Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC)

 - Class of 1918

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 194 of the 1918 volume:

 , ,cmg m :n!g:i mami:;i.air.iiKaaa'.u::iaii;:;isi;'Jisg,aiana cai3a?a nn FOREWORD NI presenting “Our Bonhomie, 1918,’’ it has been our aim to gather some reminiscences of our college days, so that in the to-morrow, when those who are now students, and those who are wanderers far from our Alma Mater, may in turning these pages, pick up again the mystic cord of memory running back to every loved spot and tender association, which cannot fail to clarify the visions she has given us and strengthen our purpose. rasas iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii! OUR BONHOMIE 19 18 VOLUME XVIII PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE STUDENTS OF FURMAN UNIVERSITY GREENVILLE. SOUTH CAROLINA PROPERTY of FURMAN UNIVERSITY LIBRARY GREENVILLE, S. C. r_ T-----------------------------------------------------+ = 5348235353532353025323535353485323532348484848482348534848532353230 7 V _ 1 Order of Books □ □ □ ONE UNIVERSITY TWO ORGANIZATION AND ACTIVITY THREE MUSCULARITY FOUR HILARITYItlllpuioriam (0tts 2Jayiuitt Irniiip, ’IT ITkmrnrr, $ . (£. iKtllrJi tit (Train JBrrrk iffrbruanj 25,1018 SCIENCE HALLTOWARD LIBRARY AND ALUMNI HALLALUMNI HALLMONTAGUE HALLMCGF.K HALLTOWARDS THE CITYSketch of Furman University HE Baptists of South Carolina sent some of their ministerial students to the Academy on the High Hills of the Santee, where the principal. Dr. J. M. Roberts, received a part, if not all. of them free of tuition. In 1827 the Baptist State Convention opened “ The Furman Academy and Theological Institution” at Edgefield, buildings and land having been conditionally offered by the citizens of the village. The magnetic influence of Basil Manly. Sr., and a desire on the part of the convention to secure the co-operation of the Georgia Baptists, caused the school to be located not far from the Savannah River. After an experiment of less than two years, with Dr. Joseph Warne as Principal, the Convention decided to abandon the classical department. surrender the property to the donors, and remove the beneficiaries to the High Hills of the Santee, in Sumter County. Later. Prof. Samuel Furman was added to the teaching force. The last four years at the High Hills. 1830-1834, was the period when it was attempted to support the school by means of scholarships. A suspension of two years, 1833-1836, followed the failure of this method of supporting the faculty. Efforts were resumed on the first Monday in February. 1837, when a Manual Labor Classical School was opened near Winnsboro. under the principalship of Prof. W. E. Bailey, but its bright prospects began to wane the following May, when the building was burned. In 1838 the Theological Department was resumed, under Dr. W. Hooper as President. Dr. J. L. Reynolds succeeded him in 1840. In 1842 Rev. J. S. Mims became Junior Professor and Teacher of Systematic Theology. Dr. J. C. Furman succeeded Dr. Reynolds in 1844, and Rev. Peter C. Edwards was made Teacher of Hebrew and Biblical Exegesis the following year. The celebrated trio were hardly in their chairs before a removal to Greenville and the enlargement of the school began to be a general topic. In 1848 Dr. Furman was released from the duties of the schoolroom, and, with the help of others, was successful in raising $70,000 for Furman University, to be located in Greenville. In 1851 this transfer was made, and the Academy and Theological Departments were opened under Dr. James C. Furman, as C hairman of the Faculty. Fifty-nine acres were purchased at first, but a part was afterwards disposed of. In 1832 the College of Liberal Arts began its work. In 1855, Prof. Mims, of the Theological Department, died, and was succeeded by James C. Boyce, under whose leadership this department of the University grew into the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (1859), with the famous quartet, James P. Boyce, Basil Manly, John A. Broadus and William Williams, as professors. In this year (1859) Dr. Furman became the President of the University, and served in that capacity till 1879, as Chairman of the Faculty till 1881, and as Professor of Moral Philosophy till his death, in 1891. Dr. Charles Manly succeeded to the presidency in 1881. and held this position till 1897. The period from 1865 to 1885 was a period of precarious struggle. At its beginning the University was stripped of everything but the campus, the main building and several thousand dollars, held for ministerial education; and it was only in 1885 and 1886, when, by the successful agency of R. H. Griffith, a considerable endowment fund was raised, that the institution breathed freely again. In 1888 Judson Cottage was built, at a cost of $2,800, and shortly after this Griffith Hall, at about the same cost, and some other smaller buildings. In 1897 Dr. A. P. Montague became President, and during his incumbency of (19) five years the Alumni Hall, the old Fitting School building, and the Montague Hall were built, at a cost of $22,000, $3,000 and $12,000, respectively. Dr. E. M. Potcat succeeded Dr. Montague in November, 1903. In the same year, under the agency of Rev. Joel I. Allen, subscriptions to the amount of $125,000 were secured for endowment. In March, 1905, Mr. Andrew Carnegie proposed to give $15,000 for a library building, on condition that $15,000 be raised as an endowment for the library. This condition was met by Dr. Judson, who created the Charles H. Judson Endowment Fund for the library. Dr. Judson died January 12, 1907, in his eighty-seventh year, after having served the University in various capacities—Professor, Treasurer, Acting President,Dean—for fifty-six years. In recognition of his eminence as a mathematician and teacher, shortly the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of ’Teaching granted him a pension of one thousand dollars per annum. In his last will and testament Dr. Judson made the Library Endowment Fund residuary legatee of his estate, and it is expected that several thousand dollars will thus be added to the fund. The library building was erected in 1906-07, at a cost of $23,000, Mr. Carnegie having added $4,000 to his original grant, and other friends contributing a like sum. In December, 1907, the South C arolina Baptist State Convention at Orangeburg projected a campaign for the erection of a new building, to be known as the "James C. Furman Hall of Science.” At the end of the year 1908, subscriptions were in hand amounting to $50,000 for this purpose, $25,000 of which was subscribed by Andrew Carnegie. Also in 1908 a commodious dormitory was built for the Fitting School. On December 31, 1909, largely through the efforts of Rev. E. P. Easterling. Financial Agent, all the conditions named above in reference to the James C. Furman Hall of Science were met. The work of erecting the new building was begun in the year 1910, and it was formally opened with appropriate exercises on January 18, 1912. At the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, June 4, 191 I, it was resolved to add $100,000 to the general endowment at the earliest possible date. In October following the General Education Board of New York voted a grant of $25,000 of the proposed $100,000, on condition that $75,000 be raised by July 31, 1914. At the December, 1911, meeting of the Board. Rev. Dr. M. V. McDuffie was elected Field Secretary and put in charge of this undertaking. (20)Officers of Board of Trustees and Executive Committee J. J. Lawton. President B. E. Geer. Treasurer HarUvillc. S. C. Greenville. S. C. H. P. McGee. Chairman of Executive Committee Greenville. S. C. (21) A. G. Furman, Secretary Greenville. S. C.Edwin McNeil Poteat, D.D., LL.D. President and Professor of Christianity B.A.. Wake Forest. 1881; Full Graduate. Southern Baptist Theoloftleal Seminary, 1885; Instructor in Greek amt Latin, Wake Forest, 1886: Graduate Student. Johns Hopkins University. ISS6-1SKS: Pastor Calvary Baptist Church and Lecture Course In Yale, Xew Haven. Conn.. 1S88-1S98; B.U.. Wake Forest. 1SJM; Pastor Memorial Baptist Church. Philadelphia. Penn.. 1S98-1303; T.L.D., South Carolina University. I! 0": President of Furman University since November. 1503. (22)Harvey Tollier Cook. M.A.. Lrrr.D. Marshall Delph Earle. M.A. Professor of Grecl( and Latin Professor of Mathematics M.A.. Furman University. lSTo; I.In.I).. Kurman University. 1900: Instructor. Patrick Military School. 1873-lssi; Professor of Greek since DSl; Professor of laitln 1917. Sidney Ernest Bradshaw, M.A.. Ph D. M.A . Furman University, l$s9; student at Cornell University, University of Wisconsin, University of Cambridge (England), South Carolina State Summer School for Teachers. 1900-1 !•«» ;; Professor of .Mathematics since 1SS9. Hides' Toy Cox. B.A. Professor of Modern Languages Professor of Physics and Astronomy B.A. and M.A.. Bethel College, Kentucky: Pb.D. t’nlversity of Virginia; Student at University of Chicago. Leipzig. and Berlin; Professor of English. Bethel College, and .Manual Training High School. Louisville. Ky.; traveled In Europe in l$9 . 1903-1904. ISO?. 1311, and ISIS; Member of Modern Language Association of America: Professor of Modern Languages since 1904, ami Chairman of the Faculty since 1912: Honorary Member of Phi Beta Kappa of University of Virginia. B.A.. Furman University. 1903: Grndunte Student. University of Chicago. Summer Sessions. 1906. 1910, 1911; Principal Heath Springs High School. 1904-190$; Assistant Professor. Furman University. 1906-1911; Dean since 1913. (23)Orun Ottman Fletcher. M.A.. D.D. Professor of Philosophy and Political Science It.A. ami B.D.. University of Chicago, is$3: M.A.. Colgate University. 1S.S7; D.D., Shurtleff College. ISSS; Memb.-r of the American Philological Association, Society of .Biblical Literature nn l Exegesis. Philosophical Society of Croat Britain (Victoria Institute), ami Atnorl-cun Philosophical Association: Professor of philosophy ami Political Science since 190$; Lecturer on the Norton Foundation, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. I.oulsvillr, Ky., for the year 1913: Lecturer In the Summer School of Philosophy, Grove City. Pa.. 1914-1917. James Lf.i.akd Vass. M.A. Professor of History M.A., Furman University. 1004: Instructor, Furman Fitting School. 1904-1905: Greek Fellow, University of Chicago. 1903-1906: Greek Assistant. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 1906-1907; Instructor University Flexnor School, Louisville. Ky.. 1907; Instructor Anderson High School. 1907-1909: Professor of History. Georce Alexander Bcist, MS. Professor of Chemistry. Geology, and Biology B.S.. Furman University: LS„ Vanderbilt University. 1900; Insttuctor In Chemistry. Vanderbilt University. 1X99-1900; Professor of Physical and Biological Science. Winchester Normal College. Tennessee. 1900-1907; Assistant. Furman University. 1907-1911 ; Chair of Chemistry, Geology. and Biology. Furman University, since 1911; Secretary of Faculty; Curator, Furman University Museum: Chairman of Committee on Degrees: Member American Association for the Advancement of Science: American Chemical Society: National Geographical Society: Manager ami Treasurer. Greenville Lyscum Association; Lecturer on Chemistry, City Hospital. Greenville. S. C. Willis Beeler Bible, B.A. dissociate Professor of English B.A., Carson ami Newman College, 1910: Athletic Coach. Carson and Newman. 1909-1911; Student, University of Chicago. 1911-1913: Professor of English and Athletic Director. Savannah Institute. Tennessee. 1912-1913; Professor of English and History and Athletic Director. Allen Academy. Bryan. Texas. 1913-1914; Assistant Professor of English, and Athletic Director, Furman University. 1914-1916: Student Harvard University, Summer. 1916: Associate Professor of English since 1915.Herbert Winston Provence. M.A., Th.D. Professor of English M.A.. ItlHiWnfl "oil. k . Vtt.. 1X1 1; Tll.U.. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 1S‘.,V: Pastor. Montgomery. Ala.. IM'S-Bov. ; Itirmini: ham. Ain., l1 :••• I: IJvank«-|i t and Teacher. Shanghai. Chinn, 1901 1912: Pastor. Clinton. Ml .. p.12-1913: Professor of Bfhlc ami Phll-OMopliy. .Ml l ippl College, 1!I12.I9I I; A soclnio Professor of Kngllsh, Furman Fnlv. slty, 1911-1913; pmfcwwr of l-lngUsh since P. l5. Major Harry R. Wilkins. B.S. 1 .AWRENCK I lENRY BoWEN. B.A. Assistant Professor of Mathematics Ll.A.. Knrman Unlvrmity. 1915; Principal PiKgnh Korol School, N. ( .. 1913-1911; Instructor of Mathematic . Spartan Academy. 19I4-J91S: Principal Fort I.nwn Graded School, s. ( .. 1913-1910; Graduate Student. University of Clilengo. Summer Session . 1913. 1910: Instructor Maihe-malic . Furman l‘ni erslty. I9IS-191 ; A l ant Professor of Mathematic . 1917-191$. James Henry Simpson. B.A. Registrar an,I Superintendent of Crontuls and Buildings Instructor of Military Science B.S.. Th - Citadel. 190R; National C,wards, four year , from Private to Conunls |oncd Olllcer; Captain, Marklcy Guard ; Instructor of Mill-tary Science, Furman University, 1917.191$. 15.A.. Furman University, 1911; Teacher. North Greenville Academy. 1911 1913: Student of I,a v with McCollough. Martin and Ulytlie, Student at DrauRhon's Practical Business College. 1915-191 ;: Ueglstrar. Furman I'nlvcndiy. 19I :-1917: Keslstrnr and Supcrlntcn«lent of Grounds and Building . Furman University. 1917-191S. (25) Our Matron Miss Annie I. Long "Grandma" Oar Assistant Matron Mrs. Sai.uk Hardin Our Librarian Miss Alberta Malone Oar Co-Ed Miss Priscilla Potent (26) Oar Office Assistant Miss Barbara Chapman(27)STUDENT BODY FURMAN UNIVERSITY 1917- 18Senior Class Miss Aimee Sloan. Sponsor Class Officers L. P. Thompson J. A Shirley .... W. E. Sims.................. M M Newell......................... L E Lenhardt................ C V Wilkes .... M. B. Gunter . President . Vice-President ..................Secretary .......................... Treasurer •.................Historian . . . Prophet Poet (31)Senior Class Heyward James Blackmon . . Kershaw APPLICANT FOR B.A. "Marfa, nut girls, have been my aim." Heyward James Blackmon firs saw day in the now-famed village of Kershaw, S. C., December 12. 1897. I lis preparation for college was received in the graded and high school of his home town. When Blackmon came to Furman in the fall of ’14 he immediately received the cognomen. "Rat Blackmon.” a name which clung to him to his Senior year. With his advent into the graduating class, a more appropriate name was found "Gooch." For such a diminutive man. "Gooch" made great pretentions in the pugilistic world, challenging everyone of his size, complexion, and weight. His particular field of accomplishment is as a student. I le always stood high in his classes, and he was famed as an "F.thics shark." Member I'hllosopltlan Literary Society: Conductor, Spring Term. 15-’lt : Recording Secretary, Fall Term. '17-'1K: Junior • Title. Spring Term. ’17- 1S: Associate Editor "Echo," Fall Term. "lT-’lS; Member Intersoeloty Relation Committee. ’17-•1S: Delegate to S C. P. A.. MT-’IS; Vice-president Class. 1I»-'I6; Member «»f V. M. C. A.: Member of Jtnlson Memorial liaraca Class; Member of Epicurean Club. Marcus Stewart Boyd .... Laurens APPLICANT FOR B.A. "He may ycl be a prophet." it is said that "in every group there is one who is considered the leader." This honored position is given to "Mark." He was born in Laurens County, March 5, 1897. and received his preparatory education at a school in this historical county. He came to Furman in the fall of 1913, making good in all his undertakings. Having lived on the farm all his life, he decided after spending one year in college to return and take up this great profession. At the beginning of the next scholastic year "Mark" had changed his mind and returned to college. Our best wishes are with him in his life work. Member r Phllojsophinn Literary Society: Junior Censor; Junior Critic: Corresponding Secretary; Standard Hearer: I‘resi- dent. Spring Term. ’17-'l$: Member Debate Council. '17 In; Member V. M. C. A.; Member Judson Memorial KnrAcn Class: President Class. ’15-'18; Secretary Class. 'lS-'l?: Member Furman Council, •1«-'I7: President Furman Council. '17- 1 s; President Student Body. '17-'! ; President McGee llall Student Body, ’1C-'17; Member Varsity Football Team. ’17: Member Baseball Team, '15- 1$: Captain Baseball Team. H.- K. ’17--1S: Athletic Editor “Hornet, ' 'lt! 17.Senior Class Ewart Gladstone Brown . . Oakway APPLICANT FOR B.S. “Keeping everlastingly al it brings success." All Oakway was astounded on May 3, 1898. a the birth of "E. G.” was announced. He spent his peurile days on the farm and attended the Oakway school. After sixteen years had passed. Furman stretched out her arms to receive the "late"' Mr. Brown. The summer of 1915 found "E. G." going out West to sell books, but ended with his inspecting live slock to ship back to the East. “Egg" was determined to finish college and came back to Furman that fall. "E. G." has many fine qualities, and when information is needed on any subject. Brown always comes to the rescue. We feel sure that his keen sense of knowledge in the scientific field will accompany him through life. And as a business man. Brown is even now unsurpassed. Meinlier of Adelphlan I.Itentry Society; Senior Censor, ‘JT-'1S; Sergeniit-al-Ainis. •K-'IS; Recorder. Assistant Ser- gcant-nt-Arnis, '17-'IS: .Inn lor Censor; Member of Y. M. C. A.: Member of the .Imticon Meiuoiial Haiaca class; Delegate to s. « . C. I . A.. Iis; Business Manager of the "Hornet.” ’17-'IS; Circulation Manager "Hornel. ’ "lfi-’17; Member Foot-tiall Squail. 'lT-’IS; Assistant I'hysics Department, '17-'tS. Samuel Thomas Brunson . . Ninety Six APPLICANT FOR B.A. “All the women in the world could not rnn c me lose an hour." This promising young gentleman quickly won a place in the confidence and friendship of the fellows at Furman. I le brought with him a nickname, which has clung to him like flypaper—"Slick Jit." Ninety Six claims the honot of his place of birth, and July 18.1899, was ;hc time. After finishing the grammar school in this village, "Jit" went to B. M. I. to get some military training. Upon graduating from that institution he came to Furman, entering the Jun’or Class. One thing "jit" must overcome before he goes out into the world is superstition. If he conquers fear, and that of his antipathy for the ladies, he is going to make a huge success in life. Member of Adclphlan Literacy Society: St an tin r l Hearer. Sprint: Term. 17: Senior Censor, Spring: Term. ‘In; Chnlrmnn Excuse Committee. Fall Term. 17: Secretary Annual Association. ’K-'IS: Member .luitkoii Memorial Iturnm class: Member V. M C. A.: Member Cotton Top Club; Member F.plourean Club; Sergeant Company C. ‘I6-'I7: Sergeant Company B. 'I7-'1S; Honor Coll for Chapel Attendance, 1C-,|".Senior Class James Hawley Byrd............................Kershaw APPLICANT FOR B.A. "You can't catch old birds lri'f i chaff.” "J. Byrd" first opened his eyes and began to chirp on a farm near Kershaw, S. C. I lis being rather sensitive about his age forced us to search all historical archives and newspapers to find when he arrived on terra fiima. I he outcome of this research gives us the date. February 23, 1892. For his preparatory education he attended Flat Creek School, Jefferson Graded School. Kershaw and Wingate High Schools. Alter finishing the last, in the spring of 1913, he made his flight to Furman and joined the Class of '18. "J. Byrd" has made an estimable record during his three years here, as a worker and as an all-around good fellow. He has won the love and respect of all the boys, and many girls, too. Member ot tSigma Section of the Phltosophinn Literary Society; Standard Bearer, Fall Term. 'Jo-'IC; Chaplain. Spring Term, 1$-’U5: Treasurer, Fall Term, 'lC-'lT; Junior Critic, Spring Term, '16-'17; Public Debater. ‘lS-'l,: Interim-clety Debater. MT-'IS: Vice-President. Fall Term. 'J7-’1S: President, Spring Term. 17- 1S; President of Baraca Class, Fall Term, 'J7-"1S: Vice-President V. M. C. A.. '17; Executive Member of student Council. •I7-,l«: Alumni Editor of •■Echo." Fall Trim, ’IS-’IT. Perry Dalmf.r Cannada.................Taylors APPLICANT FOR B.A. "Ambition rales my brain and love my heart." “P. D." was born and reared near the little town of Taylors. S. C. He procured his early training at the plow and in the community schools. Taylors High School declared h:m a graduate in 1914, after three years of hard grinding. Furman look the burden of continuing the grind in the fall of the following year, and we must say that he has always been a faithful student. The girls near Furman never caused him to lose very much sleep, but wc can't say that about the mountain maidens. The roads never get too rough and muddy for "j Ford" to find rest at a lonely little home in the foothill of the Blue Ridge. 1 he host of warm friends wish for "P. D." a successful career, single or married. Member of Phllosophlnn Literary Society; Treasurer. Gamma Section, Spring Term. ’lt -’17: Senior Censor. Fall Term. ■17-'1S; Member of Judson Memorial Baraca Class; Member of Y. M. A.-------. Senior Class Everette Hubert Croxton .. Kershaw APPLICANT FOR B.A. "There jv jj notvhere so busy a man as he.” “Crat" was born at Heath Springs, S. C.. April 26, 1896. A few years later he moved to the little town of Kershaw, where he received most of his graded school education. From here he moved to Lancaster in 1908, where he lived until 1912. I lis high school work was begun there, but was completed at Kershaw. where he had returned to make that place his permanent home I he Class of T8 welcomed “Crafs” invasion of Furman in the fall of 1914. During his four years here he has had a scry busy career at student, manager, and collector; and during his summer vacations people of many States of the Union have purchased books under his tactful persuasion, lie has been efficient in all lines, and the same success which has attended him at Furman is predicted for him wherever he may go. Member Phllosophlnn Literary Society; Simulant Hearer, Sprint; Term. 'H-’lfi; Junior Connor. Spring Term. Se- nior Censor. Kail Term. "Ifi-'l”; Recording Secretary. Spring Term. 16- 17: Cashier. Kail and Spring Terms. MT-’IS; Member of Debate Connell, 'IT-'IS; Winner of Improvement Medal. ’M-'IS: Class Treasurer. 't5-’l$; Assistant Business Manager « f “Kcho," 'U-T7; Business Manager “Our Bonhomie, 1918"; Treasurer V. M. C. A. '17; Secretary of Rnracu Class. 'K-'17. George Thomas DeVore . . . Ninety Six APPLICANT FOR B.S. "Love is the greatest of educators.” “Tom" was born in Ninety Six, S. C., April 24. 1896. He received his early training in the graded school of that di: tinguished town, finishing the high school department in the spring of 1915. Because of his thorough preparation he was able to enter the Sophomore Cinis at Furman in the fall of the same year. “ I om" hat made a warm place in the affections of the Furman boys, also in a host of city folk. I le is always jovial and good natured right there with the wit and the largest yarn. His one failing is his love for Lnc ladies in general, and one very much in particular, at Winthrop. When he leaves Furman, we will lose a devoted adherent and a good sport. Member Xigmit Section Philosophian Literary Society; Assistant Conductor. SprliiK Term. i5-'18: Correspond I hit Secretary. Kail Term, I7-‘IS; Senior Censor, SprltiK Term. T.'-'IS; Member Judson Memorial Baraca Class; Member Y. M. c. A.; Member Epicurean Club; Corporal Company li; Treasurer of Annual Association, I7-'1S.Senior Class Harry Lee Easterlin .... Waltcrboro APPLICANT FOR B.A. "The great art to learn much is to learn a little at a time." The singing negroes on a farm in Colleton County welcomed the lilt! son Marry to the peaceful farmer, Mr. Easterlin, Senior, several decades ago. His life on the plantation and in the rural schools molded him into a social orrement and a curiosity for all. He came to the Furman campus in the fall of '12 and began his record in the F. F. School. The record made is beyond all reproach. He entered the University in Septrnber, 1913. but stayed out the following year and made himself famous as a schoolmaster. However, we are glad he returned and joined our class. His irresistible attraction for the ladies does not keep him from finding lime to study and to entertain his classmates. Member Phil rsophlnn Literary Society: Junior Critic. Full Term. I7-'1S: Vice-President, Spring Term. ' 17- 1 S: Member Juibon Memorial Burnett Clan; Vice-President. •K.-'IC: Associate Kill tor "Echo," •Ifi-’IT: Member V. M. C. A.; Recording Secretary for 1! 17. Roy Alexander Farmer . . Campobello APPLICANT FOR B.A. "Hang sorrow! Care will l(ill a cat; therefore let's he mcrrXf." Roy Alexander Farmer was born in Campobcllo. S. C.. May 10. 1896. His early training and preparation for college were received in this same noteworthy spot. He entered Furman in the fall of 1914 as a green "Rat"—not so green, however, as to prevent hi associates from electing him Secretary of the class. Ho has been unusually popular with the boys, but more so with the girls, for he is in every sense a ladies' man. His Willys Six loaded with girls in his characteristic diversion. From his acquaintance with the gasoline engine, and through his weird experience on all sorts of motor contrivances, Roy will make a splendid air pilot in this branch of service, which he has joined. His favorite study is "Feministic Physiognomy." and in judging "glad eyes." he should be awarded a doctor's degree. Member Phllosophlnn Literary Society: Sergonnt-nt-Arms. 'll-'lS; Member Jud-«on Memorial Bar.'tea Claim; Secretary of class. T4-‘|S: Member of Council. 'tt-'IS: Member of Football Team, '15-'K, '10-’17. winning tils block K.Senior Class David Jones Fant......................Atlanta, Ga. APPLICANT FOR B.A. "Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast.” We would like to elaborate on this man. hut we cannot for the lack of space, time, and descriptive adjectives. I le was born in Atlanta. Ga.. January 27. 1897. After spending eight years in the grammar school and three years at Wilson Memorial Academy. Nyack. N. Y.. he was prepared to enter the Sophomore Class at Furman in 1915. He has not only won the confidence and good will of the boys, but the girls as well. Place him in a G. W. C. parlor, with his love-making apparatus in working older, and he will make Don Juan, in his sunniest days, feel like a pair of red socks at a funeral. Fan! has stood well in all of his classes; many and varied arc his tnients. any one of which will insure a success behind the curtain of tomorrow which will add a rich page of history to his life. Member of Phllosophian Literary Society; Chaplain. Fall Term, "15 '16; Executive Committee, 'ir,-’IT; Junior Critic, I6-'I7; President. Fail Term. •li-'lS; Intercollegiate Debater. '17-’1S; Senior Critic, '17-'IS; President Class. ‘li»-'17; Cheer header. ’17-'1S: Member of Y. M. C. A.: Associate Editor "Hornet.’ '1G- 17; EdItor-in-Chlef of "Hornet." 17-’IS; Assistant Editor-In-Chief of "Our Bonhomie 191S"; Member of Cl. e Club. ‘16- ‘17. 'IT-'IS: President of South Carolina I. I . A.. 'H5-‘17: Member of Student Council. 'Ifi-'K; Winner of Medal for boat essay on Prohibition. T6-'17. James Samuel Graham . . . Williamston APPLICANT FOR B.A. " ?y grit and grace I am rvhat I am.” "Cracker" made his appearance on the scene of action, according to tradition, al Hodges, S. C., January 9, 1884. Ml. Bethel School, near which this tragedy occurred, furnished him his early intellectual training. Cupid early pledged his part in "Cracker's" life, and he took unto himself a wife. Mrs. Pearl Abbott Graham der.lt patiently with him for a while. After all her patience and broomstick admonition expired, she brought him to the Furman Fitting School in September. 1911. hoping that the environment would better his condition. By effort of his teachers and his own inspired zeal, he finished his task there and joined the Class of '18 at the University. He now bids fair to become a great preacher some day; having had seven years of successful work in the ministry already, we count big on "Cracker." Member Adelphfnn Literary Society; Supports Wife and Child. xxuir.--. »«nsw wili ■hmhhmUJ ytvr w :it aaaaai Senior Class Milledge Byron Gunter .... Samaria APPLICANT FOR B.A. "As a conscious witness of Cod and a stern preacher of righteousness." There came a men from Samaria (S. C.) seeking for ihc light, not only on books, bul on all questions of life. The grammar schools of Aiken County, with the aid of Leesville High School, are to be commended for turning out a product so well finished. No doubt his efficiency as a student here is partly due to his success in the business world—manufacturing naval stores and for many years using the password "whoa." Furman Fitting School dealt patiently with him the year prior to his entrance into the University. He had become a worthy, honored, and dangerous opponent in debate, but this does not detract from his personality being felt for good over the entire campus. Member PhlloKophlnn Literary Society; scrgeant-at-Arms. 'lo-'ifi: chaplain. Fall Term, ’l«-'t ; Settlor Critic. Spring Term. •|7-’1S; Junior Critic. Fait Term. I7- IS: Intcmoclety Debater. ‘17-'ls; Associate Editor "Hornet.” 1€- 17; Business Manager "Echo," '17-'1S; Member Y. M. C. A.; Member Tennis Club; Class Poet. •17--I8. Pinkney Belton Hair................Bamberg APPLICANT FOR B.A. "He learned more from smiles and tender looks than ere he did from out his boolfs." Our friend Hair is now of Bamberg, yet l orn between Williamstown and Pclzer, S. C. Evidently he did not like the fresh air and pure water of the Piedmont Hills; for very early he moved to Bamberg. S. C. I lerc he received his preparatory education. Belton was then ready to enter college, and. of course, he chose Furman. He has made us a loyal student, an orator, and a fashion leader. Pinkney is loyal to his literary society, and. indeed, is one of its best orators. These arc not his only accomplishments. for he can hold his own against any opponent when the conflict is among the ladies. Indeed. one wonders how he could have achieved so much in the few years from July 18. 1898. the year of his birth, until June. 1918. Mom her of Adclphinn Literary Society; Chapluin Spring Term. T5-'lti; Senior Censor, Spring Term, ’18- 17; Senior Critic. Spring Term. 'lfi- 17: Chairman Interaoclety Relations Committee. '17-'1S; Vice-President. Fall Term. '17-'IS; President. Spring Trim. '17-'1$; A. L S. Editor “Hornet.” Fall Term. 'I7-’1S; Class Editor “The Bonhomie.” 'IS-'IS; Athletic Editor "Hornet.” Spring Term. 'IC-’K; Delegate to S. C. C. P. A. I7- I8.Senior Class Glover Hart..............................Taylors APPLICANT FOR B.A. "Men of real merit find favor everywhere ; inch as this man." "Farmer" Marl war wafted here on ihe breezes of a snowy morning, February 21. 1886. Hi first glimpse of ihe world was a blue range of mountains in the northern pari of Greenville County, where he lived for many years. According to history, he received his early training in Union and Locust schools. Me went forth to North Greenville Academy, and graduated from there in 1906. Mis greatest ambition was to imparl his knowledge to the world by teaching, which career he followed for eight years with great success. Mis final lesson which brought him to Furman was instilled by his good wife—a patient one, indeed. Me is what we call a "hard student." I lis cheerful smile, hearty greeting and warm handclasp are the th:ngs that have won for him countless friends, and his admirable traits of character have gained the respect of all with whom he has come in contact. Clyde Herndon.............................Ehrhardt APPLICANT FOR B.A. "Happy am I; from care I am free; IVhy aren't they all content lil(c me?" On November 7. 1896. South Carolina found herself enriched by another great man, one of whom she is justly proud. Clyde was born near Ehrhardt. S. C. As a lad he began his pursuit of knowledge in the country schools; but completed his preparatory education at Ehrhaidt and Furman Fitting School. Nineteen hundred and fourteen found Clyde entering upon an ever to be remembered career at Furman, where he has been one of the leading men of his class. Clyde's optimistic nature and jolly smile have annihilated many attacks of despondency and blues among us. Monitor Phllosophlan I.Horary Society; Winner Improvement Medal. M4-M6; Standard Bearer. Fait Term. M5-M 6; Treasurer, Fall Term, ‘lt-'l ; Senior Censor. Spring Term. MC-M7; Vice-President. Fall Term. M7 'l$; I,itornry Editor •■Hornet.' Fall Term. M7-MS; Junior Critic. Spring Term, ''i7-'l$; Historian Sophomore Clans: 1 rraaurcr Junior Class; Member Jud.Kon Memorial Barnca Class; Treasurer Barnca, Fall Term. M7-MS; Member Y. M. C. A.; Member Executive Committee P. I,. S.. M7-MS; Monitor Football Team, ’17-MS; Member Furman Fitting School Club. '17-MS; Corporal Company A; Member Baseball Team. '17-MS.Senior Class Marion McJunkin Hewell . Greenville APPLICANT FOR B.A. "She taught me love and sympathy.” "Mr. Marion" war born in the Mountain City, June 10. 1898. Hi aunt's private school furnished him with his early education, preparing him to enter the Greenville public schools. I Ic graduated from the high school in 1914, with the second highest honors. He is noted for his external show, latent ability, natural resourcefulness, and social paragonism. Jlrmber Adclphlnn Literary Society: Improvement .Medal; Chaplain: Junior t’rltlc; Senior Censor, Spring Term. Senior Critic. Spring Term. 17- IX; Society Marshal. ’16- I6; Intomoclety Debit tor. 17- I s; interoocicty Orator, ’ 17-' 1S; Chairman Intersociety Itetallonir Commltee; Intercollegiate l elmlcr. ‘17- Js; President, Fall Term. '17; Secretary Debate Council. 1$-’18; Editor-In-Chief "Echo, 'IT-'IS; Circulation .Manager "Our Donhomle,” 17- 1X; Athletic Editor "Echo," 1 tf- 17: Literary Editor "Hornet,” 16: Member Athletic Council. 16- 17. 17-‘IS: Member Tennis Club, ‘H-’IS; Doubles Champion, I5- 1X; Runner-up, State College Tournament. 17; Manager Tennis Team, I6- 18; Member Furman Council. 1 - 17; Treasurer Senior Class; Secretary S. C. I. T. A.. ’17- 1X; Winner Thomas Keys Bible Medal. H- 1S. William Martin Hunt......................Liberty APPLICANT FOR B.A. "There arc no trices in plain and simple Faith." On August I. 1894, W. M. Hunt, better known as "Sister Hunt," one of our "sisters." was born at Liberty. S. C. This youngster soon became able to manipulate his bipedal potentialities, and then he began his labors of being more useful than ornamental. I le pursued his educational career in the Liberty Graded and High Schools, receiving his "dip" from there in 1910. He entered Furman in September of the same year and spent two years, making many friends and an enviable record in •:lassroom work. From 1912 to 1916 he spent his time teaching, bookkeeping, selling laces, and engaging himself in architectural work at the Liberty Colton Mills. These occupations "Sister" decided were not his calling, so he returned to bur-man in 1916. "Sister" is a friend to all, and always ready with a kind word and a helping hand. Member Adclphiun Literary Society; Senior Censor, Kail Term. 1«- 17: Junior Censor, Spring Term, ’16- 17: High Priest. ‘I7- 18: Recording Secretary. 17- IS; Literary Editor "Echo." Spring Term. IS-‘17; Member Judson Memorial Hnraca Class: Member Y. M. ( . A.: President. 17; Editor-In-Chief "Our Bonhomie 1918"; Manager Glee Club. 17- 1S; Member Furman Council, 16- 17; Secretary. 17- 1X; Honor Roll. H5- 17.Senior Class Lawrence Ldwin Lenhardt . . . Easley APPLICANT FOR 8.A. "He has passed his lime in studious toil, and never found lime to grotv fat Tell me why the Lord made a man willi (he ideas and (ouch of a woman and I will tell you why all business was paralyzed in Easley on January 13. 1896. It was (hen that "Sister" Lenhardt first opened his eyes. The Easlcyitcs realized that the young Lenhardt would rule the town with a feministic hand and advised that he be exiled to B. M. I. for at least two years. After that, returning home, they found that the lad was more feminine, yet more masterful. Then did the Easlcyitcs recognize that there were great possibilities in the youth, and they advised that he be sent to Furman in order that he might learn the art of leadership. The Easley of tomorrow depends upon the posterity of this "sister" of our class. Member Adelphlan Literary Society; Junior Critic. M7-MS; VI......President. Spring Term. M7-MS; Member Intorso-clety Relation Commit ter-, M7-MS: Member of V. M. A.: Member of Judson Memorial Rumen class: Class Historian, ' 1T- IS; Alumni lid it or of "Kobo,” '17; Local Kdltor. 'IS; Club Iiditor of "Our Bonhomie." '17-MS: Student Iiditor of tin- "Hornet," '17-MS; President Bp leu-rcan club. 1S; President Tennis Club, MS; Delegate S. C. C. I'. A.. '17-MS. John Alvis Richardson . . Simpsonvillc APPLICANT FOR B.A. "He seemed tc consider himself as a common man among common men.” "Rich" first saw the light on June 27, 1896. near Simpsonvillc, S. C. He attended the backwoods school—J IojkwcI!—where he learned all the tricks of a grammar school boy, many of which go with him yet. From there he went lo Simpsonvillc High School, where lie graduated at the age of seventeen. The fall of 'M found "Rich" a cadet at Citadel. He endured the hardships of a Freshman at that place until the following spring. Upon visiting the Furman-Citadol baseball game in Greenville, he decided not to return to the seaport town. He said. "Furman for me." He has made us a faithful student. lining up with practically all phases of college work. Member of philosophlnn I.lterary Society: Conductor. Spring Term. MS-'16: Junior Censor. Fall Term. M6-M7; Member of .Itidxon Memorial Tinmen Class; Member of Y. M. C. A.; Corresponding Secretary. M7: Athletic Kdltor "Our Bonhomie." MS: Member of Student Council, M7-MS: Captain Company A: Member of Varsity Football Team, M6; Member of Varsity Baseball Team. MC-M7: Member of Intersociety Relation Committee, '17-MS.ggjjBBEB2E32S0SL mm Senior Class James Alexander Shirley . . Anderson APPLICANT FOK B.S. "O sleep! it is a gentle thing. Beloved from pole to pole." The year 1897 i celebrated a giving birlh to many of our illustrious class members. Among them ranks prominently James Alexander Shirley, Jr., born on February 23, 'n Anderson County. The first ten years of his education was obtained in the Anderson Graded and High School. Coming to Furman in the fall of '14, Jim applied himself arduously to his studies, even securing an A in Sophomore Bible. A selective course in girlology was undertaken in his Junior and Senior years and has had particular interest in this course, devoting considerable lime to its various phases. As a football player. Jim was no less renowned. If allowed to sleep late in the morning. his smiles would brighten the campus the remainder of the day. Jim is one of the mo3t popular men in the entire class. Member of Athletic Council; President of Athletic Association: Secretary of Class. ‘lS-’lS; Vice-President of Class. •1T-'1S: Class Editor. ’lC-'l"; Advertising Manager of "Our Bonhomie.” I7- 1S; Member of V. M. C. A.: Member of Varsity Football Team. '15-‘16, '17- •IS; Member f Furman Council, ’l.'.-'K: Member of Epicurean Club; Sergeant Company A. William Elfred Sims.......................Pcl .cr APPLICANT FOR B.S. "And pet lie loves himself." "W. E." came into existence July 31. 1896. at Wil-liamston, S. C. A few years later he moved lo "Possum Kingdom." near his home town. I lere he received his first rudiments of education at Lickville Graded School. A thorough knowledge of agriculture and "Mulcology" was attained under the guidance of his patient father. After completing hi course at Fork Shoals I ligh School in 1914. he came to Furman the following fall. Hi stay with us has been one of success, for he has participated in all phases of college life, making us an honored and popular adherent. “W. E." has one weak point, and that is his easy capitulation to Cupid. In spite of all this we prophecy for him a future of brilliancy and achievement. Member of Phllosophian Literary Society: Scrgeant-at-Arms. Sprint? Term, ’II-•15: Junior Censor. Fall Term. 'I5-'16; Corresponding Secretary. Spring Term. ■15-'18; Senior Censor. Fall Term. I6-'17; Historian, Fall Term. ’17-'IS; Senior Critic. Spring Term. -17- 1S: Member of .IikIkoii Memorial Baraea Class; Member of Y. M. C. A.: Corresponding Secretary. ’It’.-'17: Secretary of senior Class; Member of Basketball Team. Member of Varsity Football Team. 17- 1S.Senior Class David Tillerson Smith .... Greenville APPLICANT FOR B.A. “ '7is no iin for man lo labor in his vocation." "D. T." was born on October I. 1898. near Lebanon, in Anderson County, and received bis early education in the Lebanon School. In 1909 his family moved to Greenville, where he entered the Greenville schools. Naturalist, orator, debater, scholar and gentleman, he commands the respect of all who know him. We predict that his success will grow as the years pass, and our best wishes go with him. Member Adclphlan Literary Society; Sergeant-at-Arms. Fall Term. '15-M6; Recording secretary. Spring Term, M5-'1 ; Vicc-l'residcnt. Fall Term. M6-M7; President. Fall Term, M7-MS; Standard Bearer. Spring Term, '17-'IS; Public Debater. M5-’l$; Intersoclety Debater, '16- 17. M7-MS; Intorsoclcty orator. ’16-'17, 'I7-T8; Literary Editor "Echo," M6-M7. Member Executive Committee. ' 1C- 17. '17-MS; Cashier Society. M7-MS; Winner Freshman Improvement Medal; Winner Pack Oratory Medal; Winner McMillan Debate Medal: Winner Adclphlan Debate Medal; Member Debate Council, M6-M7. '17-MS; Intercollegiate Debater with Mercer. '16-M7: Intercollegiate Debater with Krskine. '17-MS; Winner In-tcraociety Debate Medal, '17-MS. Lawrence Paul Thompson . . Anderson APPLICANT FOR B.A. "Eat, drinlf an I be merry. for tomorrow rue die" Wc have been indebted to Anderson County ever since October 14, 1895, when our classmate and friend, “Ham" was born. He attended Hopewell, the community grammar school, Clcmson College, and North Greenville Academy. "Ham" graduated from the last-named institution in 1914. and the same year, being properly equipped, entered within our walls. Some people have enemies, but "1 lam" has none. His "happy-go-lucky" disposition makes for his prominence among his schoolmates. He has the talent of winning friends, and we predict for him a successful career as a pharmacist in the medical world. A fat man is seldom loved by the girls, but this is not true in "Ham’s" case. Member of Phllosophlan Literary Society: Sergeaut-at-Arms. Fall Term, M6-'17: Junior Censor. Fall Term. M7-MS; Recording Secretary, Spring Term, M7-M8; Member of .Tudson Memorial Barnca Class; President of Class. M7-MS; Vice-President of Class. '16-M7; President of Annual Association, M7-M8; Honor Roll for Chnpcl Attendance. M6-M7: Second Lieutenant Company B; Member of Epicurean Club: Manager of Baseball Team. M7-‘1S; Member of Tennis Club.Senior Class Charles Elbert Vermillion . Donalds APPLICANT FOR B.A. “Lilce the ninth of the sea arc the ninth of fate. As lvc journey along through life; 'Tis the set of the soul that determines the goal. And not the calm or the strife." "Charlie" is a bachelor, joker, and optimist. He discovered America on a farm in Abbeville County, near Donalds. S. C.. June I, 1890. Education was applied to him at the grammar schools of his community and Donalds High School. Three years following his graduation from the latter was spent in teaching. Upon deciding to make himself efficient "Charlie" has made us a man on whom wc can depend. Whenever an emergency presents itself he is always equal to the occasion. He is so independent it is uncertain whether he will have marital felicity. Despite all this, he has developed into a preacher of sterling qualities. Wc arc sure that his fine disposition will lead him to great success in his chosen work. Member of Phtlosophlan I.Horary Soele-ty; Chaplain. Kail Term, MS-M6; Treasurer. M7-MS; Vice-President. Spring Term. '17-MS: Member of Jut) son Memorial Baraca Class. Morris Kennerly Walker .... Greet APPLICANT FOR B.S. "IV hat a miserable tv or Id! Trouble if you love, trouble if n c don't." "Dock." our steady, thoughtful, and earnest student, began his record in the Piedmont town of Greer. S. C.. February 4 1895. He soon decided to sojourn into the Blucgrass fields near Lewisburg. Ky., where he obtained a great part of his early education. At the age of seventeen “Doc" returned to Greer to make it his home. 1 he following year was spent at Furman Fitting School, where he learned to love the old campus Lured by a passion to become a military man. he went to B. M. I., and received his diploma from that institution in ’16. I le entered Furman in the fall of the same year, congratulating himself on being moulded into a soldier. His character and personality have been added to and shaped in our institution, and wc know that these will help him to overcome the larger realities of life. Member «»f Kptrurcan Club: Member of Furman Fitting School Club; Senior Class Killtor of "Our Bonhomie"; Secretary of Athletic Association. '17-MS; Captain Company B; Member of Quartcrnlan Club. '16-M7, '17-MS.Senior Class Carl Vincent Wilkes . . . Timmonsville APPLICANT FOR B.A. "A mon made lo be loved." "Cicero" was born in the vicinity of Timmonsville. S. C.. February 13. 1895. Me finished his preparatory training at the Timmonsville High School. Hardly had Wilkes reached Furman before he was dubbed "Cicero." unanimously by the fellows here, perhaps from a duality of reason—his blond Roman hair and his oratorical vociferousness. His stock of yarns and jokes, his old guitar, and his good-natured versatility have won him a warm place in the affections of his classmates. He talks most fluently over the curling smoke of his Prince Albert and his "Old Cob." A good fellow is he, and our best wishes go with him. Member Adelphlnn Literary Society; Standard Hearer, Spring Term. ’H-’IR; Treasurer, Pall Term, •lS-'lG; Junior Censor. Spring Term, Correspond- ing Secretary, ’17-'IS; Recording Secretary; Public Debater, 1C-'17; President, Spring Term. "lT-MS; Member of Student Connell. class Editor of "Our Bonhomie,” '16-'W; Class Prophet. '17-‘IX; Member of Athletic Association, M7-'IX; Member of Athletic Council, Manager of Football Team, ’I7-'I8; Student Editor "Hornet,” '1C-'17; Associate Editor "Hornet," 'I?-'I8; Member of Epicurean Club; Sergeant Company A: Member Baseball Team. '17-'IS. Joseph Ernest Willis........................Taylors APPLICANT FOR B.A. " live for those lhat 1 love." The northern part of Greenville County, better known a ih- "Dark Corner." claims the right to the birthplace of "Big" Willis. This community has produced several great men, and no doubt "Big” Willis’ father thought greatness was thrust upon him June 23. 1894, when this white-haired boy made his debut into the world. His first search of books was made at Gum Springs School. This school could not satisfy "Big" Willis' dreams. He left here and entered Locust High School in 1909 and graduated from there in 1913. The fall of the same year found him at Furman, with the hopes of preparing himself for the ministry. We feel sure that he will reflect honor and credit upon his chosen profession. Member of Phllosophian Literary Society; standard Bearer. Kail Term. 'll-'lS; Junior Connor. Fall Term, 'IS-'lfi; Treasurer. Spring Term. '1C-'17; President. Fall Term. '17-'IS: Historian. Spring Term. '17-’IS; Member of Judnon Memorial Bunion Class: President. Spring Term. 117-' 1 x; Member of Y. M. C. A.; Treasurer. '1C-'17; Senior Class Editor "Our Bonhomie"; Honor Roll. Chapel Attendance, '15-'1C.Senior Chronicles I. 1. Now it came to pass that in the first year of the Great War. when cotton was selling for six cents per pound, in the ninth month of the year and the twenty-ninth day of the month, that Furman did fling open her doors and call to the youth of Carolina to drink at the fountain of knowledge. 2. From the highways and byways over fifty young men, wise in their high school knowledge, did gather in that haven of refuge. Montague Hall. And the Sophs did greatly exult and make glad at the verdant victims of their whims and caprices. 3. And it came to pass that in the fullness of time there was a Tug of War; and the meek rats did get their feet washed in crossing the turbid waters of the mighty Reedy. 4. And the new men did rack their brains in pursuit of knowledge for many moons. II. 1. And again it did come to pass that the sons of Furman did gather at their Alma Mater, and the last year’s Freshmen were no longer meek, for they had partaken freely of the tree of knowledge and knew all things—Sophomores! 2. And they did desire to get rcve.ige on the innocent rats for that which had been done to them in their rathood. but the protector of the weak, the “Midget” Councilman, did put theii plans to naught. 3. And it did ccme to pass that in the balmy days of Spring they did make merry and hold the mightiest Reception of all times. And the Fair Damsels did come forth in evening dress and lend their beauty to the festivities of the occasion. 4. And the wise fools bethought themselves the greatest personages on the campus. III. 1. And again did Furman send forth her call, and thirty-five Juniors did come forth at her bidding. And in the quiet Halls of McGee did they realize their ignorance and apply themselves diligently to books, sports and ladies. 2. And they looked with pitying eyes at the innocent densiness of the newcomers, and did toleiate the bold cgotic wisdom of the Sophomores. 3. And it did come to pass on the night of April the seventh in fair company they held a great feast, and the resonant walls did re-echo '.he sounds of revelry by night. 4. And thus did evolve the Senior of today. IV. 1. And as the war clouds did hang lowering over the land, came forth the remaining few of the faithful band. And dignified and wise did they prepare to meet the world of men. 2. And Ethics did hold for them no fear, and into Philosophic realms did they delve. 3. And it came to pass that Uncle Sam did call and found many A-1 men. 4. And joyfully did twenty-eight receive their Diplomas at the setting of a June day’s sun. And the war is still running, and cotton is selling at thirty-one. Historian. mSenior Medalists !. E. H. CrOXTON, Winner of P. L. S. Improvement Medal, ‘14-’15. 2. D. J. FaNT. Jr.. Best Essay in State Prohibition Contest, '17. 3. Ci.ydf. Herndon. Winner of P. L. S. Improvement Medal. '14-'15. 4. M. M. Hewell, Winner of A. L. S. Improvement Medal, 'I4-’I5; Thomas Keys Bible Medal. 'I4-'I5 5. D. T. Smith, Winner of A. L. S. Improvement Medal, 'I4-'I3; Pack Oratory Medal; McMillan Debater’s Medal; Adelphi.m Debater's Medal, and Intersociety Debater's Medal. (47)Alumni Banquet of 1928 OASTMASTER "HAM" THOMPSON removed the lengthy stogie from his lips, unbuttoned his coat for comfort’s sake, and rapped imperatively on the table to secure order. Having gained silence, he began to display his oratorical ability. Following this discourse, impromptu speeches held sway for an hour. A fairly reliable account was obtained as to the whereabouts and attainments of the members of the Class of ’18, which was ?fs follows: A Zachaeus in size arose, pretentiously stroking an atrocious mustache. "Gooch" Blackmon explained that he was plying the doctor’s trade at Rock Hill, with the Winthrop damsels at his special care. "Doc" Walker was present also, rich in experience gained in France, and with him the Lander girl of his college dreams. Tom DeVorc stated that he and "Jit" Brunson had settled down at Ninety-Six, and that “Jit" was unable to attend the banquet—his junior namesake being sick. "Dopey" Richardson’s sonorous voice resounded from the rear. He and Clyde Herndon were prosperous farmers at Simpsonvillc and Ehrhardt, respectively. "Crat" Croxton had never recovered from a stroke of laziness which followed the successful management of Our Bonhomie. However, he was head of an extensive mercantile business in Kershaw. "E. G." Brown came in late, and gladly announced that he had invented an aeroplane which would go to Mars, and that "Sister" Lenhardt had proved by higher Math that the mechanism was perfect to the four thousandth of an inch. Marcus Boyd confessed that he had been appointed to the Judicial Bench largely through his experience as President of the Student Council. Jim Shirley resided in Anderson, taking in the dances with the hope of capturing a maiden worthy of his cultured personality. D. J. Fant was delivering a series of lectures at one of the leading seminaries of the East. Roy Farmer was head of the Aerial Department at West Point, with the rank of Major. "Bro." Vermillion, handsome as ever, was able to give data on his brethren of the ministry. Hart and Graham were alternately preaching and teaching near Williamston. "Mutt” Gunter was Professor of Modern Languages at Meredith College, with gesticulations superior to those of Dr. "Pat.” J. E. Willis was Professor of Greek at Louisville. and J. H. Byrd had charge of the Department of Public Speaking. “Billie” Hunt was Secretary of the Foreign Missionary Board. Marion Hewcll, Editor of McClure's Magazine, stated that D. T. Smith had discovered a formula whereby a person could be embalmed before his death, and that he had successfully tested it upon P. B. Hair and P. D. Cannada, both of whom arc influential gentlemen. "Hen” Easterlin was a lecturer on ladies’ fashions, realizing that in so doing he could control the thoughts of men. W. E. Sims invited all, when passing through Pelzer, to stop at his hotel; while “Cicero" Wilkes modestly confessed that he had the best stock farm in the South. PROPHET. (To Be Continued in the History of America) (48)IN WINTER (49)Senior Class Poem As our Nation at foundation Shakes in her effort to attain Once fostered rights now taken flight From every land—hear the refrain. Comrades, there's a call for you. Of tyrants beaten to chagrin. Then, to instil against the will A sense of right, true moral light. Real freedom, in the hearts of men. Will clearly, comrades, call for you. And to maintain what we regain And usher in Divine Priesthood, Requires that men in heart and hand Be trained for service true and good. This also, comrades, calls for you. Then hear the call, surrender all. Ihe hearts, the lives of Class '18, To serve our land and God and man And keep the name of Furman clean. Comrades, ‘til heaven calls for you. Now we're leaving and are grieving For our Alma Mater true; For our comrades, friends and campus. Halls and scenes and 'fessors. too. Yet, we bid them all "Adieu.' M. B. Gunter. (50)(51)Junior Class Officers and Sponsor 1. E. C. Kolb .... 4. J. G. Lee . . Treasurer 2. D. W. Cochrane . . . . Vicc-Prcsuicnl 3. Miss Gladys Campbell . . . Sponsor 3. F. S. Stone .... 6. E. A, , MacDowell, Jr. . . (52)Junior Class History HE. Class of Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen! The words themselves have an uncommon majestic swing. Do they suggest the character of the men who make up the Class of Nineteen? Yes, the spirit. Ah, therein lies the glory of the Class of Nineteen! And ours is an underlying, an impelling spirit which leads us on to higher things and persuades us to be men. Otherwise, we are plain Juniors—not unlike the hundreds of Juniors who have walked the old campus and met in the same old classrooms before us. Students, athletes, sports, leggers, ladies’ men, blockheads, debaters, orators, big eaters—such comprise the Class of Nineteen. It was in the second year of the Great War that the Junior Class had its birth. As Freshmen wc were eighty strong. Like all other Freshmen, we thought that the world was small, and that we were the biggest part of it, of course. Wc returned to the campus in the fall of 1916, fifty-five Sophomores, our ranks depicted, but possessing what we thought to be an enormous increase in wisdom and knowledge. And now we return in 1917—Juniors! Immediately we begin to learn three things—first, the world is big; secondly, we are ignorant; and, thirdly, the faculty is friendly. The session of 191 7-’18 is nearly over, and, thanks to the fates that brought us to Furman, wc have learned all three! Wc have nearly passed the transition period, the greatest period in college life, the period of the Junior Class. As Juniors, wc arc only thirty-three, but the spirit of which wc boast is ever present. Was it not this spirit that inspired the Class of Nineteen to answer the country’s call with a dozen of its best? Ah, our ranks have thinned, but our aims, our hopes, our ideals arc and ever shall be the purest and the best. And with the same aims, the same hopes, the same ideals, yes, the self-same spirit surging in our breasts and pulsating in our veins; depleted in number, perhaps, but as Juniors of old, wc shall take our places as Seniors, striving ever to do our part in a war-torn world. And leaving the old school at last, then we shall be prepared to find our places in a changing world, a world of new problems and new opportunities—then wc shall be challenged to live the ideals of Furman, and the spirit of the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen. Historian. (53)Junior Class William Woodruff Anderson . Woodruff Arli IMillosoptiiun Literary Society; Correspond Ini? Secretary. Full Term: Associate Editor "Hornet." 1 •»-' 17; V. M. A.: Editor. 'IT; Corresponding Secretary. MS; Baraca Class: Football: Assistant Manager Baseball; Glee Club; Furman Council. M7-M8. He lives in Woodruff, but his heart is in Wcllford. and he says he likes 'Lady”(s). "Andy" is always willing to lend a helping hand in anything from mischief to hard work. Allen Whitsitt Askins .... Lake City Arh (‘hllosoplilnn Literary Society; Furman Council: Secretary Class; "Bonhomie" Class Editor. M5 1G; Assistant Football Manager; Sergeant Co. A. '17-MS. Sport in Greenville, business man in Lake City, his chief aim is to conquer the world and build a bungalow either in Williamston or his home town. "Allen" is one of the most agreeable men in the class and always wears a smile. Walter Du Barry Barr...................Greenville Science Oh. Adeline, let us shed a tear! "DuBarry" has read of the "Dinkey-bird and the Alfalula Tree." Therefore, laugh! No one enjoys jokes like this person. He is industrious, a hard worker, and a skilled mechanic of the flute, violin, pipe wrench, automobile jack, and the Physics book. Jesse Df.ro Barton.......................Tigervillc Arh Adclphlttn Literary Society: V. M. c. A. Dero's hard-set jaw betokens a determination that brooks no obstacles. He is a mountaineer-farmer in body, soul and mind, and also a debater of considerable force. I Its confidence in the correctness of his own views adds a tone of finality to his statements. Daniel West Cochrane. Jr. . . Greenville Arli Adelphinn Literary Society; Senior Censor Fall Term; Athletic Editor "Echo." Fall Term, '17-MS; Vice-President Class; class Editor "Our Bonhomie." M7-M8: Tennis, Single Champion. 'H5-M7. M7-M8; V. M. C. A. "Dan" is like the bill colleclor—never failing. 1 le is one of the sturdiest students in school, yet he is not a hookworm. He is a valuable society man. an entertaining and novel short-story writer, and a future physician. Such is the unique complexity of "Dan."Junior Class Franklin Kirkland C. Creech . Denmark Arh Adclphlan Literary Society: Assistant Sor-geant-at-Arm . Kail Term. M8-M : Marshal. Treasurer. Spring Term: Alumni Editor "Echo." Fall Term. M8-M7: Athletic Editor ••Echo." Spring Term: Athletic Editor ••Hornet”: Vice-President. Spring Term, '17-M$; Class Historian. "IS- ! ; Quartcrlnn t'lub: Assistant Cheer Lender: dec Club. I7-'1£: V. M. c. A.; Baraca class. I le is as noisy as his name is long. but Frank, or "Kirk." or "Carlisle," or "Screech." is ihc jollicsl man in tSe class. Ira Claud Davis.........................Campobello Arh Adelplilan Literary Society: Improvement Medal; Assistant .Sergeant -at-A rm», Spring Term, 'l'.-'lC; Sergeant -at-Anns. Fall Term; Chaplain. Spring Term. M8-M7: Vice-president. Fall Term: Literary Editor "Hornet.” Spring Term. '17-MS: Y. M. C. A.: Haracn Class: Glee Club. One of our students says that when he first saw "I. C." at North Greenville he was as green as a gourd, hut intimate contact with civilization has transformed him into a singer, debater and sport. Herbert Henry Erclf. .... Granitevillc Arh Adelplilan Literary Society: Junior Censor. Kail Term. M7-M8; Y. M. C. A.: Baraca Class. Newberry College sen! us a good student Iasi year in "Runt" Ergle. He likes tennis, baseball, hooks, girls, and his pipe, but is especially proficient in logic—which shows, of course, lhal he is a good thinker. He seems very much in earnest in whatever he undertakes. Bert B. Hester . . . Ruiherfordton. N. C. Arh Phllosoptilnn Literary Society: Baraca Class. The sun of Hester's universe rises and sets in one individual. namely. Painter. He is parlicularly fond of addressing everybody as "Mister." and some day he may he willing to address someone as “Miss." "B. B." is a busy man. and is continually on the lookout for light. Conway Jefferson Jones . . . Fountain Inn Science Phltosophinn Literary Society: Assistant SVr-g« ant-iil—Arms. Spring Term. T5-M8: Conductor. Kail Term. M8-M7; Football, ‘17-MS: Baraca Class. Mr. Conway Jefferson, if you please! "Con ” chief delight is in ragging Hair and Wilburn. I ul he also finds bliss and happiness in turning hit thoughts toward Coker. He is ihe butt of many jokes, but lakes them in his usual good-natured way.Junior Class Ernest Connors Kolb...........................Sumter Arts Philosophian Literary Society: Chaplain. Spring Term. ‘16-'17; Junior Critic, Fall Term: Senior Censor. Spring Term: Davis Orator’s Medal: Intcr-Sbc-Rclatlong Committee; State Orator: First Lieutenant Co. B; Exchange Editor "Echo": Y. M. C. A.: Ba-raca Class Secretary, Fall Term: Class President; Furman Council, 17- 1$. In studies, the crowned laureate; in morals, super-superb; in student activities, A-1; in friendship, with you; in oratory, prize first; in popularity, zenith-scraper. James Garcie Lee.............................Central Arts Philosophian Literary Society: Standard Bearer. Spring Term; Improvement Medal, ’15-’1C: Junior Censor. Fall Term, 'Jfi-'IT; Senior Censor. Fall Term; Secretary. Spring Term; Literary Editor "Echo.” Spring Term: Y. M. c. A. Treasurer; Class Treasurer: Furman Council; llaraea Class Secretary, Spring Term, 17-’18. Garcic’s specially is hard work—in society and in his studies. He is always in high spirits and is very punctual. James Walter Long............................Liberty Arts Philoxoplilnn Literary Society: Junior Censor, Fall Term: Treasurer. Spring Term, 17-'is; llaraea Class. "Skeetcr" is overflowing with physical energy and his mind keeps pace with his body, for he is one of the very few "A" men in the class. He is very fond of baseball and tennis. “J. V." is the youngest man in the class. Clinton Jones Lupo........................Greenville Arts Adctphlnn Literary Society: Sergeant-at Arms, Spring Term, ’15-'16; Chaplain. Spring Term. ’lr-’lS. ‘"Major" has losl his distinction since real majors have come into existence. 1 le is now Private Lupo, Co. A. F. U. Battalion. One who comes three miles to classes and gets there on time should, however, be a real major, and some day he may be. Edward Allison MacDowell . . Kingstree Arts Philosophian Literary Society: Historian; Wharton Medal. ’tr.-’lC; Bndet Medal; Hicks Orator's Medal; Exchange Editor "Echo.” •16 17; Senior Critic, Fall Term: Literary Editor "Hornet.” 17 ’1S: Assistant Manager Glee Club: Assistant Manager "Our Bonhomie”; Class Historian. ". . . and some have it thrust upon them."Junior Class Henry Grady Milford......................Anderson Arls Adolphlan Literary Society: Y. M. C. A. Baraeu Class. Observe a quiet man, but one who loves to talk. “Grady" is always prepared to give information on any subject from baseball to farming, but he is sincere to the core and good natured to a fault. Though he never admitted it, we knew he always had a date on Saturday night. Willard Voniver Nix . . . Zirconia, N. C. Arls Phllonophlan Literary Society: Conductor, Full Term; Sergeant-at-Arma, Spring Term. •17-'18; Honor Roll, Chapel Attendance. ’1G- 17. Nix is as true to his friends as the needle to the pole. He is always on time and is a good society worker. We were sorry that he had to leave us after mid-term exams; but wherever he goes he will always have our wishes for the best of success. Edward Herman Oswald .... Allendale Arls Adelphlan Literary Society: Intersociety Relations Committee, ’lT-'IS; Y. M. C. A.: Uaraca OIiism; Corporal Co. B. Ladies’ man of the first order, "Ossie’s" heart is distributed in several places, notably Fredericksburg, Gaffney and Greenville. His numerous business activities in his home town predict for him a successful career. Ernest Patton..............................Greenville Arts Adolphlan Literary Society: Sergeant-at Arms, Spring Term, ’U-’ll, No need to patent Palton—he can’t be duplicated. Each morning we sec his smiling face at military drill, fresh from a covey of good hot biscuits. He is very studious, always jolly, and pretends to shun petticoats. We "kno tho." So me of these days. "Pat" a sweet senorita will get you. Roger Craft Peace..........................Greenville 4rfs Class Treasurer. 'IS-'IG: Class Editor "Our Bonhomie. 1918." Behold the journalist and dictionaire of the Class of Nineteen and one of the most widely informed men in college! ’Roger" is already a newspaper man of note, being a member of ihe staff of the Greenville Daily Acn s. We should not be surprised in future years to see his nom Je plume in the leading magazines.Junior Class Bryan Simmons Pinson....................Cross Hill Arh Plilloaophlan Literary Society; Y. M. C. A.: Barat-a Class: Organist, Spring Term, ‘IT-'IS. He is as independent as our Revolutionary forefathers. By frequent practice, he has almost perfected the use of the negro dialect. I Ic is a true friend to those who know him intimately. Lloyd Croxton Rankin....................Blackville Arts Phllosophlan Literary Society: Assistant Ser-it.ani-iU Arms. Fall Term: Sergeant-at- Arnts. Spring Term. '15-M6; Corporal Co. A. Take the fifth letter of his first name and the third and fifth of his second and you have what "Rink" is interested in. He has the distinction of being the best looking man in the class, and the girls naturally fall for him. which fact he takes in Sis quiet, modest way. He is a good student withal. John Cypret Rogers....................Atlanta. Ga. Science Adclpblnu Literary Society: Junior Censor. Fall Term: Annum Class Editor; Basketball. 'K-'IT: Club K lltor "Our Bonhomie. IMS"; Baseball, 17-MS; Y. M. C. A : Baraca class. I le has a slight aversion to work, and yel he is an athlete, a good society worker; in short, "a jack of all trades." We regret that he quit school to enter commercial work, but we wish him a most successful career. Ivey Andrew Smoak..............................Smoaks Science IMillosophlan Literary Society; Conductor. Fall 'term: Sergeant-al-Arms, Spring Term. 1 »»-• IT : Treasurer. Fall Term: Corresponding Secretary. Spring Term, M7-MS; Baraca Class. When it comes to work. "Smoak" can do it. Law is his chosen profession, and he will make a good one. for he can see both sides to a question and can defend cither. Fletcher Seaborn Stone . . . Greenville Adolphlan Literary Society: Treasurer. Spring Term. MG-M7; Sergeant-at-Arms. Fatl Term. M7-MS; Basketball, MS-Mfi. M6-M7: Vice-President Class, MG-M7: class Secretary: Assistant Business Manager "Echo." •17-MS. "A rolling slonc gathers no moss." but nol so in ihe case of Fletcher. He has gathered worlds of moss, yel he is nol a mossback. He has red moss on his head and intellectual moss inside his head. He is interested in several activities—athletics, church socials. B. Y. P. U.'s and girls.Junior Class John Addison Tumblin........................Laurens irts Pliilosoptilun [.Horary Society; V. M. ’. A.: Bnraon Class. We have hc«ird that he once went lo sleep in class, bul when he is awake he docs not lack thoughts and words with which to express them, nor gestures with which to impress them. Me is a preacher-embryo and a musician of some natural ability. Wm. Albert Whitlock . . Kitchings Mill Arts Adctphlnn I.Horary Socloty; V. M. C. A.; Rnraen Class. "Whitty" came to us last year after two years' sojourn at Clcmson, and has become a valuable cog in the Furman machine. His chief ambition is to become a doctor, although he seems better adapted to drawing cartoons of Profs during class hours. He wears an ineradicable smile, and is specializing in "galology." David Norman Wilburn..........................Union Arts Phlloxophlnu I.Horary Society: Junior Censor. Spring Term. 'lT-'IS: Class Historian, 'lti-'IT; Barnt-n Ota. ; Corporal Co. It. “Rome for Caesar, bul Union for me."' “D. N." is an ardent admirer of athletics and a lively exponent of college spirit. His bright red hair is an index to an alert mind, for he stands well in classes and is well up on the affairs of the day. Wm. Montgomery Wilkins .... Gatfney Arts It is with a rejuvenated spirit that Montgomery returns to us from a three months' stay at the Citadel. I here is no doubt that he is a ladies’ man of the highest type— at least. From every nook and corner come comments on his elegant moustache. his is the one estimable feature about our little midget, but one girl at Limestone thinks this is his only drawback. Gary Tillman Windell...................Fori Mill Arts Phltosophlun I.lterary Society: Assistant Conductor, Spring Term. Junior Cen- sor, Spring Term. 11!- 17: Recording Secretary. Fall Term. '17-'1S; Athletic Editor "Hornet." ’Ifi-'t7: Alumni Editor “Echo." Spring Term, 'li-MS; V. M. C. A.: Vice-President. 'IS: Baraca Class; Vlcc-l’realdent. Spring Term. ’lT-'IS. Fie sometimes gets a letter from Winthrop and seems lo be delighted when it comes—and sadly disturbed when it doesn't. He is the largest man in the class, but not so pugnacious as to require caging. In fact, he has a very equable disposition.Junior Class States Wright Jolly.........................Greenville Arls PMIosophian Literary Society; Chaplain. Kail Term. M6-M7; Historian. Kali Term. ’17-'1S; Treasurer, Spring Term, ’17-MS. Here’s lo our friend, who, though he stands for "State's Rights," is "Jolly" nevertheless. To this man goes the distinction of being the oldest man in our class, and the only married man—so it is easy to determine the path he travels. Henry Owen Morris...............................Olar Arls Adolphlnn Literary Society; Improvement Medal: Chaplain. Spring Term. Treasurer. Kail Term; Recording Secretary. Spring Term, ’17-MS; Vice-President Baraca Class. MC-M7; V. M. C. A.. President. MS; Glee Club. '17-MS; Class President; Furman Council. '16-M7; Circulation Manager "Hornet,” M7-MS; Vice-President S. C. I. O. A.. •17-MS. "Morris" is old enough to have plenty of common sense, is a musician, a debater, and a business man. His quiet dignity and genuine friendliness hold for him the respect and admiration of his schoolmates. Luther Lee Painter.......................Cherokee Arts Behold! We have in this subject an extraordinary fellow. His pet hobby is remembering dates. He has decided convictions on what he believes, and if given the chance will state them in uncompromising language. Gleaming Light (to c. s. e.) O gleaming light, that beams across my way! O blessed beam that turns the night to day! Thou guide that leads my steps a-faltering home. Light up the path where other wanderers stray! Thou light that peeps through rifted shades of rain. Gleam on the waves where terrors stalk amain! Show thou the way clear through the mist and foam. The harbor safe, where men may smile again! O Light of God, that breaks on land and sea. Cleave thou the night and light the purple lea! That through the dark her wonder-smile may come. To still the hunger in the heart of me! W. C. DV. (60)SOPHOMORE A6 IDLE AS A PAINTED SHIP UPON A PAINTED OCEAN" E S XAbO (61)Sophomore Class Officers and Sponsor 1. E. A. Williams....................President A. J. D. Holtzclaw.................Treasurer 2. E. A. Power.................Vice-President 5. Miss Julia KinaRD.................Sponsor 3. J. A. Lambricht..................Secretary 6. J. L. FLEMING...................Historian (62)Sophomore Class Joshua Paul Beam...........................Gaffney Arts Member Adolphlnn I.Horary Society: Treasurer, Foil Term. MI-MS; Member Jttdxon Memorial Baraea Claiw; Member V. M. C. A. Benjamin Cecil Brasinctom..................Camden Science Wilev Moreland Braziei....................Sumter Arts Meml er Phllosophlan l.iterory Society: Mem ber Jmlson Memorial Baraea (Mass: Member Y. M. 0. A. Julian Belton Carpenter.................Landrum Arts Lewis Fred Carson..........................Saluda Arts Member Adeiphian Literary Society; Junior Vnsor. Sprint; Term, I7 "IS; Member Juilson Mom .trial Hurnca Cln »; Football. MS-MI. •17-MS; Baseball, MS-MI. ‘ll-MS. Romeo Barnes Dean..............................Starr Science Member Adelphintt Literary Society; .Member Juilson Memorial Baraea Class; Member Y. M. C. A. Otis Lee Edwards.........................Saluda Arts Member Adeiphian Literary Society; Senior Censor, Sprint; Term. MI-MS; Member Jud-son Memorial Baraea Class; Member V. M. C. A. MSSKaflBgM Sophomore Class James I.. I'i.kminc..............................Linford Arls Member Philosophlnn Literary Society; (’lass Historian. '17-MS: Assistant Manager Foot-ball Team. ’IT-'IS. Chaiu.ie Davis Garner...............................Kelton Science Member Phllosopliintt 1.Horary Society; Member Y. M. c, A. Kenneth McGee Geer . . Arls Greenville Ci iauncey Depew Grecory...................Lancaster Arls M yin her Philosophlnn Literary Society: Font-l»:t 11 Tort in. '17-MS; Member .ludsmi Memorial llarm n Class. Toy Riiea Gregory............................Lancaster Arls Member Philosophlnn I.ltorary Society: Foot ball Team. M6-M7. M7-'1N; Member .Indium Memorial Hai-aoa Class. Eugene Myers Harrison.................Tabor. N. C. Arls Member Philosophlnn I.ltorary Society: Standard Heater. Spring Term. 'H -M7: An-slstnnt Scrgeant-at-Arm . Full Term. M7-’1$: Member Y. M. c. A.: Secretary. MS: Member .JmtKon Memorial Harnca class; Treasurer. Spring Term. M7-MS. Care I Ioi fman Henderson.............Cherokee Arls Member Philosophlnn i.ltorary Society.Sophomore Class Prue B. Hendricks............................Greenville Science Member V. M. C. A. Robert Pratt Higgins...........................Hodges Arts Member Adolplilan Literary Society: Flr t Ui'unnam, Company A. James Dawson I Ioltzclaw........................Greer Science Member Adelphlan I.lterary Society; Ohm Treasurer, T7 'X$. John Allen Lambricht......................Landrum Arts Member Adolph Inn Literary Society; Class Secretary, T7-T8; Baseball. T6-T7, T7-TS; Athletic Editor "Hornet.'' T 7 Samuel Miller Lawton.......................Greenville Arts Member Adelphlan Literary Society; Member Y. M. C. A. Charles Judson League..................Simp onvillc Science Member Y. M. C. A.; Glee Club, MS-T7. T7-TS. Thomas Brouchman Lee..................Landrum Arts Member Judson Memorial Barnca Class.Sophomore Class John Thomas Littlejohn. Jr.................Scranton Arts Member l'liitosopliian Literary Society; Standard Bearer, Fall Term, Mom- lii-r .1 ndstiii Memorial Haraca Class: Mem tier V. M. c. A.; Class Secretary, ’IS-'IT; Furman Council. ‘1C-'17. James Boyd McCravy...........................Laurens Arts Member Judson Memorial Baraon Class; (ilw Club. •1«-,17. "IT-'IS. Edwin DaRCAN McKnichT......................Florence Arh Member Adclpblan Literary Society; Assistant Sergeant it-Arms. S|iritlR Term. '16-'17; Chaplain Fall Term, '17-'1S; Treasurer, Spring T« rm, MT-'IS; JlnuWr Judson Memorial Haraca Clan ; Member V. M. 0. A.; Class Editor •‘Our Bonhomie," 'IS. Ernest Lowbridce Miller......................Easley Arts Member Judson Memorial liaracu clam; Member Y. M. C. A. Stuart Nichols Miller............................Pauline Arts Member l'liilusophlan Literary Society: Member Judson Memorial Haraca (‘lass: Member Y. M. C. A. Bazil Mathis Moore. Jr......................Simpsonville Science dec club. 'I»t- 17, '17-‘1n. Winfield Kennedy Moore.........................Pendleton Arts Member IMillosopbinn Literary Society: Assistant Conductor, Fall Term. '17-'1$: Member Judson Memorial Haraca Class; Mom-Iter Y. M. C. A.Sophomore Class Drury M. Nixon, Jr.............................Greenwood Arls Member Atlelphian I,Unary Society; Improvement .Modal. ’1G-M7; Sergeant-at-Arms. Fall Term. M7-MS; ItoeordliiR See rotary. SpriiiK Tot in. M7-MS; Sttnlont Editor "Hornet." M7-MS; Font ball, M7-MS; Class Editor "Oar Bonhomie,” MS; Member Hudson Memorial Baraea Class; Member V. M. c. a. Alfred Taylor O'Deli.............................Liberty Arts Member 1‘hllosophlnn Literary Society; llls-torlan, Sprint; Term. ’17-MS; Member .Unison Memorial Rnrneu class; .Member V. M. A. Raymond Pearson............................Bennetisvillc Arts Member I’hllosoplilnn l.lternry Society; ll!s-torian. Mi5-M7; Assistant Art Editor "Bonhomie." MG ’ 17; Class Editor "Bonhomie.” 16- 17; Art Editor "Our Bonhomie.” M7-M8; Member Furman Council. M7-MS; Assistant Manager Baseball. ’17-MS; Member Hudson Memorial liaraca Class: Member Y. M. C. A. Alwa Lucent. Rower...............................Laurens Arls Vice-President f Class. ’17-MS. Richard B. Quick............................Greenville Arls Member A del pb la Literary Society; Standard Bearer. Fall Term, M7-MS; Member Y. M. C. A.: Freshman Bible Medal. Mfi-M7. David Marshall Ramsay. Jr...................Greenville Arls Member Adelphla Literary Society; Wharton Declamation Medal. MC-M7; Member Furntnn Glee Club and Oreheslrn, '17-MS. L. Rollins Richardson.....................Simpsonvillc Arls Member Giro Club. M7-MS; Baseball,Sophomore Class James Preston Rogers..........................Benncu»villc Arts, Charlie Averette Rollins..................Johnsonville Arts Member Adelphlan Literary Society; Member Judsoii Memorial Baraca Class. Cleo Timmons Sincletary . Arts Coward Kemp Delette Smith.............................Marion Arts Member I’hllosophlan I.ilerary Society: Member Judson Memorial Baraca Class; Member Y. M. C. A. Sebastian Ancelico de Souza..................... . . . . San Fidelis, E. de Rio., So. Amer. Arts Mem Ik'r Adelphlan Literary Society; chaplain. Sprlna Term, 'lT-’lS; Member Y. M. C. A.; Editor. 'IS. James I Iarrei. Speer . . . WinMon Salem, N. C. Science Member Philosophinn Literary Society; Football. '16-‘I7. '1T-‘IS; All-State. IC-17. 17-‘is; Captnin, ’17-'ls; Athletic Association. ■|7-'I8; Baseball. ,1«-’I7, '17-'1S; Basketball. 16--17; class Historian. 1 - 17; Member Judson Memorial Baraca Class; Member Y. M. C, A.; Member tJlee Club ami Orchestra; First Sergeant. Company A. Ralph Cato Stephens........................Monetia Science Member Adelphlan Literary Society; Member Judson Memorial Baraca Class.Sophomore Class Alfred Taylor . . . . Science Member Y. M. C. A. Taylors Benjamin Walter Thomason...................Mauldin Arts "In Service:’ Member t’hllosophinn Literary Society: Improvement Medal. 1C-‘17; Literary Kdltor, Kail Term. 17- 1S; Member V. M. C. A. William Foster Thompson.................Landrum Arts Member Adelphlan Literary Society. Tillman John Touchberry..................Summerton Arli Member I’hllosophlun Literary Society; Chaplain, Spring Term. 17-'IS; Member Y. M. A.; Member Judson Memorial IJuraca Claw. Eucene Allan Williams......................Brunson Arts Member Adclphlnn Literary Society; Scr-gcunt-ut-Arm . Kail Term. 17-'I$: Class President, 17- IS: Member Judaon Memorial Hnraca Class; Member Y. M. C. A. John Lawrence Woodside.....................Greenville Arts Member Adelphlan Literary Society. William Callie Wright......................Batcsburg Science Member Adelphlan Literary Society; Foot-ball, 17- 1 . rawSophomore Class Bagwell, J. L. . .........................................................................Piedmont Bates, W. T. (Science)...................................................................Greenville BEACHEM. P. F. (Special).................................................................Greenville Bobo, Pall (In Service).....................................................................Laurens Cox. Fred D. (Arts).........................................................................Lanford Member Pl)ll( »i|ihlan I.ltermy Sorleiy: Scrsre»nl-at Arnn«. Fall Term, 'IT-‘ls; Member Juriitoii Memorial Rumen Ohm; Member V. M. C. A.: Football, 'IT-'IS. Davis, E. M. (In Service)..................................................................Newberry Drummond. S. M..............................................................................Lanford FlNCH. P. F.................................................................................Pauline Foy, F. W....................................................................................Saluda Hawkins, J. F. (Arts)......................................................................Anderson Member I’lillosouhlan Literary Society: Member Y. M. C. A. Henderson, W. Y.............................................................................CKcsnce Howard, S. R. (Arts).....................................................................Greenville Ledbetter. J. F.. (Arts)..................................................................Townville Member I'liilosophiun Literary Society; Member Y. M. A. Ledbetter, V. K. (Arts)..................................................................Townville Member l'bllosoplilnn I.ltermy Society; Member Y. M. . A. Moore, H. (Science)...................................................................Simpsonville RaST, N. L. (In Service)...................................................................Cameron RHAME, J. L. (Arts).....................................................................Holly Hill Member Ailclphlnn I.ltermy Society: Seruvant-nt-Arma. Sprint; Term, 17- JS; Member .ludson Memorial ltaraea CIiim; Ram-bull, 'K-'IT, 17- 1S; Football, ’IT-’ls. Sloan, J. L. (Special)..................................................................Greenville Timmons, A. M............................................................................Lynchburg Trullck. I I. R. (In Service)...............................................................Coward Wall, B. E. (In Sendee)............................................................... Campobcllo WlLLIS, A. L. (Arts)....................................................................Greenville (70)Sophomore Class History ROM the morning that the Class of 1920 first gathered in the Judson Alumni Hall, September 13, 1916, it was evident that it was to become a leader in all college activities. Ever since that memorable morning it has been fulfilling this expectation. The first important event of class interest was the annual Fresh-Soph Tug-of-War, in which we bravely withstood the onslaught of the Sophomores. The C lass of 1920 first showed its interest in athletics by furnishing the team with two men, who not only won block F’s, but were individual stars. We would have done equally well in baseball had the schedule not been cancelled, for the nucleus of the team consisted of Freshmen. At last the long-loaked-for day came when we could say we were no longer Freshmen. On a bright June day wc left school determined to return and boost our good record besides initialing the new men into college life. 1 he ( lass of 1920 returned to Furman September 12. 1917, greatly reduced in numbers, but not in spirit. To start the year right, we won the annual Fresh-Soph Tug-of-War by pulling the rats through the deep and sweet-scented Reedy. We thereby taught them to respect all upperclassmen, more especially the Sophomores. This year we bettered our athletic record of last year by furnishing six letter men for the football team, while one-half of the entire squad was made up of Sophomores. All this goes to show the able way in which the Sophomore Class supported athletics. Our class also supported equally well the religious activities of the College. Several of our members belong to the Volunteer Band, and have pledged themselves as missionaries to the foreign fields. The Sophomore Class is also very socially inclined, giving annually a swell reception. Occupying the mest secluded and deserted spot on the campus, the Class of ’20 learned early in the year to live together as brothers, and to stick together. Residing within the historic walls of old McGee Hall, the members of the Sophomore Class executed their daily functions in the pursuit of knowledge, and do their bit toward raising the standard of the brotherhood. In the closing words of this brief sketch of our class life, by all means mention must be made of the patriotic attitude of our members towards the great world conflict. With an undying patriotism and an undaunted spirit, this class has several men in the fight of right against might, and bids fair to furnish many more. (71)(73)Freshman Class Officers and Sponsor 1. T. W. Gressf.ttf. . . . . President 2. W. G. Padgett . . . Vice-President 3. S. B. BaLLENCER ...................Secretary 4. Guy H. Hill . . . 5. Miss Bessie Prickett 6. J. S. Paget .... Treasurer . Sponsor istorian (74)Freshman Class History EPI EMBER 12, 1917, brought forth the Class of 1921. And, oh. what a day! And, oh. what a night! That night was the most frightful that many of us have ever experienced. About 12 o’clock the upperclassmen came around to welcome us into dormitory life. That welcome left a sound impression which we shall remember until the end of our days. Things seemed different from what they had ever seemed before. And they were different. We, the prospective members of the Class of ’21, had entered upon a new career—a new life with new problems facing us; with new difficulties to meet; with new joys to experience. We were actually about to experience the dream of our former years, when we should enter upon the threshold of college life. Several events came about that helped us to get better acquainted with college life and to become imbibed with college spirit. We shall always remember the addresses of the members of the faculty on the morning of the I 2th. They gave us an ideal of our opportunities, also some advice which was greatly appreciated. Nor shall we forget the great tug-of-war across the fearful Reedy, and. much to our sorrow, the Sophomores gave us the ducking. Now, how could we forget the general reception at G. W. C., which we attended bedecked with a celluloid collar, a green tic, and a green bow on the lapel of our coat. Then came the G. W. C.-Furman Annual Reception given by the First Baptist Church; also, we enjoyed the reception given by Dr. and Mrs. Potcat in honor of our class. Our class has fallen right in line with the college spirit; it has done its bit in contributing men to our athletic teams, and to other college activities. We have reason to be proud of them all. As the days have gone by, we have come to love Greenville, its people and its atmosphere. We feel that we arc a part of the city. We have also come to feel our part in Furman. We have come to know and to love our fcllow-collcgcmates. The class has caught the vision of the meaning of what a college course prepares one for— Service. Some of our number have withdrawn from college. Others have and arc still answering our Nation’s call. T o all these members of our class we extend our best wishes. To all the students who are still privileged to remain in college, we extend our heartfelt love and spirit of brotherhood. And to the old College, we raise our voices with the hundreds of her sons: "Old Turman! grateful sons arc we; Our love, our lives we give to thee; We’ll keep faith's vow to serve but thee. Our own dear Alma Mater.” (75)Freshman Class Clarence Boyce Allen..........................Latta Arls Member Ad H|)hinn Literary Society; Assistant Sergeant-at-Arm . Fall Term. '1T-'IS; Member V. M. O. A.; Member Judson Memorial ISaraea Class. Liles Baldwin Askins.....................Timmonsvillc Science "In Service.” Victor Morcan Babb. Jr...................Fountain Inn Arls Sorrels B. Bai.lencer.....................Spartanburg Science class Secretary, 'IT-'1S; Member Y. M. C. A.: Member Adclphlan I.Horary Society. William I Ienry Barheld........................Jefferson Arts Member Philosnphinn Literary Society; Member Y. M. C. A.; Member Judson Memorial liarnca Class. Paul O. Batson.................................Taylors Arls Member Pbllosophlan Literary Society. Henry Yaemans Bennett..................Laurens Arls Wm. Maxwell Blackburn . Hendersonville. N. C. Arls Member Pbllosophlan Literary Society; Man-lard Bearer, Sprint; Term, 'li-'IS; Mem-bet V. M. C. A.; Member Judson Memorial Baraca Class; Class Editor "Our Bonhomie." Ms; Member Glee Club, Asa Guy Broadwater. Jr.................Ridge Spring Arts Member Pbllosophlan Literary Society; Assistant Sergeant-at-Arm . Spring Term. '17-'IS; Member V. M. C. A.; Member Judson Memorial Baraca Class; Football; Class Editor "Our Bonhomie,” ’IS. Freshman Class James Odell Carroll..................Smoaks Arts Member Phlloaophian I.horary Society; Con- ductor, Spring Term, 17-’1S. Hugh Richardson Colcloucii................Sumter Science Armstrong Rutherford Coleman .... I lyman Arts Member Adelphian Literary Society: Mem her V. M. C. A.; Mol»it or .linlxon Memorial llaraca class. Joseph Guy Cothran......................Toney Creek Science Member Phllosophlnn Literary Society. Charles Manly Cox............................Belton Arts Member Adelphlnn Literary Society. Matthew Ci.ay Crisp......................Mountville Arts Matthew O'Brien Dices....................Lake City Arts Member Adelphlnn Literary Society; Football. "1 "-’is. Ansel A. Drake................................Drake Science Member rtiilosophlnn Literary Society. 1 homas E. Durham...........................Greenville Arts Member Phlloxophlnn Literary Society; Member Y. M. U. A.Freshman Class Robert Adcer Elrod..........................Anderson Arts Member Phllosophian I. Horary Society: Member Y. M. C. A. Ceorce Cuthert Galphin .... Hartwell. Ga. Science Member Phllosophian l.lterary Society: Member Y. M. . A.: Member .Unison Memorial Baraca ('lass; Baseball. William Henry Gamurf.i.i..........................Belton Arts Member Adolph inn I.lter«ry Society: Member V. M. C.' A ; Member J nelson Bnrncn Class. Georce M. Geer Arts Greenville Ben T. Green..............................Greer Science Member V. M. C. A. Tatum Wannamaker Gressette . .St. Matthews Arts Block "K l'ootball. 'lT-’lS; ("lass President: Member V. M. ’. A.; Member .1 mix on Memorial Baraca Class: Baseball. Elbert Pant Hardin Greer Arts Member Phllosophian Literary Society: Member Y. M. ('. A.; Member .Unison Memorial Baraca Class. William I Ioward Hawkins .... West Union Arts Member I'bllosophlan . Literary Society: Member Y. M. A.; Member Ju l8«n Memorial Baraca Class. Alton Hill Haynie Cartcrsvillc Member Adelphian Literary Society.Freshman Class Guv MaYNIE Hh.1...............Mount Airy. N. C. Arls Member Phllognphlnn Literary Society: Member V. M. C. A.: Member Glee Club: Member .1 ml son Memorial Bpraca Class: class. Treasurer, M7-'l$; Member Furman Council, ’17-’1S. Otis Monroe Hili..........................Cnrimvillc Arts Member Judson Memo rial Baracn Class; Member Y. M. C. A.; Member Adelpliln Llt-orary Society. Samuei. Lane I-Iiu.......................Abbeville Arts Member .Tmlson Memorial Bnm«i Class: Member Y. M. C. A.: Member Adclphla Llt-ernry Society, I Ienry Jacob Howard..........................Concstcc Arls Georce Grover Inman........................Kclion Arts Member Adelphlun Literary Society. Bryan Bertie Knight.......................Lake City Arts Member Jud on Memorial Barnen class; Member Y. M. C. A.: Member Adelpblun Literary Society. Mll.TON Edward McMaN'AWAY .... Greenville Arts Member Y. M. c. A.: Member Adelphlan Literary Society; Football. M7-'I$. Thomas Jerome Mims.......................Lake City Arts Member Y. M. C. A.: Member .Tmlson Memorial Baraca Class: Member 1‘hllosophian Literary Society: Sergeant-at-Arms. Spring Term. '17-MS. George Henry Moore........................Simpjonvillc Science Member Judson Memorial Itaraca Class; Member Y. M. C. A.; Member Clee C!ub.Freshman Class Jerome Morris......................................Aiken Arts Member Jtidfton Memorial Baraea Class: Member Y. M. C. A.: Member l’bllosoplilan Literary Society. Wii.lie Preston Nesbitt, Jr..................Piedmont Science John Cary Newton...........................Adams Run Arts Member IMillosophian Literary Society; Member Y. M. O. A.: Member Judson Memorial Baraoa Class. James Suddath Pacet..........................Anderson Science Class Historian, 'I7-'l$: Member Judson Memorial Baraea Class: Member Adclphlan Literary Society. William Gaines Padceit.....................Greenville Arts Class Vice-President. 'lT-'IS: Member Gleo Club and Orchestra; Baseball. Julius Lawton Patterson..................Timmonsvillc Arts Member Adelnhian Idlernry Society. William Sloan Pruitt...........................Belton Arts Member Adelphlan Literary Society. Georce Courtney Quattlebaum .... Lecsvillc Science Frank Newbern C. Quinn................Greenwood Arts Member Judson Memorial Baraea Class; Member Adelphlan Literary Society; Member Y. M. C. A.Freshman Class Willis Furman Ramsey.....................Wedgcficld Arts Member Judson Memorial Itnrnca Class; Member Y. M. C, A.; Member Phllosophlnn Literary Society. Jake Rasor...............................Cross Hill Arts Member Y. M. C. A.: Member Phllosophlnn Literary Society: Assistant Conductor. Sprint; Term. '17- IS; Member Judaon Memorial Itnraea Class. Alfred Thompson Smith....................Greenville Special Member Y. M. C. A. Brian LeRoy Talbert.......................McCormick Science Member Judson Memorial Itaraca class; Member Y. M. C. A.; Member Philosophinn Literary Society. William Michael Talbert................McCormick Science Member Judaon Memorial Itaraca Class: Member Y. M. c. A.; Member Phllosophlnn Literary Society. John Levy Watson, Jr.....................Bradley Science Paul Southerne Watson .... Winton. N. C. Science Member AdOlphlnn Literary Society. Alonzo H. Williams..........................Pendleton Arts Member Judson Memorial Itaraca Class; Member Phllosophian Literary Society. Barney Levi Williams........................RKcims Arts Member Adclphian Literary Society; Member Y. M. C. A. Member Judson Memorial Itaraca ('lass;Freshman Class Baldwin. G. H. (Arts).....................................................................Laurent Member Y. M. O. A.; Member Judson Memorial Bartel Class; Member Phlioaophlan Literary Society. Barton. L. L......................................................................... Cnmpobcllo Berry. J. F...............................................................................Smoalcs Black. V. W............................................................................Greenville Bradley, A. M. (In Service)...............................................................Bradley Chapman, J. W. (Ill Service)...........................................................Greenville Clyde. V. E. (Arts)...................................................................Greenville Member Adelphlan Literary Society. Cox. K. M.................................................................................. IW«on Flynn, J. R. (Science)....................................................................Taylors Member Y. M. C. A. Gibson. F. N. (Arts)........................................................................Greer Hall. ...................................................................................Stcedman Hooper. T. L. (Special)....................................................................... Member Phlioaophlan Literary Society. Hyman. L. ...................................................................................Hymn Ingram. W. J. (Science)....................................................................Tindal Member Judson Memorial Uaraca Class; Member Y. M. C. A.; Member Phlioaophlan Literary Society. Jones. A. B. (Science)...................................................................Columbia Member Y. M. A.: Member Adelphlan Literary Society. Jones. F. L. (Arts)....................................................................Greenville Member Y. M. C. A.: Member Adclphlu Literaly Society: Member «lcc Club. Kilgore. A. .........................................................................Simptonville Lindsey. H. ..............................................................................Iay,ors Loadholt. J...............................................................................Fairfax McBraYER. William (Special)............................................................Greenville Owens, J. ................................................................................p Aiken Picklesimer. H. G. (In Service)..........................................................Piedmonl Slaughter. J. ................................................................. Burlington. N. C. Stone. L. O. (Science).................................................................Greenville Member Y. M. C. A. Waters. W. ..............................................................................Florence (82)In Training- Jfr Gump pevier. (84)Military Training at Furman Secretary N. D. Bal(cr said, May 5, 1917: O the extent that college men arc disqualified or too young, their major usefulness lies in remaining in college.” Again he said that we need, first, munitions; second, food; third. EDUCATED MEN. "When the war is over, there will be made upon us such demands for men and women of knowledge and training as have never before come to any country. The colleges of Europe arc now almost empty. The older students, graduates, and professors arc fighting in the trenches or arc already dead, as arc many scientific and literary men whose work is necessary for the enlargement of cultural life. For many years after the war some of these countries will be unable to support their colleges. America MUST COME TO THE RESCUE. How well we can do this will depend upon you young men and women who are this year graduating from our high schools.” General Leonard Wood wrote: “The war promises to be long. Urge young men to finish their education.” Thus it appears that the old arguments in favor of young people going on with their education are now tremendously reinforced by the appeal of patriotism, of duty to the Nation, and duty to Christian civilization threatened today as it has not been since the Saracen invasion.” In view of the situation, the Board of Trustees of Furman University, at their June meeting in 1917, authorized the addition of Military Training to the curriculum. They were thus undertaking to meet an emergency in the life of the Nation, and had no intention of transforming Furman into a military school. In accordance with this action, the faculty made provision in the schedule of studies for drill periods of five hours per week, and granted one and one-half hours credit for this work. Major Harry R. Wilkins is military instructor. He is a graduate of the Citadel, and an ex-officer of the South Carolina National Guard, where he had four years’ experience. The students arc organized into companies A and B. with full quota of officers for each. Uniforms arc required for drill, and wooden guns, such as were used by the British soldiers in the first months of their training, have been provided. A marked improvement in physique already appears in our student body, and observers have frequently remarked upon the improved appearance on the drill ground. This training acquaints them with army regulations, the manual of arms, the principles of military discipline, and is giving them just the preliminary training which puts them in line for the special intensive training of the Reserved Officers' Training Camps maintained by the War Department. It puts them far in advance of raw recruits from civilian life. At the same time Furman is proving her readiness to "do her bit” in the service of the Nation, and will not be found unprepared in any crisis that may arise. (85)THF. FLAG RAISING (86)Officers Annual Association L. P. Thompson.................President S. T. Brunson..................Secrcturv G. T. DeVore...................Treasurer Manager of “Our Bonhomie, 1918“ 1. E. H. Croxton . . . Business Manager 3. J. A. SHIRLEY . . . Advertising Manager 2. E. A. McDowell . Assl. Business Manager 4. M. M. Newell . . . Circulation Manager (89)Editors of “Our Bonhomie, 1918“ 1. W. M. Hunt...................Editor-in-Chicf 4. J. A. Richardson .... Aihlctic Editor 2. D. J. Fast . . Assistant Ediior-in-CInef 5. L. E. Lenhardt..................Club Editor 3. Raymond Pearson .... An Editor 6. J. C. Rocers....................Club Editor (90)Class Editors of “Our Bonhomie, 1918“ Senior Class 1. J. E. Willis 2. M. K. Walker Junior Class 3. D. W. Cochrane 4. R. C. Peace Sophomore Class 5. E. D. McKnicmt 6. D. M. Nixon, Jr. Freshman Class 7. W. M. Blackburn 8. A. G. Broadwater (91)The Furman Hornet PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE STUDENT BODY OF FURMAN UNIVERSITY D. J. Fant................ C. V. Wilkes.......... E. G. Brown . . . H. O. Morris . . F. K. C. Creech . J. A. Lambricht . L. E. Lenhardt . D. M. Nixon . . W. W. Anderson S. A. Souza . . P. B. Hair . . . I. C. Davis . . . . C. Herndon............ E. A. McDowell, Jr........ .................................Editor-in-Chicf ...............................Associate Editor .......................Business Manager .................Circulation Manager .......................Athletic Editor .......................Athletic Editor ........................Student Editor ........................Student Editor . . . . 1917 Y. M. C. A. Editor . . . . 1918 Y. M. C. A. Editor A. L. 5., Fall Term, '17-18, Editor . A. L. S., Spring Term, 17-18, Editor . . . . P. L. S„ Fall Term, 17-18. Editor ..............P. S. L., Spring Term, 17-18, Editor (93)Furman Council I. M. S. Boyd....................President 2. W. M. Hunt.................Secretary Seniors 3. J. 11. Byrd 4. J. A. Richardson 5. C. V. Wilkes Juniors 6. W. W. Anderson 7. J. G. Lee 8. E. C. Koi.d Sophomores 9. Raymond Pearson 10. J. H. Speer II. G. H. Hill Freshman (94)The Furman Council HEN the Trustees granted the privilege of intercollegiate football, it was upon the condition that the students themselves prevent hazing in all of its forms. For this purpose the Furman Council was organized September 17, 1913. Later its jurisdiction was extended to cover all cases involving discipline. This extension of power was made with the provision that every finding of the Council be reported immediately to the faculty in writing, and that in :ases of expulsion or suspension the finding be not reported until consultation be had with the President, a committee of the faculty, or the faculty. T he members of the Council are elected by direct vote of the student body. In May the Senior Class elects five of its members as a nominating committee. I his committee nominates twenty men, ten of whom arc eligible for election, five from the present Junior Class, three from the present Sophomore Class, and two from the present Freshman Class. The first week in October this newly elected Council elects one member of the incoming Freshman Class. (95)Creech, Him., Schaefer. Davis, League, Morris. Fast, Blackburn, Moore, G. I I. Hunt. Ballencer, Padgett. Ramsey, Swift. McCravey. B. M. Moore, Richardson, Anderson, Jones, McDowellThe Quartet Moore, B. M. McCravey. J. B. Leacue. C. J. Jones. F. L. Furman Glee Club and Orchestra D. J. Fant........................................................................ President C. J. Leacue...............................................................Secretary-Treasurer W. M. HUNT....................................................................Business Manager E. A. McDowell, Jr................................................Assistant Business Manager First Tenor Second Tenor Baritone Bass McCravey, James B. Leacue. C. J. McDowell. E. A.. Jr. Fant. D. J.. Jr. Moore. B. M. Morris, H. O. Moore, G. H. Jones, F. L. Davis, I. C. Anderson. W. W. Blackburn, V. M. Hill. G. H. Creech. F. K. C. Hunt. W. M. Ballencer, S. B. Richardson, L. R. James B. McCravey . . D. M. Ramsay. Jr. . . . W. G. Padgett .... J. H. Speer........... I’rof. Gale Swift . . . Prof. George E. Schaefer .....................V iolinist .....................V iolinist .....................Come list ....................... Drummer Cellist and Orchestra Director Pianist and Clcc Club Director (97)Y. M. C. A. Officers, 1917-’]8 1. W. M. Hunt . . 2. J. II. Bvrd . . , 3. E. 11. Croxton . . 4. H. L. Easterlin Secretary 5. J. A. Richardson . Corresponding Secretary 6. V. W. Anderson 7. H. O. Morris......................President 8. G. T . IN DEI. I...........Picr-Prcsident 9. J. G. Lf.e.........................Treasurer 10. E. M. Harrison . . Recording .Secretary 11. S. A. Df. Souza.....................Editor Editor. 19 S Cor. Sec. (98)Furman University Y. M. C. A. The 1917 officers served the Association from February I. 1917, to January 24, 1918. The 1918 officers took up their duties January 31, 1918. Within the 1917 Association year thirty-nine meetings were held. Students participated in the programs of twenty-four of these meetings, two were given by the Volunteer Band, three by members of the faculty, four by speakers from the city, four by visiting speakers, and two were joint meetings of the Y. M. C. A. of Furman and the Y. W. C. A. of the Greenville Woman’s College, held at Furman and G. W. C.. respectively. In February, 1917, the Y. M. C. A. sent seventeen delegates to the State Volunteer Conference, held at Rock Hill. Furman was represented by fourteen at the Student Conference at Blue Ridge, N. C.. in June, 1917. M .rS. A. dc Souza was sent by the Association to the Student Volunteer Conference at East Northficld, Mass., in January, 1918. Also a large subscription to the war work was pledged. Prayer groups. Bible and mission study classes were held all during the year. I he Y. M. C. A. touched every man at Furman. Mkmbf.rs Ai.len, C. B. Dean. R. B. Hunt. W. M. Pearson, R. Anderson, W. V. Devore. G. T. Ingram. W. J. Pinson. B. S. Babb, V. M.. Jr. Durham, T. E. Jones, A. B. PoTEAT, E. M. Baldwin, G. B. Easterun, H. L. Jones, F. L. Provence. H. V. Hai.li.nger, S. B. Elrod. R. A. Kolb. E. C. Quick, R. B. Barfield, W. FI. F.rcie, H. H. l-AWTON, S. M. Quinn, F. N. Barton, J. D. Fast, D. J.. Jr. League, C. J. Ramsey, V. F. Beam. J. P. Farmer, R. A. Ledbetter, J. E. Rasor, Jake Bible, W. B. Finch. P. E. Ledbetter, V. K. Richardson, J. A. Blackburn, W. M. Fletcher. 0.0. Lee, J. G. Rollins. R. A. Blackmon, II. J. Flynn, J. R. Lef.. T. B. Shirley. J. A. Bowen. L. II. Foy, J. V. Lenhardt, L.. E. Simpson, J. I-L Boyd, M. S. Galphin, G. C. Littlejohn, J. T. Sims, W. E. Bradley, A. M. Gambrell, W. H. Me Br AYER, W. B. Sl.AUGII I'F.R, J. W Bradshaw, S. F.. Garner. C. D. McDowell. F.. A. Smith, A. T. Braziel, W. M. Geer, B. E. McKnight, E. D. Smith, K. D. Broadwater, A. G. Gressette. T. V. Me.Mam a way. M. E. de Souza, S. A. Brown, E. G. Gunter, M. B. Miller, S. N. Spef.r, J. H. Brunson. S. T. Hair. P. B. Mims, T. J. Stone. L. O. Byrd, J. H. Harrison, E. M. Moore, G. H. Talbert, B. L. Cochrane. D. V. 1 Iardix. F.. F. Moore, W. K. Touchberry, T. J Coleman, A. R. Hawkins, J. F. Morris, H. O. Vass. J. L. Cothran, J. G. Hawkins, W. 11. Morris, J. Whitlock. W. A Cox. F. D. Hendricks, P. B. Nesbitt, W. P. Wilkes. C. V. Cox. K. M. Herndon, C. Newton, J. G. Williams, B. L. Creech, F. K. C. Hewell. M. M. Nixon. D. M. Williams. E. A. Croxton. E. H. Higgins, R. P. O’Dell, A. T. Willis, J. E. Davis, F.. M. Hill, G. L. Owens, J. L. WlNDELL, G. T. Davis, 1. C. Hill, S. L. Pacet, J. S. Wright, W. C. mVBLUE RIDGE SNAPS (101)(102)Judson Memorial Baraca Class OFFICERS Prof. B. E. Gef.r................ Dr. O. O. Fletcher............... . . . Teacher Assistant Teacher Fall Term J. H. Byrd........................ M. B. Gunter................ E. C. Koi.b........... C. Herndon . . . V. M. Hunt .........................President , . . . Vice-President . . . . Secretary . Treasurer Music Spring Term J. E. Willis.................................... G. T. WlNDELL............................. J. G. Lee........................... E. M. Harrison................ B. S. Pinson............ .........................President . . . . Vice-President . . . . Secretary . Treasurer M usic The Judion Memorial Baraca Class was organized ihe year after ihc death of Prof. Charles H. Judson. who for more than fifty years identified himself with the life of Furman University as a teacher. Dr. Judson was deeply interested in Sunday school work throughout his entire life, and evidenced this interest by a constant attendance .at Sunday school and by giving his services as teacher of a class. It was thought to be eminently fitting to organize a Sunday school class which should bear his name and for all time serve as a memorial of him. and as a reminder of his long and useful career as a Sunday school teacher. Professor Judson lived in the home of Prof. B. E. Geer for a number of years before his death. The relation of Prof. Judson and Prof. Geer was more than that of friendship, and the lie which bound them together was as strong as that of father and son. Because of his close relationship. Prof. Geer was asked to take charge of the class. Prof. Geer, though no longer a teacher at Furman, is the Treasurer of the institution, and is still faithful to his charge. Dr. O. O. Fletcher has become a very loyal member of the class and ably assists Prof. Geer in the work of the class. The membership is made up of the students of Purman and a few residents of the campus. While the class does not come directly under its observation, the Y. M. C. A. works towards its development. The class has been connected with the First Baptist Church of Greenville ever since it was organized. It meets at 9:45 every Sunday morning during the entire college year, in the Y. M. C. A. room in the tower end of the main building, thereby making it possible for all to reach any church in the city in lime for the morning services. (103)Student Volunteer Band Touchberry. Hawkins. Nix. Hunt. Moore Hardin. Souza. Harrison Sketch HE Student Volunteer Band was organized at Furman in 1907 with eight members. The following year the membership was nineteen. According to the best information obtainable, the Band has not again had such a large enrollment, but, however, it has existed each year until 1916, and it is believed that there were a few volunteers that year. Furman has graduated twelve volunteers who have gone to the foreign field. However, it is to be remembered that two of this number are dead. The Band was organized again April 26, 1917, with eight members. It now numbers fifteen. 1 hey are: W. M. Hunt, J. E. Willis, W. V. Nix, W. K. Moore. T. J. Touchberry, E. M. Harrison, J. Morris, S. A. de Souza, W. H. Barfield, W. H. Hawkins, B. E. Wall, E. F. Hardin, V. K. Ledbetter, J. G. Newton, B. B. Knight. Mr. Wall is in the service of his country, and Messrs. Nix and Knight have withdrawn from school, but will continue with the other members of the Band to carry out the purpose of God in their lives. (104)8j?jj? —--— LIKPAPY rOCICTTES (105)(IOC) ADELPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY Adelphian Literary Society ETA SECTION Presidents D. T. Smith (Fall Term) P. B. Hair (Spring Term) Vice-Presidents 007) P. B. Hair (Fall Term) L. E. LenhardT (Spring Term)Adelphian Literary Society ETA SECTION Officers FALL TERM D. T. Smith......................President ........................ P. B. I Iair.....................Vice-President ................... W. M. Hunt.......................Recording Secretary............... D. W. Cochrane.................Senior Censor..................... J. C. Rocf.rs....................Junior Censor..................... H. O. Morris.....................Treasurer......................... F. S. Stonf......................Sergeanl-at-Arms.................. E. A. Williams.................Assistant Sergcant-at-Arms . . . . E. Patton........................Chaplain.......................... R. B. Quick......................Standard Dearer................... SPRING TERM . . P. B. Hair . L. E. Lenhardt . II. O. Morris . S. T. Brunson . . R. B. Quick . . J. P. Beam . . . E. Patton . . E. G. Brown . . C. J. Lupo . . D. T. Smith S. B. Ballencer J. D. Barton J. P Beam E. C. Brown S. T Brunson J. B. Carpenter W. E. Clyde C. M. Cox R. B. Dean R. P. Higgins J. D. Holtzclaw W. M. Hunt Members A. B. Jones F. L Jones J. A Lambricht L. E. Lenhardt C. J. Lupo M. E. McManaway E. Patton W. S. Pruitt R. B. Quick F. N. Quinn J. C. Rocers D. 1 . Smith F. S. Stone W. F. Thomson P. S. Watson W. H. Gambrell P. B. Hair P. B. Hendricks H. O. Morris E. H. Oswald J. S. Paget W. A. Whitlock B. L. Williams E. A. Williams (108)Adelphian Literary Society PHI SECTION Presidents M. M. Mf.WF.U. (Fall Term) C. V. Wlt.KES (Spring Term) Vice-PresidentsAdelphian Literary Society Pi ll SECTION FALI. TERM M. M. Hewell . . I. C. Davis . . . C. V. Wilkes . . E. G. Brown . . H. H. Ercle . . . F. K. C. Creech . E. D. McKnicht . D. M. Nixon . . S. A. de Souza . . L. F. Carson . . Officers President ............. Vice-President . . . Recor-ting Secretary? . . Senior Censor .... Junior Censor .... Trcasurer ............. Chaplain............... Scrgeanl-at-Arms . . . Assistant Sergcant-at-Arms Standard Bearer . . . SPRINC TERM . C. V. Wilkes F. K. C. Creech . I). M. Nixon . O. I.. F.dwards . L. F. Carson F. D. McKnicht . S. A. de Souza . . J. L. Rhame . . G. G. Inman . M. M. Hewell C. B. Allen I.. F. Carson A. R. Coleman F. K. C. Creech I. C. Davis O. I.. Edwards H. II. Ercle Members A. H. I Iaynie O. M. Hill M. M. Hewell S. L. Hill G. G. Inman S. M. Lawton F.. D. McKnicht D. M. Nixon, Jr. D. M Ramsay, Jr. J. L. Riiame C. A Rollins S. A. de Souza R. C. Stevens C. V. Wilkes Joint Officers for Academic Year W. M. Hunt . E. G. Brown . C. V. Wilkes D. T. Smith . P. B. Hair . M. M. Hewei.l L. E. I.ENHARDT J. P. Beam . . . . . High Priest ................Recorder Corresponding Secretaryj .................Cashier .................Marshal .................Marshal .................Marshal .................Marshal (110)fKQCreech MM Hew ell M Blunter Published Monthly by the A DE LPHIAN PHILOSOPHIAN Ci ter ary Societies VI?Cochrane Ze.Koib. 3).t?mith- mEMMDT I H.JBlrckjion ' £%RMAN (JmVER lT bW.fHon r?ON G.T.WiNDELL ECHO STAFF (HDEcho Staff M. M. Hewell......................................................Editor-in-Chief D. J. Kant..............................................Associate Editor-in-Chief M. B. Gu.VTER . . .......................................Business Manager F. S. Stone...................................................Assistant Manager Associate Editors Fall Term D. T. Smith........................................Literary Editor (A. L. S.) B. W. Thomason.....................................Literary Editor (P. L. S.) I). V. Cochrane.....................................Athletic Editor (A. L. S.) L. E. LenharDT.......................................Alumni Editor (A. L. S.) E. C. Kolb.........................................Exchange Editor (P. L. S.) H. J. Blackmon........................................Local Editor (P. L. S.) Associate Editors Sprinc Term D. W. Cochrane.....................................Literary Editor (A. L. S.) J. G. Lf.e...........................................Literary Editor (P. L. S.) F. K. C. Creech....................................Athletic Editor (A. L. S.) G. T. WlNDEU.........................................Alumni Editor (P. L. S.) E. C. Kolb.........................................Exchange Editor (P. L. S.) L. E. Lenhardt..........................................Local Editor (A. L. S.) (I!2)Left to Right: Smith. Newell. Dr. Provence. Dr. Fletcher. Croxton and Boyd The Debate Council Faculty Members Dr. II. W. Provence. Chairman Dr. O. O. Fletcher Student Members M. M. Newell. Secretary (A. L. S.) D. T. Smith (A. L. S.) E. H. Croxton (P. L. S.) M. S. Boyd (P. L. S.) (113) Inter-Collegiate Debaters QUERY: Resolved, Thai the Oregon system of initiative and referendum should he adopted in the governmental system of South Carolina. (IN) D. J. Fant. P. L. S. E. A. McDowei i. P. L. S.Adelphian Inter-Society Debaters QUERY: Resolved. Thai all municipalities in the United States should oft’.'i and operate their street railways and plants for furnishing light, water and gas. M. M. Hewell D. T. Smith Philosophian Inter-Society Debaters (115) J. II. B rd M. B. GunterAdelphian Inter-Society Orators P. B. 11 AIR M. M. Newell D. T. Smith Philosophian Inter-Society Orators J. G. Lee (116) F.. C. Kolb F. A. McDowellErnest Connors Kolb REPRESENTATIVE TO STATE ORATORICAL CONTEST. GREENWOOD. APRIL 19. 1918 WON SECOND PLACE (117)(811)Philosophian Literary Society GAMMA SECTION Presidents D. J. FaNT (F ,11 Term) M. S. Boyd (Spring Term) Vice-Presidents C. Herndon (Fall Term) (119) C. E. Vermillion (Spring Term)Philosophian Literary Society FALL TERM CAMMA SECTION Officers Joinl Officer. E. H. CROXTON, Cashier spring term D. J. Fant . . . . President M. S. Boyd C. Herndon . . . . Vice-President G. T. Win pell .... . . . . Recording Secretary .... M. S. Boyd . . . . Corresponding Secretary . . . . . W. W. Anderson P. D. Cannada .... . . . Senior Censor L. P. Thompson . . . . . . . Junior Censor E. A. McDowell . . . . . . . Senior Critic E. C. Kolb . . . . Junior Critic C. E. Vermillion . . . i. . Treasurcr S. W. Jolly J. A. Tumblin’ .... . . . Chaplain S. W. Jolly . . . . Historian C. J. Jones . . . . Conductor W. K. Moore .... . . . . Issislunt Conductor .... W. F. Ramsay B. W. Thomason . . . . . . . Scrgcant-al-Arms J. E. Ledbetter . . . . . . . Standard Bearer Members W. W. Anderson W. J. Incram E. A. McDowell P. O. Batson E. F. Hardin A. T. O'Dell L. L. Barton C. Herndon W. F. Ramsey W. M. Braziel W. Y. Henderson B. L. Talbert W. M. Blackburn C. H. Henderson L. P. Thompson M. 5. Boyd G. H. Hill B. W. Thomason P. D. Cannada S. W. Jolly J. A. Tumblin’ J. G. Cothran C. J. Jones C. E. Vermillion T. E. Durham E. C. Kolb G. T Windell D. J. Fant J. E. Ledbetter J. G. Newton R. A. Farmer V. K Ledbetter D. N. Wilburn G. C. Galphin W K. Moore L. C Rankin (120)Philosophian Literary Society SIGMA SECTION Presidents J. E. Wjlus (Fall Term) Vice-Presidents J. II. Byrd (Spring Term) J. I I. Byrd (Fall Term) (121) H. L. Eastkrun (Spring Term)Philosophian Literary Society SIGMA SECTION Officers FALL TERM SPRING TERM J. E. Willis . President ..... J. H. Byrd J. H. Byrd . Vice-President ...... ... II. L. Easterlin M. B. Gunter Senior Critic W. E. Sims M. L. Easterlin . Junior Critic . . . H. J. Blackmon H. J. Blackmon . Recording Secretary? . J. G. Lef. G. T. DeVore . Corresponding Secretary) . . LA. Smoak J. G. Lee . Senior Censor . C . T. Df.Vore J. W. Long . Junior Censor I. A. Smoak . Treasurer J. W. Long J. F. Hawkins . Chaplain . T. J Touchberry F. D. Cox . Sergcanl-at-Arms T. J. Mims E. M. Harrison . Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms . . . . A. G Broadwater W. E. Sims . Historian J. E. Willis C. D. Garner . Conductor J W. V. Nix . Assisi nit Conductor Jake Rasor J. T. Littlejohn . Standard Bearer • • • • J Members H. J Blackmon R. A. Elrod W. V. Nix J. II. Byrd C. D. Garner B. S. Pinson A. G. Broadwater M. B. Gunter J. A Richardson G. B Baldwin J. F. Hawkins Jake Rasor W. II. Barfield W. II. Hawkins W. E. Sims F. D Cox E. M. Harrison K. D. Smith E. II. Croxton B. B Hester LA. Smoak J. O. Carroll J. W. Lose W. M. Talbert G. T. DeVore J. G. Lee T. J. Touchberry A. A. Drake J. T. Littlejohn J. E. Willis H. L. Easterlin S. N. Miller T. J. Mims A. II. Williams 022)Athletic Association Officers 1. J. A. Shirley 2. M. K. Walker 3. C. V. Wilkes 4. A. W. Askins 5. J. L. Fleming 6. J. H. Speer 7. L. P. Thompson 8. W. W. Anderson 9. R. Pearson- 10. M. S. Boyd 11. D. J. Fant 12. F. K. C. Creech 13. M. M. Hewell (125)Athletic Association Officers J. A. Shirley..................................................................................President M. K. Walker.................................................................................. Secretary C. V. WlLKES...................................................................... Manager Football A. W. AsKINS...............................................................Assistant Manager Football J. L. Fleming............................................................ Assistant Manager Football J. H. Speer..........................................................................Captain Football L. P. Thompson......................................................................Manager Baseball W. W. Anderson.............................................................Assistant Manager Baseball R. Pearson............................................................... Assistant Manager Baseball M. S. Boyd..........................................................................Captain Baseball D. J. Fant.........................................................................................Cheer Leader F. K. C. CREECH.................................................................Assistant Cheer Leader M. M. Hewell............................................................................Manager Tennis Athletic Council S. A. Moore..........................................Graduate Manager H. W. Provence...............................................Chairman A. G. Furman, Jr............................................Secretary Student Members J. A. Shirley C. V'. Wilkes L. P. Thompson Alumni Members S. A. Moore A. G. Furman, Jr. A. D. L. Barksdale Faculty Members H. W. Provence M. D. F.arle J. L. Vass 026)027)Result of Football Season Sept. 29—At Atlanta . . . 0 Georgia Tech . . . 25 Oct. 6—At Greenville .... ... 7 Wake Forest . . . 6 Oct. 13—At Greenville .... . . . 0 Clcmson .... . 38 Oct. 20—At Greenville .... ... 20 Newberry . . . . 7 Nov. 3—At Greenville .... ... 7 Davidson . . . . 28 Nov. 8—At Florence . . . 0 Carolina .... . 26 Nov. 17—At Greenville .... ... 7 P. c . 14 Nov. 29—At Greenville .... ... 18 Wofford .... . 3 “To the Team ’ The White and Purple, with upheld brow. Emerging from defeat, Reaped honor on the field that now Ha seen grim warrior meet. Speedy Speer’s nerve when on hi skill Defended Furman’s line. 1 the one kind of Will Wc Furman fellows enshrine. Defeat brings bitterness to those Who know not honor true; We raise our heads amid our woes. So, Furman, here’s to you! Men who can hold their courage up At one fool from the goal Will never fear to drink the cup Life holds out to their soul. All hail! to our defeated team: All hail! to men who can Wrench from defeat the right to seem God’s noblest work —a man. “TO THF. You go your way unhonored and unsung: No wild acclaim, no cheers resound for you; You lose a leg. an eye, a tooth, a lung. You give your all to mold a Varsity Crew. Five days in every week you lake your stand. To be trampled on, and smashed, crushed and torn; Your bruised body is in great demand. Rut as for fame, yours is a hope forlorn. Scrubs" The public does not know that you're alive; The papers never say a word of praise. You nurse your wounds, and pray you may survive The poundings through those long and gruesome days. Oh. lowly Scrubs, you arc heroes rare— Cuffed, kicked about—to build a great machine. You waste your courage on the desert air; You play a noble part that goes unseen. (128)Miss Vircinia Barkadale. Sponsor (129) W. L. Lavai., Coach J. H. Speer, Captain(130) Football Team Fir»t Rote: Creech. Fi.eminc. Wilkes. Rhame. T. Grecory. C. Grecory. Gressette. Speer. Power. Herndon. Laval. Fast. Askins. Second Ron: Anderson. Broadwater, Cox. Pacet, Dices. Nixon.. Third Ron: Shirley. Brown, Jones, Boyd. Sims. Carson, Wright.JONES SHIRLEY BOYD C. J. Jones (“Con”) If one wishes to see a right guard who has gone into the game for all that's in it, let him look at Jones. "Con" is as tough as those old pine knots found in the woods, and is a hard fighter and good all-around player at all limes. He is a Junior, and we hope that he will be as good next year as he was this season. We are expecting great thing from Conway Jefferson next fall. J. A. Shirley (“Jim”) Shirley has completed his second year on the Varsity and is a great player when it comes to the duties of a right end. "Jim" is at home in breaking up those plays around right end, and tackling as though he meant to kill. This is "Jim’s’ last year in college, and we hate to see him go, but we feel certain that he will make good in life, as he ha on the gridiron. M. S. Boyd (“Daddy”) This is Boyd’s first year as a pigskin chaser, but he held his job down at center like a professional. Fo our sorrow. "Daddy" suffered a sprained ankle at the beginning of the season, but this was not enough to keep the big boy out of the game. We regret that we must say good-bye to him as a football player, as this is his last year under the Purple and White. (131)HERNDON RHAME SIMS Clyde Herndon (“Kid”) Enter the boy who can stand anything as long as there is a chance. Clyde has been one of the fellows whom the other boys have wanted on the football team for the past four seasons, but who. working in hard luck, kept on just the same. This shows that he is one who sticks to his task. Clyde will make a great success chasing the pigskin in the game of life if he goes at it the way he did on the gridiron. J. L. Rhame (“Monty”) Rhomc is a new man on the Varsity list, and a good one. too. I Ic has the ability to play his position at quarter with agility and precision. I Ic is a sure shot when he goes through the air for his man. and he doesn't mind making that flying tackle a bit. There was not a grittier man on the team than "Monty." He is always ready to do his part when needed. W. E. Sims (“Red”) We were glad to have this good-natured, tough, hard tackier on our team. This is his last year in college and his first on the team, but it was through no fault of his own that he was not permitted to play until this year. "Red" showed the fellows who had to contend with him on the line of scrimmage that he was capable of making a left guard, even though it was his first year of football. It is truthfully said that he played every minute of the season without even having time called for him. (132) BROWN GRESSETTE GREGORY E. G. Brown (“Egg ’) This is Brown’s first year as a first-siring man. but his experience as a "sub " last year did him a world of good. He was competent for the task of tearing through the enemy's line and spoiling many of their plays before they reached the line of scrimmage. We hope that "Egg" does as well in after life as he has done at right tackle. T. N. Gressette (“Tate”) Please do not gel this Freshman confused in mind with his brother. "Cap’n Bill, who finished at Furman last year, for "Tate" is competent of making a record all his own. He simply needs to hold the pace he traveled this season -a record for any of us to envy. I Ic is a steady lad when it comes to playing the position of fullback, and we must pity the men who contest against him in the seasons to come. C. D. Gregory (“Chauncf.y”) If you have seen Furman play football within the last two seasons you have seen the two Gregory boys there ready for the fray. The larger of this loving couple is our right half. Chauncey was a steady player the whole season through and finished the year by showing the stuff that he was made of when he went after the Wofford Terriers. This little fellow had hard luck from injuries this season, but these did not stop the game little Furmanite very long. (133)CARSON NIXON WRIGHT L. F. Carson (“Scaley”) Our left tackle became a real good Varsity man this year, for he showed that he had the "stuff last year while playing on the scrubs. l ie is a hard customer for the fellow who ha to face him. a .hard fighter, and an all-round clean sportsman. We feel sure that this husky lad has the making of a player who will cause the fans to sit up and take notice before his college career is over. D. M. Nixon (“Nick”) Nixon comes to us this year from the city of Greenwood to show us that the inhabitants of that town can furnish a real football player—a player that has the grit to tackle anything, no matter how large it may be. just so it has on a uniform. I le is a Sophomore and saw hard work on the "Scrub" team last year, which is of great value to him this season. Just watch him play the old position of left end next season. W. C. Wright (“Philosopher") Wright is another of our devoted Sophomore Class, the class with the most athletes, in Furman. Me made us a good man at left end. and is a wise old owl when it comes to his favorite game. Wright is always hard at work when he is in the pigskin chase, and that is what it requires to take the ball across to safety for old Furman. Luck to you. Callic. in your remaining seasons of the game. (134)WILKES SPEER LAVAL C. V. Wilkes (“Cicero”) Our manager. Carl V. Wilke , it one of the best football manager Furman ha had in a long time. If anybody wanted to know where '‘Cicero'' wat in the afternoon, or any other time, for that matter, he could usually be found "on football duty." If anything was needed by the players, our faithful manager would tee that they got it. The performance with a cheerful and willing mind of all the heavy ta»k connected with a football team was greatly appreciated by all the boy who wore the Furman color . J. H. Speer (“Speedy”) For the benefit of those who have never seen our cap'n play—he is the classiest man at left half that ha played football in the Palmetto State in many a day. "Speedy'' hail from the "Old North State." and we arc as proud of him as it is possible to be. The man who can beat "Speedy calling signals and making those end runs at the same time is "some" football player. Captain Speer has been one of our best man for two years, and is the fastest halfback on any South Carolina team. W. L. Laval (“Coach”) Ye . Coach Laval is still with us. although he has been wanted elsewhere. In a word, he believe in Furman, and Furman believes in him. He is fast making Furman' place in the athletic world secure. Mention must be made of his helpers, beside all those before mentioned: The assistant business manager . A. W. Askins and J. L. Fleming; the cheer leaders. D. J. Fant and F. K. C. Creech; the Scrubs. W. W. Anderson. A. G. Broadwater. F. D. Cox. M. O. B. Diggs. T. R. Gregory. J. S. Paget and A. E. Power; the rooters, and the band—all go to make up the spirit of Furman. 035)(136)FOOTBALL PARADE (137)SNAPS (138)(139)Lonc. Lee. Watson. Rasor. Wilkes, Herndon, Golphin. Anderson. Gressette. Rhame. Lambrigiit, Moore. Boyd, Smoak, Cox. Carpenter, Nixon. Padgett, Shirley, Richardson. Baseball Team W. L. LaVal....................... M. S. Boyd.................... L. P. Thompson............ V. W. Anderson . . . Raymond Pearson I. A. Smoak . . . J. A. Shirley . . W. G. Padcett . . M. S. Boyd . . . J. B. Carpenter . J. A. Lambricht . D. M. Nixon . . J. L. Rhame . . . Harry Moore . . T. W. Gressette . F. D. Cox . . . ..............................Coach .................. . Captain ....................Manager . . Issistant Manager issistant Manager , . Pitcher . . Pilcher . . Pitcher . . Catcher . hirst Base Second Base . Third Base . . Shortstop Center Field . Left Field . Right Field SUBSTITUTES AND SECOND TEAM C. V. Wilkes. G. C. Golphin, Jake Rasor. I.. R. Richardson. Clyde Herndon. J. W. Long. W. C. Wricht, T. R. Gregory. J. L. Watson, T. B. Lee, J. O. Carroll. D. J. I'ant. W. M. Brazif.l, A. W. Askins. (140)Mar. 30 Apr. 3 Apr. 5 Apr. 8 Apr. 12 Apr. 16 Apr. 17 Apr. 18 Apr. 23 Apr. 24 Apr. 26 May 2 May 3 May 4 May 10 Schedule . At Greenville . Al Greenville . . Al Spartanburg . Al Greenville . Al Greenville . Al Greenville . Al Greenville . Al Greenville . . Al Greenville . . Al Greenville . . Al Greenville . At Newberry . At Columbia . . Al Due Wesl . . Al Greenville . . Erikine Univ. of N. C. . . Wofford . . Davidson . . Wofford . . . Trinily . . . Trinily . Wake Forest . . . . Elon . . . . Elon . . Newberry . . Newberry . . Carolina . . . Erskinc . . Carolina (141) LIBERTY LOAN PARADE (142)(143)D. W. Cochrane M. M. I Jewell D. M. Ramsay. Jr. Tennis Champions S. C. I. T. A. Tournaments. Ridgewood Club Courts, Columbia, S. C, October 14-19. 1917. Doubles Furman I Icwcll and Cochrane Engine Grier and McDonald I Jewel! and Cochrane 6-4; 7-5 P. C. Barnett and Jacobs Bye Barnett and Jacobs I Icwcll and Cochrane 6-1; 6-4 Carolina Kuhn and Vaux Bye Kohn and Vaux Clcrmon Robertson and 1 laskill Bye Robertson and I laskill Robertson and I laskill 4-6; 9-7; 6-2 Robertson and I laskill 7-5; 6-2; 6-0 Singles I iagood of Carolina defeated Cochrane.. .6-2; 7-5 Ramsay defeated Jacobs of P. C.........7-5; 6-5 I laskill of Clemson defeated Ramsay...6-0; 6-4 (144) Tennis Club L. F.. Lenhardt . D. J. Fant ..................President Secretary-Treasurer M. L. Easteri.in Jake Rasor II. II. Ercle M. B. Gunter D. J. Fant 11. O. Morris M. M. Newell Members S. B. Bai.lencer G. C. Galphin E. H. Croxton L. E. Lenhardt J. E. Willis P. B. Hair D. M. Ramsay D. W. Cochrane (I4S)SNAPS (146)(6H)The A. F. M. Club I. J. E. Willis.................... 2. C. D. Garner............. 3. T. F. Durham . , 4. F. L. Miller President 5. J. Morris Vice-President . . . . Secretory (150)The A. S. P. Club Motto: "We Cling Together" Flotoer: Carnation Personnel P. B. Hair..................."Most Red Tape" J. A. Shirley................“Most Coquetry" M. S. Boyd..................."Most Sincere" M. McJ. HEWELL .... "Biggest Wonder" C. J. Jones .... "Most Precious Jewel" R. C. Peace.................."Best Novelist" D. N. Wilburn .... "Grcaiesi Arguer" D. W. Cochrane . ... "Best Student" G. H. HlLL......................."Freshest" (151)HARVARD tf ce -ftftDotve - Wo Aer Curry- Creech - A hury THE QUATERNION CLUB (152)Askins. Oswald. McCravey. Grecory. T.. Geer. Speer. Grecory. C.. Anderson The Pikers Club Members A. W. Askins "1 lc hath a »ilvcr longue, inspired wilh a heart of gold." W. W. Anderson "Hi ways are Iruc; his conduct blameless; his friendship lasting." T. R. Grecory "Were he not a man we would be tempted to caress him for his culer.ess." C. D. Grecory "Do not blame him for his defects, he does the best he can." K. M. Geer "Looks sink into obscurity when one thinks of his mental ability." J. B. McCravy “He has broken many a heart, but he is still in the arena of love." E. H. Oswald "Small of stature, but with a love of the fairer sex not in proportion to his build." J. H. Speer "A veritable ball of fiery energy and a man withal." (153) The Day Students’ Club D. T. Smith V. T. Bates E. Patton M. M. Hewell S. R. Howard F The Patriarch Club J. S. Graham J. R. Flynn D. W. Cochrane D. M. Ramsay C. J. Lupo M. E. McManaway R. B. Quick S. M. Lawton L. O. Stone J. L. Woodside W. D. Barr G. G. Inman J. D. Barton F. N. Gibson A. Taylor S. Stone A. L. Willis F. L. Jones (Former Furman Filling School Students) T. J. Touciiberry J. Morris A. L. Willis F. S. Stone M. K. Walker J. S. Graham I I. L. F.astkri.in R. B. Quick C. I Ierndon E. Patton S. A. Souza S. R. I Ioward M. B. Gunter J. G. Newton S. M. Lawton L. O. StoneMountain Mission School Club P. O. Batson........................"Tigerville" J. G. Lee............................."Six-Mile" T. E. Durham.........................."Six-Mile" H. O. Morris........................"Tigerville" W. W. Hawkins......................"Long Creek" J. G. Newton....................."Tigerville" J. D. Holtzclaw........................"Spartan" J. A. Tumblin......................."S. T. 1" Williams-Williams Goat Club "Williams," Alonzo H. "Williams,” Barnie L. "Williams," Eucene A. "William” A. Whitlock "William" H. Barfield "William" H. Hawkins "William" M. Hunt "William" E. Sims (155)The Epicurean Club Mollo: "Eat. Drink, and Be Merry" Object: To carry oul the motto Time and Place: Wednesday night, 10:30 P.M., C-10. Montague Hall Officers L. E. Lenhardt.........................................President M. K. Walker.....................................Vice-President L. C. Rankin..................................Secretary-Treasurer W. M. Hunt............................................Chief Coolc Members Hunt. W. M. Wilkes. C. V. Rankin, L. C. Walker. M. K. McDowell, E. A. Oswald. E. H. Hair. P. B. Anderson. W. W. Lenhardt. L. E. Jones. C. J. Wilburn. D. N. Brunson. S. T. DeVore. G. T. Blackmon. H. J. Boyd. M. S. Shirley. J. A. Thompson, L. P. Fant. D. J, Creech. F. K. C. Menu Oyster Cocktail Chicken Salad Olive Potato Chips Pickles Sallincs Celery Block Ice Cream Pound Cake Black Coffee Cheese Straws Mints Cigars (156)Motto: “Kill or Kurc the Rat " K. M. A. Klub Pants ord: "K. M. A. Membership Requirement: To be skilled in all departments of the K. M. A. (Karelcsi Midnight Association) activities Flotvcr: Morning Glory Favorite Drinif: Paris Mountain "White Lightning" Officers Raymond Pearson............................................................Cram! Duplex C. D. Gregory..................................................Chancellor of the Exchequer Members L. F. Carson...................................................... Scaly A. A. Drake..........................................................Ish J. L. Fleminc......................................................... K. M. Geer........................................................Count C. D. Gregory......................................................Far T. R. Gregory................................................L.ittlc ‘Un G. M. Hill...........................................................Rat J. B. McCravy....................................................Fiddler D. M. Nixon.....................................................Conceit Raymond Pearson.............................................Propagandist J. H. Speer.......................................................Speedy R. C. Stevens.......................................................Karo (157)Our “Bonhomie ol 1918“ in the Making APPRECIATION The management of “Our Bonhomie 1918" takes this opportunity to thank those who have helped in making the hook what it is. Space will not jKimit mention of all who have willingly given much of their time to the work. The Benton Printing Co.’s printing. Jahn Ollier K.ngrnving Co.' work. Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Orr's photographic work, have been most satisfactory. The management is also very grateful to Dr. S. E. Brad thaw. Messrs. J. E. Willis and J. A. Richardson for the kodak snaps they have contributed, and to many others who have had part in the work. W. M. Hunt litlitor-in-Cliicf Raymond Pearson An EJitojr. E. 11. Croxton Buiinva Manager_ Campus Runabouts (159)WHAT WOULD WE DO WITHOUT THEM? (160)(161)Characteristics NAME DISPOSITION AMBITION H. J. Blackmon . . . . . To leg Professors . . . . To be a dancer M. S. Boyd . To make money . . . . To carry a suitcase F.. G. Brown . . To be an engineer S. T. Brunson . Ain't got none . . . . . To avoid women J. H. Byrd . Ecclesiastical . . . . . Army Y. M. C. A. E. II. Croxton . Industrious .... . . To collect money G. T. DeVore . . To tell a lie H. L. Easterns .... . Countrified .... . . To run a pressing club D. J. Fast . Brilliant . . To be a journalist R. A. Farmer . Ramblin' .... . . Captain in aviation J. S. Graham . Quiescent . . . . . To be a worthy father M. B. Gunter . Studious . . Baibcrism P. B. Hair . Sweet . . To be a fashion plate G. 1 Iart . Diligent . . To leach a country school M. M. Heweli . . To play mixed doubles V. M. Hunt . . To be a Y. M. C. A. Secretary C. Herndon ‘. Drowsy . . I o be a farmer 1.. E. Lenhardt . . . . . feminine .... . . To knit a sweater J. A. Richvrdson . . . . . Miserly . . To win Conway’s girl J. A. Shirley . Amiable . . To live without work W. F.. Sims . Fiery . . To go to bed early D. T. Smith . Intellectual . . To be an undertaker 1.. P. Thompson . . . . . Grouchy . . To have a sweetheart C. E. Vermillion .... . Indeterminable . . . . . To joke M. K. Walker . Plcasanl . . To settle in Greenwood C. V. Wilkes . Musical . .???????? J. E. Willis . Oratorical .... . . 1 o get an audience "Great men parting leave behind them footprints on the sands of time." The following is a famous and lime-honored syllogism of Professor Martin, former head of Latin: "Man is made of dust; dust settles; he a man." Professor Martin always liked to tell of the young Freshman who began to translate the opening lines of Virgi 1 in the following fashion: "I sing of a man with a dog in his arms." Another saying of Professor Martin: "Paint covers a multitude of defects." (162)Our Idea of Nothing at All "Egg” Brown on lime for a class. Wofford Editors of the Old Cold and Dlacl(. "Puss" Cox culling a class. D. T. Smith nol asking the Prof a question. “Jit" Brunson getting married. Belton Hair not writing to Coker. Roy Farmer not riding some Janes. "Dopey" Richardson teaching a dancing school. Croxton with all the money he needs. Blackmon’s mustacnc (Shirley model). Jim Shirley not in love. "Doc" Walker spending the week-end at Furman. Marcus Boyd sweeping out his room. Washwomen returning with all our clothes. Clyde Herndon up for breakfast on Sunday. The guy who studies on Sunday. G. Hart with a haircut. C'hauncey Gregory without Toy. "Speedy" Speer without a chew. Rankin without his pipe. Cicero with Sim’s banjo. Our uniforms. Things We Never Hear " This is the greatest piece of literature ever penned by the hand of man.” “Glad to see you back, Mr. Kolb." "I undertook this work because all other philosophical works were as dry as desicoatcd cocoanut, run through a press, and laid in the sun three years to dry.” "That’s the gist of this epitome.” “Got that? That right?" "Don’t say, ‘It looks like, but ‘It looks • t t as it. "The Lyceum tonight will be of interest." “Come right in. young gentlemen. Glad to see you." "Get your Hornets.” “Pardon my stupidity.” “Dad jimmit.” "Great guns, man." "Who’s going uptown now?" "Who’s going to mail a letter on the four o’clock train?” "Let’s ride by G. W. C." "Has the mail come?" Seven Wonders of Furman Why Dr. Bradshaw- and Miss Malone don’t get married. Why “Puss" Cox is so jovial this year. What’s the name of the latest edition of the "Bible.” Why Ethics is so popular this year. Why we arc so reverent in the messhall when the blessing’s being said. Who’s starting up a jewelry store at Montague. Why Wofford did not remain for Thanksgiving dinner. (163)Flames in the Hall of Fame Handsomest Man: D. T. Smith. Ugliest Man: “Hen” Eastcrlin. Herndon in second race. Biggest Logger: Blackmon. Hewell (race is close). Biggest Liar: Fant. Cyp Rogers nominated for next year. Biggest Loafer: Farmer, by a close margin. Laziest Man: Jim Shirley, unanimously elected. Most Desperate Lover: "Jit" Brunson. Biggest Bonchcad: "Egg" Brown. Hardest Boner: D. T. Smith, Roy Farmer. Most Conceited Runt: "Gooch” Blackmon. We Want Where Shirley's sweater is. Who used up all the hot water. Why Creech and Conway make noise. Why Jim Shirley shaved off his mustache. Why Professor Bowen borrowed a dime from his lady. Why Cyp Rogers quit going to Gaffney. Why W. Y. Henderson quit school. Why Polly returned to New York. Why quietness prevails the library. Leading Financier: Croxton. Best Singer: Richardson. Best Athlete: Boyd, with "Sister" Len-hardt second. Biggest Runt: "Doc" Walker. Sweetest Boy: Hair. Biggest Bag of Gas: "Ham" Thompson. Pacifists: Willis. Brown. Wittiest Man: Byrd: Cannada contested the election. Best Poet: Gunter nominates himself. Biggest Sport: Sims. Biggest Tightwad: Thompson, Blackmon. Best Dancer: DcVore; Richardson learning fast. Best Y. M. C. A. Worker: Byrd, Hunt. Cutest Man: Herndon. to Know Why Professor Bible attends summer schools. Why they all love Jim Shirley. What time the mail will come. Why the Wofford cheer leader shut up. Why McGee Hall did not eat breakfast one morning. Why "Gooch" Blackmon packed up during the Council meeting. When the next draft will come. When the war is going to end. (164)Things We Never See Turman boys downtown on Monday afternoon. Ton DeVore with his own tobacco and matches. Girls at four-fifteen. Third-floor boys studying — their lessons. Receptions. Marcus Boyd sweeping out his room. Washwomen returning all the clothes. Clyde Herndon up for breakfast on Sunday. Hart without a haircut. Chauncey Gregory without Toy. "Speedy” Speer without a chew. Rankin without his pipe. Cicero without Sim’s banjo. Society Notes Mr. Allen Askins went calling on a certain young lady last Sunday night. While bidding her a fond farewell, her little bull terrier became jealous or fearful. As a result Mr. Askir.s made a rapid retreat down Augusta street, and the following day sent his trousers to the tailor for much needed repairs. Mr. Askins will be out again soon. "Sister" Lenhardt completed his second pair of knitted sox. Belton Hair wrote to Coker yesterday —for a change. Cyp Rogers slept till 10 o'clock. He then proceeded to borrow a dollar which our uncle owed his grandfather. Oswald came in breathless from a visit to the fair sex the other night. When questioned he averred that he had been "rocked in," but Jones contends that they were imaginary stones. Rat Galphin engulfed fifteen biscuits for breakfast. Professor Vass cut History. Glory be! MacDowell is still worrying about Polly. William Anderson spent the week-end in Wclford. Walker Fords to Lander. Franklin Kirkland Carlisle Creech sang a solo at the First Baptist Church Sunday. It was entirely solo. Conway Jones was quiet last night. He was worrying because J. A. Richardson went to see his girl. Good old ten-dollar sweater! Wilburn went to Florence to marry Frances, but lacked the license fee. He spent the three dollars en route for that place. Manager Croxton says that kodaking is kale-a-flying as well as fascinating, but he doesn’t mind expenses when his kodak is focussed on the fairer sex. Ask Farmer if his future wife lives at 41 5 Hampton. Fant, Farmer and Shirley have taken up civil engineering and surveying. So it is whispered that they arc contemplating macadamizing the roads between Woodruff, Benncttsvillc and Anderson. (165)Society Notes—Continued Guy Hill had his pants dusted at I I o’clock P.M. Ham Thompson spent a nicklc. It was for a Sunday smoke. DcVorc borrowed a little Prince Albert once. Fleming had his picture made for the Annual. Photographic work was halted for repairs. Somebody told Jim McCravcy that he was pretty. Helen wants to know why Chauncey Gregory’s ears protrude so far. She must have never studied evolution. Toy is the young parrot. He imitates Chauncey—also Jim. Hunt went to the chiropodist’s yesterday to get his nails manicured. Doc purchased a P. N. mileage book. Cicero’s girl married, so he takes solace in a guitar. He has our sympathy. W. E. Sims seeks the Summum Bunum in the Main Building tower. Hart and Painter did not attend the Senior-Junior reception. “Gooch” Blackmon dislocated his little finger, untying one of his fancy cravats. Brunson drank three cups of coffee last night. "Slick Jit” said he needed a stimulant, as he was going to see his girl. Durham took a bath. He remained in to avoid catching a cold. Gunter sheared Eastcrlin's hair in preparation for the reception. Eastcrlin therefore pressed Gunter’s clothes, all of which was to get in practice for the reception. Hewell sent a lurman pillow to Win-throp. Marion believes that "the hand that rocks the cradle rules the world.” D. T. Smith made a great debate. He is accustomed to handling dead subjects. Graham took his honeymoon on the P. N. to Williamston. Askins is thinking of reversing the direction. "Daddy" again carried the leading lady’s suitcase from the camp vaudeville last night. "E. G. (g)’’ Brown makes a trip downtown all by himself, just to purchase a supply of pink stationery. (166)nozi I. L-JLD—I— |—LjJ (167)FURMAN UNIVERSITY GREENVILLE. S. C. Courses are offered leading to the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), and Master of Arts (M.A.). Beautiful campus, healthful climate, moderate expenses. James C. Furman Hall of Science, costing, with equipment, $50,000. Library especially endowed. Trained Librarian. Large, comfortable dormitories FOR CATALOG SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT FOLDER GIVING ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS OR ADMISSION BLANKS ADDRESS E. M. POTEAT, D.D., L.L.D. PRESIDENT Be Sure to Patronize Our AdvertisersGREENVILLE WOMAN'S COLLEGE 1854-1918 College Courses Leading lo Degrees B.L., B.A. and M.A. Diplomas Awarded in Piano, Pipe Organ, Voice. Violin. Expression and Physical Culture; Art and Kindergarten Normal Training Courses. Strong Faculty in Liberal and P ine Arts Departments. 1 wo handsome new Dormitories, Dining Room and Kitchen of unsurpassed excellence. New Modern Science Department, second to none. Library Building now completed. All buildings have been wholly renewed and furnished. NEXT SEASON BEGINS SEPTEMBER 12. 1918 Medical College of the State of South Carolina Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy Orvned and Conlroiled by the State Rated In Class A by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association. Member of the Association of American Medical Colleges and of the American Conference of Pharma-oeutleal Faculties. A LEADER in Medical Education in the South New building with well-equipped laboratories. A full corps of thoroughly efficient nll-tlme teachers. Located opposite the Roper Hospital, nnd very near the Charleston Museum, thus affording the students more extensive opportunities for research work and training. Women admitted on the same terms ns men. For catalogue address II. GRADY COI.I.ISOX. Registrar t'nlhoun anti Lucas Streets Charleston, S. C. HAYNSWORTH HAYNSWORTH ATTOR N EYS-AT-LAW Masonic Temple Building Greenville. S. C. loans INSURANCE REAL ESTATE STOCKS AND BONDS Alester G. Furmen Telehone 593 Southwestern BuildingThe Photographs in This Annual WERE MADE BY MR. and MRS. J. ORR Greenville, South Carolina SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS AND COURTESIES TO ALL He: "Please give me your picture.” She; “ can't get a photographer to Jo me justice." He: "A y dear girl, what you need is not a photographer, but an artist."THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK AND PIEDMONT SAVINGS TRUST CO. lkiiUU ll lllU lUiS1SIVHHIBXnnXIOnWXUIli MAIN STREET AND McBE;E AVENUE Wc Respectfully Incite Your Business GILREATH-DURHAM, Inc Goldsmiths Silversmiths A Complete Line of Waterman’s Ideal Fountain Pens Fine China. Cut Glass, Art Pottery. Gifts for all occasions. We make Medals. Badges and Class Rings. Designs and Estimates Cheerfully Furnished 208-210 South Main Street At the ‘Sign of the Dig Watch'' ROGERS BROS. MEN’S FINE SHOES. NECKTIES, COLLARS. HOSIERY AND GENTS’ FURNISHINGS Have YourSuit Made to Fit by the Kahn Tailoring Co. of Indianapolis. Ind. A FIT GUARANTED South Main Street Greenville. S. C' CARPENTER BROS. THE VERY BEST LINE OF Drink t C'niulios : mid : CignrN College Students Always Welcome E. A. WRIGHT CO. BROAD and HUNTINGTON STS. PHILADELPHIA. PA. Engraver . Printer . Jeweler . Manufacturing Stationer . College Calendar . Calling Cards Cia Ring . College and Cla » Stationery— 0 A MESSAGE FOR YOUNG MEN -v; 'ARananBaHWinna :. Mmmmmaa -w v Young men have their own idea about clothing—-and a young man best understand} a young man's wants. The designers of our suits for young men arc young young in years, young in spirit, in thorough accord and sympathy with the young man who appreciates REAL style. They know how to drape a coal; how to produce clean-cut. elegant lines; how to contribute the dash and vim that strike the young man just right. Our suits arc not freaky. I he majority of young men do no want freakness. I hey want distinctive style—young men's style—not eccentricity. We know what they want. We give it to them. See the suits then judge. Strictly one price, and your money back if anything goes wrong. New I lats. New Furnishings. New Everything for Men's wear. SMITH BRISTOW MEN’S AND BOVS OUTFITTERS Main and Washington Streets. GREENVILLE, S. C. THE IDEAL LAUNDRY r Dyeing and Cleaning Strictly High Class Work East McBee Avenue 1 elephone 2086 This Bank solicits accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations, and is prepared to render efficient service in the transaction of all lines of conservative banking:. In its DIME SAVINGS DEPARTMENT »Pe-cial attention is uiven to savinK accounts on which interest is allowed at the rate of A per cent per annum, compounded quarterly. Farmers’ Merchants’ Bank State and County Depository Greenville, S. C. Palace Barber Shop TUB AND SHOWER BATHS Corner Main ar.d Washington Sts. Under Smith Bristow Largest Shop in City StrictI}) Sanitar ) J. O. Raines, ProprietorPeace Printing Company PRINTERS-ENGRAVERS BLANK BOOK MAKERS Loose Leaf Ledgers and All Kinds Special Forms and Systems Index Cards, Steel Cabinets and Piling Devices FOR Better Pricks and Better Quality of Goods Come to J. O. JONES Co. DRESS SUITS FOR RENT You Are Always Welcome Are You Ambitious? Nenrly all really Miccewfiil nifii In pnl . lie life learned Salesmanship tluriiiK Mini in i vHratl'Mi while students In colli-se. They learned the value of their exjnrj. «•»«•«• when fated with the realities of life. Hunilrnl.o students are • .utility th« lr college tfX|H‘iin' ji ■ much im'iv In »nn rnwK—under our Personal Help Methods • ti Salesmanship. Particular nit ivquest. THE S. A. MULLIKIN CO. Educational Publishers Marietta. Ohio WHEN IN GREENVILLE Stop at NOKASSA HOTEL All Modern Conveniences BUILT IN 1917 CITY NATIONAL BANK GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 4 ( o On Savings Deposits WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE IN THE PAST. AND WILL MAKE EVERY EFFORT TO HOLD YOUR CONFIDNCE AND PROVE TO YOU THAT OUR STORE IS THE BEST STORE AT WHICH TO BUY ANYTHING IN THE DRUG LINE PALMETTO PHARMACY J. W. HEWELL. Manager KERSHAW GROCERY COMPANY Kershaw, S. C. Incorporated 1905 Wholesale and Retail Grocers "Good Things to Eat" Local and Long Distance Telephone No. 98 W. L. ( ROX'rON, President. W. O. CROXTON, Sec}) and Treasurer. Huvft your olil hIiock iiuuli new while you Wltll. W. B. Stafford’s Shoe Works TELEPHONE SC?t Busbee Southern Furniture of All Kinds Call «o wp UK. Slu l niK alwuy welcome. TELEPHONE 2r.fi Prof. Pass (in History): "You and I. Mr. Brunson, arc just overage men.” Slick J,t: Ye - dr. just COMMON people."The Place to Come for the Proper Things in Dress for Men and Young Men at the Right Prices The styles this year are attractive, vigorous, correct, characterful; they are there with the kick and punch behind them. Full Lines of Hals and Furnishings Always on Hand Come in ancl Inspect Our Slock L. ROTHSCHILD Corner Main Street and McBee Avenue. Greenville, S. C. HUNTER WILSON LUMBER CO. S. L. McBef., President; S. M. Hunter, Vice-President; ROBERT WlLSON, Secretary and Treasurer. Dealers In ROUGH AND DRESSED LUMBER. SHINGLES. LIME, LATHS AND CEMENT, DOORS, SASH AND BLINDS; ALSO PAINTS, OILS AND VARNISHES. Telephone 688 Greenville, S. C. C. D. KENNY CO. Jobbers and Retailers TEAS. COFFEES, SUGARS, RICE. GRITS AND BAKING POWDER Telephone 118 South Main St. Greenville, S. C. L. L. Barr Co. Heating, Plumbing And Piping. Greenville, S. C. COTRKLL-LEONARD Albany, N. Y. Makers and Renters of Caps. Bowes and Hoods Hullctln!). Sample , etc., upon request.Loans, Insurance, Trust Funds WF. WRITE LIFE, FIRE, ACCIDENT AND ALL OTHER LINES OF INSURANCE CITIZENS’ TRUST COMPANY Telephone 1167 A, D. L. BARKSDALE. Secretary. Vice-President and General Manager THE COURIER J. E. SIRRINE PRINTING CO East McBee Avenue MILL ENGINEER AND ARCHITECT Printers Who Please Greenville. S. C. We appreciate all orders for Printing. whether large or small, and and show our appreciation in SERVICE. H. T. STIRLING Dentist Did You Ever Hear of Our Disappointing on Deliver f? Wallace Building Greenville. S. C. Prof. Va«: "IVhat is a hatched light. Mr. Wildes?" Senior IVifycs: "A lightning hag. I guess. Professor."'A Monthly Income Policy Will Pay the Bills When Your Wife Is a Widow A Disability Policy Will Pay Your Bills When You Are Disabled INVESTIGATE OUR INVESTMENT OPTION ATLANTIC LIFE INSURANCE CO. F. W. FELKEL. General Manager. ANDERSON, S. C. Where is the girl n-ilh heart so red Wlio to her lover patriotically said Cut out the candy; it must he fed To our sailors and soldiers in the form of bread The War's On? Ross Plumbing Co. PLUMBING. GAS AND STEAM FITTING Corner Main and Broad Streets Phone 490 R. H. Stewart T. M. Merritt Stewart Merritt Tailor, Clothiers, Furnishers 126 South Main Street Gkeenvu le. S. C. THE SAVOY College Headuartcrs fer Home-Made Candies, Ice Cream and Lunches Telehone 1899 1045 Main StreetGIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, CUT GLASS HALE’S GIFT SHOP No matter how large or how small your purchase may be, you gel value as well as quality). Our Jewelry and Silverware are wrought from the finest metals only, and are so handsomely designed that they cannot help but reflect good taste to the giver. Your Jeweler for 61 Years. Your Jeweler to be 61 Years. W. R. HALE Jeweler, Silversmith and Optometrist 105 N. Main Street. GREENVILLE. S. C. Hale Quality) Stands the Test of Time THE MEN’S SHOP OUTFITTERS FROM HEAD TO FOOT We invite your inspection of our new line of Hats, Shoes, Clothing and Furnishings High-Class Merchandise at Moderate Prices Real Estate and Building Insurance and Bonds William Goldsmith Near New Courthouse Greenville, S. C. BUSY BEE CAFE 113 South Main Street Greenville. S. C. THE "QUICKEST SERVICE .V TOWN' College Boys Welcomed P. F. Cox, Grocer Pendleton Street Greenville, S. C. Soph. IVilliams (presiding at c’ass meeting): "Boys. I have called the class together iri order that Dr. Poteat map give us a lecture." Dr. Poteat: "No, no, hops. I'm not to lecture. Mr. IVilliams is of} his hypotenuse, as Prof. Bowen Would sap.”BELK-KIRKPATRICK CO. Main Street and McBee Avenue Offering Special Merchandise for College Men in the Way of Suits, Extra Trousers, Underwear, Shirts, Collars, Neckwear, Hosiery and Shoes In fact, complete outfits from top to toe, at prices less than same class of goods may be had elsewhere. Strictly one price to all and courteous attention. Visit our store and make yourselves at home. Telephone: Numbers 680 and 737 Patronize the Nokassa Barber Shop On South Main Street One-Half Block South of Postoffice TWELVE CHAIRS —FOUR PRIVATE SHOWER BATHS Old Prices Prevail Throughout Only Best Barbers Employed THE FOURTH NATIONAL BANK Greenville. S. C. The Young Man’s Bank "Connect With a Live One WIN THE WAR May l o easier said than done. I»ut to make everythin : count for the most la one way. Light your work with KD1SOX MAZDA LAMPS. Have your electrical work and appliances Installed by us. This will lie a move in the right direction. GOWER-MASON ELECTRIC CO. 203 West Washington Street GREENVILLE Floral Company Flowers For All Occasions Greenville, S. C. VISIT OTTARAY HOTEL Greenville, S. C. Polite Service and Modern Equipment Your Patronage Solicited M. GASSAWAY, Proprietor .itiiL, 1i.i.1;..1L..Lu,iOLi..I...!,i. i!u.ii..;:Li!U. 4 (Here is the Answer; in | Webster’s New International Every day in your talk amt reading, at home, on the i street car. in the ollico. shop and school you likely question the meaning of some new worth This New : Creation answers all kinds of questions with 'mat authority. More than 400.000 Words. 6C00 Illustrations. 27C0 r.s;:e . Cost $400,000. New Divided Page. India-Paper lull t ion: On thin.onaquo.stronir. sii|xvrior p India |ni|« r. One half tlio thickness and weight of the Itcspdar Edition. Rcoutar Edition: On strong iKHik paper. Weight Ufa I Us. Sizc 1 29$ x P? x 5 iitches. WHITE tor specimen pages of both Editions. G. C. MERRIAM COMPANY, Springfield, Mass. .......£ L. H. STRINGER DRUGGIST Good Line of Stationery and School Supplies Agents for Waterman P'ountain Pens FINE CANDIES West End Drug Store- Pride Patton Tilman FINE SHOES Our Fixed Aim Our aim is to sell you shoes that arc so good and fit so well that your SHOE THOUGHTS will be pleasant and always with us whenever you arc in need of shoes. If you want one hundred cents’ worth of good shoe value for every dollar you invest, here is where you will find it—along with almost limitless variety of styles, sizes, and models, and at a price to please you. PRIDE PATTON TILMAN GREENVILLE. S. C.YOUR SUCCESS Depends Largely Upon Your Training YES, it is true that native ability counts for quite a bit, but unless you have an opportunity to work right along with some one who is an expert in the particular line in which you arc interest, your native ability will not avail much. Our strong forte is the right kind of training for REAL business—the training that gives you the “know how” assurance— and the "job" will then take care of itself. We emphasize this point because some young people, and apparently some business colleges, seem to have an idea that the chief function of a business college is to furnish jobs rather than business training. We deliver "the goods" in both. And we see that the training is such that you can "make good" when you get the chance—and that is the important point. If you want to be a winner instead of a perpetual "job chaser,” you should get your business training with us. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■nsiiDiiii immui un vi n uuviun n n u i» DRAUGHON'S PRACTICAL BUSINESS COLLEGE Phone 723 Parkins Building Greenville, S. C. Prof. Van: "In rvhat light. Mr. Hair, mas this subject of Byzantine art studied?" Senior Hair: "Last night under an incandescent light."KEEP COOL THIS SUMMER BY USING A Robbins Myers Electric Fan SOUTHERN PUBLIC UTILITIES CO. West Washington Street For Good Coffee, Go to Bull's For Good Things to Eal, Go lo Bull's J. A. BULL CO. NEEARD LUMBER CO. Incorporated Lumber, Shingles and Builders’ Supplies Greenville, S. C. Dr. Potcal (in Bible I): "Mr. Jones, n hat is the chief end of man? Pal Jones: "His head." -w® STUDENTS OF FURMAN And Their Friends Are Cordially Invited to Stop at the IMPERIAL HOTEL C. S. JAMES, Proprietor. LAWTON LUMBER COMPANY Incorporated Wholesale Lumber and Red Cedar Shingles Greenville, South Carolina West End Supply Company The Largest Wood and Coal Dealers IN THE CITY Near College Place Phone 61 W.M. BEACH AM, President. W. M. HAGOOD. Vic -President THOU. G. DAVIS. Cashier. W. G. McDAVID. A.« t. Cashier. THE PEOPLES’ NATIONAL BANK Direct or : F. V. POR W. J. THACKSTOX H. BN DEL GEO. T. BAKU V. C. BEACH AM J. M. GRKIt V. M. HAGOOD AI.I.KX J. GRAHAM C. B. EARLE CAPITAL AND SURPLUS A QUARTER MILLION Greenville, S. C.MAULDIN FLORAL COMPANY Perry Ave., Calhoun and Leach Sts. FLOWERS AND PLANTS Corsages and Designs of All Kinds You Arc Looking for the Best Service and the Best Material, See Us. Wc Arc Prepared to Do Your IVorl( Right Smith’s Shoe Works 1 1 7 S. Main St. Phone 499 Greenville. S. C. WF. SELL BOY DEN’S. FARBUSH FLORSHEIM SHOES FOR YOUNG MEN We can save you from 50c to $ 1.00 a pair on your Shoes. Childers Cely Shoe Co. 103 N. Main St. Phone 167 CALL ON JOHN G. PERRY FOR GROCERIES. FRUITS. CAN-DIES. CIGARS. TOBACCO Always Clad to See You Phone 159 College Place EAT AT THE Royal Restaurant TO BE PLEASED The Only Restaurant in Town With Clean and Sanitary Kitchen 1 1 1 West Washington Street Telephone 857 XV. L. GAKSAWA Y. PrcgiUcnt 1.. II. STICINGKR. Vice-President V. D. ICA.USKI K. ’ashler. PALI, imow.xixc. A !. Cashier The American Bank Greenville, S. C. Direct ori : S. 1.. McBuc J. X. Watkins 1i. F. Martin J. 1 . ‘arcy 11. B. Geer C. C. Goml 1.. II. JStrliiKir R. G. Gaines Dr. Davis Furman V. I.. Gnstttway V. 1). Itams.'iir SPORTING GOODS ATHLETIC GOODS Anything for Any Game or Sport A Complete Slock From the Leading Makers at O’Neal Williams Co. 120 West Washington Street Greenville, S. C. VAUGHN MARCY Jewelers 118 South Main Street Reliable Goods Only AGENTS J. P. Stevens Engravinc Co. Atlanta, Ga. Expert Watch Repairing Jewelry and Silver RepairingOREGON LUMBER COMPANY R. K. Faylor, President SELLS Paints Glass Mirrors Everything for Building East Court Street GREENVILLE, S. C. PIEDMONT SHOE COMPANY Good Shoes For Everybody Spring Shoes with the smart and springy step of youth in all their lines arc ready for the man who knows and shows that he knows. Dark. Rich Cordovan, Brown Calf and Kid, Kangaroo and Gun Metal —Everything. ON THE CORNER Where the Big Shoe Hangs Out Get Your Suit Made at U. S. WOOLEN MILLS CO. And Save $10.00 Auk (• .H.-p our CHAI.I.ICNOB BRAND lino: also our SIADB-TO-OUDBR Suits, uncalled for. Sold at Special Bargains W. M. YOUNG, Manager. 218 South Main St. Greenville. S. C. Benson Drug Company “A Good Drug Store” College Headquarters for the Best Drugs. Stationery, Soda Water and Ice Cream. Agent for the Norris and Allcgretti Line Candies Phone. 2510 and 2511 208 North Main St. Greenville. S. C.VIRGINIA C OALS—Steam, Gas, Domestic CLINCHFIELD FUEL COMPANY Spartanburg. South Carolina And 24 Broad Street, New York (Irncral Sale Awnls for ( I.IXMII IKI.H COAL (Oltl'OliATION Til K VIKIilN'IA I.KK COMI'ANV, INI . Ami Ollier Virginia Opera!ion Bunker Coal Supplied at NORFOLK. YlltOIXIA...................Mlm-lilleld Fuel C o., Citizen Hid . (TlAKI.KsTON. SOUTH CAROLINA .... Coii nmrr Coal Company SAVANXAII. OKOKOIA.................................TiijcRert Company OALVKSTOX, TKXAS ... Clinelillrld Fuel ..........American National Kid . Sullivan-Markley Hardware Co. Wholesale and Retail Hardware Full Line of Baseball Supplies, Tennis Goods, Basketball Goods. All Kinds of Uniforms, Guns, Rifles. Anything in Athletic and Sporting Lines. 113 North Main Street GREENVILLE. S. C. ICE CREAM Quality, Price and Service Always the Best Campbell Cream Candy Company South Main Street GREENVILLE. S. C. Gassaway Building. Telephone 132THE NORWOOD NATIONAL BANK Story Motor Sales Co. Greenville, S. C. J. W. Norwood President W. P. Anderson. . .Vice-President C. B. Marlin Cashier J. F. Davenport. .Assistant Cashier Best Machines at the Right Price. “Back of Grand Opera House.” DRINK Mahaffey’s Market COCA-COLA Dealer In Fresh Meats Fish and Oysters in Season BOTTLED IN Greenville, S. C. 121 Coffee Street Greenville, S. C. Good Bread Is the Staff of Life J. A. Cureton Co. Wholesale and Retail BAKERY 215 Augusta St. Greenville. S. C Lipscomb-Russell Co. WHOLESALE GROCERS Distributors for Wesson Cooking Oil, Snowdrift Lard and the Celebrated Gold Bar Brand of California Canned and Dried Fruits. Doster Bros. Drug Co. AGENTS FOR Nunnally's Candy and Cut Flowers Corner Main and W. Washington Seybt Carter Stationery and Office Supplies Greenville, S. C. Greenville Transfer Co. Let Us Haul Your Trunks. Baggage, Etc. Phone 142. W. McBEE Ave. Reynolds Earle DRUGGISTS Good Soda Water and Clgars-Gulh’s Candies Toloplionex CM and r.ct lie Sure to Patronize Our Advertiser:jv alters of % -- ' Hivhost Quality jmftj ' Designs and Plates for College and High School ';s" Annuals ° ° BRANCH 0F7ICES-ATLANTA COLUMBUS- DAVENPORT- DES MOINES MINNEAPOUS■ SO. BENDPLAZA CAFE A mcrican Managernenl For Ladies and Gentlemen Opkn All Night A Clean, High-Scoring Restaurant For Fastidious People 105 South Main Street Greenville, S. C. GREENVILLE STEAM LAUNDRY l or the Best Laundry Work. Especially on Colors Cleaning and Pressing Corner Townes and El fords Sts. Telephone 119 Athletics! At the word you In «lln•'lively think « f SPALDING i, S|ial(linR » have always made their good correctly and •( the highest quality, and hacks them up by a broad guarantee that Insures sat isfni-tlon ami service. CATALOG ON REQUEST A. G. SPALDING BROS. 74 N. Broad St. : Atlanta. Go. There’s a rent Hutchings-Craig Co. WHOLESALE GROCERIES Distributors Of C. H. S. and El Wingo Cigars FRUITS AND PRODUCE Greenville, S. C. CALUMET TEA 6c COFFEE CO. 409-411 W. Huron Si. CHICAGO Importers ot Teas and Coffees Distributers of Brosia Meals THE ARISTON LINE Baking Powder, Flavoring Extracts, Spices, Cocoa, Gelatine Desserts DRINK CHERO COLA 5c There's None So Good Garments Made In Town LOUIS SCHONWETTER Greenville's Leading Tailor V. Washington Street Telephone I NOS A. H. PYRON CO. For the host Tea. Coffee. Sugar. Klee, Grits, and li.-iklng Powder, telephone lTt. S. MAIN STJtKET Greenville. S. C. J. R. JENKINSON b e lii all kinds of Fresh Meat . Fish and Oysters. For the host Sausage tele phono 120. Vou arc always welcome Visit us. 319 SOUTH MAIN STREET J. A. COSTNER’S Wholesale and Retail Dealers In FISH AND OYSTERS AM. KINDS OF SKA FOOD 122 K. Washington St. Telephone 2095 GKKKNVIM.K. S. (’ Thirty-Four College Annuals Benson Printing Company is a printing plant specially equipped for every kind of school and college work. It isa complete organization with artists and designers and workmen whose thought and inspiration is concentrated in the production of College Annuals and School Literature. Each year Annuals ar printed for such Institutions as: Vanderbilt. Tulane, Sewanco. Kentucky State. Mississippi A. M.. Louisiana State University. University of Alabama, Richmond College, Citadel college. Transylvania College, ltrcnau College, Wofford College. Roanoke College. University of Mississippi Furman University. Asbury College, West Hampton College. Ouachita College. Sewanee Military Academy. Peace Institute, Carson Newman College, Meridian College. Mercer Hillman College. Kentucky College for Women. Columbia College. Tennessee College. Branham Hughes School. Carthage High School, eminence High School. Salem High School. Trimble High School. ENSOfJ , PRINTING CO. JVASMVIlLfjj College Annual Experts Samples and Prices Upon Request gnnuBirgsgrcgTHE END


Suggestions in the Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) collection:

Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1915 Edition, Page 1

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1916 Edition, Page 1

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Page 1

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1920 Edition, Page 1

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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