Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC)

 - Class of 1911

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1911 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 192 of the 1911 volume:

THE BONHOMIE AN ARTISTIC CHRONICLER OF The Life at Furman University GREENVILLE, S. C. Volume Eleven PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY THE STUDENTSContents PACE FwrrOf . |_C r • V'O •s . Dedication .................................. Dr. O. O. Fletcher. Sketch................... Response to Dedication....................... Greeting .................................... Main Building, Photo......................... University Calendar ......................... Hoard of Trustees, Ai.umni Association....... Officers of Annual Association............... Group ................................. Editorial Staff........................ Brief History of Furman University........... Alma Mater. Poem ............................ Faculty ..................................... Photos of Faculty...................... Senior Class Poem............................ Roli................................... Photos ................................ Paginal Futurorum ..................... Stars We Hitch Our Wagon to. Statistics Junior Class................................. Roli................................... Groups ................................ History ............................... Sophomore Class ............................. Roli................................... Group ................................. History, Statistics ................... Freshman Class .............................. Roli................................... Group ................................. History. Statistics ................... Doleful Dormitory Days, Poem................. Furman Echo. Historical Sketch............... Managers and Editorial Staff. Photo---- Furman Echo Staff, Roli................ Tiie Sudden Dawn, Short Story................. Literary Societies........................... Adklphian Officers ....................... Group ................................. 4 6 ..... 8 ..... 9 ..... io ..... n ..... 3 ..... 14 ..... '5 ____16-19 ..... 20 ..... 21 ....22-36 ..... 38 ..... 39 ----40-67 ... .68-75 ..... 76 ..... “8 ..... 79 ....80-81 ____83-88 ..... 89 ..... 9° ..... 9 ..... 02 ..... 94 ..... 95 ..... 96 ..... 97 ..... 98 ..... 99 ..... 100 ..... 101 ..102-109 ..... no ..... hi ..... »«7 2Ring on Old Bell, Poem.......................................... 1 Philosophian Officers ................................... 19-120 Group ................................................... I2 Why we Laugh, Jokes............................................ 3° Montague Ham., Photo........................................... I3I Mrs. M. D. Calmes, Portrait.................................... 32 Mrs. Mary E. Barton, Portrait.................................. 133 Y. M. C. A. Officers........................................... 134 Group ................................................I35"I3 History ...............................................137 38 Student Volunteer Band Group and Officers...................... 139 History ................................................. 4° Judson Memorial Baraca Class Group............................. 141 Officers and History..................................... 142 Why We Laugii, Jokes (Continued)............................... 143 Athletics ..................................................... 44 Officers of Association, Ron............................. 45 Group ................................................... 46 Schedule ................................................ 47 Baseball Squad .......................................... 148 Basket Ball Team......................................... 149 Tennis .................................................. 150 Junior-Senior Football Team.............................. 151 Freshman-Sophomore Football Team ......................152-153 Senior Medalists............................................... 154 Glee Club...................................................... 155 Personae ................................................ i$6 Group ................................................... 57 Clubs ......................................................... 158 Judson Cottage........................................... 159 Champion Eaters.......................................... 160 Doctors.................................................. 161 Penmanship ...........................................162-163 Golly Whopper Trust...................................... 164 Comejun ................................................. 165 Midnight Crew ........................................... 166 Lawyers ................................................. 167 Minute Men ............................................. 168 Quarternians ............................................ 169 Samuel Roosevelt Talley a (Our Dusky Duster)................... 170 Advertisements................................................. 172 3With true JFitrman lnyaltit. me hrhiratr this thr rlruruth unliunr nf ehr iHunhnmir In Dr. jFlrtrhrr the man minim mr lime aith mhu Imirs us.•I OKI.IN Ottmax Fi.ktciikkISrsjjmtsr to tlir Dfbiratinu So lour worthily! Cljia is rarlb’s lirat sourrr nf joy. anb it is unfailing. Sr nuly linns mini lours, anb lour groins in tljr Inning. So br worthily lourb! 3t is tlius Srauru lours; anb (Bob giurs Simsrlf to us. £Hy luislj for ttir baby of stubruts mho abbrrss tbr inorlb in this unlumr nf UbC 36onb01HiC is. that all tbr lour tliry giur anb all tljr lour ginru tbrm may brgin in. anb br hallnmrb by. Sim mho is Sour. (Orlin (0. yirtrlicrOrlin Ottman Fletcher ORLIN’ OTTMAX FLETCHER was born in Ontario, Canada, but is of New England descent. Ilis ancestry dates to the Mayflower, and to the earliest settlers of Concord. Mass., and of Hartford. As a young man some time was spent in teaching in Michigan, after which he studied law; then came a renewal of an 4 ld struggle between desire and duty, for the call to preach had been persistent. It was settled by entrance upon the ministry, and Mr. Fletcher was ordained in June. 1876. Mathematics and languages were his favorite subjects while a student, and later, notwithstanding the pressing cares of large pastorates, he found time for philosophical study. Doctor Fletcher received the degrees of A. P.. and 15. D. from Chicago I’Diversity, and A. M. from Colgate I’Diversity. Shurtleflf College. Illinois, conferred the title of 1). I), upon him. He has been honored by election to membership in the American Philological Association, the Society of Biblical Literature and Exegesis, and the Philosophical Society of Great Britain (Victoria Institute). In March, i o8. he entered it|x n his work as Professor of Philosophy and Political Science at Furman (Diversity.Greeting Take me for wliat I am. And read me with open heart: For the thoughts 1 speak are picture Heart pictures of Nature’s own art. Engraved in the innermost self Comedies light as a i oct's lays. nd tear-fraught tragedies deep as life— Til' abiding dreams of student days. SMain L«l'imjixcBoard of Trustees (with expiration of terms of service) Mr. Chari.es A. Smith. President . . . A. G. Furman. Secretary............. 1911 W. F. Cox............................ Dr. J. R. Eari.k.................... J. M. Geer........................... V. C. Miller....................... W. K. Ra»b.......................... 1912 Rev. C. E. Burts, D. D.............. A. G. Furman......................... C. K. Henderson..................... J. J. Lawton......................... Dr. Brooks Rutledge................. 1913 Rev. j. Hartwell Edwards............ H. J. IIaynsworth................... R. Y. Leaveli........................ Rev. L. M. Roper, D. D.............. Charles A. Smith..................... 1914 R. J. Alderman...................... Rev. J. H. Boi.dkidoe, I). D........ Rev. C. A. Jones..................... J. C. Spivey......................... Rev. A. C. Wilkinson. D. D.......... 1915 J. A. Carroi.i....................... Rev. 7. T. Cody. D. D............... T. W. King........................... A. M. Kennedy....................... IT P. McGee......................... Timmonsville. S. ( . Greenville, S. C. Anderson, S. '. Greenville. S. ( '. Greenville. S. ( Greenville. S. ( JVinsboro. S. C. Edgefield, S. C. Greenville, S. ('. Aiken. S. C. Hartsville, S. ('. El ore nee, S. C. Ridge Spring. .S’. C . Greenville, S. C. . Xetvberry. S. C. Spartanburg. S. ('. TinnnonsviUc. .S'. C. . . AI coin, S. C. . Lancaster. S. liennetfsvillc, S. C. . . Conway, S. C. . Abbeville. S. C. . Gaffney, S. C. Greenville. S. C. Dillon, .S'. C. Williston, S. C. Greenville. S. C. ioUniversity Calendar 1911 ()pcning Day of Winter Term..................... Day of Prayer for Colleges...................... Second Installment of College Fees Due.......... ()utline for Senior Essays Due.................. Fast Day on which to Hand in Senior Essays .... Spring Examinations............................. Opening Day of Spring Term...................... Field Day....................................... Final Examinations.............................. Commencement Exercises.......................... Opening Day of Fall Term, 'n-‘l2................ Thanksgiving Day................................ Fall Examinations............................... Christmas Holidays.............................. January 3. February 26 February 15 January 15 February 15 March 24-April 1 April 3 May 26-June 2 June 5-7 September 21 November 24 December 15-23 Dec. 24-Jan. 2 1912 ()pening Day of Winter Term............................. Day of Prayer for Colleges.............................. Second Installment of College Fees Due.................. Outline for Senior Essays Due........................... Fast Day on which to I land in Senior Essays............ Spring Examinations..................................... ()pening Day of Spring Term............................. Field Day............................................... Final Examinations...................................... Commencement Exercises.................................. January 3. February 26 February 15 January 15 February 15 March 24-April 1 April 3 May 26-June 2 June 5-7 11The Bonhomie Officers of the Annual Association M. S. Fender . . . P. M. Haii.es . . . K. C. Simpson . . ...............President . . . ice-f resident Secretary and Treasurer Managers of the Bonhomie |. K. Hzku...........................................................Business Manage ' J. K. Barber..............................................Circulating Manager A. B. M a RETT............................................Advertising Manager Editorial Staff 13. C. Givens.................................................Editor-in-chief E. M. Pot EAT, Jr................................................Art Editor F. S. Jones......................................................Art Editor I. E. Bridges............................................Senior Class Editor G. S. Si.oan............................................Senior Class Editor C. D. Boyd...............................................Junior Class Editor E. M. Hicks..............................................Junior Class Editor G. Y. Cox............................................Sophomore Class Editor R. G. Lee.............................................Sophomore Class Editor T. C. Lancaster........................................freshman Class Editor IT. F. STEEDI.EY.......................................freshman Class Editor 13Officers oi? Annum. Association and Managers of RoxiiomieKditokiai. Stait ok UonhomikA Brief History of Furman University THE record of Furman University is that of struggle, sacrifice and triumph. In exulting over the splendid triumphs one may he inclined to forget the strenuous struggles and silent sacrifices that have placed Furman where siie now stands. Then patiently attend, kind reader, while we present the paramount events transpiring, which have developed stage by stage the grand old institution which we all love to call Furman University. Twenty-five years before the writing of the Declaration of American Independence there was a man named Oliver Hart, who went from place to place speaking and working for the Baptist school in South Carolina. After his earthly career was ended, the agitation for an educated ministry was taken up by I)r. Richard Furman, who migrated with his parents from New York. Doctor Furman will ever be remembered as the first president of the Triennial Convention of Baptists, the founder of Mercer University of Georgia, and Hamilton University of New York. For a number of years this faithful, devout man pleaded and worked for a Baptist institution of learning in South Carolina, but he did not live to see its real inception. I fowever, the dreams and plans of this earnest worker passed into the hearts of others, who in the year 1S27 founded at the old Edge-field courthouse the institution that has ever borne his name—Furman Academy and Theological Institute. The Academy began its eventful course with only one man at its helm, 'file future looked dark and gloomy, and for two long years the institution lingered on the verge of disbandment. At this impending crisis it was suggested by Basil Manly. Sr., then the influential young pastor of the Edgefield Baptist Church, that the Academy be moved to a place not far from the Savannah River, 'flic convention. believing that they could secure the co-operation of the Georgia Baptists, accordingly removed the school to a location near the Georgia line. The results were not so good as exjK-cted and in 1830 the convention decided to take the institution to the I ligh 11 ills of the Santee. Here with discouragement on all sides lames Hartwell and Samuel Furman freely opened the treasury of their minds to a few thirsty young men who had been given scholarships at the institution. For four years these generous-hearted instructors toiled and strived in order to keep the door of the Academy open. But the scheme of the scholarships proved futile, and in 1835 the doors were closed and the students sorrowfully made their way toward home. As a partial result of this failure there was a cessation for about two years. Then on a bleak morning in January. 1837. it was whispered half timidly, half hopefully, around in the towns of innsborough that l’rof. Y. E. Bailey would open at that place on the first Monday in February a Manual Labor Classical 16School. The morning arrived and with it were brought back, to the hearts of many, the brightest hopes of former days. But just as the sun of their fondest hopes was scattering the last drifting mist from their hearts a cloud suddenly rose and hovered heavily above them. In May the academic building was burned. In the following year, however. Dr. Y. Hooper, of North Carolina, was chosen president of the Theological Department, and thus the work of educating the ministry was continued even through days of gloom and discouragement. And in those dark days of struggle were instilled in the hearts of many noble young men thoughts and ideas that have blessed South Carolina in after years. In the year 1S40 Doctor Hooper was succeeded in the presidency by Dr. J. I,. Reynolds, and in the course of four years he was in turn succeeded by Dr. J. C'. Furman. This eminent teacher had as his co-workers Rev. J. S. Mims. Professor of Systematic Theology, and Rev. Peter C. Edwards. Professor of Hebrew and Biblical Exegesis. I'nder their skillful guidance the institution began to nourish in a more marked degree. Indeed, after a few years an invitation was sent from Greenville asking that the school be moved into her borders. The news of this soon spread to all quarters of the State, and the enlargement of the institution and removal to Greenville was a general topic in Baptist circles. To bring the proposed change to a reality. Doctor Furman, in 1840. was successful in securing $70,000 for Furman I’niversity with the understanding that it be located at Greenville. Three years later the proposed change was effected, and again, under the leadership of Dr. I. C. Furman, the doors of Furman Academy and Theological Seminary were opened, and about sixty students found their way into her sacred rooms. Twelve months more witnessed the birth of the “Standard College of Liberal Arts." This year also marks the arrival on the campus of an eminent man and teacher. Dr. Charles Hallette Judson. After the death of Professor Mims in 1855. James P. Boyce assumed charge of the Theological Department of the I’niversitv. He had as his worthy associates in the Seminary John A. Broadus. Basil Manly, and W illiam Williams. This famous quartet did much in promoting the cause of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. The I’niversity continued in a prosperous conditon for a few years. The dawn was bright and hopeful. But soon the trumpet blast was heard in the distance and the clouds of coming conflict began to gather. The strife was evident, and on its shadowy eve two hundred and sixty young men who had gathered within Furman’s peaceful walls to sit at the feet of such gifted men as Judson. Eurman. Boyce. Williams, and Manly, laid aside their books and in response to the clarion call of their beloved State matched forth to war. After four years of martial conflict the drooping flag of the annihilated Confederacy was furled, and the weary, half-starved, half-clothed, broken-hearted Confederates returned to their devasted Southland. But the ruins themselves 1 seemed to breathe into the hearts of the weary soldiers a new hope, and truly did they show a heroism which was equal to that shown so many times on the battle plains. Once more the eyes of the Baptists of South Carolina were turned toward Furman. But nothing could now be seen save the Main Building standing in grey outline on a lonely campus of about fifty acres. What could be done? During an interval1 of four years several attempts to answer this question were made. But it was not till 1869 that the school was permanently on sure ground. Under the presidency of Doctor Furman, who continued to serve in this capacity till 1881, the school, year after year, breathed more freely. In the year 1881 Dr. Charles Manly assumed control and directed operations wisely and well until his resignation in 1897. During his administration the financial agent. R. H. Griffith, was successful in raising a considerable endowment fund. Xew buildings also were erected on the campus, among which were Judson Cottage, erected by the Baptist ladies of South Carolina at a cost of $2,800. and Griffith Hall at a similar cost. At the termination of Doctor Manly's incumbency. Dr. A. I . Montague was chosen president. The administration of this brilliant man was one of great undertaking and accomplishment. During the first year that he was officially connected with the University, two modern and much-needed buildings were erected on the campus—Montague I fall (the dormitory), at a cost of $12,000. and Judson-Alumni Hall (the auditorium), costing $22,000. Dr. Edwin M. Potcat, the present President, succeeded Doctor Montague in 1903. In this year, through the untiring efforts of the financial agent. Rev. Joel I. Allen, subscriptions amounting to $125,000 were secured for Furman's endowment. Of this amount $21,000 was given by that “grand old man.” who gave his time, talent and fortune to the institution which was so dear to him— Dr. C. II. Judson. In March, two years later. Mr. ndrew Carnegie proposed to donate $15,000 for a Library Building, provided that a like sum be raised as an endowment for the Library, 'file condition was met bv the generous response of Doctor Judson, who created the Chas. 11. Judson Endowment Fund for the Library. On January 12. 1907. in his eighty-seventh year. Doctor Judson passed over the River into the Great Beyond. He had been connected with the University for fifty-six years, during which time he served as Professor. Treasurer. Acting President, and Dean. In recognition of bis eminence as a mathematician and teacher, a short lime before his death he was granted a pension of one thousand dollars per annum by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Doctor Judson. in his last will and testament, made the Library Endowment Fund residuary legatee of bis estate, and it is expected that several thousand dollars will in this way be added to the fund. 18During the session 1906-1907 the Library Building was erected at a cost of $23,000, Mr. Carnegie having added $4,000 to his original gift and other friends of the institution contributing a like sum. In the autumn of 1906 the General Education Hoard of New York proposed to contribute $25,000 towards the erection of a Science Hall at Furman, provided that South Carolina Baptists would, by January 1, 1910. contribute $25,000 for the same purpose, and also add $25,000 to the permanent Endowment Fund of the institution, making a total endowment of $200,000. A few months later, at the Baptist State Convention in Spartanburg, the pro]x sition of the General Education Board was accepted with enthusiasm. Rev. E. P. Easterling and (). I,. String-field were employed as financial agents to secure subscriptions to cover the necessary amount. In the meantime,- Mr. Andrew Carnegie donated $25,000 to materially assist in erecting the Science Hall. However, at the Slate Baptist Convention held in Anderson, in December, 1909, it was made known that the great undertaking of 1906 would fail if $14,000 could not be raised before the first day of January. This would mean the loss of the conditional sum promised by the General Education Board of Xew York, and also the conditional donation from Mr. Carnegie. But a concerted campaign was at once begun and before the midnight bells announced to the sleeping world the birth of the Xew Year, the victory was won. and the cherished dreams of South Carolina Baptists were coming to pass. The victory assumes the immediate erection of the James C. Furman Hall of Science, which has been needed many years. The building, which will cost $50,000, of which $15,000 will be expended for furniture and apparatus, will be composed of apartments for classes in psychology, chemistry, physics and biology, and physical laboratories. It will also contain the museum of Natural History. It is gratifying to know that the contractors expect to complete this beautiful struction about the first of May, 1911. When the Science Hall shall have been erected and the proposed improvements on the other buildings shall have been made, Furman University will rank along with the foremost colleges of the Southland not only in modern equipment, but also in educational standard. May the glorious day soon dawn when the priceless influence of this grand Republic of Letters shall be felt throughout the nations of the world! J. W. Huff. 19Alma Mater Tune: “Creation.'' by Haydn 'flic Mountain City is here home. A mountain river laves her feet. But from far coasts her children come. And crown her broxv with dowers sweet: And ‘neath her shade they rest secure. And drink from wisdom s fountains pure. And rally, loyal sons and true. Round our dear Alma Mater. A ship of royal make is she. And brings her treasure from afar. Her truth it is that makes us free And gleams her beacon like a star. Twas Furman's hand that laid her keel. And Judson set her ribs of steel: The Fathers, prayerful for our weal. Launched our dear Alma Mater. A mother gentle, fair and wise. And grave with weight of storied lore. She greets us with love's patient eyes. And chains our hearts for evermore. )ld Furman! grateful sons are we. ()ur love, our lives we give to thee; We'll keep faith's vow to serve hut thee. ( )ur own dear Alma Mater. 20Faculty Edwin McNeil Poteat. 1). D.. IJ„. D.. President ami Professor of Biblical Literature ami Christian lit hies Harvey Toi.ivkr Cook, M. A., Litt. D.. Professor of Greek VVii.i.iam Fra.nki.in Watson Professor of Chemistry and Biology Marshall Delph Eaki.k, M. A., Professor of Mathematics Bkxxkttk Eugene ('.KICK. M. A., Professor of English Sipxky Ernest Bradshaw, M. A.. Ph. D., Professor of Modern Languages Coi.umimjs Ben Martin, M. A.. Professor of I .at in 1-IiDKx Toy Cox. B. A.. Professor of Astronomy ami Assistant Professor of Mathematics Ori.in Ottmax Fletcher. M. A.. D. D., Professor of Philosophy and Political Science Wii.i.iam IIarvkx Vann. M. A.. Instructor in English Gkouck Alexander Buist. M. S.. Professor of Physics James Lki.axd Vass. M. A., Assistant Instructor in Latin and German George Smith Bryan. B. A.. Headmaster, and Instructor in Mathematics Ai.i.ison Wii.i.iam Honeycutt, B. A., Treasurer, and Instructor in English James Lki.axd Vass. M. A.. Secretary, ami Instructor in Latin W. 1). Workman, Commandant, and Instructor in History and Ch ics 21Edwin M. Potkat, D. D., I.I.. I)., President, and Professor of Biblical Literature and Christian EthicsHarvey Toliver Cook. M. A.. Lrrr. D.. Professor of Creek [.angunge and LiteratureWilliam Franklin Watson. M. A.. Professor of Chemistry, Biology and GeologyMarsham. Dhi.imi Earls. M. A., M. M. P.. Professor of MathematicsISknnivTTK EugenK Geer, M. A., M. M. 1 . Professor of English Language and LiteratureSidney Ernest Bradshaw, M. A., Pii. I)., Professor of Modern LanguagesCoi.UMiiUS 1 kn Maktix. M. A.. Professor of Latin— Hidkx Toy Cox. P . A.. Professor of Astronomy ami Assistant Professor of MathematicsOrmn Ottman Fj.ktcjiku, M. A.. D. 1).. Professor of Philosophy and Political ScienceOiSOKCii A. I rist. M. A.. Professor of PhysicsWii.i.iam Marvkv ANN, M. A., Assistant Professor of EnglishJamks Lki.and Vass. M. A.. Assistant Professor of Latin, and Instructor in Latin and Creek. Furman Fitting SchoolAl.J.ISON 11.1,1AM IJoNKVCUTT, 1 . A.. Instructor in linglisli. I'urnum rilling SchoolGeorge S. Bryan. 1 . A., cad master and Instructor in Mathematics. Furman Fitting, SchoolW. D. Workman. Commandant, and Instructor in History and CivicsSenior Class Poem Our college days are ending, and we feel The deeper meaning of that love we bear To our Nurturing Mother. As with steel Bonds all our hearts were held within her care: Associations sweet and memories dear! And now to leave behind, to break, to part. Within the soul’s recess distills a tear. Burning the soul into an helpless start. And bringing sad a nameless longing to the heart. Life's thousand doors arc open, and we stand L'pon the many thresholds to decide Which way is ours. The gentle, firm command Of college rule has ceased, and we abide 'l he masters of ourselves, choice undenied. But guided by the truth the Mother taught. Sweet truth that lingers in our hearts to bide. The guardian of our every deed and thought In that career to which the Mother's teaching sought. Soon we arc lost in the world's broad field of life, Our ranks all broken, scattered here and there To be in all the world’s increasing strife. As on she marches to make herself more fair. Some will in foreign fields the burden share, Remote in hostile climes where light and sun Shines on eternal night; other will bear Their part in other spheres; still others run Their course apart—all with one motto: Duty done Thus with one purpose life’s work we begin. Prepared in heart and hand to do the best. Each in his sphere to brave the fight and win. Thine image, Alma Mater, strong imprest L’pon our hearts keeps warm within each breast Those nobler hopes and aims thyself instilled. Thou art in sooth the Nurturing Mother blest: And all our utmost self rcpletely filled With warmest love for thee stands ever loyal thrilled.Senior Class Mol to—Plus Ultra Colors—Old Gold and Leaf Green Pass Word—Xil Separabit OFFICERS II. S. Brockman . . . . J. A. Smith........... L. Y. Langston . I. E. Briix'.ks . W. Huff W. Y. I 11 SCO Mi: ...........................President ...............I 'ice-President ............... Treasurer . . . . Secretary Poel and Prophet Historian Proverb—A good professor regardeth the life of his class, but the mercies of the wicked are cruel MEMBERS REMBERT XUMA ALLEX JOIIX EDWIX BARBER JAMES WENDELL BARBER A. I). L. BARKSDALE FRAXK BOYCE BOATW RIGHT IRA ERNEST BRIDGES HOMER SAX FORD BROCKMAX CHARLES EDW'ARI) BYRl) ANDREW BOYCE CARSON EDW ARD LEE COLLIXS JAMES CLARKSON" DERI EL X I-IEXRY TilADDEl'S DUCKETT GROVER CLEVELAND EPPS MARK X SIMMS FENDER BURNETT CAWO )D GIYEXS FRED GEXTRY HARRIS DOX LEROY HILL JOIIX VASIIIXGTOX HUFF LARUE VYERTS LAXGSTOX W ILLIAM CLEAX ER LAXGSTOX W ILLIAM WARREN LIPSCOMB EUGENE WATSON MILFORD W:ALTER FURMAN MOBLEY C. E. PETTIT JESSE FURMAN PITTMAN SAM ORR PRUITT GEORGE SEABORN SLOAN JOSEPH ALLEX SMITH EZEKIEL RANSOM STEGALL JAMES FRANKLIN WHATLEY ISHAM DE X WINGO 39REM BERT Xl'MA ALLEN "Wisdom is tile conqueror of fortune ' Horn on the farm near Latla, S. C.. March 30. 1891. At six years of age lie attended school first at Temperance Mill Academy, obtaining thereat the elementary roots of wisdom. Life on the farm was noted for its tendency to make mud pies and to eat green apples and for dislike of work. At the tender age of nine years he moved to the town of Latta. S. C.. because lie had conquered old fields of wisdom and sighed for new. He found the new field at Latta High School, where he first assimilated the wholesome lesson that he didn’t know it all. However. after a number of adventures with the professors and with Cupid, he conquered those fields and graduated in May. 1907. Sighing again for new fields to conquer, he entered Kurman in the Fall of 1907. Only after entering college has lie come to see the beauties of life on the farm. Member of the Adelphia I.itcrarv Society: member of the Y. M. C. A.: on Honor Roll. ’07-08. '08-'09: inemtHT Judson Memorial liaraca C lass, ’09-'u ; Treasurer Adelphian Society, Spring term. ro-'i 1. 40JOHN KDW1X BARBER “flout su-eet III ' tuneful bell's responsive peal ’ I Ic entered upon his double existence near Fort Mill, which is located somewhere in York County. South Carolina, on the 17th of December, 1888. It is said that he has spent but twenty-two months of his life in a school house. He ascribes his early education to his mother. After his short school life he entered the University of Hard Knocks, where he remained for three and a half years, all the while preparing himself to enter Furman. Since entering Furman he has thought philosophically and entwined himself lovingly about the hell rope. B. A. Entered Sept.. '07: member Philosophian Literary Society. 'o7-’ii; member Y. M. C. A., ‘07-11; member Jnelson Baraca Class. o7- ii: member of Mission Study Class. '08-09: Secretary Mission Study Class. '08-09: Historian Junior Class, 'op-'io; Historian Gamma Section, P. L. S.. Spring Term, 'op-'to: Class Editor Bonhomie, 1910: Baccalaureate Usher, 'to: Official Bell Ringer, '09-'n : President Penmanship Club, ’to-'ii: member Intersociety Relations Committee. Spring term, 'io-'ii: Cor. Greenville Daily News, 'to-'ii: Circulating Mgr. Bonhomie. ‘11: Rcc. Sec. Gamma Section P. L. S.. Fall Term, 'io-’ii: Chairman Program Committee Gamma Section P. I.. S.. Pall Term. ’10-T1; Junior Critic Gamma Section P. L. S.. Spring Term, 'io-'ii; Contributcr to Furman Echo. 'o -'n; Editor Alumni Department Furman Echo. Fall Term, 'io-'ii: Exchange Editor F »- —•» Echo, Spring Term, 'to-’it; Honor Roll Chapel Attendance. 'oS-'it. 41J- w. DARKER ‘ A mighty pain to low it is And tis a pain that pain to miss: nut of oil pains, the greatest pain is to love, hut love in tain.’' ISorn in 188S, J. . Darbcr began the arduous pursuit of knowledge at the hort Mill Academy. Having completed his course at this school, he then entered Furman University where, notwithstanding his love troubles and his zealous study of missions, he has found time to delve into the depths of metaphysics. Member Philosophian Literary Society; Treasurer, Fall Term. 'io-'n; Chaplain, Spring term, 'io-'ii; member of Personal Worker's Committee of Y. M. C. A.. ’08 and ’09; member of Devotional Committee. V. M. C. A.. '10; Represented V. M. C. A. at Sixth Annual Interstate Convention at Charlotte, 09, Annual Bible Conference at Wofford, '09, and Southern Student’s Conference at Montreal, 10: Leader of . M. C. A. Mission Study Classes. ’oS-’oo and ’o9-’io; charter member of Volunteer Band. Corresponding secretary of same, ho; Represented Volunteer Band at Annual State baptist Convention at Laurens, 'to; Furman Correspondent for Greenville News, 08-09 and 09- to. member of Doctors Club, 'it. 4;:FRANK BOYCE BOATWRIGHT “.I proper man, as one shall see in a summer's day.' Iioaty' claims the honor of having been born in the thriving (?) city of Ridge Springs, S. C., on November 20. 1889. lie received his early education in the Ridge Springs graded school. He entered Furman in the Fall of 1906 and since then has been a regular patron of the W est End Drug Store. He is especially fond of mathematics and the opjjositc sex. Member of Adelphian Literary Society; member of Y. M. C. A.; member of Judson Memorial Baraca Class. IRA ERNEST I BRIDGES If is mind his kingdom, and his will his law.” This young man was born at Forest City, X. C. December 16, 1889. Ilis educational career has lieen varied and extensive. He has attended the graded schools of Shelby. X. C., Spartanburg, S. C.. and Greenville, S. C. He finally settled on Furman, however, and began his college career in 1907. In college lie has been noted for sturdy devotion to what he deems the best and a deep-set horror of sham. Freshman Editor on the Annual Staff. ’08: Junior Censor Adclphian Society, ’08; Corresponding Secretary Adclphian Society, '00; Associate Editor Echo, 09; Debater at the Public Meeting Adelphian Society, '09: Intcrsocicty Debater. '10; Secretary Senior Class, ’ll; Senior Critic Adclphian Society, hi; Speaker in Preliininan Oratorical Contest in Adelphian Society, ’to; Speaker in Preliminary Oratorical Contest in Adclphian Society. ii; Intersociety Debater. ’11: Senior Class Editor of the Annual, ’11; Placed on Honor Roll of Adelphian Society, ’09; President of the Adelphian Literary Society, ho. -11HOMER SAX FORD BROCKM AN "Hr, while his companions slept, was toiling upward in the night." “Brock first began to make himself known at Reedsvillc, S. C., on that patriotic occasion, July 4, 1887. lie first went to a small country school near Greer, S. C. In the session of 1906-07 he attended Charleston College. Aweary of his efforts, he returned home and rested a year, entering the Sophomore Class at Furman in the session of 1908-09. "Brock" has made himself dear to his classmates, and this year is their president. Member Phitosophian Society: Junior Critic Gamma Section I’, 1,. S.. Fall Term, fo9-’io; Senior Censor. Spring Term, Vxj-’to: Senior Critic, Fall Term, ’to-’ii: President Spring Term, ’io-'ii; Corresponding Secretary V. M. C. A.. 08-'09; Vice-President Section A, Fall Term, Jtulson Memorial Baraca Class, 'lo-’u; Secretary Section A. Fall Term, 'oq-’io; Charter Member Doctors Club; Editor Doctors Club, ’10-'i t: Left Tackle Soph.-Junior Football team, ’08-'09; Fullback Junior-Senior team. ’09-’10; Monitor Senior Class, ‘to-’ii; President Senior Class, 'to-’ii. 45CHARLES EDWARD RYRD “The sweetest of all dr corns to me With nothing to bother nor mar. Is just to sit in the shade of a tree Smoking an endless cigar." “Mike" first began his eventful career at Hartsville, S. C., on November 14, 1S90. "Michelas” began bis educational hardships at a small country school. From there lie entered the primary department of the Welsh N'ech high school. Thence he went to Clemson. where lie made his exit on April 1. 1908. He entered Furman as a Sophomore. Here he has been an all round good fellow and a runt. He humbly begs that the world mislike him not for his complexion. 4bA. ! • CARSON “Whatever sceptic could inquire for. For every why he had a wherefore." Boyce has the honor of being born near the city of Saluda, S. C., on March 27. 1889. 11 is early days were spent on the dear old farm and even now he loves to narrate events which occurred in those pleasant days. During his life, prior to entering college, he had several occupations, such as farming, mechanics, and merchandise. He is said to have attended several schools, but as the places where these schools are cannot be located on the map. we will not attempt to name them. Vice-President Freshman Class. ’o7-’o8: number Frcsh.-Soph. Football team: member Fresh. Baseball team: Speaker Wharton Oratorical Contest: member Adelpltian Literary Society; member Tennis Club. oS-'op: member Soph.-Junior Football team. ’oS-’og: mcml cr Soph. Baseball team: member Santee Canoe Club; member Tennis Club, 'oq-'io: meml cr of Bunker’s Quartette: member Junior-Senior 1'ootball team. '09-'10; member Junior Basebal. team: Assistant Business Manager Furman Fclio; Junior Critic Adclpbian Society: member Junior-Senior Football team, 'to '11; Business Manager Ivcho: Manager Senior Baseball team; member Tennis Club: manlier Quartcrnian Club: Leader Mission Study Class; mcinl cr V. M. C. A.: member Judsou Memorial Baraca Class. 17EDWARD LEE COLLIN’S '7 don’t know, Professor.” Collins was born October 17, 1883. n Spartanburg County. For many years he was a student of the public schools near his home. His rare determination is shown by his continued efforts to reach the realms of understanding and hold within his grasp a diploma. However, he could not attain sufficient speed in answering questions and hence did not finish his primary education until 1907, in which year he entered Furman University. Member Philosophian Literary Society; Chaplain. I'all Term, oo-'io: Chaplain, Fall Term. Sigma Section, ’io-'ii. 48HENRY TH AD DELS DUCKETT “Beauty is only skin deep." Henry Tadpole Duckett. Alias “Billiken," discovered America at Greenwood, S. C., January 18, 1891. He has attended the Graded Schools of Greenwood. S. C.. and Crcsco, la. I le has quite an enviable athletic record at Furman, having been active in baseball, football, and tennis. ITc is. nevertheless, quite a ladies’ man. Ilis operations and campaigns around G. F. C. and Chicora have been numerous and although often going down in defeat, he has always returned valiantly to the fight. Member Philosophiau Literary Society: V. M. C. A.; Fresh.-Soph. Football team. '08-'09; Junior Football team. '10: Fresh. Baseball team. ’08: Soph. Baseball team, ’09: Junior Baseball team, ho; Senior Baseball team, hi: Varsity Baseball team. ’08. ’09. ho: Tennis Club. ho. 49JAMES CLARK SOX DERIEUX "Much learn in}; doth wake thee wad." “Jim” was born in Spartanburg, S. C , on December 13. 1801. Since that time he lias led a wanderer’s life. I le first attended the Spartanburg graded schools and later fitted himself for college at Richmond Academy and Suffolk I'niversitv School. Ilis present residence is in Greenville. He is a thinker on abstruse subjects, lie is a deep and fond lover of nature. Ilis ideal is the simple life.GROVER CLEVELAND EPPS “He never yet no vileynye nc sayde. In n! his lyf. unto no in oner tvighl; He was a verray par fit. gen til knyght." Epps was bom near the historical town of Fort .Mill. S. C., on February 4. 1885. Fort Mill is thrice blessed, it claims the P.arber twins as well as this consummation of good traits, lie first drank from the Pierian Spring at Gold Hill Academy and Pee Dee Institute. His life at Furman lias been a shining example of Christian Endeavor and conscientious work in all good causes. Epps is a hard student and earnest Christian. What more can we demand? Member Philosophian Litcrarv Society; Chaplain, Fall Term. ’oK; Treasurer. Spring Term, ’09: Senior Censor. Spring Term, ‘10: Recording Secretary. Fall form. '10; member of Glee Club three years; Right Halfback Fresh.-Soph. Football team. ’07; Treasurer Class ’08; Vice-President Baraca Class. '09: President Volunteer Band. ’10; President Class 09; President Student Body, ’to-’ii; President Voting Men’s Christian Association, to-’n. -1MARION SIMMS FENDER "Discreet he teas, and of great reverence Bamberg, S. C., was made glad by the birth of Simms Fender on June 21, 1890. Simms showed such a fondness for country schools that he attended them until 1906. Becoming tired of country life and longing for the opportunities of city culture, lie moved to Bamberg and entered Carlyle Fitting School, remaining there until prepared to enter Furman University. Member Philosophian Society; Vice-President Sigma Section. Spring Term, ’io-’ii ; Serjeant-at-arms, Fall Term. ’08-09: Assistant Conductor. Fall Term, ’oq-'io; Historian, Spring Term. ‘oq-‘io; Recording Secretary. Fall Term, 'io-'ii: Chairman Program Committee, Fall Term, ’io-’ii; member Executive Committee. Spring Term, ’io-’ii; Member Program Committee. Spring Term, 'io-’n; member Class Baseball team. 'oy-’oS. ’o8-’oQ, ’o9-’io. and ’io-’ii; President Section A Judson Memorial Baraea Class, Fall Term, ’io-’ii; President Annual Association, ’io-’n. 52B. C. GIVENS "Work first, and then rest” Was bom in the fair land of Tennessee in the midst of the mountains thereof. Here he spent the early days of his existence in going to school, raising corn on the fruitful bottom lands and puddling in the French Broad River, near which he lived. In the year 1898, being probably frightened by the outbreak of the Spanish-Amcrican War. he moved to Fountain Inn. S. C. Here he finished the graded and high schools respectfully and entered the Sophomore class of 1908-09. President of Philosophian Literary Society (Gamma Section), Fall Term, ’io-’n; President South Carolina Intercollegiate Oratorical Association, 'io-’ii: President Judson Memorial Baraca Class (Section B). Fall Term, ’io-'ii : Historian Philosophian Literary Society, ’09-’io; Junior Censor Philosophian Society (Gamma Section). Spring Term, 'oo-’io; Corresponding Secretary Philosophian Literary Society (Gamma Section), Spring Term, ’oq-’io: Honor Roll. ’oS-’io; Chapel Honor Roll. oS-'io; Recording Secretary Gamma Section Philosophian Society .Spring Term, ’io-’ii; Participant in Annual Public Debate, ’o9-’io; Secretary Intersociety Relations Committee, oo-'to; Presented Diplomas to Graduating Philo-sophians. 'o9-’io; Alternate in Oratorical Contest, ’09- 10; Contestant in Oratorical Contest, ’io-’ii; Intercollegiate Editor of Furman Echo, 'og-'io: Literary Editor Echo, ’io-’ii: Presiding Officer at Annual Public Debate, ’io-’ii; Editor-in-Chief of the Bonhomie, 'io-’ii. 53FRED GENTRY HARRIS “Whatever is worth doing at all is worth doing well.' Harris was born near Spartanburg. S. C . during the year 1890. His love of knowledge was first demonstrated while attending Spartanburg graded school and Fair Forest high school. In 1907 he decided to enter Charleston College, which lie did. However, he did not like the city hv the sea. so he did not remain there but entered Furman I niversity. His popularity is proved by his many nicknames, the most prominent of which is “Si.” “Si" is a veritable joke teller, especially in l)r. Cook's class room, lie very frequently indulges in ethical and philosophical conversations which would take a l.L. D. to unravel. Editorial Staff Echo, 00-10. ’io-'ii: President Sigma Section Philosophian bitcrary Society, Spring Term. io-‘u; Vice-President. Sigma Section. Plulosophian Society, rail Term, 'io-’i 1. 54DOX LEROY HILL “And he teas not fat. undertake.’’ Mighty in intellect is this man. who was horn at Cartersville, Florence County. S. C, in 1881. Just to prove that even the starry constellations honored his birth, a comet fell during the year prior to and after his birth. Many years of his early life were spent in attendance at Brires Creek Academy, X. C. When he left home, he railroaded for a number of years. Later he decided to enter the ministry and entered Furman University. Member Philosophian Literary Society; President Sophomore Class; Vice-President Ministerial Maud; President Ministerial Hand; Corresponding Secretary Philosophian Society, Fall Term, 09 ’10; Junior Critic Philosophian Society. Spring Term, ’io; Vice-President Philosophian Society Inuh Fall and Spring 'Perms, 'lo-’it. a aJOHN WASHINGTON HUFF “ ’ »!« «• himself to sing And build the lofty rhyme” Huff was born in ante diem XII Kalendas Octobres Anno Domini millesimo octingentcssimo octogesimo sexto at Locust. S. C. At five he entered the village school. But he never allowed his work to interfere with his social engagements, such as swapping knives, pulling hair, writing ditties about his teacher's mustache, ct cetera, et cetera. He finished the village school with second honors, there being only two in his class. Member Philosophian I.itcrarv Society: Winner Echo Medal. oS-'cv): Treasurer Jitdson Memorial Baraca Class, Kail Term: Literary Editor Echo. Kail Term, ’oo ho; Exchange Editor Kurman Echo, Spring 'Perm. ‘09 ‘to; Class Editor Bonhomie: Historian Philosophian Society, Fall Term; Junior Critic Philosophian Society, Spring Term: Member Program Committee Philosophian Society. Spring 'Perm: College Correspondent Columbia State, 09-ho; Editor-in-Chief Furman Echo, ho-h 1: Senior Critic Philosophian Society, Kail Term; Member Program Committee. P. L. S.. Pall Term; Kditor-in-Chicf Furman Echo, Spring Term; Recording Secretary Philosophian Society: Leader Mission Study Class; Class Poet and Prophet; Member Dark Corner Crew; College Correspondent Columbia State, Chester Reporter, Greenwood Index. Union Times, and Sumter Herald, ho-'ii. 56WILLIAM CLEAVER LANGSTON "Sharply the troubadour Touched his guitar ” “Cleve" was born in Newberry County, South Carolina, on January 3. 1890. At the age of seven lie entered the primary department of the public schools at Pacolet, S. C., where his people then lived. Upon the removal of the family to Greenville, in 1898, lie entered the second grade of Oaklawn school of that place. After completing the seven years' course there he entered the Central high school, where he remained one year. In 1905 lie entered the first class of Furman Fitting school, but remained there only part of the year, on account of his parents removing to Southern Georgia. The following year he entered McPhaul Institute of Sylveston, Ga. In 1907 he entered the Freshman class of Furman. Member Philosophian Society; Standard Bearer. Sigma Section. Spring Term. ’09; Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms Sigma Section. Fall Term, ’09: Corresopnding Secretary. Spring Term, ’io; Senior Censor. Fall Term, ’to: Memlier Intersociety Committee, ’to-’ti; Meml cr Fresh.-Soph. Football team. '07-'08. and Soph.-Junior. oS-oq: Right Fielder Class Baseball team. ’09; Left Fielder, 'to: Short Stop. '11: Lett Fielder Varsity Baseball team, ’io-'ii; President Athletic Association, 'io-’ti: Secretary Section A Judson Memorial Baraca Class. Fall Term, ho: President Doctors Club. 57LARI'E WERTS LANGSTON ‘'Thou lilllr thinkcst what a little foolery governs the world." 'Phis man was born June 14, 1888, at Newberry. S. C., but “full many a gem of purest ray serene, the dark unfathomed caves of ocean bear." “Hud" has attended schools of all kinds and all over the country. Member Adelphian Literary Society; Winner of Improvement Medal, ’07-’08; Center on Fresh.-Soph. Football team, ’07-'08; Center Fielder Class Baseball team. ’o7-'oS- Standard Bearer of A. L. S.. Fall 'Perm, 'oX-'ck). Spring 'Perm. oS-’oy: Center Class Football team. oS-’oo: Corresponding Secretary A. L. S.. Fall Term. ’09-’10: Chaplain. Spring Term. o )-’io; Monlblv Orator. Session Orator, 'ofl-’io; Debater in Public Meeting, 'oy-’io: Center on Soph.-Junior Team, ’otj-’io: Delegate of V. M. C. A. to Montreal Convention in June, op; Literary Editor Furman Echo. Spring Term. 'og-’io; Leader of Mission Study Class. ’09-'10; Center Fielder Class Baseball team, 'oq-’io; Vice-President Montague Mali, 'io-'n: Treasurer Senior Class, ’io-’n: Vice-President V. M. C. A.. Fall Term, 'io-’ii: Cliainnan of Devotional Committee of V. M. C. A.: Treasurer Montague Mall, ‘io-’n; Center of Fresh-Soph. Football team, ’io-'n: Senior Censor A. L. S.. Fall Term, ’io-’ii: President A. I,. S.. Spring 'Perm, ’io-’ii; Grand High Priest A. L. S.. Fall Term, ’io-’ii. Spring Term, ’io-’ii; Assistant Business Manager Baseball team, 'io-’ii: Prosecuting Attorney of Good Order Club, 'oy-’to: Member of Executive Committee. S. C. I. (). A.. 10 ji; Member of Sewing Circle, 'ot)-’io; Executive Committee A. L. S.. 09 ’io; Presiding Officer at Public Meeting Society, ’io-'ii: Center Fielder and Sub. Pitcher Class Baseball team. ’o8-’oq; Member of Program and Excuse Committees, 'oq-’io. 58WILLIAM WARREN LIPSCOMB “Stand uf . O mighty dollar, .Ind show■ Iliy wondrous ptnver. Hide thyself in my vest pocket. For I need thee ex’ery hour” “Lip’’ began his career at Asberry, S. C , February 2. 1891. Since that time lie has been plodding his weary way through this dismal world of ours, beginning his early educational activities at Asberry, S. C. Then entering Woftord hitting School in the Fall of 1906, and finally making his “debut ' at Furman the following Fall. 1907. "Lip" has had many thrilling experiences, especially in taming bulldogs. I le always added to the pleasure of the class room by his eye-opening questions. Member Freshman Baseball team, 'o7-’oS; Member V. M. C. A.. 07- !t; Second Tenor Furman dec Club, ,0 --o8; Class Editor Bonhomie. '08-09; Class Historian. 08-09; Chief Orator Chcrochec Indian Club. Vxj-ho; Manlier Judson Memorial Baraca Class. 07-09; Member Philosophian Literary Society. '07-'n; Assistant Conductor. Fall Term, 10-11; Vice-President Mission Study Class. io-'ii: Class Historian for Bonhomie, ’lo-’n; Manlier Champion Eaters Club, ’io-’ii. 59EUGENE WATSON MILFORD “A lender heart; a will inflexible The “Electric City” of Anderson was honored by the birth of that mighty athlete, Eugene W. Milford, on February 9. 1892. For ten long and weary years lie struggled with his text-books in the Anderson high school. On account of his advanced standing he entered the Sophomore class in 1908. His popularity among his fellow students is beyond question. In the basket ball games, lie always starred. “Gene” was not only a good athlete, a good student, and a popular fellow, but lie attended receptions at G. F. C. and Chicora with unparalleled frequency. Member Adelphian Literary Society; Marshal Adolphian Society, Joo-ho; Temporary Senior Censor Adelphian Society, Spring Term. ’or -’to; President Mission Study Classes, ’o9-’io, ’io-’u; Corresponding Secretary Adelphian Society. Fall Term, ’io-'n; Senior Censor Adelphian Society, Spring Term, ; First Base and Captain Senior Baseball team, ’io-'ii; Left Halfback Junior-Senior Football team, ho-’n; Member Tennis Club, ’oq-’io; Vice-President Athletic Association, ’io-’n: Right Guard Varsity Basketball team. ’oS-’oq, ’09-ho, ’io-'ii; Captain Varsity Basketball team, ’io-’ii; First Base State and Furman Baseball team, Student Conference, ’op; Vice-President Judson Memorial Baraca Class, Fall Term, ’io-’ii; Member Quarternian Club. 60WALTER FURMAN MOBLEY "This life is of ups and downs.” “Crip” was horn August 26, 1888. about two miles northwest of the beautiful city of Heath Springs, S. C. At the age of eight lie began his school days, working on the farm during the Fall months, going to school during the Winter months, and returning to farm in early Spring. Living on the corner of three school districts, he had the honor of attending two country schools and the village school at Heath Springs. In the Fall of 1906 he entered Welsh Neck high school, where he showed his mathematical talent by making a yearly average of 100 in Algebra his first year, and 98 his second. He graduated from this noble institution June 1, i x 8. with the last class that went out from that school. September 21. 1908. he became a student of Furman University. Member Philosophian Literary Society; Standard Bearer P. S. L.. Spring Term, ’oq-’io; Member Judson Baraca Class: Member Y. M. C. A.; President Mission Study Group. Fall Term, ’og-’io; Chairman Mission Study Committee. Spring Term, ’n: Member Volunteer Band; Vice-President Band, Fall Term, ’to-'ii; Chairman Deputation Work Committee. Spring Term. ’09-10, and Fall Term. ’io-’ii; Charter Member City Volunteer Union of Greenville: First President of City Union, ’to. 61SAM ORR PRUITT " «• hath a doily beauty in his life." "Pluto" entered this world in Anderson County. South Carolina. December 6. 1890. lie attended a county school and the Anderson high schools. His Freshman work was done at Washington and Lee University. He entered Furman as a Sophomore. "Pluto" takes his time, but “gets there" just the same. He is always ready to go to help a friend in need. Member delphian Literary Soeietv; Chaplain A. I.. S.. ’o9-’io: Substitute Forward Basketball team, og-'io; Member Kxecutive Committee Adclpltian Society, 'lo-'i t; Center Fielder Class Baseball team. o8-’og; Recording Secretary V. M. C. A., 'io-'ii ; Junior Censor A. L. S.. ’io-'ii; Treasurer Athletic Association, ’op-’io: Secretary and Treasurer Volunteer Band, ’io-'ii: Secretary Athletic Association, ‘io-'ii; Right Forward Varsity Basketball team, ’io-’ii: Recording Secretary A. L. S.. ’io-'ii: Secretary Judson Memorial Baraca Clas . '09-' 10: Mcmlter Quartcrnian Club. 62GEORGK SEAHORN SEOAX “ .augli and I lie world laughs with you. At the opening day of college in 1907, there appeared on the campus the beaming countenance of George Sloan. I because of his extreme youth fulness and pleasing manner, he at once attracted the attention of his classmates and this admiring attention lie has held ever since. If one were to ask who was the richest character in Furman University, the universal answer would be “George Sloan.” In addition to his mischievous stunts he has been a prominent factor in the class room. Also George has found time to display his talent for oratory, having won the MacMillan Declamation Medal in n;io. Member Adclphian Litcrarv Society: Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms. Spring Term, 'o7-'o8; Member of Eat a Little More Club. ‘07-08; First Base Hardy's Bible Class Baseball team. ’07-08; Out Fielder Class Baseball team, oy-’io. ho-'ii: Marshal Adclphian Society, ’io-’ii; Vice-President. Fall Term. ’io-’ti; Chairman Intersocicly Relations Committee. Fall Term. 'io-’ii; Chairman Executive Committee. Fall Term. ’io-’it; Reader. Public Meeting, ho-'ii : Junior Critic. Spring Term, ’io-’ii: Class Editor of Bonhomie. ’io-’it: Reporter for Athletic Association, ’lo-’n : Winner MacMillan Medal for Declamation, 'oo-’to; Member of Minute Men. 63JOE ALLEN SMITH “Six hours in sleep, in law's grave study six, I'our spend in prayer, the rest on nature fix." On November 5, 1890. near the historic town of Springfield. Joe A. Smith planted his wee foot on the threshold of a destiny as terrible as it was untimely, lie attended the city high school of Springfield during his youth. lie entered upon his career at Furman in the Fall of 1907. During his years of college struggles, he often thought of what his future career should he. Joe has always shown an aptitude for law. I le never missed an oportunity to improve his capacity in this respect, hence he frequently displayed his oratorical powers. Member Philosophian Literary Society; Winner Third Place Rhodes Oratorical Contest, ’08; Scrgcant-at-Arms Philosophian Society. Spring Term. '09; Member Frcsh.-Soph. Football team, ’09; Junior Censor Philosophian Society. Fall Term. '09; Member Junior-Senior Football team, ’09: Corresponding Secretary Philosophian Society, Spring Term, To: Member Intersociety Relations Committee: Public Debater Philosophian Society Meeting, ’io; Center Fielder Junior Baseball team. To; Presiding Officer at the Annual Address Before the Societies Commencement. To: President Philosophian Society, Fall Term. To; Vice-President Senior Class, Ti; President of Furman Bar Association, Ti; Senior Critic Philosophian Society, Spring Term. Ti; Literary Editor Furman Kcho, Spring Term. Ti. 64EZEKIEL RANSOM STEGALL "There abideth mind, body and spirit, but the greatest of these is body." “Zekc” was lx rn June 6, 1891, in Anderson County, near Piedmont, S. C. He spent a quiet childhood communing with nature. At the age of six he entered the county schools and in the Fall of 1906 entered the Williamston graded schools, from which he graduated in the following June. "Zeke" frequently journeyed home, hence it was believed that some unusual attraction held him in thralldom. He was one man who thoroughly believed in exercising the body as well as the mind. Member Philosophian I.itcrary Society; Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms P. L S.. Spring Term. ’oS-’o9: Assistant Conductor, Gamma Section. P. L. S.. Fall Term. 09-10; Junior Censor. Gamma Section. I . L. S.. Spring Term, ’09- to: Monitor Junior Class, ’09-’10; Treasurer of Gamma Section. P. L. S., Fall Term, ’io-’u: Junior Censor, Gamma Section, P. L. S.. Spring Term, ’io-'ii. 65JAMES ERA.XKL1X WHATLEY "Silt'iict• is soldi'll.'' James was born near the mountain city of Greenville, S. (A. April 28. 1891. That he is profoundly fond of his native city is distinctly proven by the fact that lie has spent all his life within her borders, lie states that no unusual events have occurred in his life except a continual brokeness. He believes in letting others do the talking, but he always does his part of the thinking. Member Philosophian Literary Society: Shortstop Freshman Class Baseball team: Left Fielder Sophomore Team: Lett Fielder Junior Class Baseball team; Junior Censor. Gamma Section. P. L. S.. Fall Term, ‘to-'it: Corresponding Secretary. Gamma Section. P. L. S.. Spring Term. To-'it. 561 SI I AM DEAN’ VVIXGO “Last bui not least.” Dean lias the honor of bringing up the rear of our class roll, but this by no means implies that he is at the "foot” of the class. Dean has always been a leader and has always stood for the best interest of his class, lie was born at Gaffney. S. C . in Anno Domini 1890. He has attended many schools throughout this section. The apple of his eye, however, is Old Furman. Captain Class Baseball team. 'o7-'oS; Pitcher Class Baseball team. '07-08; Meml cr Santee Canoe Club; Captain Baseball team. ’o8-’o9: Pitcher Class Baseball team. ’oS-'o;): Member Adelphian Society: Marshal Adelphian Society; Vice-President Adelphian Society; Center Fielder Varsity Baseball team, 09: First Baseman Varsity Baseball team, 'to; Pitcher Varsity Baseball team, ‘it: Member of the L. (). F. Club; Member of the lutersocietv Relations Committee; Manager Varsity Baseball team, 'to: Treasurer Junior Class. 'o9 ‘to; MemlK-r Quarternian Club: Member Tennis Club, 'to-'tt; Right Halfback Junior-Senior 1‘ootball team, 'to-'ti; Caterer of the Dormitory, 'io-'tt; Pitcher Class 1 baseball team. 'io-'ii; Chairman Kxccutive Committee, Adelphian Society. 6 Paginas Futurorum REM BERT XL'MA ALLEN When as a Freshman Allen came L’pon the hill we knew his fame Would reach some day, some future day. Beyond the lands and far away. So hv his learning, broad and deep, And by his judgment, sane, profound. The years as onward they did sweep Still found him master of the ground. JOHN EDWIN BAk'BER Ah. call them teachers if you will, Or. call them by another still. And yet. no name would Barber take I f by such he must e'er forsake Philosophy, for this must be II is future love and happy bride. To sail with him across life’s sea And stem for him life’s surging tide. JAMES WENDELL BARBER To help the sick relieve the pain Is worthy of the shrewdest brain. And this prediction now we give To stand the test of those who live To know as Barber now we know, The man in China far away: Both far and near to him they go That life might last another day. ALFRED DeLAFAYETTE BARKSDALE It’s not the preacher, sir, alone That loves to pick a chicken bone, For "Dooly” Barksdale we confide Will never take a circuit ride. And yet his life we venture now With poultry yards will be involved. Except when love recalls his vow To living problems yet unsolved. 6SFrank boyce boatwright They tread the land, they cross the sea. In pursuit of the alchemy That breaks the tenet undefined. And gives contentment to the mind. And yet upon a quiet farm Frank Boatwright, through the wheeling years, Has ever had contentment's charm. And never crossed "a vale of tears.” IRA ERNEST BRIDGES How humble seems the primal land Upon the which we feebly stand As forth we look with anxious eye, Long at the hill-top toward the sky. So Bridges looked, and looked again Toward the legal plain above. And then he left his humble plain, And onward to the top he strove. IlOMER SANFORD BROCKMAN We shade our eyes and look afar Into the skies to find the star That smiles upon a man. though small Be his physique, yet striking tall I le stands in mind, and big in heart. And such a star as Brockman's star Will ever find in moor or mart A friend-physician near and far. CHARLES EDWARD BYRD "Mike” Byrd has never rued the time When first he said, in youthful prime, “The banking business is the gate Through which a man may pass and rate Himself ere long among the men Of trust and wealth, and power, too.” So "Mike” passed through the gate and then Amassed a fortune real and true. )ANDREW ISOYCE CARSON "Pis said that Washington surveyed Virginia hill and lowland glade. And to this day his work has stood The test of chain and compass good. 'Plu same of Carson will be said When chains and compasses all new Shall try in vain to prove instead Of brains of men machines will do. EDWARD LEE COLLINS To teach the young idea to shoot And give the youth irresolute A vision of a broader field Where manhood strong can ever wield A power for the good and true. In such a calling Collins found. And in this field he sought t » do 11 is duty with a love profound. JAMES CLARKSON DERI EL N To French descent Jim Derieux Holds certain claims and justly so. So then, of course, his prophecy Is read and written easily. In Richmond College French he taught With sure success for many years. Till Harvard called and Harvard sought Him out and called him truly hers. HENRY THADDEL’S DUCKETT I peered into the future far. And asked myself. "What says the star That rules the life of Duckett?" Then I saw with prophet's eyes unseen l.cfore the star that signifies A life of mixed and crossed intent. And so with very doubtful eyes I. battled, puzzled, spare comment. 70GROVER CLEVELAND EPPS As forth lie went into the land Of jungles deep and ocean strand. We knew that Epps would lead to light The heathen from his lonely night. And kindle in his breast a spark Of gladsome hope and love sublime. What nobler work: from out the dark Cold night into the love-lit clime? MARION SIMMS LENDER Old Furman takes her happy stand Among the seats of learning grand, When Uncle Sam a call sends forth For civil service men for North nd East and South and West. And no One else more skill has ever shown In civil service, high or low. Than Fender. Furman's worthy son. BURNETT CAWOOD GIVENS The realm of mercantile was blest When Givens planned to spend the rest Of life in honest merchandise At Fountain Inn. a town that lies In peace beneath the Southern sky. And in the course of events rare 11 is townsmen showed their full trust by The honor of the mayor’s chair. FRED GENTRY HARRIS Among the men adown the years That stand as beacon lights, appears "Si" Harris, blest of wisdom’s smile, And guarded as her precious child. Tis not a dream: And blest arc those Who sit and hear this gifted man Reveal the beauties and disclose The English jewels as he can. 7iDON UROY IUU, A theologian from the farm Began his auditors to charm While yet a youth. When 11 ill appeared Upon the campus and we heard Ilis matchless eloquence we knew lie was the self same country youth— A prophecy of that one who Would yet expound the word of truth. JOHN WASHINGTON HUFF From out the looming, lowering clouds, Amid the gloom that fast enshrouds, Breaks forth the gleam of Huff’s guide star. And trails these words along the bar: With quill in hand he penned his thought In sermonette from day to day, And thousands reading, daily sought To follow in the narrow way. ’ (Written by J. A. Smith.) LaRUE WERTS LANGSTON Among the men who saw the need ()f preparation more to speed The joyful tidings far and near Was Langston I,., what need to hear His prophecy—the prophecy Of one whose earnestness and zeal Was but a natal quality Which every movement would reveal ? WILLIAM CLEAVER LANGSTON Alone, but proudly, Langston chose For his vocation at the close Of his successful school career The druggist; and no man has e’er Achieved success so sure as he In that profession good and great. From mountain peak to rolling sea His name is known throughout the State. 7-’WILLIAM WARREN LIPSCOMB Of all sad words of pen or tongue The saddest are: “If 1 were young Once more, no bonds would ever bind This heart. ()h, youth, how oft we find Too late, too late, thy dreams unreal!’’ But Lipscomb, pastor, friend to all lias never, never learned to feel 'Pile weight of youthful follies fall. EUGENE WATSON MILFORD A man of fine physique we praise, Altho unskilled in all the ways ()f athletes good. A man of fame I las right to base his claim of same ()n both : and Milford is the one. Gene Milford, champion of the earth In basket ball. And Anderson Molds claim to place of Milford’s birth. WALTER FURMAN MOBLEY Of our large class of thirty-one The years will say, ‘‘No man has done 11 is duty to his fellow-man More faithfully than Mobley." Can There be a better monument To any man in any land Than this from time? Then why content With granite pure, or marble grand ? CHARLES ECHOLS PETTIT We praise the doctor to the skies, We call the teacher great and wise, We hold as models noble, grand, The preachers good throughout the land. And yet, although too oft ignored, A work we place alongside these Is that of Pettit’s, in a word. The dental doctor, if you please. 73JESSE FURMAN PITTMAN A little genius now and then Is found among the best of men. We heard his music, yet we ne'er Did dream that in a later year Dear Pittman, pensive now and then. And. then and now, a jovial friend. Would move the stubborn hearts of men And wake this world from end to end. SAM ORR PRUITT At college might have been applied To Pruitt that bold, undenied, Frank charge against the English king: “He never said a foolish thing. He never did a prudent one." But Pruitt left the college hill For his old home in Anderson— At A. F. C. his name blooms still. GEORGE SEABORN SLOAN The lawyer’s life is hard to live (That is the statement that they give Who are just setting out), and few Arc they, at first, who do not rue The primal thought of legal life. Among those few is found George Sloan. Despite the day with failures rife, I le climbed the height before unknown. JOSEPH ALLEN SMITH One seldom ever hears it said That men heap honors on the head ()f their own neighbor, fellowman. Till from abroad in truth he can Announce his worth. But Smith has proved That man can first by his own State Be rightly honored, trusted, loved. And hailed as statesman wise and great. 74EZEKIEL RANSOM STEGALL And there are men who modestly Remain at home in liberty, Content to live, unknown, unseen, Yet gladly neighbors to all men. With Stegall this may well compare. What e’er in life he chose to do, The farm, the store, the teacher's chair. Will even find him faithful, true. JAMES FRANKLIN WHATLEY When in the council of the class No words his lips would ever pass. And though we heard not Whatley’s voice. His vote was cast with thoughful choice. And, so in after life, as there. 1 le was a man of silent thought. Who weighed his actions with much care. And wrought it well whate'er he wrought. ISHA.M DEAN VV1NGO "Success" has truly always been The watchword of all Furman men. And this is most especially Observed of Wingo, you'll agree. With wisdom, judgment, ever blest. Ilis work as civil engineer I las stood the crucial, trying test Of searching time from year to year. The maiden fair sat in a chair. Beside her, wooing, he Stole one sly kiss. The victim miss Cried. "Give it back to me." — J. W. Huff, Class Poet ami Prophet. Which he did. —G. W. Cox. "5The Stars We Hitch Our Wagons To si lien. R. A.....................To hear. Barber. J. li.....................To let the chimes ring forth. Barber, J. W......................To he a Barber. Boatwright, V. B..................To he a moonshiner. Lipscomb, IV. IV..................To perfect his method for the taming of fierce bulldogs. Huff. J. IV.....................'I'o find the really effective hair restorer. Bridges. I. ft....................To find the seat of the affections. Brockman, H. S..................'I'o he a grafter. Byrd. C. E......................'I'o harbor and protect hookworms. Carson, A. B....................'I'o borrow a pipe full. Collins, It. L..................'I'o pick his teeth. Dcrieu.x. J. C..................'I'o live close to nature. Bucket. II. T.....................To read Frawnch. Epps, C. C......................'I'o protect Rats. Vender. M. S....................'I'o be a "Bushwhacker.’' Ovens, B. C.....................'I'o keep his fat down. Harris. V. G....................'I'o be philosophical. Hill. P. L......................'I'o he a skeleton. Langston, L. IV.................'I'o receive board. Langston, IV. C...................To be a street car conductor. Milford. U. IV...................To be a ladiesman. Mobley, IV. V..................'I'o be a humorist. Bit man, I. V.....................To outclass Dr. Cook. Pruitt, S. O......................To do nothing. Sloan. C. S.......................To grow some. Smith, J. A.....................'I'o go to Winthrop. Stegall. E. R...................'I'o be strong. Whatley. J. V.....................To say nothing. IVingo, I. D......................To murder the boys with muscovators.Senior Statistics Best orator—J. A. Smith. Book-worm—“Mike” Byrd. Stingiest man—W. W. Lipscomb. Most bashful—Whatley. Mutton head—Hill. Most brilliant—Byrd and Allen. Best society workers—Ducket and Boatwright. Ladies’ man—Stegall. Biggest beat—A. B. Carson. Most artful legger—D. L. Mill. Handsomest—Duckett and Pittman. N ea test—Milford. Best crap-shooter—Duckett. Most insignificant—“Mike” Byrd. Biggest loafer—S. O. Pruitt. Best natured—Sloan. Most siren-voiced—R. X. Allen. Most popular—“Dean” Wingo. Best athlete—E. W. Milford. Ugliest—L. W. Langston and W. C. Langston. Laziest—Boatwright. Most in love—G. C. Epps. Biggest feet—"Dean” Wingo. Best morally—J. W. Barber. Silliest—C. E. Byrd. Chicken thief—J. W. Huff. Best writer—J. W. Huff. Best read—I. E. Bridges. 77J CK'fl© J funior Class A. B. Maki:tt I . Y. Brockman . . . . !!. (». Cl’i.ukwtson . C. IX . . OFFICERS President Secretary and Treasurer 11 istorian SKI NS. W. T. BAii.ES. I'. M. B YJ). C. D. BR CKMAX. K. W. CABS X. T. C. CABS()N. VV. IK ccu’»krts x. n. g. EZF.I.L. JJC GAU'IIIX. J. on E.xs. ! i;. I-l G X. W. R HARPER. T. J. HICKS. E. M. MEMBERS JAMES. 0. !i. JOHXS X. R. X. MAll EFKY. M. R. MABF.TT. . ! . PERRY, K. E. !' TK T. !•. .M., Jr. RICE. MAX RODGERS. D. SC RB i »l Gl i. J. i i. SIMPSON. K. C. TAXXEi . K. TIMMONS. Y. I . ■;Junior ClassJunior Ci.assOur Little Fairy O you dainty little being, we see you every day. And in your charming presence we feel so blithe and gay. You are so sweet and dainty, so very small and trim You are welcomed by the student as you pass around to him. Mow often arc our footsteps heard upon the well-worn stair That leads into a spacious room. ) joy! we find you there. You arc so still and quiet, with not a word to say, Altho you make some life more sweet ‘most every single day. Long may we find you in your place, to make life more complete. Long may your gentle presence help to make our days more sweet. For by your quiet presence our dinners arc made richer, So stay with us and cheer us. dear little syrup pitcher. —Andrew Lee Pickens, ’14. 82History of Junior Class OX looking back over the past three years we arc astounded at the rapidity with which this eventful time has flown. Yes, it is indeed true, “we spend our years as a tale that is told," for it seems only yesterday that the class of ’12. forty-eight guileless youths, came up to drink from the far-famed fountain of learning. We got together, however, and organized, with J. R. Barnett as president. Everything considered, 12 progressed fairly well during the early part of her existence; for she was, withal, a quiet kind and took what was coming with a philosophic calmness. After having organized, we desired to kncAv the fate that was so near at hand, so we hastily sought the prophet. We found him sitting before a grate of dimly flickering coals bitterly bemoaning our doom, which he told us in detail, then said. “Let us pray." No man ever set forth, and no congregation ever heard a more fervent prayer than was delivered on that night. Deep, slow, solemn came at first our prophet's husky accents; but as the spirit moved more vigorously his voice increased in volume, while higher and shriller rose the heartfelt pleas. All sood enraptured with his eloquence. W hen lie finished—through sheer lack of mind—though at first kneeling, he was on tiptoe iq on the highest piece of furniture in the room, both arms stretched at full length toward the ceiling. At that last utterance, if the missiles of destruction must fall, let them not be, “Well, ves, that’s not quite it." or “Well, so much for that;" all shouted with one accord. Amen. Amen, “let it be Cook’s laughing gas." The following will be a great help to the readers of our class history in understanding why such marvelous things have happened during the career of the class of ’12: W. T. Askins, known by his keepers and those intimate with him as “Tracy." for short. Famous for the introduction of the elimination method for preparing class room work, lie was much admired by the students while attending Furman University, because he could so successfully operate this method that he never allowed his class room duties to keep him from the theater the night before. Porter Marcellus Bailcs, big in body, loud in voice, traitorous in instincts, first caused trouble by his appearance upon this mundane sphere in the year 1888. His famous birthplace, as tradition has it. is near Fort Mill. S. C. In his early life he filled the house with his cries, his stomach with green plums, his head with space. After manifesting unusual and irrcsistable propensities to do as little work as possible, which, for want of better term is called inerta. some days later Ire came into Greenville on a local freight. After about two hours’ search he found a wheelbarrow and brought his trunk to the dormitory. Since then he has frequented the fruit stands, dining room, and C’hicora campus. 83“Peace ho! ‘C. I).‘ stands without." "W ithout what?" “Without enemies.” "Without enemies, did you say?" "Go to the Chicoreans. thou sluggard, and ask there if a girl once said to C. I). Boyd, 'If hot air was music, you would equal a brass band " Boyd is known for his ephemeral gaiety and his kind answer, "Yessum." Ilis popularity among the ladies is unseeminglv good, for he wears a smile that never fades away, and his over cautious nature is never shown so much as when standing on the corner watching the college girls pass by. E. W. Brockman. On a bright morning in November, in 1889. in the vicinity of the little backwoods town of Reedsville. S. C.. the hearts of relatives and friends were suddenly made glad with the intelligence that a babe was born, lie was christened "Earle VYingo.” Instead he has assiduously cultivated the act of the mocking bird, and at all times one can hear him casting himself into throes of agony to the tune of "Home. Sweet Home" or "Sunday Morning I'll Get My Boots Blacked.” We await with pleasure notorious accounts of "Brock" as a millman, which profession he gives all his intention to follow. Ilis studies are: Galologv, Penmanship, Raw Cabbage. I.oveatory. Predestination, and Voice. Thomas C. Carson, more generally addressed on the campus as "T. Q." Carson, made his initial as a member of human society. August 7. 1891. At a later period in his existence, the seeds of knowledge were sown in his youthful brain. After these sprouted seed had been cultivated for a season by the Williamston stunting plan. "T. Q." was headed toward Furman, where ultimately he turned up as a member of the Sophomore class. A. I). 09-10. Ilis socialistic progress on the Furman campus is indicated by a growing tendency on his part towards overcoming his former habit of neglecting that exterior portion of his anatomy scientifically known as the scalp. After taking his "dip" in 1812 "'1'. Q." will have aspirations of a journalistic nature. William Burton Carson. "Bill." yes. "Bill:" it could be nothing else, and we would have it nothing else, lie is one of the quietest boys in the class. It is only on great occasions (receptions at the girls’ colleges) that he blossoms out into a regular sport. ()n occasions like this "Bill" has some of the characteristics of the redoubtable “Buffalo Bill." and you would think from his looks that one of the girls would be kidnapped. All of this soon wears off and we have our same quiet, steady, classmate carrying on his "dad blamed work." Henry Gradv Culbertson. The most noteworthy event of the year 1890 was the advent of Culbertson into this world of joy and sorrow. The appendix "Cub" has been applied to him. and so he will always be called. “Cubby" is somewhat of a humorist, ball player, and ladiesman. but of the last named the ladies are blissfully ignorant, since in timidity the new bom kitten cannot hold a match 4to him. This child of song tells us that he intends to take unto himself a medical training, but evidence and observation verify the impracticability of bis doing anything but twirling the sphere from the professional box. John Kimsey Ezell was known as " .eke.” and now boisterous in borrowed wit and mummied jokes; inherently handsome, except his face; potentially pestiferous, surreptitiously noelambulistic. minimizingly industrious, unequalled in mathematical ability, everlastingly energetic in theological disputations, tan-talizingly trite in English essays, became acquainted with this terrestrial ball in the winter of t88 ) in the metropolis of Cross Anchor. S. Later, in company with the conductor and train crew, he left Cross Anchor for the little town of Greenville. Me arrived at noon. Getting on the good side of a drayman, he arrived at the Eurman campus in company with a suit case. "Well. Galphin. old sport, how are you?” "I feel on the bum. The Piedmont didn't say a word about that star catch which I made in center field.” Galphin is a comer, l ie never has time to study. I le has the prefix "nihil.” which is a very striking characteristic of the very-much-in-love Galphin. lie has been in love more than any man in our class, except Wedd and Askins. Galphin will never be happier than when he is receiving the long ones from the sticks of such amateurs as Lajoic. Cobh. Joe Jackson, and Max Rice. (). I». («ivcns. commonly called "Sprout." now comes before our vision. He first saw the light in the mountains of Tennessee, later moving to the nourishing little city of Fountain Inn. S. C. In the heart of this "Sprout” there springs forth a very great affection for all "sweet sixteens." In his regular daily routine he has a definite number of hours dedicated to flirtations. In addition to all these virtues, astonishing is the volume of noise that proceeds from a biped so minute. W. E. I lagan, heinously hilarious, hinderingly hazardous, the very llower of chivalry, who is distinguished!)’ known as "Dick,” began his uncertain and precarious existence at Hampton. .8. C , an indefinite number of years ago. Three years of college life finds him aged but not altered, proficient but not progressive. What he was. he is. what he is. he shall be. "Dick" is very intelligent except in the class room, handsome when his back is turned, liked when absent. I le is a regular attendant at church, except on Sundays, and at Latin classes. You talk about stars, "Dick” knows Astronomy. If one talks of flowers, he knows Botany, if of rocks, he knows Archaeology. Exam! and when it comes "Dick" is in the dark. Exam! and "Dick” hideth 11 is circular mark. 85Thomas Jesse Harper came all the way from Seneca, where his first “Love” is still respiring. "Harpy” is one of the automatic pieces of humanity which always has a slap, a pinch, or a knock for his fellow students. His motto is, “On to Diplomaville." "Ilarpy" makes friends wherever he goes, but he doesn't go among the "feminine.” Mis generosity surpasses his good looks when his purse is not empty. His favorite smoke is either a cigar, cigarette, a pipe, or a cubcb, made of “Duke’s Misery." E. M. Hicks comes from the land of swamps, but his fellows took the privilege of rechristening him under the appellation of "Stix." His voice is known to the uttermost parts of the State, for he must have imitated his native frogs in his young days, as he can run the scale two octaves below " ." flat. 1 le is noted for his loud sneezing and broad grinning. Sir Holley James burst upon college society under the artistic cognomen of "Jim." His sagacity is beautifully demonstrated by leaving Dr. Cook and his jokes to his colaborer. "Dick" Hagan. His encounters with the head of a neighboring institution have never been equaled. He has the biggest heart that ever beat in a human breast, for whenever called upon for a place in his hotel, to look out upon the "passing Chicoreans." he never fails to make room for himself and you. And R. X. Johnson, “Bob," "Xeill," "Fatty." “Crip." or what not, looms before us. "11 is mighty brawn and massive limb, ah! sure there is some class to him." Ilis antipathy for the ladies makes him peculiarly prominent and susceptible to the fiery darts of young Dan Cupid, who seems for lo! these many years to have failed to pierce him with his arrows, lie directs his cortex mostly to the study of scientific baseball, and is a master of the art. “Blondie" Mahaflrey. "The Red Crest." hails from the vicinity of Owings Station, S. C. lie is very fond of “Crook'ed studies, such as Rhetoric. On account of an undying devotion to "Campbells" "Blondie" says he will be compelled to take a special course in zoology after leaving the beloved Alma Mater. "Beck" Marctt, the man who does things for the Junior class, came to us with recommendations from a Westminster girl and his paternal ancestry as a man of unusual ability in the world of scholasticism. "Beck" has done much for us. and he is sure to do more for himself when he gets a chance at ’em in the merchandising business. 86E. L. Perry, the "Beef" from Georgia, “licet," “Peck," or “Ed" came to us from the land of peaches. "Peck" lias had one of those peaches with him ever since he has been at Furman. It is his voice to which I refer. "Beef" will be satisfied with less than thirty-five years with the New York Metropolitan. "Peck" does not keep the harmony when he sings, but his sweetness of quality makes "Peck” a "licet” which Furman will hear much of in the monev world. Edwin McNeil Poteat, Jr., better known as "Fatty," in due consideration of the tact that he occupies more space at one time than any other member of his class. Although “Fatty" does not intend to go into the medical profession, he would make a great doctor, as he "takes life easy." He has made himself j opular among those he has come in contact with by his vocal organs and his skillful touch of the piano. Max Rice, an erstwhile baseball phenomenon, who goes by the name of “Reece." or "Meek," among his associates, is continually before the eyes of the athletic loving public on account of his wonderful performances from time to time on the diamond. He is said to have gotten three base hits during his career as a ball player. His principal weakness, however, is one universal among the college men. The ladies hold him so completely in their thraldom that he tries to duplicate the trick every time he gets a chance. Never mind, we'll hear from him. whether it be as water carrier for John McGraw of the Giants, or as professor of chemistry in some female college. In the early winter at the little “seaport" town of Tcndal, S. C.. there began the life of one who is now a distinguished member of the Junior class, Archie D. Rodgers, familiarly known as Archie "Busbce" Rodgers. Archie has great ambitions. I Ie hopes some day to hold an important professorship in sonic girl's college. By some of his associates it is said. "Me draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument." Julian M. Scarborough, or. perhaps, 1 had better say. "Jule Hash Scabby ’ is the most undaunted lover of them all. Mis best loved occupation is warming the sidewalks in front of G. F. C. or jerking his tattered handkerchief out to convey by his own code of signals, some message to a faithful dame who peers out of the window and utters a long drawn out sigh of despair or desperation as he wheels around the corner—to be lost to her view in the avenue of trees. Mis course is, "Dinner, breakfast, supper. Chicora, French, Drug Store, and ‘uptown.’ " E. C. Simpson, or. the man with the broad brow, is one of those superhuman phenomena that arc raised in and around Starr. S. C. “Simp" is never behind time, but "Gee Golly" boys, "those" chemistry is some “Alchemy" to him. Never 87is "Simp” more pleased than when lie is making the last lap on the sidewalks in Dr. James' premises. Never mind. “Simp" will he at the head of some big educational institution (colored) in the near future. “Simp" says. “Hicks. I can’t help you with the Annual work, for I ain't got time. I just can't let my studies come in between me and my college work." Keltner Tannery, more widely known among Ins fellow students, especially his table mates, as "Cram." because ol the great amount of dormiton food he can cause t" disappear in such a short time. “Cram" loves to take bis daily walk in front of Chicora. He also loves a snappy game of basket ball. William R. Timmons! W'hat shall be said? Ihll's prominence is not confined to any one branch of collegiate existence, so to choose bis most noticeable characteristic is no small task. Put hark! Through the walls of his room come the sound of sweet music. A clear, grand operatic tenor shakes the windows and extinguishes the electric light by its brilliance of tone. It's Pill humming a melody of amorous fervor to a picture hung on his wall. Again the note dies down in passionate devotion, and we enter and see him going into space with tears in bis eyes. J. Ray Webb. By his smiling countenance, his piercing brown eyes, and his cheery disposition, this "Ray” of sunshine is well known in every phase of life. I Ie enjoys, very much, walking by Chicora, especially since the new ordinance came into effect, and it is no less pleasant to the ladies to see him direct his footsteps in their direction. 11 is most frequent songs are snatches of melodies such as "The Last Rose of Summer." or "Bout a Crocodile.” French seems Webb’s favorite study, and some day we will doubtless read of his election to some importnat chair »f modern language in a large institution. 88Sophomore Class Motto—Oui non proficit deficit Colors—Green and White Class yell Thirteen, thirteen, shout it loudly. Clear, hoys, ring it proudly. All time, Any time, Sis, boom, hah. Class of ’13. rah. rah, rah! Password—Soph. Math. (Catfish brand.) Proverb—Maximum cuts make minimum labor Object—To get the Faculty's autographs OFFICERS W. M. Ckaic..............President G. W. Cox . Secretary and Treasurer W. M. Bridges . . 'icc-President R. G. Lick...........Historian MEMBERS ALLEN. W. K. HESTER. II. C. RAKER, C A. HUNT. 1). B. BARKSDALE, 11. G. JONES, F. S. BLACK, V. KERRY, L. E. BOWEN, L. 11. LANGSTON. T. II BRIDGES. VV. M. LEE. R. G. BROWN, C. V. I.IDE. L. M. BROWN, W. T. LONG. I). T. BURNETT. A. 1). MACIIEN. E. W. BURNETT. G. X. MAXGUM. G. C. BUSSEY. J. I . Mcdaniel. w. c. CARSON. W. R. MITCHELL. L. D. CARY, W. L. I TAXER, J. L. CLEVELAND. J. X. 1 TAXER. J. W. CLIXKSCAI.ES. g. s. ROT EAT. J. R. COX. G. W. RAINES. L. II. CRAIG, W. M. ROBINSON. J. F. DALTON. F. L. ROE. T. A. DEW. J. L. SAPOCIL M. F. EASTERLING. T. R. SAWYFJL W. R. EDWARDS, J. A. SMITH. II. C. PILASTER. W. J. L. WARD. W. H. FOWLER. T. M. WATSON. T. II. 90History of the Sophomore Class THE Sophomore Class f 1910-11 returned to Furman with good intentions. Their ranks, when compared with the former year, were thinned considerably, but the determination of former days was not lacking. I11 aim and endeavor the class is not among the lesser breeds, nor do they expect either in college or in after years to be swept into the lesser places. In its purposes the class is not thwarted by lack of effort. However, all of effort the class can manifest, all of zeal it can show forth, all the co-operation it can give and take will be necessary to carry it through the perils of an unknown sea. It has saddled its ponies, and whipped and spurred and lashed its way on. Into the dark valley of mathematics the noble band has ridden, some to return no more, some to return scarred but victorious. But with all its trials, all its conflicts, all its examinations, all its doubts and fears, all its tremblings and shakings, all its ignorance and knowledge, it hopes that through devious days it may come at last to say that the inscrutable years that claim for every man their toll of years weave for its brow a wreath that shall not fade. “Selah.” Amen. Sophomore Statistics The man with the largest feet—Smith. The man with the big head—W atson. The biggest caters—Cox and Y. K. Allen. The best boy—Bowen. The most bashful boy—Lidc. The smartest man—W ard. The greatest ladies’ man—Craig. The man most like an owl—Moon Craig. The sons of Orpheus—Robinson and Machen. The man most in love—Poteat. The best athlete—Bussey. The sons of somnus—Dew and Sawyer. The oldest man—Kerby. The best looking man—Jones. The youngest man—Poteat. The most industrious men—Lee. Mangum. and Bowen. The best debater—Bridges. The best dcclaimer—Brown. The best poet—Cox. Class orator—Lee. 92 7 j« '( «• ) 'mFreshman Class OFFICERS E. B. Crain............................. B. J. Workman........................ O. C. Scarborough................ A. L. Pickens................. T. C. Lancaster........... ...............• President . . . Vice-President . . . Secretary . . . Poet H istorian Motto—So fid fuer das Colors—Blue and White Class yell One nine one four Rats! Rats! Rats! Furman! Mascot—Bennette Eugene U'ord—Butter speak for yourself Pass AIKKX. J. B. ALLEN. J. R. ANDERSON. J. T. BRADLEY. S. C. BROCK MAX. II. L. BRIDWELL. W. B. CARTER. W. W. CASEY. W. C. CHAPPELL. L. M. CHILDRESS. J. P. CLEVELAND. R. M.,Jr. COKER. F. M. DORN. L. F. DUSEN BERRY. R. M. EARLE. F. H. EASLEY. J. A. EDWARDS. J. A. EZELL. A. J. FOREMAN. A. A. FOWLER, T. M. FI RMAN. A. G.. Jr. GARDNER. E. E. MEMBERS HAMMOND. W. M. HARRIS. K. E. HARTLEY. L. P. HAWKINS. F. C. IIODGENS. II. M. HOLLAND, E. B. HOLLEY. H. E. Hl NT. W. M. IRBY. G. W. JACKSON. J. E. KING. A. L. LANCASTER. T. C. LANCASTER. T. S. LITTLE. T. L. LOADHOLT. W. R. I .OFT IS. E. E. MASON. I). V. McCullough, j. il mcdaniel. w. c. MILLER. J. B. MITCHELL. F. W. MO )R E. F. C. MOOREHEAD. H. MORGAN, G. R. MULLIGAN. A. D. MULLIKEN, W. L. OWINGS. J. E. PATTERSON. W. C. PICKENS. A. L. RAS( )R. W. E. ROPER. R. II. SIMONS. II. E. SKINNER. A. C. SKINNER. R.G. SMITH. I). T. STEEDLY. H. F. SULLIVAN. C. S.. Jr. TATE. W. E. TRULUCK, J. M. WALKER. J. L. WARD. J. W. WEBB. E. J. WILLIAMS, C. L. WILLIAMS. W. E. ZEIGLER. W. 95Fkkshman Ci.assHi ory of the hreshman Class Till , present Freshman Class began its daily round of studies and pleasures at Furman University. September 23. Starting with a membership of alxnit eighty, the class braved the perils of the Christmas examinations. On emerging from the contest it was found that about fifteen men had been left behind, as was discovered when the remaining ones had returned from the holidays. No unusual events have happened in the history of the class of which to make any special note, 'file first social event was the reception given at the First Baptist Church to the new men. The class attended this in a body, most of the men securing the necessary credentials from the tipper classmen before leaving the dormitorv. the said credentials being a green bow worn in a conspicuous position. The most enjoyable event of the year was the reception given b Dr. and Mrs. Poteat to the class. Fverv man was present at this reception, and went with the expectation of an enjoyable evening. Anticipation is said to be half of the pleasure, but in this case the pleasure exceeded even the anticipation. The upper classmen have taken pains frequently to impress upon the Freshmen the fact that the I'niversity. with its rights and privileges, does not belong entirely to the Freshmen, blit they felt that the interruption of nightly sleep, midnight visitations, and the results of walking carelessly under upper-story windows were partly avenged by the Thanksgiving football game, when the Freshman-Sophomore team defeated the Junior-Senior team by a very close score. The class has men who they feel confident will make their mark upon the athletic field and in the literary and religious life of the University, in such a manner that no member will regret having entered the University with the Freshman class of 1910. Freshman Statistics Average age— Eighteen. Average weight— 146. Average height—5 ft. 9 in. Favorite sport— Baseball. Most in love—Aiken. Most bashful—Chappell. Biggest bore—Aiken. Best athlete—Mason. ()ldcst man—Crain. Fattest man—1 lolly. Tallest man—I kittle. Best artist—Ezell. Most conceited—Tate. Neatest man—Roper. I lest declaimer—Aiken. Youngest man—Morgan. Biggest man—Crain. Smallest man—Harris. Shortest man—Patterson. Best football player A. C. Skinner. Smartest man—Anderson. Ugliest man—Moore. Largest man—Bridwcll. Most skillful legger—Carter. 07Doleful Dormitory Days (), I clearly say truly of all life unruly That of college is hardest to nerve; The faculty’s bum. and the jolly good chum For his good time some hardships must serve. Such as. to name 'em. on six plunks per mensem "Pis said we can easily live; The girls we can woo. visit Lyric. Bijou. And still some to missions can give. And another, for instance—such is persistence That trials should sharpen their blades— 'Par mixture molasses, which even surpasses In blackness old Pluto’s dark shades. Concerning that “butter." what words can 1 utter That would U) any justice at all? 'That cotton seed oil from which we recoil To keep back the nose from appall! And another example—all this is a sample ()f trials we must undergo— We arc fed on tough hamestrings mixed up with more blame things That they call beans, don't you know! Now that's what we're given and that's what we live on: It’s a trial for livers, no doubt: And good marks of the teacher-, they never can reach us While the liver is down and out. 98 —G. W. Cox.Historical Sketch of the Furman Echo THE publication of a college journal at Furman University began probably about the year 1820. Little is known of the magazine beyond the name, which was the Furman Collegian. The following years were hard times for the University. Students were few and finances limited, and so after a struggling existence of a few years, the magazine ceased to be. I’ut the founders of the Collegian had kindled a flame which although it might smoulder could not die altogether. A few years elapsed and the Furman University Journal was attempted for one year, after which it died. Then there was a longer period of inactivity. Hut in 1882 several members of tlie Adelphian Literary Society, prominent among whom was Mr. J. M. Manly, now professor and head of the English department of Chicago University, revived the interest in literary endeavor and began the publication of the Adelphian. 'flic first issue was for November. 1882. In this there appeared the editorial comment: “Since the number of students is greatly increased, and the Adelphian Society i enjoying a like prosperity, having failed to secure the assistance of our beloved and highly esteemed sister, the I'hilosophian Society, the Adelphian Literary Society has decided not to revive the Collegian or Journal, but to start an altogether new paper, the Adelphian." In March, seven and a half years later, the sister society, following the example of her companion, began the publication of a rival paper, 'file I’hilosophian. Loth the Adelphian and the I’hilo-sophian were printed in the form of a paper, that is. they were not bound as the form of the Echo. The two publications continued several years of friendly rivalry until in the session of i88q- x they united to form The Furman Echo. The societies have equal authority and responsibility in the publication of the magazine. On alternate years each society elects the Editor-in-chief and Assistant Husiuess Manager. Ihisiness Manager and Assistant Editor-in-chief. Each society regularly elects for each term three associate editors. The twenty-three years of the life of the Echo have been years of increasing prosperity. The managment has been placed upon a sure financial basis, and the work of the editors and managers with the hearty support of the students at-large has been such as to elevate the magazine into a place of deserved importance in the life of the I niversity. 99The Furman Echo FALL TERM STAFF J. V. llriT................................................E d it dr- in-Chicf M. Ckah;.....................................Assistant Editor-in-Chief A. I . Carson............................................ Easiness Manager J. K. Exhi.i..................................Assistant Easiness Manager I . C. Givens........................................Literary Department V. M. Bridges.......................................Literary Department G. W. Cox...............................................Local Department F. G. Harris........................................Exchange Department J. E. Barber...........................................Alumni Department E. M. Pothat, Jr.....................................Athletic Department SPRING TERM STAFF J. Y. IIul-T..............................................Editor-in-Chief Y. M. Craig.....................................lssistant Editor-in-Chief A. B. Carson..............................................Easiness Manager J. K. Ezi-i.i.................................lssistant Easiness Manager J. A. Smith..........................................Literary Department Max Rick.............................................Literary Department G. Y. Cox............................................l.ocal Department J. E. Barber.........................................Exchange Department R. C. LEE..............................................Alumni Department R. X. Johnson........................................Athletic Department totThe Sudden Dawn SHft, Juanita Weir, was Spanish. He. Allien Finney, was mcricau. She. highly nurtured, with all the traditions of her race and breeding behind her. was slender and lithe, as graceful in her every movement as a young wild thing of the forests. He was tall, straight, blue-eyed, brown-haired, strong. I loth lived in Panama City, she as a nurse in the ncon hospital, he as chief surgeon for the hospital authorities. When he met her first, her dark sensitive face, framed in masses of rich-jet-black hair, which he thought was the most beautiful lie had ever seen in woman filled his mind for days with thoughts of her. So fragile she seemed, so masterful, and withal so beautiful. Meeting her next at a social gathering, he was conscious that her beauty was not her chief charm, though her voice, soft and subdued, moved him strangely, and her dark eyes, like great black opals, fascinated him. He was with her again when they came in at sunset from a sail on the bay. They lingered on the beach to watch a great ship hass by. t that moment something deep down in his heart was singing very low and very, very sweet, and he knew he loved her—loved her with tenderness and strength. It was not that love which comes after long association, but that stronger, tenderer love which survives absence, neglect, and betrayal—that love which is born in an instant of time but outlasts life and conquers death. And it was this love, insistent and irresistible, which led him after many days to aske her to become his wife. A house—a house by the sea—was what they desired after their marriage. And the house was built. A strange place it was for a home, far up there on the face of the c 1 ift’. Yet it was the place agreed upon by both. The sea. far out to where the most venturesome fishing smacks went to pluck a scant living from the deep, could be seen. The green hills beyond the harbor, where the ships lay at anchor and a thousand junk and sampans, their sails of mat glorious in even-shade of dusky red and dusky gold, scurry about every day. were scenes of beauty from the balcony of the little house. Magic turrets never had a more eerie site nor balcony a fairer view. A place it was exotic with the breath of a thousand tropical islands. And behind the house was a garden. There, in the cool of the evenings, as the years went by. they walked together by the fountain or sat together under the trees, repeating that sweet story which was old when the pyramids were new. In that loved spot, the past, with all its wonder and mystery, rolled back on them like billows of the soul. In those happy hours they came to learn as never before that the things of love are the only true realities, worth more than much gold and many diamonds, and not to be bartered awav for the shows of life. Sweeter grew their love and stronger became their affection, when, after 102many months, the child, that other part of themselves, came. A beautiful child it was, with the sea in her eyes, the sunshine in her hair, the majesty of the hills in her little face, the music of the winds in her voice, the fragrance of the llowers upon her lips, born of the sense of beauty and nature and love. Great was their happiness, and in the companionship of each other was all the joy they desired. But when Kinney, under some impulse which he did not attempt to check or explain, began to go down town in the late evenings and at night, a change was wrought. At first Juanita did not seem to notice, for she knew he was a busy man. But the frequency of his absences from home brought into her heart a resentment which she vainly tried to curb. Almost every night she was left alone with the child; and her heart was grieved. And when her grief could no longer he hidden, when the sadness of her heart uttered itself aloud, he, at her questionings, made trivial excuses. These excuses she heard in silence, while within her. her own soul cried out in all the bitterness of secret anguish. One night, some weeks later, when Kinney did not come home to supper, the soul of her revolted. At the same time a soli fought within her throat. The next moment anger began to rage in all her loyal veins. She could not endure it! She had no right to do so! Youth and the vitality of her race resumed sway. The surge of young blood came back into her veins. She would find her husband. Leaving the child asleep, she threw a shawl across her shoulders and started down the hill, following the little path, to where it changed into the street of the town. Slowly she passed along the street, glancing at the face of each man she met. She came, after a short while, to the tiny river on the other side of which was a park, half-kept and crowded with people. She stood for a moment listening to the murmurous music of the Spanish guitars and to the soft confusion of voices. Krom the wine tables under the banyan trees came the sound of clinking glasses and an occasional oath or medley of hoarse laughs. Unconsciously she shuddered and turned her footsteps to the most remote part of the park. She had not gone far until she was staggered by what her eyes beheld. At some distance from the others and at one of the smaller tables sat Finney. (Jpposite him sat a young woman, a Spaniard, who leaned across the table and touched him lightly on the cheek. The sight staggered Juanita as the full force of a dizzying blow. She heard them laugh, saw them drain their wine glasses, saw them lean across the table until their faces came very close together. Then, in a moment of boldness, which made them forget their surroundings, their lips met. 'I'he young wife fell back into the shadows with a gasp of horror. Her crushed heart revealed itself in her eyes: the blood rushed madly to her face: her body burned as though it were lying on cinders fresh from the furnace. Vainly, for a moment, her brain tried to lalx r through the crazy bewilderment of it all. Her whole body and the soul within her revolted: and in that moment 103she hated him. hated the beautiful creature across the table from him. The next moment she thought of the child and slipped away speechless. She ran out of the park along the street and up the hill to the house. There she Hung herself heavily ti| on the bed beside the child, who was sleeping still, and tried to stifle the angry sobs. She rose presently, however, and dressed herself. In an hour Finney came. Entering the door, he came forward to kiss her. I lis eyes were full or water, and the wine was heavy upon his breath. She turned from him angrily, her dark eyes Hashing fire. "Don't you dare touch me!" she cried, scorn and contempt in her voice. She was like one speaking out of the night long travail of her soul. Her words, angry and tumultuous, were like the secrets of a suffering heart uttering themselves aloud. Again he started toward her, but she waved him back with a gesture of her hand. The wild insurrection in her soul dazed him. Her burning gaze never left him: it beat upon him like a flame. Every word that she spoke fell slowly from her lips and smote the man. And when he tried to speak it was falteringly. as though he were afraid she would not listen. A strange and alien woman, she seemed to him now, filled with violent emotions whose depths he could not fathom. ()nce again he stooj e l to kiss her. She shrunk away, her body quivering with sudden revulsion. She stood blazing with wrath, a small slight figure. Violently beat her heart; the blood rushed to her face with double force; her hands trembled; her whole body quivered. She choked for a moment, before she could find words, lint the fire that filled her invested her with the power of one of the ancient Hebrew prophets when he stood, he alone, a frail bulwark against a rising tide. It seemed that the room rang with a baffled silence. All this he took in while his eyes, feverish and intent, searched her very soul. In a moment the fountains of her speech were loosened. “'Pile mere thought of your caress is hateful!" she hissed. "In all my loyal .veins I feel it. W ere I forced to accept your caress, it would lie with unutterable horror and repugnance! Now I am forced to adjust myself to a new image of you. You are not the hero of my dream! The corruption of your heart has taken on the most incredible audacity, your pleasure the most unbridcled license. Go to the wine table and spend your nights! I shall not want you now! Smile, if you care, into the evil eyes of a strange woman! care not for your smile! Kiss the lips of her who is no better than a harlot; mv lips will never again be so vulgar as to touch yours!" All the wild blood of the woman's race was aflame. Her words came out with the force of a torrent. "The tender love that has filled my whole being for months is banished in an hour. 1 am crushed by my mistaken worship!" she cried in a voice of terrible pathos. Finney stammered and stood, stupid, amazed, wrathful, accusing. He 104turned on lier savagely. Then his wrath hurst forth more furiously for having been restrained. But she would not listen. "Go!” site cried, “Go!" To him the whole thing was inexplicable. He felt smirched and hurt. Turning, as one in a stupor, he stooped to kiss the child, the beautiful child, his child, asleep on the bed. Still the odor of wine was strong upon his breath. She flung her body as a barrier between him and the child. At this his nature rose in revolt. In the bewilderment of the moment he became angrv and dismayed at the change in his own world which had seemed so impregnable sure. Without shame he struck her across the face. Under the pain of the blow, she stood tottering, swaying, dazed. Reeling against the wall she stood dumb. The child began to cry, and the man swore an oath fiercely. For a moment he turned his dark, fierce countenance upon her. In that moment she thought he would strike her again. But in the next moment he was gone out into the night. His tall figure seemed tottering and staggering as under the pressure of some awful burden. But she cared not to call him back. In the torment of his soul. Finney went back to the house next morning, after a night of aimless wandering about the town. When he found her gone, an intolerable madness seized him. Like a creature accursed, lie wandered about the house and garden, a prey to the most terrible upheavals of the soul, to the most hitter and sorrowful reflections. Terrible incoherent thoughts of resignation coursed through his mind. His lacerated heart left him no power of thinking or feeling anything but his loss. In the moments when he thought that she might never come back, shame burned his being like unquenchable fire; and he cursed himself for striking her. When he thought of the child, he cursed Juanita for going away. I lowbcit, there was no venom in his cursing, though it lacked not for words. And in the long, drear months, when he sought for her and found her not. and when she came not back to the house, his sadness pained him like an open wound. And when he realized that henceforth even-woman's face would remind him of her whom he had lost, he tried at first to forget her by throwing himself into the wildest debauchery of the land. Failing in this, he broke loose. In this mood of reform lie began to travel extensively. But all during the few months of reckless debauchery and during the ten years of travel, she. like some flaming star that speeds across the uncharted dark, lighted the barren country of his dreams. It was a stormy night and snow had begun to fall on frozen Lake Uieng. And the face f a man who stood at the window of a cottage by the shore and looked out across the frozen lake was something like the night. 11 is was the face of a man old beyond his years, and he mused darkly as one who broods on some bitter defeat. 105“Diamonds don't care who wear them; money doesn’t care who spends it; whisky doesn’t care who drinks it. and Fate doesn’t care who sorrows." he said to himself. "Here I have been traveling for years trying to forget, lint I can’t. And in tiie effort to forget I do the more remind myself that memory is stronger than will. In the night, in the storm, on the sea—yes. everywhere—I think of her. In my heart is a murmuring as eternal as the old murmurings of the sea. as little to be hushed, as prone to burst into sudden roaring. It is something I understand but could not see with a thousand eyes, nor taste with a thousand tongues and palates. 1 can hear the music of it with my ears stopped, but it will not l e trampled bv a million feet nor cut with a thousand swords nor burned in a furnace nor drowned in the depths of the sea.” As the man stood thus, musing and talking to himself and watching the great trees swayed by the wrathful winds, he looked out across the frozen lake and saw a man on skates approaching the shore. "I wonder,” he said aloud, "who is so foolish as to venture out on such a night as this. It is enough to freeze the marrow in a man’s bones. This wind is almost strong enough to throw a mail off his feet, and this snow would well nigh pelt the blood out of a man’s face." I’v this time the man on the lake had reached the shore. Without taking the skates from his feet, he ran up the path and past the window to the door of the house, lie seemed to be in a great hurry. "I wonder what this tall woodsman wants with me on such a night." said the man at the window as he turned to open the door in response to a heavy knock thereat. As he opened the door a great giant woodsman, his face dark with cold, stood facing him. “Is this Dr. Finney?” he asked abruptly as he shook the snow from his broad shoulders. "It is. Come in." answered Finney. P ut the man shook his head. "It seems like inviting you out to torture, sir. to come for you on such a night as this, but I want you to go back with me. And if you will. sir. for heaven’s sake be quick. A human life depends upon it." Finney was shivering with cold as he stood in the open door, but he did not hesitate a moment. It was a terrible night, but the look on the man’s face was irrcsistaible. "Is someone sick?" he asked, turning and taking his skates from a hook on the wall. “Aye. sick indeed, sir. and the person is a little child who cut her foot while carelessly handling my ;txe. Her foot is bleeding terribly, sir. and is draining her i of life away. Yc tried to stop it. but we couldn’t. And unless you get there to stop the flow of bloow I’m afraid, sir. that the child will he dead when its mother returns tomorrow night." “Is it your child?" h'innev asked, buttoning on his fur coat. “Xot mine, sir; but tis such a sweet and beautiful child that I've wished it was." "How old is it?" ”1 judge her to be ten or twelve, sir." "Where is the mother of the child?" “The mother, sir. who teaches school hereabouts and nurses the sick in the mountains went off today to visit an old woman who is dying. She left at iu on, sir, and left the child with wife and me. saying she’d be back by tomorrow at sunset.’’ "You’re an acquaintance of the child’s mother, then?" asked the Doctor as he closed the door and started down the path toward the lake. "Yes, sir. I’m a trustee of the school she teaches, and she boards with us." In a few moments the man had reached the lake. There both stopped to see if their skates were securely fastened and adjusted. "Mow far is it?" shouted the Doctor above the shrieking of the wind. "It’s eight miles down the lake. sir. and then one mile from the shore. Nine miles in all. I»ut now we must hurry, sir. for the snow is growing deeper every minute." said the man as he swung out across the ice. "Lead the way: I'll follow." answered Finney. In an instant they were off down the lake, their skates biting sharply into the ice. I very moment the storm hurled itself against them, spat its venom into their faces, and. like some monster jealous of their progress, held them down to a tedious pace. The wind, carrying in its teeth ice and snow which stung their faces mercilessly, came pouring, flying, lashing by like the angry laughter of the ancient gods. The old woodsman, thinking of the child, chafed and grumbled at the slow pace until the shore was reached. There they took off their skates and started at a run across the fields of snow. Panting for breath, they came at last to the woodsman’s house, lie knocked on the door. A bent little woman with a wrinkled, kindly face and dark piercing eyes met them at the door. "An’ it does me good to see you. sir." she said to the doctor. You’re wise where we are ignorant; where you see, we are little better than blind: where you walk, we are not chosen to tread." "How is the child?" asked the doctor, taking off his great coat. "I've tried to stop the flow of blood, sir. but I'm profited nothing. She is here. sir. Look for yourself and examine the wound. Then you’ll know." The woman was talking in a whisper, but when Finney caught sight of the pale little face among the pillows and saw the stained band—""S he turned to the woman with an imperative gesture. 107‘‘Hush.’’ he said. “No words: every moment is precious." lie knelt hv the bed and placed his car to the child’s breast. Kainllv. very, very faintly, heat her heart. Then his finder went to her wrist, where he felt of her pulse. Very weakly and irregularly it was beating. "There’s a chance, a slim chance. She is almost gone. The blood must be stopped instantly," lie said gravely, as one talking to himself. Then with a skill born of years of experience and with the determination of a man lighting for his own life, he went to work. There was something on his face not of fear nor fatigue as he tore bandages and applied poultices which had power to check the flow of blood. And on the face of the old woodsman and his wife, as they stood silently watching his every movement, was bewilderment and wonder and a touch of awe. They realized that he was battling with death for the life of another. And. as witnesses to the battle in which they took no part, they stood speechless, as two wondering children watching a conflict too real for drama. Outside the storm was still raging. In the corner of the room the old clock, with tick loud, measured, and slow, pointed to the hours of night. All the while the doctor’s face was grave, and the child, who had moaned once as he bound up her foot, seemed too still to be the possessor of life. For an hour after the Doctor had done all that it was jjossible for him to do. he sat by the bedside, his eyes upon the face of the child. At last, near dawn, he arose and went to the window. The winds had ceased. Snow was no longer falling, and through a break in the clouds one'golden star was burning brightly. He turned from the window with a wan smile on his face. It was a smile of victory. “The blood stopped some hours ago.’’ he said to the man and woman. “The child is very, very weak, but safe. Hut had I been a few minutes later there would have been a little grave dug somewhere in these hills." "An’ that it would, sir.” said the old woodsman. “A noble man you are, sir, and the Lord bless you for what you've done this night." said the woman. “The child will not need me further," said Finney, who had let pass unnoticed the remarks of the Others. “I need sleep, and if you’ll let me take a nap I'll appreciate it. When the child wakes, call me if you think it necessary." The little woman showed him to another room where a bright fire was burning on the hearth. When he was left alone, Finney, without a glance around the room, threw himself across the bed without undressing. Soon he fell into a heavy sleep. Xear sunset he was awakened bv the old woodsman. "I’m sorry to wake you. sir." lie said. “Knowing that you was up all night and tired and in sure need of sleep. I ut the child is awake, sir. and the mother, who came an hour ago. is anxious that you take another look at the child." 10SWithout a word Finney arose and went into the room where the child was. As he entered the door the mother, who was sitting by the bedside and looking into the face of the child, lifted her face to his and arose to greet him. Their eyes met. Finney stood as one hopelessly bewildered. ••Juanita!" he cried. At the sound of his voice the hot color surged under the pallor of the woman’s cheeks. He noted the black rings around her eyes, the look of soul hunger in her face, the faint lines of hardness about her mouth. She gazed at him steadily without the quiver of an eye-lash. To him there seemed to be an eternity in the waiting moment when they stood thus, eye to eye, face to face, soul to soul. Incoherently he was whispering her name. Slowly, with outstretched arms, he came nearer. She noted the quick wild question of his eyes. In that instant the old dream, the dream of love, that has been strong enough throughout the ages to cast the weight of the world from its shoulders, forced itself upon the woman. Slowly, in a sacred stillness, they came together. And that hour, with its sudden great decision, its thrilling renewal of hope and love, was like no other hour in all their lives. Robert G. Lei . 13. 109Adelphian Literary Society I. E. Bridges . . G. S. Sloan . . R. X. Johnson . E. V. Milford . L. V. Langston S. O. Pruitt . . I. D. Wixco . . W. M. Craig . . E. L. Perry . . G. $. Cunkscai.es L. XV. Langston E. V. Brockman V. M. Craig G. S. Sl.OAN T. IL Watson OFFICERS—FALL TERM .................................................President ........................................I ’ice-Prcsident .......................................Recording Secretary ...................................Corresponding Secretary ............................................Senior Censor ............................................Junior Censor .................................................Treasurer ................................................. Chaplain ..........................................Sergcant-at-Arms ...............................Assistant Sergcant-at-Arms ............................................High Priest ■ ...............................................Marshals L. W. Langston I. D. Wingo . . S. O. Pruitt . . E. W. Brockman E. W. Mii.ford . Max Rice . . . W. M. Bridges . R. X. Allen . . G. W. Cox . . . G. C Mangum . W. K. Au.kn . . I. E. Bridges . . G. S. Sl.OAN . . OFFICERS—SPRING TERM .............................................President ................................... I'ice-Prcsident .................................Recording Secretary .............................Corresponding Secretary .......................................Senior Censor ......................................Junior Censor ............................................. Chaplain .............................................Treasurer ..............................................Recorder ....................................Scrgeant-at-A rins ..........................Assistant Scrgcant-af-Anns .......................................Senior Critic . . . ..................................Junior CriticRoll of Adelphian Literary Society MEMBERS ALLEN. R. X. ALLEN, J. R. ALLEN, W. K. BAKER, C. A. BRIDGES. 1. E. BRIDGES. W M. BROCKMAN, K. W. CARSON. A. B. CARSON. W. B. CARSON. T. C. CARSON. W. P. CUNKSCAT.ES. G. S. COX. G. W. CRAIG. W. M. CHAPPELL. L. N. COKER. F. M. EASTERLING. T. R. EASI.EV. J. A. ESTES, JL W. HAWKINS, F. C. JOHNSON. R. N. KING, A. L. LANGSTON. L. W. LIDE. L. M. LITTLE, T. L. LOAD HOLT, W. R. mcdaniel. w. c. MANGL'M, G. C. MILFORD. E. W. MILLER. J. IJ. MULLIGAN, A. D. PLYLER. J. L. PLYLER. J. W. PERRY. E. L. P( )TEAT. E. M., Jr. P( )TEAT. J. R. PRUITT. S. O. RICE. M. ROBINSON. 1. F. SAWYER. W. P. SIMONS. E. G. SLOAN. G. S. SULLIVAN, C. S. TATE. V. E. WALKER. J. L. WARD. W. H. WATSON. T. H. WINGO, I. D. I 2Sketch of the Adelphian Literary Society IMMEDIATELY after the opening of Furman University in 1850. the students framed their first organization for literary purposes. The name given to this venerable institution, so noble in its origin and so full of historic interest, was the Adelphian Literary Society. The object sought by its founders was to obtain for the members not only social enjoyment, but practice and skill in parliamentary law. in the composition of literature and in the art of public speech. Having perfected their organization, the students held their meetings at first near Main Street, but later the secured an apartment in the University, where they regularly met up to 1900. In that year, however, the Alumni Hall was completed; and in this building the society has ever since occupied an elegant and commodious hall. Xow. soon after the society had begun its work, a faction arose which became so dissatisfied that it drew apart in 1854 and formed another body called the Philosophian Literary Society. Thenceforth a friendly though spirited rivalry subsisted between the old society and its new competitor. Hut in 1861 the contending Adclphians and Philosophians dropped their scholastic contests to engage in the more gigantic contest between the North and the South. Answering to the bugle call of the Confederacy, they enlisted by scores under the banners of Lee and Jackson. For a period of five years the University was closed. Ihit when peace had been restored, the University reopened in 1866, and the Adelphian Society resumed its work with the old time enthusiasm and with a steadily increasing membership. During the period from the close of the war to the present, the society has accomplished much. It has been a large factor in the training and equipment of hundreds of men, many of whom have achieved distinction as preachers, lawyers and professors. It has united with the Philosophian Society in publishing the Furman Echo, and it has thereby provided its members with a field of training not only in journalism, but in all kinds of literary composition. When, in 1898, the South Carolina Intercollegiate Oratorical Association was organized, it elected as its first president a member of the Adelphian Society. As regards the public functions of the University, it has long been a custom of the society to hold an annual public meeting. Out of twelve inter-society oratorical contests, the society has won six. In the inter-society debates, the representatives of the society have won the debater’s medal every time it has been given. Such being the nature and the record of the Adelphian brotherhood, it only remains to be said that its membership is composed of hard working men who are concerned with promoting the welfare of one another in particular and of the University as a whole. 1131. E. Bridgks President. Poll 7 ennL. VV. Langston. President, Spring TermG. S. Sl.OAN. I ‘icc- fresident. 'till TermRing On, Old Bell {Cowposed in thf belfry of l:urmon University) You look as though forsaken, bell. Ah, yes, you think your work is done. "Pis true, perhaps, some thankless son. Who your sweet tones once knew so well. As they the hourly breeze would swell. Has gone his way. Perhaps some one— Some thankless son—would blush to own Your call. Thus let it be, old bell. And vet your tones shall linger still. No noble son can e’er forget The bell that called in measures grand. Ring on. old bell, nor cease to thrill The hearts of younger sons who yet Obey with joy your sweet command. —John W. Huff. 118Philosophian Literary Society Gamma Section OFFICERS—FALL TERM B. C. Givens.................................................President D. L. Hiu..............................................Vice-President J. E. Barber.......................................Recording Secretary W. W. Lipscomb.................................Corresponding Secretary H. S. Brockman..........................................Senior Censor R. G. LEE................................................Junior Censor E. M. Hicks.............................................Senior Critic J. F. Whatley............................................Junior Critic E. R. StEGAU................................................Treasurer L. E. Kerry................................................. Chaplain J. F. Pittman................................................Historian M. R. Mahaeeey..............................................Conductor W. W. Lipscomb.....................................Assistant Conductor H. T. Duckett........................................Scrgeant-at-Anns H. G. Culbertson............................Assistant Sergeanf-at-Anns Hoi.lie James..........................................Standard Bearer OFFICERS—SPRING TERM H. S. Brockman..............................................President D. L. Hiu..............................................Vice-President B. C. Givens.......................................Recording Secretary J. F. Whatley..................................Corresponding Secretary A. B. Marett.............................................Senior Censor E. R. Stegali...........................................Junior Censor R. G. Lee................................................Senior Critic J. E. Barber.............................................Junior Critic E. M. Hicks..................................................Treasurer L. D. Mitcheli............................................... Chaplain W. R. Timmons................................................Historian J. II. Scarborough...........................................Conductor J. R. Barnett.........................................Sergeant-at-Arms W. L. Feaster...............................Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms L. H. Raines...........................................Standard Bearer 119Philosophian Literary Society Sigma Section OFFICERS—FALL TERM J. A. Smith. President F. G. Harris. I'ice-Presulent M. S. Fender. Recording Secretary I . M. Baii.ES, Cor. Secretary V. C. Langston. Senior Censor E. C. Simpson, Junior Censor I. Y. Hufi . Senior Critic J. K. EzEU.. Junior Critic j. W. Barker, Treasurer E. I.. Collins, Chaplain J. IT. Sc a Ki'.oKouc.Ji. Historian K. Tannery. Conductor I. R. Wkiiii, Assistant Conductor H. A. Johnson, Sergeant-at-.Inns O. I . Givens. Asst. Sergeant-at-Anns C. I . I’.ovi). Standard Hearer OFFICERS—SPRING TERM 1 G. Harris. President M. S. Fender, ice-President J. W. Huff, Recording Secretary E. C. Simpson. Cor. Secretary O. B. Givens. Senior Censor Y. C. I'attkkson, Junior Censor J. A. Smith, Senior Critic C. I). Boyd, Junior Critic I . M. Baii.ES, Treasurer J. Y. Marker. Chaplain Y. T. Ask i ns. Historian E. II. Crain, Conductor C. Y. I Shown. Assistant Conductor J. K. Kzeij., Sergeant-at-Arnis R. (i. Skinner. Asst. Scrg.-at-Arins II. L. Brockman, Standard Hearer STANDING COMMITTEES—FALL TERM Executive Committee— D. L. Hill, F. (i. Harris, J. II. Scarlxirough. INTERSOCIETV RELATIONS COMMITTEE—C. D. I»0 'd. Y. C. Langston. C. E. Pettit. Ham. Committee—M. R. Mahaffey. I '. C. Simpson. H. C. Hester. Query Committee—Gramma Section—J. E. Barber. G. C. Epps. R. CL Lee. Query Commuter—Sigma Section—M. S. Fender. J. Y. Ilnff. P. M. Bailcs. STANDING COMMITTEES—SPRING TERM Executive Committee— Y. R. Timmons. M. S. Fender. D. L. Mill. Intersociety Relations Committee—C. I . Boyd. VY. C. Langston. J. E. Barber. Hall Committee—E. C. Simpson. M. R. Mahaffey. H. C. Hester. Query Committee—Gamma Section—B. C. Givens. Y. L. Ecaster. I). I.. Hill." Query Fender. Committee—Sigma Section—J. Y. Muff. J. (These represent both sections) A. Smith, M. S. 120Sketch of the Philosophian Literary Society PREVIOUS to the year 1S52 there was only one society at Furman University. This one met in Me Lee Hall, a few blocks from the campus, under the Masons, who met, as did the society, every Saturday evening. The saying, "Everybody does not see alike." was true with the society, and when asked to vacate the hall by the Masons, because their eloqucnc was heard beyond their hall, some held the right to retain their place of meeting while others thought best to leave. 'This difference of opinion divided the society, and those who held the right to keep the hall, gathered under the stately oaks just below the campus and there organized their group under the name of "l’hilosophian," with G. A. Norwood president and "Excelsior" as their motto. The society was carried on in the same excellent manner as before the division, until the great struggle came on between the States, when the Philoso-phian society closed her doors and gave her brave sons to the ervice ot her country. The minutes cease for five years, until the valiant heroes return to take up their search for knowledge and began work again in their society hall. They mourned the loss of the following of their fellow-menil crs: Samuel 1 Mims. John Y. Mays. Judson Y. Knotts. Felix I.. Timmerman. Samuel I . Pringle. J. Calhoun Sparks. Joseph A. W allace, and Elliott K. Mill, all of whom sacrificed their lives on the altar of their country. Starting after the war, with few members, the society has steadily increased in membership, until the fall of 1909 it was thought best to divide the society into two sections, called the Gamma and the Sigma. There were eightv-five members on roll, which was the largest in its history. The Philosophians have not been without their honor, for in the State Oratorical Contest they have won the first place twice and the second place four times. In 1.889, the society began the publication of the "Philosophian," a monthly magazine, but realizing afterwards that a better one could be published by combining the magazine of the sister society with theirs, they christened the new publication “The Furman Echo." This magazine is such that any small college would be proud to claim. Advised by a lecture given by Dr. E. M. Poteat in 1904. a "goat" was secured and has been kept in the society hall ever since. The secret brings the members closer together in their work and business. Meeting behind closed doors, as did the signers of the Declaration of Independence in old Philadelphia, we hope to send out a blessing to the world through our members, as did our forefathers through their great document. May our motto be stamped upon each member’s heart, and that no man may be satisfied with his lot. but strive to go higher—‘'Excelsior." In 1908 we suffered the great loss of our first president. G. A. Norwood. lie was a noble citizen and an honorable gentleman. 121I». C. Givens. President, (i(iiiiiiih Section, Fall TermJ. A. Smith. 'resident. Sigma Seel ion. Fall Term1 I. S. 15 ROCK MAX President, Comma Section, Spring Term1;. (». 1 {arris, President Sigma Section. Spring TermK'Jt Vice-President Sigma Section. Pall Term F. (». H arris.D. L. Him.. I"'ice-President Comma Section, Spring Term I'ice-President Gamma Section. Pali TermPhilosophian Literary Society AIKEN, J. B. ANDERSON. J. 'I'. ASKINS, W. T. BAILKS. P. M. BARKER. J. E. BARBER, J. W. BARKSDALE. A. D. L. BARNETT. J. R. BLACK, W. BOWEN, L. II. BOYD. C. I). BRADLEY. S. C. BRI DWELL. W. B. BROCKMAN. II. L. BROCKMAN. II. S. BROWN. C. Y. BURNETT. A. 1). BURNETT. G. N. BUSSEY. J. P. CARTER, W. W. CHILDRESS. J. P. COLLINS. K. L. CRAIN. E. B. CULBERTSON, H. G. DORN. L. E. DUCKETT, II. T. DUSENBURRY. R. M. KITS. G. C. EPPS. W. C. EZELL. A. J. EZELL. J. K. I-EASTER. W. L. PENDER. M. S. FOREMAN. A. A. MEMBERS FOWLER. T. M. GARDNER. E. GIBSON, R. B. CrVENS, B. C. GIVENS, O. B. HAMMOND. W. M. HARPER. T. J. HARRIS. F. G. HESTER. H. C. HICKS. E. M. HILL. I). L. HODGENS. H. M. HOLLEY. II. E. HUFF. J. W. HUNT. I). B. IRBY. G. W. JACKSON. J. E. JAMES, I). H. JOHNSON. H. A. KERBY. L. E. LANCASTER. T. C. LANCASTER, T. S. LANGSTON. T. II. LANGSTON. W. C. LEE, R. a LIPSCOMB. W. W. MACIIEN. E. W. MAHAFFEY. M. R. M A RETT. A. B. McCOY, J. A. MITCHELL. L. I). MITCHELL. F. W. MOBLEY. W. F. M )()RE. C. MOOR El 11 'AD. H. NELSON. C. S. OWINGS, J. E. PATTERSON. C. W. PETTIT. C. E. PICKENS, A. L. PITTMAN. J. F. RAINES. L. H. RODGERS. A. I). ROE. T. A. ROPER. R. II. RUNION. J. J. SAIT)CIL M. F. SCARBOROUGH. J. II. SCARBOROUGH. O. C. SIMPSON. ]•;. C. SIMPSON. J. II. SKINNER. A. C. SKINNER. R. G. SMITH. II. C. SMITH. J. A. STEKDLY. II. F. STEGALL, E. R. TANNERY, K. TIMMONS. W. R. TRULUCK. J. M. WHATLEY, J. F. WEBB. E. J.' WEBB. J. R. WILLIAMS. W. E. WILLIAMS, C. L. WORKMAN. B. J. ZEIGLER. W. 12[)Why We Laugh I)k. Pothat (in Bible)—"W’liat is the origin of sin?" Sot’ii. Carson—“Eating an apple." Jcp. Barnett walked into the Barber twins' room and, seeing a picture of the two as babies, asked: "Boys, wuz you always twins? Mow did they know which of you two was hungry?” Dr. Potkat—“What do you know of Saul's ancestry?" E. M. Micks—“Do you mean his father. Doctor?” Young Lady (at G. K. C. reception)—"How do you like novels?" Fr HSU man S. O. M.—"1 don't know. I’ve never eaten any, but ’Possum is mighty good ’ Student Barnett (at Y. M. C. A. banquet in Montague hall) was asked to remain for a while after the banquet, as there were going to he some toasts. "No, thank you.” he replied. "I don't care for another bite." Rat S. O., on going into the postottice to mail a package, was asked by the clerk, “Is it merchandise?” He quickly replied, "No, sir: it’s cloth.” Frksu. B. S.—"I owe two dollars to I)r. Stringer." Fresh II. M.—"I paid my drug bill yesterday.” Fresh. I . S.—"Why, mine's for medicine." Dr. Potkat—"Name some of the Apostle Paul's contemporaries." Sr. Givens—"Jesus, Saul, and John Bunyan." Jr. T. Carson—"There are three cities in the South which allow Sunday baseball. St. Louis, Memphis, and Alabama.” Prof. Buist (in Physics)—"What kind of friction do falling bodies encounter ?” Jr. Barnett—“Falling friction, Professor.” Freshman, upon entering a very much crowded street car with a young lady, said to her: "Do you suppose we could squeeze in here?" Dr. Potkat—“Did the Apostles have swords?” Sr. Lipscomb—"I don’t know. Doctor: but Christ told them to put on the breastplate of righteousness.” Dr. Watson—“Well, now. gentlemen, mercury is a liquid metal. Can you give the name of another liquid metal ?” Jr. Si m pson—“Quicksilver.” (Continued on page i.jj) 130Mrs. M. 1). Cai.mes, MatronMrs. Mary K. Hartox, HousekcepcrOfficers of the Y. M. C. A. W. Marshall Craig A. B. Marett . . . P. M. Bulks . . . W. M. Bridges . . R. X. Johnson . . .............President . . . Vice-President . . . . Treasurer . . Recording Secretary ( orresponding Secretary STANDING COMMITTED, 1911-12 Membership C. D. Boyd, Chairman A. 13. Marktt W. M. Bridges Max Rice H. L. Brockman Mission Study R. G. Lee. Chairman H. C. IIkster L. M. Lide W. L. Blaster Devotional A. B. Marett, Chairman J. II. Scarborough R. N. Johnson Y. R. Timmons Personal Work P. M. Bailes, Chairman George Cox L. 1). Mitchell E. C. Simrson Neighborhood C. A. Baker, Chairman L. H. Raines J. R. Barnett II. C. Smith J. II. Si MESON R. M. Dusenbury Finance M. R. MaiiaEEEY, Chairman E. B. Crain J. R. Potkat K. Tannery A. I). Rodgers 0. B. Givens Social E. W. Brockman, Chairman J. II. Scarborough E. M. Poteat R. X. Johnson J. K. Ezell A. B. Marett Max Rice II. G. Culbertson Music E. M. IIicks, Chairman Y. R. Timmons E. Y. Brockman E. M. Poteat 134History of the Y. M. C. A. Till . Young Men's Christian Association as an institution of Furman University had its beginning in 1882, when a delegation of young men from the Y. M. C. A. of Wofford College, which association had been organized in 1879. came over to Greenville and formally organized a Y. M. C. A. at Furman. At times life in it seemed to be extinct, but. volcano-like, it was not dead: it had ceased to cast forth its expected streams of moral and religious helpfulness, and Christian brotherhood unity, only to burst forth with renewed vigor under new stimulations and the pressure of the need of such a Christian organization in a student body. These eruptions compose a history that is varied and checkered and full of vicissitudes, struggling at times to let the world know there was even a crater existing. In the year 1898 Doctor F.stcs, who was then the University Professor of Latin, was one who took great interest in the student life; and in his observations and dealings with the students, found the vital need among them of a burning mountain of Christian manhood with its life-building and life-uplifting forces flowing out of it. The thought of this mountain, which had been thrown up in 1882, and filled with Association principles and ideals to be cast forth to enter into the development of the student life, had ceased to seem to be and had passed from the minds of all. Doctor Hstes set about to infuse into the mind of a few students the need of a Christian organization among the students, and together with their assistance an organization of this character was organized, or rather reorganized, for what they brought to existence was the revival of the burning mountain of Christian development of the spiritual and moral nature of man, which had its initial flow in 1882 under the name of Young Men’s Christian Association, which name was given to the reorganized institution. Since 1898, there has never been any doubt to any one of extinction or lessening of the burning mountain. The Y. M. C. A. since then has had a steady growth. In 1898. there were fifteen members in the Y. M. C. A., and a total enrollment of 141 in the university; in 1903. there were sixty meml ers in the Y. M. C. A., and a total enrollment of 112 in the University; in 1909, there were 116 members in the Y. M. C. A., and a total enrollment of 155 in the University. 'Phe year 1911 shows still greater growth, for there are now 180 on the roll of the Y. M. C. A. from a total enrollment of 246 in the University. Interest has been actively manifested in every phase of the International Y. M. C. A., of which the local body is a part, since 1898. There has not been a year since that date that the local organization has failed to send delegates to the Southern Students' Conference, which meets at Montreat. X. C.. in June of every year. In 1910 the Y. M. C. A. sent twenty-one delegates, which was the second largest delegation present at the Conference. Two championship pennants U7arc in the possession of the V. M. C. A. which were won at Montreat. Delegates have been sent to the Interntaional Conference since 1901. The association sent two delegates to the International Convention, which met at Columbus, ()lno. 1908. Three delegates were sent in 1906 to the International Volunteer Convention. which is a division of the International propaganda; and in 1910 three students and one member of the Faculty were sent as delegates to the Convention at Rochester. The Association, in 1909. sent a delegation of twenty-two to the South Carolina Bible Institute, a division of the South Carolina V. M. C. A. organization. ()nly one other school in the State was represented by a large number of students. Rut the interest in the work and welfare of the State. National, and International Organizations has not narrowed the field of local service and development. Since the revival in 1898 of the sleeping crater there have been meetings conducted by the X’. M. C. A. in a commodious room in the Alumni Hall. These meetings are held each Thursday night, and are led by members of the Faculty, pastors in the city, visiting pastors, physicians, visitors to Greenville connected with various prominent religious movements, traveling Y. M. C. A. Secretaries, students, and various other men. Hiblc study and mission work is encouraged and fostered, and has been for the last thirteen years. At present the Hiblc study work i not directly under the control of the X . M. C. A., as it has been given over to the Judson Memorial Baraca Class (if the First Baptist Church. This class has an enrollment of 165. composed exclusively of the Furman students, and is taught by Professor Geer. This year the mission study class has been put into the hands of twelve students as teachers. These leaders are very ablv prepared to lead their respective class, auending a normal class which is very ably conducted by Dr. .( . Fletcher. Me is a man of experience and this experience is bountifully shared to every man who comes in contact with his cultured presence. hat is his is the property of every one else. There are in the mission study classes this year about 145. The Volunteer Band is another phase of work done by the X’. M. C. A. This will be treated elsewhere in the Annual. Of all the Y. M. C. A. work, one of the greatest and best sources of religious inspiration, and in coming in touch with'God. is found in the daily prayer meetings. These services arc conducted each evening. X'. M. C. A. night and Sunday night being excepted, in one room on each floor of Montague I fall, and in each of the other three halls, for about fifteen minutes, after supper. It is the sense of these prayer meetings that every student on the campus will attend one of these gatherings each day, and a very gratifying attendance usually marks them. Another feature of the Association is the jail work. Every Sunday afternoon a volunteer committee from the Association visits the County jail and holds religious services among the prisoners there. 138Student Volunteer Band for Foreign Missions Motto—“The evangelization of the world in this generation." (J. C. Epps.......... W. 1 . Moiu.ky . . . S. O. Pruitt . . . . J. W. Hakbick . . . . BAKER. C. A. BARBER. J. W. BROCKMAN . II. S. KBPS. C,. C. 11 ESTER. II. C. MILL. 1). L. IIODCEKS. II. M. OFFICERS ..........................President ....................... I 'ice-President ...............Secretory and Treasurer ................( orresponding Sccretary MEMBERS JACKSON. J. I-:. UDE. L. M. MOBLEY. VY. E. PRUITT. S. (). RAINES. L. II. SMITH. II. C. WATSON. T. II. 130History of the Student Volunteer Band THE Furman University Student Volunteer Hand for Foreign Missions was organized in October, 1907, by eight young men. The men who composed this first band were I'owe. Quisenberrv, Barber. Smith. Abbot, l’oteat, Babb, and Lidc. V. II. Powe was president, and J. K. Quiscn-berrv vice-president. In answer to specific prayer, four more men during the early part of the year. 1908, volunteered their services for the foreign field. At the close of the scholastic year there were twelve Student Volunteers in the institution. The Band reassembled in October, 1908. but four of the fellows had not returned. Powe and Babb had graduated in June. 1908. and two others had entered Richmond College. The Band was reorganized with J. R. Quisenberry president, and J. F. Lidc vice-president. Prayer was entered into with renewed fervor, and definite plans were laid out for the year’s work. As a result of special work there were ten additions to the Band during the year, and one of the students who attended the Montreat Conference volunteered before the Conference closed. Thus as the result of the year’s work there had been an increase from eight to nineteen Volunteers during the year 1908-09. At the first meeting of the Band in October. 1909. there were seven absent. Five had graduated in the previous June, and two had failed to return. J. F. Lidc was elected president, and Gordon Poteat vice-president for the ensuing year. The Band did a good year's work, but the results are not seen in the increase of numbers, as was the case in the previous year. However, there were three additions, so the year closed with fifteen in the Band. I11 the annual October meeting of 1910. the fellows were somewhat discouraged because six of the Band’s best workers had not returned. Four had taken their degrees in June of the same year, and two had entered other colleges. But feeling that it had a work to do. it reorganized. G. C. Epps was president, and J. T. Anderson vice-president. Since Anderson was one of the two who had entered other colleges. W. F. Mobley was elected to fill out his unexpired term. The Band, after some delay, entered upon its new year's work enthusiastically. And up to February r. 1911. there has been five additions. 'rile Band holds weekly meetings. The purpose of these meetings is to strengthen each other, to study the Bible, the nature and extent of mission work. "Come and go with us. Forgetting the things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, (we) press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus."Judson Memorial Baraca Class OFFICERS -FALL TERM Prof. 15. E. Geer..................... Section A M. S. Fender.................................. H. S. I .ROCK MAX......................... . . W. C. Langston................................ E. M. Hicks................................... Section B P». C. Givens................................. E. W. Milford................................. C. E. Pettit.................................. Max Ricf...................................... Music Committee E. M. Hicks A. D. Rogers Y R. Timmons G. C. Errs F. G. Harris OFFICERS—SPRING TERM W. M. Craig................................... E. C. Simpson................................. Max Rice...................................... A. R Marett................................... Teacher . . President I ice-president . . Secretary . . Treasurer . . President I ice-President . . Secretary . . Treasurer President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer THE Judson Memorial Class was organized the year after the death of Prof. Charles H. judson. who for more than fifty years had served Furman University in the capacity of Professor of Mathematics, and for a short time as Chairman of the Faculty. Professor Judson was all his life deeply interested in Sunday School work, and evinced this interest by a constant attendance and by giving his services as teacher of a class. It was thought to be eminently fitting to organize a class in the Sunday school which should bear his name and for all time serve as a memorial of him and as a reminder of his long, useful career as a Sunday school teacher. Professor Judson lived in the home of Prof. 15. E. Geer for a number of years before his death. The relationship between Professor Judson and Professor Geer was more than that of friendship and the tie which bound them together was as strong as that of father and son. Because of this close relationship. Professor Geer was asked to take charge of the new class that was organized. 'Pile membership of this class is made up of Furman University students and the total enrollment this present year exceeds one hundred. 142Why We Laugh (Continued from page 130) Craig was telling the fellows about the tennis tourney at Erskine. He mentioned the fact that fifteen or twenty of the Erskine students were girls. Jr. Langston said, "Why. I didn't know Erskine was intercollegiate." I)r. Cook—"What is the first division of time?” Student L.—"1 don't know, sir." Dr. Cook—"Why, night and day. of course." Dr. Ki.etcher—"In what two ways does a man get a living?" Student S.—"Working and stealing. Doctor." Dr. Potkat- "Will you tell us what estimable trait Jacob showed in tricking Esau out of his birthright?" Duckett—"It showed that he was a dishonest man.” J. V. Harder—"I've got to get something to clear the cobwebs out of my brains." Prof.—"Try a vacuum cleaner. Mr. Barber." Eresiiman S. L. II.—"How long can a man live without brains?" Dr. Cook—"How old are you?" Dr. Fi.ktciier—"What two senses are involved in space perception?" D. IL James—"Vision and sight.’’ Fresh. A. G. and Lady in conversation over phone. Lady—“Say. arc you going to the show?" Mr. A. G.—“Yes, ma'in." Lady—"Well, will you please call by for me?" Mr. A. G. nodded his head and hung up the receiver. (Continued on page 173) Shakespeare—As He Would Have Been The man that in himself loves not hominy. Xor is not moved with grinding of old grits, Is fit for hunger, starvation and death. The outlines of his body are lank as ghosts. And all his prospects dark as Erebus; Let no such man come to College. L W. C.Furman Athletic Association OFFICERS W. C. Langston . f.President E. W. Mi1.1-oun...............................................Vice-President S. O. Pruitt.......................................................Secretary E. M. Hicks........................................................Treasurer W. M. Craig.........................................Manager Baseball Team L. W. Langston............................Assistant Manager Baseball Team Max Rice....................................................Captain Baseball Team I. K. Ezkli......................................Manager Basket-ball Team E. W. Mii.i-okd...................................Captain Basket-ball Team W. T. Askins..................................................Manager Tennis W. M. Craig.......................................Assistant Manager Tennis C. E. Byrd................................Advertising Manager Association J. Corbett............................................................ Coach G. S. Sr.oan....................................................... Reporter 145Baseball W. M. Craig.....................................................Manager Max Rick........................................................Captain Jack Corbktt..................................................... Coach SCHEDULE OF GAMES April i—Charleston College April 7—Clemson College April 8—Clemson College April io—Wofl’ord College April 11—Wofford College April 13—Citadel April 14—Citadel April 17—Xewberrv College April 24—Clinton April 25—Clinton May 5—Erskine College May 6—Erskine College May 12—Newberry College May 13—Newberry College vs. Furman, at Greenville, vs. Furman, at Greenville, vs. Furman, at Greenville, vs. Furman, at Spartanburg, vs. Furman, at Spartanburg, vs. Furman, at Greenville, vs. Furman, at Greenville, vs. Furman, at Greenville, vs. Furman, at Greenville, vs. Furman, at Greenville, vs. Furman, at Due West, vs. Furman, at Due West, vs. Furman, at Newberry, vs. Furman, at Newberry. i47Basket Ball S. O. Pruitt . 1). V. Mason . J. K. Kzki.i. . A. B. M ARKTT . 1 '. Y. Mii.ford . . . . Fonvard . . . . Fonvard ('enter and Manager . . . . Guard Guard and Captain iTennis Club OFFICERS . W. Tracy Ask-ins........................................... Manager W. M. Craig.......................................Assistant Manager Champions, 1910-1 I Y. T. Askins, II. T. Duckktt...............................Doubles W. T. Askins................................................Singles Represented Turman in Stale Tournament at Clinton R. X. CHAPPI-XL 1C W. MILFORD II. G. CULP.ERTSOX YM. CRAIG Y. R. TfMMOXS A. 11. MARETT MEMBERS E. M. POTKAT M. RICE Y. T. ASK IXS II. T. DUCKETT S. O. PRUITT K. W. MACMKX 150Junior-Senior Football Team OFFICERS C. D. Boyd................................. Max Kick................................... Manager Captain Laxc.ston. !,. Y Brockman . . Boyd . . . . Maiiaffky . . P )TKAT . . . SCAKI50ROUC.il Emi............ Rick . . . . Wixc.o . . . Mi I.ford . . . Carson, A. B. . Causox, Y. B. . LINEUP . . . ('enter . Right Guard Left Guard . Right Tackle . Left Tackle Right End . . Left Hud . Quarterback Right Halfback Left Halfback . . Pullback . . Substitute 151Freshman-Sophomore Football Team LINEUP Workman.....................................................( enter Holley........................................Left (;,uird HuNV...........................................Right Guard Poteat.........................................Left 7 acklc Little.........................................Right 7 acklc Scarborough..............................................Left End j?, ............................................Right End Tate............................................Quarterback Skinner, A C..................................Left Halfback Drake........................................Mg11 Halfback Skinner. R. G..........................Captain and f ullback Substitutes Chappell Mayfield Padgett 152Senior Medalists L. W. LAXGSTOX 154 J. W. Hl’FF G. S. SLOAXGlee Club A. W. Honeycut.....................................................President K. M. Hicks.................................................. Vice-President W. R. Timmons . »....................................Secretary and Treasurer E. M. Pot bat. Jr..........................................Business Manager E. M. Hicks......................................Assistant Business Manager PERSON E First Tenors A. W. I Ioneycutt S. O. Pruitt Second Tenors E. W. Mach bn F. G. 11 ARRIS E. Y. 1 ROCKMAX First Basses E. M. Poteat. Jr. Second Basses E. M. Hicks Y. R. Timmons J. R. Poteat J. 1 . Rowxsox Quartet A. W. Honeycut, •' .? Tenor E. M. Poteat. Jr., first Bass W. R. Timmons, Second Tenor E. M. Hicks. Jr.. Second Bass Ciias. E. Poston, Director LeRoy P. Hartley. Violinist 156Judson Cottage T. H. Watson ...................Janitor H. C. Smith....................Chaplain S. C. 1‘uadi.kv............f'irst C ook Y. E. Wii.ua.vs.......Bottle I Cosher C. W. Pattkrsox. .Wall Sweeper ( ?) G. C. Max gum..............Xews Toler II. E. I Ioi.f.v....General Manager L. II. I vkx....................Girl linibracer J. R. Au.kx....................High Sleeper J. M. Tkui.uju................Butler J. I - Jagksox................Barber II. I .. I lonCKXs..............Room Cleaner A. A. Fork max . T'ool Room Instructor W. Zkigi.kk......Pool Room Lounger C. L. Wn.i.iams.................“IT” R. X- Au.kx................Chaperone Xol ours to shout from out the lofty towers That we are bosses and the world Is ours, Hut when all calm 'mid ruler's strife is lost. Tis awful had to he the ones who’re bossed. J. T. AXDERSC X J. A. McO Y I- X. CHAPPELL I. 15. MILLER A. L. PICKEXS Motto—If our work conflicts with moving pictures, cut work out. 159Champion Eaters Club Pass word—Si loot the old reliable Object—To make the rations fly Stop! Stop! waiter, in your haste. Give us some rations to our taste. For we arc hungry at every meal. Hence to your heart do we appeal. Members F. G. I Iakkis W. C. Langston II. S. Brockman B. C. Givens V. YV. Lii’Scomh J. A. Smith J. W. Huff G. C. Ei’i’S A. B. Marktt M. S. Fkndkr functions and favorite Dishes Server of the coffee. Rice, and it's so very nice. A sure destroyer of the products of wheat. To find the bottom of the butter-bean dish. The generous distributer of water. Hides the muscavotors. Consumer of the products of the slaughter pen. Feed me on wasp nest. Prunes, prunes, yesterday, today and forever. Likes something strong—Butter. 160f Doctors Club Motto "Let's carve him as a dish lit tor the gods. Xot hew him as a carcass lit for hounds." Object To make the undertaker's business more inviting. Time of liusincss When tile patient is unconscious. ROLL FOWLER, T. M. SAWYER, W. P. HICKS, K. .'t. TIMMONS. W. K. l.ANGSTON. W. C. WEim. E. J. S A POCII. M. F. W( IK K M A N, 8. J. BAKUKK. .1. W. BROCKMAN. H. S. BROCKMAN, II. I.. DfSKNHURV. K. M. Dr. W. E. Carpenter. Demonstrator 161(1 h r p c ii in a ns'lt i p (T1 n It JKffi'I'ff VeilPenmanship Club OFFICERS J. E. Bakbkk...............................................President O. 1 . Givrns....................................... I'icc-Presidcnt K. Taxnkrv..................................Secretary and Treasurer Paul II. O’Hara. Department of Penmanship. Draughon’s Business College ....................................................I nstruetor C. A. 15AKICR J. K. HARPER E. W. BROCKMAN j. C. I SYR I) W. v. C RTER MEMBERS O. B. ('.IYEN’S M. R. MAIIAEEEY I). W. PAYNE J. I . ROBINSON KLKTXER TAXXERY 163Golly Whopper Trust Habitat—Griffith 1 lull I . M. I . ii.ks, “.Mama." A. 1). IUuxktt. "t’ncle Dink.' G. X. Hurxktt. "I Tide Willie.” E. E. Gardner, "Rip an Winkle.” A. L. Kixc, "Aaron.” W. R. Eoaiwoi.t, "l.ort Gott.” R. G. Ei:e, "Doctor." E. C. Moore. “Easticaclo.” T. A. Roe. "Tommy." IE E. Simons. "Simple." C. S. Sri.i.IVAN. "Charlie." Prof. W. II. Vaxx. "Rhetor. Aim—'IT) create a disturbance at midnight, attract attention during the day and make our existence known to mankind. 164Dat Comejun Club In which deni trcncir.cns what 'pears in dat picture is as tollers: Mister I Job Johnson is dat mean nijjgur in de middle: on his let" and on vo right is "Xeke’’ Kzcll— yas’m lie's dat yeoman what blewed down dat New 'i awk Bank. Dat slim genemens on de yothcr side lie "Fatty' Boteat, de one what’s been in the penitentiary fo years—I mean married fo' rears. Dat voting an' biggcty lookin’ coon is Max Bice, de musician what plays, an' de vother one. why. he’s Bud Langston, what's dat sho'miflf ladies man spo t. He's sonic spo’t. don't he look dat er way in de miner? Yas'ni. dis hyer is us! 165The Midnight Crew Object—That "Rats’ shall learn their place Time of meeting—When the whistle sounds wild as the scream of the curlew Motto—Let no lx lt or lock retard you Colors—Green and Red OFFICERS Grand IT hard......................... Wizard................................ Scriba................................ Tribuiius Aerarmn..................... Censor ........................................... Poem—Rats may come And Sophs, may go Hut hazing stays forever. 166 . J. I . lirssF.Y K. W. Machkx W. I . Sawykr . C. Y. r.ROWN J. I'. RoiUNSON . W. I . CarsonLawyers Club Aim, I ’rimary—To represent the student body at Faculty Meetings Ultimate—To raise the standard of law profession OFFICERS Motto—Know the law 1 Smith E. W. M ciiKx Secretary I. R. YVkbh .. 1 iee-Presulcnt C. Y. J rovv. Treasurer Name Address Type Ii.ti mate End Aiken, J. 15. Fair Forest, S. C. Civil Clerk Court. Brown, C. V. Laurens. S. C. Criminal Senator. I Ikiik;i:s. I. E. Greenville, S. C. Civil Judge. Crain, E. 13. Dark Corner. S. C. Civil Politician. Fender, M. S. Bamberg, S. C. Commercial Insurance Company Mgr. Maciif.x, E. Y. Laurens, S. C. Criminal Solicitor. Mitchem.. F. W. Travelers Rest, S. C. Civil Magistrate. Simpson. J. H. Princeton. S. C. Civil Justice Supreme Court. Smith, J. A. Springfield Criminal 1 'olitician. Weiib, J. R. Blackville, S. C. Civil Lawyer. Wii.i.iams. W. E. Lancaster. S. C. Criminal City Commissioner. 167168Quarternian Club (Till-: FOUR FROM THK SKNIOK CLASS) S. o. PRUITT I. I). VYIXGO 169 A. IT CARSON K. W. MILFORDSamuki. Rooskvki.t Tau.ky, “Our Dusky Duster" 170SEE OUR ADS 171con Furman University GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA EDWIN 1. POTEAT, D.D., L.L. I)., President Courses arc offered leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Master of Arts (M.A.). Beautiful campus, healthful climate, moderate expenses. New’Library Building, specially endowed. Trained Librarian. Large comfortable dormitories. ::::::::: For catalog, special announcement folder, giving entrance requirements, or admission blanks, address, G. B. MARTIN, Chairman Committee on Admission of Students. n 1 2Why We Laugh Pitot . W’atso.x "W hat is tin odor of this gas: IrxioK l». M. “It is odorless. I smelled some of it yesterday. R. (!. Li: k (writing a eoni]H siti n)—"Wonder ii 1 could write a composition and not have a blue mark on it l y 1‘fnl. ami A. I). Burnett—"Yes. Ask him to mark it with red ink." Mangum (walking up street) seeing the sign. "excursion to Vtlanta. Round trip. $2.50.” said: “I didn't know those street cars went to Atlanta. Soph. Smith, having boarded a street car and seating himseli comfortably, was approached by the conductor for his fare. Stumbling over his feet, the conductor requested: "Mister, will you kindly set those suit cases to one side.-'” I)r. IIradsfhaw was addressing the Senior French class and said: "There is a fool born every.minute.” J. . Barber, of the Barber twins, asked: "Doytor. isn’t it true that sometimes more than one arc born every minute?” Dr. Bradshaw: "Well, now. Mr. Barber, I don't mean to get too personal.” l 1 l 1 Enigmatical T rutK. Suppose You Read ly itent; se with nywise Ideal |k men, be Fountain Com Stu Ex The Ser A t. ury! Waterman's “Ideal” will sate you dously and at slight se and Shar Com your donee from common s and holders, inkstands, ink blots, ells and cil- ers, and so on through the dium. ding etrating investigation d no money, but write us NOW. ;ilm:. tii-ih mi v. i companyJr T e Electric City Engraving Co. Buffalo, NY WE MADE THE ENGRAVINGS POR THIS BOOK t 1 4MAKE MONEY This Summer by writing Life Insurance for the Southeastern Life Insurance Company Apply at Home Office GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA I Three Essential Factors in every SCHGDLorCOLLEQE COURSEI Brains. Ambition, AND A . io. t €h The cone shape for ease in writing and secure friction lock of cap, the patented spoon feed for accurate ink supply, and the ciip-cap to prevent loss arc some of the individual qualities for the college success of Waterman’s Ideals. Also Safety and Self killing. Ask your dealer. L. E. Waterman Go., 173 Broadway, New York 1 5A NEW SEASON MEANS NEWER STYLES IN PHOTOGRAPHS. THE VERY LATEST ARE ON DISPLAY AT MY STUDIO L. A. BERNHARDT PHOTOGRAPHER MANY OF THE PHOTOS IN THE ANNUAL WERE MADE BY L. A. BERNHARDT. SPECIAL PRICES TO ALL COLLEGE PEOPLE. FRAMES MADE TO ORDER Moved to North Main St. Bell Telephone Connection Don't be a Ready Made Man TH E A M ERIC AN TAILORS will make you an all-wool suit to your order for less money than you can buy a ready-made suit. SPRING and SUMMER patterns arc now ready, comprising the most attractive styles and patterns ever shown in Greenville. IT’S A PLEASURE TO SHOW YOU REMEMBER we make you an all-wool suit and positively guarantee the fit, for as little as $13.75 American Tailors Mansion House Building OXFORDS There is satisfaction in a pair of our Oxfords well lilted. They are light, dressy, and durable, and we understand titling them. PRIDE, PATTON TILMAN GREENVILLE. SOUTH CAROLINA 176Seybt Carter Sch°°‘ “nd ■------ = Office Supplies BOOK STORK Phone 504 127 S. Main St. MERRITT-RUNIOR CO. DRUGS and DRUG SUNDRIES THE BEST ICE CREAM Agents Whitman's Fine Candies SMART CLOTHES for SMART DRESSERS SMITH BRISTOW Manhattan Shirt GREENVILLE, S. G. § t c t a o n Hats pi Tr)PT For NOBBY CLOTHING 1 1 Q and furnishings We always introduce the latest styles. A visit to our store will convince you. See SCHLOSS BROS CO. Spring Styles at ENDEL’S Meet Us At the Corner—Best Fountain in Ttnvjj Our Ice Cream and Soda arc the best you can get Fine candies in packages and bulk Headquarters for Fine Cigars and Smokers’ Supplies. Agency for Nunnally’s Candies MAULDIN PHARMACY ( OX THE CORXER ) THIS COL.I,E JE HOY'S PRIKXI) IIOltHS-IIKXDKUSON COMPANY IH SY STORK I.KK H WAS 111 XOT(»N A Hit; ASSORTMENT AI.CO SVSTKM MADIC fl.OTHKS TO SKI.KCT FROM HO-Il-J MAIN STRK1 :tYour Success Depends Largely on Your Training Yes, it is true that native ability counts lor quite a bit, but unless you have an opportunity to work right along with some one who is an expert in the particular line in which you are interested, your native ability will not avail much. Our strong forte is the right kind of training for REAL business—the training that gives you the “know how” assurance—and the “job" will then take care of itself. We emphasize this point because some young people, and apparently some business colleges, seem to have an idea that the chief function of a business college is to furnish jobs rather than business training. Wc “deliver the goods" in both. And we sec that the training is such that you can “make good" when you get the chance—and that is the important point. If you want to be a winner instead of a perpetual “job chaser.” you should get your business training with us. Draugli oil’s Practical Business College Atlanta, Macon, Augusta, Ga.; Montgomery, Ala.; Knoxville, Tenn.; Greenville, S. C. i 8LAWTON LUMBER CO. Inc. Wholesale Lumber and Shingles GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA For Fine Tailoring See A. SCHONWETTER GREENVILLE, S. C. Pay Less and Dress Better BRUNS-McGEE COMPANY JEWELERS WE have one of the most complete stocks of jewelry to be found in upper South Carolina: also a fine assortment of CUT GLASS, SILVERWARE, hand-painted CHINA, etc., suitable for WEDDING GIFTS. Drop in and look over the stock. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 109 North Main Street, - GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA i 9E. Inman Attorney at Law GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA HAYNESWORTH HAYNESWORTH Attorneys at Law Masonic Temple Greenville, South Carolina H. K. TOWNS BROWN MARTIN TOWNS MARTIN ATTORNEYS AT LAW M. F. ANSKL II. II. IIAKKIS ANSKL HARRIS ATTORNEYS AT LAW MASONIC TEMPLE Greenville, South Carolina A. BLYTHE ATTORNEY AT LAW Practices in all the Courts of the Stateand in the United States Courts GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 180 GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINATin Southern Baptist Theological Seminary DR. J. P. CARLISLE Dentist LOUISVILLE. KENTUCKY CESSION of citrht months opens Octol er 1st. Excellent equipment: able and piosrcssivc faculty, wide range of theological study, if help Over Mauldin’s Pharmacy is needed to pay board, write to Mr. It. Pressley Smith. Treasurer of Students' Fund. For catalogue or other information, write to. Main and Washington Streets Greenville, S. C. K. Y. MULLINS. President c. o. Allen. President. I). 1). Davenport. V.-Pres.. W. I,. Cnssaway. Cashier. C. D. Kenny Go. AMERICAN BANK Jobbers and Retailers GREENVILLE, S. C. — General Banking Business. We solicit TEAS, COFFEES and SUGAR your business, large or small. Divertors I) 1 . Davenport. A. Kamsenr. R. O. (Inins. C. C. Milford. I,. O. Patterson. II. Kndel. M. D. Karl. C. o. Allen. V. I.. Gassaway. W. N. Phone 174 118 S. Main St., - Greenville, S. C. Watson. Mansion House Dr. P. A. Pressly DENTIST Barber Shop Shave Over American Bank 1 0 cents Students always welcomed J. M. CONNOR Go to FINE TAILORING Reynolds A Earle For GREENVILLE, S. C. PURE DRUGS and MEDICINE Represents ■ ■ ■ KLEE CO.. New York Agents for Gath's Candies WANAMAKER BROWN. Phila. 111 North Main Street, Greenville, S. C. Room K, Mauldin Building iSiPALMETTO PHARMAGY THE NEW DIM G STORE IN WEST ENI) GOOD FOUNTAIN FINE STATIONERY AGENTS EOR PADGETTS CANDIES STL DENTS PATRONAGE SOLICITED CORNER PENDLETON AND RIVER STS. THE WEST END SUPPLY COMPANY THE LARGEST WOOD and COAL DEALERS IN THE CITY Near C. G. Depot. Phone 61 W. A. SIMPSON, President H. W. ALLBN. V-Pret. and Treat. W. R. CASON. Sec R. E. ALLEN BRO. GO. WHOLESALE GROCERS Flour our specialty Hay, Grain, Fruits, Produce GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA i8_ The CITY NATIONAL BANK of Greenville, S. C. CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND 00(1(1 fiflfl UNDIVIDED PROFITS - - VLUU,UUU DIRECTORS H. A. Smyth, L. W. Parker, J. H. Morgan, H. J. Haynesworth, A. A. Bristow, W. H. Irvine, C. O. Allen, T. Q. Donalson, G. W. Taylor, Henry McGee, Charles M. McGee. COAL When you want COAL OF QUALITY which burns up perfectly clean and does not clinker BUY FROM Griffin-Hollman Fuel Co. Phone 781 Greenville, S. C. Frank Hammond, President W. M. Ilanood. V.-President William G. Itcacham. Cashier THE PEOPLES BANK GREENVILLE, S. C. Capital $120,000 Surplus and Undivided Profits $100,000 1S3 If it’s in the Grocery Line — we carry it — Hudson Jordan SOUTH MAIN ST. and WEST END Phone 400, 410, 99 TRY USA N E W C R E A T I C) N Webster’s New International Dictionary The Only .Yew unabridged dictionary in many years. Contains the i ith and essence of an authoritative library. Covers every field of knowledge. An Encyclopedia in a single book. The Only dictionary with the .Yew Divided Page. A “Strokeof Genius." 400,000 Words Defined. 2700 Pages. 0000 Illustrations. Cost $400,000. Post yourself on this most remarkable single volume. C. C. Merriam Co. Sprta« tM. Max., U. 8. A. TAYLOR means quality to baseball players —we handle everything for baseball players but errors. Send tor new 120 page catalogue. Alex. Taylor Co. Athletic Outfitters 16 East 42nd St. opp. Motel Manhattan NEW YORK FOR SPRING AND SUMMER The line of styles and fabrics we are showing in Clothing, Hats and Furnishings is the best in many years, and if you do not wear one of our suits, it is because you have not seen them. Everything that is right in Men's Wear. I DOTUCPUTI n SELLER OF EVERYTHING THAT IS COR-L. KOI IlOLlllLl , RECT FOR MEN AND HOYS E.' A. WRIGHT College Engraver, Printer and Stationer 1108 Chestnut Street PH ILADE LPHI A ('nmmrtierinml Invitation" Dance Invitation and Program , Menu . Fraternity Insert and Stationery, Class Pin . Visitinft Card . Wcddinit Announcement and Invitation Samples Chert n!ty S h( oh Request Peace Printing Go. Manufacturing Printers Binders OUR MOTTO “Everything just a little better than seems necessary” Phonr I5WI News Building 184Eastman PoughKeepsie, New York prepares young men and women for positions of trust and responsibility, and assists them to PAYING POSITIONS Comprehensive courses of study, Liberal policy, Faculty of specialists, Strong lecture course, Ideal location, Excellent record of 48 years, More than 47,000 alumni. Prospectus and Calender may be had upon application. Address CLEMENT C. GAINES, M. A., B. L., President Poughkeepsie, N. Y.CIIICORA COLLEGE Conservatory of Music ART ELOCUTION and BUSINESS A Christian Home- School Terraslow for special advantage . A high alnndard. For Cntulogur- write to S. C. BYKI . 1).D., President GKKKNVII.I.K. S. C. The Rolfe Shakespeare IN LIMP I.KATIIKK Edited by H I . JA M J. ROLFE DOR twenty years regarded »' the standard in point of text mul notes by the leading schools and college of thecountry- Now issued in hand-sonic olive green limp leather binding. stamped in gold. with silt top and specially designed title pages in two colors. I.imp Leather. Per Volume. DO cent net The Set. 1(1 Volumes. - $36.00 net. The Baker iV Taylor Co., N. Y.City Publishers and Wholesale Dealers in the Books o( nil Publishers Everything you need, boys, in the HARDWARE LINE and SPORTING GOODS LINE will be found on your side at the West Hardware Co. Try Our HOLEPROOF HOSE 6 prs. for $2.00 EVERWEAK HOSE 6 prs. for $1.50 We exchange for the worn pairs in our store J. O. JONES CO. 117 N. Main St. Drink Coca-Cola Bottled in Greenville, S. C. For best barber work go to West End Barber Shop .‘$0 Pendleton St. Convenient to students J. R. KENNEDY, Proprietor Best of Service—Polite Attention Busy Bee Cafe Greenville’s Most Popular Restaurant for Ladies and Gentlemen Open day and night Telephone 943. 113 S. Main St., GREENVILLE, S. C. Greenville Baking Go. Ice Cream, Bread, Cakes Pies, and Confectionery WHOI.KSAI.K RKTAII. 186A IDrlrnmr (6tft in any Simitc THE "MOST POPULAR” MUSIC FOLIOS Homo Songs ( Words and Piano).......$0. 50 Hymn Words and Piano)............ ft » Mother loose Song ( Words and ‘tone) .. .50 National Songs (Words and piano).......50 Songs of the f lag and Nation i W. and P ) .SO Songs from Popular Operas (W. and '.) .To Love Songs It outs and piano).........50 College -Songs ( Words and Piano).......80 New College Songs {Words and P ri .. .50 New Songs for Glee Clubs 1 Words and Piano) .50 New Songs for Male yuartets 1 W. and P.) .80 Songs for Guitar 1 Wonts and Out.at ...75 llano Pieces............................?.'» Modern Piano Pieces.....................75 Piano Pieces for Children...............75 Piano Duets.............................75 Piano Dance Folio......................To Selections from the Operas, i 'iano At ) .75 " ” •• Comic • .75 Piano Instructor.......................“5 Mandolin Pieces Solo Mandolin......................40 Second Mandolin....................40 Piano Accompaniment...............50 Guitar Accompaniment...............40 Cello Obligato.....................40 Mandolin Pants Pieces Solo Mandolin......................40 Second Mandolin....................40 Guitar Accompaniment...............40 Piano Accompaniment...............50 Tenor Mandola...........................50 Mandocello.............................50 Violin Pieces 1 with Piano Alton pamment • .75 Violin. Cello and Piano.........1.00 AVw Violin Solos (with Piano Act"mf)....75 Clarinet Solo • with Piano Accompaniment) .75 Cornet Solos itfit i piano Accompaniment) .75 Cornet Selections {with Piano Actom .)... .75 Flute Solos iwifti Piano A ctom pan intent).. .75 Trombone Solos u it It Piano Accomp.).75 Trombone Selections (with Piano Accomp. ) .75 Cello Solos i with piano Accompaniment) .. .75 Cello Selections (ith Piano Atcomp.)....75 Music Dictionary.......................10 The Mod popular Orchestra Folio Full Orchestra and Piano........2.50 10 Parts. Cello and Plano.......2.00 The Most popular Hand Folio Concert Band. (86 Parts)........5.(0 Full Band. (21 Parts)...........4.00 Small Band, 10 Parts)......... 3.00 SOME OF OUR OTHER MUSICAL PUBLICATIONS All with Words and Piano Kindergarten Songs..................$1.00 Songs of the Flag and Nation...........50 School Songs with College Flavor.......50 Songs of .( Colleges............... 1.50 Songs of Eastern Colleges........... 1.25 " •• Western ■ 1.25 ” " the University of Chicago....1.50 " Michigan..... J.25 Pennsylvania. 1.50 “ Virginia..... 1.00 Hinds, Noble Eldredge 31-33-35 West 15th St, New York City WOOD-HACKNEY FURNITURE CO. SUCCESSORS TO LEE H. WOOD CO. Furniture of all kinds, Matting, Rugs, and Carpets Corner RIVER and PENDLETON STS. The BAPTIST COURIER The organ of the 135,000 Haptists in South Carolina Unexcelled Advertising Medium APPLY FOR RATES FISH FISH Cash is King We assist you to get up your BILL of FARE. Anything in the FRESH MEAT and SAUSAGE line. “The only sanitary market" The new market opposite the POST OFFICE BUTTER AND EGGS Carolina Packing Co PHONE 768 1S7L. H. STRINGER Druggist GOOD LINE OF STATIONERY AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES fine Candies West End Drug Store Greenville Female College C.Collcge Courses leading to degreess B.L., B.A., M.A., L.I., Mus. B. Excellent Fine Arts Department, Conservatory of Music. Strong Faculty. Piano, Pipe Organ, Violin, Voice, Theory, Harmony, etc. Painting, Drawing, etc. Expression and Physical Culture. :: :: :: :: President: E. C. JONES, Litt. D. J. C. FITZGERALD 14 4 Main Street Artistic Photographer Portraits in colodio carbon, sepia Call and see our artistic folders Special Prices to all College Students 188This booK was made, complete by TPAQC MANA Queen City Printing and Paper Co. Printers, Binders, Eng'ravers, Charlotte, N. C. Fine Half-Tone. 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Suggestions in the Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) collection:

Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1908 Edition, Page 1

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1909 Edition, Page 1

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1910 Edition, Page 1

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1912 Edition, Page 1

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1913 Edition, Page 1

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1914 Edition, Page 1

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