Gainard (DD 706) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1953

Page 1 of 56

 

Gainard (DD 706) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 56 of the 1953 volume:

V 1 1 if Qf ' 4 1'f2 ' ? i 1 3 M W 3 Q l n my 4 w ww 6 veffyl N 74ff0s lf X . X Mi? Uk 0 'Liv fm . 0 Mm ' A 5 ff0r fX-,. ni? ,Of Ofevz A V. 9 E ywgf N 52 . .fa nftss , ' , 1,3 AMiCECQM cE IL"3ZIl1I12CEEHl1Tll Sea if f 1151! ff, TJ' if Q yi? AA ' ff' 5 , CRUX SE 7 .J 0 ' Mm 'IZECF fi Q gif? ff! of of xiii 9 i lf' V y.'1",m: 'riiazezp 1 W ' is ,ln .Ja :eg 4 fa .4 4 - A . , Y 1-- 45 gg.-K. . 4 ' 4 2 t A I F 1 I s ? . l l f 'N 5 p I 1 A 1f"?"il"-'kin Ti. v V ,-.M -...U -J qwzailfkwmmmf s ?n sf Z 4 ii! il si .BSKSQW ix 6 USS Gainard DD 706 Mediterranean Cruise January- BY 1953 Z 2 3 rk ex- S is var fmffjfi' x S I f- ! . S N K ! Eg X 3 Ei 5 Q x 1 5 V 2' -5 ffTg!'q.T' 72,535-El-555' ' :!"'ymM if H' L " m" C ,QLLLSL A 'H PGS 3 T' if N4 -L RALPH TASMAN DEDICA 'FIV N 17 Cruise Book Staff Editor ENSIGN HOWARD A. MICHALSON, USNR R Art PETER J. coLosI Script Writer GEORGE M. SANBORN Photography ENTIRE CREW :X T - Q , - Wm amz E WA rg QE ll 1' cf 3 Eb ,iw :' :"'fQ.x. 'T we .,. -"-"""'lt-'t"""'lU1- v!l"7k'lTE?"F?'5'1E"ff"'-' 'l' '- ' 'A " K " 1 ,1,1q . I 'i 5 Q 5 I ROBERT BoUcHER IEIT Y' ft ' ' 'A gimnznf: - ---A,-..-.---...-. igkfffiglidh-,QHZYIIHH 1-A---f - W or-W--f-, --:fn - --:M...s....M..r.uF.,,.,......,...,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,1 ' LlmT.1lfl'l4Kn ' f XX X gfffff i i is l 5 I 1 l i I am very proud ot the high standard ot operational performance, smart- ness, and conduct ashore achievedlby the Gainard during our recent Med cruise with the Sixth Fleet. I teellsure' that it was a pleasant, interesting and beneficial experience tor all ot us which this Cruise Book will help to keep fresh in our memories of Navy lite. r ROBERT S. BROOKINGS, Il KLA! ' 5.",',.,f,..,,,,mJ.N1.44.-uma. .... 2 -. . A..- Y. - To the men ofthe Gainard: Congratulations on ,your splendid record of service i on this Mediterranean cruise. May this book be a tribute to the Gainard and the men who sailed her-for you have sailed her well. i H. M. BRIGGS Captain U.S.N. .brig J W I R Q s si .ss f f' f Q! XVNJ N',v :CN Vg YAQK, ,, X A yf f FN A ,M 1 Qfx A 7 X9 M X f We is we ww , N FEV The Gomcird s officers, eoch with vorymg degrees of experience. Under our fine Executive officer, these department heads with their GldeS did Q swell 'ob in leading the ship through the cruise. V V-H r .- f . V " vm-w,e K. 5--V Supply Divisi Q , X X ff , L 4: 'Sr , .,, 2 X Q K A ff X .K ' IM A g ff X New , 74 Y X -A 'V N 74 ' N15 ,ZA 'wif , ppagw , 'SQ?7"f oy ' - gf' 4 ' x , Qs ,gs , y 55 + fs f WW Rf"'WNw -uw? ,Qty ZX 4 xwwwqaq OT1 f WX X , 1 Sw . , ..., ., . x S' X1 Q 5 X e ,Miki Hilmar S. Division composed of men with a variety of skillsg bakers, barbers, storekeepers, Ioundrymen, corpsmen, and stewards all working together to make the Gainard a good ship on which to serve. I ff f A . A 5 ...fn -,. .-'-f:':?':4 ffl kghgx ., Q . I- J, .- .l..,.1g:jifm-.Yue-r ' 5' OPERATION DIVISION T2 3,11 I Us IG 5322324 WQ3"fZ3z I ........, f2 . I ,Q -ff--Q-FY ---- f N- W ff., .,..,- ,WWVW YUM 5 Av. V-Ak 'AMN-A 'nv i N W-Y'-bw -.W-A-ww , " " Y amii .1..., . 1, E le 'VS Q ? MW ,MW Q a g X 1 W 5 5 2 5 5 5 -MQQ 'vw O Division under the guidance of Ensign Krehbiel with its ET's. Radarmen, cmd Sonarmen represent a highly trained and valuable group. rig, ,I 8: II' E E I I l 4 l l l l l . l l l 4 I l i l i x I I I E I n ,J 5 si H . bi H 'W rv X . Q :xi Y 5 w' sg... The 2nd Division responsible for the miotorwhole boot, rigoings, lines, etc. includes Torpedomen, boofswainmoles, gunners moles, fireconlrolmen, ond those hardworking deckhands. Their pet complclinl: stock soot i F A WW s J is S T Q 3 5 Q ,gi Q - ,X ff ws-fw-f,,.f Wax ate. 'wfvibun The First Division under the able leadership of Nelson are a well disciplined, working body. They can handle lines actively or drop the "hook" when called upon. Among them are gunnersmates and Firecontrolmen. fi , 1 .mf--1 V--Q -,lf -f T A 422- 51 ' ' 3:1 '. - A Blu, ' rg- A .L,1"f UL"-,J,!:ai..f v i A X: .- . . . , , ' L ' 1 '-,JJUJQ W 1 i i The Deck Divisions e f ,M 2 Q.. ..N,L..,., , ,, ,hr lll, Huw 4 K K, A - - --A..- --- -, .,.'. ...., . .... K ..,. ,., . --.. .. .. .x,,.f.N ....-.,.,.A.' .i,,,,g.,,4-his-.-,4s .,.,,,,,, f 'Lf ' 2 . 'ffm 4 , bb , ,, , ,,. 4 5 i 'L X5 fi Q fw Wf ff wif x wrwmi i ,.,.A..,M,,m- we-+ S NZ , - . ," ' ,A . ,. ., .H '. . - V i 1 .. ynT,,3T.7T,Z,-T-vrvwwl V I H ' ' k ' "' ' """""'1' ""'- 'f - " ' . ""'41TW'- :rv--'.r.ff.., - .-..,. .., , -.-.- MS Zi . 'f 1 X ' 1, , ,k',,' 5444':-JL 'uiiffvl 'Q 'Mfg :2k,g':Y' ,W -2,,,fff'g+, :,,:f, t S .. . Jkvz- 25-sq J ,gf-1 - N '5 I"" H' .' .1-1-.YIJK ' if'TU'f' 1 f - . f f.- I "",""1 4,0 .Q 3 -1 311. i V J Q , - V- , . . Q . . f 'f . . 4 Q ' , ,qw 3-Q - , , fi. K v ' Q ' -- If. ,.,.,.f-. ,v p FAI, Gif' 435.143--N 0,1 I..-.,,!, E F F Z ? , ' ,, S? X 5 f X, AN...-,gf 5, 1, Z f H i xx,-V 4 VS sf Y Q 2. f , 4 7 Vf Z- wi i f- Fist -:R Qi 7 '1 I N A My ' 1 ornmunicafions Division X. ew si , . 9 W EQ ii X, 42 l,y, vw - . "- Fi, v-vw----f Trgwf-,--,. ,f,.v--N P w1,,...,-,W ,, i 2 , 2 a s Z 1 3 3 3 A -Nunn H Q-wM"Ff 2 We 3103356 C Division quortermoster, Rodiomen, Yeomen, even the moilmen ore o port of this group. They handle oll incoming ond out- going communications whether by flushing light, tloghoist or correspondence. Q3 4 i -.1 'Ty --.H Q 'f 3 5 X s. E W. ES? it ww :fi ' . iw .,,. 52-E if 2 fl .Ar , I be gps? i k V! if i "' 2 f l 3' E 5:4 .1 A S y 5 yfqv unnnqqys R Division. The Repair gang is responsible for doing the odd iobs around the shio. The electrical work, interior communico lion, deseils, and shipfitting are all included in their day's work. P Q4 1 K f Xxx . M x, Elin: VM, .Sw Z i 3 s Yi N 3 E Division. Affectionately called "snipes." Seldom seen topside except to edt or go on liberty. They iust oren't.hoppy with- out the noise and heat of the fire and boiler rooms. , .ww-W-nf,-rr' .w.i,mgaav H---s ,,,p:,s .,.,,.- -w-l.,e,, v.ww-ry - W, . :WNY - 'Ulf Y ' "A ""T'iN'i"""""l'?f- W' f Q --fir. war '11, 1'-' 1-5 'zrff'm'- , - , f fx , , lg' 1 , sg , ll R I 'ZF , irm , L.ef,s 4r. .n 4 , A, U Engineering Divislons W- .. Q 1' . s km f ' . -, 0 QV New 4 3 ' wx:--7 4, U, ,X f x 1 z.. f 0 , 1 6 ' iff- 'J-V - H fff fz 1-1 i 'f'f-fl" i w ? - A 31'2 '+ --1 X ' J -'ff' -ll' ' .. ,.....V .,., :,1e...:.... ,.:.., .. ,-.. ,,.Y M... . , , .. . The Master-At-Arms force. Theyfc S ii 'P never win a popularity contest bil, out our police force,sl1lD life would run smoothly. 'l X puvnomgp i E E Z i f P X X Th M . ' ' ' 'lv to elovissoqgglgu A gang that all get the chance to loin sometime. However :tvs never permanent and they're always sorr tr. : , 1 X , 5 I 1 H ,,1 ,, 1. ,S H - . ' W-' QW VA ,, ',.,l .W W I VV A Vu, , The Chlef Petty Officers The old warhorses aboard ship Each a specnallst In his chosen field, an able Instructor and an example to the men m the ranks commg up ,Q-A 'Ti Yuf 115511541 'Fl LA'Auxnc.a.ur 511.1 l'Z5Fl5'22S:WA' ' v K. . . . . L, .L 12:12. rr 13 3' 55,3 i:5lyZii:iJ,.5:1w:i .X , -.fs fa"'r.-.wr rl--'T.'f' 5 'il tfih-mi--ie'f1.'qr :J . .. rs. V-...J-v ..t- . 'Cruise 'Itinerary January 7-Left Newport, Rhode Island 19-Arrived in Gibraltar 26--Left Gibraltar 30-Cagliardi, Sardinia February 3 -Augusta Bay, Sicily 7-Left Augusta Bay 8-Arrived Taranto, Italy 13-Left Taranto, ltaly 21-Arrived in Cannes, France March 3 -Left Cannes, France 10-Arrived in Naples, Italy 915-Left Naples, ltaly 27-Arrived in Trieste, F.T.T. April 4-Left Trieste and arrived in Venice, Italy 10-Left Venice, Italy and returned to Trieste 18-Left Trieste, F.T.T. J 21-Arrived in Cannes, France 27-Left Cannes, France May 4-Arrived in Oran, Algeria 8-Left Oran I 20-Arrived back in Newport, I Cruise Data traveled 24,755 miles. Burned 1,306,936 gallons of fuel costing 565,- , 346.80. y . That 312,000 man hours of watches were stood or an average of 1,040 hours per man. We used 910,000 gallons of fresh water. We were paid a total of S120,411 and that ' our pay chits, if laid end to end, would cover 1,472 feet or encircled the ship more than two complete times. We ate 80 tons of food or 535 lbs. per man or 54.6 lbs. per man per day. That ourbakers baked approximately 10,530 loaves of bread. That 2,147 "shots" were given by sick bay. That 54,400 lbs. of laundry were done. That we had four 25 hour days. ' The crew wrote 2,775 lbs. of mail and received 4,968 lbs. of mail. - I That about 520,000 was spent in our ship's store including 50,000 bars of candy con- sumed and 53,000 packs of cigarettes smoked. f . . "HOW ABOUT THAT?" Rliode Island si-uP's I-usronv uss GAINARD inwoai The Gainard, a 2200 ton Sumner Class destroyer, was launched on 23 November, 1944, at the Kearney, New Jersey yard of the New York Shipbuilding Company. It was named after the late Captain Joseph Aloysius Gainard, a hero of two wars and the famous City of Flint epic. c After :CI .brief shakedown cruise to Bermuda, the Gainard was ordered to the Pacific thelater of operations. Her first duty was as an anti-submarine warfare ship. Later the Gainard participated in the Okinawa campaign as a radar picket ship and following that in the occupation of Japan itself. A f I In July of 1946, the Gainard was detached from this duty and returned to the Atlantic Fleet. Upon her arrival she entered the New York Naval Shipyard for an overhaul. February of 1947 saw the Gainard as a part of the Second Task Fleet and when these maneuvers were completed the ship reported to Commander Naval Forc- es, Mediterranean. V ' - During the next six months the Gainard made such 'ports as Gibralter Naples, Venice, Genoa, the Free City of Trieste, Suda Bay, Crete, Yatapia, Syria Algxqndrig Egypt, Sardinia, and the French Riviera city of Nice. It was August, 1947 when the Qqinard returned to her home port of Newport, Rhode Island. At this time the Gainard was placed in a state of temporary immobilization at Dovisville, Rhode Island. In March of I948, the Gainard again returned to a Navy yard, this time in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba followed and then came a second tour of the Mediterranean area. This cruise took the Gainard to Tunisia, Trieste, Golfe Juan, French Riviera, Pireaus, Greece, Haifa, Palestine, Cyprus and Rhodes. In February, T949 the Gainard again partici- pared in Second Task Fleet maneuvers, this time in the Caribbean. In June, I949 the Gainard departed for New Orleans where she was engaged Wyx A Q54 4, . fo,-, Ni f , l.ayZ,?v A few Q 4 X H X by A,xQJf?'.7,,.. 'ca A E M y I 1 Q V- , - K f , Jax . f f"f'fhs-My iw 2:3-.4 X , " cf ' v ff , M.?f5.2l..,fY'f ., vim f . . , 0 ..-M , - I' s. -..,,,- I 1- fm . W A X , . .. 5- gk ,gf f t V W 14N Q, Q W- W mm ., sw . ,Vw Y ", 1-WH 'fu ' as ,c,f,,.- - , W 4. , . . . .. , ,A ft is KW, N WZ.,-fi ,, ,V W.-.,.,,2y f " ' , K 9"w X f by 4 ' , AfgffjhXf34 " " 14,45 i ,PQQSfWiy, .jf ' I ,L . I I PW 6 Q, LL A . W , .., ' A.. fl ,Q 7, .W 4 .M-y,:,sZf ,s .Q J r f ' fi. X ' 1, W uw . .. 49 ' ' 'A-1695. 'WW MVA.. . fl . mf" , K ,Wg f f ., my ' ef A-4. , .W in Naval Reserve Training Cruises, returning to NeWP0f'f in December' l95O's . ' d 'I M , For the next six months the Galnard operated out. of Ts hotmecslg ?J2on"IdUrs1Z I95I she again returned to the Mediterranean. Addltiona 5051 SnCRemo Holy-.L Ville- this cruise were Istanbul, Turkey, La 599301 Ropello' an 0 ' " Iranche, on the Riviera: AIQIGTSJ Uncll-Isbonf Porlugal' 7 Ing October of I95I, the ship returned to Newt-WOVII and pclrtlgpgleildlneirilelcl FLEX operations off the coast of the Carolinas. In December., .The 432210 Quanta- lhe PlIll0d9lPl'IICl Naval SIIIPYUVCIS and left in Muay fcirlli Ilglnilgii Ehud in October of namo BOY, Cuba. The SIIIP NGXI Operated. out of Nero ' lrg ' ' d tro - , tune 95 Y 1952 returned to Newport The remainder of the year was spenf In VOU ' - h G ' rd departed Sr activities in and out of Narraganset BUY- On January 7th l e Gmc On its Fourth cruise to the Mediterranean- h G . d-S presenf Captain is Commander Robert S. Brookings, ll, USN Cup T e f ' ' anna born in Redlands California, on 27 June, 1912. He attendegf . ' ' . P tain Brioiokllngfllrzsj Alexandria, Virginia, and Exeter Academy in New Hampshii 'Q copa i B kingsfreceived his undergraduate degree from Harvard University hi O I gggaind gfidegree of MBS from the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce gf an - - - 'A h U . rsity of pennsylvania in 1938. While in college he won varsity letters in fnpi f 9 W8 b ll nd track His civilian employment was with the Johns-Manville Corporation a an . 4 1- N Y k City. . . ' ew' 05940 Commander Brookings, then an Ensign, U5NR,.as a result of NROTC ' 'n at Harvard volunteered for active duty and was assigned to the USS. Gil- g2:nligD233l Wheri war with Japan broke out the ship moved into Alaskan waters, After gunnary schooling in 1943, he served aboard the USS Thatcher lDD5l4l taking part in the Solomons, Marshalls, MOrtcn0S, New GUU160, Philippine, and Okin- awa campaigns. ln 1944, he became Executive Officer-Navigator. ln the Spring of 1945, Commander Brookings was ordered back to the United States for leave and reassignment as Commanding Ofticer of the destroyer USS. Cra- ven lDDilf' 382l, then operating in the Mediterranean. He is one of the few reserve officers to have achieved command of a destroyer during the war. By the end ofthe war he had reached the rank of commander and in 1946 he applied for and was transferred fromnthe reserve to the regular navy. Commander Brookings later experience was as a student in the General Line School course at Newport, Rhode Island. Upon completion of this course he was as- signed as Administrative Officer for the Bikini Scientific Research Expedition. In the Fall of 1947 Captain Brookings assumed the duties of Executive and Industrial Rela- tions Officer of the Naval Ordanance Plant at Alexandria, Virginia. His next assign- ment took him overseas to Ankara, Turkey as Operations Officer and Training Offi- cer, Naval Group, Joint American Military Mission for Aid to Turkey. In the Spring of 1952, Commander Brookings was ordered back to the United States for leave and a course in anti-submarine warfare tactics. Following this he assumed his present duties as Captain of the USS. Gainard lDD706l. Commander Bf00ktn9S 1105 the Naval Reserve Medal, American Defence Service Medal, Ameri- can Area Campaign Medal, European-African-Middle Eastern Area Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Area Campaign Medal l9 starsl, World War Il Victory Medal, NOVY Occupation Service Medal, and the Philippine Liberation Medal. ' ff .,,.,,k,w.,, , , L ,,. v fywgg..-,.f 5 gf . f as f' ' ,N 4 1 -rx 4611! Ni'-J! 4' ' e' ,EA 1, " is 11 in 1 gf i J' Gibraltar On I9 January the Gainard, oafterlacross- ing of thirteen days arrived in Gibraltar. It was a welcome sight to all of us after the difficult trip. For ua large 'part of the men it represented the introduction to a ne-'lv con- tinent and the beginning of an enriching 'ence in trave. expgilce secure inside of Gibraltar's shelter- ing breakwater and having finished the usual Ship chores necessitated by tl1e.crosslng, we turned to the task of acquainting ourselves with fhe people and their ways. Gibraltar was a mingling. of two cultures lust as it is a meeting place of two continents. .An old and typical British coloniallsm'was interspersed with the less familiar Spamsh,.lts istel streets were narrow and irregular, its architecture European, and its shops dark, low-cellinged and interesting. We found a mixture of the fashion shop and the bazaar. But all took advantage of the bargains both had to offer in woolens, silks, and linens. Certainly none of us will ever forget the grandeur of the rock itself, standing maiestic- glly above the city and the harbor. Here was a fitting symbol of Britannica's unfailing vigilance and it served to remind all that we were entering a sea still very much guarded by the English at either end. Those of the Gainard who took the British Army sponsored tour of the rock saw many of its secrets, its brislling guns, detection devices, reservoirs, and underground fortifications. All hands spent a memorable week in Gibraltar before turning Eastward into the vast Mediterranean. iw .ijt Nr' 1 Augusta, 5iCilY The second port that we ed at was Augusta BUY, 0 stopp n town on the eastern small Sicilia side of this Italian island. Set beneath Mt. Etna, Europe's highest active volcano, the city was dominated by the Pe0k5 snow-capped heights. Augusta was a poor city and we were often beseiged by small children and peddlers who had something to sell. Many of us took to tour- ing from Augusta. The favorite spot was the ancient city of Syra- cuse, founded in 736 B.C. by the Greeks. We saw a Roman amphi- theater, an old but well-preserved Greek theater, the crypts of St. Marziano, an old Christian church where the people took shelter from the catacombs, and the ancient stone quarries of Sym- cuse. -A .wf , 3 pa ,,,. . ,,, , 5.51 -s-.,':f'4"a- t gs- af 1 , A f F . .-. I, siy' fa 7 V . 5' s rf, 2 J. . V53 ' fi.. mf-.., 'F f i - FM! A . :B . 1 Q A ' v' ,, " .s - - ' 4 ' - C. -' , , -' , , , I ' 4-' . I- I -:ff imivfs ,f-in sts s K a s NN.-f,,, , , 4 -f . v.. ui. 1,5 ,,..,gmr:? 13: 41,35 , ,,1d 'JA- . 4115? s . .:,., .qi "gil 1 :A -.l'i",3z is A -r fait siliti .445 .s. .-L4 sw .cw n 'le-mf r Q ix-'wif-w 1 . ' "- , '1 'L 'S' .' 'im . - . ,ay 8 l -'hr , A--'Sn ' .ig -' "W U ,Z ,. vw. - t y f " A L 5 if we - V I ,, ' Zu - .N ,si l 0 .- ,N.s..,s.. ., ,s 5. .Q 1 K, .1 y , 1 I 1-t3L,j.i - 1 "fs A' 'is is-4 t -4 i ft sf of ,ix . N fl'-'1'1 i Cannes, France We had all been looking forward to the Gainardls visit to the French Riviera and when it came, none of us were dis- appointed. lt was even more than we had hoped. i 5' Magnificent palm-surrounded villas . . . luxurious beachfront hotels . . . powder- blue Cadillacs . . . and high-powered French madamoiselles. Cannes had them all. Its restaurants servedthe finest in French cuisine and the shops carried the latest Paris fashions. 'L ' From Cannes we were able to go on tours of Paris, Lourdes, or one day tours that took in Nice, De Grosse, Monte Car- lo, and many other scenic spots along the Mediterranean. For those who wished to ski, trips to the French Alps were arranged. Golf facilities were available for those who pursued that form of recreation. lf these activities were too exerting, there were the cafes and nightclubs. Shows ranged from burlesque to ballet, and both were eye-fulls. So none of us had too much trouble finding his favorite type of enter- tainment, and when we hoisted anchor on March 3rd, it was with fond memories and empty wallets that we said au revoir. X XX VJ ,f,,f , , ff y ,f ll, XZ ,AN R Z If ' .L ' I f VV? M4 fww 5E,W,,,,,,,,g, ,N Q , , 5 ,- Q71-L A, , . V r - . ,. llfxmwyii M' 'W ' fffffcf-vs te et f ."' ' a s - v- - -w we 4? ' ' 1 ,, f - f ,,-,, , 'JW ., e, ,V ,WW M.. ,i , Q 4 , t -r f reefs: " ff --A 1 so F , f . ' 'Nbr-ef an-1-tjex.--, ,,at-,W I if?-:ww . f W - -,.- we - - 1 I '-5. GE , , 14-14 ' -. 44 -, ff K I f - A f,--'. ,f ,sa J, 4,5 Maw " , -"' - " an f was V.. s - fs ' can T f QWs:.Wf"'-'-'feeye eY5'?v5?.,. .q5Q3',,iF1ff'NM,fGf., , - - ' . - . ,.3g,e,,,wl rf" f T f' W 2, ?1'ff42s-9'P,,'W.'2 '-'f 5.3,-fn., . wg We - it , ,. F, Y yivfzqf .T-Wfwfwivl -k2ifff:,,,4!rj.-,,:.z,!.. H Tri, I ,,,4. , -V fW'fWl-Sw V s,,fwmf2ff,w-, 'VIL ,Q ' 1 " K ,l fr-'I' . Taranto, Italy On February 8th, the Gainqfd arrived at its third Mediterraneoh port of call, Taranto, Italy, an Italian Naval Base located in instep ot the "boot". The city'g long history dates back to early' Rome, the Byzantines, and the Saracens. It became a part of the ltalian Kingdom in 1861. During World War Il, British Naval units sunk and damaged a large part of the Italian Fleet there. The city had several points oi historical interest, among them an lith century cathedral and an old castle built to guard Taranto seaward. While there were a few shops, several cafes, and res- taurants, amusements were few. Little large-city life existed, Gnd evenings ended early. Most of us relaxed here in anticipailon of better liberty elsewhere- vaaa rzileremg ' i 3 W-lauofuy ti, 'N ' 3 v t ,, 4 t if ,fif as ,- 7 , Taranto X W 'MW P. M 17101 34 ai? 3' QV' 4 -My Y 4 1-eggpf -V , V 1,,,, -- , ,xgfgsg V Wx V , 5 W W, V Q u .,, ww, ,VV KQV65':wNSf'E?w9wGm?A6QAVsm,wfw?,N-Vv,V , . , -, . 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Omg From Naples local tours were tak fo the ruined city of Pompen volcanic Mt Vesuvius, as well as the more romantic spots of Capri and Sorrento Two day trips to Rome were possible and those who went saw St Peters Cathedral, the Sistine Chapel, the Roman Forums the Collesrum the Circus Maximus, and the Palatine Hill The Garnard left Naples on the l5th of March and participated along with other umts of the Sixth Fleet in Exercise Ren- dezvous These were lornt NATO maneuv- ers involving Naval forces of the U S. Britain, France, Italy Greece, and Turkey Their pur- pose was to simulate actual wartime condi- tions and to develop teamwork between the North Atlantic nations in combined tactical efforts These maneuvers were the operation- ol highlight of the Gainard's Mederterranean duty. ,- f 1 1:12, ,-,1- P, - ,f 'f.ff,1Y, ,,.,. 1, f X " ' 2 'Q ' 9 mmf 111411107 zifwsrogsfm-1g1 wwf ,mis X 14, y X 111 5 2 f r I '-' .,., ' A ':f"-f lr' zi- M! .V , ,,... 1 , Q ,..- .. 4-1-, co- , , N., . .. 7, , , ., , ,W ow, .. , . ' ' , 1 'A' 1 v ' ' " 1 1r- s1 1 11 ,ix . 5 vt 1 I deg, E - it 4 , If , I, .,r i xx . ! ll. ' y lr Venice, Italy Venice was the most unique city that we visited during our time in the Medi- terrean and before we left, one of our favorites. For the charm that Venice has seems to increase as you learn the ways of this city. In Venice the canal replaces the avenue and the gondola the automo- bile. The over one hundred canals that run through the city divide it into a maze of narrow passageways, quaint footbridges, and picturesque struc- tures. The plaza of San Marco, inthe center of the city, is the heart of Vene- tian life. Here is found the world-fam- ous Cathedral of St. Marks, the old customshouses that date back to when Venice was Europe's importer of Ori- ental treasures, and, the city's finest shops andJcafes. The rest of Venice is dark walks, but behind the dingy build- ing fronts these took us by were found its best nightclubs, restaurants, and bars. And while much of Venice's beauty is repetitious, it was a' beauty that no one could tire of.' ,vgnv -"""-"""" Venice, Italy Venice was the most unique city that we visited during our time in the Medi terrean and before we left, one of our favorites. For the charm that Venice has seems to increase as you learn the ways of this city. ln Venice the canal replaces the avenue and the gondola the automo bile. The over one hundred canals that run through the city divide it into a maze of narrow passageways, quaint footbridges, and picturesque struc- tures. The plaza of SanMarco, in- the center of the city, is the heart of Vene- tian life. Here is found the world-fam- ous Cathedral of St. Marks, the old customshouses that date back to when Venice was Europe's importer of Ori- ental treasures, and, the city's finest shops andjcafes. The rest of Venice is dark walks, but behind the dingy build- ing fronts these took us by were found its best nightclubs, restaurants, and bars. And while much of Venice's beauty is repetitious, it was a' beauty that no one could tire of.' , 1 . ws' Q X W XX WW W x Rx xi X X. , A fi 9 Q EN - Li . xy' e SA 1 A Q M 5 , sl 'ii Q 3 AA Ex A x M.MW,,,..Lu..-H.. Q-.mshsm ,Q ' 'Nu , .J . .. I, A . Q . ,gf 'nr' n e-:rv QL l"'-Q, Jn.. 1 ,. ,. ga . ,K gn ' f xf' .x' v-7 U W. ., -tx. 'u i gf?- L? x fiw Q53 Q J x A LJ!! 'S . 'F' 0 V L: A T' Li W E I mf' 5 Ja' 1 pg. 5 !'f ,rf 4 Q? I ' 1 ss : -'ww ' ?E . 1 15' fi 2 'V-. :FS ! Vi - . V V Vg 141 ,asm-:mm Trieste. F T T The Gainard was in Trieste twice with a trip t ore to Venice in between. As a result we spen m . ' there than in any other port. Trieste was dif- EEI M g e-L Q :. . "' ii-413. lam. 3' IJ, L,w,v'fk-A A , vii 4:3-ma. , N ,- -4-.1 V- 5,-.ji-. .f a......2.. z W , 1 r. I J- f L A.. Lv me 4, if 0 o u 0 - . I ' ' ,P-L L time ferent due to its unusual political situation. The struggle for the city, with its fine natural harbor and facilities, is an old one between Italy and ' b f Yugloslavla. Actually it dates back to eore orld War l When the British Army entered W . Trieste in 1945 they found the city also occupied by Yugoslav troops. To prevent any conflict and to solve the problem of which countryiwas to re- ceive the territory, two zones of occupation were set up, the A zone iointly controlled by British and American forces and the other the B zone occupied by Yugoslav troops That is how the situ ation has remained Still Trieste was good liberty Places like the sixteenth century castle of San Giusto and old Miramar castle were of interest Also facilities for servicemen were the best that we had found yet with several fun clubs recreation halls gyms and a bowling alley The Army also ran Q well stocked Post Exchange that offered real buys in cameras and other items f Ping i l if FJ N. :Il iw ?' no Q, fn". 5 .:.f :X .Xl "S -P' b . W ii . WkSx"ik X' Tx xx , ., E V 5,1 3 . x Ar YW, - pw wwvk X W-,S-rf' km- f X 4 A X -IH 1--ex""' -at I.. .X his . N N, -. 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Its stores carried a variety of native products al- though most of us iust purchased leather goods or the traditional fez. On May 8th we said good-bye to Oran and the Mediter- ranean and set steam for Newport, Rhode island. M -. .,., , V l -V uv-sq ,,,,, 'W 'V 7' x it All N f Q' ,mo ck-all T it lil X J I t T Q U -2 General Photos of the Cruise QW Q 3 E 4 gal Qu-v www - ur- ew ww .v 5. + ,aft Failma WJ-:1 .... .M Mas- -" ,i A -1 u 1 1'-j 1 A, f 1 "s 1 i 5 " 1 ix x 1 N 1' X ' ' 0 'X N 'v f ' f 1 1 1 K , K . . 1 X 1 . : 1 1 N 1. JL . 'H ' 1 . 1 I K, 1 Ni ,QI 'Y' . - 'N . K., , nf I Q 1 h, in -,Y 1 1 X 5. 1. 6 ..,f-f"""'MW G2 J -WN nm, 1 1 1 1 I. 1 if 1 1 1 L1 . E 1 1 1 1 1, 1 I1 11 Ii 11 1. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 V 1 1 1 1 1 'H 1 J ' v 1 ' 1 , 1 , A 1 1 3 i ' 1 1 .. I xx! . 1 ,rr W - -4 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 ff 1 ' 1 1 1 1 51 11 X 5: 1 A 11 .1 W 1' 1 1 , :'ff5':' ' ' , I 5 f ,. ff' 1- ,3 fn ' 1 'if A 'ii 111 V . 34' 11 . ,. -' ' 1 S' 1 :eq 1. iff 1 ? 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X 1 X1 '4x1 57 1 QW? 10efK1 X ff 1 I 11 fwf -f H1 ffijw 11 1 ,WA M 13,11 , 1 5 f yyggww ,411 1 l'f11WlZ425W 17456 fb 1 H- 6? 1 !gMf62 1?,1 11 1 1 11 1 my 1 1 S111 1 ,1 Avy 1 W nw A-,Za 111, W1 M10 1Z241mw f W 7 fmfgzfxffzw MM 11 11 1 1' J fljm IVQAX 14? . -N Officers l Captain R. S..fBrookings ll Alexandria, Va. Executive Off. P. A. Newlove . Hudson, W. D. Lieutenant Spriesterbach, W. L"-G McKinley, W. -"-G Andrews, C. A. Leslie, M. F. Mathers, W. G. Steuber, G. A. Bartuska, A. J. Stewart, Raymond Krehbiel, P. J. Whittemore, W. Y. Finnegan, J. T. Lawson, E. N. Michalson, H. A. Soulos, S. T. Murray, J. E. .1 up -"- G -"- G -'- G 'cs - ..- -T- G ENS ENS ENS ENS ENS ENS ENS G Newport, R. l. Atlanta, Georgia Minneapolis, Minn Warren, Ohio Newport, R. l. Coronado, Cal. Johnstown, Penn. Rochester, N. Y. Nanticoke, Penn. Glen Dean, Ky. Scarsdale, N. Y. E. Providence. R. l. West Roxbury, Mass Irvington, N. J. Mount Vernon, N..Y Hartford, Conn. Syracuse, N. Y. Alabama Leach, James Grady, Dadeville, Alabama Smallwood, Jack, Cullman, Alabama Wiggins, Arnold Linburg, Troy, Alabama Arkansas 1 Henry, Robert Loy, Mullberry, Ark. Ingram, George L. Blytheville, Ark. California Seldon, Kermit W., Long Beach, Cal. Connecticut Cicchiello, Angelo Carman, Waterbury, Conn. Deutsch, Marvin, Waterbury, Conn. Dormody, James, Bristol, Conn. Genua, Francis Ronold, Waterbury, Conn. Lafo, Frank Eugene, Naugatuck, Conn. McCarroll, John William, New Millford, Conn. Melde, Robert T., Bridgeport, Conn. Prince, Carl Theodore, Norwalk, Conn. Smith, William D., Bridgeport, Conn, District of Columbia Dulin, John Walter Florida MCMllll0n, CleOphus, Gainesville, Fla. Powell, Adolf, Plant City, Flq, Smith, William Walter, Jacksonville, Flq White, Gerry W., Daytona Beach, Flq, Georgia M00dY, Harlridge Roosevelt, Savannah, GQ, RlleY, Nathanael, Savannah GQ Cruise Book Roster lllinois Beasley, William James, Chicago, Ill, Bright, Joseph Eugene, Georgetown, III Gannon, Patrick T., Chicago, Ill. Jossendal, William R., Dekalb, Ill. Lawrence, Otis M., East Moline, lll. Nelson, Richard Gerald, Loves Park, III Peterson, Kenneth W., Zion, Ill. Steele, John William, Springfield, III. Indiana Garrett, David K., Dublin, Ind. Mann, Russell, South Bend, Ind. Steinway, William M., Indianapolis, Ind Stevenson, Lyle Jay, South Bend, Ind. Iowa Benson, Donald D., Hastings, Iowa Clare, Walter H., Cedar Falls, Iowa Holmes, Donald K., Waterloo, Iowa Whitsell, William C., Jefferson, Iowa Kentucky Frogge, Nyal J., Monticello, Ky. Givan, Gene Wendell, Louisville, Ky. Harbison, John L., Lexington, KY- Howard, Robert L., Leitchtield, Ky. Kendrick, Cecil, Pikeville, Ky. Kirby, Clarence, Ky. U Louisiana Preston, Lawrence M., Appeville, LU- William, Robert, Ponchatorila, La. Maine Forbes, John R., Bethel, Maine Larrabee, Miles C., Dexter, Maine McWilliams, Richard, Portland, Maine Pepin, Roland Gerald, Auburn, Maine Ricker, Douglas E., Corinna, Maine Maryland Booth, William R., Elkton, Md. Broadwater, James D., Frostburg, Md. Dill, Lawrence W., Baltimore, Md. Evans, Myrl R., Cumberland, Md. Goodwin, Austin M., Dickerson, Md. Heacock, Douglass A., Baltimore, Md. Muhles, Edward O., Baltimore, Md. Wooten, Richard S., Salisbury, Md. Massachusetts Borkowski, Peter, Lawrence, Mass. Burke, Paul D., Worcester, Mass. Carleton, William F., Boston, Mass. Crocker, Robert A., Falmouth, Mass. D'Arcangelo, John B., Somerville, Mass. Dion, Robert R., Salem, Mass. Elizardo, Manuel P., New Bedford, Mass. Fisher, Harry J., Bellingham, Mass. Glebus, Frank J., Saugus, Mass. Girard, Benoit C., Somerville, Mass. Gonsalves, Joseph J., Acushnet, Mass. Graves, Robert S., Brighton, Mass. Griffin, William T., Cherry Valley, Mass. Henderson, Arthur J., Chelsea, Mass. Kinnally, Robert, Revere, Mass. Kiddie, Robert S., Cambridge, Mass. Lemoine, Arthur F., Collinsville, Mass. Lemoine, Donald Paul, Lowell, Mass. Kiernan, Hugh M., Agawam,'Mass. Larue, Ernest, Fall River, Mass. Matoes, David P., Marion, Mass. McCauley, Paul C., Roxbury, Mass. McMahon, William D., Middlesex, Mass. Mont, Walter E., New Bedford, Mass. Morin, Elmer L., Lynn, Mass. Nugent, Walter R., Somerville, Mass. Grlando, James C., Framingham, Mass. Peterson, Albert S., Brighton, Mass. Pike, Charles A., Somerville, Mass. Ryan, John F., Lawrence, Mass. Reid, Herbert B., Fall River, Mass. Smith, Waldo H., Lancaster, Mass. Sztuka, Stanislaus S., Worcester, Mass. Michigan Ball, Gerald A., Detroit, Mich. Bossardet, Bert M., Holland, Mich. Chandler, Norman L., Romulus, Mich. Chandler, Sheldon L., Romulus, Mich. Dalka, Robert A. Detroit, Mich. Funderburk, Samuel E., Pontiac, Mich. Hakala, Jacob W., Pelkie, Mich. Korte, Leo M., Dearborn, Mich. I Reibling, Clarence A., Detroit, Mich. Schultz, Robert D., Dowagiac, Mich. Sheppard, Harold J., Rochester, Mich. Thomas, Frank D., Dearborn, Mich. Minnesota . " Demarias, Joseph H., Red Lake fFalls, Minn Missouri Dowell, Sanford R., Fremont, Missouri Mississippi J Gillaspy, Robert C., Monticello, Miss. Harper, Bobby H., Greenwood, Miss. New Hampshire E Babbitt, Lynwood J., Newport, New Hampshire New Jersey F Barnes, Jack DI., National Park, N. J. Covert, Roy G., East Orange, N. J. Frank, Edward S., Passiac, N. J. Fysz, Stanley W., Trenton, VN. J. Jacobson, Walter E., Trenton, N. J. Johnston, George E., Jersey City, N. J. Meehan, Bernard J., Plainfield,N. J. McCauley, Harry J., Erlton, N. J. Pellecchio, Salvatore A., Ridgefield Park, Reilly, John P., Jersey City, N. J. V Seymour, Charles S., Rumson, N. J. Sullivan, John J., Bayonne, N. J. Wallace, Charles, Jersey City, N. J. New York Adamczyk, Frank M., Lackawanna, N. Y. Argentino, Carl J., Brooklyn, N. Y. Bellosa, Robert F., Sauguait, N. Y. Boucher, Robert I., lllion, N. Y. Burns, Martin F., Long Island, N. Y. Carey, Thomas E., Brooklyn, N. Y. Carlson, Edward J., Long Island, N. Y. Cavaseno, Carmine, New York, N. JY. Chetaitas, William C., Brooklyn, N. Y. Chetaitas, John A., Brooklyn, N. Y. Cipriano, Frank5qC., Brooklyn, N. Y. Cody, James J., Yonkers, N. Y. Colosi, Peter J., Niagara Falls, N. Y. Colosi, Ronald D Niagara Falls N Y Dehan Kenneth Brooklyn N Y Devlin Bernard C Broad Channel N Y DlStefano JamesJ Bronx N Y Duffy, Francis J., Kingston, N. Y. Esposito, Robert V., Brooklyn, N. Y. Eychnerl, Lyle E., Veinoa, N. Y. Fay, 'Thomas F., New York, N. Y. Gagliardi, Frank, White Plains, N. Y. Garren, Edward J., Binghamton, N. Y. Grunthaner, Raymond G., Buffalo,.N. Y. Hennessy, George F., Poughkeepsie, N1 Juke, Frank B., Buffalo, N. Y. Kreiser, Richard K., Jamestown, N. Y. if Kunder, Donald, Flushing, N. Y. Kushner, Jack, Bronx, N. Y. I J , Leahy, Thomas, Brooklyn, N. Y. Matters, Anthony L., Brooklyn, N. Y. McGuire, Robert J., Jamaica, N. Y. Meader, Gordon A., Saratoga Springs, Miller, Charles E., Peekskill, N.lY. ' Monoachino, Samuel, Rochester, N. Y.- Moran, Joseph J., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Moran, Edwin G., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Y. N. Y. Moore, Edward V., Queens Village, N. Y. Murray, John F., New Hartford, N. Y. Muller, Raymond D., Utica, N. Y. Rees, Robert A., Queens Village, N. Y. Resch, Lewis, New York City, N. Y. Sebastiano, Rudolph J., Staten Island, N. Serino, Giriaco M., Beacon N. Y. Stefanick, Stephen J., Buffalo, N. Y. Sullivan, John L., Dunkerque, N. Y. I Tasman, Ralph, Huntington, N. Y. Texter, Guy G., Blasdell, N. Y. Wendt William B Sanborn N Y Whltehurst Alfred M Long lsland Zanlel NlcholasF Flushing N Y i 74 if .r 'I I s a I . . 5 I I'. I - Q ' " ' ' ' ' 0 Q J ' . I 01 I , , 1 ol I N. Y. it . 2 . . . I 1, I Q . I u, , 0 . lim W-w,., . .. . V ' - . Ji 5 -' or if ' F' e--"-' t , o ' ' . ' North. Carolina A Featherston, Ernest H., Mount Holly, N. C.. Kellum, Charles R., Wilson, N. C. Saunders, Fred W., Franklin, N. FC. Ohio Beck, Roger L., Salem, Ohio Bishop, Donald E., Columbus, Ohio Byers, Dean G. Startton, Ohio Dougherty, Roderick M., Dayton, Ohio Graves, Richard A., Toledo, Ohio Herrick, Edward A., Toledo, Ohio Hoy, Robert E., McArthur, Ohio Ingram, Kenneth C., Toledo, Ohio lnsley, John L., Dover, Ohio Moses, Joseph S., Cincinnati, Ohio Rogers, Patrick J., Cleveland, Ohio Scales, Edward A., Columbus, Ohio Stone, Allen L., Cleveland, Ohio Tricker, Bruce O., Farmdale, Ohio Zerefos, Steve M., Warren, Ohio .Oklahoma Burrus, Bobby Gene, Seminole, Oklahoma Hughes, James C., Henager, Oklahoma Thompson, Garold M., McAlester, Oklahoma Pennsylvania Anesko, Kenneth F., Dichson City, Penn., Barnes, Carl C., Muncy, Penn. Casterline RobertJ Clarks Summit Penn Creavey Thomas Dickson City Penn Crowell Johnl Stevens Penn DuFonzo Joseph A Bradford Penn Eutin HarryJ Ralphton Penn Fantozzi NlchoIasJ Philadelphia Penn Figlar, John, Butler, Penn. Fisher, Harold R.,.Meadville, Penn. Gilliard, William J., Philadelphia, Penn. Guldner, Gerald R., Catasaudue, Penn. Gursky, Joseph, Shenandoah, Penn. Hafer, Richard L.,j2eading, Penh. Hamborsky, William, Lemont Furnace, Penn. Hampton, William J., Butler, Penn. Hetman, Alexander, Reading, Penn. I Houtz, Lee E., Tower City, Penn. A Kaley, William C. W., Reading, Penn. Kapalka, Sylvester, New Kensington, Penn. Kennedy, Theodore R., Zelienople, Penn. Kerstetter, Donald F., State College, Penn. Kieffer, .Conrad H., Lancaster, Penn. Kuhn, Charles E., York, Penn. Mills, Robert A., Philadelphia, Penn. Ratter, John J., Philadelphia, Penn. Revay, Joseph E., Beaver Falls, Penn. Senter, John W., Millvale, Penn. A Stahon, Joseph S., Erie, Penn. Walker, Francis L., Meadville, Penn. Weagratf, George D., Titusvilile, Penn. Wertz, Floyd C., Reading, Penn. ' Wissner, James B., Pittsburg, Penn. Yatsonsky, Paul J., Lake Ariel, Penn. Rhode Island I Howes, Charles E., Newport, R. l. . Hughes George E Pawtucket R Hufford Robert C Newport R I Kiper Bernard D Newport R I Lussier Joseph R Newport R I Morris Manuel R Bristol R I McNeil Edward W Newport R I . . . S . V . 1 S s s s S . . 5 . S S . 5 0 5 O ' ' S , s s .. . S . . . S . A Q . ' s . I . . . . . i,, . ' S .. . s 5 , ' s N . , . I Q ' N . I ' - I 5 I' . s . V s , , S .4 . N r 5 . . , s .I l . 1' l I . , iv, I til 7 yy, ., "'-"-"H - . 1. I-xi' .Q .4 it-i 'iii .i . -4 -, J- i - r .L 1 4 af .el H... S' ,N ff 4. ,r., gg .1 3.1 .VP fill RMK 4 ls r 1. L2 , H . .r .r 2'- .fl rr ,r g. ai? ,. l 1' L iw 1 if if ,. l li? ' .,, i. ': 'W .U FFA slll ,V E xi' i r l.A g. flali 'Q- ,,,, l ,V 1.-l ,, -,- V r 'r ij? I4 .rl -gr an WFJF fu .f' . Im l l .T in r : r V It gJ,. . if -it P' 'l ar" T Z Z . ... liar. .,1. i Q, 1. - ,.,. 5. . 122 :gg wil r, l ,K- ., gs. QJL ,,. H? H El Zlzl 5 'r 3 a ill , li -l ' lr' Q if 'Cl Q., L Roy, Roland A., Woonsocket, R.. l. Schlais, Alvin E., Newport, R. l. . Wylie, Robert C., Newport, R. l. ' - . 0 South Carolina J' Anderson, John T., Charlestown, S. C. Henson,,Walter J., Taylors, S. C. Tennessee Gritfen, James R., Memphis, Tenn. Kennedy, Robert F., Knoxville, Tenn. Myatt, Lloyd D., Nashville, Tenn. Smith, Jimmy D., Belfast, Tenn. Texas Lafon, Raymond E., Tahoka, Texas Virginia . Bowman, Denny L., Jewell Ridge, Va. Gregory, Douglas H., Martinsville, Va. Hammond, Melvin E., Lynchburg, Va. Harrell, Carl G., Arlington, Va. Hartburger, Clarence D., Roanoke, Va. Holberg, Robert L., Portsmouth, Va. Kitts, Samuel R., Bland, Va. Landrum, Donald li., Covington, Vq,. Lawson, James O., Stuart, Va. Martin, Walker L., Vinton, Va. Mohun, Edgar R., Mathews, Va. , Revell, Richard L., Portsmouth, Va. Sanborn, George M., Danville, Va. Wood, Donald L., Richmond, Va. Ziegler, Paul E., Richmond, Va. , Vermont Bigelow, Charles A., Wilder, Vermont West Virginia f Goff, 'Oren R., Parksburg, W. Va. Nelson, Olif M., Parkesburg, W. Va. Wilson, James L., Wellsburg, Va. Wisconsin Demers, Harvey F., Rice Lake, Wis. S Fulwiler, William H., Milwaukee, Wis Gauger, Gustave R., Oshkosh, Wis. Lindenberger, Roger F., River Falls, Wis Loucks, Roger H., Marinette, Wis. J -Ill 2 l 52 va Qin fx 2522? Xin. 9 Glfdffof 01672 A X XR f0s f CQ Gam 4 Quik ,jx GJLZM445, 4557065 Cd' Iii' to 0 v 1 1 . V 1 A 4 in ,L - f'4mg.':"."t"'.'1'-fx'-':T. ,. iff" , SHSGQ. N lf 51" 1 TNI" 'W'wu 'V , Q ,' , ,Q , ,' V 7 A 'f'Sq'i""'f".' ' A. , wi .,f,.,y,p6V, , Af, , .000 . .z,,J.J,,AE.j,, X, g-, ,,. ,.. y All ,F 74. ., ',,,.,fW3', , , 4 , ,5f,,y,. f- ' X. w - A , K L T, .x 4. , 5- ,. f 1 . 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Suggestions in the Gainard (DD 706) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Gainard (DD 706) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

Gainard (DD 706) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1961 Edition, Page 1

1961

Gainard (DD 706) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 11

1953, pg 11

Gainard (DD 706) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 38

1953, pg 38

Gainard (DD 706) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 55

1953, pg 55

Gainard (DD 706) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 54

1953, pg 54

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