'he Shadow that if Casts- as they have during the l , I Protects the lingering dew drop from the Sun. to their principle of xx1,R.,5..-..R-H past year. mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm I 67 3 ? 6 E E E E E E E E E E E E Q E E Q E E E Q 6 6 E E E E Q E E E E E E R 32 AM A!! AM AM AM AM All All AM BM AM AM BM A24 BM AM BM All AM AM A!! A24 AM A!! AM AM BM All B!! M All All M Z B 5, Q 9 ' '1 1 y z'GllRlL,S SCTENCE Kll-Ellzlll STTLPF E' 'E 9, A .. 4 1 l A 'E Q Q V 2' 'E E' 'E q V 2' 'N v 1 S9 is A 91' 'E v Q 5? th l , . - Y 5 Lights! Action! Camera! Sound! G.H.S. -the unique fall party, "The Penguin Prom- Q . . . - - v E' is ablaze with lights. The students are seated enadef, The girls and their escorts dance, 'R A in the auditorium and becoming impatient surroun e y ice ergs an penguins, w ie 5 E' for the performance to begin. Outside one two large penguins stand guard at the door. '5 92' hears the loud howling of automobile horns Take H- G- S- C- establishes itself by 'E E' bringing some late-comers. The audience is placing third in the debate IC111alS- HOW 'R . . - v E' composed of interesting peopleg there are proud eVeFy0I1e IS When G- S- C- has 1'ePfe- N . . . - v E' little brothers and sisters of students in school Se11IaI1VeS 011 the N- W- C- Clehafe Squad- 'R . . . . . - u if who insist upon standing in their seatsg some Take HI- Extemporaneous SPe9-king 'S ' . , . . . V Ev of the students are laughing and talking with takes the Spotlight with G. S. C. again repre- 'g iq . . v gf their friendsg others are the mothers and Selifed- 'R 'Ei fathers of the students and are patiently Take IV. February 11. Every member 'Q it awaiting the final moment when the curtain of G. S. C. entertains her Valentine of Q Q will rise. At last the big moment arrives and Vale11ti11eS - her mother - at the almllal 'E -Ei the eloquent master of ceremonies steps out Mothers' Tea. 'E from behind the curtain. "Ladies! Gentle- Take V. March 25. G.S.C. and F.D.C. 15 if men! Students! Tonight we take great pleas- present their annual assembly. -E :E+ ure in showing you some brief post-view Take VI, May 27. G. S. C. members 45 scenes of the G. S. C. production entitled once again dance to lilting and tantalizing 4? ig- "The G. S. C. Re-review of 1937-38." The tunes at the spring party. -Q scenes you see will be Ad, M R -ef Take VH- June 8- 'E , iss YIN .1 exactly as they would T R E M JT H, B W t D M ,H fA most memorable day -E U 0117+ . A - C 43.11 1111, . CS, . Crfl , Y , , , :S+ be in movie- I- lilleqlufev M- ,l- Sauni VV. Strawng E. Neilson, lfl the 1'I'1lI'lC.lS ofSen1ors 15 IA 11. Lozier, E. Parnell, C. Straub, lNI.PbuEtaisoH, f d t -51 lend- S0 lef us fake Q '-I5I3?5ra'31 lxfifghclfilf'i15Ff1Iif5i.2Q.-'ffifiii'Lfiiillej 3: when they bade a on -5 - , M. af .,,. f ., . ., 11, . v aj look behind the scenes. Fiigigiafg Mmgfjlgjgljegelh,C?ggg,iE..,kJ0hyjO'E0 .gigs farewell to the good .5 Ii. T1'dR'-.M,ll,.. ' , . - ' ' 5. Roll them over! G. iagvisfiii. lhoniiis,IiE.0shelfmgil?iR.Mx1iHill, UIDCS they had had 111 -E V. T' kh , ,l'. L, XY.lla , . v ' f, L . i' n, 3, Take I. December 4 11. 1.iii-iieaeiii. q ff U mg me G. S. C. Q fl gv P 2- N .1 --f. '-K -R ,- 1 ef 'g 4 :G "4'4' ' A " A A A A A A A A ' 7 il 741 751511 H1 741 741 741 741 741 741 '241 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 741 721 741 741 741 741 741 741 W1 741 751 7218 l 68 l SE 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 E' it 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 51 E an 5 5 5 AP Y 122. 6 5 5 56 MmmmmmmmmwwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmM fSblAlsOTFUSS PUXSS lVN RT3VlJE l ,- 41. The other evening I was visiting at the home of Anna Lotos and secured her per- mission to read an account of her good times in her Diary. I found that on November 5 she attended a delightful fall party. The party was held at Steele Hall and the theme of the party was "Annie Swing Time." The dance pro- grams were in the form of black suede top hats and many colorful balloons were given for favors. The hall was decorated with top hats, canes, and many other attractive dec- orations. Anna said she had a wonderful time. A little farther on I read that Anna had taken part in a play which her club, with the cooperation of the Bovs' Science Club, had presented to the school as the year's project. This presentation was an old-fashioned melo- he proved to bel These characters and other members of the cast provided an amusing assembly program. Cn March 16, Anna took her mother, lVlrs. Lotos, to the annual Mothers, Tea. Her mother met Annals friends and was en- tertained by a program given by members of Anna,s club. Anna had written in her diary other events in which she had enthusiastically taken part. She had represented her club in interclub activities, such as debate and basketball and had participated in many interesting club programs. Another entry was made in her Diary on May 21 when she attended at Steele l-lall. The hall decorated and an evening a spring formal was attractively of dancing was enjoyed. drama, "Fireman, Save my Childil' The On June 10 she brought to a close the heartless villain aroused the anger and disdain Aa'-mer, Miss lVlosER account of her school year. Cn this date she Tnf' Ron'-C. Driscoll, Bl. I. Stephens, ll. Johnson, l ' ' ' ' ' Q of the audience while - fair Daisy, the village attended a banquet at the Galesburg Club l.. Hacclen, J. Mans. l. Johnson, Nl. Broun, .. John son, ll. Johnson, O. Lundquist, ll. Lewis, A. Nelson Bl. Showers, ll. Sanford. Suvmld Ron'-J. A. Bowles, B. Chandler, I. Sargeant, li. U'l3rien, H. Flinn, D Lund en, iz. 1.0 - H. Sm -nah. H. H.11..-, Hf - belle, Won the hearts glyerz, I.. Frickggi-,T E. M. M. johiigoif M. Where She bld farewell sowman. M. s 1 . Tl'-.1 RVQJ. I- 1 , M, - of any and Chester Koons, D. Klciil? Haflilen, Scott,ugl.ecliranz, to the graduatlng Sen' tklIlrIllEhPNI R htn 3. 'jc ante , . ,. cc er, . . incr, .Creig o , - 1- Wilt H M V, s lofi ll H' M er iors of her club. l. Y, ..CZ1',...lIl,.lSS.0S. Quingle . . what a hero YK 721 YK 7K YN 711 YI! 711 YR YK YZ! YN YK 721 721 YK YK YN YK 711 711 7K 711 YK 71? YN YN 711 YR 7K YK 715 l69l Z 3 E 5 5 Q E 5 E 6 5 E K5 E E Y ,I 'Lf li 33 A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! 14 xv 15 5-4 23. 74 Q Z' K1 5 fa' xv Z' 3. fl xv 71 xv 5 di Q 5 rg' xi Z' Q 1- ri' NS Z N1 Z A' Q Z' Q Z' W 5 di Q Q ri Q Z' xv 'Z Q 5 A' E- 74 xv Z' xv Z' E, fl xv Z xv ve f V4 QS. 14 xg Z' xv Q . fd '-.1 if I fc A". fa Mi jr 1 mi wa b FJ .TJ 6 v L: ,. K4 R1 0--. FA 5.1 0--. fi N37 2' YO . A' ll . S fa 2' fn 'si 9- fl , . In C4ODlL.LECT0lRS EVER READY In the latter part of September in 1923 a student of Galesburg High School named Vivion Sjadin instigated and was responsible for the founding of the Boys' Collectors Club. He made a petition, which is the cus- tom in starting a new organization, and had the signatures of boys interested in joining this new club placed on it. Thus we owe the credit of founding this new club to Vivion Sjaclin. The club was not large, thirteen was the number of the charter members, but it had taken hold of the spirit of these boys and it was in their heart to place the Boys' Collectors Club at the top. At the time of the first meeting, an elec- tion was held and with clue respect Vivion Sjadin was elected president. After the elec- tion of officers, the club thought it necessary new organization was christened, "The Boys, Collectors Club." At this time it was thought necessary to have a set of rules so the constitution of the Boys' Collectors Club was formed. This year the Boys' Collectors have ad- vanced even more with the printing of the constitution. Also this year the club won first place in the inter club baseball tourna- ment receiving the trophy given by the Franklin Debating Club. The fall party was in the form of a Cotton Carnival, much of the commendable work being done by the Laurian Literary Society. For the Regional Basketball Tournament, the Collectors made program cards which were donated to the REFLECTOR to aid in their work. The club did very well in the swimming meet. The to decide upon a name. The purpose of the club was, and is today, to foster a desire to make useful collections of every nature, and to render aid in the classi- fication and study of the same. Thus this Advifer, MR. DAMBERG T011 Row-R. Ryberg, H. Carlson, R. Pendergast, H. Bowers, F. Emery, T. Peterson, B. VVitherspoon, C. Heimel, E. Jones, C. Thomas, H. Parmenter, VV. Fin- dahl, B. Carlson, C. Flickinger, H. Reno, M. Joseph- son, R. Carlberg, G. Myers, R. Coatney. Second Row -K. Mason, R. Nelson, D. Walters, R. Britt, R. V. Johnson, H. Winters, C. Kenney, R. Roberts, E. Iosefson, H. Uhlman, L. Moon, C. NVedan, V. Traff, A. Parmenter, W. Starr, R. Hagerstrom, J. Nelson, Third Row-J. Crozier, D. Craig, H. Weaver, E. Stoneking, R. Hale, VV. Carlson, I. Chapman, R. Carusi, I. Snodgrass, D. McLaughlin, L. Owen, V. Blixt, G. McLain, D. Florer, VV. Peck, M. Johnson, Mr. Damberg. spring party date was the 20th of May. Cn the last day of school the club held its annual picnic, this being the last social function of the year, at this time the seniors bade good- bye to their club-mates. 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E +5 'E 'E 5 'E 'E V 'R 'EQ V 'R 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'Zi v 1? 1 'S u N v 'S 'E E 'E 'E 'E 'E E 'E 'E E 5 'E 'E 'E . 726 725 nl 725 hi 721 721 721 721 721 1,1 72? 72? 721 72? 721 72V 721 721 721 721 72Y 72Y 72Y 721 72V 721 72? 72Y 721 72V 7218 i701 Zh 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 . Z ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm Q SCHENCE BUYS DARE TU DU When the first meeting of the Boys, Science Club was held on September 15, 1937, the president properly inaugurated the event by giving a speech in which he set forth his views and aspirations for the club in the approaching year. His oral energies did not go for naught, for the Boys' Science Club, under the leader- ship of Captain Herbert Willer, tied with the Franklin Debating Club for second place in the baseball tournament. Not only in this year, but also in the year of 1936 the Boys' Science Club distinguished themselves in sports, for they won the golf champion- ship and tied in the swimming meet. On November 3, Dale Nelson, then president, conferred an honorary member- ship upon Roger Harry Garst, son of the The Boys' Science Club displayed the de- bating ability of its members by winning first place in the club debates. This was a gala occasion because it had been some years since the club had entered the finals. The debate team consisted of Leonard White, Gale Ben- son, aflirmativeg and Rupert Miller, and Roland Nelson, negative, the team was coached by Mr. Garst, the club adviser. The fall party was held on November 21st with Karl Aldrich and orchestra supplying the music. The theme was "College Dazef, The decorations were carried out in accord- ance with the unexampled theme. The annual banquet was held on March 7 at the Galesburg Club. Major E. D. Porter of Knox College was the speaker of the evening giving an interesting tallc on club adviser. The Boys' Science Club with the Analotos Literary Society pre- sented a comedy, 'Tire- man Save My Child," starring such celebrities as Lyle .Albro, Billy West and Jaclc Holst "Ballistics." To bring the Science Club's Adviser, Miz. GARST Top Row-L. NVats0n, H. Bayless. H. NYong, P. Sims. K. Horn. T. Curless, K. Freese, R. Johnson, R. Brom- berger, R. Bonney, C. Heller, R. Nelson, H. XYiller, R. XVright, E. XValters, D. Olson. Second Row-XV. Felt, L. XVhite, R. Dulaney, J. Rowen, J. Davis, S Keefer, VV. XVest, I. XViller, L. Maxwell, L. Albro G. Benson, R. Hunt, I. XValton, K. Mason, L. Page R. Pearson, Mr. Garst. Third Row-XV. Harshbarger I. Holst, XV. Heule, R. Haines, M. Dickinson, R Yordhielm, XV P rso H Y , T L. , E A . ea . n. . oung ,. arson McCullough, R. Mathewson, R. Anderson, R. XYisch husen, E. Nelson, I. XVoIl?, IJ. Nelson. activities to an end, the spring party was held on May 7, at Steele Hall, where dancing was enjoyed through the passing hours. It has been fun, this year that's done, and there's more for the future. :YC and was a huge success. 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 725 1711 .4 V! u 1 LN YI 1 1 AN V! 1 -Q LN VJ i -4 L N YI 1 1 LN vf 1 -4 LN v 'E V1 eg YI 1 'Q BN F4 ax YI 1 1 AN Y! 1 1 LN px Z AN V 'R V 4 'px V .1 'ax V 'R V 4 'h V 'S V 'S V 1 'Ax V 4 'px V ug V 'R V i 'AN V sg V i th V 4 'LN V 4 'sw V 'R .Z B v .S If 1 9 hi Z sw. Z 1 ss VI - -4 L 5 V Q -Q LN F4 ss XI 4 Q A W YI 1 11 L N 9.1 'Q L X S service, one can understand the feeling in NV Z' 4 Z' Q Z' W Z' S 4' W Z' S rx' W 72' W Z' E' W Z' Q Z' G Z' E' Q Z' 4 Z' W Z' QV Z' W Z' S. A E- Q Z' G Z' S, YA S1 Z' NY Z' X1 be A I4 SV 1 ' .YA gl Z' S. i4 S. 6 N. IA 3. it N1 if ' V4 N1 P v fl S. fl NY 9: ' 1' A X1 9-. Il 71 ammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmz V R BLAZHMEIANCULNS TRAMA The Lincoln Debating Club was organized by a group of boys in the winter of 1904 for the purpose of furthering speech activities. Under the capable direction of Mr. Robert Chandler, the club made progress in further- ing activities of the school. The first activity founded by the Lincolns was the Bud get. In the first six years of their history the Lincolns stood with a clear slate in debate, they had never been defeated. This was an honor because they competed with Springfield, Macomb, and Decatur, which were among the best schools in the state. In the year 1915 the Lincolns pledged seventy dollars toward the furnishing of a recreation room. Rambling on through the years the Lin- colns participated in all events and won many forensic honors. Under the able lead- some time. In 1925-26 the Lincolns purchased blue and white sweat shirts and trousers for the basketball team. During 1927 the Lincolns made a contribution toward the purchasing of a piano for the school. The years 1928-32 witnessed a temporary recession in Lincoln supremacy. But in the year 1932 the Lincolns soared again by win- ning all club events with the exception of baseball and there they placed second In 1929 and following years when the depression struck the world, it was likewise reflected in the Lincolnls record. The years 733, '34, '35, and '36 were very mediocre as far as competitive activity was concerned, but the Lincolns retained their lead in scho- lastic standing. In view of their record of ership of Mr. I-Iarry Crawford the Lincolns went far in attaining distinction in debate and oratorical contests because the Lincolns took almost complete possession of them for Adviser, MR. GOODWIN Top Row-G. Swallow, D. Burkett, D. XVoolsey. D. llracker, F. Nyman, XV. Snapp, M. Myers, V. Lash brook, R. Boyes, D. Crandell, R. Sharp, R. Peck, D. Myers, fl. Hanlon, V. Peterson, J. Adcock, R. Brown Second Row-R. Carley, R. Wlhite, R. Aldrich, M Hotchkiss, J. Barrow, F. Olson, C. Boyclstun, H Guenther, J. Harlan, C. Lester, XV. Moore, C. Sells E. Seifert, T. Freda, R. Eyre, T. Pihl, R. Sharp Third Row-J. XVirt, XX' R. Hardine, J. Harnest. Hamilton, C. Hartley, H. Secrest, C. Ruth, R. Seerest GGd D.Crle RFAb' R.RthJ . ar ner, a y, . air airn, u , . Lawrence, H. Gardner, J. Highlander, I. Mclxee, R. Allison, E. Fritz, N. Landon, Mr. Goodwin. G.1-I. S. halls in 1938 whenever an emergency arises. 4'Let the Lin- colns do it.'7 Under the expert guidance of Mr. Goodwin, the adviser, such a feeling has been made possible. E E 'E 'E '26 5 'E 'E 5 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 5 'E 'E 'E E 'E 'E 'E E 15 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 5 +5 AM . :gc :ls si: sg: nc nv m vis var 711711721 nv Viv vit wiv nv wiv 721 wiv 711 wiv 721 nv Viv 711 vit vii vim 1721 5 E' 52' E' 5. 5 5. 5 5 5. 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. E' 5. 51' 91' 5. 91' if 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. E' 5. 5 5. m!AA!n!A Alntma A!n!AA!AA!n!4A!4i!n!n!4 AM Ala B24 Ma i!n!n!4 itz in AM M4 Ma i!4:!4i!u!4i!a lElL.llZ.ABlETllrllANS UN PARADIB Dearest Lizzie: Now that the activities have quieted down a wee bit, I find myself brimming over with things I must tell you about the glorious year we've spent in club. To start our whirl of fun, on November 30, our charming actresses and the L. D. C. actors gave a star production of the clever comedy "Hold Everything." Our next, well we might say, dramatic step, was to help the S. A. A. give the "Silver Strealcsv a mighty send-off with a "Foretold, the Future" stunt. The E. L. S. parties, those fetes of fetes, were celebrated on December 18 and April 30. In every department these thrilling events were charmingly superb. The bril- ilantly decorated ballrooms would have made any starry night simply pinlc with envy and the music was just to a queen's taste. Under a midnight blue ceiling a-glimmer with silver stars, our Christmas dance was held. Prancing rein- deer, a grand sleigh, and a fir tree, trimmed with bright blue lights, added their share to the evening's splendor. Adviser, Miss WHITE Top Ron'-C. Moore, Bl. -I. Frankrnburger, L. Little. li. liurgctt, 1. Rose, -l. Gordon, J. Harshhargzcr. E. Meadows, H. XYynn. XY. Firnved, M. Hazen, E, XVeb- ster, I. XVehster. BI. Cramer. Nl. L. Fleharty, I. Porter, E. XYoolsey, J. Hinchlirf. Sm'Or1dRow-ll. Linrlstrum, ll. Parks, ll. Swanson, D. Jacobson, M. M. XVatson, Y. Nlurecn, A. Benedict. E. Stiekney, G. Nesbit, M. Schmidt, C. Glass, D. M. Linrothe, F. Dahlstrom, S. Ross, Ii. J. Koffer, B. Parks, IJ. Sowder, L. XVehster, Bliss V. F. XYhitc. Tlz1'r'd R010-R. Kanrm, Rl. A. Cline, M. E. Stuart. R. Voight, P. Parsons, C. XYil- son. Rf. Tolbert, KI. McLain, J. Scott, RI. F. Cooper, V. Tracy. A. Stoffel, R. Strawn. J. Soper, P. At- wood, E. Jennings, A. Craft. I. A. Stamlmaugh. King Snowman reigned supreme o'er the punch bowl. Certainly no less delightful was the gay spring festival, which captivated the hearts of all who participated in the cele- bration of this nicest of nice seasons. We shall long dream of these entrancing fairy- land occasions. The E. L. S. banners were floated high this year by the debate teams and the basket- ball squad, in the intra-club tournaments. Then, of course, we always enjoy enter- taining our mothers at a valentine tea, for it gives us a little chance to show our apprecia- tion of what they are constantly doing for us. As the curtain of the school year rang down, the underclassmen bade the seniors farewell, at a lovely banquet at the Galesburg Club on June 7. All of us agree that the year 1937-38 has been one of the most success- ful in the Lizzies' his- tory, due to the sincere efforts of Miss W'hite. As ever, Sister Lizzie. 4 3 721 721 721 721 721 721 7K 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 W 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 l 73 l X I4 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'S 'E' 'E 'E 'E 5 'E 36 A 'ZS 'E -E 'E 'E E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'S 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E YQ DN ki S! gf Z' X1 Z' Q Z' 4 Z' Q Z' Q Z' 9 Z' xi Z' 9 Z' Q Z' G Z' N1 Z' N! Z' K! Z' V 5 A' G Z' XY Z' 4 Z' 4 Z' N1 Z' Q Z' S. K4 N1 be v fl Q Z' 23. fi Y! 'R P :F 6 gi Q- 1 f A X1 'Z' xi 3 s fl gl D- - I A K! 2 ' fl nj 5 fa' K,1 UL b fA :V fi if fl xi in fl JS. A gi 1 fl. N1 X v IA R1 .. . f'l 'V A. fl ,, . It in any AM in A24 A24 in AM in in AM in AM A24 i!a AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM A!AA!n!AA!A All AM me V HLLHNAES CUME HN ORDER it ,. Readers, if you look up and listen you may hear the deafening roar of an air-plane, then train your field glasses and you will see the name of the craft, "ILLINAE", printed plainly on the side. This three year old flier left the protection of its hangar, gaily took off and winged its way against the wind last September, having Geraldine McCarthy as pilot, with Darlene Burch, Ethel Leighton, Marian Collier, and Dorothy Moran as crew, Mrs. Rich helped to guide us in our course. On an evening in October, our plane stopped, and took aboard for the evening, some of the members of other clubs, to have a I-lallowe'en party. The dance programs were small booklets in the form of black cats. We landed at Steele Hall, which was dec- orated with black cats, cornstalks, and pump- kins, and in the center stood a huge ear of corn, around which the couples danced. Cider and doughnuts were served as refresh- ments, lending this un- usual party theme an added charm. Our plane flew along N. Quarterman, Advixer, MRS. RICH Top Row-F. Riley, R. Boyd, E. Anderson, L. Brann, D. Fones, C. Johnson, M. Thomas, B. Flickinger, K. Stringer, I. M. NVagner, E. Pumfrey, H. Augerson, ILC ls ,K.Jh. ,M-.R'l. Sv dR '- so smoothly that we decided to have another party in February, and our air-ship was made a suitable place for a barn dance. In due time and cooperating with several other clubs, this party was held amid the gaudy glamor of various farm-yard personalities and proved great fun to all who came. We gave our mothers a spin with us at our annual tea, they admired our brave little craft, and the charming persons who enter- tained them. At our farewell party for the seniors, the senior banquet, the juniors wished those graduating a goodbye and "happy landingv in their more or less unguided solo flights that are taken after the guidance and protection of the teachers of good old G. H. S. are left behind. After a few more loops, what a satisfaction we had in the feeling of the successful flight we had made as our plane rolled quietly into the hangar in Room 227, where it is awaiting in happy anticipation of the Hight it will start next September, with Mrs. Rich to capably ZH' 0l'l 0 H5011 fi lC1 C O71 OIL P. Peabody, M. Zeffo, L. M. Lamb, T. Johnson, G. . McCarthy, E. Leighton, M. Collier, G. Selk, J. Tab- guide the craft as She hone, A. Reynolds, D. Burch, D. Moran, K. Hudgel, has this year. 711 513 51? 712 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 AM 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 R l74l L 's E E 'E 'E 'E E 'E 'E 'E 5 'E 'E 'E 5 5 5 'E 'E E 'E E 'E E 5 E 5 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E Q 'E E 'E E E E 'E 'E E M 5. 5. 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. P NA24 A24 A24 AM A24 AM A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 AM A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 H4 BYE A24 AMERICANS AT ATTENTIION The American Literary Club activities of 1937-38 began with the acceptance of new junior club members. These members were accepted into the American Club group at intervals during the two semesters of the school year. The first important work accomplished this year by the American Club was the writing and adoption of the new constitution by which the club is now governed. This constitution was first worked out a year ago, but due to some changes it was not used at that time. For the first time since the organization of the club, the members decided to have a club pin. The design for the pin was drawn by an art student-one of the members of the club group. This year was not a successful one for the club ball team. Every game ended in a de- feat for the Americans. However, even with the loss of all the games, the team members still proved themselves great sportsmen by be- Advixer, MR. SLAVEN T01' Rott'-K. Cook. T. Ekstrom. f. Larson. F. Tohn- With the termination of the baseball sea- son, the Americans started to plan in earnest for a winning basketall team. The plans were very successful, as the club had one of its best teams in years. The quintet suc- ceeded in taking third place in the club tournament. As usual the Americans had a good swim- ming team, and were successful in winning a position in the inter-club swim meet. The Americans joined with several other clubs in putting on a large mid-year party. This party was held February 19, and all attending had a grand time. The theme was that of a "barn dancegi' so, to rhe tune of lilting melodies, the Americans passed sev- eral happy dancing hours amid all the atmosphere that is indicative of rustic life. In summing up the activities, the Amer- icans feel that they had a very busy and happy year. They hope other Americans in the years to come will do as well. With many bright prospects in view for the future, the members of the club i I y ion. L. Szrxzeant, NV.'Raffn-rty, XY., Mumlv. S. Ihierre. Ing good losers' and O5 TZ. Re 0. L Xsl C Q1 '. E I 5 Moser ag r, . f mury, . Intl, XX Inrch, It . ' Mr. Slaven. Second Rowell. XYenclell, R. Levcnhcrg, having 3' tearn on the J. Glasco, H. Shafman, C. Hvarvcn, I.. Huplics. J. H - Forsythe, F. Mead, K. Law, K. Raaen, R. Tapper, C at 3. tlfnes. R. Sunwlquist, A. lllasnovich, C. Lipsky. look forward happily to next year. AY4 Q 4"4"A'v- - - A A - A . 4 - A -' - - 4 . . A A ' ""' 0 751 151 151 151 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 151 15x 755 I 75 I Y! YQ AN YI . Q BN V! 1 'Q IN VI 4 4 IFN 'AI 1 Q LN .Z AN v 1 'xx .Z LN .Z LN u T .IW .Z px u Q 'Ax v 1 Q LN .Z Ax Yi 4 4 LN .Z Us v 4 'mx vf 1 'px V 'R u 1 'A Z! 1 'A v 1 'BY u 1 'px -Z LN Y .4 LN u i 'As ,t 'S UN U! 4 1h YI 1 'AN v 1 'ss V 1 'A .Z IX If A 1 LN YA . qq AN YI ' fl LN Q1 -4 ti Y! 44 LN Y! 11 LS If -C LN U! 'Q . A'S V1 1 l'! vz f 1 rs ' -n AX 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 EP-A 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 E 5 5 , IA ammmMMMMMmmmMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM E WE FULLUW THE FRANKLIINS - . 'K On the good ship G.H.S. Franklin, 1938. Location: Room 105. Tonnage: 51 mem- bers. Commodore: Mr. Bednar. Course: to the end that through social and intellec- tual efforts better citizenship may be attained. Weather: favorable for even bigger and better years in the future. This spring the Franklin Debating Club ended another successful year stop Ever since the club was founded in 1923, the members have sought to maintain standards repre- sentative of Benjamin Franklin, after whom the club is named, and this year has been no exception along this line stop Starting early in the year, the baseball team came through with second place honors, and soon after the basketball squad won a second notch position stop When swimming came along in early spring, the Franklins contin- ued the brilliant pace with winning stride stop It has been in schol- arship, however, that the club has best shown itself, with a constant second place position in berger, R. Wald ron. Adviser, MR. BEDNAR Top Row-R. Ingram, H. VonLangen, R. Lundeen, I.. Mason, R. Sands, NV. West, E. Miller, VV. Ander- son, L. Munson, M. Peterson, H. Upton, R. Billings, H. Porter, H. Stotts, R. Parkinson, E. Clendenin Second Row-Mr. Bednar, R. Evans, I. XVest. D. Lacky, K. Mudd, R. Mills, F. Lundeen, D. Sands, XV. Johnson, E. Burrell, Rileyb Eevinipnivlg. Sarver, D. Suydam, D. Mc amy, . :ut rie, . e - - son. Third Row-M. Nelson, M. Parkinson, G. Kemp, a Successful and exceed A. Freed, D. Parkinson, H. Xvainright, R. Kite, R Fundenberger, C. Brashear, R. Swise, R. Kemp, R. Johnson, R. McLain, XV. Newcomber, E. Franken- the boys' club grade averages and on occa- sion occupying first place stop Again, as usual, the Franklins donated magazine subscriptions to the school library as their annual project stop As another proj- ect, the organization collaborated with the Girls' Science Club in March in the produc- tion of a clever one-act play, 'CA Mad Breakfastv, in the auditorium for the benefit of the student body stop As a respite, the Franklins have enjoyed a highly successful social year, which was inaugurated November 6 at their fall party stop The occasion was one of the highlights of the season stop The annual founder's day banquet was held at the Galesburg Club February 16 with Mr. W. Arnold of Knox College as the main speaker and Charles Guthrie as toastmaster stop On May 14 the Franklins held their seasonal spring party to round out their pro- - gram stop Altogether, the good ship has had ' ingly profitable trip this year stop. 711 711 711 711711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 7K 711 711 1761 E E E 5 E E mmm W W WWWWWWWWWW H1 711 711 711 711 711 711 1mm 15 WWWWWWWWWWW The Laurian Zephyr, with Miss Anderson S! 5 5 E 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 H 5 E 5 5 5 5 5 5 an 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 it 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 'Q 55 Mwwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm LAURHANS FORWARD MARfClIll younger passengers, together with their as its dependable, ever-ready engineer, Helen Culver as the fireman, and their assistants, Dorothy Carlson, Alice Marie Harmon, Margaret Randall, Jeanette Babbitt, Maxine Booth, Theresa Wilson, and several other girls on different shifts, as well as many eager-eyed passengers, sped out of Station 112 at 1:15 on September fifteenth for an exciting and entertaining trip. The Zephyr made its first stop at Assem- bly I'-Iall where, to an attentive and interested audience, the train crew and the passengers presented a rollicking one-act comedy, "Elmer.,' On and on the Zephyr rushed until it came to a sudden standstill down South where all the passengers got off and, with the members of the Boys' Collectors Club, went mothers, they enjoyed a delightful Mothers' Tea on March twenty-second. The next stop was at Spring Valley, a true paradise, when on May twentieth a gay colorful party was held with the Boys' Collectors Club. The stream-lined Zephyr made its final stop on june seventh to let everyone off for a formal, farewell banquet in honor of the departing senior passengers. Interspersed throughout the merry trip were weekly meetings, where there were discussions of interest which led to vital decisions, concerning participation in activ- ities. Ar various intervals paper "girls" board- ed the Laurian Zephyr and distributed, free of charge, the "Laureate,,' a paper telling of the passengers and their accomplishments, to the Cotton Festival held on November and containing jokes, riddles and puzzles. twenty-fourth. lVIany All the train crew, as A dvixer, Miss ANDERSO N famous guests were well as the passengers, Ttvf' Rott'-A. Harmon, 13. Johnson, NI. Davis, D. Mallery. NI. Eppstuiner, H. Nnrqnist, H. Hrittocks, IZ. Tlionipson, KI. llilmbs, F. Hitchen, ll. Carlson, G. ' - In - X . ' " . S.. present. had a grand time, and h f ' ' Norstrmn. . Johnson. I.. 'Inrntr. 'I. Wilson. rioml h L - 7 er t C gay est-lvl' Row-H. Culver, C. Cerleroth. I.. johnson, RI. Erick- next year t 6 aurlans son, I. 1Y:ittcrs. I.. NVils0n, KI. I.. Lewis, llzlblvltt, C. Limllrlooni. L. Nlugxgiiisoii, Nl. Flurner, XI. Nelson. ll. Swanson, IJ. SXYZIIINOII, R. Ilzirris. llirril Ron'-Y ll. Hampton, ll. Ilzist, NI. Rzinilcll, NI. llootll. IL. Hin- ilom. I., Klilroy, 111. johnson, If. l'ct.t-rsnn. .X. Ranclell, ties were over, all re- Zephyr will resume its sumed the trip. Then, trip leading to places X. Lamren, li. Norquist. I.. Kinstzilson, ll, 'Iziht-r, I.. ' Peterson I! Foster IJ Ieiln-r Nliss .-Xmlvrson. of Interest' having taken on other Q , D Q Y E 4 V- H WRWRWKWKWTWVWHWVWVWTHVWVWTWHHYWHWHWHWRHXH!ZXZRWRWTHiWRHvHYH!ZiHQ i771 I5 LN E 5 F E E E s E E E .54 B R 6 E E E V 'R V 'R V 'R Y E E Y 6 V N 7 2 V 'R Y Q V 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R Z1 'K V 'R V 1 1 LN Z, AN .z AN z. I-'N F4 BN R 8 AM A24 A!! M AM M AM AM AM AM AM A!! AM AM All AM AM A!! AM AM BM AM All AM AM AM B!! All All BM BM B!! M S. ,V A R' W V Q . 3' PRUKURAMAS QUN1113 FURVVARD '54 25 x i t V k I 'gg in 45. V V bb 4 1 7' N ' 4 V it 4 , , . 3 v va' 'Ei 52' 4 u 1 bv 4 .4 f Q as-4 1 1 1 . . 53' Hear ye! Hear ye! Hear ye! Lend us an "Spr1ng,' as a theme. This tea gave our 'E' V . . . . E' ear! We have come to sing the praises of the mothers an opportunity to become acquaint- 'E' q . . . . . . p Z' Prolcorama Literary Society. We are proud ed with our friends and their mothers. 'R' 4 . . . E' of P. L. S. as it has taken many long strides In April, P. L. S. had charge of an 'E' x . . . . . Z' forward during this past year. We Proko- assembly which was given for the entire 'E ' 4 . . 7 5' ramas have stepped out in front and shown school. A one-act play, entitled "Uncle 'g ' E' the other clubs of what we are made. Bob's Bridef' was presented under the direc- 'S E' When the debate season rolled around, we tion of Miss White. 'F ' 73' Prolcoramas spoke learnedly for and against May 28 and lovely formals announced 'S A E' unicameralism, winnin all four reliminary the Prolcorama s ring art . Althou h the 'R S, U ' 3 P , , u P ., P Y g V 3' debates in inter-club debate. P. L. S. placed senior girls danced gaily and seemed to be K . , , Y 72' second in the debate finals. very happy, we knew their gaiety was marred 'S w . . . . v 'Z' Then we Prolcoramas went Hollywood! bv the realization that this was their last 'E 1 . I E' The occasion was the Prolcorama fall party club party. 'E v . . . v Q' held in Steele Hall the night of January 22. The last social event on the Prolcorama's 'S E' The theme, 'cStar Nite at the Brown Derbyv, calendar was the banquet honoring the 'E X1 . . . . . Q' was cleverly carried out with tables placed graduatlng seniors. This proved to be a 'E 1 - . E' along the walls of the gym and pictures of great success as many of the alumni re- 5 'fi' movie stars simply everywhere. turned to be with their fellow club members Q if Cn March 31, we P. L. S. daughters for perhaps the last time. The banquet was 'E QE- entefltained our mothers Ad t M H held June 6. 'S vf at t e annual Mothers' me" 'SS MER Thus the 1937-1038 '4 rn f A Tea, held in the Rec- T351stillilwgEt'i1Tiiii,1ilibamT.l?C11il'liil4irT,t1T1r51PgfTi-sli,mIL season of P. L. S. has Q xg - Horton, P. Gabrielson, H. Henning, H. Perschnick, Q 21 reation Rooms after iz, iaurfm-fl, 1. Cherrington. 5.-.-0.1.1 zeuwalp. Ryan, been 3 most Successful 15 . . Usmorne, . ernston, D. Suyfam, IZ. leholson, 3. School A10 I I bl lzffllwf cE1z.Rv1e. D iximhrili E Hicllilman M Cl 1 N bl .Z 74 . Ve y CO 'Or Jones, 1i. ShBI'NVOOifl, D.. Bayllesg, if. fills, 13. Olson: one un er tie Calia 6 B 51' Scheme of Sfeen and milf...f.TfE'E.Mlif.vffflfS,"itll'slifffffu'1-Yiffliiif'1.12 Suidame Of Miss Hil' 'Q S, yellow was used garkloif, l. Sihkarrl, 1i.EScg1ulltgl,l L. Cook, F. Chase, ket, our Club adviser 'Q H X. U Son, 4. UWC11, . 0 Vl C. 7 . A EZ' t 5 71 75 :JN 71? 'FR VN 721' 71? 711-YKUKY YN 72? YZY 7K 71V 721 711 7181 YN YZ! 721 711 711 YN 721721 721 711 YN YN YN YNR 1781 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 E 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 ammmmmmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm PUILYIIIIYMNIIAS IIDRUMENAIDIE, Polyhymnia, the Muse of religious poetry and hymns, has Iecl the way of the Poly- hymnia Literary Club through a successful year of club activities. During the regular meetings of the club various educational topics were discussed. Many times famous men and women of history were paraded before us in imaginary word pictures. A particularly interesting series of programs were given containing facts about different states. Also several club members told about trips which they had taken in various parts of the United States. Polyhymnia began the first major event of the year by giving a fall party with three other clubs, the Illinae, Castalian and Thes- pian, on October 23. The theme was attrac- tively carried out in I-IaIlowe'en spirit, amid cornstalks, black cats and witches. A competitive pep assembly was held in which the five winning stunts were presented in an all-school assem- bly. The Polyhymnians staged a boxing match I' C I1 C Ilu llut I.. NN which was selected as one of the five to be presented. On February 19 a joint party was held with all the non-elective clubs participating. The novel theme of a barn yard was cleverly used. An orchestra in efhgy concealed a recording machine which played popular dance music. Cn April 6 we entertained our mothers at a tea in the Recreation Room. The theme was, c'ApriI Showers and May Flowersfl Gay decorations and favors were carried out in accordance with the theme. A musical pro- gram added to the enjoyment of the affair. The Juniors gave a delightful banquet on May twenty-fifth in honor of the seniors. The theme, 'cln a Gardenf, was artistically carried out in the table decorations and favors. The Seniors gave the program con- sisting of a prophecy, a will and music in keeping with the theme. With this affair Adviser, Miss LAMB Polyhymnia cli ma xed Top Row-N. Hoots, lf. Cumminglmzmn Il. Stackhousc, J. HZlfNIlllZ1TMCf. If. Ifrlzmslson, IQ. fnrlson, Ii. Vlohn, illrlcf. Il. lltmlr, I.. Swall- the major activities of ' " our social calendar. , '. .I Wm. . ' r n . representing the two son. Il. Perscllnick, I.. Illrmmlwrg. II. I-oyu. Il. lfmlcy. I R l Smith. Y. lilott. I.. Su-wart. lf. Cole Svrmlt Il'lx' --D. basketball teams, Gales- ' burg and Burlington, th?" Q' 1'5" KI. llrcenup, BI1-N Laml ' This club year was a X. Cc-clcrlxcrpg. KI. jon-gs, NI. XX ntson. bl. Ilowur. KI. Johnson, I7. Hamlmlin, Ii. XYuIrsttfr, II, XYvl1l1. I., Ru I IJ1 Xl IJ Ilton ll Rum XI Y mtll V. ...-'. ITIOSY 0116. 3 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 W 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 i 79 l ? 'E E E E 6 E E E E E E 6 E E E 6 6 E Q E E E E E '4 LN I! 4 Lx Y! a 1 LN VA .Q I- Y ni 5 Q Z' Q 'Z' W Z' S. A Q' Z' W Z' N! Z' S. A Q Z' Q Z' S. A Q Z' xi Z' QV Z' Q Z' S. A S. IA N1 Z' S. A N1 Z' xi 71' wc' 'A x 1 1- I fd sd -. rip XV 5 L- fi N. 1 ,E 1. fi D4 H fl 11 D fl NA' bt fd 51 Of" ft ki Uv- il S1 D" fl N4 Q.. fd r l,1 1 :P fl s. .J- fl 5 1 IA syi!ai!.n!a A24 ik ik in AM AM AM AM AM M4 AM mia in itz in itntnya itz itmnta A!mn!n!n!n!n'.AM 1 UUR FRHENDS, 'lF'llFlllE CASTALHANS A A Q A .. - A "Castalian, Castalian, A Fountain of long ago, Appollo and the Muses were inspired by it, I suppose that you all know. Drink from it, don't shrink from it, But always do your best. With each day that draws near, meet with good will and cheer, Be eager and full of zestf' Tune: "Memories" Ar the first meeting, junior and senior members took a deep drink from Castalian fountain on Mount Parnassus. The first results from that inspiring drink were shown at the autumn party held Uctober 21, in true Halloweien fashion, amid pumpkins, corn- stalks, and all that signihes I-lallowe'en to us. Later, gracious gods gathered 'round and cooperated with us in helping a needy family have an enjoyable Christmas. Then, great Appollo, inspired by the water from Castalia, stepped down from his favor- ite residence long enough to help several members frame a constitution for the club. Castalian members participated in the efligy of a barn dance in Steele Hall on Feb- ruary l9, along with members from the other ..1ic:rs0, , ve A dvixer, MRS. GALE Top Rim'-I. Patterson, B. Carlson, M. Bruner, M. Rosinu, ll. lluerre, H. Perez, L. Sullivan, R. Manley, H. Janes, li. Gottrick, S. Andrews, M. Kahler, I Carlberg, ll. Hunt. Svvoml ROwfA. Harslibarger, . 2116 . VVEI' . Crabtree was chairman of both the autumn party and the G. I-I. S. Barn Dance. The goddesses put aside their grudges between themselves long enough to help us entertain our mothers at a delightful tea in their honor. As a finish to this full year of activity, the girls had a potluck supper in the recreation rooms. The intervals between the various events were Hlled with inspiring contributions to the club programs by different members. Miss I-lilker also gave a talk on her trip to France. The gods suggested that Castalian mem- bers wear pins to signify that they are members of the club. They are proud to wear their pins and hope that future mem- bers will follow in their footsteps. When this year of activity was completed the gods and goddesses went up to their home to make preparation for the arrival of more girls seeking a drink of the inspiring water from Castalian fountain next year. VU e eagerly await the prep- 5 U arations the gods and S Xml n IJ Al y, D Bl r, C U0 , R Luvall, V. McC0n1bs, D. Benson, E. Avery, M. Cole, ' ' Q l new clubs. Martha Jean . M. Lipts, M. J. Crabtree, I . Jzirnell, Mrs. Gale. goddesses rnake' 'E 15 Ea -2 'Z 116 'E 'E '55 5 32 'IS E 'E 'E 'E 'E 156 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'R E 'E 'E 'S 'E 'E 'E E6 2? 711 5,5 24.-:A 511 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 7115 l 80 l 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 wsu A!n!n!4A!4 M4 r!n!n!n!AA!n!a M4 mia AM AM AM Au AM Ala AM AM Amynya AM AM A!n!u!4 :ya in SENECAS TALL AND SMALL had T A - Q - Q ' "Me am Big Chief Seneca, chief of Iro- basketball, baseball and swimming. Especial- ' quois tribe of Indiansf' such is the chief who ly were they active in baseball for many has led the Seneca Club of Galesburg High times their enjoyable gatherings occurred in School through a year of successful club the games of baseball between other clubs activities. or tribes. Big Chief Seneca thought his tribe needed The Seneca tribe does not have much some rules to govern themselves so it was, social activity during their meetings, for they that during one of their tribe gatherings have educational topics which are educational they organized a constitution, the first one to their members. They have some social to be had by the Seneca tribe. Big Chief life in their participation of sports. Members thought he had made one of his biggest of Chief Seneca's tribe had a spring party accomplishments during the year 1937-38 by gathering along with the other boy and girl writing this constitution. clubs. This spring party gathering of all Many times during their tribal gatherings these different tribes was held on February they not only had men of their own tribe nineteenth at Steele Hall. The theme of a give programs but they also had speakers "Barn Dancev was a great novelty. The and men from other tribes of clubs and pro- decorations were in accordance with the fessions speak to them. Along with these theme. Music was furnished by a recording speakers of other tribes they had their own machine which played popular music. This members lead them in discussions and talks. party was enjoyed by all the members of the The members of this tribe enjoyed their tribes. Thus Big Chief Seneca says again, club meetings immensely. 'cMe am Big Chief Seneca who has lead the The tribe of the Sen- way of the Seneca Club ecans were active in Adm MR' SWINTON through the year of . , Top R010-R. Homes, BI. Vantil, C. F0l'Stl'0m, H. , many d'ffeffnfkmdS of Eazx?'S?'B?5"':f.1iv.E2?'1.Fals?3i22' .?:s5'...E' 1937-38, and who Wd' Sports- T hey were ac- 2f".si'.:.'.3'.::f:"5.i5f.i'.2?..'5..".':4iS' 2x'::.'s2Q"RG-R25'.1f.1'1s2 also lead the foffh- tive with other clubs in EL,.fj,'2f,2ff'ljVf 'Q'j,11Q1',h'3f'1g,f1',,g.Q'fuQ1.lR liyldbmg' R' coming members." 'N YK YN YK YN 721 YN YK! YZ! YN YN YZ! 711 YR YN 711 7K YK YK 7K YK YN 711 7K YN 711 7K YI! 7K YK 711 Hi' 54 EZ' 5. 3 F. 2 E' 5' 5. 3 Z is 5 E' if 2, 5' 3 E' 5 5' 'Y 5' 5' E' qi 3 EI E 5' Gi E 0' 5, W E' xv, 3 AP 5. 3. qv 6 5, 5. 31 I 81 3 ? 'E 'E 'S 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'Ei 'E 'E 'E 'E 'S 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E .Z S 'K Y! 's Y I L? 1 YI 4 -Q LN IVA ji A 5 ' 1 tk E! gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg gg fd Pl :fi fd ZS'- fi 5,1 Q-1 fl N21 Civ fl 'VI O'-A W4 N Irs- fl sy! ll'-2 fl M! IE! rd si ug- 'fi X' O- . fl K3 Q--f F4 mf? 1- I fd ' 1 IA 34524315 AM AM All AM AM AM AM A24 AM A24A24A24 A24 A24 AM AM A24A24A24 A24 A24 A24 AM AM A24A24A24A24 A249 '? SEQUUTAS R1lG1111T11N LTNE L 'N - A .. - The Sequoia Club was organized by boys of the junior and senior classes under the direction of the faculty. During the school year of 1934-35, a faculty adviser was ap- pointed by the principal to oversee the work of the club. The purpose of the club is to promote a better feeling of fellowship among the boys and to create a better understanding of everyday problems that confront boys in the senior high school. This year the above purpose has been carried out in two ways. First, by programs presented at the regular meeting of the club and second by the club participation in extra- curricular activities such as basketball, base- ball and swimming meets. The program committee arranged a series of interesting programs consisting of talks by members of the faculty on various topics. The baseball, basketball and swimming teams of the club met in competition with the other clubs of the school. Everyone who showed up for practice and was on hand for B. Morrissey. Advifer, MR. PAUL JOHNSON Top Row-L. Hand, D. She-aly, C. Levinson, R. Mus- tain, N. Van Etten, L. Swedlunfl, ll. Mcfiaughey, T. Miles, C. Hendricks, L. McMillion, C. Erickson, E. Trehbe, C. Pumfrey, P. Ostron, L. Webber, Mr. Paul Johnson. Second Roztffl. Lundeen, VV. XVil1iams, F. Barton, R. Johnson, L. Carman, C. Bryant, G. Mead, R. Hoffstatter, R. Haggenjos, R. Wagher, D. Morrissey, D. Darrah, E. Porter, R. H. Scholes, the games was given a chance to play. In these games the qualities of sportsmanship, fair play and cooperation were stressed, and the competitors showed high ranking in these qualities. A committee of the club was appointed to draw up a constitution for the club. A con- stitution was presented and accepted by the members of the club in April, 1938. The Sequoia Club joined with several of the other clubs in giving a dancing party at Steele Hall on February 19, 1938. The "Barn Dance" proved delightful for everyone who attended. The other boys' clubs of the High School invited a representative from the Sequoia Club to be present at their various parties. and banquets. These invitations were ac- cepted and the representatives enjoyed them- selves a great deal at these parties. The members of the Sequoia Club feel that they have had a successful year and those members who remain are looking for- ward to a continuation of interesting programs. 711 1,1 7 71-Y 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 7113 1821 Q 'E 's 'E 'E Z 32 S 's 'E V 5 's 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E AE 'E 'E 15 5 'E E V R V 1? I 'R mmmmmmmmmmmm M ummmmmmmmmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmwm ammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm YTTTESSPTJSFQS SXAIJUTFE TYQIU isi1:-1" V I . I Up the broad, wooden gang-plank, the Thespian Club travelers made their way onto the liner, the S. S. Thespian, amid all the noise and gaiety that accompanies the departure of just such a liner. The whistle blew! All aboard! The S. S. Thespian pulled out of the Galesburg High School docks in the month of September, 1937, with thirty-five passengers aboard, bound for the gayest, brightest ports in the world. On October 23 the passengers landed at the first port of call, Steele Hall, where the Thespians danced amid Hallowe'en goblins, witches, pumpkins and corn stalks, to the tune of swing time. The passengers of three other liners, namely, the S. S. Castalian, S. S. Illinae, and S. S. Polyhymnia joined in this merry frolic. Cn March 24 the liner docked for its sec- ond stop at Recreation Hall. Here, the girls of the S. S. Thespian honored their mothers and their friends at a most lovely and Vim' Ad Miss Invms was used very cleverly throughout the tea. The S. S. Thespian hauled up anchor to speed on its way to the third stop where the passengers and their escorts, clad in sport clothes participated in a spring party. Here, on February 19, the gay and gorgeous barn dance was held, amid all the fun and jollity that its rural name suggests. A group of enthusiastic sports fans decided to have a Thespian basketball crew to enter in the Club basketball tournament. The team made an excellent showing in this event. The journey of the S.S. Thespian was completed when the ship stopped at its last foreign port of call on june third. At this time a gala banquet was held for the graduating seniors and for the alumnae, who enjoyed reviewing and thinking once again of the many enjoyable and happy events of the past year. On june IO, the S. S. Thespian dropped anchor in the Club Dockyard after a pleas: . T0f' R012-E. Payne, M. Harvey. I Simn A. . delightful tea and pro- Jewel, E. xx llama, 1. na 1. II Nam, ia. I gl, ureable cruise through- N .-X. .Horlso XX. Hor L RI. Cla y. E. Larson, Bliss l gram. The theme, The I'jv"1f- 5 ' R nf- D1 '- I' SW" R- TW' out the year with Nliss First Day of Spring," '-Qlmgnj ' 's I y E C h I HJ It A Ihnforth. I. Enes, M. S th R I . l. . ll NI I I! yi Ix li ,.... oi,'. Irvine as Captain. '- M E E E 5 PI w E E E E E 5 Q E E 5 E 5 5 E E Q E E E E E E E Y Q E E E N Q E E .Z 5X rf l --0 AN A 71 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 li T833 and AM AM All AM M4 AM AM M4 A24 124 All AM A24 AM AM AM 1!a AM 1!a AM AM AM 124 1!a Au 124 1!a AM rlntntag N1 r i ua 2'Vllill'llllff, MAGHC TTTAT TS MUSTQF z' 'S S 47' gi 5 ' K v if 15 A ' 'S 5' 'E 5' 'E 92' 'E' 91' 'YY E' 'E 5' 'E v . . . . . . u ex' The fifty hard-working musicians who orchestra Jointly with the band on May 17. 'E 1 if s end three lon work-Hlled hours each The ro ram for the concert was as follows: K P g, C 77 CC ' V E' week to earn their seats 1n the Galesbur ' Overture to Eomont -Beethoven, Liebes- 'R w g D - - V 2' Senior High School Orchestra have had leidv whose composer is Fritz Kreisler, 'R . . . . . v E their diligence rewarded by being allowed "Third Movement of Brahm's Second 'g . Y E' better and more advanced music than ever Symphony," and two movements, "ln the if . . - - Y E' before. The delightful result is that the Villagew and "Procession of Sardari' from Q E' orchestra is playing the most difficult music "Cancassion Sketchesi' by lppolitov-Ivanov. 'E . . . - - Y E' of its career, and, not only that, but in the "The Little Symphony," an organization 'Q 5 rendition there is not a sin le ear- ratin dis- of twent -seven la ers selected b merit 'E Q g g S Y P Y n Y V 2' cord. One ptaCtlCC IS held each week for the from the regular orchestra, likewise spent a 'g 'fi' string section of the orchestra, they meet very busy year. The music for two cantatas, 'E E' then during the week with the entire group. "The Walrus and the Carpenter," presented Q 'S Two assemblies were resented this ear b the rade schools, and 'cKin Nut- is ff P Y Y S u . V X' for rade school audiences and one for the cracker," 1ven b the Galesbur Senior ff 4 g :N E' students of Churchill Junior High School. High School chorus, was provided by the 'Q 'E' The Union Parent-Teacher Association uLittle Syrn.phony.'7 Spring appearances 15 Q' meeting of the year was favored by the were also made at Lombard and Hitchcock. 'E if appearance of the orchestra as was the The Little Symphony's final performance of 'En EEZ- County Teachers Insti- the year was an assem- 15 E, tute was Director, MR. LANTZ Presented in May QE '55 here ih our high School Jiinilftfxiif' gdiiiijtciiilgghlal ii'iaiiifQ'nE1 Eioggiarffg for the Senior High Q E- in January- The year lneflpllfkatiea2533TEES'gf12'..l.'ba?ZS20'3'uff'123.3221 School student group- E X' . . barger, B. Hast, S. M. Hawthorne, A. Hodson, I. V Cz' WHS teffnlflated In 3 Holst, R. Holmes, P. Ingles, E. Jennings, P. Johnson, T IS COHCCIT llfldollbt' 4g 4' , G. Kemp, C. Kenny, M. L. Lewis, R. Lowry,' D. Q 21 grand and glorious lglolimy,GMM5,:Lfik11ilR-IM:i1I11eyx5IG.MEadMT.M1lii, edly showed the fine tg . 1 er, . . 1 s, . . oon, . orris, . 5 Climax when a Con- Gslfkgifsxrf-BTUV121.?'i1iaa.rE,.,?ffsbaE.2::?Ws1 Work of Conducting 'E QQ cert was given by the f0'Q,Vk2'QEf,'f,' SQ Igvrlgilfafj lg,.,X'f,fQfSte" I' Whmple' rendered by Mr. Lantz. Q Sn I 45 Q L 71 721 721' 721? 321 721 721 721 721 721 721721 721721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 R l 84 l -A E Zn 5, E' fi 5 5. 3 ab SD ji 5s 2 it ji W QAM A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24A24A24A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 A24 14 KEEP STEP W'll"ll"llll 'JFHE EAND Ltfel Color' Interest' We fmd all three 1n our belov d G H S Band At assembles, games, and commencements we are never falllngly greeted by the boys and g1rls ln blue and gold and the man w1th the baton who stands before them Ram or shme, snow or w1nd they dlsplay thelr fervent loyalty The S1Xfy boys and glrls, who make up the band practlce tlrelessly three hours a week one semester and two hours the other They know that the1r flmshed product, to be good takes a quantlty of patlence, endurance, and perseverance 1n rehearsals Not only the Galesburg Sen1or l'l1gh School was honored by the band s presenta tlons th1s year but Churchxll umor I-hgh School was treated to a band assembly Out of school performances were also glven The Harvest Parade and the Afm1SUCC Day and 9f'2 1-4. 4. , Band concert w1ll ever forget the thrlll whlch they felt when our Mr Lantz was asked to dlrect the Navy Band Members of the band w1ll long treasure the memory of the occaslon when they were conducted by the Commander of the Navy Band, Lleutenant Charles Benter when they sere naded hlm on hrs arr1val ln town When the Galesburg Alrport was dedx cated 1n October, the band was on hand to contr1bute IIS share to the ceremon1es The football games at Lombard F1eld would lack somethlng of their emotlonal appeal Af the band were not there to make th1ngs exc1t1ng The basketball games Wlll forever lmpress us as sp1r1ted, llvely, st1rr1ng hustlmg, and bustlmg affalrs Scholars and sportsmen and commence ments w1ll come and go but the band, the Memorlal Day Parades held more lnterest for hlgh school students because the band took part 1n them Few G H S ers who were present at the Umted States Navy Dxreczor MR LANTZ Berry N Be B D Bra ker I Bro R Carlb rg YV Corb L Dawso B Ecklu d H Guenther S GL tafson I Hand J Harshba ger C Hartley B Hast Stanley Hawthorne Stuart H rne R Holmes I Holt B Hun F Iac so John on P Joh son C lxemp R Ixemp Landon lx La R Lo y E McCullough E 'NIC Cll D McKamy C' Mead I Mercer T Miles I Nlunson L Page D Parknson R Park nson X Pet rson E Rley E Schnexd r R Scneder R Sharp E Self t Xl Str R Struble D Suydam F Tate NI Tolb t B Treffr H Trout H n a gen I :ppl ce Y Yhther ll H WVong R Wr ght iss orgamzatlon, w1ll en dure forever For the band because of IIS out standmg work 1n school affalrs sh1nes as a bea con l1ght ln many of 1ts lmportant and varxed actlvltles 1 .Z 3 'E 1 1 4 1 4 4 1 1 1 4 t 1 4 4 1 41 4 Q 1 at 14 14 44 11 44 4-0 ei if 1 1 l - , , V ez' C' - A . I V 'Q 1' 'FZ' A 3 ' e . ' . Q, . cc ' S A ' ' 5 4 Q n 1 I 1 V Z' G S at A H . . , E' 9 ' 7 ' 2 if . . ' l- Q 4' ' B W ' V A ' 5 A . . ' . 3 S, A B Q A S. ' ' ' V A , . . . . 3 Q - W I 2' J . . . ' B - I - V Q I 2' . ' . . . B Q ' l , ,V W , P. , .'. wley,- S. ly, . C ' , . wn, D S if thlo , .y ' ,' . S, . T . k 'E , - E. Sr, . n , 1. ' , . ' , N. - - - V . . .- 4. 4 . , . , . 'x , . 1 , 4 G '. e , . i , . c ' e , . A , . R , . ' , '. a , . , . , ' ' ff 2' . , l . er er , . wn e , . , . Vo R q - Ln , . wh' e, P. L. wana , J. vm, J. - -- V 4 " e , . , . ' i . - 1? il' If Zviwivrivvivvivm vit wiv nv vit wiv viwivviv vit wiv 711 711 Viv vit vit vit vit 73: vit vit 71: 71: wiv 71: m nc 'Q pA!n!n!4m!n!n!aAMA!mn!4umaAu1!n!n!4M4A!n!n!n!a1241241!n!n!41!u!41!m1!n!aQ M .v is v Q br Q r 5 UKIR VTRJELAL. CCN FJCHL HRHNQEE A 4.5 as Q, Q ' .. 1 L 4- A.. .gg ,L 4-K lg V v E' 'N 2' 1 so K 3 'R Z' E w W 5 Sv W A K Q Z' 1 'E E' Z A Each year school reopens after a long and pep within their 1nd1v1dual advisories. Thls ff w . . . . . . Z' en o able summer vacation. There are man or an1zat1on IS one of the school's most im- 'Z w JY Y s A Z' coming events and business matters to be portant servants, for it is through the coun- Q -1 . . . 5' taken care of through the approaching ses- cilman that students are urged with powerful ts 4 . .... . Z' sion of our learnin 1nst1tut1on. These bus1- orator to attend basketball ames la s 'Z E' ness matters and transactions are capably football games, debates and so forth. 'cSub- Q E' handled by an advisory representative who scribe to the Budgetf, '4Don't forget your Q . , y E' IS termed as a student councilman by popu- S-A.A. Duesff uBuy a REFLECTORP Tl'16S6 N . . u E' lar vote of the advisory members. A student are Only a few of the many warn1ngs and ad- 'R E filling this position must possess qualities of vertlsements with which the Student Coun- 'N . ..., u if honesty, reliableness, salesmanship and so cilman endows his fellow advlsory members. 'R . . . , y E' forth. When the advisory, as a group, selects Also the student council 1S a means by which 'R 4, . - . . . Y E such a representative, the members of the the students can voice their opinions to the fi A-, . . . . Y E advisory cast their votes for the one who, faculty. This, of course, provides a more 'Q 75 they think, is the most capable and most immediate understanding with the pupils and 'E '-a, . . 'PE worthy of being their personal "go betweenf' teachers, and all students may reap the E K, . . . . E' In connect1on w1th the duties of a councll- benefits. is N! . . 'Z' man, lt may easily be seen that honor and As the school year draws to a close, we Q sv . . . . Z' raise o to each student councilman. can ud e the 1m ortance of the student 'Z Q P s Je P 5 'Z' The student council as a body 1S made up council by the success of the school's activ- Q X, . . . . 53' of thirty-seven mem- 1t1es and all 1ts under- 'E . . ' . 51' bers, whose task it IS AdWf'f MR- ROBERTSON takings. Because of the Q X' . . ' ,1 . .'- f . . F0 advefflse Coming iifaam, :sq asyzzrfn1.6a..:.f1.s:z:f11..1fCifsisfms fine that events, sell tickets, col- EfIlffQ','jf" QXZ0,Z"2Q'QQ,1h2. f:,2,e5n,RH.FiQfFfQQjH1 Ig you are, we salute you is sv, ' ' L l , C. L . , ll. I 'l , E. lN'I'll , R. Ald I 11 ' ' Z lect var1ous k1nds of Tfniafigav WfqflQinSonfU5EfS J0h,mQ,,f'F. Lundrggn. for your d1l1gent work Q5 xt TI "d R '-D. R , F. T . , P. All , B. Ch' fl- ' Z dues and keep a general le1i:'D. gimlap, Iimljvzzrks, Qficllifllcfflure, MillerjmP. and this yeatjs accom' Q sv -- - Jh ,G.Bf,H.H ' 1. ' Z, Splrlt of fellowship and bgrgjpn urgett ermmgs J' ran en Ph-Shrnentsl Q 1 E hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm i861 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. E' 5. 5. 5. 5 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. 5. sum AM A!n!n!n!n!n!n!n!n!a i!n!n!4m!n!n!n!n.!n!a i!n!n!n!n!n!n!a:!4:iamm STUDENTS BAND TcOGlE?LTll'lllE1R '? ,, '5"c.-5 Convenience is the description of this modern age-new ways of saying things and new ways of doing things. The student activity association gave us a new way to solve our admission problems at the door of the school's extra-curricular activities. The plan was discussed and pre- sented to the student body who approved of the idea and soon the association was under way. In addition to the promotion of the schoolis activities, the organization, under the new plan, gave its members a deduction in the price of the games and plays put on by the school. The admission fee of the organization was four dollars, this sum was made payable in four equal installments dur- ing the year. Heretofore, the former organ- ization's way of paying admission was a JL.: organization presented very interesting pro- grams, plays and speakers which consisted of groups organized by the classes of the school and outside speakers. They also showed the ability of those who were inter- ested in dramatics, debate and music. One of the outstanding plays of the year was the play, c'The Valiant," which was very different from any type of play presented to the organization. The play was so much enjoyed that the S. A. A. sponsored the play for the interest of the public. The support of the society was excellent and each member was fully repaid for his price of membership. The officers for the year were: Bob Bromberger, President, Ned Landon, Vice- President, Mary Jean Frankenburger, Sec- retary, and Bob White, Treasurer. The deduction of the regular gate price plus the mem- bership card. This year,s members were admitted to the extra-curricular activi- ties of the school by the Sept Adviser, MR. BROOKING 14--Alice in Senior High. Oct. Zl-Play, "Crashing Society." Nov. 18-Budget Assembly. Dec. 3-Opening of Basketball. Jan. 20-Debate. jan. 23-20-Night play: "Three Cornered Moon." Feb. Hash of a card. QE? The meetings of the QQ? l7-Ur. Harry C. Mcliown: XYho Ever Heard of Such a Thing?" 2-Pre-tournament Pep Assembly. 24-Play. "The Valiant." 21--Magician Demonstration. 19-Special S..-MA. Program. response on the Part of the members showed a delight- ful satisfaction in the or- ganization throughout the year. With dependable leaders and faithful mem- bers this organization has been a worth while one. 71 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 i871 Y! YZ 1 4 A N YI 4 9 LN .Z LN V! 'R Q 'R Y! 'R V 'E Q 'R 'E Q 'R Q 'R V 'R V 'R Q 'N Q 'R Y 'R 'E Q 'S Y 'S Q 'R Q 'S Q 'R Q 'R Q 'S Y 'S Q 'R Q 'R Q 'S Q 'R V 'R 9 'if V 'R V 'R Y! 'R 22 'R V! 'R LW Y ! 1 1 LN Y I Q 'Q L 'S Y I v -Q DS Y ,I 4 'C A 'W ki 32 BM AM BM AM BM AM AM All A!! AM AM A!! AM AM BM A!! All AM AM BM AM All AM BM M4 All B!! All B!! M AM AM M Y P 5 EAS WE REMAIN RESOLVED? 2' rg 2' fs 5' 'E' 5' 5 5' if E' 'E 91' With the traditional, "Madame Chair- four represented Galesburg at Aledo. Cn Q E' man, honorable judges, friends," and the January 31 Galesburg was host to four 'S E' customary conclusion, 'cand so my fellow Aledo debaters. Augustana College spon- 'E E' colleagues I have proved to you," once again sored a high school debate tournament on E E' the battle of wits has begun. Brains, the gift February 4 and 5 at Rock Island. A team E E' of gab, and poise are the distinct qualifica- of eight represented Galesburg on the two E6 E' tions of a Galesburg High School debater. days against teams from Pekin, Sandwich, E E' With all of these qualincations the North- Muscatine, Iowa, Nlt. Pleasant, Iowa, Free- 'E E' west Conference squad goes whizzing by. port, Decatur, Sterling, West Aurora, Ct- 'E E' Twenty-five debaters were chosen to rep- tumwa, Iowa, Davenport, Iowa, Elgin and 'E E' resent the Northwest Conference squad Geneseo. A debate for an S. A. A. assem- 'E 'E' which was coached by Mr. Harry Garst. bly was held with four members of the 'S 71' The question of which the debaters so effl- Galesburg squad competing. 'E 'E' ciently acquired knowledge was: Resolved: Cn December seventeenth the squad was 'E That the several states should adopt the uni- reduced to eight members. From this squad 'E 'E' cameral system of legislation. the final team of four with an alternate was 'E E' A few weeks after the squad was chosen chosen for the Northwest Conference tour- 'E E' teams were paired off. Practice debates were nament held in Rock Island on February 26. 'Q E' held among these teams. A practice tourna- Those chosen for the team were: Affirma- 45 ment was held at Monmouth in january. tive, Myrl Rasmussen, Marjorie Lerschg 'E ig' Ar this tournament the four chosen to repre- Negative: Vincent Peterson, Rupert Miller, 5 'E' sent Galesburg met the and Ned Landon, alter- 15 teams of Kewanee, Advise" MR' GARST nate. 15 Monmouth, Western gfffifif.,ifbdusiffsfgfuiziilfdaiifolii'13g1ega15lef5hfl' This question of QE S. Academ Hannibal i5"mTr.':.??dfn'1Jf..,5.i'Sf3T'1'Jf.Jsiit1?.R1-222212343 unicameral le islation .z 1: Y' ' Rasmussen, H. sem-st, 1. A, Stambaupjh., E. Tuptier, g . B 7,7 Mo., and Geneseo. On 'XVj?j5f1f- L- Websffff B- West- L' WMSVR-Wh'fe proved of unusual ln- 45 January 24 a team of Qfb1ZffQeQf,"n'f'j,lff,'fgf'Hf1ie1f' Rasmussen' N' Landon terest to the members. 45 'E' AM 71714 35? 141711711 711 721711 721 711711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711711721711 721 721 711 721 711721711 711 721 71111 i381 A Q X D 5 P 3 XD D 3 bb 5 1 1 2 2 1 by 25 5 5 5 5 5 5 TJUUEY WEHGTH OUT WURDS Ir has often been truly said that Speech is the mirror of the soul and we having seen this assertion verified by various mem bers of the student body in three outstanding speech events this year, agree with the author of the above bit For under the supervisior of several members of the faculty, these speech events have Hourished this year First on the year s calendar came declama tion, and we feel greatly indebted to the six young ladies, namely Barbara Wynn, Louise Webster, Marjorie Turner, Eloise Tppper, Ruth Harris, and Mary Jean Frankenburger who worked hard for the honor of represent- ing G. H. S. in the Northwest Conference Declamatory Contest. They couldn t all win, so, on October 15 Eloise Tupper, read- inv Sun Up was chosen with Ruth Harris as her alternate. On October ZZ, after a trip to Rock Island, Eloise brought back fifth place honors. Next on the calendar came an enthusiastic group of young orators, following diligently strings of the audience to the tune of first place both at home and in the Northwesr Conference Oratory Contest at Monmouth with his interpretation of My Account with the Unknown Soldier However his vic tory was not easily won from his forceful rivals Gordon McLain, alternate, Robert White, Joe Adcock and Vincent Peterson Last of the speech events to be here enum erated 1S extemporaneous speaking This is probably the most taxing mentally of all these activities and the members of this squad deserve special praise for their work. Laurels to you, Marian Cramer .eanette Elphick, Jack I-louchens, Geraldine Kling Robert McClelland, and Robert White. And last, but by no means least. may we offer our thanks to those whose coaching gave the aforementioned students the abil- ity to gain what they have this year. First, to Mr. White for his training of the declam and oratory enthusiasts. Second, to Miss Anderson and Miss Ryin, for their work with the extemp squad. in the Steps Of Dem05' Advirerf, Miss RYIN, Miss ANDERSON, MR. WHITE Ih'clurm1t1'm1-E. Tnppcr, R. Harris. H. Franken- thenes' Our accorn' burger, L. XYeh-ter, II, XYynn. M. Turner. May we proclaim mer- its to the leaders and John Highlan- I. llighlancler, G. McLain, V. ,, E.I'fl'HIf07"-Rl. Cram-r, G, Kling. J. Houehenf, R. def Played OH the heal! Nlcflcllziiftl, R. what.-i J. Elphick. N participants. 9 E .ci E .Z S E E 6 6 E E E E E E Y E E YI ': Y I 1? 's LN V! G 1 KN 71 fC LW 4 Z 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 951 Li I 89 I smmmmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm E. 1 D .3-, . r , - it P 3 5 A W A 5 Si- 5 2 5 5 . .4 Q . . M.. . , . , 3 , . .f f ' A' f ' , . . . .. . ,, . A W . . .H . 5 A . 5 g , NJ . . E .y . , . . . . 5 I , . . in . . .' .. .. W, 7 1 Q il I , a 5 it CC 77 7 G O i 5 an A W my A!4B!AA!4A!4A!6 AYAAMAYAAllAMMAAQLA!AA!AA!AA!AA!AA!!A!AB!4A!LA!5A!AMA!H!0!43435124125M gr 15 Q L, Y 6 6 v 9 5' 11192111192 S 11 UUR UNCLE 1111111315311 '5 Z' 'E 1 in 45 1 E' Q E' 5 E' 5 w 3 .Z Z' N q V by 44 A B q V br 44 A B E, Right down the aisle to your seats, ladies fellow-townsmen and glorifies in his many 5 E, and gentlemen. Next two over, please. Yes, loving cups, given him for his many philan- 5 E, sir, capacity crowd tonight. But now, the thropic deeds. Then there 1S Dudley's mother, 45 E, house-lights are dimmed, the curtains are Janet, a 78-year-old debutante, who is- auda- 45 E, parting, and here is the first act of that clever cious, fun-loving, and understanding, and in 45 E, comedy, "Your Uncle Dudley." carrying much of the play's comedy, comes 45 93, "The slogan of this Hghrj' boomed out one in neck and neck with Dudley for popular- 45 E, enthusiastic young follower of David Gar- ity. Besides these, of importance is Mabel, 45 S, rick, "is going to be to sit and shiver without Dudley,s sister who rules with an iron hand 45 l . . . . . . . . g, a sliver." This IS just one of the many lines and an even voice and domineers everv Sltua- Q E, that received hilarious laughter from the en- tion. Then there are her two children, Cyril, ,E l . . . . ,Q thusiastlc crowd that filled the seats of the the high school sheik and a household pest ,E I . . . . es, auditorium on the gay night of October 1, whose heterogeneous conglomeration of wear- ,E l . . . . Q 1937. mg apparel IS a comedy in itself and V Q4 7 41 1 . B it The play concerns Uncle Dudley, a bach- Ethelyn, whose romance with handsome Q 5, elor, whose interesting character lmmedlately young Robert Kirby provides the principal ,E f . . . S, endeared him to every member of the audi- love 1nterest of the play. 5 f . . . Sr ence. He is the natural-born glad-hander of Again, laurels to Mr. White, as ever and E 5, the town in which he lives and It IS he who always, the capable director in any situation, ,E Q, puts across every civic activity and it 1S his this play being no exception to the general Q 4 . . . 3, time and his money that is called upon every rule of the successful plays presented. Last, ,E fi . . . . . gf, time the city can think of something for but not least, we salute those faithful mem- Q I4 . t EJ, which to beg. In return he hears himself bers of the backstage crews. 45 Q X' lorified as the townis And so the curtain 45 'Z' g Director MR WHITE A vb . . . , . I f V Q3 leadlng clglzin and dhe Ulgle Purlscy-I.h11iIH1qla1pl'er, Jaigielpt, lllurlI4iy's rglother fal S or one 0 e i . - . 3 e , z If r' 1- . ner, W Warrns ar? OWS un gr Ethelyilughfirgli-1.1lX. Stzin'f1f21ugh,YuC3'1'il ChurdhLC. rnost C ever Corne les Y E. the admiration of his 11,fl1fJ.Cf'lQH2fIf Rf,T,'l'Qfh1'ffQQE1f,i'Q1ff,fffQQQ,cfharl'e of the 1937-38 year. 5 S, QZ 'Z - - 5' 71 711 711 311 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 W 711 711A!A 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 7116 1901 4 8. F I. T 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Z 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 ammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmM 5 A M'lFllllRlEZ',lE CURNERED MUONW 'cBut it's suddenly serious-this business of livingf, This fact was brought home to all who saw "Three Cornerecl Moon,', a three-act comedy written by Gertrude Tonkonogy. The play was a dramatization of the above statement. Ar the beginning of the play, the children exist. With plenty of money they try to amuse themselves by taking sudden trips about the country, or by planning the best methods to use to commit suicide. Finally the ubadn news comes-they have no more money. Their mother, while planning to surprise them, brainlessly buys stock "on marginl' from an unknown yet "nice manf' From then on things are different. Why, even food and all the practical things of life are appreciated. They begin to live. There is a love element, even the eternal triangle is in the play. The clreamy-minded poet and the one sane man among them, the doctor, both love Elizabeth, the only daughter. Kenneth, who passed Director MR. is beauty, Douglas, with theatrical ambitions. and Ed, the younger sophisticated brother, swimming instructor in a hotel swimming pool, constitute the rest of this harum-scarum family. Along with Jenny, the tempera- mental cook who can't get her genders straight, or her stocking seams eitherl The effect which this exciting household has on its audience by its insane actions is striking. Some are horrified to find children being reared in such a careless manner, with no idea as to the value of money, horrified to find a mother letting such grand opportuni- ties pass by her children, to find that they are all bored with life. Yet some are amused when Donald, the poet, comes wandering in bringing Elizabeth flowers when he was sent out to get a job so that the family might eat. All through the performance the audience was entertained by either clever or philo- sophical lines. "Three Cornered Moonv was given two nights, January twenty-Hfth and twenty-sixth. The play was under the WHITE . - . direction of Mr. White. l'1lS bar CXHITI, has both Mrs. Rimplcuar-E. Stickney, Douglas Riinplegnrf T l"rc:rl'i, Kenneth Rilnpleuar-R. llrmvn, Jenny, the l l H hl ff hl R ll 1, X l I l:,l a changeable accent and ffffif Y-1, inf i ' if Il lk' H1136 'aril . . ima e far- . 'u crson. iz- :ul-'ht-ee C 0 If n e r e d l th R 111. Nl 1 Przinlcenhnrgcr, llonalmlr-R. ' Nelson, llr. Alan Steveiisfll. llronihergcr, Kitty- K1tty7 the Brooklyn Dorothy Klein, Messenger-J. l.?lXYI't'l'lCC, Moon" was delightful. 71 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 71? l 91 3 ? E E E 6 E Q 6 5 5 E E 5 6 5 E E E Q 1 'h Q 'R Y E YI 'R u 'R v 'R Y E .Z AN .'Q LN '4 LN ' Q HX Nl!!BY!AllBYHYHYJMBY5BYU-YH!!B!!Milli!!M4A!Al!H!4MBMAMMLAMXLAMBMMBMNJNLXKM 5? Q PD A 19 n V V '5 3RlElF'lLlE.QTllUNS llN RE UE? A R 4 i 2' E Q 2' 'E Q 2' E Q 2' 15 5' 'E E' 'E Q v Z' 'N Q 2' Fe Q 2' , 'E Q Z' 'S 71' Februar twent -fifth and twent -sixth ohn Elmer visits a Turkish harem where he E Y Y Y 9 S' f .1 11 ' '- ' 1 ff 'E 3 year o our Lor one-t ousand, nine hun- is entertained by a su tan, and Ten Pretty Z E' dred, thirty eight are two days that will long Girls." His three twins meet up with a girl 'B 5' be remembered b the students of Galesbur what uwinkedv at them and Karen Lee falls is 7' Senior High School for these days marked in love. They see how the "Big Applev is 'P' E the presentation of the 1938 Reflectavue, an done in Harlem and the Hula 1n Hawaii. Q E' "International Extravaganzaf' This produc- From the time the S. S. Hawaii leaves San 'fi E' tion was viewed by more than two thousand Francisco until it docks in New York there 5 E' persons and was one of the finest and most is never a dull moment. 'E E' elaborate musical performances ever given on Lorayne Frickey and Shirley Breedlove '53 Z' our stage. More than 150 students partici- are to be complimented on the way they 'g v . . 52 pated. The scenery was one of the highlights handled the many dances throughout the 'E Q , . . . . . Z' of the show. The costumes were beautiful play. While giving compliments, itis only 05 Q . . . Z' and brought many comments from the spec- fair to give credit to the backstage crew who '53 Y . . . . . E' tators. Miss Belshaw and the art classes de- had a particularly hard Job in taking care of 'R E' serve considerable praise for their contribu- lighting effects, scenery and other backstage 'E E' tions to the success of this show. Clever skits W0rlC- Again Mr- White WaS in charge Of 5 E' and music, together with the costumes and the P1'OdUCfi011 and haladled if in hiS Same 'N , . . . . v E' scenery made these two evenings of enter- efficient manner. All in all this production if' E' tainment most enjoyable. was most unusual. Too much praise can not 'E E' The revue centered around the capers of be given Robert Bromberger, who so efli- E E' the John Elmer family who take a trip ciently directed the orchestra. 'g iz- around the world. Visiting various countries This revue, being the second of its kind 'S E- they have many inter- known as the ulnterna- 'E if estlngexperiences. Mrs. THE CAST tional Extravaganza," 15 2- Elmer. 15 Polsfmed m linMiiZ,S.E1.Q,.,H'iT'aR.2.f32lZEISL1.f1SeCET..Q.1f..i.lfut5f. was a umque perform 'E E' Q CIUHCSC restaurant, 3.5.1152Eo."Y1fi1.1lfgillfoYi7'f415l.'.'I0'ill'll'ELal,lQlZ anfe. 5 Su QE 6 71 711 745 3145 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711K l92l 5 E E 5 5 5 EP 2. 5 Al E 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 if 5 5 5 5 5 E 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmg 5 K DEATH TAKES A HHULHDAY Y The climax of each year's dramatic pro- ductions comes as commencement is drawing near. The Senior Class Play always pro- vides a Hnal opportunity for the graduating actors and actresses to show their Thespian ability. This final opportunity was also a very exceptional opportunity in 1938, since the production given on May 5 and 6 was the outstanding comedy "Death Takes a Holi- day." Originally written by Alberto Casella and revised for the American stage by Wal- ter Ferris, this famed Broadway play offered not only an absorbing and vital dramatic presentation for the audience, but at the same time provided many definite and diffi- cult characters for portrayal by the cast. The players rose to the required heights and pre- sented a performance which held the audi- ence tense throughout the fascinating tale. The story is based on the poetic concep- tion of Death sus- pending all activities Direclor-MR. XXVI-l1TL 3. to also discover what love is, that it should always be on the lips of men. "Remember this. There is only a moment of shadow between your life and mine: And when I call, come bravely through that shadow, and you will find me only your familiar friend." Thus says Prince Sirki as Death concludes the play, '4Death Takes A l-lolidayf' Thus the curtain descended on one of the most outstanding plays ever to be presented on a high school stage. Every character por- trayed his part in a most commendable fashion. However, there were three mem- bers of the cast who did exceptionally fine worlc. They were John Plighlander, Robert Bromberger and Mary .lean Franlcenburger. The setting, the lighting, costumes and act- ing are all a direct result of the experienced and capable directing of the dramatic coach, Mr. White. The coach, the actors, and the crews all deserve the praise which was given them after the final for three days, during iihn Higlllzmclcr-llezitli. Nlnry Juan l'-T1ll'llik'l1lllll'LLL'f l which period he seelfs razm. lloh llroinluurucrwlluke Lzimlicrt. llurlxarzi -r.'XYli-ixlflll, Eloise 'l'uppcr-liiichcss Stcplmnlc. lmlzi Ann Slillllllllllllllfl,l'lllCt'5x of Sun Luca. 'lillorwmi curtain of this play to learn rnen fear iilijflzi-lliurlctm licsitrczi. QNl:irg:irt't14l'.. -lnlinsnn :mil produced by the 1938 'yn L ll r-Rh la, lzrlwurml l'rltz--lzric lwnton. him as they do and - e e 1 Russell llrown-Currznlo, l':nul Sims--Klzijor XYl1it- rt.ul. Lois Coolt-Liora. .intl l' l Xl r l' l l ,.,. A Wt- W- t- Senior Class. 3 711 711 K1 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 51 l 93 l 1 4 V 'R YI 'R 9 'R E V 'R V 'S V 'R V 'R Q 'R V 'R 9 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R Q 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R V 'R 7 'R 9 'R V 'R V 'R E V 'R V 'R E V 'R .Z LN Y! 'R .Z AN Y: 1 Q AN YI 1 Q AN If - fo N A YI .QQ AN 'I 'Q ss Pl -Ad BS mi SSMZMZMZMZMZNZNZNMEMSMSMNZMKMZNZNZMZMZMZMZMZMZMZMZMZMZMZMZNZNMNMNMEQ gb Y ea Y ie ii E5 Q ea Q ea 4 X P A -s 5 S ff W ea K ei E5 E5 Q ew X ei Y is qv 5. ea Q ea E5 W ee E5 Y ea 1 E? E5 E5 'qi 33 5. fl as fl E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 E5 gs gg E E5 ii lhf lil lf' TF lfl li tl lil l lVl li S5 A me . b .Q ' .- J 1542.44 ' G. 'W' 4 HANG N . Q, 1 , i A X Q t 1, V ...-. Y, 'tm ,mn 11 'E 4... , sf P . ig .,..' - Y ' The door of the dim medieval hut was closed and Steen was left behind. He had wanted with all the intensity of his childish soul to go to the Service at the Cathedral for they said perhaps the Christ Child would come. And others said that the chimes which rang only at a gift of perfect love, would ring this night. I-le wanted to go and give his pennies. But he knew he could not leave the old dame who had come to his hut for shelter. Under his loving ministrations the weary She bid him pray that the Christ Child would not pass. him by. After he prayed, he fell asleep and dreamed he was in the Cathedral. The rich dame became young and radiant. and the poor, one by one, were offering up their most cherished possession, each in turn hoping that his gift would make the chimes ring. The scholar brought a rare volume, the maiden, flowers, and the woodman his axe. But still the chimes offering his crown. Surely they would ring now. But the silence was unbroken. Steen timidly offered his pennies and shrank back into the gloom, whereupon a great and sudden light filled the Cathedral and the Chimes pealed forth in a wild ecstasy. An angel appeared and spoke. "It is not gold, nor silver, nor pearls, nor rich jewels that please the Lord, but love and self- sacrifice? Steen amazed, stammered, c'But, I have not seen the Christ." The angel spoke again saying, "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these, ye have done it unto mef' When he awoke, the Cathedral and dame had vanished, but in the distance the Chimes were still ringing and through the window could be seen Crod's Chimes, the stars. The play, by its superb and almost pro- fessional acting of its well-chosen cast, its beautiful costuming, efficient directing, and magnificent staging, Director-MR. WHITE were not heard. t proved to be one of the H01 . peasant boy-V. Peterson, St A h young- - u . Then a hush er llT0thCTiH. Secrest, llartel, thei l -R. Boyes, most un I-esslve and ln, An old woman--M. I. Frankenl , Priest-I. P Hiphlander. Courtier-C. Heller, A womansXV. ' ' ' upon the Congrega' Strawn, A scholar-R. Bromberger, A young girl- 5P1f3f10U31 Pf0dUCf10US . . . P. Johnson, King--I. Adcock, Angel-F. Dahlstrom, h h I h - 111011 for thelf Klflg WHS A rich man-E. Clendenin, A woodman--M. Hotchkiss. t C SC 00 as glven- 55 ,,,,... . . 357N2W7N7N7W7K7N7WZNWWWNW WKWKWKWKWKWKWKWKWKWKWKWKWKWNZNZNWRUKWKWK55 l94l E5 'A V QV 4' ' E5 ii Ei ii p 4 QV ' 'v gg. Ei ii E? I r E5 EE ES E1 sv gg P . gi gg 4 4 gg E? QQ 4? lg! gg gg gag. gg. gg .gi Q. f K-rf. X f joLLY CRICKET Q 0 x N MERRIE ENGLAND , I ,. V I X . W, -..:f i e '41 .!... Q'-u ""' "n.Ad,!,,.! . I I x' nH', A W I 'U A. I IV x xt I 2, 9 ' , ' .n. If ' , I ' -.1, V ' , - Q' x 4 , ,. '- , ' , N, y, 'Q , ,, "5 '25 + -3wg,eu"fff'r. 1 ,A M , .U ' - -1 ,,,' 17. ln' S , w .f X11 'Y?4, ..llgIgveI NJNIL EIT! N ' ' r ' - I ' , -- 'ff -5. . 4 ' 1 47 V: -' ', , -lfxfll A , Y 'Q -Jai 'jx YI X s ' Y1Zrf"f, 1 gg" -,W , , M H 'fx idling ', Ir 41. 1 My Jjfibaws 1 1f ',' ff f ' ' ' l -M lwrxw M I ' ' H ' 'V 'M " N - ' 1 + !" Q r 'l""5- -X1 V A QI L I P ' , ' '3s1'v'9 N' '4 15 .."' '," ' . X'-lv ,,p,l'0-Ny ' ' Y' 1, 1' 4. '.! M' - ' "gf '- Y' Y, X ' " . , 4: 4. mmf. fly, i-alum? :IL . I n x I n 4 'Q f'.' ' 'A' ' . "A' 'GPH Q 2 "fy ' ' f " - fi Jiffy' , .1 r : , ff . sd k' fjiqiaifill' ' 'V PQI1 '-ff' . ' "' I, .'-' w' vlinirmut ' 1A N 'f!"'MM ' Wh -4, - , 'V . 1.454 I ' V 'Xa I A' - N - ,ff ,n. , 1 .S ik1H:!M VS' zz Q , x ,L 1 '-1, l '. In 3. Q, - My A:..m. .1l+1iMn , ff 4 S A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! AM A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! A!! if ,iv 5 E 5 Ev it v Z v 5 5 5 qv G if. qv A qv E qv A D A qv G rx' 'v A 5 qv 4 K J A 'v K A 'v qv A qv qv qv A' 'v A qv A 5 71 U , ll I .L-N . 1 R l 1 N ax: f I I X ' I 6, . K - s. H f,, tw- " W 'W f .Q l',,'JmA'lT. if A' 1 ff . "' 'J ' - -- 1' I--N' xxx- I J. .- ff vw 1 1, gf -f .- J f -A . , s 1... , S I . Frivolous, foolish, fun- ,X fag! loving England. In such a 1,-. light we see another phase of the happy and many- " ifii' sided life of the Englanders ii of long ago. Many were their games, their plays and their frolicsg each and every proud member of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, from richest to poorest, from oldest to youngest, and from noblest to lowest par- took of the many advantages of games and of their own particular type of athletics. We seldom stop to think a great deal about the background of those sports prev- alent in our school, enjoyed and loved by all the students, spectators and participants, and to recall the fact that many of them are descendants of English ancestors. Here in our school, our England, the first sport to blossom forth at the beginning of each school year is football. Few know, as they brave the chill November weather to watch it, that this exciting game has been directly developed from the very old game of rugby, for many, many years a favorite of all England, played by those game on the calendar of our school each year is that wonderful one termed basketball. It. too, had a British precedent, namely soccer, an age old game played also with a large ball similar in many respects to our present basketball. Like the aforementioned games, tennis also has been derived from a very popular English game, in this instance, badminton. Both are played with a net, the one in a bad- minton game being placed at a higher level than for the sport of tennis, both also are played with rackets, dissimilar only in a very few respects. Since England is really an island and filled with many lakes and rivers, it is only natural that the English should be great boating enthusiasts. There are few anywhere in the entire world who have not heard of the great competitive boat races between Ox- ford and Cambridge. Although we have other sports from other than English sources, and ones descended from English ancestors in a changed form, we too have the same love of physical fitness, games, and athletics as did the Englanders of many, many years ago, most physically Hr and able, ATHLETICS and we are indebted to them Th y l arn to play the game, . watched by spectators full of T9 pl y fair 1 ma, and their rugby, soccer and U ' 0 AX he halesbulrg H h 'h, l gymbols i true British pride and enthu- They C Pflvmgffl ' ' ' badminton, for our wonder- ' ' ' d as Q siasm. ?,fdQt',fe'2jT'F ,ggi ik, I I If ,H ful games of football, bas- - XV K f ' , - The next outstanding 'rhl-'fgcfelrafilmflii-.1 paid. ketball and tennis. Y! E Y W V W E V R V K V 'N V 'S V K 9 ii K E E V W E V K Y Q V 'E V 'S V N E V 'R Y Q E E Y 'S 5 5 Y Q Y Q E V 'S Y Q Y 5 Y 5 E 9 'S' Q 'K Y Q V 5 'K WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWR I I 95 wma AM A24 AM AM mu MAMA AM AM AM AM AM AM M4 AM AM AM zu ua Amlnla All AM ua A!n!n!n!n!m sn 7 V , ' 4 QGY, H0 Sf, TKUDUCHDUVVN TEAMS 2' 's 1 E 7' B A 45 E- 'EQ 'E 'E 'A K E 'm E Y En l -Z K 'EZ' 'E u V 2' 'R '7'. Z Tl A 's 'z 5 E 'E E' 1 5 at 3 4 ,Z vi 'F S, ' 1 7 44 A 3 5' 'S 71 711 713 211 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 71122 I 96 1 I P I 1 A. NMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM Q Y MM MMM MMMA M MM MMM M M MM M MMMMMM M M uMMMMMMMMMMMMMM Ff1UTFBfXL13 F The kick-off, ladies and gentlemen! It is received by Mr. X on Galesburg's own 25- yard line. And here he comes down the field ducking opponents right and left. 1-1e's still running and is finally brought down on the opponent's 38-yard line, first down for Galesburg and ten to go. There,s Coach John Gillespie down there on the sideline bench. What a team he has this year too, ladies and gentlemen, with six let- termen and several willing substitutes from last year. But now, the ball is on the opponent's 38- yard line, still ten to go and third down. 1t's a pass, a lateral but is intercepted by the opponents on their own 14 yard line. 1-Ie has it, but is brought down on the 27-yard line. The opponent's ball now, first down and ten. Galesburg has won six games, tying one and losing three this year. There's the whistle-the half and both teams are tied at 7 and 7. And now, just a bit about this year's games. On September 11, the Bushnell boys came here with fight in their eyes, only to be sent home with a 27 to 0 defeat. September 17, Burlington gave a demon- stration of classy football, thereby defeating our boys, 12 to 6. September 25, Rushville came to Gales- burg with high hopes of setting the Tigers back, only to be lulled to sleep to the tune of 47 to 0. October 2, for a good part of the game iii- - wr - - -M. Babbitt 2-M. Coe, 3-T. Freda, 4-L. 1X 1, H S t 6 R Reagor, 7-R. Bonney, 8-R. KDR. T11E lFA1QS toward the end of the afternoon the East Moline eleven wound up their scoring ma- chine tallying 22 counts to the Tigers' 14. October 9, the fighting Moline boys held Galesburg to no score while they chalked up 19 points. October 15, fans and players agreed that the Tigers played their supreme game at Rock Tsland, but the accurate passing and kicking of the latter held them to a scoreless UE. October 23, Macomb was the next team to invade the Galesburg field, only to find that two touchdowns and a safety were too much, as they were only able to score six points. October 30, the Canton eleven showed some real playing ability. But the game ended with Canton on the bottom side of a 33 to 0 score. November 6, the Kewanee eleven was fast as well as heavy, but good old G. H. S. Hghters turned them back with a 20 to 7 defeat. November 20, not even a snow storm could effect the spirit of the Monmouth- Galesburg contest. Monmouth had a team worthy of the seven points allowed them by the fighting Galesburg Tigers, but the back- field and line gave G. 1-1. S. a victory, 27 to 7. And now, ladies and gentlemen, Gales- burg's ball on the opponentis 4-yard line, fourth down and four Coach, MR. G S ME P to go. Mr. X has the e son, , ball, he's over the line! aggenjo 9-H. Upton, 10-L. Hand. 11.-G. ' Brashear. 12-T. Curl 13-L. WVeber, I4-K. ' Q the Tlgefs Showed 3 cook, 15-B. H roldson, 16-G. Coughun, 17-H. The Whlsfle and Gales Ba 1 18-C. S .llow 19-R. B wn, 20-E. john- fine style of play, but Son, 21-F, L d l burg wins, 20 to 14. mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmWWWWWWMR E971 1 m 711 nv vzvvzvm :xv vzwzwzv :xv nv vxv mmvzmvvxv nv vzv mmm m my W SKY 7K YK YN 7K 7K 711 711 YK YK W 72? a V4 LN P! . -4 L N VI -'Q B!! All B!! B!! B!! B!! A!! B!! B!! All All M4 All B! M WM MMMMMMMMMMMMMM- M mmmm I D A24 AM AM A25 P M NM myAuAumayAuAsamayAsammmmsnmuAmzammznzmnummwzm 1 5 CLASSM3 UF THE HARDWUUD P 'ANNLQ' ? 7 i .1 54 1' ,nz 1 ' ' V 1"-r W . - .Af-1 M, X V , L, , , i -1- -J 'P M,g,,, VN, 1 -, IHillWHlQ 1 Eg, ' , , , . r r I ,Q , . El 1 11 Mmwwwm. -1 if E! X if' .. an ' 'Q 23? Q 4 4 V 'R E V 4? 6 5 5 E if -Q 4 mm mmmmmm mmm mmmmm E E Q E 'ze fs Y E fs Q fre E E 4 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 H1 711 R 1981 I t!A!AA!4l!H!4l!H!H!4B!4k!4l!4b!4BMl!0!4B!4I-!H!4B!4A!4l!4A.'4A!4A!4l!H!4b!4B!6l!H!0!H!H!4 Nl!!l!AA!AA!Ab!AAMB!!AMA!!L!!B!4b!H!4A!AM4M4BMAllMMA!!b!4A!0Mb!4l!M!H!4A!0!4l!4A!HMA!4A!AA!4A!4A!AA!Al!H!4l!f- BASKETS TIIR A patter of feet! A thunderous applause! A swish of netting! A hearty Hi-O-Silver! The Galesburg Silver Streaks. Again we present to you the story of a small but com- petent Galesburg High School Basketball Team. Guided by Coach Phillips, this team was able to push through to a record of 16 won and 6 lost. Galesburg placed second in the North West Conference, first in the Regional Tournament and managed, by clever and brilliant basketball, to snatch the Sectional honors from a highly reputed Canton five. Cui' story begins in the gymnasium at Galesburg and rival near-by schools, and comes to a glorious finish on the hardwood of the University of Illinois Gymnasium in Champaign, Illinois. As the curtains roll back on our drama of the hardwood we find the Silver Streaks matching their speed against the height of Burlington on their home floor, height proving the victor, as Burlington slipped away to a 4-point victory, 27-23. A week later the Streaks were forced to accept a defeat at East Moline, 34-20. The night after this game, the Streaks handed Peoria Manual a 21-19 set-back and followed up the next Friday by defeating Rock Island on their home Hoor, 20-16. The next week the Streaks easily defeated Monmouth by a 43- 21 score. Canton also fell victim to the Galesburg winning streak by a 24-22 score. Cn January 14, the spirit of the Kewanee Gym dedication was damaged, as Coach, MR. PHILLIP UUG11 A 110019 burg hopes of a North West Championship in a heart breaking thriller, 24-22. In the second act of our drama we find the Streaks more successful, as they defeated East Moline 30-22, Rock Island 28-205 Monmouth 27-215 and Kewanee 37-275 they were defeated by Moline and Canton by scores of 30-20 and 36-29 respectively. Let us pause and discuss the team which makes possible this discourse. They are small in size, clever and swift in handling the ball, steady in pinches, and are a high- caliber scoring squad. At guards we flnd "Bucky,' Swise and "Louien Vitali, two of the most competent players in the game. The forward positions were handled by 'cRick" Lundeen and "Baldyn Sands. Into their hands fell the responsibility of rebound- ing as well as bringing the ball up from the back court. To complete the quintet we have Bob Coatney, who along with his reli- able rebounding lent most of the height to our team. These five, aided by those scrappy subs, proved a winning combination. In the closing act we find the Streaks de- feating Gilson 35-18, Brimfield 37-21, and Knoxville 42-8, to win the Regional tourna- ment. The Sectional tournament proved a more strenuous task, but the Streaks showed themselves fit by defeating Fairview 36-28, Macomb 24-22, and Canton 31-28. The final curtain fell after Galesburg had defeat- ed Rock Island 23-21, when Braidwood ended hopes the Galesburg for a second the Streaks downed the -HRQ C 71?' 2f,'f,ft'F,3'-L' 7251 SP? State Championship celebrities, 30-19. Mo- L-R-h LQ 'lk Q if1p.BQm"'IQ lflilgng HSE by a close score of line toppled the Gales- lx 1. l.-H. Hiller. I Il. NX alclron. lf-T. Turn- bull,18-H.Upton.19-R c zo H c' 11 35-30. . oe, f . .uent er. 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 73? 1991 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? 71? Ki 71? 7N73? 71? 73?73? 7K 73? 73? 73?73?73?73?73?73?73?m73?73? 71? 71? 71? 7K 71? 71? 71? 71? 4 O I 71? 71? 71? 71? 'I 19 'ax ' 1 AX mmmmmmmmmMmmMmmMmwmmmmmmmmmmwwwwmmmmmmmmm ammmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmww THE PUNIES GALLGP FAST Under the capable Guldance of our pony coaches Phrlhps and Altchlson the sopho mores c me through wrth a most successful season In the first game the POHICS held East Mo hne to a 0 0 score The followmg week Rock Island also t1ed the local sophomores wh n both teams ran the score to 13 After two tres Mollne v1s1ted the POHICS and took home a nrce 14 0 vlctory Followmg th1s loss to our greatest r1val the boys went to work and won the remarnmg four games Startmg first on Kewanee we took an easy game 20 6 after whrch we won over Canton 18 O Macomb out up a httle better battle wh1ch we took by a score of 17 6 In the final game at Monmouth w1th the mercury hugglng the goose egg and a stlff north wrnd cuttrng the boys hands we were warmed a lrttle by a 7 0 victory A to al of one loss two tles and four w1ns makes our out look toward the next two years qu1te hopeful was composed of such M TC M PH LLIPS E S lx 1 E L 'NI Ft B L Th y XV P P L g I R E I NV ll L W Bob Beck and Kenneth Horn 1n the back field whlle at ends were Bob Lundeen and Earl M1ller Tackle pos1t1ons were held down by Wayne Anderson and B111 Ingles Gordon MCLQIU a Junror helped the pomes out by playrng guard w1th Marc Adkrsson And not forgettmg the center posltron whlcn was capably filled by Marv1n Myers we conclude the pomes Hrst strmv Sometlmes one forgets that second team who pounds the first team 1nto shape Our second team thrs year was one of the 1mpor tant reasons for such a successful season Forrest Ol on ack West 1m Tole Donald Wallace and Bob Kemp a jumor composed the backfield 1n the l1ne at ends Brough Treffer and Donald Grrfhth tackles El don Long and Charles Thomas guards FFHHCIS Olson and ohn Hrcks centers Bob Marvrn a junror alternated wrth Ray Evans Cther players who helped develop such a fine first team by the1r hard work day rn and R IN SCEISOYI HFC S6611 In the notables as Lloyd Ma son Corky Evans IN fy xr Adk lx H F Ol p1cture at the top of t page N4 5 4 E 7 7 5 1 5 5 A D 5 S S 5 E- OS D A 2 9 ? 9 E 5 9 K 5 Z' 9 E 5 S E K E is s s Q E E E E 4 Y Q E Y N O 7 - LQ . . . . . Q Y 3 - Q . . I . . . V - V . . . . . , 'S . .E e . A I , ,E Y U- te . - . . . . v 1. r . 2 E ' A ' 5 ' E 7 ' 7 7 S 7 J 7 J 7 45 ' B' ." 5 3 7 E 7 7 7 ' 4: . , - . , 7 J 7 7 ' 45 - . t , , , . . ,E , ' 7 7 ' QE - 1 E - Coaches, R. A1 H1501-1, R. 1 - 7 b ' ,I.,h . Top ow Crc'nd1'ng from Icft to rightj- 'Ir. Aitchison, d ,h h h S 3 team I 15 631' J. St'l , J. W If , B. T ff r. D. XVind'sh, D. G-if- 3 out t fgu t ' Y fith,le.S lwfilleffjcf eueff, Ii. 'ennedy,lG. McLain, Y ' g e 'E i. vans, . A unson, R. izsimmons, . undeen, ' Q 7 R. ' rr , ' . Ander , B. eck, V. Traf, F. Olson. Q Bott R - . ' an, E. Long, J. Hicks, B. ngles, ' 7 D ' , J. ' R. Kemp, . Mason, I. est, 4? H 77 J. Toll I. R . B. M' vin, l . 'iss0n, C. y , , , Thomas, '. orn, . son. he . lg Y . re ,' . .. - . - . . 4 ..... A A A 4 A A A A A 4 A A A A A A yQ IA! I" '7'7171717X71'1'i171 1 17171 171'17 "' "' " "' ' " KX m!H!H!4A!A A!!-N!4A!H!n!4A!4l!4 A!0!4A!0!4A!4A!4l!H!4A!4 AM A!! A!! A!4A!4A!4A!4 A24 AM N4 BY4 A2415 E, - .L A . I Z Q SUEWIUDHUEUES UTJDEHR BAfMSET6 5 2' 'N E' 'F Sb F 'Q Q , an wb A L 5' 'N 914 '5 gs K4 2' is 5 5 5 5 5 , 51- 5 v gg, , 4 4. 3 44 ei 4 l i f 'S . ' ,, Q. v Ii ig' A 51, A group of fifty candidates answered mores. According to win and loss record the .E 911, Coach Bednar's call for 1937-38 sophomore team did not have a very successful season, .5 ii, basketball team. From this number a squad nevertheless there were several individual .5 E, of seventeen boys was selected and main- players who showed possibilities of develop- .E tained throu hout the basketball season. in into varsit material. .Z A g g Y N 5 Inasmuch as these boys had never played In the attempt to select a winning com- ,E 5, together in high school competition they were bination Coach Bednar shifted his boys fre- ,E 4 . . E, taught constantly, all season, the fundamen- quently to develop more punch in the scoring ,E 3, tals of basketball and team cooperation. The of his first five. The loss of Bob Luncleen ,Q A . . . . . A E, purpose of the sophomore basketball team is and Jim Doyle thru injuries, hurt the team's ,YQ it to prepare the boys for varsity competition. chances in staying above the five hundred ,Zi . . . . . L S, The squad was drilled in the shooting of mark for the season. The material of this ,Q . . . . I Q baskets and free throws 1n handlin ln ear's so homore s uad was ossibl , from v 5, , s, Y P q P Y U 4g 5 dribbling the ball, in passing, in pivoting, in the standpoint of individual players,a heavier ,Q . . . . . A E, developing a change of pace, in timing and team than of previous years. The team had ,gs 3 in developing a spirit of team cooperation. height and showed at times flashes of speed, ,Lg A . . . ' . E, A total of fourteen games was played with timing and change of pace. In commenting ,E 5 both conference and nonconference teams. on the possibilities of the sophomores who E, The final record for the season ended with will make a serious bid on next year's varsity E, a total of six victories and eight losses. In five, we predict that Bob Lundeen, Fred 5, the four nonconference games played, the Nlitchell, Lloyd Mason and Bob Peck will .5 E, soph team split even. In conference compe- make strong threats to break in the varsity W, tition the team won line-up, as out of the -Z 2 Coach MR BEDNAR 'N . , . V 5, four and lost six, tak- b V first twelve there re- -4 . I Top Rott'-Mrxliednar, G. Blame, F. Olson, J. XX est, . rx it mg fouffh Place m the Q: Sfivdjsi'J...'2.'.i?'1a'.'ii..E.2i.1:s1,jH-. Qi,.2ti1t,?ifii1?x:: mms only wo var- 'E OH P- "-K. H , R. V . . S . B. P tl-Q, ' Y! iv' N- W- C- fm' 50Ph0' E xilileffnis. Iiurkgnll. Lund F. Biiitiliiell. Slfy men- 'R 9 z 4 ns Z wiv vit in m Viv wiv wiv vii wiv nv vit wiv wiv wiv vit 721 vii 711 wiv wiv wiv 711 wiv nv YK wiv nv nv nv 11: 73: as fioij . F f, P-424' LM A!! B!4A!4A!A A!! A!! MA B!4A!4A!A BM A!AA!AA!AA!AA!A AMMANJMAM 15 STARSTTUF THE CIINDERQPATH mv zfgwgvwgvygvvzvvzvvzvmnvvzvvzv flozj 'E E E ' 'E 'E if E we as 'S 'E QE E E E 'E 'E Q 'xx 'E 4? I 'N 'E 'E ii +5 1? 16 Q6 45 N 'E 'E 'E QE 'R 'E V 45 'R R minimamimmvmaA!n!nm!nvnvnvnvaimvnVn!n!4A!n!aA!n!AA!n!.n!n!n!n!n!a AMMMMBMMAMMMAMMMMMAMMMMMMMMMNAAMBMAMNAAMNABMMGBMBMMJBMAMNAAMAMAMNA THMHNG T11111lfi1 50 Yd Dash Shawler 1934 5 6 sec 100 Yd Dash T Murphy 1932 101 sec Pole Vault L D Witt 35 G Dutton 33 12 t Mile Run Schroeder 1926 4 min 36 sec Shot Put Howard Iundeen 9 49 fr 9172 in avelin Throw R Scott 1935 169 fr 440 Yd Run N Horton 1935 518 sec High ump J Doyle 1935 5 fr 10 in 170 Yd High Hurdles 1 Tulin 1933 153 sec Discus Throw Howard Lundeen 1936 119 fr 215 m 880 Yd Run C Lester 93 7 min 1 2 sec Broad lump-Jack Doyle 1936 21 fr 9 in 700 Yd Low Hurdles K Hardine 9 7 23 2 sec Hop Step and Jump H Smith 720 Yd Dash T Murphy 932 22 4 sec Mile Relay P Pruett R Gunther Tulin M Robertson 1933 3 min 32 5 sec 1'1alf Mile Relay T Murphx R Klinger W Anderson Tulin 1932 1 min 33 6 sec Two Mile Relay Cederoth H Schroeder J Murphy G Schroe der 1927 8 min 226 sec Medley Relay Tulin T Murphy Steele R Klinger 9 2 3 min 45 sec On your mark' Get set and the report of the gun sends Th Y 1' the Galesburg Senior High X h TRACKSTERS School track team on to another victori- ous Saturday afternoon. In this fashion the Geneseo, Bradford, Kewanee, Northwest Conference and the District Meets were be- gun The Galesburg team showed great power in the running events and a strength to gather a score of points in the field. To show the strength of this team let me give you a brief resume of their accomplishments for the past three years. They won the Geneseo meet three consec- utive years, bringing back this year two trav- eling trophies which will be kept here. Two other trophies which have only been won for two consecutive years as they were not given the first year are also in the possession of G H S The Bradford meet has only been in prog- ress for two years and they have reluctantly given their total point trophy to Galesburg In the Northwest Conference, the team has established itself as the only team to occupy the winning position for three con- SCCut1V6 years. The District meet has also fallen into the hands of the fast stepping Galesburg team for the past three years. They won this year by a total score of four times the amount compiled by their nearest rival. In the state meet they gathered a third place last year and this year were only able to collect two points. And so we close an eventful season with the Galesburg track team and bid "good speed" to its forthcoming members, with high ' hopes for next year. J v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v P , 1: P P , , T 7 .. ,........ . . u , I H I , .- I I - 7 1 . C , , 7 , , ,..,...,,,,,,,..,...............,.., f. , H I ..,. I Q I M 1 J 7 1 37 ....... ................................. . A ' . J - . , ........., . I H I , ..., I 0 - P . I' 2- . 2 , --nu--H Nunn- -----nu . I . r ,' , . 1 9 , I H I 7 1 7 ................. .................. - ' . . . P . 5 , A ,--, . . n I L10 P - . i . - 5 P 1 3 .,.....,.,.,,..,.....,,............... - ......... . f . " ' 7 -' ' 7 1926 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,..,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,., 43 ft. 3 in. each year. 7 I H I , ' 1 ....,....,...,,,. . ,,.....,,..................... . . H I , I 7 U ' ' I- , - , ' T1 ' - . 1, . , . . 7 ' 7 Cl' 7 , . v ' 1 7 , ' , I 7 I - b , ..............,...,.....-.-. . I I I , 2 i Coach, MR. GILLESPIE 7 , .. 7 Great Mercury livel 1 3 ,,,,,,, , ,,,,,,,.,,., . . Long years ago, H n 7, gut heri.aL:eAh IS, D p h ack " X h .p tl , ' ' Here, OE their reco l You may read. Q - V. A ,- - . - - - - .' - - v- 7- - - -v - 51033 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 7213 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 1 721 721 721 721 71 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 721 5 E 95 9. E 5 E 3 5 E 5 E E 5 5 E' gf. gg. 5. 5. gl. 5. 5, 5. 5, 5. E. 5. ,E 71 SXBMAMAMl!4A!4l!4M4A!4A!4l!5l!4A!H!H!4l!4B!4l'.4A!4A!n!AA!AMA!4A!AA!AA!0!4l!Ab!4N4A!6A!5M E 5 Q 74 bn A 4 Q, CRUSS QUUNTRY Cl TEER LEADERS 'E A 5' 'E 5' 'E it '5 5' 'E 5' 'E 5' '5 5' XE 5' 5 1 fa' 'R w Q g if With a Cheer! and a Rah! and a loud Seven boys inclined toward shortness of is sv . . 4 G Hooray? and the cross country team is off stature, but according to the laws of compen- E EP . . . . . . . Q G streaking across the country on six pairs of sation, make it up in lustiness of lung. Sev- 2 QU . . . R xy sturdy legs, possessed by DeWitt Morrissey, en boys whose praises are altogether too V 10 . . Q gb Hugh Winters, Wiley Burch, Leroy Wat- seldom sung. These are our cheerleaders. .5 E son, Max Josephson and Robert Rickords. These are the boys who themselves deserve a E E' This year the Northwest Conference cross cheering section as large and enthusiastic as 'E E' country meet was held at Lombard field on the one they led for our teams, 15 E' Saturday, 'October 9, 1937. Rock Island, A symphony is a symphony only when 5 E' with a low total of 50 points, won the meet, there is a director to indicate when the in- 'E E' seizing first-place honors from Galesburg, struments shall be played. Similarly a cheer is 15 5' who has held that place for the past year. a cheer only when there is a leader to make 3 v, . . . . . . ,Q E The locals took fourth place in this meet. it one. Enthusiasm and interest in the. game is E' Rogula of East Moline covered the two and are increased ten-fold by organized cheering 'F Z' a uarter mile stretch in 11 minutes 35.6 in lace of the eneral hubbub. Under the 'S q q , s E' seconds, breaking the record set last year by guidance of these leaders our distracting 'E E' Galesburg's Ernest Nelson. noise was transformed into a real inspiration E E' East Moline took second place with 55 to the Tigers and the Silver Streaks. 'E E' points, Kewanee third with 58, and Gales- Four upperclassmen and three sophomores 'E E' burg fourth with 59. Moline and Mon- used their lungs this year. They were the 'N x . . v Z' mouth did not compete with full teams. boys who were on duty at all football and 'S Q . v Vi A better result is expected from next basketball games, to cheer our boys on to Q Q . . . . . . v Z' year,s competition, as all on the team are victory, thereby winning acclaim for them- fi br 4 A Juniors with the excep- selves and their team. S 'E' tion oi Watson and Coafh' MR' FREEMAN Three cheers for the 'E Q ' 'L' ' -ii. , . ' , . ' , . Q 2' Rlckords who are soph- 5i..f,Z'l.fQ.nf Fiirtiggleillrlil. llZ3i'i2'.S.lf R1fI'iI2'f.fl.'L, fl. cheerleaders. They're 'N Q NVatson, M. Josephson, H. VVinters, XV. Burch. Pic- . ' Q W OITIOFCS. ture III-S. Zeldes, I. Larson, J. Lawrence. all flght. Q f 9' A!! 4 71 wiv 73: nv nc nv vit vit nv nc as :xv :tv vit nv YN vit vit nv wiv wiv vit vit wiv wiv vit wiv nv wiv wiv vit vit vim f104:I E 5 5 5 P bb D 6 Q D 5 bb bb bb pr by bb bb by bb 6- by bb b bb bv bb P bv bb bb bb bb bb br ammmmwwmmwwwmmmmwMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm QEAQZHFJG UIQ fG1DLf? Q3RfEETUS As Cwalesburg High grows older, a new sport golf is becoming popular in North- west Conference sports. Golf as a sport any of the other school sports. This is one of the reasons it has been incorporated in the school s extracurricular activities. One who has never played a round of golf probably thinks of it as a hit and walk sport. Wheia perfected to a decent height, golf provides a high degree of ecstasy for Hlling up dull afternoons With veteran Dale Sarver back, the team composed of Leonard Abrahamson, Bob Coe and Gene Nelson played with the toughest team at the Davenport Country Club. Under a clear sky the boys went to pound that little white ball into 36 cups. Dale Sarver stroked one hundred and eighty-two, while following him closely, Abrahamson and Coe shot one hundred eighty-three and one eighty-four respectively. Although fourth isn't what Galesburg is used to receiving, the team did v v v v -4 v4 v Q Z' qv qu A qs A qv A qv Q 5 Q A qv 1 qv A W A qv T J A Q A . Q Q 7 f Q A 1 . . . 2 requires as much practice and science as does 4 . A Q Q . Q 7 A Q . A Q, - Q Q A Q A qv A . N Y A Q 4 Q A qv A Q A Q . A Q 6 . Q A , Q A Q A Q 4 . Q Z! 5 5 5 G Z' Q! IA fairly well considering all are juniors with better team than ever next year. It is also rumored that two excellent golfers will appear from the junior high schools next year. The district meet this year was held at Peoria. Each school entered a four-man team. Individual records were kept to de- termine the lowest point man. The team, and also the individual who marked up the lowest points were eligible to take place in the state meet held at Urbana. In selecting the best possible team for the district meet, Mr. Aitchison took Bob Coe, Leonard Abrahamson, Dale Sarver and Raymond Tapper to Peoria. Despite the handicap of playing in driving rain, Peoria Centralls golf team took first-place honors at the Peoria meet with Andrews and Modjeski scoring 74 and 75 respectively. Dale Sarver, the only Galesburg man to win individual hon- ors, scored 83 to take Hfth place. In school ranking, Galesburg brought home fourth place. So from the sand pit where we ended up in the N. W. C. meet we turn our faces to the setting sun over the green turf the exception of one sophomore. and wish the best of luck to the Mr. Aitchison, who has coach- Cvdfff' MR- AITCHISON golf team of 1939 at the state ' ' ' l . .12 ' . i. Ncls . ' ed golf this year, is expecting a ,fu ,,Q,QQhjf,,,N,f,,' ,L ,ffl meet at Champaign. ? E E 6 E E E E 6 E 6 E E E E E E E E E E E E 6 E E E E E E E E V! 1 LN YI 4 1 LN YA . :Q LN 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 K1 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 R 51051 wwwmmmMmmMmwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmma 15EEQbJlS VTE AIW FCDR BQDYVS l The Cwalesburg High School tennis team in its third year of North West Conference competition, is rapidly gaining fame and prowess. The anetu result so far this year is the conference title which was won by a large margin. Bob Aldrich, veteran Gales- burg racqueteer, was defeated by Hainline of Rock Island, to take second place. Rich- ard Ruth, although somewhat less experi- enced than Aldrich won third place. In the boys, doubles, Galesburg won first and sec- ond. West and Swise displayed a combina- tion of speed and consistency which was not to be beaten. Siefert and Burkett, now much improved, were beaten only by their own team mates in the finals. There were about twenty-four boys work- ing in preparation for the State High School Tennis Tournament held in the spring in Champaign. To qualify for competition in this meet a player of team of doubles, must win first or second place in their district meet. For Galesburg that meet was at Canton. Considered as number one in singles this spring is Bob Aldrich. stantly improving his style and power he entered the State Tournament in '37, not be- ing eliminated until the quarter finals. Being a year older, somewhat taller, and much more experiepced than last year, Bob should make a fine showing when he competesfin Champaign this spring. Richard Ruth, play- ing a greatly improved game, is as last fall, number two single. Number one doubles is the team of Siefert and Burkett. Number two is West and Maxwell. Swise is not participating because of his track activities. These boys mentioned are only seven of the twenty-four who are out for tennis, the other seventeen making them Hght to hold their positions. West being the only one to graduate this year gives Galesburg the prospect of having again next fall a team not to be surpassed in the North West Conference, and we look forward to next year with high hopes for a winning team not only in the district meet but in more suc- 3 He won his first letter Cm," MR' BEDNAR cessful state competition fi' 1 I-R. swiss, ia. wer in is 1 tr, . E, when a Sophomore. Con- E. Seifert. Pf.-fm 11-is. Ammh, R. Ruth. at Champaign. S, E E E E E 5 s S 5 5 S 5 R 5 R E 1' .ii ? PZ 5 E E E E E E E E E E E E E 5 5 Q M A ,,,,,,,,.,, ,,, ,,,, -9 Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmms H061 5 5 5 EZ 1 Q 5 5 5 5 5 if za 5 5 re E Q 52 A at -ri fl' 2, qs Z. 4 as 5- E1 ab 5 E E 9? 5 5 ii 2 ammmmmmmmmmmmwmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 5 1 1 1 s QEHRJQS PlaAfY THEFJPJHS, 'MKDO Tennis is the only sport in which the North West Conference recognizes girls, competition. Also it is the only sport in which the Cwalesburg High School girl has an opportunity to win a "G',. If she has an opportunity to go to the tournament two years in succession she receives a "GH and a bar. A tournament is held within the school during the month of September from which a team of three girls and three boys are se- lected to represent the school in the North West Conference tournament, which is held in Qctober. Practice cards are kept by the girls throughout the summer on which they note the number of times they have played, place where they have played, and the score of both themselves and their opponents. This is done not to give the girl a constant practice in writing but so that a record can be kept in order that the games in the tourna- ment may be scheduled so that the players will be more evenly matched. However, any- one interested in tennis may enter the tour- naments regardless of whether the best "carry-overi' sports of the physical department, as a girl must practice through- out the summer vacation if she expects to represent her school in the conference tour- nament. There were about twenty girls who practiced during the summer and who were on the squad. Out of these twenty there were four girls selected to represent Gales- burg in the North West Conference tourna- ment. The girls look forward to the day of the tournament with great anticipation. There's a big thrill in not only playing in the tournament, but also meeting the cham- pion girls from other schools. The four girls participating in the tournament were: Mar- garet Tolbert and Mary Jane Stephens, who represented Galesburg in the doubles, June Harshbarger, who was the single represent- ative, while Ruth Lowry was the alternate. The double team placed fourth, while June was able to grab fifth place in the tourna- ment, which was held at the Kewanee Coun- try Club in Kewanee. The five schools com- peting in the tournament were: she has kept a summer record. C""f"' MISS CYPREAN5 N Rock Island, East Moline, Nlon- For this reason tennis is one of li,,,1f,lf1fQ1.1', TLf,',..fI.1 mouth, Kewanee, and Galesburg. 71 711 711 W 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 K1 711 711 img 711 Y! E E V 'R V 'R V 'R E Y 6 V 1 'Q 5 E V 45 1? I 'R E V 'R V 1 B E V 'S V 4 B E E V 'R V 4 1 .E B Z 4 V 'N E V 'R Y Q V 'S V 'K V 'S E E V 1 4 S 1? VI 0 1 C2 'R YI If ' 1 MX M f M4 xg M Mb f A' X!! AF E wi R agp sr? ag' U :Y if N wg EY U 15 F E N I N H M E F I H083 - 42 F: .5 Z Qu .E 'S 'Z dl E ,L E ,L Q4 Ig cg tg ,A eg Z 45 E Z tm E .Z ,A Z 45 Z 'A A .5 Z c 5 1 vii mx -Y 75 -Y yi sf? vi: S 5 5 5 E 1 Z' w 'Z' Q' 'Z' , ws 311' Y E S. A -4 72' E E 9 4 - V E w 'Z' E Q 'Z' 5 'Q 'Z' xv 'Z' '4 2' 1 E S. A E E Sf 4 Q Z' Q Z' 'E Z' 9 'Z' Y E 'W 7 x 'V S, v4 N! 2 5 S A .gd Q-E X-av f!! I 5 4 E 'Z' AMES!!A!n!4A!AA!n!AA!4A!n!u!n!1A!f1Kfg'ff' 1 ' ' HIGH LIGHTS IIN CLTUB PHJAYS lxm NL LJ ffen I '54-vu, " - fl' O Civ' ' en 4 f' '7 vnuwn, Ike A 4 L- A' 71 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmww ' img S. SY!!! B!! B!! B!! B25 PM B!! B25 at AM B!! B!! BM B!! B!! B!! B!! B!! B!! B!! B!! B!! B!! B!! B!! B!! B!! All M A 'E 1 Y f E' WATER, WUMEN AND SWIM 'S E' 'E E' 'E E' 'E 95 ti E' 'E E' 'E v E+ 'E E' 'E if 'E S' 'E l X Y Q 1 , . . . 'S S, Is the water cold. Come on in and find swimmers and divers. - 45 Q . . . . . S, out. It?s just right and will pep you up. We also wish to honor graceful Miss .E 1 . . . 5, Splash around and you will warm up. Time Cypreansen, whose constant work and inter- .E 4 . . . . . g, me! I want to see if I can swim the length est has been largely responsible for the train- .E S, of the pool in less than fifteen seconds! Oh, ing of swimming and diving beauties of Q A , . . S, Im afraid to go down in the deep end. G. H. S. Q r . . . . S, Well, okay, but if I drown-Will you watch Do you remember the first time you tried ,E r . . . . . S this dive and see if I keep my feet together? to swim and instead you sank below the sur- E f . 53, Keep your head between your arms and you face of the water? Werenat you frightened? ,E Q won't hit the water flat. Oh, you did! Can't Of course you were. And remember the first ,V S you girls understand anything? Breathe in time you stood on the high dive and slowly ,Q J A lj your mouth and out your nose? Get rhythm bent forward to see the cold water come up ,Q 1 . ' . . . . I 2 in your breathing. That's right! All the to meet you. These were exciting moments. ,E S, beginners must swim the length of the pool Now you have passed all the beginning ,Q Q, with three different strokes and do a plain and preliminary steps in learning how to be ,Q . . . . A dive." Thus an average day in the girls' an expert. You are an excellent swimmer ,Q ,Q . . . A l is s ent and a beautiful diver and all because ou v sv, P00 P - 7 Y .5 E-1 So from G. I-I. S. we nominate the fol- spent several deliciously cool and pleasant ,Q . ' . . . . . . . . . n 53, lowing girls in the hall of swimming fame: hours in the G. I-I. S. girls' swimming pool. ,E ES, Lois Milroy, best swimming form, Shirlyn With this brief resume of the training of ,E Ross, the best diver, Marie Zeffo, the great- our females, we hope you will be enthused ,E est progress in one term, Marian enough to take up the class and ,E 'ff . . . . Li, Smith, in the pool the greatest COWWMISS CYPREANSEN learn what fun it is to know ,E 4 . . 3, number of times, Sara Lee Dor- gif, fQ'IQf'1,fu'f ' yourself as an expert in the art .E A . . ' -A . . w mer, the most persistent begin- b 1. fi ,Ii t of swimming. ,Z 5' . , , . . 5 Q, ner. We honor these girls for Th Y Q 'm W1 flw It 1S desired that next year 4V Z , 7 Oh I t they do, l , l S E, the world praises all good Qhelyef Lmggfcgo, more girls will enjoy the pool. 45 Sr 'Zi A . , A,,,,.,,,,,,,, , , A , P 71 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 K1 711 H1 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 R fuoj f ff X BOOKV j SILKEN BROCADESO o IN MERRIE ENGLAND gym m m mmm m m m m m m m m m m m m 5, 5, 5, 5. 5, 5, E' 5. Q. Z' S. A Z' if in 5' gi 5' E, is gr gi 5 in is E, E. E' gl E' E. 5, .5 5. .Ei it E. E, Er E, gr gp gb 71 WATER, WOM EN 'els the water cold? Come on in and find out. It's just right and will pep you up. Splash around and you will warm up. Time mel I want to see if I can swim the length of the pool in less than fifteen seconds! Oh, I'm afraid to go down in the deep end. Well, okay, but if I drown-Will you watch this dive and see if I keep my feet together? Keep your head between your arms and you won7t hit the water flat. Oh, you did! Can't you girls understand anything? Breathe in your mouth and out your nose? Get rhythm in your breathing. That's rightl All the beginners must swim the length of the pool with three different strokes and do a plain divef, Thus an average day in the girls, pool is spent. So from G. H. S. we nominate the fol- lowing girls in the hall of swimming fame: Lpis Milroy, best swimming form, Shirlyn Ross, the best diver, Marie Zeffo, the great- swir. V CYP est l ing G. I If to ss face Of f time bent to n IX. and an e and spen hour hh our est progress in one term, Marian Smith, in the pool the greatest number of times, Sara Lee Dor- mer, the most persistent begin- r ner. We honor these girls, for the world praises all good Coach, Miss CYPREM For female fun, Fall right in line, Yes-ewen in sport Our girls do shine. They swim anfl di Oh, but they rlo, And what is more- They're graceful t YK YK 711 YK YN YK YK 72? YK YK YN W 721 71? YK YK YR 51103 l l 1 , X FEATURES -. , . LIFE Give me the seething throng, With their loud-taut. crowd-talk, Their lilting laughter., And petty sorrows. That's life! Give me the crowded streets With people loud and gay. Pushing, struggling, shoving Some falling along the way That's life! -G,-ace Nesbit ONLY ONE SOLUTION One tin soldier thrown in the corner., Two little hooties here and yonder.. Happy little playroom all asuncler, Naughty little hahy hoy., temper like thunder., one little foot goes stamping. kicking, one little tear clown a. cheek goes triclcling. Then comes mother. face full of wonder, Bahy runs to hecl. puts his head under, Mother takes hahy out to the kitchen, Maid gives him cookie. "Tank oo Gretchen. -Mary Jang Saum TWINKLING IEWELS O IN MERRIE ENGLAND ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 5 5 5 5 Q W 4 Z' 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 N 5 Z' 1 5 5 5 5 E 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 .E .5 5 5 5 . " N L.. .- ..A N 5 l ' wx l 4 , N . ef X i i I -X A - u.,'1-Q., ' ' f. A l 1-Nq-,1.Js.li'x.N B 1" l rj ' X s -.4 - fe... . fy, iss.. - . 9 at I .. I., Nw.. l us , Songs and stories, poems and essays. Gay England loved them, reveled in their writing, and produced some of the finest the world has ever read. 5 Ubi. It is in our features that we are primarily interested at the present time, however. Fea- tures in the form of pictures and poetry. England also had such features-pictures and poems. In fact from England have come some of the most beautiful examples of the classics and fine arts that have ever met the human eye. It was during this period that the great Samuel Johnson gained a foothold in the literary age of which he became the dictator and in which he shone with such a guiding and inspirational light to all his contempo- raries and their posterity. It cannot be truth- fully stated that the Georges who guided England at this time were vitally interested in the advancement of the literary art, yet it is true that general literature went forward by leaps and bounds during this period. Fielding, often called the father of the his preference for a single poem, the choice probably would be Thomas Grayis '4Elegy." Ar this same time, another man was also making his literary impression on the world-Oliver Goldsmith, very different from Gray in character, Goldsmith was Irish, genial, happy, witty, humorous, loved by all, and a member of Dr. Johnson's famous club. He was very popular with his contemporary England, his books were read, his poems learned, and his plays enjoyed throughout the land. Then of course, there was that truest of poets, the beloved Scots- man-Robert Burns. Yet it was a period full of real literary development, real intellectual achievement with the beginnings of the novel, the further- ing of poetry, the oratory of Burke, wit of Sheridan, and deep learning of Dr. Johnson, it developed into the foundations of a real literary nation. After all, is it not really such learning, intellectual achievements, and developments that we are in school for? We are happy to print the poems which have been written by some of the poets in our school. our English novel, gave birth to this amusement, so enjoyed by every one of us today. Favor- itism is a foolish diversion, to be sure, yet, if every poetry- reading person were to give A ZWWWWWWWWWWW FEATURES The English loverl good poetry. Produced some volumes too. Ilut here on pages following YYe woultl present to you. The poems of our stutlents. And we'cl amltl this little note: NYe think tliey're hue as any English poets ever wrote. England. Then, too, we pre- sent for your enjoyment pic- tures of the different members of the classes taken when affairs of state were not too weighty. 55 E Q E E 5 E E E E E E 5 E E E E E E E E E E E 5 Q E E E 5 E E Q E E E E E E E 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 711 R fiiijl S R R D A R L R U U G N NTI E S R R R 12 fl Z W x XM A M A B M by is , X Av W f:33'5 gig . ' Tilt? Ni' W R J K fy J' v fs V Z .Ze V Y ai 'A .5 E- .5 .E Y Z fb .Ei Q .E .5 Z5 'E 'L I E 123 .Ei 5 AK I? .Y AX W? 7? 74 N A vw L 5 H .Ei my A!4A!n!a AM mu Ak AM MA AM BM M4 AM AM AM l J . 5. gg, gg, 5, .5 gg. 5, 5. 5. 5, 5. gg. 5 5. 5, g. 5. .5 5. 5. 5, 5, 5, .3 5, 5, 5. 5' .5 .5 5, 5. 5. 5. 5. 5, 5, 5, 5. 5. 5. 5, 71 TREE GJMXi IPHCTFUIQE fQIJHZZ7 X . . . ,,-ff' in- mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmw ,fu V, -k , 1 51131 , M 1:3 gg ,gpg 4, k jig .fi EM W 'xvf W xv! V XV xv xv NM V f Nj 4,4 p-,A L4 91,4 5,4 1s,4 n,4 s,4 n GRAND OLD REFLECTEERS nfs. :gg 5 . ff.: 1 ' I-7 x4 ! 'R V 'N 15 V 'R 'E 'E V 'R V 4 4 ,S S E V 45 45 'R V R 'E 'E 'E B 'E E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 'E 15 15 'E 45 'E E 'E E 'E E 'E 'E 'E 1 ' ' if 1 ' ig WN YK YR' 7281 QR' 721 WVR f1l4:I 3 AM AM BM Ma BM AM AM AM AM AM Ma AM AM AM Am Q Z' 'E' 'E' E' 93. a QS. 4 S, Q S, ua PE' w 'Z' 5' 4 4 'Z' JS, ba xv 25 v :ii 5 A , S, S+ Af A ls 2 Q 2' 54 2' is Z' Sq, 2 S, f 3 ip IEP in fi, 5' Sf, fl ll fi' 5 1 ir fi Y in '11 ,G Z' 1 2, 5, 53. 5, 5. 5, 5, Z NHTTHNG THF, NIU SWWU7 : 1, Z WWWWWWWWWWWWWMW' f115 E . . ,W EEEE , ZSAYIJ. an an mia A24 mu Ala nmmnlm PICTURES EUR PLEASURE E E E 5 YQ. X :E E Y V 'F 1? 32 E Qs V Q E V 'S V I S :nun 1, E? E . ' Z ' B 1 5 'pr 5 Q Q Mwf'f wmmmmmmmmR f1l6:f my All Ma AM AM Ma :ya AM mia na mia AM AM AM Ma 3, L E T U S L O U K gg. Z? D .5 7 95, '55 fs, . S, 5, 5, 5, cg. gg, 45 5, . Q Z' -TS, .pq R il 5, 5, 5, 5, 'E 5, 5, 5. eg, 5, 5. ig, Qi, 5. gg, 5. 5, .5 G Q Z' E' A 1 E ..... .A....4.. 0 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 751 1751 7,52 f - 51173 . 1 , 11.5 , ' AND BE GAY 23275 9 X A34 A35 BM All BM AM AM AM AM AM Q TUNE SPMXPPY SBMXPS UF Q HLS X ' X 51181 +2 Y is Y 4 S E E 5 E E Q E Q E E 5 E E E E E 5 E E E E 5 Q E E E E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 Q wmmmmmmmmmk 5 5 5 zu 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 a 5 5 5 5 5 5 71 ummmmmmmmmwmmmmmmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmmm5 5 N THOUGHTS OF ONCE A MARY Sitting at this desk with pen And ink-indelible, Engulfed, all gilden, by the ocean Of the spring which holds Miles deep the shining blue Of warm, enchanted childhood, Once a Mary Traced her name Among the perils of conflicting Grains of wood that make the desk. An envelope of springs Encloses years Wherein this Mary, Plunging bright into a fusion Of the seasons, Chased her laughing life Along a singing path. But today, A time-encrusted teacher Fearing that another, Sun-lost in the vastest spread Of sky and space, Might trace again Upon the desk A name, a year- Casts long thoughts of wisdom Like cold nets, to catch The wind-wise dreams of childhood As they shimmer on the ocean Of the spring. -CAROIYN WILSON TIIEL PCIETTIC HAPPINESS 'Tis a feeling of calm restful contentment, A measure of joy and good will. 'Tis freedom from hate and resentment, From discord and anything shrill. 'Tis the pleasure of living and seeing others live The satisfaction from working hard and long. 'Tis helping others and being able to give, And at random, bursting forth in song. 'Tis working for honor and not for praise, Such a feeling of peace with the world. 'Tis desiring knowledge and using the days Which God, in his bounty, unfurled. -ALICE MARIE HARMON BEACON ILE I have a secret hidden domicile Which is my refuge from the tiresome earth. My books fantastically become an isle Containing thought and friends of greatest worth. Poor simple folk content with sustenance Condemn me with, "Why don't you come to life? When you awake at last from your gay trance Reality makes you her fated wife." To thee, my fairy Ile, my thanks I make. A wondrous shining beacon urging me To do my best in all I undertake. Till then dissatisfied in this world be. Remove my books, gone is my beacon light. My fate is weary, groping, without sight. -Barbara Young A XYEEPING XYILLOW TREES Gauzy wings of brilliant hue, A little green and orange and blue, Dainty as fragile Chinese ware, In . El CI' 'eeping XVillow tree patter on the Pave- Down in a meadow green. There are ome XX VVho've cried so man Their tears have mad I - 'NLE They dribble down the PHOTO y, many 5 ment, C In stre R N wall, Oh! I can hear soft music -X t ll dark man came out of a store, isa esote I rl h rm a black satchel he bore. . H p rd a uirl with high heels and boot When the raindrops start Vkh 1 kly h td Please don't shoot " Silken as a maiden's hair. Hg Ziilifai th -BETTY POPLE Then put the s ou e , " trigger once right in her face, camera back into its case. X I' to fall. -DOROTHY FINIEY - IERNON xLlXT mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm I:119:l . Q E E E E Y Q K E E E E 6 5 5 E E E E E E E E E E E E 5 Q E 6 E E Q Q K E R Brown, 'lhelma, 24, 64 Anderson Lois, 52, 65 S 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 eg, 5 5 5, E, LE, 5 5 5 E, 5 5 5 5 5, 5 5 5 5 WV ummmmmmmMMmmmmmmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmwmmg 5 18 PfR E SlE BITF IW E S A PEACEF UL NIGHT It was a calm and peaceful night, The stars above gave forth their light, The weary mortals drifted into sleep And the waves were calmed upon the deep. The gay colored birds ceased their flight, Lulled to slumber by the still of the night. The beasts were peaceful in their lair And all the world was free from care. -VIRGINIA MCCOMBS Abrahamson, Leonard, 40, 66, 98 Adams, Duane E., 52 IT MUST BE LOVE A gay Spanish caballero Singing songs to his newest flame, A handsome Irish twosome Walkin' in the rain. Indian braves leavin' for the hunt, Saying goodbye to dark-eyed squawsg But Stops" of them all-An American couple, Becker, Eileen, 20, 23, 63, 64, 78 Beckham, Irma, 52, 65 A soda and two Adcock, Joe, 40, 66, 72, 89, 94 Adkisson, Marc, 40, 100 Aitchison. Mr. John, 16, 100 Albright, Leo, 40 Albro, Lysle, 66, 71, 92 Aldrich, Robert, 40, 66, 72, 86 Aldus, Mr. Harry, 16 Allen, John, 52 Allen, Martin, 40, 66 Allen, Patti, 40, 65, 86 Allensworth. Ruth, 52, 65 Allison, Robert, 23, 66, 67, 72 Alvey, Dorothy, 23, 64, 80 Anderson Anderson Anderson Anderson Dale, 52 Edwin, 25, 66 Ethyl, 23, 65, 74 Miss Hazel, 16 Anderson James, 52 Anderson Mr. Joe E'., 14 Anderson June. 52 Anderson Lloyd, 52 Anderson Anderson Miss Rachel, 16 Richard, 40. 66, 71 Anderson Robert E., 52 Anderson Shirlee, 40, 65 Anderson Anderson, Anderson Sybil. 23, 64, 80 VVayne, 52, 76, 84, 100 1Villiam, 52 Andreen. Marian, 40, 64 Andrews, Shirley, 40, 64, 80 Arie, Muriel, 52, 65 Armpriest, Leona, 23, 64 Armpriest, Lucille, 40, 64 Arnold, Albert Edwin, 52 Asbury, Lyle. 40, 66, 75 Atwood, Phyllis, 40, 64, 73 Augerson. Harriett, 64, 74 Avery, Eileen, 23, 66, 80 Ayers, Edwin, 40, 66 Babbitt, Garnet, 52 Babbitt, Jeanette, 23, 64, 77 Babbitt, Marcel, 23, 66, 96 Babbitt. Miss Marjorie, 16, 62 Babbitt, Robert, 52 Bainte r, Kenneth, 66 Baker, Dorothy, 40, 65, 80 Bandy, Martha, 52 Bednar, Mr. Charles. 16, 66, 76 Bell, Robert, 40, 66 Bell, Rosemary, 52, 65 Belshaw, Miss Flo, 16, 62 Benedict, Audrey, 52, 62, 64, 73 Benson, Dorothy, 40, 80 Benson, Gale, 20, 23, 66, 71, 84 Benson, Patricia, 52 Berntson, Elsie, 23, 64. 78 Berquist, Dale Larry, 52 Berry, Norma June, 52, 65 Berry, Paul, 23, 66, 85 Bewley, Nelson, 40, 66, 85 Billings, Lee Rodrick, 52 Billings, Robert, 20, 24, 63, 66, 76 Binz, Carl, 40, 66 Bird, Cleo, 40 Bird, Phyllis, 24 Birdsall, Betty, 40, 64, 68 Bjork, Frances, 24, 64, 83 Blaine, Gerald, 24, 66, 102 Blixt, Vernon, 40, 66, 76, 119 Bloomberg, Lillian, 40, 64, 79 Bly, Sylvester, 24, 66, 81, 85 Boen, Vernon, 52 Bonney, Robert, 24, 66, 71, 96 Booth, Maxine, 40, 64, 77, 88 Botruff, Richard, 24, 66 Boughan, Harold J., 40, 66 Bowen, Elizabeth, 40, 65, 78 Bowen, XVallace, 52 Bower, Clara, 24, 65, 80 Bower, Julia, 40, 64, 79 Bowers, Howard, 24, 66 Bowles, Chiquette, 52, 64, 78 Bowles, Jo Anne, 40, 65, 69 Bowman. Merle, 40, 64, 69 Boyd. Alice, 41. 64 Boyd, Mary Louise, 41, 64, 83 Boyd, Ray, 24- Boyd, Ruth, 41, 64, 74 Boydstun, Charles C., 52, 72 Boyes, Robert, 52, 72, 86, 94 Bracker, Don, 52, 72, 84, 85 Bradley, Delvina, 52 Bradley, Ethel, 41, 65 Brann, Lorain, 41, 64, 74 Brashear, Guy, 24, 66, 76, 96, 98 Breedlove, Shirley, 41, 65 straws. -Louise LITTLE Brown, Russell, 24, 62, 66, 72, 91, 92, 93, 96 Bruner, Marjorie, 41, 64, 80 Bryant, Carroll, 24, 66, 82 Burch, Cora, 52 Burch, Darlene, 24, 64, 74 Burch, XViley, Jr., 41, 66, 75 Burford, Beverly J., 41, 64, 78 Burgett, Grace, 20, 25, 64, 73, 86 Burke, Bernard, 40, 52 Burkett, Durwood, 41, 66, 72 Burrell, Ernest, 25, 66, 76, 102 Burton, VVayne, 52 Butterheld, Maxine. 52, 64 Button, Edward, 52 Button, Kenneth V., 52 Campbell, Betty, 41 Caniren, Virginia, 25, 64, 77 Carl, Clarabelle, 41, 65 Carlberg, Jean, 41, 64, 80 Carlherg, Robert, 25, S5 Carley, David, 52, 63, 72 Carley, Rodney, 41, 66, 72 Carlson, Carlson Agnes, 41, 65 Barbara, 41, 65, 74 Carlson, Bernice, 25, 65, 80 Carlson, Dorothy, 25, 64, 77 Carlson, Gertrude, 25, 64, 79 Carlson, Harlo, 25, 66, 70 Carlson, Marian, 52, 65, 78 Carlson, Martha Jean, 52, 65 Carlson, Robert, 25, 66, 70 Carlson, Carmod Y, XVillard, 52, 70 John, 52 Carrico, Frank, 20, 25 Carusi, Dick, 41, 66, 70, 102 Cation, Bob, 52 Barker. Barlow Barnes, Barnes , Barrow Lloyd M., 52 Ada, 52 Dale E., 52 Lois, 23, 64 John D.. 40, 66, 72 Barton, Forrest E., 23, 66, 82 Baughman, Meredith, 52 Baughman, Vesper, 52, 64 Bayless, Dorothy, 40, 65, 78 Bayless, Harold, 23, 71, 96 Bearlles, Robert, 23 Beaird, Ethel Marie, 23, 64, 69 Britt, Ralph, 24, 66, 70 Bromberger, Robert, 24, 62 90, 91, 94 Brooking, Mr. Thomas, 16 Brown, Brown Brown Brown Evelyn, 52, 64 Gordon, 24, 66, 98 81 Harry, 66, James P., 52 , 66, 71, Brown James D., 41, 84, 85 Brown La Verne, 41, Brown Margaret, 41, 65, 69 Catron, Florence, 41, 64, 79 Cederberg, Virgieline, 25, 64, 79 Cederoth, Georgene, 52, 64. 77 Chandler, Betty J., 41, 64, 69, 86 Chandler, Mr. Robert, 14 Chapman, Jack. 41, 66, 70 Chase, Floy, 25, 65, 78 Chatterton, Margaret, 53, 64 Cherrington, lsal, 53, 65, 78 Cills, Carroll, 20, 25, 63, 64, 78 Clark, Virginia, 53, 65 Clary, Margaret, 41, 83 Clendenin, Edward, 20, 25, 66, 76, 92, 94 Cline, John, 53 Cline, Mary Alice, 41, 65, 73 Coatney, Robert, 25, 66, 70, 98 Cobb, Alvin, 25, 66 Cochran, Ruby, 53, 65 Coe, Max, 41, 96 Coe, Robert, 41, 66, 98 Cole, Betty Leone, 53, 65 Cole, Evelyn, 41, 79 Cole, Jane Maxine, 25, 65, 80 Collier, Marian, 41, 65, 74 I 'Y 4 c E Q Q Y 4 5 M B .Z A ,v 5 qv Y Q 5 5 je 5 R ? Q 5 f 5 ? I Qi A z 5 Q E 5 z 2 S 14 2 2 2 2 5 r Y 4? 6 Y Q A M Zmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmk fizoj 5 84, ' 1 SMMMMMMMMMMMMMMWMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMg 6 ll-i'OR'YOlUR JNFURMATHU 'Q Z P ' Colville, Edith, ss, is gg Conlon, Melvin Roy, 53 Q Cook, Kenneth, 66. 75, 96 Cook, Lois, 20, 25, 62, 64, 78, 93 gl Cooper, Mary Frances, 41. 64, 73, 92 Corbin, NVilliam L., 41, 66, 85 Ep Coughlin, George, 41, 66, 96 Courtright, Grace Lilly, 42, 64, 84 Y, Cox, Eugene F., 53 Z Cox, Miss Margaret, 15 Coziahr, Elaine, 42. 64, 83 4, Crabtree, Martha Jean, 20, 26, 62, 64, 80, 92 Ev Craft, Anne, 42, 65, 73 ' Craig, Daryl, 53,- 70 49 Craig, Maxine, 53, 65 Cramer, Marian, 20, 26, 65, 73, 86, 89 W Crhiiaeii, Dwight, 53, 72 W Crawford, Mr. Harry, 15 7 Cratty, Jane, 53, 65 Creighton, Rosemary, 26, 64, 69 S grozienl-James, 42, 66, 70 ulver. elyn, 26, 64, 77, 93 fi Cunningham, Faye. 26, 64. 79 D Cunningham, Marilyn, 53, 78 E. gunlnlnghqagi, XX aygge, 623 96 ur ess, omas, , , 71, 2 Cushman, Alberta, 53, 65 7, Cypreanson, Miss Clara, 16 gahlstrom. Florence, 20, 42, 73, 90,94 aton, ilary, 26, 64, 79 Damberg, Mr. Roy, 16, 62, 63, 70 S, Damitz, Doris, 42 4 Danforth, Ada. 26, 65, 83 S Danforth, Joseph, 53 4 Danner, Sarah, 53, 64 Darnell, Rosetta, 26, 64, 80 Darrah, Duane, 42, 82 5 Davies, Robert, 66 W Davies, NVillard Rolland, 53 V Davis, Genevieve 20, 26, 63, 65, 68 5 Davis, Jean, 53, 65 Ilgavis, John, 53, 71 avis, Margaret, 53, 64, 77 4 Dawson, Gale, 26. 83 b Dawson, Lowell, 53, 85 4 Derby, Dorothy. 42 Q Diaz, Ruth, 26, 64, 79 Z' giclkinson, Jieanne, 452, 63, 64, 78 ss ic '1nson, I aurice -., 53 bb Dlefendorf, Robert, 53 S BiPrimaI3 Agatha, 53, as 3, ixon, etty, 42. 64, 83 4 Dixon, Dorothy, 53, 65 4, Dolimsek, Julius, 66 Z Doran, Margaret, 26 tg, Doran, Ruth, 42, 64 Q Dowell, Frances, 42, 64 Downie, XYilliam, 42, 66, 84 AP Doyle. Jimmie, 53, 66 Driscoll, Carolyn, 26, 63, 65, 69 Duerre, Delores, 42, 64, 80 A Duerre, Janet, 53, 65 Duerre, Stanley, 26, 66, 75 Dugan, Betty, 42, 64 S. Ilguke, Miss Marian, 16 pi ulaney, Bob, 53, 11, 84 Duncan, Lena Mae, 53, 64 Dunlap, Dorothy, 42, 65, 86 1 Durbin, Irene, 53, 65 5 Dutch. Henry S., 53 Duvall, Ruth, 53, 64 'r 4 Eaker, Beulah, 53 QQ Eccher, Betty Lea, 42, 69 Z' Ecklund, Beverly June, 42, 65, 85 S Egan, Miss Grace, 16 4' Ekstfom, John, 66, 75 Elliott, Harriett, 53, 65 Elphick, Jeanette, 53, 64, 84, 89 Elphick, Lisa, 42, 64 ' Emery, Fred, 26, 66, 70 V Enes, Julia, 26, 65, 83 Ensley, Dorothy, 42, 64 Ensley, Madalyne, 53, 64 Eppsteiner, Margaret, 42, 64, 77 Erickson, Arlyne, 42 Erickson, Carl, 82 Erickson, Marian, 42, 64, 77 Erickson, Muriel, 53 Erlandson, Elfreda, 26, 64, 79 Evans, Raymond, 53, 100 Evans, Robert, 53, 76, 100, 102 Ewalt, Richard, 53 Eyre, Robert, 27, 66. 72 Fairbairn, Robert, 20, 42, 66, 72, 86 Farquer, Garvin, 66 Fassett, Robert, 53 Felt, XValter, 27 Fey, Edwin, 27, 66 Field, Clella, 27, 64, 68 Fields, Mable, 53, 65 Findahl, XVayne, 27, 66, 70 Finley, Dorothy, 42. 64, 79 Firoved, Robert, 53 Firoved, VVilma, 27, 64, 73 Fitzsimmons, Robert, 53, 100 Fleharty, Mary Louise, 53, 65, 73 Flickinger, Barbara Carrol, 42, 65, 74 Flickinger, Charles, 27, 66, 70 Flinn, Helen, 27, 64, 69 Florer, Dale, 27, 62, 66, 70, 98 Foertsch. June, 53, 64 Fones, Darlene, 42, 64, 74 Foote, Russell, 53 Foreman, Delores, 53, 64 Forstrom, Charles, 42, 66, 81 Forsythe, James, 42, 66, 75 Foster. Betty Ann, 42, 64, 77 Fox, Bettie, 64 Foye, Helen, 27, 79 Frankeberger, Eugene, 20, 27, 84, 93 Frankenburger, Mary Jean, 20, 27, 62, 64, 67. 73, 86, 89, 91, 94 Franz, Mary, 27, 65, 69 Freda, Thornton, 20, 27, 66, 67, 72, 86, 91, 93, 96 Fredrickson, Marjean. 54, 64 Freed, Aaron, 54, 76 Freed, Phillip, 20. 27, 66 Freeman, Mr. Ross. 17 Freese, Kenneth. 20, 27, 63, 66, 71 Freese, Phyllis, 42, 64, 78 Frickey, Lorayne, 27, 62, 64, 69 Friedman, Maurine, 54 Friend, Drusilla, 42 Fritz, Edward, 27, 66, 72, 92, 93 Frymire, Janet, 54, 65, 78 Fulton, Forrest. 28, 66, 102 Fundenberger, Robert, 54, 76 Gabrielson, Phyllis, 54, 78 Gale, Mrs. Irma. 17, 80 Gallaway, Robert. 54 Gannon, Irene, 54, 64 Gannon, Kathren, 43, 83 Gannon, Maxine, 54, 65 Gans, Juanita, 43, 69 Gardner, Gerald, 43, 66, 72 Gardner, Harold, 43, 66, 72 Garman, LaVerne, 66, 82 Garman, XVallace, 54 Garst, Mr. Harry, 17, 71 Garver, Dale, 54, 88 Gattermier, John, 54 Gattermeir, Robert, 28, 66 Gayman, Arthur, 54 Gianakis, Sophie, 54 Gibbs, Margaret. 43, 65, 77 Giliford, Guinever, 54 Gillespie. Mr. John, 17, 102 Gladfelter, Kenneth, 43, 66, 81 Glasco, Joe, 66, 75 Glasnovich, Anthony, 43, 63, 75 Glasnovich, John, 54 Glass, Cynthia, 43, 65, 73 Glass. Mack. 43, 66 Goedeke, Orville, 43, 66, 81 Goehrig, Charlotte, 43, 64 Goodman, Stanley, 43, 66, 81 Goodwin, Mr. VN-'illiam, 16, 72 Gordon, Jean, 20, 43. 63, 64, 73, 84, 88 Gottrick, Eleanor, 28, 64, 80 Greenup, Maxine, 64, 79 C, iregory, Lillian, 54 Grider, Paul, 43, 81 Griffith, Donald, 54. 100 Grimes, Leola, 54, 65 Grogan, James, 43, 66 Grogan, Roberta, 43, 64 Guenther, Dayzie, 54, 65 Guenther, Harold, 20, 28, 62, 66, 72, 85, 98, 102 84, Guenther, Lawrence Elmer, 54 Guenther, Maryann, 54, 64 Guenther, Robert, 43, 66, 81 Gustafson, Leone, 43, 64, 77 Gustafson, Marjorie, 20, 28, 63, 64, 68, 88 Gustafson, Stanley, 43, 66, 85 Guthrie, Charles, 28, 62, 66, 76, 94 Hadden, Louise, 54, 64, 69 Hadden, Rosemary, 43, 64, 69, 88 Hagerstroln, Ray. 28, 66, 70 Haggenjos, Miss Carolyn, 19 Haggenjos, Riley, 66, 82, 96 Haines, Russell, 54, 71 Hale, Robert, 28, 66, 70 Hall, XVilla Bell, 43, 64 Hallas. Helen, 28, 65, 69 Hamblin, Dorena, 28, 64, 79 Hamilton, Colletta, 54. 64 Hamilton, XYilliam, 54, 72, 92 Hampton, Barbara, 43, 64, 77 Hand, James, 43 Hand, LeRoy, 28, 66, 82, 85, 96 Hanlin, Carl, 54 Hanlin, Imogene, 54 Hanlon, Jack, 43, 66, 72 Hanna, XVillia1n, 43, 66 Hannam, Pauline, 28. 64, 68 Hardine, Russell, 28, 63, 66, 72 Harlan, Jud, 28, 62, 66, 72, 90, 92 Harman, Marilyn. 54, 65 Harmon, Alice Marie, 20, 28. 77, 119 Harnest, James, 43, 63, 66, 72 Haroldson, Robert, 43, 96, 102 Harris, Ruth, 43, 64, 77, 89 Harshbarger Harshbarger, Harshbarger, , Alice, 43, 64, 80 Jean, 28. 64, 79, 84 June, 54, 65, 75, 84, 85 Harshbarger, Mr. Royal, 17 Harshbarger, XVayne, 28, 66, 71 Hartley, Clayton. 54, 7.2, S5 Harvell, Charles, 54 Harvey, Marilynn. 54, 64, 83 65 ll 84 Hast, Betty, 43, 5, 77, Hatfield, Bernadine, 28, ,85 Ss Hawkinson, Dorothy, 54. 64 Hawthorne, Stanley, 43, 66, 85 Hawthorne, Stewart, 43. 66, 85 Hazen, Mary, 29, 64, 73 Hazlett, Jean, 54. 65 Healey, Marcile, 54, 65 Heimel, Charles, 29, 70 Heller, Clifford, 20, 29, 62, 71, 90, 92, 94. 102 Hendricks, Carl, 29, 44, 66, 82 Hendricks, Claude. 44 Hendrix, Shirley, 29, 64 Henning. Hazel. 54, 65, 78. 86 Hermetet, Marilyn, 54, 65 Herndon, Leon, 44, 66 Hertenstein, Phyllis, 54, Heule, XVendel. 54. 71 64 Hibbard, Imogene, 54, 64, 78 E L E 1 E E I 'L E E E a E E 1 E E ,V E 15 Q V 'lf 5 v Q E E E E E E E 5 E E E E E z -.- ,, ,,,,, Q ,,, ,,, ---gg 71764711m7K7iX'7iV7W7K7K7K7N7N7N7N7KYKWVNVKYNVANYNYNVAWKVVAYYAWKWVKYNVAWN img Shirley, 45, 64, 69 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 E 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 m!n!n!n!n!n!4a!n!n!n!n!n!n!n!n!n!n!n!a i!n!n!4 Ala A!n!n!n!n!n!n!n!n!a AM T1-1113 HNDEX 11101E,NT11F11ES Hickman, Eloise, 54, 64, 78, 86 Hicks. John Phillips, 54, 100 Hicks, Joyce, 54, 65 Highlander. John, 20, 39, 62, 66, 72, 89, 93, 94, 98 Hilker, Miss Jeannette, 17, 78 Hinchliff, Joan, 20, 44, 63, 65, 73, 86, 91 Hinchliff. Mr. Ray, 14 Hinchman. Mr. C. L., 14 Hitchen. Anne, 44, 64 Hitchen, Frances, 54, 77 Hix, Alvin XVilbur, 54 Hodson, Arlene, 44, 64. 83. 84 Hoffstatter, Robert, 66. 82 Hogan, Hershel, 29, 66 Hohl, Doris, 54. 64 Holcomb, Richard, 54 Hollaway. Robert, 29, 66 Holmes, Richard, 44, 66, 81, 84, 85 Holst, Jack, 44, 66, 71, 84, 85 Hoots, Nellie, 29, 64, 79 Horn, Kenneth, 54, 71, 100, 102 Horton. Lois, 54, 78 Horton. lYinona, 29, 64, 83 Hotchkiss, Morton, 55, 72. 94 Houchens, Jack, 55, 89 Houlihan, Robert, 55 Howe, Mack, 44 Hubbard. Clyde, 29, 66 Hudgel, Kathleen, 44, 64, 74 Hughes. Lloyd, 44, 66, 75, 102 Hunt, Bessie, 41, 65, 80 Hunt, Bob. 66, 71. 85 Hunt, Ruth, 55 Hurbul, James, 44, 66 Hurlbut, Carol, 44, 64, 79 Husted, Miss Betty, 19 Hvarven, VVilliam, 55, 66, 75 Imel, Barbara, 29, 65, 83 Ingles, Pauline, 55, 65, 68, 84, 86, 88 Ingles, XVilliam, 55. 100 Ingram. Robert, 29, 66, 76 Irons, Stanley, 55 Irvine. Miss Ellen, 17, 83 Jackson, Fred, 29, 66, 85 Jacobs, Donald, 44 Jacobson, Dorothy. 55. 73 Janes, Helen, 44. 64, 80 Jennings. Elizabeth, 55, 65, 73, 84 Jensen, Dorothy, 55, 64 Jewell, Anna Loise, 44, 83 Johansen, Ray, 55 John, Florence, 29, 64, 79 Johnson Barbara Jean. 55 64 Johnson Mary, 55 Johnson, Miss Milfired, 17 Johnson, Mr. Paul, 17, 82 Johnson, Paul, 44, 66 Johnson, Pearl, 30, 64, 67, 68, 69, 84 85, 86, 94 Johnson Phyllis, 44, 64, 77 Johnson, Robert, 55, 71, 76 Johnson Robert C., 30, 66 Johnson, Robert L., 30, 66 Johnson, Robert V., 30, 66, 70 Johnson, Sam, 55 Johnson, Samuel, 30, 66, 81 Johnson, Shirley, 44, 65, 69 Johnson, Sumner, 30 Johnson Thelma, 44, 64, 74 Johnson Violet, 55, 65 , Johnson, Wayne, 44, 66, 76 Jones, Elbert, 20, 30, 66, 70, 102 Jones, Elmer, 20, 30, 66 Jones, Marguerite, 30, 64, 79 Jones, Muriel, 55, 65, 78 Joneson, Lloyd, 45, 66 Jordan, Shirley, 30, 64, 69 Josefson, Eugene, 30, 66 Josephson, Max, 45, 66, 70, 104 Josephson, Vwfalter, 55 Jurjevich, Kathryn, 45, 64 Kahler, Maxine, 45, 64, 80 Kanan, Rosalyn, 45, 65, 73 Keefer, Sheridan, 45, 66, 71 Kelly, Eleanor, 45 Kelly, John, 30, 66 Kelly, Russel, 30 Kemp, George, 31, 66, 76, 84, 85 Kemp, Robert, 45, 66, 76, 85, 98, 100 Kendrick, Glenn, 55 Kennedy, Irene, 55, 65 Kennedy, Lowell, 55, 100 Kenney, George. 55 Kenny, Chauncey, 45, 66, 70, 84 Kidder, Lowell, 55 Kimpton, Marjorie, 55, 64, 68 Kite, Richard, 45, 66, 76 Kjellander, Gertrude, 55, 64, 69 Klapp, Virginia, 55, 65 Klein, Dorothy, 45. 65, 69, 91 Kling, Geraldine, 55, 65, 89 Klott, Violet, 45, 79 Koffer, Barbara Jean, 20, 45, 64, 73, Knauss, Jimmie, 55 Johnson 3 Y , Barbara Louise, 55, 65, 69 Johnson Bernyce, 44, 77 Johnson Clarence, 44, 66 Johnson Corrine, 29, 74 Johnson Delbert, 66 Johnson Donald E., 44 Johnson Donald, 44, 66 Johnson Dorothy, 55, 65, 69 Johnson Eric, 44, 66, 85, 86, 96, 98 102 Johnson Erlyne, 44 Johnson Evelyn, 29, 64 Johnson, Florence, 55 Johnson Johnson Johnson Johnson Frank, 44, 75 Frederick, 55 Gerthrude, 20, 29, 64, 77 Harry, 30, 81 Johnson Ilah Mae, 44, 65 Johnson Iva, 55 Johnson, Joan, 55, 65 Johnson, Kathryn, 30, 65, 74 Johnson Lois, 44, 64, 77 Johnson Marcel, 30, 66, 70 Johnson, Margaret E,, 30, 64, 69, 93 Johnson Marian, 20, 30, 79 Johnson Marjorie, 44, 68 Johnson Martha, 43 Koons, Maribelle, 45, 64, 69 Koons, Marjorie, 31, 65, 68 Krahn, Lucile, 31, 64 Kramm, Hartzell, 45 Kramm, Maurine, 55 Kussmann, Helen, 20, 31, 64, 68 Lacky, Dale, 31, 66, 76 Lagergren, Mr. C. J., 14 Lamb, Miss Flora, 17, 79 Lamb, Lilly Mae, 31, 64, 74 86 Levinson, 1Villiam, 20, 31, 62, 66, 76 86 Lewis, Barbara, 31, 69, 93 Lewis, Mary Louise, 45, 65, 77, 84 Lewis, Robert, 55 Lieber, Dorothy, 55, 64, 77 Ligman, Paul, 55, 100 Lind, Curtis, 31, 66, 75 Lindbloom, Constance, 31, 64, 77 Lindstrom, Barbara, 45, 64, 73 Linrothe, Donna Mae, 45, 65, 73 Lipes, Gladys, 80 Lipsky, Charles, 31, 62, 66, 75 Little, Louise, 45, 63, 64, 73, 88, 120 Lofgren, Mr. George, 14 Logsdon, Marie, 65 Lohmar, Diana, 55 Lohmar, Robert. 56 Long, Eldon, 45, 66, 100 J Long, James, 45 Lowry, Ruth, -45, 64, 69, 84, 85 Lozier, Ruth, 31, 62, 64, 68 Lundeen, Dorothy, 32, 65, 68, 90 Lundeen, Frederick, 20, 32, 66, 67, 76 86, 96, 98 Lundeen Jack, 56 Lundeen, Jane, 56, 65, 69 Lundeen, John, 32, 66, 82 Lundeen, Robert, 56, 76, 86, 100 Lundeen, 9 Landon, Ned, 20, 45, 63, 66, 72, 85, 86 87, 88 Landon, Mr. Roy, 17 Lane, Dorothy, 45, 64 Lannholm, David, 55 Lannholm, John, 31, 66, 81 Lantz, Mr. Edwin, 18 Larson, Elsie, 45, 64, 83 Larson, Jack Edward, 43, 45, 75 Larson, Jack Leonard, 55, 66, 71 Larson, Martin, 31 Lashbrook, Vaughn, 55, 72 Law, Kenneth, 31, 66, 75, 85 Lawrence, Jack, 55, 72, 91 Lawrence, Ruby, 31, 64, 78 Leighton, Ethel, 31, 65, 74 Leighty, Robert, 92 Leonard, Earl, 45, 66, 81 Lersch, Marjorie, 55, 65, 78, 88 Lester, Clarence, 45, 66, 72, 86, 102 Levenberg, Ralph, 31, 75 Levinson, Curtis, 45, 66, 82 Lundquist, Orabelle, 32, 64, 69, 92 Lutes, Robert, 56 Luvall, Ruth, 32, 65, 80 Lynch, Patricia, 32, 64, 78 Lyons, Shirley, 56, 65 McAu1ey, Frances, 56 McCarthy, Geraldine, 32, 64, 74 McCarthy, Jessie, 56, 65 McClelland, Robert, 56, 63, 88, 89 McClure, Erma, 64, 68 McClure, Joan, 20, 32, 56, 65, 68, 86 McCollum, Bill, 32 McCombs, Virginia, 32, 64, 80 McCullough, Eugene, 45, 66, 71, 85 McGaughy, Bert, 32, 66, 82 McGill, Earl. 56, 85 .McGraw, Margaret M., 32 McKamy, Donald, 32, 66, 76, 84, 85 McKee, James, 32, 62, 66, 72, 100 McLain, Gordon, 45, 66, 70, 76, 84, 86 88, 89 McLain, Marjorie, 32, 65, 73 McLain, Richard, 46, 66 McLaughlin, Donald, 46, 66, 70 McLaughlin, Edna Mzie, 56, 64, 68 McMaster, James, 46 McMillion, Leonard, 46, 66, 82 McNeil, June, 56 McNeil, hlabel, 32, 64 McVay, Harriett, 32, 64, 69 Magnuson, Dorothy, 46, 64 Mallery, Dorothea Lee, 46, 64, 77 Malm, Billy, 56 Malm, XValter, 32 Malmrose, Lois, 56, 65 Mandel, Bernice, 56, 65 Manley, Ruth, 46, 65, 80, 84 Marshall, Doris, 46, 78 Marshall, Jeanne, 33, 64, 68 Martz, John, 56 Marvin, Bob, 66, 100 Mason, Kenneth, 33, 66, 70 Mason, Lloyd, 56, 71, 76, 100, 102 Mathewson, Robert, 33, 66, 71 Mattocks, Helen. 33, 77 Maxwell, LaVerne, 33, 66, 71 Mead, Franklin, 33, 75 Mead, George, 33, 66, 82, 84, 85 Meadows, E'nid. 33, 64, 73 Meadows, Ralph, 46 Megginson, Corrine, 56, 65, 77 Mejia, Avelina, 56, 65 E N e e Q V 15 N V 'R E V 'R E E E E Q E I 'E is E 5 E w E E E 5 5 Q E E E 5 E 5 5 E E 5 5 2mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmn fizzj Rogers, X. 5 T'- N 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 P D a AP 5 5 5 5. ii 5 an 5 5 5 5 5 n 5 5 5 Av D 5 5 5 5 Y i!n!n!nm!n!n!n!o!a!n!4itntntntnmtaA!n!n!n!n!Ai!n!o!n!n!n!n!n!n!n!4 AN W1EllA'lF'8 11N AME? Melin, Howard, 56 Mercer, Jack, 33, 66, 85. 88 Merrick, Doris, 56 Merrick, Maxine. 56 Merrill, Dorothy, 33, 65, 68 Metz, Carolyn. 46, 64 Meyer, George, 33. 66, 70 Miles, Theodore, -16, 66, 82, 84, 85 Miller, Dorothy, 56 lliller, Earl, 56, 76, 86, 100, 102 Miller, Fern, 33, 64, 84, 86 Miller, Harry, 46, 66 Miller, Rupert, 20, S8 Miller, Ruth. 56, 64, 68 Mills, Marna Jeanne, 33, 65, 68, 84 Mills, Ralph, 46, 66, 76 Milroy, Lois, 44, 56, 65, 77 Miner, Patty. 33, 62. 64. 69 Minnick, Martin, 56 Mitchell, Bud, 56, 102 Mitche Mitche ll, Dorcas, 46 ll, Howard, 56, S6 Moffit, Miss Helen, 18 Moon, Ida Marie, 56, 65. 84, 86 Moon, Lyman, 46, 66, 70 Moore, Bill, 46, 66, 72 Moore, Cora, 20, 46, 63, 64, 73 Moran Doroth' 33 64, 74 .1 3. . Moreland, Armor, 56 Morris, Morris, Morris Betty Eileen, 56 Betty Eleanor, 56. 65. 84 , Lester, 33, 66 Morrison. Bernard, 46, 66, 82 Morrison. Elizabeth, 33, 65. 68 Morrison, Martha, 56, 64 Nordheilm, Berndt, 47, 66, 71 Norquist, Betty, 47, 65, 77 Norquist, Helen, 35, 64, 77 Northrup, Jack, 45, 57 Norstrom, Gladys, 47, 64, 77 Norton, Stanley, 57 Nyman, Fred, 47. 66, 72 Nystrom, Mr. Alfred M., 14 Nystrom, Jane, 47 Oberling, Lois, 47, 64, 68 O'Brien, Kathryn, 57, 65, 69 O'Connor, Mrs. Louise. 14 Ohlsson, Gunnard, 66, 81 Olsen, Forrest, 57, Olson, Bernice, 47, Olson, l Olson, 100, 102 64. 78 Dwight, 47, 66. 71 Francis, 57, 72, 100 Olson, Ttliss Helen, 18 Olson, John, 66 Olson, Richard, 57 Osborne, Muriel, 35. 64, 78 Ostron, Percy, 47, 66, 82 Owens, Kathleen, 35, 64 Rabenort, Bert, 57 Rafferty, XYillizim, 66, li Randell, Arelene, 57, 65, 77 Randell, Cecil, 36, 66, 81 Randell, Margaret, 36, 64, 77 Rasmussen, Myrle, 36, 64, 68. 88 Rasmussen, Paul, 57 Reagor, Robert, 36, 66, 75, 96 Reamer, Maurice, 57 Reem, Dorothy, 47, 65, 79 Reeves, Arlene, 47 Reeves, LeClare, 47 Rehn, Betty Mae, 57. 64 Reimer, Betty, 48, 64 Reinhold. Robert, 48, 81 Reno, Hugh, 48, 66, 70 Renow. Doris, 48, 65, 86 Reser, Homer, 48. 66 Revis, Charles, 36 Revis, John, 57 Reynolds, Alice, 48, 74 Reynolds, Ralph, 57 Rhykerd, Harriett. 57, 65 - Owens, Lawrence, 57, 70, 102 Page, Leland, 35, 66, 71, 85 Palmrose, Carl, 57 Parkinson, Dean, 47, 66, 76, 85 Parkinson, Merrill, 57, 76 Parkinson, Robert, 35, 47, 66, 76, 84, 85 Parks, Barbara, 47, 65, 73 Parks, Miriam, 20, 35, 62, 64, 67, 73 Parmenter, Allen, 57, 70 Parmenter, Harry, 35, 66, 70. 102 Parnell, Evelyn, 20, 47, 64, 68 Rich, Mrs. Lucy, 18, 74 Rickords, Robert, 57 Riley, Edward, 36, 76, 85 Riley, Fern, 48, 65, 74, 84 Riley, Vaughn, 48, 66, 81 Ritchie, Billy, 57 Ritter. Francis, 48 Ritter, VYanda, 48, 65 Roberts, Ralph, 36, 66, 70 Rodenhouser, Cleo Mae, 48 Rodgers, Ila, 57 Patricia, 48, 65 Morrissey. Dewitt. 46, 66, 82 Morss, Kenneth, 56 Mory, Charles, 33, 66 Moser. Floyd, 34, 66. 75 Moser. Miss Frances 18, 69 Mower, Robert, 34, 62, 66, 92, 93 Mudd, Kenneth, 46, 66, 76 Mundy, Gordon, 34, 66 Parrish, Parsons, James, 57 Phyllis, 57, 65, 73 Patterson, Juanita, 35, 64, 80 Payne, Edith, 47, 65, S3 Peabody, Phyllis, 47. 65, 74 Pearson, Roy, 35, 66, 71 Pearson, Virginia, 57, 64 Mundy, Munson Mureen, XYilliam, 34. 66, 75 , Leo. 46, 66, 76, 85, 100 Mr. E. XY., 14 Mureen. Marian, 46, 64, 68 Mureen. Virginia, 46, 65, 73 Mustain. Rolland, 46, 66, S2 Myer, Robert, 46, 66 Myers. Betty, 34, 65, 69 Myers, David, 34, 65, 72 Myers, Delwyn, 56 Myers, Marvin, 56, 100 Neeld, Sheldon, 34 Neilson. Eleanor, 34, 62, 64, 68 Nelson, Adria, 34. 64. 69 Nelson, Dale E., 62, 66, 67, 71 Nelson Nelson , Dale H., 34, 56 , Edsel, 46, 66, 71 Nelson. Gene, 56 Nelson, Harriet, 46, 64, 83 Nelson, Jean, 34, 64, 68 Nelson, Jess, 34, 66, 70 Nelson Nelson Nelson . June, 46. 65, 78 . Katherine, 46, 64, 78 . Lloyd, 20, 34, 66, 76, 96 Nelson, Marjorie, 56, 65, 77 Nelson. Mary, 56 Nelson, Melvin, 56, 76 Nelson, Richard A., 34, 56 Nelson Nelson Nelson Nelson , Richard L., 66, 70 , Robert, 56 , Roland, 34, 66, 71. 91 Rosalee 46 64 119 Nemeni, Lillian., 34,' ss ' Nesbit. Grace, 46, 64, 73 Newcomer, Vlfilbert, 34, 66, 76 Nicholson. Betty Lee, 46, 78 Nickel. Miss Edna, 18. 63 Norburg, Louise, 57, 65 Norburg, Maxine, 34, 65, 68 Pearson, XVillard, 47, 66, 71 Peart, Mr. Ray, 18 Pease, Verna, 47, 63, 78 Peck, Robert, 57, 72, 100, 102 Peck, XN'illiam, 57, 70 Pendergast, Robert, 47, 66, 70 Perardi, Miss Tressie, 19 Perez, Helena, 35, 64, 80 Perschni Perschni ck, Bernadine, 35, 47, 79 ck, Helen. 57. 78 Peters, Dorothy, 35, 65 Peterson, Esther, 35, 65, 77 Peterson. June, 47, 64 Peterson, Louise, 35 Peterson, Lucille, 35, 64, 77 Peterson Peterson Peterson Peterson. , Marc, 35, 66, 76 , Russell, 57 , Theodore, 57, 70 Vincent, 20, 47. 66, 72, 85, 88, 89, 91, 94 Pettifurd, Sam, 35, 102 Phillips, Mr. Gerald, 18 Pihl, Ted, 35, 62, 66, 72, 102 Poe, Donald, 47 Poole, Betty. 47, 64, 79 Betty, 47, 119 Edwin, 35, 66, 82 Pople, Porter, Porter, Howard, Jr., 35, 66, 76 ean Lorena. 57, 65, 73 Porter, J Powell, Audrey, 47 Preston, Marjorie, 57, 65 Puckett, Dorothy, 47 Pumfrey, Clifford, 36, 66, 82 Pumfrey, Eleanor, 47, 64, 74 Pumfrcy, Herbert, 57 Quarterman. Clyde, 36. 81 Quarterman. Norma, 47, 74 Quick, Catherine, 57, 65, 68 Raaen, Kermit, 36, 66, 98 Raaen, Ralph, 48, 66 Rollins, Margaret, 57, 64 Root, Dale, '57 Rose, Jeanette, 36, 65, 73 Rosine, Mary, 36, 65, 80 Ross, Shirlyn, 57, 64, 73 Rowen, Jack, 57. 71 Ruth, Charles, 57, 72, 92 Ruth. Richard, 48, 66, 72 Ruther, Lucille, 36, 64, 79 Ryan, Doris, 57. 78 Ryberg, Dick, 48, 66. 70 Ryin, Miss Sylvia, 18, 68 Sackey, Gene, 57 Samuelson, Pauline, 64 Sand, Darrel. 57, 76 Sandall, Albert Frederick, 57 Sandberg, Russell, 66 Sandberg, Virgil. 36, 63, 66, 81 Sands, Robert, 36, 66, 76, 98 Sanford, Doris, 57, 65, 69, S6 Sargeant, Jessie, 36, 64. 69 Sargeant. Lloyd, 48, 66. 75 Sarver, Dale, 48, 66, 76, 98 Saul, Lowena, 57, 65 Saum, Mary Jane, 20, 48, 62, 64, 68 Sauter, Marian, 48, 64, 69 Saville, Joyce, 58, 65 Scannell, Harry, 66 Schlaf, John, 58 Schmidt, Mary, 58, 62, 65, 73 Schneider, Eugene. 58, 85 Scholes, Roy Harold, 48, 66. 82 Bettye. 48, 65, 78 Schultz. Schurtz. Jack. 48, 66 Ruth, 48, 64, S3, 85 Scneder. Scott, Jean, 36, 64. 67, 73 Scott, Marjorie, 58, 65 Scott, Mary, 48, 65, 69 Scott, Rosemary, 58. 65 Seaburg, Patricia, 58 Searl. Islea. 48, 65. 83 Searles, Orlie, 48 Secrest, Bob. 58, 72 Secrest, Harold, 20, 48, 63, 66, 72, 88. 92, 94 ' Seiberlich, Janet. 36, 64 Seifert, Edward. 49, 66. 72. 85, 98 9 Q 5 E E E E E E E E E E 5 5 5 E 5 E E E E 5 5 E 5 E E E E E Q 5 E E 5 E E E E E E E 5mmmmmwmmmmmmmmWWWWWWWWWWWmmmmmmmx fizsj ss Z' Snapp W Q K Q qv z 1 AD W W 4 Q E 8 w 5 dl 5 E' W 5 1 E x Av r 5 5 5 if 3 5 Q w 5 5 4 w Q 4 D 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 amMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmz AlLASl THE END MU Seiler, Mr. Frank, 18 Selander, Janice, 36, 65 Selk, Grace, 49, 64, 74 Sellers, George, 100 Sells, Clark, 49, 66, 72 Serio, Cully, 50 Severns, Jimmie, 49 Shafman, Henry, 49, 66, 75 Shafman, Myrtle, 58, 65 Shannon, Josephine, 58, 65 Sharp, Ralph, 49, 66, 72, 85, 102 Sharp, Roy, 49, 66, 72 Shaw, Benjamin, 49, 66, 81 Shaw, Bernard, 37, 66, 81 Shaw, Robert, 37, 66, 81 Shay, Eileen, 58, 65 Shealey, Dale, 66. 82 Sheldon, Mrs. Florence, 18 Shelton, XVilliam, 58 Sherman, Elizabeth, 49, 65, 68 Sherwood, Claire Ellen, 58, 65, 78 Showers, Glenn, 58 Showers, Marjorie, 37, 65, 69 Simmons, June, 37, 64, 83 Simons, Richard, 37 Sims, Forrest, 58 Sims, Paul, 37, 66, 71 Slaven, Mr. Prince, 18, 75 Smith, Bernard, 37, 49 Smith, Smith, Smith, Mr. Charles, 19 Helen, 37, 64 Jean, 49, 79 Smith, Marian Frances, 49, 64 Smith, Marian Virginia, 58 Smith, Paul, 49, 66 Smitts, Robert, 49, 59 XVilliam 49 66 Swanson Swanson , Betty, 58, 65 , Delores, 58, 64, 77 Swanson, Doris, 58 Swanson, Lois, 50, 79 Swanson, Margaret, 58, 65, 73 Swanson, Mr. Martin, 19 Swanson, Robert, 50, 66 Swanson, Robert, 50 Swedlund, Lawrence, 66, 82 Swinton, Mr. Wayne, 19, 81 ST CUME Ward, Victor, 59 VVarner, NVanda, 59, 64 Warren, James, 59 Wasson, Helen, 59 VVasson, Katheryn, 59, 65 VVatson, Jeanette, 39 Watson, Wfatson, Mary Martha, 59, 65, Watson, Mildred, 51, 79 Watters, Ilah, 39, 64, 77 Leroy Edwin, 59, 71, 102 73 Swise, Russell, 20, 38, 66, 67, 76, 86, 98, 102, 106 Tabbone, Jennie, 50, 65, 74 Tabbone, Mike, 50, 58 Tabbone, Nick, 58 Taber, Beth, 50, 64, 77 Talbert, Mary, 58 Tapper, Raymond, 50, 66, 75 Tate, Betty J., ss, 65, 84- Tate, Frank, 38, 66, 85 Taylor, Herschel, 38, 66 Tederman, Rosemary, 58, 65 Terpening, Lyle, 58 Terry, Miss Grace, 19 Theobald, Philip, 50, 66 Thierry, Thomas, ROy, 58, 100, 102 Charles, 50, 66, 70, 100 VVay, Doris, 59 NVeaver, Harry, 59, 70 Webb, Hortense, 51, 79 VVebb, Maxwell, 59 Leo, 39, 66, 82, 96 VVebber, VVebster, Eleanor, 59, 64, 73 XVebster, Esther, 51, 64, 79 Webster, Gloria, 59 1Vebster, Joy, 59, 64, 73, 84, 88 Webster, Louise, 21, 39, 62, 64, 73, 88, 89 VVedan, Carl, 51, 66, 70 Wedan, Wilber, 59 Welsh, Robert, 59 VVendell, Raymond, 66, 75 YVest, Barbara, 20, 51, 63, 64, 68, 88 VVlest, Billy, 39, 59 VVest, Jack, 59, 100 Vlfest, WVilliam, 66, 67, 71, 76 Thomas, Margaret, 20, 38, 62, 64, 68 Thomas, Mary Jane, 38, 64 Thomas, Mildred, 50, 65, 74 Thompson, Betty, 77 , , , , 72 Snodgrass, James L., 49, 70 Snow, Clifton, 58 Somsag, Mac, 49 Somsag, Mildred, 37, 64 Soper, Jane, 58, 63, 64, 73 Tingley, Ruth, 64, 83 Tinkham, Virginia, 58, 68 Tolbert, Margaret, 50, 64, 73, 84, Tolle, James, 50, 100 Tomlinson, Delene, 38 Tonkin, Darlene, 38, 64, 78 Torley, Margaret, 58, 65 Tracy, Virginia, 50, 65, 73, 86 Traff, Virgil, 50, 66, 70, 100 Trebbe, Eugene, 50, 66, 82 Sowder, Dorothy, 49, 65, 73 Spangler, Margaret, 58, 65 Sperry, Mary, 49, 65, 78 Stackhouse, Betty, 37, 64, 79 Stambaugh, Ida Anne, 20, 37, 62, 73, 88, 90, 92, 93 Starr, VVilliam, 49, 66, 70 Stegall, Frances, 49, 64, 83 64, Stephens, Mary Jane, 37, 65, 69, 107 Stephens, Minnie, 58, 65 Stevens, Charles, 58 Stewart, Lois, 37, 64, 79, 84 Stiarwalt, Meda, 58 Stickle, Miss Ruth, 19 Stickney, Elizabeth, 20, 37, 64, 73, 91 Stiles, John, 58, 100, 102 Treffer, Brough, 50, 66, 84, 85, 100 Trout, Hurlene, 50, 66, 81, 85 Trulson, Marjorie, 50, 78 Tupper, Eloise, 20, 38, 62, 64, 67, 88, 89, 90, 92, 93 Turnbull , Jack, 50, 66, 98, 102 Turner, Lila, 50, 77 Turner, Marjorie, 58, 64, 77, 89 Turpin, Betty, 58 Turpin, Evelyn, 50, 65 Turpin, Howard, 58 Uhlmann, Howard, 38, 66, 70 Upton, Howard, 50, 66, 76, 96, 98 Vancil, Mark, 38, 66, 81 Vanell, Mary, 50, 79 Stillian, XVanda, 37 Stites, Edward, 49, 81 Stites, Elizabeth, 58, 65 Stivers, Loretta, 49, 65 Stoerzbach, Helen, 49, 64, 69 Stoffel, Alice, 58, 64, 73, ss Stoneking, Eddie, 49. 66 Stoneking, Laverne Franklin, 70 Stotts, Harold, 66, 76, 96, 102 Straub, Carol, 58, 65, 68, 84 Strawn, Rosemary, 58. 64, 73, 84 Strawn, VVanda, 20, 37, 63, 64, 67, 68, 85, 86, 94 Stringer, Kathleen, 37, 74 VanEtten, Nelson, 38, 66, 82 Van Gieson, James, 50, 66 Vitali, Louis, 20, 38, 66, 67, 98, Voight, Rosemary, 59, 65, 73 Vondelo, Vanessa June. 59 VonLangen, Herman, 20, 38, 66, 84, 85, 102 Wade, Raymond, 59 Wager, Georgetta, 59, 65 Waghcr, Dean, 50 Wagher, Richard, 51, 82 VVagner, Ida Mae, 38, 65, 74 Wainright, Harvey, 51, 66, 76 Strong, Lutnella, 58 Stroops, Clariece, 20, 58, 65 Struble, Roy, 49. 66, 85 Stuart, Mary, 20, 37, 64, 67, 73 Sullivan, Lorraine, 64, 80 Sundquist, Richard, 37, 75 Suydam, Delmar, 58, 76 Suydam, Dorothy, 49, 64, 78, 85 Swallow, Gene, 20, 38, 66, 72, 96 Swank, Charles, 49, 66 Swanson, Alice, 50, 64, 68 NValberg, Gordon, 59 Waldron, Robert, 51, 66, 76, 98 85 102 78, 102 1 76, XVhalin, Betty, 59, 65 Wheeler, Wanda, 51 Whipple, John, 39, 66, 84, 85 XVhipple, Mrs. Velma, 19 NVhite, Leonard, 20, 51, 66, 71, 88 NVhite, Mr. Melvin, 19 XVhite Robert 39 63 6 72, 87, 88, 73 7 9 7 9 6, VVhite, Miss Velma, 19, VVhiteside, Lydell, 59 Wiegert, Virginia, 59 VV'ignall, Evelyn, 59, 65 Vlfilder, Lucille, 51, 79 Wfiller, Herbert, 39, 66, 67, 71, 98 YViller, James, 51, 66, 71 NVilliams, Emma, 51, 83 VVill1ams, VVarren, 51, 66, 82 XVillis, Jearldean, 59 VVilson, Bill, 59 Wilson, Carolyn, 39, 65, 73, 119 Wilson, Earl, 59 WVi1son, Lucille, 39, 65, 77 VVilson, Theresa, 20, 51, 65, 77, 88 NVinchell, Everett, 39, 66 VVindis h, Dale, 59, 100 Windom, Caroline, 51 VVindom, Catherine, 59 XVindom, Eileen, 51, 63, 77 XVingo, Evilo, 59, 6-l VVinters, Harry, 59, 102 XVinters, Hugh, 66, 70 VVirt, Betty, 39, 62, 64, 69, 92 NVirt, John, 59, 72, 85 VVischhusen, Robert, 59, 71 VVise, Matthew, 39, 66, 81 Witherell, Joyce, 51, 64, 68, 84, 85 VVitherspo'on, Bob, 59, 70 XVitherspoon, Shirley, 51, 65 - VVolff, James, 59, 71, 100 Wong, Homer, 51. 66, 71, 85 VVood, Donald, 51 XVood, Jeanne, 51 VVoolsey, Donald, 39, 66, 72 VVoolsey, Esther, 59, 65, 73 Wallace, Donald, 59, 100 VVallace, John, 59 VVallace, Paula Lou, 38, 65, 68, 84, 85 Wallace, Richard, 51, 66 Wallick, VValters, YValters, Margaret, 51, 65 Carol, 59 Donald, 59, 70 Walters, Eugene, 38, 66, 71 VValton, James, 38, 66, 71 XV'right, LeRoy, 59 Wright, Robert, 39, 71, 84, 85 VVynn, Barbara, 20, 51, 63, 64, 73, 86, 89 Young, Barbara, 20, 39, 68, 84, 119 Young, Harold Gale, 59, 71 Young Mr. O. O. 14 Youngblood, Miss ,Alta, 19 Zeffo, Marie Angela, 51, 74- Zeldes, Sidney, 59 1 1 4 L 1 X A 3 4 L 4 K 1 4 'L Y' mfif 'A YK V' V' Y Zmmwmmmm WWR 1 f124J ' ., Y A v n av ' 1 1' , 5 r f '1-A ,2,f,: A , - , ',m. I' 'el 5 F ' ,v kv 'A s N '.1'! 5 K v Q , O 6 I -'Z k n Q,- 4, .yn l.


Suggestions in the Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) collection:

Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

1935

Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection, 1936 Edition, Page 1

1936

Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

1937

Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

1940

Galesburg High School - Reflector Yearbook (Galesburg, IL) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

1941

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.