Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC)

 - Class of 1919

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 168 of the 1919 volume:

........mlmk V FOREWORD C It Has been our aim in producing “The Bonhomie, 1919,” to collect within its pages all that is best and most enduring in our college life. T he friendships and associations, the gaieties and pleasures, the hours of work and strife of intercollegiate contests these are the things we shall most often recall in after years. We hope that this book may serve to keep more bright memories of college days. We have worked earnestly with this purpose in view1 and if we have succeeded, our work has not been in vain, but if we have failed our only reward lies in the knowledge that we have done our best mm Jv acs pis Wm' wM 1 mm mm pi ■nni ,v75 St ,s S DEDICATION 'T'N RESPECTFUL RECOGNITION OF HIS SCHOLARSHIP, WITH HEARTFELT APPRECIATION OF HIS INTEREST IN FURMAN AND FURMAN MEN. and AS A TRIBUTE TO HIS WORK AS TEACHER AND THIS NINETEENTH VOLUME OF THE BONHOMIE IS DEDICATED y •y n n 1 DR. S. E. BRADSHAWSullfii S rjitrmhrr 24. 1U1B £ mjraut (Charles iEiUuarft uJinmums. 3Jr., HUT Jtt iftmnriamRecord of Furman Men In Service HIS page is dedicated to the men from Furman University and Furman Fitting School who heard their country’s call and responded to it by offering themselves for the defense of the world. Even before America severed diplomatic relations with Germany, there were those who gave themselves in this great cause, entering French and British units as soldiers, ambulance drivers, and surgeons. By May. 1917, so many undergraduates had volunteered that the student ranks were visibly depleted, and several Seniors came from nearby camps to receive their diplomas. The number grew continually until more than 320 men of the Purple and White were in service. On the old world battlefields, in the Army, in Air Service, the Navy, in Sub-sea work, as Chaplains, as Y. M. C. A. workers, in virtually every branch of the Service, Furman was ably represented. Our boys were in Flanders, in the St. Mihiel sector, at Chateau-Thierry, in the dread Argonne Forest, in Italy, and later, in the Army of Occupation in Germany. Not all could go Overseas, and those left in America in Camps, in Army Schools, and in the S. A. T. C. should receive our homage along with the heroes of the front lines. Many suffered from wounds and from the deadly gases; they may bear in their bodies permanent evidence of their sacrifice. A few will be still more deeply enshrined in our hearts because they made the supreme sacrifice, counting life itself not too dear to give in the cause of peace for their generation and succeeding ones. Quite a number were awarded distinctions of special merit—promotions, citations. Distinguished Service medals. Now that they have returned, after their baptism of fire, we would outpour our profound appreciation and deepest love to lurman’s faithful “Heroes of the Greatest War the World ever Witnessed.” For lack of space we cannot give the names of all Furman’s representatives in the world war, but we must mention those who won distinction in the giving of their lives and those wounded in action. Sergeant Edward Timmons, killed September 24, 1918. He was a member of the 1917 class, taking his degree in khaki. He volunteered in the spring just preceding graduation as a private in Company “A,” I 18th Infantry. Going Overseas with his regiment and while in battle he volunteered to guide a detail of some thirty men with provisions for Co. "D.” Losing his way, he entered the German lines and was killed. Lieutenant J. H. David, killed in action, being among the first from South Carolina to give his life. He was commended for his bravery; as it is said, he held at bay seven or eight Germans, armed only with an automatic revolver, and when found dead his revolver was empty and seven of the Germans lay about dead. Lieutenant Hagood Bostick, of the British Squadron of the Rotary Motor Scouts. Royal Air forces, was shot down by a German airplane and his wounds were so serious he lay unconscious for seven days. Lieutenant William Hamlin Beattie, wounded October. 1918; details of wounds and bravery unknown. Corporal Harvey T. Cook, son of Dr. H. T. Cook, beloved Professor of Greek of Furman, was cited for bravery. Captain John O. W. Donaldson. Air Hero, being decorated by King George. He shot down nine enemy planes, and then he was brought down, his plane beingcompletely demolished and himself being taken prisoner by the Germans. After escaping twice from prison camps, he made his way through Belgium to Holland and from there the American Consul sent him to England. Lieutenant Edwin L. Hughes enlisted with the Butler Guards, served on the border, and went Overseas with the 1 18th Infantry. He was gassed in action September 30, 1918. Capt. O. K. Mauldin, former attorney of the Greenville bar, went Overseas with the 7th Division, 53th Regular Field Infantry. He was gassed during the last week of the war. Corporal Brummctte Mobley, who graduated in '16, went Overseas with the Butler Guards, and was seriously wounded. Sergeant Herman B. McManaway went Overseas with the I 18th Infantry. During a gas attack by the Germans he gave his gas mask to a wounded comrade, this act nearly causing the loss of his own life. C. P. Rice (“Sister”) of the Class of ’ I 7 went over with the Butler Guards and was shell-shocked last fall. William Schwiers, formerly of the Furman Fitting School, went Overseas with the I 18th Infantry and was wounded in the head by a shell October 15. 1918. Lieutenant D. Townsend Smith, also of the 1 18th Infantry, was wounded, remaining in the hospital six weeks. Capt. W. Wallace Wingo, Class of ’16, also of the I 18th Infantry, was gassed at St. Quentin, France, September 28, 1918. Lieutenant Frank Wise was wounded in action. Lieutenant John W. Wood, Class of 17. of the 29th Division, was severely wounded while in command of two companies in the Argonnc l orcst. Resting in a shell hole, he was attacked by five Germans, three of whom had bayonets pointing at his throat. He disposed of three of them, but in attempting to get a fourth was shot twice, one bullet passing through his left lung and the other one through each wrist. Sergeant Wayland B. Jones, Class of '16, was a member of the distinguished group of engineers who saved the Allied cause when it took the place of the French, who had fallen back and thus left a breach in the line. He was under fire for nine months.MAIN BUILDING AND LIBRARY Pai fifteenTOWARDS THE CITY Page sixteenALUMNI HALL Page seventeenTOWARD THE LIBRARY AND ALUMNI HALL Page eighteenSCIENCE HALL 0ic nineteenMONTAGUE HALL Page I verilyMcGee Hall P°gc Itvenly-oncpresident’s home Page tvcnt -iv° inA Brief History of Furman University HE record of Furman University is that of struggle and triumph. In exulting over the splendid triumphs one may forget the strenuous struggle and silent sacrifices that have placed Furman where she now stands. As early as the beginning of the nineteenth century the leading Baptist of the State saw the need of an educated ministry. With this need in view they began to plan. The agitation for an educated ministry was taken up by Dr. Richard Furman (1755-1825). who migrated with his parents from New York. His name is written in letters of light over all the early history of the Baptists in South Carolina. He will ever be remembered as the first president of the Triennial Convention of Baptists, the founder of Mercer University of Georgia and Hamilton University of New York. For a number of years this faithful, devout man pleaded and worked for a Baptist institution of learning in South Carolina; but did not live to see its real inception. However, the dreams and plans of this earnest worker passed into the hearts of others. The result was the establishment of h urman Academy and Ideological Institute at Edgefield, S. C., 1827. Shortly afterwards the school was removed to Winnsboro, in the Fairfield District. At the same time an agricultural department was added and the literary department broadened. From here, more than half a century ago, it was transferred to Greenville, its name having been changed to Furman University. Here, under the leadership of Dr. James C. Furman, "the distinguished son of a distinguished father,” the institution was widened in every respect, and, despite the thickening shadows of the war, never was there such a bright prospect for the future as now. Eighteen hundred and fifty-two witnessed the birth of the “Standard College of Liberal Arts.” This year also marks the arrival on the campus of an eminent man and teacher. Dr. Charles Hallctte Judson. After the death of Professor Mims, in 1855, James P. Boyce assumed charge of the Theological Department of the University. He had as his worthy associates in the Seminary, John A. Broadus, Basil Manly, and William Williams. This famous quartette did much in promoting the cause of the Southern Baptist 1 heological Seminary now located in Louisville, Ky. For a few years the University was in a prosperous condition, with a faculty composed of young men versatile in talent, noted for their depth end breadth of learning and possessing rare mental vigor and acuteness, Furman University promised to be at cncc the foremost college of the South. The student body grew larger and larger every year and the dawn of Furman’s history was bright indeed. But clouds began to gather yonder. The trumpet blast was heard in the distance. I wo hundred and sixty men, who had gathered within Furman’s peaceful walls, laid aside Page l»enl f-lhrcetheir books and in response to the clarion call of their beloved State, marched forth to battle for the cause she espoused. Four years later, when the battle flag was furled by a people defeated and cast down but not destroyed, the first thought that came to the battle-scarred heroes was to reopen the doors of Furman. What devastation filled the land! What could be done? The era of Reconstruction hung like a pall over all her fortunes. It was not till 1869 that the school was permanently on sure ground again. Under the presidency of Dr. Furman, who continued in this capacity till 1881, the school, year after year, breathed more freely. In the year 1881 Dr. Charles Manly assumed control and directed operations wisely and well until his resignation in 1897. At the termination of Dr. Manly’s incumbency. Dr. A. P. Montague was chosen president. During the five years he was president, the Alumni Hall, the old Fitting School Building, and the Montague Hall were built, at a cost of $22,000, $3,000, and $12,000 respectively. Dr. E. M. Poteat succeeded Dr. Montague in November, 1903. In the same year, under the agency of Rev. Joel I. Allen, subscriptions to the amount of $123,000 were secured for endowment. Under Dr. Poteat’s administration, 1903 to July, 1918, the University made great progress. Faculty organization was modified by the creation of two new positions. Chairman of the Faculty and Dean. The Curriculum was broadened by the following new departments or schools: The School of History with a professor giving all of his time, the School of Physics and Astronomy, the School of Philosophy and Education, and the School of Christianity. The new Laboratories for Biology and Physics, the new quarters for the museum, together with the new facilities for the teaching of Chemistry, have put Furman alongside the best of her sister institutions. A new course, with a predominance of Science leading to the degree of Bachelor and Science, was made possible by these new facilities. To write the present history of a school such as Furman is no mean task. Though in the past her progress has been great, never in her history has it been what it is today. New buildings are constantly being added, the student body increasing, and the endowment fund being added to. The grounds have shown general and steady improvement with paved walks and roadways, and last of all, to crown all. the flag and flagpole and the Manly Athletic F ield. Today she is more widely known than ever before. The Baptists realize that it is their school and arc proud, and justly so, of the work which it is doing. The faculty stands for all that is best in both the old and the new methods of teaching, and nowhere will you find a more thorough system of instruction. The work of Furman is well known throughout the Southland and recognized by the older and larger institutions of the North as the equal of any. The present, then, is a medley of work, energy and enthusiasm. There is a pleasure in the past, a glorious work at present, and hope and wishes for a prosperous future. Page Iwcniy-fourPa«' toenljf.faSydney Ernest Bradshaw, M.A.. Ph.D. Acting President and Professor of Modern Languages II. A. mid M.A.. Ret ht-l (’olli'trp, Ivon lucky: Ph.D.. I'n I versify or VirRinln: Student at University « r Chicago, Leipzig. and Berlin; Professor « r Knglish. Bethel College. and Manual Training HlRh School. Louisville. Ky.; traveled in Europe In 1895. 1903-1904. 1900. 1911 and 1913; Member of Modern Languages Association of America: Professor of Modern Language since 1904. and Chairman of the Faculty wince 1912: Honorary member of Phi Beta Kappa of I'n I versify of Virginia. Harvey Tolliver Cook. M.A.. Litt.D. Emeritus Professor of Creclf M.A.. Furman University, 1875; Lltt.D., Furman University. 1900; Instructor Patrick Military 8choo|. 1S73-1S81; professor of Greek since 1881. Marshall Delph Earle Professor of Mathematics M.A.. Furman Unit,-rally; Student University of Wisconsin. Cornell. Cambridge (Kngland): professor of Mathematic South Carolina State Summer School, 1900-190S; Member of tlie American Mathematical Society. Mathematical Association of America: American Association for the Advancement of Science: Instructor in Mathematics. Furman University. ISS9-1S93; Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 1X9S-1897: Professor of Physics. 1897-1900: Professor of Mathematics since 1900. Hides Toy Cox. B.A. Professor of Physics and Astronomy H.A.. Furman University. 1903; Graduate Student University of Chicago, Summer Sessions, P.'iiC. 1910. 1911; Principal Heath Springs High School. 1904-1900; Assistant Professor, Furman University, 1906-1911; Dean since 1913. Page twenty-six!irofcssor of Philosophy and Political Science It. A. and !!.! .. University of Chicago. lss.t; M.A.. Colgate University. V' t: l .I). Shurtleff College, isss; Member of the American Philological Association. Society of Biblical Literature ami Bxeglsl . Philosophical Society of I real Britain 4Victoria Institute), ami American Philosophical Association; Professor of Philosophy ami Political Science since ISOS; Lecturer on the Norton Foundation. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Ky.. for the year U'L ; l.ecturer In the Summer School of Philosophy Grove City. Pa.. 1914-1917. Wii.lis Beeler Bible. M.A. Associate Professor of English It.A.. Parson ami Newman College. 1910; M.A.. Parson ami Newman College, 191S; Athletic Coach, Parson ami Newman. 1901-1911; Student University or Chicago. 1911-1912; Professor of English and Athletic Director. Savannah Institute, Tennessee. 1912-1913; Professor of English and History, ami Athletic Director. Allen Academy Bryan, Texas. 1913-1914; Student Harvard I’niverslty. Summer. 1910; Associate Professor of Kngllsh since 1914. Profcsor of Chemistry, and Biology It s.. Kunnnn 1‘nlversity; M.S.. Vanderbilt University. 1900; Instructor lit chemistry. Vanderbilt University. 1999-1900; Professor of Physical and Biological Science. Winchester Normal College. Tennessee. 1900-1907; Assistant in Science, Furman University, 1907-1911: phalr of Chemistry. Geology, ami Biology, Furman University since 1911; Secretary of Faculty; Curator. Furman University Museum; chairman of Committee on Degrees and Publicity Committee; Member American Association for the Advancement of Science; American Chemical Society; National Geographical Society; Manager and Treasurer. Greenville I.yccum Association: Lecturer on Chemistry, and Member Board of Governors. Greenville City Hospital; Treasurer City Hospital. James Leland Vass, M.A. Professor of History M.A.. Furman University. 19 M; Instructor. Furman Fitting School. 1901-1905; Greek Fellow, University of Chicago. 1905-1900; Greek Assistant. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 1900-1907; Instructor University Flexnor School, Louisville, Ky.. 1907; Instructor Anderson High School, 1907-1909; Professor of History. Page tt enty-se cnHerbert Winston Provence, M.A.. Th.D. Professor of English M.A.. Itlchmond (’nllopo, Vn.. IS! I: Th.l).. Sonihorn Itaptlst Theological Seminary. is: s: I’astor, Montgomery. Ain.. 189 1902: lifrmlng-hum. Ain., 1902 1904: Kvangclist and Teacher. Shanghai. China. 1901-1912: Pastor. Clinton. Miss., 1912-391 :t: Professor ..f Hlble anil Philosophy, Mississippi College, 1911 1914: Associate Professor of Knglish. Kurmnn University. 191I-1915; Professor of KngliSh since 1915. Lawrence Henry Bowen. B.A. Assistant Professor of Mathematics •On leave military service. 1918-1919. John Scott Murray, M.A., LL.D. Professor of Indent Languages M.A., Fiirmnn I'nlverslty. Greenville, S.O.. 1878; Attorney-al-Law. Anderson. S. « . 1880-1882; Onuliinte Student at Johns Hopkins University, session 1SS2-1SS2: At Goo t linger, Germany, sum-iner semester. 1883; University of Leipzig, 1883-18 4: University of Herlln. PM-ISSS; Occupied the elialr of Latin l-aiiguage and Literature, University of South Carolina, I$ss-ix91: Chair of the Greek Language and l.lterature, Mercer University, 1S9M917, the chair of German. 1 92-1894; the chair of French. 1901 1911: the Chair of Modern Languages, Mercer University. 1917 1918; the Chair of Ancient Languages, Furman University. 1919; Degree of LL.I . conferred by Furman University, Mercer University. University of South Carolina, 191 ; Member of the Ithodes Committee of Selection for Georgia, 1907-191.;. Students’ Assistants Ai.fred Taylor Assistant in Chemical Laboratoryj W. W. Anderson and C. J. Jones Assistants in Physics Laboratory Page twenty-eightAdministrative Officers S. E. Bradshaw I I. T. Cox . . . G. A. Buist .... J. H. Simpson............ Alberta A. Malone . . Barbara Chapman B. E. Geer . ................................Acting President • • . Dean . . . . Sec'}; of the Faculty arul Curator of the Museum .................Registrar and Supt. of Grounds and Buildings ............................................ Librarian ........................................ Stenographer ..........................Treasurer and Bursar Committee of the Faculty Admission of Students................. Athletics............................. Catalogue............................. Bulletin of F. U...................... Executive............................. Library .............................. Publicity and Announcements . . . Scholarships and Student Loan Funds Student Publications.................. Courses .............................. . . . Provence, Eari.e, Cox ..............Vass. Eari.e. Cox Fletcher. Murray, Buist Murray. Fletcher. Bradshaw . . . Bradshaw. Earle. Cox . Bradshaw. Vass. Provence . . . Buist, Cox. Bradshaw . . . Earle. Cox. Provence . . . . Bible, Buist. Vass ............Cox. Earle, Buist P t' twenty-nineVIEWS Page thirty aZc thirty.ontPage thirty-twoD. V. Cochran. Jr W. W. Anderson . L. C. Rankin . . Senior Class Miss Carolyn Elizabeth Cartwricht. Sponsor Class Officers . . . President . Pice-President . . . Secretary F. K. C. Creech G. T. Windei.l . W. D. Barr . . R. C. Peace . . . . . Treasurer Prophet Historian . Poet 3q8c thirty. tl,rccSenior Class William Woodruff Anderson, B.A...............................................Woodruff, S. C. "Hail to the Chief who in triumph advances " Athletic Editor "Hornet"; V. M. O. A. Editor 'IC-’IT; Kurmnn Council; AMixUnt Managei : Glee Club: Corresponding Secretary Society '17-MS; Glee Club; Vice-President class: Furman Council: Vice-President Phllosophian Society. Spring Term; Senior Critic. Fall Term: President Glee Club. Secretary Debate Council; Editor-In-Chief Bonhomie 'IS-’IS: Member of Phllosophlnn Society: Senior Club; Kindergarten Club: Tennis Club; Epicurean Club; PI Kappa Phi. "Nor could he be improved upon; A lovely man, with shining eyes; His portrait throw your eyes upon— Listen to that lady's sighs!" Allen Whitsitt Askins, B.A. Lake City, S. C. 'Man's ranl( is his power to uplift." Furman Council: "Bonhomie" Class Editor: Sccretaty Class ’lS-'lS; Assistant Football Manager; Assistant Cheer Leader; Member Athletic Association: Sergeant Co. "A”: Member "Pikers" club ’17-’18: Treasurer Senior Club; "Hornet" Staff; Junior Censor, Spring Term; Glee Club; Furman Council: Member Executive Committee Council Judson Baraca Class: V. M. C. A.: PI Kappa Phi. "Loving heart! loving heart! listen lo me! Light of my life. I can fork up the kale; Sail with me out to the bliss summer sea!"— Oh. how many maidens have heard the same plea? Page thirty-fourSenior Class Walter DuBarry Barr, B.A..........................................................Greenville, S. C. "I never fell (he l(iss of love, nor Maiden's hand in mine." A man of inevitable worth—a credit to Ills class—this man hits always been. Member doe Club; Historian Class 'l$-‘lt ; Club Editor 'I8-‘1! : Member Senior Club. "The tide moves even! No ebbs nor flows To mar ihe lemper of a genlle man! But what may happen, my word! who knows? When he becomes a married man?" Daniel West Cochran, Jr.. B.A "A lovelier flower cn earth was never sown." Assistant Fergennt-ftt-Arms Society: Society Editor ••Hornet.” Spring; Term: Single and Double Tennis Champion ’Id-’l"; Senior Censor .Fall Term; Athletic Editor Echo. Fall Term; Literary Editor Echo. Spring Term: Class Editor “Bonhomie”: Vice-President Class; Chief Marshall at Commencement: Single and Double Tennis Champion; ltunncr-up Doubles; S. C. I. T. A. 'I7-'1S; Junior Critic Society; Inter-Society Debater; Member Debate Council; Member Inter-Society Eolations Committee; Corresponding Secretary: Literary Editor Echo, Spring Term: Vice-President Society. Fall Term; President Society. Spring Term; Assistant Editor “Hornet"; President Class; President and Manager Tennis Club, 'lS-’P.i; Member Adelplilan Literary Society; Tennis Club; V. M. C. A.; Alpha Sigma Pal; Senior Club. Dan is a man who can. He never ran. nor raised sand; Loyal lo our band, he stands A winning hand—a man! Greenville. S. C. Page (hirl )-fiveSenior Class Franklin Kirkland Carlisle Creech, B.A....................................Denmark, S. C. "Let the wide world wiggle, got it by the tail " Assistant Sergeant-nt-Arms, Kail Term: Historian Class ‘la-'K; Marshall Sockty: Alumni Editor. Kolio, Flail Term: Athletic Kdltoi Echo. Spring Term 'lt:-•lT; 'treasurer Society. Spring Term; Vie.-' President Society, spring Term: Athletic Kditor ••Hornet”; Assistant Cheer l.eader; Glee Club ’IT-'ls; President Society. Fall Term; Standard Bearer Society. Spring Term; Assistant Editor-In-Chief •‘Echo": Assistant Editor-in-chief "Bonhomie": Business Manager "Hornet”; Treasurer class; chr.-i-Lendcr: Glee Club: President Athletic Association: Member Athletic Council ’IS-’lft; Member of A lelphlan Literary Society: Baraca Class; V. M. C. A.; Epicurean Club: Senior Club; Kindergarten Club; ijuurtcrnion Club, "Tell me not in mournful numbers Creech is but an cmply dream; If you heard his midnight slumbers You would think him full of steam." Hubert Westmoreland Cunningham, B.A.............................................Greer, S. C. "Come, my crony, let’s think upon far-away days. And lift up a little Oblivion’s veil; Let's consider the past with a lingering gaze. Like a peacock whose eyes arc inclined to his tail." Graduated B. M. I.. '15-'18; Glee Club President Annual Association 'IS-’U; Quarternlon Club: Member of Adclphlan Literary Society: Senior Club. "Handsome Hubert is our hero. He who never loafs nor plays; If he e’er should catch a shero She will change his quiet ways. Page thirty- ' Senior Class Ira Claud Davis, B.A.....................................................Campobcllo, S. C. “O dear, the pang it is to feel So mealy-mouthed without a meal! Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms Society: Improvement Medal Society I5-’I€; t'bnplnlu Society. Sprint; Term. ‘IC-’IT: Society Public Debater; Junior Piltlc Society. Sprint; Term; Vice-Provident Society. SpiJnt; Term; I.Horary ICdilor "Hornet." Sprlne Term. ’IT-’IS; Senior Critic. Spring Term: Chairman Inter-voclcty Delations Committee; President Society. Spring Term; Secretary of Senior Club: Cllec Oltib. ‘IT-’IS. 1S-' 1»; Member Adelplilan I.Horary Society; Y. M. C. A.J Balnea Pin . 1. C. Davis! What sees he? Belcher it’s a girlie If it’s not another I. C. Herbert Henry Ergle, B.A..........................................................Granitcville, S. C. ”How seldom, friend, a good great man inherits Honor or wealth with all his worth and pains! Member Adelplilan Literary Society; Junior Critic Society. Fall Term. Vice-President Society Fall Term. is-i»; Member V. M. a.: Judson Memorial Uaraca ias : Tennis flub; Senior Club. "And when ihc lighls arc burning low 1 hrough broken windowpanes we’ll sec A smiling chap rock to and fro With seven little ones on his knee." Page thirty-sevenSenior Class John Joseph Gentry, B.A......................................................................Landrum, S. C. "Your glass may be purple, and mine may be blue. But, while they arc filled from the fame bright bowl, The fool, who would quarrel for difference of hue. Deserves not the comfort they shed o’er the soul.” Our frleml Centry w« n regular ••sale-water guy” ami deserve special mention f« r til ,arl ' J '" struggle for Christianity over riiirbitrism. Ho was on tin ship f. s. Mmituuk until iIm.' ":i ’’,k: M-rubor Soninr flub. “An old cob pipe and a soft plush chair. Plenty of water, but a shortage of beer: A nice warm fire, and some comfy togs. 1 ill ma yells out, "Come, feed the hogs.’ Conway Jefferson Jones. B.S. Fountain Inn, S. C . A gentleman without fear and without reproach." .Wislanl Serge«nt-nt-. rrns« Society. Spring Term Mi-’IC: fomluetnr ..f Society. Kail Term ,l.:- | : .M- -in Inn-.r arsitj l o.,inull Team ‘IT-M.s; Junior fcnitor. Kali Term; Vice KiosUIrnl .Society spring l-im. At ember .Mill tie Assoclal i-n: .M-iiiIht „r Varsity Knot but I Team; M a linger of Ha ebnll Team; Knot ball Team: Assistant Kusllic Manager "Bonhomie": Secretary „r -! T’"''.'" ,,f ' «« •■ --!=.: .Member „f l-hll-x-.pliian Km-lciy; kindergarten, lit. 1.1 ui - an « tut ; A. At. «. A.; Itaraea On ; Alpha Sigma I'sl; Senior flub. "Never was a football player Better when il comes to striking, Never was a beller fellow Insofar as goes our liking." Page thirty-eightSenior Class Ernest Connors Kolb, A.B.........................................................Sumter, S. C. "A the sky we look up lo. though glorious and fair. Is looked up to the more, because heaven lies there. chaplain Society, Spring 'form ’Ifl-’IT; Junior Critic. Fall Term: Senior Connor, Spring orator's .Metlal: I liter-Society Relation Committee; State Orator: Exchange Editor "w'jio": Hurttca Clatis Secretary. Fall Term: flu president: Furman Council; Faculty "Echo" Medal 1.- IS; president Society. Fall Term; Junior Or I tit?. Spring Term: Intel-Society IX'baler; Winner Inter-Society Oratorical .Medal: State orator: Bdilor-ln-t'hler »r "Beho" Member of Plillosopnlan I.iteiaiv Society; Itaraca ('lass; V. M. O. A.; Senior Club: "Hiker ' " Club. Gentlemen of the Universe, arise! Here comes a man lo fill a place Which is not won by weakly sighs Or balking in a stiffened trace. Lawrence Edwin Lenhardt, B.A.....................................................Easley, S. C. "His changing cheek, his sinking heart confess The might, the majesty of his loveliness. Junior Critic Society. Fall Term: Vice-President Spring Term; Member Intcr-SJ? ■ .... . o.. rl millet ; SI talent Editor "Hornet”: Alumni Editor "Echo." Fall Term: I.ocnl ... illsimlae' Term; flub Editor "Honltomle": Prcaident Tennis Club: President Epicurean Itelatlons Commit Club Senior Critic Society. Society Editor "Hornet” 1«- 1S: Meinlici of lntcr-Soelety Relation « oimnitt ••: . «ocrcPiry arid Fall Term; Vice-President Society, Spring T«rm; Cashier Society; Reporter Senior •"Tennis C'ub; Treasurer of Tennis Club 1S-'P.»: Member of Adelphiun I.iterary Sccltty: V. M. -• Epicurean Club; Haracu Class; S« Itior Club. "No, she is not ejuile a woman. Just a "Sislcr." we would say: If her nose weren't |uilc so Roman Wc would kis3 her every day." V thirt n;ncSenior Class William Francis Logcins. B.A....................................................................Easley, S. C. "I have not a joy but of thy bringing. And pain itself seems sweet when springing From thee, thee, only thee. ' Attend 1 I'i liii .nl Cnll -K ' ' • I . t • - 1 n : -M :nl « f litu l.itcrnrx 8« el. ty; .if V. M. c. A.; Memtn-i' nf .Itnlvon Memorial liarai'ii (.'lass: Mfnil«-r of Senior ’|ut». "I !c loves his rides to f.aslcy. He's always neat and sweet. .And lighting his fair countenance Is the smile you always meet." James Walter Long, B.A....................................................................Liberty, S. C. "Taps!" You shall linger in my dicams.” •IuiiIoi tYntint s ii- iv. Kail Term; T •■amnci Society. Spijnsr Term: Winner r MticMiillnn in-elniimtton Medal ‘IT-'ls; pn-Hid.-nt ot I lii) i»l iixt» Sociotv. Fall ‘term: Senior Critic Society. Spring Term., Kintt Sei Kcant in S. T. C.: Sc« i -tur Bniaca Class IS--1: Vlco-l'n-aidem Antiunl Associate !' •Ja.'lt : .Member of l'liHoyoptiiaii Literary Society: V. M. C. A.: BavnCa Class: Meinlicr Senior cm . A long, long trail is winding Into the lands of his dreams. And we hear the little ones whining Till he stops them with cream. Page torl Senior Class Clinton Jones Lupo, B.A..............................................................Greenville. S. C. "O, inexpressible as sweet. Love takes my voice away; I cannot tell thee when we meet What most I long to say." Scrgeant-nt-Arms Adelphlan Society, Spring Term 'IS-’K; Chaplain Society. Spring Term: Sergeant In S. A. T. t Member « f AdclphIan I.Horary Society; Member of Senior Club. “A man with a square jaw. Willi eyes that say. Will take the biggest flaw And make it pay." Edward Allison McDowell. B.A. Kingslrcc, S. C. "W'hy did I dream that sleep overpowered me." Winner of Wharton Declamation Medal ' 1 V I I; Historian Society. I'ull Term: Exchange Editor ••Echo," Fall and Spring Terms: Member Glee Club; Deelalmer Phllosophlan Society 1’tinllc Meeting; Winner Hiekx Orator's Medal; Endel Declamation Medal 'K-'IT; Senior Critic Society. Fall Term; Debater Philosophlnn Public Meeting: Inicr-Soelety Orator; Society Editor •'Hornet"; Assistant Manager "Bonhomie"; Manager Glee Club; Class Historian '17-'1X; Vice-President Society. Fall Term; President Society. Spring Term: Inter-Society Debater; Glee Club; Manager Glee Club; Chairman Executive Committee: Editor-In-Chief "Hornet": Member of Pbllosophlan l.lterary Society: Quartcmlon Club; Epicurean Club: Kindergarten Club; Tennis Club; Senior Club; Y. M. C. A.; Baraca Class. "Ho! A strong man, l orn wilh brains. Wilh valor of a Roman. May lose his spurs and driving reins— Oh! blame il on a woman!" igc forty-oneSenior Class Henry Owen Morris, B.A.......................................................................Olar, S. C. "A daiing pilot in extremity." Improvement Medal: Chaplain Society. Sprint? Term '1.' -’16; Class President: Fnrmnn Council: Vice-President Buraen Clnw ’16 17: Treasurer Society, Fall Term: Recording Socretnrj Society: V. M. _ • President: Qlee Club; Cireiilntion .Manager ’'Hornet": Vice-President South Cnrollnn Inter-Collegia Association: Society Public Debater; President Society, Full Term: chaplain. Spring Term: President Bara Oft Class; Business .Manager "Kcho”: President South Carolina Inter-Collegiate Oratorical Association ’lS-'lil; Member of Adelphlan Literary Society; Y. M. c. , : Burma Class; Senior Club. “Along shall ride a young lieutenant Beneath the triumphed U. S. Pennant, Shall lake a wife of fair complexion And leave her io attend inspection." Edward Herman Oswald, B.A..........................................................Allendale, S. C. “ ’Tis sweel lo think Inal, where’er we tovc. We are sure lo find somelhing blissful and dear. And lhal. when we’re far from the lips wc love. We’ve but lo make love lo ibe lips wc arc near. Sorgoant -nt -A rms T.iterary cording Secretary Society homle”; Junior Baraca Class Society, Fall Tei or Censor Society Is- I- : : Y. M. C. A.: Bplcuivan Fall Term ’IG-'lT; Inter-Scclet notations Committee nr; l.oc-aI Kditor ‘•Kcho.’’ Fall Term: Circulation Mi Member of Adelphian Literary Society; Senior Club; Pi Kappa Phi. “Jack the Giant Killer slew gianls Soldiers slew men. Re- nager "Ho,,. ,ub= Judaon Lawyers ply upon ibeir clients— I capture women.” Senior Class Rogers Craft Peace, B.A.............................................................Greenville, S. C. "Bui oh! Inc pocl's lo.c Can boasl a brighter sphere; Its native home's above. 1 hough woman keeps it here." On. )! Treasurer '1S- 1C; (Mass Editor “Bonhomie" ’17-MS; Class Poet: Class Editor ’lS-'lO; Member of Senior Club; Alpha SiRmA !• !. Peace in this world. Peace in the future. But the best kind of Peace, Is the Peace we are used to. Lloyd Croxton Rankin, B.A...........................................................Williston, S. C. ” ’N Lverylhing." Assistant Sergcant-nt-Anns. Fall Term: Scrgennt-at-Arms, Spring Term M6-M7; Junior Censor. Fall Term ’17-MS; Vice-President Furman Council; Member Debate Council; Circulation Manager Furman ’■Hornet"; Senior Censor. Fall Term; President of Society. Spring Term; Business Manager "Bonhomie’'; De'egatc to C. P. A.; Member Executive Committee Phllosophian I.lterary Society; Secretary Senior Class: Treasurer of C. I . A. ’1S-M9; Member Kindergarten Club; Member Epicurean Club; Member of Phllosophlan Literary Society; Member Senior Club. Our '19 Apollo, serenely fair. Annclte figure, Pickford face. When to a bride the oalh you swear. Be sure that she will love your grace. Page 1 or ly- threeSenior Class Kemp Delette Smith, B.A..............................................................Marion. S. C. "Would you forget the dark world we arc in. Just taste of the bubble that gleams on the lop of it; But would you rise above earth, till akin To immortals themselves, you must drain every drop of it. Public Debater Society; Junior Critic ,ts-'l!»: Member of pit I humph Ian Literary Soel.-ty; .liid«m Memorial Itarnen Claw; V. M. A.: Senior Club. "The rest have tarried. But K. D. married; So hc‘s ready for strife— The struggles of life." Sebastian Angelico de Souza. B.A..........................S. Fidelia E. dc Rio, Brazil, S. A. "Souls to souls that never can teach What unto themselves was taught." Honor Itoll Chaplain Society. Sprint: T rm; Senior Censor. Sprint; Term; Member of the Faculty of Chick Sprint; Military Academy: President of Student Volunteer Hand, Sprint: Term; Delegate to tb Internatlonnl Stnclem Volunteer Conference. Hast Xorthtlehl. Mtl«.; V. M. « . A Editor. Spring Term '17-'1S; Junior Censor. Fall Term: Vice-President Society, Spring Term: V. M. c. A. Editor 'IS-M9; Memtter of Adelphlan Literary Society; Bartica Class; Tennis Clul ; Meinlter of Senior Club. "Gaze upon his handsome face. Ladies greet him with a smile. Grant him yet a lille grace— Mis will be a handsome child." ’uge forty.fourSenior Class Fletcher Seaborn Stone, B.A.....................................................Greenville, S. C. "Oh! haste and leave this sacred isle. Unholy bark, ere morning smile; For on thy deck, though dark it be. A female form I sec." Varsity Basketball Team 'lo-'li;; Basketball Team: Viee-lTeiddem Class; Treasurer Society ‘16-'I7; Sergcant-at-Arm . Kail Term: Secretary Class; Assistant Business Manager ■‘Echo" 'K-'IS; Advertising Manager "Hornet" '1S-'1S ; Member of Adelphinn I.Horary Society; Senior Club: Active Service I . S. X. R. F. “Red.” the sailor, college boy— Auburn, shall wc call the grass? Upright as a soldier toy— Will he wed an Auburn lass?" John Addison Tumblin, B.A................................ “My spirit is too weak—mortality Weighs heavily on me like unwilling sleep." Standard Hearer Society. Spring Term Chaplain Society, Kali Term Corresponding Secretary Society Kecordlng Secretary Society. Spring Term: Corresponding Secretary 1S- It : Member of riiiloaophlan l.lterary Society; Y. M. c. A.: .ludaon Memorial linraca Class; Senior Club. "1 love to sleep. I do. 1 do. I love to have the breezes blow Across my weary eyes at two When Doctor Pat is breathing low." Laurens, S. C. n°8cSenior Class William Albert Whitlock, B.A........................................................ditching’s Mill. S. C. "Unless you now give up your suit. You may repent your love; I, who have shot a pigeon match. Can shoot a turtle dove." Standnril Bearer Society: Sergemii .Military C . "IT-’IS; Sergeant S. A. Reporter of Haracfl Clans 'IS-'IS; Member of Attelplilan Literary Society; V. M. c, A.: Barnea lmu»: tennis (tut.; Senior Club. "Were I a painter 1 would paint His beauteous form in heavens fair: So that the ladies might sec this saint And love him as he slumbers there." David Norman Wilburn. B.A.....................................Union. S. C. " 1y only books Were woman's looks. And folly's all they've taught me." Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms; Class Historian Junior Tensor. Spiimr Term 'Ij-'U; ; Rocor.lliiS S.-eivtarv Society. Kail Term; Senior Critic Society. Spring Term; |nler-S «-l«t Helatlons « «mmit e. Athlet ie Rilltor ••Bonlieinlo”: Class Kilitor; t'liairinan Kxeoutive t’onimittee Connell. I iesi l-nt St intent Council: I’resident Senior Clul. IS- l;.; Member of I’hlloimphlnii l.iterary S»«let ;: '. M. . A. . Baraea Class; Kindergarten Club; Kpicurean Club; Tennis Club: Senior dab: Alpha Sigma 1st. Our cat says. Then of course it's true. "That Tootsie' will gel married And live happily, too. Page forty ' Senior Class William Montgomery Wilkins, B.A.............................................Gatfncy. S. C. "Some sigh for this and that. My wishes don't go far, The world may wag at will, So 1 have my cigar." Sergeant Military Co. 'lT-'IS; Corporal S. A. T. C. '1 1 : Member of INiilosophlan Literary Society: Judxon Memorial Baraca Class; Y. M. C. A.: Senior Club: Tennis Club. "Young Lochinvar is come out of the west, With necktie of purple and pink colored vest; In the great wide arena he can cope with the best As he slings the bovine with a great deal of zest." Gary Tillman Windell, B.A.......................................Fort Mill, "He is nothing of the lion, hut nothing hut the roar. s. c. Itnrncn Class: Senior Club; Tennis Club. "When goblets spill the parting drop. And fancy into fact docs glide. We ll mis-s your smiling face—but stop! Who is that damsel at your side?" Page forty-sevenSenior Class History 1 was in the autumn of 1915 when seventy-five verdant youths listed to the call of Furman to be ripened into wiser and abler boys, hoping that in their quest for the truth they would be made free. Breathlessly they gazed upon the platform in Judson Hall where set the wise faculty. Soon, however, their fear vanished, and the seventy-five who had become organized into a freshman class grew into the life and spirit of the campus. They learned the art of ignoring the majestic gaze of the Soph., and returning home that year they were a surprise to their parents and a smartly-clad mystery to their sweethearts. Once again the veteran of college life is seen lugging his suitcase down past the Chapel Hall to that isolated domicile of the Sophomore. This is the critical year of college life. He counts his classmen—forty-seven! But there’s no time for tears; the Soph, reception has to be pulled off in more radiant splendor than ever before. It was a summer house hidden in a garden of roses; and what will remain more beautiful to his memory than that one short evening? The happy maid with the glowing face and the evening dress, and the music outside in the hall, was enough to justify the ice cream he found on his dress suit the next day. Our mood has changed. Each day the war clouds grow darker and our boys go quickly away. We are drawn by an invisible force into the spirit of oneness. With the future dark and uncertain our attention is focused upon our country. Restless we plod along to our classes, expecting each hour to hear the call "To the Battlefront.” We number but thirty-three. Our president has us to “stick to our job until the finish.” So with this idea strongly fixed in our minds we stand by our Alma Mater and dare to hope that we might have opportunity to spend full time in college and in 1919 reap the four-year harvest of Furman. We did not start so soon this year, but it was with a newer and brighter hope that in January we assembled at Chapel to begin a more vigorous quest for truth. As a class we no longer feel as strangers to each other. We have become truly fellows. Friendships have been formed which are locked no doubt for a lifetime. We have learned that the faculty is not the terrible enemy of the freshman’s nightmare, but friend and helper and, if you will, pal with a clubable spirit. And to each member of the faculty we leave our sincerest thanks; and to Miss Malone and Miss Long we would express our gratitude. And to Furman, our Alma Mater, who has given to us her fullest measure of devotion, we cannot speak, but our hearts will forever pay to her the homage of love and affection. —Historian. Page forty-eightSenior Medalists I. C. Davis J. W. Long H. O. Morris E. C. Kolb E. A. McDowell orty-nirteSenior Prophecy March 7. 1929. To the Prophet of the Class of 1919: Will you kindly take a census of the members of the Class of 1919 and let me know as scon as possible "Who’s who, where, and why?” Secretary of the Alumni Society. September 3, 1929. Dear Sir: Since receiving your letter of five months ago I have endeavored to cither sec or get in touch with every member of the 1919 Class, and I am now able to make the following report: Upon leaving Fort Mill I went straight to Woodruff. I found "Andy" Anderson a Medical Doctor, having only one Wm., Jr., and boosting his home town and Carolin-a. A. W. Askins is now mayor, council, chamber of commerce, and police force of Lake City. He is an old bachelor, but a great ladies’ man. After finishing Physics 3, Barr went into the hardware business in the city of Greenville. I found him at a baseball game between Wofford and Furman on the old Manly Athletic Field. Dan Cochran has given up his love for tennis and is ably occupying the chair of Argumentation in the Presbyterian Seminary at Columbia. In passing through Denmark I looked out of the train window and saw some one swaying a large audience with a masterful selection from McDowell. "It is Screechy' Creech. I must hurry on. next station, please.” I remarked to the conductor. Strolling down the Main street of Greer, I paused before a large dental establishment just as our old friend Cunningham walked out. "Lo, Old 1 op, was just going to dinner. Come and go along.” His ability to envelop a vague and uncertain thought in a spontaneous flow of superfluous verbosity soon won fame for I. C. Davis in the political field. He is now State Senator, is a planter, and is married. After graduation. H. H. Ergle went to the Southwestern Seminary for two years. He is now pastor of the First Baptist Church of Graniteville, but he informed me that he and Mrs. Ergle would sail for Shanghai, China, as a missionary in the early fall of 1930. J. J. Gentry, Jr., is still looking for the “rookie" that sent him to the hospital for three days while he was in the navy. Conway Jefferson Jones is the sole owner and proprietor of a magnificent country home in the progressive community of Fountain Inn. He says that his vocation is farming, but that his avocation is amusing and entertaining the children. The Class of '19 produced a profound thinker and a very abb scholar in Ernest C. Kolb. Rio Baptist Theological Seminary. Brazil, was very fortunate in securing him to occupy the chair of Theology and Homiletics. After finishing a medical course at Johns Hopkins with second honors. J. Walter Long returned to Belton and opened an "Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat ’ establishment. “Major” C. J. Lupo will begin his new duties as instructor of mathematics in Page fiftyColumbia University next fall. He is now taking a short course at Oxford University preparatory for his work. The untiring work and interest of W. F. Loggins in the progress of education in Pickens County has led to his election as Superintendent of Education of his native county. After finishing an anonymous course at Furman, “Sister” Lcnha Jt made a trip to Paris in order that he might set a new pace in styles. I found him operating a Ladies’ Quality Shop in Easley. “Lo, the mountains stoop to hear my oratory"—E. A. McDowell. This virile little orator’s voice has failed him and he is now writing short stories for the American magazine. Strong convictions, studious habits, patient love for Greek—these traits led to the eminent qualifications of H. O. Morris for his position as Assistant Professor of Greek in the S. B. T. S. E. H. Oswald is now writing a book on the merits of the latest style of dancing. After spending two years in the editorial rooms of the Greenville News, Roger Peace retired to his mountain home. Since that time he has been devoting his time to writing poetry. "The Things Wc Love.’’ his first volume, will be published this fall. By reason of his experience gained in managing the publication of the Bonhomie, L. C. Rankin has risen rapidly in the financial world. He is now President of the Bank of Williston. K. D. Smith is preaching in Williainston, and is also Principal of the High School. This furnishes him an opportunity to ask questions. Fletcher Stone is physical director of the city Y. M. C. A. of Greenville. Calling at his study in Laurens, I found J. A. Tumblin dozing over a sermon. The quiet, unassuming yet devout life of S. A. de Souza was a blessing to every cne of his classmates. He has returned to Brazil, his native country, and is persistently laboring among his people, preaching, teaching, writing. W. A. Whitlock, of Kitching’s Mill renown, is art editor of the Saturday Evening Post. It is said that he developed his art by drawing cartoons of the professors during class periods. The tone of finality in his voice, his dignified air. and his graceful bearing add to the qualifications of "President" D. N. Wilburn for the position of Military Instructor of West Point. W. M. Wilkins has accustomed himself to the patter of little feet and childish and joyous exclamations, for he is the proud father of four. Montgomery is one of Gaffney’s most successful merchants. For several years after graduation, G. T. Windell held a position as traveling salesman for a large business firm. He has given this work up, however, and now has a beautiful Southern home and a pretty wife. Trusting that this report will be sufficient for ycur purposes, I am. The Prophet cf the Class of 1919. °8C fiflx .oiieDistant Prospect Georce V. Swann. 70. As one who stands upon an ocean strand And gazes on a country far and fair. And longs to breathe of its enchanted air, But cannot, for the ocean from that land Shuts him apart; and he with trembling hand To launch upon the billows doth not dare. And yet his soul longs for it; in despair He falls with grief upon the barren sand—■ Thus we who know not love do often sigh Whene’er we gaze upon love's happy shore. And from the glories which it doth outpour Unto our sight, tho we are not nearby, We know what loveliness that land doth store, Yearning we watch, and yet we come not nigh. Page fifi!rlv0Pq c fifty-threeJunior Class Officers and Sponsor Officers J. A. Lambright...................President T. B. Lf.f.......................7 reasurer L. R. Richardson .... Vice-President A. T. O’Dell......................Historian J. L. Rhame.......................Secretory Miss Flora Bell Hunt .... Sponsor Pane fifty-fM'Junior Class Benjamin Cecil Brasincton, B.S. CAMDEN, S. C. "Brasington says that life is a joke To be spenl in a Humorous way. Bui why be so weary when life is nol dreary And offers new pleasures each day?" Philosophlnn Literary Society; Judaon Memorial Baraca Class. Wiley Moreland Braziel, B.A. SUMTER, S. C. "A shooter of bull, a lover of girls, Braziel is all right after all; Here’s lo his health, renown and wealth. In all things great and small." 1‘hllosoplilan Literary Society: Conductor, Pall Term ‘lH-'lS: Judson Memorial llnrm-n Class; Vice-President. Fall Term ‘18-'I9; V. M. C. A.; Chairman Membership Committee 'lS-’IS: Assistant Business Manager "Echo” ‘IS-’ts. Julian Belton Carpenter, B.S. LANDRUM, S. C. "A chief of "loggers" is Carpenter With a line of fresh bull every morn. He can shoot a professor and deceive every coach Though as star on a diamond he sure can perform." Member of Baseball Club 17-'In; Football ’is-'IS. Otis Lee Edwards, B.A. SALUDA, S. C. "Edwards. O. L.. the popular guy. Is councilman stern and severe But in all that he does and tries to do He is earnest indeed and firmly sincere.” Adelphlnn Literary Society; Member Football Squad •ls-’ia; Member Furman Council ’ls-’19; Student Editor "Hornet" 'lS-'lt . William Walker Edwards, B.A. DUE WEST, S. C. "Here’s another Edwards that from Erskinc has arrived To make old Furman better if be can; Here’s a hearty welcome, may his purpose be Instilled into the heart of every man." Plillosophian Literary Society; Member Y. M. C. A. fV hnyfotJunior Class Francis Ebenezer Grier, B.A. DUE WEST. S. C. "Not from Greer is Grier But from Erskinc. Due West, did he come. We welcome him here, and give as his share I he right to call Furman his home.” Member of Tennis Club Member of Base- ball Club 'IS -19. Eugene Myers Harrison, B.A. PLANT CITV, FLA. "I larrison leads in the bull art at school. And speaks with such wonderful skill I hat he never docs fail in a public debate lo produce a most wonderful thrill." I'hilosopblan I.Horary Society; Simulant Uonivr, Spring Term ; Assistant Sergoant-at-Arms, Kail Term 17-'U : Senior Critic, First Term ‘IS-'IH; Junior Censor. Second Term 'ls-‘i: : Uaraca Class. Treasurer. Spring Term 'IT-'IS; Y. M. C. A.. Secretary 'IS-'IJt; Chairman Bible study Committee "I.S-‘lt»; lalllor ’19-20; Assistant Football Manager MS-•I! ; Honor Roll 1«- 17; Alumni Kdltor “Echo" J.S-'!!»: I’ubllc Debater 'iT-'ls. IS- I J»: Winner Hicks Medal of Oratory 'IT: Delegate S. . I . A. ' IS-' 19. Robert Pratt Higgins, B.A. HODGES, S. C. "I lerc's a leader in ihc Army Here’s a leader anywhere When you want a man of- power Send for Higgins, he’ll be ihcrc." Adctphlun l.lternry Society: Junior Censor, First Term 'I: : Member Haraea Class. John Allen Lambright, B.A. LANDRUM. S. C. "A captain of athletics And an all-round Furman man. Lambright knows the method To accomplish all one can." Member Football S |ttad '1S-‘H ; Member Baseball Club ’IT-’IS; Captain ’IS.'IJ; ('resident of Class ‘1S- 19; Secretary 'IT-'IS; Member Adelphlan Literary Society: Athletic Editor of ■•Hornet" '1T-'D : Student ICdltor “Hornet” ‘lS-'lf . Samuel Miller Lawton, B.A. GREENVILLE, S. C “Lawlon always knows his lessons And he never cuts a class Though he has a limitation Yet he always docs his task." Adelphlan Literary Society. page fifty- ' Junior Class Charles Judson League. B.S. SIMPSONVILLE. S. C. "Never was there such a fellow That could play like Judson League; Everybody went to dancing When Judson played the rag." Member Philosopblftn Literary Society; Sergeant-.it-Arms ’lS-’l!); Assistant Manager Glee Club: Member Y. M. C. A.: .Member Baraca Class; Assistant direr Leader "1.8 19; B.Mus. G. V. O. Thomas Brougham Lee, B.A. LANDRUM, S. C. "Was there ever such a fellow As old Thomas B. Lee? He is jolly and congenial And as smart as he can be." Member Adelpblnn Literary Society; Member Baraca Glass: Member Y. M. ( A.; Baseball Club Mfi-MT, 17-‘18; Treasurer Class 'IS-'lf. "Ladies beware when Littlejohn's near, I-or all who have known him have said I hat "Red" is nothing at all but a sport And can make any girl lose her own head." Phllosophinn Literary Society; Standard Bearer. Spring Term 1« '17: Secretary Fall Term MS-lf; Cla Secretary 1G-'17; Member Baraca Class; .Member Y. M. C. A. Edwin Dargan McKnight, B.A. FLORENCE, S. C. "Behold ihc poet comclh In the person of McKnight. With a sense of humor and a touch of love He's sure to come all right." Adelphian Literary Society; Assistant Sergoant-nt-Anng. Spring Term ltS-'17: Chaplain '17-'ts; Treasurer. Spring Term 'll-'lS; Senior Censor. Spring Term '18-'19; Member Baraea Class; .Member V, M. C. A.; Exchange Editor "Echo” 'is-'If. Drury Mealing Nixon. B.A. CREENWOOD, S. C "What shall we say of dear Nixon. The wonder-star player indeed? A lover of ladies, we all must confess. Though he says this is not of his creed." Adelphian Literary Society; Winner Improvement Medal ’1$: Sergeant-at-Arms. Spring Term "IT; Recording Secretary, Spring Term MS; Student Editor "llornet'' 'I7-'1S; Class Editor “Bonhomie" ‘is; Member K. M. A. Club; Recorder, Spring Term 'is-'1!»: Member Y. M. C. A.: Member Baraea Class; Knot bail Club '17; Baseball Club 'IS. John Thomas Littlejohn, Jr.. B.A. SCRANTON. S. C. PaSc fifty ■sevenJunior Class Alfred Taylor O’Df.ll, B.A. LIBERTY, S. C. "O'Dell is just the fellow, When you wanl a thing pul through; He has enthusiasm and a bit of wit by spasm, Yet he always seems to know the thing to do." Phllosophinn Literary Society: I Hat or tun ' 17 -' 1 $; Trenail rot 1S; Cashier 1S : Class Historian 'IS-'! : Member Y, M. C. A.; .Member Itaraen Class. Alva Eugene Power, B.A. LAURENS, S. C "1 here’s always Power moving In a bunch of bo)s at school; Power is a leader, for he makes his power felt. And he proves to be a winner as a rule." Member Phllosophinn Literary Society: Assistant Sorgeant-at-Arms. Fall Term ’H -‘17; Member Football Squad ‘ 1 ' -‘17. 'I7-'1S; Vice-President class '17-'is; Member Y. M. C. A.: Member Haraea Class; Captain Philosophian Football Team 'IS. Richard B. Quick, B.A. GREENVILLE, S. C "Quick in thought, and quick in words. And quick in every class; This Richard Quick, beloved by all. Is always sure to pass." Aalelpbiun Literary Society; Standard Hearer. Fall Term ')7-’l$: Junior Censor. Spring Term ’lT-'ts; Senior Censor. Sprfcit Term ’ls-'l ; Vice-President, Fall Term 'ts-'l9; Winner Sophomore Declamation Medal •|7-'18; Inter-Society Debater '18-'19; Winner Freshman Bible Medal Class Kdltor "Bon- homie" 18-'19; .•'ember Debate Council 'l$-'1t». James Lee Rhame, B.A. HOLLY HILL, S. C. "A wonderful leader is Captain Rhame, From the city of Holly Hill he came; All ra!s beware, when Rhame is near. His policy’s one and the same." Adetplilnn Literary Society; Sergeant-at-Arms; Member Baseball Club '17; Member Football Squad '17-' 1S; Captain Football ’17. Lawrence Rollins Richardson, B.A. SIMPSONVILI.E, S. C. "That Richardson guy is a sport from the heart And the ladies go wild with delight; With a borrowed auto to a dance he will go And spend perhaps most of the night." Member Philosophian Literary Society; Baseball Club "17-'1$; Vice-President Class 'IS-'ltC. Member llaraca Class; Member Glee Club. Page fiftyJunior Class James Preston Rogers, B.A. BENNETTSV1LI.E, S. C. "Roger is a shooter Of a special kind of hull When it comes to yarns and stories He has a cranium full." Member Tennis Club; Member Track Team. Charles Averett Rollins, B.A. JOHNSONVIU.E, S. C. "Love is like a flower Blooming in the spring. Rollins keeps it growing For he masters everything." Adelpltlan Literary Society: Junior Censor. Spring Term ‘IS; ItecordlnR Secretary. First Term 'in; Member Y. M. C. A.: Baraea Class. Cleo Timmons Singletary, B.A. COW RI), S. C. "Singletary’s quite contrary. From the rest of us in love; For as a flirt, and ladies' sport, He always ranks above." Ralph Cato Stephens, B.S. MONETTA, S. C. "And here is Stephens, handsome and tall. Better looking no doubt in uniform. When perhaps by a chance he happens to dance He displays his most wonderful charm.” Hornet Staff ‘lS-'ltt; Member V. M. C. A.: Member Baraea Class. Lawrence Brownlee Stevenson. B.A. DUE WEST, S. C. "Stevenson is honored For his Herculean ways; As a player on the diamond He’s a wonder when he plays." Class Kditor '•Bonhomie” Member Football Squad Member Y. M. C, A. fifty-nineJunior Class George Rogers Swann, B.A. TRENHOLM, VA. "Swann is a shark in every class, Bui he likes loo much lo read. However in History, English, and Science He easily lakes the lead." Member Philoxophlan Literary Society: V. M. A.; Member Uarnen flits . Alfred Taylor, B.S. TAYLORS. S. C. "Taylor from Taylors, is tailor indeed. And here is a friend you can trust. As chemistry shark he can tell of the earth And explain every particle of dust." Member liarnoa Pin ; Member Y. M. « A. John Cowan Todd, B.S. DUE WEST. S. C. "Here’s to Todd the star of all. How much we love him ’tis hard to tell. 1 his cute little fellow from Due West College Is loved by the ladies as well." Member Phllosophlan Literary Society: Member Pool bn 11 Squad Member V. M. A. Samuel Watt, B.A. DUE WEST. S. C. "Samuel Watt. "Estcll” for short Is quite a handsome guy; He loves the girls and they love him Though he is awful shy." Member Phllosojdilnn Literary Society; Member V. M. A.: Senior Censor Society, Sprint: Term 'IS.'ll'. Eugene Allen Williams, B.A. BRUNSON, S. C. “We often think of Williams As the biggest flirt of all. While he never sports the ladies Yet he swears he knows them all." Member Adelpltlnn Literary Society; President class •i:-,IS; Member Y. M. A.; Joke Kdltor ••Hornet” 'IS-'II . Page S’ 1?Junior Class John Lawrence Woodside, B.A. CREENVILLE, S. C "There’s always much lo mention When you criticize a guy, But Woodside is exception, For he's such a modest guy." Member Adelphlan Literary Society. William Calbraith Wright, B.S. BATESBURC, S. C. "Wright is all right, and don’t you forget That Cal is as good as his word; Though he says but a bit, yet we know from his wit, That 'tis better to be loved than to be heard." Football Squad "IT-'IS, ’1S- 19: Baseball Club '17-•|s; Member Baraca Class. Moffitt Grier Bicham, B.A...............................Chester, S. C. "A quiet fellow i$ Bigham. no doubt. But his presence here can never be forgot Here's a friend that is true. That is faithful also— If he has a single fault D e l(non it not.” Member rhltoaophian I.Horary Society. Fred Drummond Cox, B.A..................................Langford, S. C. "Cox may be slon . but he is sure And that is the thing after all He wins his chief rep when he gets the old pep And lands a two-bagger in ball.” Member Plillonophlnn Literary Society: Member Football Squad, ’lS-'lH; Member Baseball Club, ’17-’18: Member V. M. c. A.; Member Baraca Clan . Qte sixty.one Junior History N the morning of September 25, 1918, the Student Body at Furman University held its first meeting at the Alumni Hall. But, alas! Of the ninety-nine freshmen who had begun their college career two years before, scarcely twenty were present. For quite a while it seemed as if there would be no Class of 1920, owing to the fact that every effort was being made to co-operate with the government in the S. A. T. C. program. However, with the cessation of war, everything became normal again. Several of our classmates, who had been stationed at various camps and colleges, returned to F. U. after Christmas, while a few men from other colleges joined us. The class, thus augmented to thirty-five, held its first meeting in the early part of January for the purpose of electing officers. After a few remarks by our former president, the election was entered into. J. Allen Lambright was chosen president; L. R. Richardson, vice-president; J. L. Rhame, secretary; T. B. L e, treasurer; and A. T. O’Dell, historian. Soon plans for a class banquet, the first ever given by a Junior Class at Furman, hegan to be discussed. After a great deal of preliminary work, arrangements were completed, and the banquet was held on March 27 at the Ottaray Hotel. Mr. L. B. Stevenson, the toastmaster, gave some very interesting remarks, which were admirably suited to the occasion. Then followed toasts on “Our Class,..l'o Furman." "Athletics,” "Friendships,” and " To Our Sweethearts" by various class members. A little later, Mr. E. A. Williams, the assistant toastmaster, concluded the pleasures of the evening by bidding each guest good night. In every respect this banquet was one of the most enjoyable social functions of the year. While our class work has been somewhat disrupted, we do not feel that our year has been spent in vain. On the contrary, we close the present year with a feeling closely related to elation, as we look forward to the year when we will be Seniors. Page iixly-lvoSophomore Class Officers and Sponsor B. L. Williams,........................President }. Rasor . . . . F. N. Quinn..................... Vice-President G. B. Baldwin . O. M. Hill............................ Secretary Miss Emmie Smith . Treasurcr Historian Sponsor Page sixty fO' Sophomore Class History RADI 1 ION has not failed to hand down from college generation to college generation the history of the Sophomore. The spirit of the distinguished group of men is unique, but nevertheless essential to the life of a college. It is during this period of a educational career that the fathomless becomes fathomed, the dark and mysterious unknown becomes revealed, the hitherto unexplored realms of knowledge are made subject to the will of this mighty man of brains; in fact, the world is brought under the subjection of the victorious Soph. So much for Dame Tradition and her tale, now for the application. Wars may come, S. A. T. C. organizations may organize, in truth, the whole world may be obeying the call to arms, but the Soph, remains (shall we say ‘‘forever?’ ). As of the blowing of a mighty hurricane on the high seas, so came the S. A. T. C. to Furman, and as of the coming of the calm after the storm, came the pre-war regime back to Furman. Yes, the session of 1918-1919 has been most extraordinary, but amid it all the Soph, has remained a Soph, as of old. In the class room, on the gridiron, on the diamond, in the society hall, and in the various branches of college activities, the members of the Class of 1921 played well their part. The class was represented in affairs outside of the college community also. A few of our songsters, by their mocking bird qualities, obtained places in the choirs of our city, occasionally taking a tour in their “stiff fronts" and “jim swingers" under the auspices of the renowned F urman Glee Club. Wc, as a class, have come to love the old college with a love that promises to steadily increase as the days pass by. Again we have come to appreciate ourselves better—to understand ourselves, if you please; thus an abiding fraternity bids fair to arise. With cheerful hearts do we face the future. In our rosy dreams we can sec a "dip" coming slowly into view on the horizon. Nearer and nearer docs it come, and faster and faster beat our hearts with expectancy and gladness. —Historian.Sophomore Class Clarence Boyce Allen. B.A. latta, s. e. Can I you "C" he will "I}” ever Ivoting Allen?" Adclphian Ut.-iaiy Koeb-t Arms. Kau Term 'IT-'IS; ‘l . : lifti-aca lass i;-’is. lm|ii(ivrm ni Medal • 17-’ IS- lit; MciiiIkt Y. M. y: snistnm s.-imam-at-Treasurer. Full Term 1$. vtnn r Freshman in; Mi-mlwr Tennis Flub A. Gary Bell Baldwin. B.A. LAURENS, S. C. "Perfection is my aim." I'lillogopHlaii Literary Soiloiy; Sornennl-ai - A rm. . l-’alt Term IS- I»: MemWt Y. M. c . a.; M.-mb.-r Haracn Class: Historian S. | ln mm.' ('lass ‘IS-'IS. William Henry Barfield. B.A. JEFFERSON, S. C. A Second Lieut, ar.d a student too; Hats off to Sophomore Barfield." IMtilosophlan Literary Society; Y. M. C. A ; Itavaca Cliis : Member Student Volunteer Hand. Paul O. Batson, B.A. TAYLORS. S. C. "Yet he ivorl(s while we are sleeping; lie's a student, don't you sec?" l'hllosophlan Literary Society; liaruca Class. Henry Youmans Bennett, B.A. LAURENS. S. C. "II. Y. Bennett may some day see the senate, For he is from Laurens, where the politicians grow. William Maxwell Blackburn. B.A. HENDERSONVILLE. N. C. He hath the longue of an orator. But it hath never been fnotvn to loiter. w= rr «‘ds Editor ••Hornet" F.ditor IS-Sophomore Claso Asa Guy Broadwater, Jr., B.A. RIDCE SPRINC, S. C. "Roll on. thou broad and dreamy water, roll." i'hlloxophiui) Literary Society; Assistant ftTgcnnl-nt-Arma. Spring Term Karaea Class '17- • 1 n ; Y. M. A. ' 17-' IS, M 8 • M 9; f|a»S Editor '17-•is; Foot ball '17-MS. MS-'19. Armstrong R. Coleman, B.A. HYMAN, S. C. "Old King Cole has very, but too high for a janitor is he." Arielphian Literary Society; £erReant-at-Arms. Spring Term M8-M9; Karma Clara M7-M8, Ms-M9; Y. M. C. A. M7-MS. Charles Manly Cox, B.A. BEI-TON, S. C. "Chailes is a runt, but he is very manly." Adelptiian Literary Society. Matthew Clay Crisp, B.A. MOUNTVILLF-, S. C. "I'll lalfe one crisp chew of 'Apple Sun Cured' and tal(c life easy." William Boyce Dominick, B.A. NEESES, S. C. "A fair representative of a good laying hen; He never cuts a single day." Adelpliian Literary Society; Baraea ("ass MS-MS; Y. M. C. A. MS-M9. Thomas E. Durham, B.A. CREENVILLE, S. C. “A’ever let your studies interfere with your matrimonial affairs." Philoaophian Literary Society; Assistant Sorgoant-nt-Arnm, Fall Term MS-MS; Y. M. C. A. M7-MS; llarncii Class 17-MS. MS-M9. Pn e sixty-sevenSophomore Class George Cuthbert Galphin, B.S. WILLIAMSTON, $. C. "And this can be truly said. 'He Is an efficient slingcr of goulash.' " Phllosophian Literary Sodeiy: Sergoant-at-Arms. Spring Torm "17-MS; Senior Ceniior, Fall T«-rm MS-’ I : V. M. •. A. 17-Ms. IS- I•.«: Baraea ‘Mass 17-MS, Ms-Mf; Baseball M7-MS. William Henry Gambrell, B.A. BELTON, S. C. "The higher things will come in turn; Grasp the things within your reach." Adelphlan Literary Society: Sergeant-at-Arm . Fall Term 'IS-TS; Winner of Freshman Improvement Medal IT-' IS; V. M. A. MT-ls. MS-M: ; Baraea Floss M7-M8. Tatum Wannamaker Gressette, B.A. ST. MATTHEWS. S. C. "Far from being a saint, yet from a saintly town." Flux I'resident '17-MS; Baraea Class M7-'ls; V. M. c. A. '17-MS: Football MV-'IS. 'ls-'llt; Ha.xehall '17-MS. M -M». Elbert Fant Hardin, B.A. CREF.R. S. C. "Let your conscience be your guide." I’llilosophIan Literary Society: Baraea ('lass M7-MS, 'lS-'IS; V. M. . A. M7-MS, MS-MS. William Howard Hawkins, B.A. WEST UNION, S. C. "As watchful as a hawl(, and as far seeing as a owl. ' I'hllosophlait Literary Society: Sergeant-nt-Arms, Spring Term '17-MS: Chaplain. Full Term MS-MS; Baraea Class "17-MS, MS-M9; V. M. F. A. M7-MS. MS.MS. Guy Haynie Hill, B.A. MOUNT AIRY. N. C. "As he is loved, so loves he; His heart is opened with a very small J(cy." I'hiloxophian Literary Society; Conductor, Fall Term M7-MS; Junior Critic. Fall Term '1S-M9: Assistant Contluetor, Spring Term 'is-'io: Assistant Kill tor of Echo. Spring Term 'lS-MS; Baraea Class '17-MS, MS-MS; Y. M. C. A. '17-MS; Student Council M7-MS; Glee Club '17-MS. Ms-'ll : Class Treasurer M7-MS; Class Editor "The Bonhomie" MS-•|»: Foot hall MS-11 . Page sixty-eightSophomore Class Otis Monroe Hill, B.A. CARTERSVILLF- S. C. 7 have just hatched, hal I have not yet scratched ” Adelphian I.Horary Society: Y. M. C. A. M7-Ms; Baraca Class M7-MS, MS-M9; Class Secretary MS-M'J. Samual Lane Hill, B.A. ABBEVILLE, S. C. 7 wish my smiles would tal(c effect." Adelphian Literary Society: Sergcant-at -Arms. Spring Term MS-M9; Member Baraca Class 17-MS. MS-M’.i; Y. M. C. A. M7-MS; Second Honor Student 17-MS. W. J. Ingram, B.S. TINDAL, S. C. 7 would be friend to all—the friendless." I'hiloxoplihin Literary Society: Chaplain. Kail Term MS-M9: Baraca Class 17-MS. MS-19; Y. M. C. A. George Grover Inman. B.A. KELTON, S. C. ‘7 do not believe in waltzing; yet must I hesitate before accomplishing my tasl(." Adelphian Literary Society: Assistant Sergonnt-at-Arrns. Spring Term MS-M9; standard Bearer. Fall Term. MS-M:»; Baraca Class: Y. M. C. A. William Leroy Johnson, B.A. SWANSEA, S. C. "As you lilfe it. so shall it be; If you don't lifyc if, don’t blame me." l’hiloxophian Literary Society. John Miles Loadholt, B.A. FAIRFAX. S. C. His mind has broadened a long time since. Because he has so many classes under Dr. Provence " Adelptiiun Literary Society; Baraca Class. Pa c dxty-nincSophomore Class Milton Edward McManaway, B.A. CREENVILLE, S. C "I a ill plunge the line no mailer hot) strong the re sistance " Literary Society; Y. M. C. A.: Glee lu » •IN-’I! ; Football ’1S-’19. Thomas Jerome Mimms, B.A. LAKE CITY. S. C. “He halli a lean and hardy lool(." I’lillogopltiaii Literary Society: SeiKoant-at-Arms. Sprinjj Term 'li-'IS; Coiicxi oihIIiik Secretary. Fall T im ' 1 s •' l n; Treasurer. Spring Term I in men Clams: Corresponding Secretary of Y. M. . A. IS-’19. Georgf. Henry Moore, B.A. SIMPSONVILLE, S. C. "In silence has my heart grown large.' Y. M. C. A. Henry Meleolry O’Neal. B.A. FAIRFAX. S. C. "Since my name is O'Neal I never cut a meal, 'Cause it's too good, don't you l(now " AiUlpblaii Literary Society: Barucn Ola . William Sloan Pruitt, B.A. BELTON. S. C. “He l(ccps a jolly mood Because he's a regular dude: from Belton." Adclphlau Literary Society: Y. M. C. A.: liaraca Class. George Courtney Quattlebaum. B.A. "Low Phllosophian LEESVII.I.E, S. C. and chunky, yet not a monlfey." Literary Society: Baraca Class. Page seventySophomore Class Frank Newburn Quinn, 13.A. GREENWOOD, S. C. "Cold winds ma e me sneeze. But I life the chi sea breeze." A(Ic:])iiliiM I i:« rnry Society: .'tnndnnl Bearer, Sprlaj; Ti'rni 'Isls ; Barum laws: V. M. c. A.: • ’.:»«» Vice I 'resident ' 1N . ■ 1 ; Chape) Attendance Honor 17-MS; .Member Student Council 'is.-la. Willis Furman Ramsey, B.A. WEOCEFIELD. S. C. "I mil hear what every one sajfclh." Philosopiiinn Literary Society: Assistant conductor M7-MS: Treasurer 'In-'IH: l{arat.i Class; Treasurer 'IS.'lJ; Y. M. C. A. Jake Rasor, B.A. CROSS Hlt.L. S. C. "He is friendly and l(ccn ; More heard of than seen." I’liilosopliian l.llcrury Society; V. M. i •. A. M7-MS; Treasurer Ms-la; Itaraea Class; Atliletic Kdlt .-"Echo": class Treasurer MS-MU; Basel»all MS-MU. Jefferson Roland Richardson, B.A. SIMP ONV1LI.E. S. C. "IVhat satisfulh others, salisfi:th me." Philo-opltlan l.ltcrnry Society: Hanna Class. V. M. C. A. William Michael Talbert, B.S. MCCORMICK, S. C. "I believe in those ndio believe in me. For why should anyone be so free?" I'liINvutpl)ian Literary Society; Treasurer. l-‘atl Term Ms-'19; llistorlin Ms-M; ; Ita a a Class; V. M. C. A.; class Kill tor "Our BunlieinlA MS-M9. Memory Watson, B.A. LATI7, S. C. "Someone thinking, someone blinking, j rcr forgetting lest he fall." I'hllosopl ian Literary Sicleiv; Y. M. C. A.: Baraca Class. °gc seventy-oneSophomore Class Barnie L. Williams, B.A. RIIEIMS. S. C. "Take life easy. Why cry over spill mill( o hcn there's more to spill?" Adclphian l.lu-rary Society; Treasurer 'Is.'Is; V. M. C. A.: Rnracn Class; Class President 'IS-'b; Second Honor Student 'l'-'IS. Carl A. Wilson. B.A. SIMPSONVH.LE, S. C. “ he best Way lo n’in is lo hold out to the end." I’hlloxophian Literary Society; liaraca Class. Adcf.r Lee Cothran, B.S. TONEY CREEK. S. C. "There are no headlights save those in front of his eyes." Adrlphlnn Literary Society: Bainen Class. Lody Dewey Cothran, B.S. TONEY, S. C. "Study that you may have l(nondedge " Adclphian Literary Society; Barnen Class. Joseph Guy Cothran, B.S. TONEY CREEK. S. C. "He’s the 'Cuy' that put the dance in dancing." Plil'.OHoptilnn Literary Society. Frank Nolan Gibson, B.A. CREER, S. C “The station of Creer is very dear, Because it produced 'Jal(c,' rvho slays in gear." Alfred B. Jones, B.A. COLUMBIA. S. C. He ri’indeth his way t ilh the alphabet. But such a thing as hurrying he has not yet." Adelphlan Literary Society; chaplain. Fall Term Y. M. C. A. Fred LaFayette Jones, B.A. C.REENVILI-E. S. C. "Ma e your minutes count for something; ‘Tis but folly to idle your time an ay." Adelphlan Literary Society. L. Otis Stone, B.S. CREENVILLE, S. C " Is solid as a rocl(; as reliable as his name." Iinacbnll John Livy Watson, B.A. BRADl.EY. S. C. "Let me live in languidncss; let me die in peace." Page sevenly-tvoPa nfy.thneFreshman Class Officers and Sponsor w. c. carter..........................President I. m. grcsscUe . . . . a. g. alien......................Vice-President h. r. weeks................. g. s. hlackburn.......................Secretary Miss Constance Davenport Trcacurcr Historian . Sponsor Page seventy-fourFRESHM .N CLASSFreshman Class Roll adam, r. r. gressettc, 1. m. mcleod. a. p. alien, a. g. hayes, a. m. montgomcry. 1. f. alien, w. h. haynie, j. p. moorc. h. m. asbury. r. r. hasty, b. f. nelson, j, d. blackburn, g. s. hindman. c. c. nixon, j. j. brant, w. e. hudson, h. c. o'dell, w. t. branyon, c. h. hutto. m. owing , n. h. broadway, o. h. jameson, 1. j. pinson. w. a. brown, a. $. jones, a. e. pitls, r. k. brown, c. g. jones. r. c. posey, g. f. brown, g. d. kcllcr, f. w. provcnce, i. h. carter, w. c. knight, b. b. eaves, h. m. Christopher, j. a. lancaster. w. f. edfearn. r. t. cox, h. s. lay. d. j. riebardson, r. 1. Culbertson, 1. e. leach, m. r. u»hton, f. . danicl, c. f. looper, j. b. stover, c. c. dicks, f. h. marshall, d. h. summers, c. c. ellcnberg, w. j. narshall, m. a. sulhcrlan, h. b. finch, h. m. martin, j. w. libbs. a. e. foster, a. m. nartin. r. 1. weeks, h. r. foster, j. m. neallistcr. h. 1. wells, j. m. gaudy, w. c. nebee. 1. wilcut, j. b. geer. g. m. mscravey. g. s. wood. t. grccnc. 1. w. Specials zorn. d. baker, g. 1. driggers, c. johnson, j. 1. baldsvin. 1. a. carle, t. 1. cid, s. d. bolt. c. a. ebaugh, d. c. haynsworth. k. 1. rickman, j. p. Page seventy- ' Short History of the Freshman Class N September the twenty-fifth, nineteen hundred eighteen, the Class of 1922 set out upon what bade fair to be one of the most momentous years in the history of the college, for all students over the age of eighteen were to be inducted into the Students Army I raining Corps. They were to be under regular army discipline and were governed bv officers of the United States Army. Nearly all the freshmen fell under this class, and so, soon after our arrival, we became members of the army. Of course, the freshmen looked awkward and green to all the upperclassmen, as freshmen have always looked for time immemorial, and we were the objects of many jeers and gibes as we innocently strolled about the campus wearing that "lost" look so common to freshmen who are not over-used to being so far away from their mothers. We received a warm reception the first night of our slay and those of us who still survived, were soon properly initiated into the regular college routine. Soon we became more able to take care of ourselves and were not nearly so verdant as when we made our debut upon the campus. But hardly had we settled down to real work when the influenza epidemic spread among us. Nearly all the freshmen were victims, and after a short illness we were sent home. For three weeks the quarantine remained on, but finally, on the first of November, we returned to college. The regular routine of the S. A. T. C. now taxed our energies and we found that little time was left for studies or social activities. The rigid military discipline undoubtedly did us a great deal of good, but on the whole, it interfered with our college work to such an extent that everyone was glad to hear that the corps was to be disorganized as soon as possible. The demobilization began early in December, and by the tenth we were once more on our way back home for the Christmas holidays with a discharge in our pockets. We returned on January the third, and this time each man was determined to settle down to real work, and the evidence of this determination was shown by the manner in which every student took hold of his work and made the "fur fly." Although the military organization interfered with athletics in the earlier part of the year, the Freshman Class was not backward in taking its place in this line of’ college activity. Five of its members were on the football squad and many more will be seen on the baseball diamond. The YAV.C.A.-Y.M.C.A. reception, given at G. W. C., gave the freshmen their first opportunity to show their social ability and to become acquainted with some of our fair neighbors. The green ribbons were very much in evidence that night. The Freshman reception was given in April and was an unqualified success. Other social activities in which the freshmen took part showed that the Class of ’22 was far from lacking the social instinct. Seventy-six in number, the Freshman Class undoubtedly numbers among its members many future Edisons, Demosthenes, and Ciceros. In literary society, on athletic field, in class room, and at social gathering, the freshmen have shown that they mean to count for much in Furman life. Guided by a splendid staff of officers, aided by the advice and instruction of the faculty and our colleagues, steadied by the example of every other Freshman Class before us. we expect to climb on and upward to our ultimate goal, an honor to Furman and a potent influence in the life of our State. How much of this we shall accomplish and how far toward our our goal we have advanced you may find in our history as the Sophomore Class of next year. HISTORIAN. °ge seventy-sevenSNAP SHOTS Page seventy-eightPage cvcniy-n,ncThe Students’ Army Training Corps at Furman N view of the enlarged military program to raise ninety-eight new divisions by June 30. 1919, the Government formulated a plan for the utilization of college students as material for officers in the United States Army. This was to allow each institution of collegiate grade to send to Plattsburg Barracks. New York, one representative for each ten students enrolled last year. This gave Furman a delegation of twenty-one and associate. Professor W. B. Bible. These men were to return to the colleges to be assistants to the member of the Faculty in organizing and training the student body for military purpose.-. As Commanding Officer at Furman, under the revised plan. First Lieutenant Emil Breitcnfeld. of New York, was detailed with Second Lieutenants Joseph H. F rales, of Massachusetts; Hamlin G. Forsythe, of Washington City, and James M. Neil, of Georgia, as assistants. One hundred and sixty students were inducted into the S. A. T. C. unit. These students thereby became soldiers of the United States, receiving housing, subsistence, uniforms, tuition and $30.00 per month from the Government. Not long after the signing of the armistice, the Government issued orders to demobilize the S. A. T. C. The unit at Furman was mustered out December 6th and 7th. Taken all in all. it is perhaps hardly fair to pass final judgment on the S. A. T. C. The experiment was accompanied by so many interruptions and the time was so short that the actual results were bound to be unsatisfactory. The weak point in the system as applied. however, was the dual control, military and academic. In the last analysis the real control was military. Page eightyOUR BOYS f,8 hly-onePage eighty1 0Officers Annual Association H. V. Cunningham...................................................President J. V. Long.........................................................Secretary W. F .Logcins...................................................... Treasurer Managers of “The Bonhomie, 1919’’ L. C. RaNKIN......................................................... Business Manager C. J. JoNES..................................................Assistant Business XIonager H. O. Morris.........................................................Advertising Manager I’.. H. Oswai.d ...................................................Circulation Manager Pate eighty.fiveEditors of “The Bonhomie, 1919” W. W. Anderson . . . F. K. C. Creech . . W. A. Whitlock D. N. Wilburn . . . . S. A. de Souza . . W. D. Barr . . Editor -in- Chief Asiiilant Editor-in-Chicf ................ A rl Editor . Athletic Editor . . . . Cluh Editor ................Club Editor Page eighty-sixClass Editors of “The Bonhomie, 1919“ Senior Class D. N. Wilburn R. C. Peace Junior Class R. B. Quick |_B. Stevenson Freshman Class C. F. Daniel H. M. Reaves Sophomore Class G. H. Hill W. M Talbert P gc cighty-ic-venEcho Staff E. C. Koi.b . . F. K. C. Creech H. O. Morris . W. M. Braziel Officers ............................... Editor -in- Chief . A ait tan I Editor-in-Chief ..............................Business Manager ....................Assistant Business Manager Associate Editors FALL TERM D. V. Cochran, Jr..................... E. D. McKnigiit........................... E. H. Oswald.............................. E. M. Harrison............................ Jake Rasor ............................... G. T. Win dell............................ Literary Editor (A. L. 5.) Literary Editor (A. L. S.) Literary Editor (A. L. S.) Literary Editor (I . L. S.) Literary Editor (P. L. 5.) Literary Editor (P. L. S.) Associate Editors SPRING TERM G. H. Hili.................................. L. R. Richardson............................ A. T. O'Dei.i............................... D. M. Nixon................................. J. L. Woodside.............................. R. B. Quick................................. Literary E lilor L. 5.) Literary Editor (P. L. 5.) Literary Editor (P. L. S.) Literary Editor (A. L. 5.) Literary Editor (A. L. S.) Literary Editor (A. L. S ) Page eighty eightp°gc eighty-nine“The Furman Hornet” Staff Officers E. A. McDowell........................ V. V. Cochran, Jr.................... F. K. C, Creech....................... L. C. Rankin........................... F. S. Stone............................ V. M. Blackburn....................... A. T. O’Dell........................... L. E. Lenhardt.................... . - S. A. de Souza........................ A. W. Askins........................... R. C, Stevens ......................... E. A. Williams......................... J. A. Lambricht........................ O. L. Edwards...................... . . J. L. Littlejohn....................... T. B. Lee............................. . , . Edilor-in-Chicf Assistant Edilor-in-Chicf . . . Business Manager . . Circulation Manager . . Advertising Manager . . . , Student Editor , . . . Athletic Editor Society Editor (A. L. S.) ................Y.M C A. Society Editor ( L. S.) . . . , Student Editor ...............Jof(e Editor . . . . Student Editor . . . . Student Editor Society Editor (P. L. S.) Society Editor (A. L. S.) Page ninetyPage ninety-oneA. H. Setzer Hickory, N. C. Rutherford College, Rutherford, N. C.. 1910; Methodist Training School for Christian Workers. Nashville. I enn., 1911-'13; Mirs onary Belgian Congo. Africa, for Southern Presbyterian Church and Methodist Episcopal Church. South. 1913- 15. Page ninety’ll 10Y. M. C. '■ G. T. WlNDELL ...................President 2. R. B. Quick.................Vice-President 3. S. A. de Souza ..................... Editor A. Officers 4. E. M. Harrison................. Secretary 5. Jake Rasor .................... Treasurer 6. W. W. Andf.RSON Corresponding Secretary Page ninety.threePage nlncty-fot  a$c ninety.fiveJudson Memorial Baraca Class Officers Prof. B. E. Gf.er..................................... Teacher Dr. O. O. Fletcher........................... Issistanl Teacher G. T. Windell............ W. M. Braziel . . . J. W. Long . . . W. F. Ramsey FALL TERM . . . . President . Vice-President Secretary; Treasurer H. O. Morris............. Jake Rasor . . . . T. J. Mims . . . V. M. Talbert SPRING TERM . . . . President . Vice-President . Secretary; Treasurer Members Allen, A. G. Ercle. H. H. Ramsey, W. F. Allen. C. B. Finch, 11. M. Rankin, L. C. Anderson, W. V. Fletcher. O. O. Rasor, Jake Askins, A. W. Fletcher, Mrs. O. O. Redfearn. Lownley Baldwin, G. B. Foster. A. M. Reid, S. D. Baldwin. L. A. Foster. J. M. Richardson, L. R. Barfield. W. H. Galphin. G. C. Richardson, J. R. Blackblrn, V. M. Gambrell, W. 11. Rollins, C. A. Blackburn, G. S. Gandy, William Rhame, J. L. Bolt, C. A. Geer, B. E. Setzer, A. H. Brant. W. E. Geer, Mrs. B. E. Setzer, Mrs. A. H. Brasincton. B. C. 1 Iarrison, E. M. SlNCLETARY, C. T. Braziel, V. M. Hardin. E. F. Souza, S. A. Broadway, O. L. Hardin, Mrs. E. F. Stevens, R. C. Brown, E. G. Hasty. B. F. Swan, G. R. Brunson. S. T. Hawkins, W. 11. Talbert, W. M. Carter, V. C. Haynie, James Tibbs, A. E. Christopher, J. 1 llCCINS, R. P. Tumblin, J. A. Coleman, A. R. Hill. O. M. Watson, M. Cox. H. S. Hill, S. L. Weeks, H. R. Cox. C. M. Hill. G. H. Whitlock, W. A. Cox. F. D. Hutto, Maurice Wilburn, D. N. Daniels, C. F. Inman, G. G. Williams, E. A. Davis, I. C. Jones, C. J. Williams, B. L. Dicks, F. H. Jones. A. B. Windell, G. T. Dominick. V. B. Johnson, Jennings Wood, Toy. Edwards. O. L. Posey, G. F. Wright. W. C. Ellenberc. W. J. Power. A. E. Pruitt, S. Zorn, David Page ninety-it V»49S-fouiU 3g0 JUDSON MEMORIAL BARACA CLASSGEORGE H. SCHAEFER Furman Glee Club Officers W. W. Anderson................................................. President F. K. C. Creech.......................................Secretary-Treasurer E. A. McDoweu........................................Business Manager C. J. LEAGUE............................... . Assistant Business Manager Prof. George H. Schaefer...................................Club Director First Tenor Second Tenor Baritone V. W. Anderson A. G. Allen V. M. Blackburn F. K. C. Creech A. W. Askins H. V. Cunningham 11. R. Weeks G. S. Blackburn E. A. McDowell C. J. League J. R. Richardson Bass W. D. Barr F. I.. Jones G. 11. Hill 1.. R. Richardson Page ninety-eight?UlU-(f 3UIU ,2d First Row—Anderson, Blackburn. G.. Weeks. Barr. McDowell. Cunningham. Creech. Jones. Second Row—Hill. Richardson. J.. League, Askins. Richardson. R.. Allen.GLEE CLUB SNAPS Page one hundredThe Furman Council Officers D. N. Wilburn............................................................ President L. C. Rankin..................................................Vice-President C. J. Jones................................................Secretary Executive Committee D. N. Wilburn A. W. Askins D. M. Nixon Members D. N. Wilburn W. W. Anderson D. M. Nixon C. J. Jones J. A. Lambright Jake Rasor I- C. Rankin O. L. Edwards F. K. Quinn A. W. Askins W. C. Carter hundred neStudent Volunteer Band Officers . Hawkins ...... J. T. Littlejohn . . S. A. de Souza . Members Secretary and Treasurer W. 11. Barfield 11. H. Ergi e E. M. 1 Iabrison W. 11. Hawkins A. I’.. I'lllBS J. T. 1.1 TTI.KJOHN S. A. dk Souza Sketch In ils shorl Iif and history the Volunteer Band of Furman University has achieved a great success. Today Furman lias representatives in various parts of the world shaping the destiny of nations. And as the years pass on. others are dreaming of the day when they. too. will he found fighting with the veterans, who have preceded them in various foreign fields. And they are not willing only to fight the battles against sin and superstition, hut also against autocracy and world power. I hus J. F.. Willis. B. E. Wall, and J.G. Newton have gone to the battlefields of France and Belgium and fought against pagan Germany. . "r ‘’I1' , his year has not as many members as it had last year, this being due to many of our num ier gra uating, and others joining the army. Let us hope that in the coming year many other Furman ‘ 8'VC lo •I ® work of God in some land where Jesus is needed mort. That is our Page one hundred tvohundred threef'cfc tnc hundred four ADELPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETYPresidents H. O. Morris (Fall Tcrir) D. W. Cochran, Jr. (Spring Tern') Vice-Presidents D. W. Cochran (Fall Term) L. E. Lendhart (Spring Term) pogc one hundred fivcAdelphian Literary Society KTA SECTION. Officers Fall Term Spring Term H. O. Morris D. W. Cochran, Jr. . . . E. H. Oswald R. B. Quick R. P. Higcins B. L. Williams R. B. Quick C. J. Lupo B. L. Williams W . II. Gambrell .... A. B. Jones . . . Chaplain F. N. Quinn Members Adams. R. R. Foster. A. M. McCravy. G. S. Asbury. R. R. Gambrell. W. 11. McMannaway. M. E. Bai.lencer, S. B. 1 IlCCINS. R. P. Oswald. F„ H. Brown, G. S. 1 Iaynie. J. P. Quick. R. B. Branyon, C. H. Jamison, J. L. Quinn. F. N. Cochran. D. W. Jr. Jones, A. B. Reid. S. N. Cox. H. S. Jonhs. F. 1.. Sutherland, 11. B. Cox. C. M. Keller. F. Stone, F. S. Cothran, A. L. Lancaster, W. F. Whitlock. W. A. Cothran. L.. D. Lenhardt. L. E. Williams, E. A. Dicks. F. 11. Lcccins. W. A. Williams, B. L. F.l LF.NBFRC. V. J. Lupo. C. J. WoODSIDE, J. L. Flynn. J. R. Marshai.l. M. A. Zorn, D. Morris, H. O. Page one hundred i Adelphian Literary Society PHI SUCTION Presidents P. K. C. Crf.ECH (Fall Term) I. C. Davis (Spring Term) Vice-Presidents H. H. I.KGLE (1-all I erm) S. A. D£ SOUZA (Spring Term) P° e one hundred sevenAdelphian Literary Society PI II SEC TION Fall Term E. K. C. Creech......... H. H. I'.rcee........... C. A. Rollins........... E. D. McKnicht . . . . S. A. oe Souza.......... C. B. Allen............. O. L. Edwards........... A. R. Coleman........... S. L. Hill.............. G. G. Inman ...... Officers President.............. Vice-President . . . Recording Secretary . . Senior Censor .... Junior Censor .... Treasurer ............. Chaplain............... Sergcant-at-Arms . . . Ass'I Scrgeanl-at-Arrns Standard Hearer . . . Spring Term .... I. C. Davis . . . S. A. de Souza . . E. D. McKnicht . . D. M. Nixon. Jr. . . . . S. L. Hill . . . C. A. Rollins . . . S. M. Lawton . . . J. M. Loadholt . . . G. C. Summers . . E. K. C. Creech Allen, C. B. Brown, A. S. Carter. W. C. Christopher. J. A. Coleman. A. R. Creech. F. K. C. Davis, I. C. Dominick. W. B. Edwards, O. L. Members Ercle. H. H. Finch, H. M. 11 ill, O. M. 11 ill, S. L. Inman. G. G. Knicht. B. B. Lawton, S. M. Lee. T. B. Loadholt, J. M. McKnicht. E. D. Nixon. D. M.. Jr. Nixon, J. J.. Jr. O’Neal. H. M. Posey, G. F. Rollins, C. A. De Souza. S. A. Summers. G. C. Weeks. H. R. Joint Officers for Academic Year H. O. Morris.......................High Priest D. M. Nixon, Jr.,....................Recorder D. M. Nixon, Jr. . . Corresponding Secretary L. E. Lenhardt........................Cashier R. P. Higgins.......................Marshal C. J. Lupo...........................Marshal S. A. De Souza.......................Marshal J. L. W’OODSIDE......................Marshal Page one hundred eijhtInter-Society Adelphian Debaters D. W. Cochrane. Jr. R. B. Quick Debaters Philosophian Debaters E. C. Koi.b E. A. McDowell P° C 0nc }'undrc ] n.ncAdelphian Orators C. J. I.uro R. B. Quick F. Jones Inter-Society Orators Philosophian Orators E. C. Kolb E. A. McDowell J. W. Long Page one hunJred enErnest Connors Kolb Representative State Oratorical Contest at Greenwood. April 18. Won Fir ! Place. 1 aK' one hundred eleven PHILOSOPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY. Philosophian Literary Society GAMMA SECTION Presidents E. C. Kolb (Pall Term) E. A. McDowell (Spring Term) Vice-Presidents E. A. McDowell (Fall Term) W. W. Anderson (Spring Term) onc hunJrcJ thirteenPhilosophian Literary Society Fall Term E. C. Kolb GAMMA SECTION Officers . President Spring I erm E. A. McDowell Vice'President .... W. W. Anderson D. N. Wilburn . Recording Secretary} . . J. A. Tu.mbi.in J. A. Tumbun . Corresponding See p . . W. W. Anderson Senior Critic .... C. H. Hill . Junior Critic .... E. C. Kolb G. C. Gai.pi iin . Senior Censor .... W. M. Blackburn . Junior Censor .... A. W. Askins W. F. Ramsey . Trcasurcr W. M. Braziei. T. E. Durham . Chaploin G. S. Blackburn . Historian V. M. Braziel . Conductor G. C. Galphin Sam Watt . Ass'l Conductor . . . C. H. Hill A. G. Allen Standard Hearer . E. F. Hardin . Scrgeant-at-Arms . . . C. J. League H. M. Reaves . Ass’t Scrgeant-at-Arms . . . . W. W. Edwards Allen. A. G. Members Galphin, G. C. O’Dell. A. T. Anderson. W. W. Gressette. L. M. Owincs. N. 11. Askins, A. W. Hardin, E. F. Power, A. E. Blackburn, G. S. Hill. G. 11. Quattlebaum. G. C. Blackburn. W. M. Hutto, M. Ramsey, W. I-'. Brown. E. G. Ingram. V. J. Reaves. H. M. Broadway. O. 11. Kolb. E. C. Rushton. F. Braziel League. C. J. Richardson. L. R. Brasincton. B. C. Lcoper. J. B. Swann. G. R. Cothran. J. G. McAi.: ister. H. L.. Tumblin'. J. A. Culbertson. L. E. McDowell. E. A. Watt. Sam Durham. T. E. McLeod. A. P. Wilburn, D. N. Edwards, W. W. Moore. G. I I. Wilkins. W. M. Page one hundred fourteenPhilosophian Literary Society SIGMA SECTION Presidents J. W. Love (Fall Term) L. C. Rankin (Spring Term) Vice-Presidents G. I. WlNDEUl. (Fall Term) C. J. JONES (Spring Term) °gC °ne hun'!rcJ fif,ccnPhilosophian Literary Society SIGMA SECTION I'all I etm J. V. Lonc . . G. T. WlNDEI.L J. T. LlTTLEJOHN T. J. Mims . . E. M. Harrison K. D. Smith . I. . C. Rankin . C. J. Jones . . W. M. TAi.nr.RT W. 11. Hawkins Jakf. Rasor . . D. J. Lay . . J. O. Carroll . V. II. Barfield W. E. Brant . . Officers Preside til........... Vice-President . . . Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary Senior Critic . . . . Junior Critic . . . . Senior Censor Junior Censor . . . T reasurcr............ Chaplain.............. Historian............. Conductor............. Sergeant-at-Arms . . dss’l Scrgcant-al-Arms Standard Bearer . . Spring Term . L. C. Rankin . . C. J. Jones . G. T. WlNDEI.L . . Jake Rasor . . J. W. Long J. T. Littlejohn . . . F. D. Cox . E. M. Harrison . . T. J. Mimms A. G. Broadwater . W. B. Talbert . C. A. Wilson . W. 11. Hawkins . W. T. O Dell J. O. Nelson Batson, P. O. Baldwin, G. B. Baldwin, L. A. Barfield, W. 11. Broadwater. A. G. Bolt, C. A. Brant, W. E. Carrol, J. O. Cox. F. D. Daniel, C. F. Earl, T. Gandy. W. C. Members 1 Iarrison, E. M. Hawkins, W. II. Hasty. B. F. Jones. C. J. Johnston, J. Lay. D. J. Lonc, J, W. Littlejohn. J. T. Martin, W. J. Mimms, T. J. TDei.l, W. T. Nelson, J. D. Pinson, W. A. Rasor. J. Rankin, L. C. Richardson, J. R. Redfearn, R. T. Smith, K. D. Talbert, W. M. Tibbs, A. E. Watson, M. Wilson, C. A. Wilcutt. J. B. WlNDELL, G. T. Page one hundred sixfee.i ■ V. hanttl age one hur'JrcJ r,ir' lcenCoach William L. Laval William L. Laval, good scout, regular fellow, gentleman, and for several years past Furnam’s coach, has made an enviable reputation in all parts of the South both for himself and for the old college. Billy Laval believes in individual skill, but he believes more in team work; he believes in strategy, but he believes more in the straightforward game; he believes in his men, but to a greater degree do his men believe in him; he is proud of Furman’s athletic record, but with stronger faith does he believe in the F urman of tomorrow. Flats off! students, alumni, all—to COAC H LAVAL. Page one hitn.lrcd twenty. I . Miss-But k Danizfe Sponsor CapfQin Rhame agC 0nc hun lrc l Itoei'ly.one ,ua.a; pnpumi 3U0 o Football Team Firsi Rot»: Rasor. -re. Mc -eod. Gamukei.l. Blackburn. Owincs. Littlejohn. Williams. Brunson. Hill. Dominick. Nixon. Coach. Second Ron: Wrigiit. Edwards. Brown. Gressette. Lambricht. Rhame, Jones, McAllister. Cressette. T.. Cox. Stevenson. Carpenter. Third Rom: Foster, Culbertson. Branyon, Weeks. Allen, Dicks, Talbert. Quattlebaum. Lay.Block “F” Football W. E. Sims, Right Guard “Red" Sims comes from a fighting slock and he lives up to family traditions in a football game. For twa years he managed to let his opponents know that Furman's right guard is truly "on guard. ' and it's a hard matter to pass him by. He is a tackier of no small ability, and a tough man to deal with in any phase of the game. This is Sims' second and last year on the giidiron and it is with regret that we lose him. C. J. Jones, Right Tackle There are Joneses and still more Joneses, but this Jones is an entirely distinctive gentleman. You may know that all hope whatsoever is gone when Conway is silent. He is an eternal optimist; he never gives up the fight no matter how the battle goes against Old Furman. This is the last year that Jones will don the Finman uniform and his fighting spirit and "pep” will be greatly missed. Page one hundred Ixucnly-thrccBlock “I ” Football J. L. RhaMF.. Half Back Capl. Rhame is a "hard baby" in ihc pig skin chase. Time has never been called on the sturdy little gentleman. Rhame is not as spectacular as he is persistently dogged, constantly steady, and always delivering the goods. As captain of the 1918 Furman Eleven. Rhame proved himself a football player and general of the first order, and we arc expecting great things from him in the future. J. A. Lam BRIGHT, Quarter Back Lamhright played excellent scrub ball on that famous I'urman Eleven of the 1916 season. Ihc call ol the gridiron again came to him in the fall of 1918. and he answered it with all that was within him. At quarter-back "Ap" showed lots of the genius stuff. Clean, cool-headed, and speedy is Lambright—a man well worthy of the block “F." Page one hundred ttvcnly-fourBlock “F” Football J. B. Carpenter, Right End Jute Carpenter received injuries about the middle of the season and was consequently not able to enter the jjame for the rest of the lime. However, it did not take him all the half-season to prove that he could play right end. To tell the truth about the matter. Carpenter showed worlds of the fighting football spirit, and won the admiration of the entire student body by his determination and pluck. T. W. GRESSETTE, Half Back Cresselte hails from St. Matthews. S. C.. a town that turns out lots of' football material. I alum is a big fellow with lots of the old beef and speed, and has played well at half for two seasons. If he realizes in the future the full extent of his powers he will become a strong backficld man. Page one hundred twaily-fiveBlock “F Football W. C. Wright, Left End “Philosopher Wright is one of those football players who believes more in action than in words. He is an excellent F.nd, and for two years has shown great skill at ca'.ching and intercepting forward passes. "Cal" will be with us next year, and Furman’s left wing is certainly assured against any flank movements next season. F. D. COX, Left Tacl(lc It has long been a question whether or not "Puss" Cox lives for athletics, or athletics exist for Puss Cox. Yes. "Puss" Cox lives for athletics. Cn the gridiron he is especially active and possesses a skill at tackling that is hard to beat. He is also very proficient in using his "cud to great advantage in the game, both to terrify and to drown his opponents. Page one hundred lB cnly'UxBlock “F” Football L. B. Stevenson, Left Guard Brownlee Stevenson ployed football for two years on the F.rskinc team before entering Furman, l ie is one of the best linesmen in the stale. At left guard lie proved to be a brick wall almost insurmountable to bis opponents. "Steve" says little, but plays much—this is his chief characteristic. In all. he is a gentleman, on and olf the field, which is one of the highest compliments we can pay him. J. C. Todd, Half Bade Todd also hails from the "Holy City." On Furman’s football field lie won for himself the distinction of being one of those "mighty little men." To see him on the field in action one would at first think that a mascot had slipped in as one of the Backs, but close observation would disclose that he is more than a mascot—he is a player of the first class. Page cne hundred iu c i u-scvcnBlock “F” Football H. L. McAllister, Center I iarry was the efficient pivot of the Old Furman Line this season. I le learned the game in high school and on the squad at Georgia I cch., and learned it well too. Mac has plenty of the stick-to-it-iveness that it lakes to make a good football player. This is McAllister's first year at Furman and we look foi-ward to some good work in the future. M. E. McManaway, Full Bach; "Mill" McManaway is a product of Greenville, and be it said to Greenville s credit that he is a fine one. McManaway was one of the biilliant players of the team last year. Me is a swift runner, showing re markable ability at broken field running; possesses a level head: and in all is a man who can carry the ball over the line. Page one liundrcJ lo cnly-eigfitFootball Season UK football season this year was one of success, considering the disadvantages that we had to deal with. Our team was light and was late in beginning practice; therefore it was not as efficient as in former years. We lost several of our last year's players whose places had to be supplied with new, and for the most part, inexperienced ones. Even under these difficulties our men showed good spirit, and were ready to meet any team on the gridiron. Due to the fact that many colleges had limited schedules, wc met several army teams in hard-fought games. Although the army boys were hard players and good fighters, we were successful in downing three out of four teams. Besides these army teams, wc played the following college teams: Erskinc, C arolina. Clemson. Wofford. Georgia l ech, and Presbyterian College. Of these games we tied Erskinc. downed Wofford, and lost to the others. Under all these difficulties we had a full schedule and were, on the whole, quite successful. Had we not had an experienced coach we would have been far less efficient, and probably would have been in the same condition that many other colleges were in—namely, a small schedule and a poor team. Turning from last year’s failures and successes we look forward to the 1919 football eleven that is being planned. Much is being expected of this machine, and preparations are being made to make it one of the best in the state. Coach Laval is planning to give the football squad training in the mountains for about a month in the latter part of the summer. In this squad we arc expecting to have some of our former players who were in service during the war. Among these are: Nixon, who was commissioned as a Lieutenant at Plattsburg in the summer of 1918, and detailed to the S. A. T. C. at Hendricks College. Arkansas, will probably be on the squad next fall. M. T. Jeter, an All-State lineman in 1916-1917. having done his bit in France as member of the 30th Division, will likely don a uniform next season. “Speedy” Speer, known and respected by all sport fans in South Carolina Colleges, is still in France, but he is expected to return soon to America and to Turman next fall. If he returns in time, he will represent Furman on the gridiron. In addition to these, the following men will soon be discharged from the army and are expected to return and represent old I urman on the gridiron: J. C. Sherwood, L. F. Carson. W. E. Carson. D. R. Cain. Beside these men we have a neuclus of material from this year’s team to draw on for next year. I here is no doubt that the following men will be in the thick of the fight: Rhame, captain and halfback of this year’s eleven, a consistent ground gainer and deadly tackier; Todd, smallest man on the team and very skillful at picking holes in the opposing line: Gressettc, very spectacular in his playing; Lambright. steady and dependable all the time; Wright, fast and sure tackier; Cox. lineman of considerable ability; McAllister, center and good defensive player; Stevenson, Page one himJreJ Iwcntv-nincinvincible lineman; Carpenter, an end who always fought hard; Weeks and Edwards and several of the scrubs will likely be back. Many new men are expected from the high schools, and these along with those already mentioned should make up a winning team for old Furman. The Manly Athletic Field is expected to be completed before next fall, and the following schedule will more than likely be played on it: September 27 . . . October 4 . October II. October 18 ... October 23 . . . November 1 . . . November 8 . . . November 15 . . . . Ncwlrerry . . November 21 . . , . Greenville . . November 27 . . . Greenville . . . . Georgia Tech. . . . Oglethorpe .... Wofford Presbyterian College . . . Wake Forest ............Citadel ............Erskine . . . . Newberry . . . . Clemson . . . . Davidson Page one hundred ihiity tr c hundred thirty.oneBaseball Schedule March 25...............................At Clcmspn............................................Clemson March 29...............................At Greenville.........................................Erskine March 31...............................At Greenville......................................Oglethorpe April I................................At Greenville......................................Oglethorpe April II................................At Greenville.........................................Trinity April 17................................At Greenville ..........................................Ellon April 19..................................At Greenville............................Presbyterian College April 25..................................At Greenville.................................Georgia Tech. April 26..................................At Greenville.................................Georgia Tech. April 30................................At Greenville........................................Davidson May 2................................At Greenville........................................Guilford May 3................................At Grceyillc.........................................Newberry May 5................................At Greenville.........................................Wofford May 6.....................................At Clinton...............................Presbyterian College May 7................................At Newberry..........................................Newberry May 8................................At Columbia..........................................Carolina May 9.....................................At Camp Jackson..........................................48th Infantry May 10....................................At Due West...........................................Erskine Games in Greenville with Clemson. Carolina. Wake Forest, and Trinity dates to be decided later. Page one hundred thirty190°nc l,un lrcd thirty-three BASEBALL SNAPSW. L. Lavai. . . . J. A. Lambricht C. J. Jones A. P. McLeod . . C. B. Wilson . . . B. B. Knight . . . N. I I. Owincs . . . J. A. Lambricht . . L. R. Richardson . J. L. Rhame . . . O. L. Stone . . . D. M. Nixon . . . F. D. Cox . . . . W. C. Wright . . Baseball Officers Mf.mbf.rs Substitutes Jake Rasor T. W. Gressette O. L. Edwards . . . . Coach . Captain Manager . Pitcher . Pitcher . Pitcher . Catcher First Base Second Base Shortstop Third Base Center Field Right Field Left Field L. B. Stevenson Page one hunJr'JTrack Team Officers McAllister, H. L................................................. Captain Blackburn, W. M...................................................Manager ICO-yard Dash...............................................McAllister, Gambrell 220-yard Dash......................................Hawkins, Blackburn, G. S.. Cotiiran 440-yard Run...............................................TuMBLlN, Wood. WILLIAMS 830-yard Run........................................................Lay, Bi„ackburn, Rocers I-mile Run..................................................MlMS, TUMBUN, HaWKINS Hurdles.........................Blackburn, McAllister. Blackburn, G. S., McMannaway Broad jump...................................................McMaNNAWaY, McAllISTER Shoi Pui....................................................Lay, O'Dell, Williams Discus......................................................O'Dell, Lay, McAllister Pole Vauli...................................................................O'Dell. McAllister High Jump................................Reaves, Gambrell. Blackburn, McMannaway Javelin Throw...............................................O’Dell, Lay, McAllister Page one huntlrc,! thirl};-fivehunJfcJ ihirQr Pose oneTennis Club Officers I). W. Cochrane .......................................................President L. E. Lenhardt.........................................Secretary ami Treasurer Members Allen. C. B. Grier. G. E. Quick, R. B. Bincham. M. G. I (ill. C. H. Reaves. H. M. Cox, H. S. Hill. O. M. Reid. S. M. Coleman, A. R. Jones, F. L. Rocers. J. P. Creech. F. K. C. Lancester. W. F. Sincleteary. C. F. Daniels, C. M. Lee. T. B Souza. S. A. Earl, T. F.. Long. W. J. Stone, F. S. Eli.enburg. W. J. Marshall. M. A. Summers. G. C. I .rcle. H. H. McCravey, G. S. Tibbs, A. E. Finch. H. M. McKnicht. E. D. Whitlock. W. A. Galphin. G. C. Pinson, W. A. Wilburn. D. N. °,,C ,U"‘W thirty.!se ,cnManly Athletic Held Willi work going forward at a rapid pace on the famous and far-famed Manly Athletic Field, the fondest hopes of Furman student bodies for many years is approaching realization. The work, which is progressing so rapidly, is under the direction of the Gallivan Construction Company of this city. The contractors claim that the field should be completed by the first of June. The Manly Athletic Field is to be one of the best in the South and one of which Furman may be justly proud. I he need of an athletic field has long b’en felt, and that this need is to be met is a source of joy to every one interested in Furman. I his field will be one of Furman’s greatest assets. Page one IntmlrcJ ihirlyeight♦ The Quaternion Club (Established November 27. 1903.) J. C. Keys, '04 I. R. Rice. '04 C. F. I Iaynswortii. 04 R. M. Maudlin. '04 V. 11. Powe. 08 K. B. Adams. '08 I {. M. Dunn. 08 S. B. Marshall. ‘08 J. W. I Iicks, '09 J. R. Quisenberry. ‘09 J. R. Geicf.r, ’09 C. M. Workman, '09 L. M. Glenn. '09 R. A. Mac Dowei.i., 10 R. B. Curry '10 I. B. Rutlecce. '10 R. D. Calmes, '10 S. M. Lipscombe. '10 J. A. CULLUM. '10 B. E. Geer ‘ Deceased Members L. W. Milford, 'll I. D. Winco. II A. B. Carson. ' 11 S. O. Pruitt, "II J. W. Kinc. "II R. N. Johnson, '12 J. II. Scarborough. 12 Max Rice. 12 E. M. Poteat, Jr.. '12 E. M. Hicks. Jr.. '12 11. G. Culbertson. "12 W. M. Craic. '13 W. P. Sawyer. "13 V. M. Bridges. '13 G. W. Cox. '13 C. Y. Brown. '13 W. V. Zeicler. '14 A. A. Foreman. '14 J. A. Easley. Jr.. '14 C. S. Sullivan. Jr., '14 Honorary Members O. D. Fletcher O. C. Scarborough. Jr.. '14 C. O. Milford, '14 H. L. Bai.lentine, 13 E. II. Henderson, '15 W. L. Drummond. '13 E. R. Stall. ':3 B. B. Lincle, ‘16 W. F. Cox. Jr.. 16 11. H. Kinc. 16 J. B. Curry, '17 A. D. Asbury. Jk.. '17 J. E. Bolton. 17 J. E. Burnside, 17 J. D. Poac. 18 M. K. Walker, '18 II. W. Cu.NNINCHAM. 19 F. K. C. Creech. '19 F. A. McDowell. Jr.. 19 II. J. I -Iaynswortii. Jr.. 19 C. B. Martin Page one hundred fatly 0The object of the club shall ! c: 1. To stand first and foremost for Furman and to strive as a club and as individuals for the advancement of the institution. 2. I o preserve relics and records of the University and anything which would be of historical interest. By special permission of the Trustees of the University the Club has taken charge of ‘‘Old College." the original university building, and proposes to remodel and Furnish it so that it will be an archive or museum for the University. 3. To l c ready at all time to rerve or work in conjunction with the Alumni, the I rustccs. the Faculty. or the Student Body in the betterment of Furman. 4. To bind the Alumni members by a double tie to the institution, and to bind the Alumni memliers to members of the Student Body. 5. To bind members of the various classes to each other. (Re-printed from the Constitution of the Quarlcrnion Club.) Pa%c one hundred forty-three“Senior Club” Officers D. N. Wilburn............................................. President I. C. Davis........................................Secretary A. W. Askins.............................. Treasurer S. E. Bradshaw.........................Patron Executive Committee D. N. Wilburn D. W. Cochran E. A. McDowell. Jr. I. C. Davis A. W. Askins 1 he Senior Club which was organi .ed during the present session is composed of the entire membership of the Senior C lass. The Club is the outgrowth of a desire on the part of the faculty and members of the Senior Class to come into closer relationship with each other as well as an organization for the promotion of social and literary diversions among its members. Page one hundred forty-fouri A- Tumbi ain r T Winded • ;v. M- B»a"el •j j. Mi s W H. B. F. HastV H M- R vW G. lxM'N „ U .ics’SON Officers p(csi l nl ' picc-Pf "1 Secretary Treater jvIfmbeRS F £. Greer r c RUSTON P T S. "" B: b. n,cht A. L-M. ;• A. E- c. H. E. c Cothran J3.CHAM Tibbs BbaN'oN Kolb “Bath Room Club” Yell: "Gangway" Motto: "A bath every lime Halley’s Comet passes' WpAiC "To tel the right example." Time of Meeting: "When the rooster lows for daylight and the ox crows for dawn." “Eaters Club” Yell: "Grab it first.’’ Motto: "Ti better to cat and suffer than not to eat at all. Object: "lo get fat. Place of Meeting: "In the front yard on the back porch just outside the third story window of the basement." Page one The Pikers Club Members E. H. Oswald V. W. Anderson A. W. Askins °"c hundred forty. seven“Our Idea of a Good Time” Thirty minutes at Pete’s. Two hours at G. W. C. Returning with the 30th Division. Beating Clemson at Clemson. Presiding at the Council meeting. Watching Whitlock at Plattsburg. Senior Banquet. Sophomore Reception. Sick with the "flu.' Getting a letter from G. W. C. Hubert Cunningham. History IV. “Things We Do Not Understand ? ? ?” G. W. C. Girls? Why Anderson College Glee Club mr.de such a hit? Why Grandma never says anything? Why Conway did not fill his date on North Main street? Why C. B. Allen never made the Glee Club? Why some people arc bachelors? Browning? Why straw hats were so popular at Plattsburg? Why my bonus doesn’t come? Why Whitlock did not have his characteristic picture in the Annual? Why the boys pay the Bonhomie dues so promptly? Why Bill plcys ‘‘Forgotten?’’ Hubert Cunningham? ? ? ? Why ‘‘Rink’’ is so good looking? The Faculty? Why "Andy” enjoyed "THE WILD ROSE?" Why Mac docs not hear from Anderson College? Why Erglc is so cute? Why Dan is hanging around "Bill?" Why Rankin sent flowers to Coker? Why Da is attended the fashion show ? Why bachelors ar.d old maids arc so popular at Furman? Why the subject of marriage is discussed so much among Seniors? Allen Askin’s Line? Why "Toots and Frankie" made up? Why Bill Blackburn goes to Gicen-wood ? Page one hundred forty-eight“The Life” Dear Alumnic: By this lyme you have almost finished this annual and befour you go any farther we wish to take up a little of your lyme and space sc you play do not read this just after a heavy meal for they may not be the space referred loo and again it may set unpleasantly upon your scnsce of yumor or your esteemed idea of propriety. There is going to be lots of ego in this article. Go swear out a search warrant for the ole once highly valued gass mask and when you have recovered it donn it and head o.v Go back, if you will, to the tyme when you roamed these happy hunting grounds and climbed the steeply steps of McGee and Montague, and remember what you did then and how things were—and how they wern’t. Now. if you have drawn the draperies of your couch about you and have set down to pleasant dreams we will open up rapid fire at close range and commence loo tell you how and perhapsly why the class of nineteen-19 differs from others, its characteristiks. pekuliaritie. , and its idosynkresies. Dear reader, if you have graduated since the Span-Am. War you have looked forhead to having an athlctick field at the Alma Mater, no matter whether you pronounced it alma maylcr or ahlma mawter. Well (that's a deep subject come too think ‘o it), our class has the honner to prokure thier dips the same year that the Mandly feild was constructed. It's a giatc field. If you will overlook ths historic of the class to be found elsewhere in this grate publikation you will be emprest with the fact that wc rescived our cdukation while the world war was going on. and that we graduated soon after it ended. Don’t get the idea that we wcic slakcrs for we were all in the armic that could get in it. Not that the army was full, nix, but that about won fifteenth of us was underwate an another fifteenth was not a cylizan. That left 26 out Of 28 us cither in the armie or the nnvic. Maybe it wasn't that away when you was a Senior, eh? And then some of us claim loo be a smart bunch. The faculty desided unamourly to give us our degrees for only five months work this our last year. Doing nine month's work in five made some of us too grow sick at hart an so wc would lie out on the grass an list to natures teaching as Shakcspccr so bcfittingly put it in his Bunkome I lill Oration. Wc may be smart but there arc no smart-clliks in the class since Dr. Murray came. We originated and organized a club nown as the Senior Club. Won of the belt ideas ever written by the pin of man or conseived of by a living organism. Dr. Brad, layed her keel an all the folios help to set her ribbs of steal. Turning back thru the pages of historic we cannot immajinc how you. in your collective aclivitic, lived and moved an had your being, as a class, wi:hout a Stn'.or Club. Among other things that would distinguish our class from yours would be the fact that wc have a Brazilian with a name as lone as Cleopatra’s needle which you have seen hinging in New Y; that wc have with us a man from Denmark and yet he is not a Dane; and that some of the men in the class come from the fore korners of the earth such as Blackville. Campbcllcr. King'stree, an Kitchings Mill. This gass attack is largely charged with hot air, but since this article comes free with the rest of the annual in order that it will sell eisily, you are out of only a little bit of time and patience. Please pardon our egotism. We know it is our won grate fait—even the ed. of the Bonhomie would tell you that it was a good looking class with the exception to fore or five sorrel tops. Take off the mask, Ole Timmer. the hurly burly is done, the war is fought an won, and OUR life as an Alumie is begun. Bay Rum. Pc •ge one hundred forty-nine av'.'i'morc lUTcptlim a»n It. KtV if he -liii’.u't fliti s'! $tirman llniveriiu Ct.1» I'.xr.-.if! OHsi.i? jU'.tl Amt uni .-lutfr-iJaeifJ flrnturicnl Conti it aye AHiK. . tvi;sn n TI It WILD ROSE w lii rrsi ii kim kt W OPKRnTA IN TM'O C IS «L Aill ft i i Page one hutuIfeJ fifty "S:!-o o e 2 C © FURMAN UNIVERSITY Greenville, S. C. mm Courses are offered leading to the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), and Master of Science (M.S.). Beautiful campus, healthful climate, moderate expenses. James C. Furman Hall of Science, costing with equipment, $50,000. Library especially endowed. Trained librarian. Large, comfortable dormitories. FOR CATALOG SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT FOLDER GIVING ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS OR ADMISSION BLANKS ADDRESS S. E. BRADSHAW, M.A., Ph.D. Acting President Page one hundred fifty-'v0THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK AND PIEDMONT SAVINGS TRUST CO. MAIN STREET AND McBEE AVENUE We Respectfully Invite Your Business GILREATH DURHAM, Inc. Goldsmiths Silversmiths A Complete Line of Waterman’s Ideal Fountain Pens Fine China, Cut Glass, Art Pottery. Gifts for all Occasions. We Make Medals, Badges and Class Rings. Designs and Estimates Cheerfully f urnished 208-210 South Main Street At the “Sign of the Big IValch” THE COURIER PRINTING CO. East Me Bee Avenue Printers Who Please FOR Better Prices and Better Quality of Goods come TO J. O. JONES CO. DRESS SUITS FOR RENT You Arc Always WelcomeWk Appreciate Your Patronage In the Past, and Will Make Every Effort to Hold Your Confidence and Prove to You That Our Store Is the Best Store At Which to Buy Anything in the Drug Line PALMETTO PHARMACY J. W. HEWELL. Manager KEEP COOL THIS SUMMER BY USING Westinghouse Electric Fans SOUTHERN PUBLIC UTILITIES COMPANY West Washington Street NEEARD LUMBER COMPANY incorporated Lumber, Shingles and Builders’ Supplies Greenville, S. C. Telephone 88PEACE PRINTING CO. Haynsworth Haynsworth ATTORNEYS. AT-LAW Masonic Temple Building Printers, Engravers Blank Book Makers Greenville. S. C. Loose Leaf Ledgers and All Kinds Special Forms and Systems Alcater G. Furman Alester G. Furman. Jr. Alester G. Furman Index Cards, Steel Cabinets and Filing Devices STOCKS, BONDS, LOANS INSURANCE Greenville, S. C. R. FI. Stewart T. M. Merritt Stewart Merritt The Ideal Laundry TAILORS, CLOTHIERS FURNISHERS 126 South Main Street Greenville. S. C. Cleaning 4- Real Estate and Building Insurance and Bonds Strictly High Class Worl( William Goldsmith East McBee Avenue Near New Courthouse Telephone 2086 Greenville, S. C.  VM. C. BEACI1AM, President W. M. HAOOOD. Vice-President THOMAS G. DAVIS. Cashier C. H. STOKES. Asst. Cashier The Peopled National Bank DIRECTORS K. V. Poe J. M. Geer V. J. Thackston W. M. Ilu Rood II. Endcl Allen J. Graham It. E. Geer C. I). Earle V. C. Bcacham Capital and Surplus a Quarter Million Dollars Greenville, S. C. Vaughan Marcy Jewelers 118 South Main Street Reliable Goods Only AGENTS J. P. Stevens Engraving Co. ATLANTA, GA. Expert Watch Repairing Jewelry and Silver Repairing SPORTING GOODS ATHLETIC GOODS Anything for Any Game or Sport. A Complete Stock from the Leading Makers At O'Neall-Williams Co. 303 North Main Street Smith Building Mahaffey’s Market DEALER IN FRESH MEATS Fish and Oysters in Season 121 Coffee Street Greenville, S. C. SAVE Something Every Year We Pay 4 Per Cent Compounded Quarterly EAT AT THE Royal Restaurant TO BE PLEASED The Only Restaurant in Town With Clean and Sanitary Kitchen 1 1 1 West Washington Street Telephone 857 Citizens’ Trust Company Greenville, S. C. A. D. L. Barksdale, Vice-Pres. W. L. GA88AWAY. Pr.sldnt I.. II. STRINGER. Vice-President V. D. RAMSKCR. Cashier PAUL BROWNING. Atst. Cash. THE AMERICAN BANK Greenville. S. C. DIRECTORS S. L. McBee J. P. Carey B. F. Martin C. C. Good B. E. Geer It. G. Gaines l . H. StrlnRer W. L. Gassaxvny Dr. Davis Furman V. D. Ramseur J. N. WatkinsBELK-KIRKPATRICK COMPANY Main Street and McBee Avenue Offering Special Merchandise for College Men in the Way of Suits, Extra Trousers, Underwear, Shirts, Collars Neckwear, Hosiery and Shoes In facl, a complete line, from top to toe, at prices less than the same class of goods may be had elsewhere. Strictly one price to all, and courteous attention. Visit our store and make yourself at home. TELEPHONE: NUMBERS 2540 AND 2541 COLLEGE CLOTHES You’ll sec them at Yale, Harvard, at all the great universities. The bulk of our business is with young men. They wear the new things first. They ask for them. Nowhere is there a more particular class of men, when it comes to clothes, than you’ll find in college. Tailored or Ready-to-Wear, We Have Them L. ROTHSCHILD Main Street and McBee Avenue Greenville. S. C.PATTON TILLMAN BRUCE FINE SHOES Our Fixed Aim Our aim is to sell you shoes that are so good and fit so well that your SHOE THOUGHTS will be pleasant and always with us whenever you are in need of shoes. If you want one hundred cents’ worth of good shoe value for every dollar you invest, here is where you will find it—along with almost an unlimited variety of styles, si .cs, and models, and at a price to please you. PATTON TILLMAN BRUCE GREENVILLE. S. C. Medical College of the State of South Carolina Owned and Controlled by the State SCHOOLS OF MEDIO INK AND PH A IS • MAOY. Rat«l In ('lasx A by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Colleges anil the Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties New building with well equipped laboratories. A full corps of thoroughly efficient nil-time teachers. Located opposite the Itopor Hospital and very near the Charleston Museum, thus affording the students more extensive opportunities for research and training. The requirements for admission to the School of Medicine ar -the completion of a four-year high school course and two years of college work, with a credit of 60 semester hours. The college work must include credits for 12 semester hours in Chemistry, S semester hours in Biology. S semestei hours In Physics, one year’s work In college English, and a reading knowledge of a modern foreign language. Women admitted on the same terms as men. Next session begins In September. DRINK COCA-COLA BOTTLED IN GREENVILLE. S. C. The Norwood National Bank Greenville, S. C. J. W. NORWOOD.................President W. P. ANDKIISOX.........Vice-President II P. McGEK.............Vice-President ('IIAS. M. MetJKE ..............Cashier -IAS. F. DAVENPORT................Asst. Cashier .1 II. OREENl.F.E.................Asst. CashierJahn $5 Ollier ENG RAVING COMPANY V ( £?es gners am l)?gr 7t' ?rs of fiyAerfSlaa f y ■ANNUAL -' •Sg o Illustrations. Designs Photographs ° I 'Wk WP‘'‘ Half-tones. Line •ni 1 ’p r .SSS ‘ Process Plates- c dBlast Quality ■4 88arl £ c h i c aSTUDENTS OF FURMAN AND THEIR FRIENDS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO STOP AT THE HOTEL IMPERIAL C. S. James, Proprietor LAWTON LUMBER COMPANY INCORPORATED Wholesale Lumber and Red Cedar Shingles GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA L. H. STINGER DRUGGIST Good Line of Stationery and School Supplies Agents for Waterman’s Fountain Pens FINE CANDIES WEST END DRUG STOREThe Photographs in This Annual WERE MADE BY MR. AND MRS. J. H. ORR Greenville, S. C. SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS AUD COURTESIES TO ALLKRESS’ THE BEST PLACE TO BUY YOUR School Supplies Music and Candy AT REASONABLE PRICES Greenville Auto Supply House Auto Accessories and Supplies of All Kinds Goodrich and India Tires Gasoline, Free Air and Water ROY A. FARMER. Manager 210 East Washington Street Telephone 2377 r-i ip Forty-One College Annuals Representing Colleges in Seventeen States is Our Record for v This Season Benson Printing Company is a printing plant specially equipped for every kind of school and college work. It is a complete organization with artistsand designersand workmen whose thought and inspiration is concentrated in the production of College Annuals and School Literature. This year we are printing for such Institutions as: Georgetown College, Alabama Woman's College. Mill saps College. Wofford College. Rrennu College. Mercer University, Judson College. University of Alabama, Transylvania College. Kentucky College for Women. Tennessee College. Greensboro Woman's College. Trimble County High School. Sewnneu University. Greenville Woman’s College, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Tulane University. Kentucky State University. Belhaven College. Se-waitee Military Academy. Dickinson College. Blue Mountain College. Muskingum College. University of Mississippi. Ouachita College. Furman University. Mississippi Woman’s College. Hillman College. Branham and Hughes Military Academy. Davidson College. Birmingham Southern College. The Citadel. Henderson-Brown College. Westhampton College. Trlnliv College. Central College. State Normal School. Alabama Presbyterian College, Central High School. Vanderbilt University, Howard College. ensoi'IN I PRIMING CO. .NASHVILLE.A College Annual Experts Samples and Prices Upon RequestOREGON LUMBER COMPANY (incorporated) Lumber, Shingles, and Building Supplies EAST COURT STREET GREENVILLE. S. C. DRINK CHERO-COLA 5c There’s None So Good The Bank of Commerce Corner Main and Coffee Sts. Greenville, S. C. “ Your friend and mine. ” B. A. MORGAN. President F. F. MARTIN. Vice-Pre . and Cashier STAFFORD’S SHOE WORKS When your shoes are worn Till the soles are thin, Bring ’em to us for speedy mend 404 S. Main Street Telephone 267 1 THOROUGH SIGHT TESTING We assure you ability. • We assure you accuracy' ,Our ability in sight sav injc examinations is your assurance of glasses correct in appearance, locus land lit. Odom-Schade Optical Co. OptonietriM A Optician Muftnnir TempleWe sell everything worn by man, woman or child, and by our great buying facilities we can undersell. You never Efird’s, EfircTs Department Store p,3 m.°!;e the correct than it s place to The New Store Phone 271 worth at shop. I 14-1 16 South Main Street Efird’s.mmm


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