Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC)

 - Class of 1901

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Furman University - Bonhomie Yearbook (Greenville, SC) online yearbook collection, 1901 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 124 of the 1901 volume:

To ‘the (Ota JTolUsixt Home” the students of 2?nvman otniuevsity louinyty dedicate this llolumc..............................Greeting. PSBkim sullen lay the stone, Vain efforts has e’en sunk it deeper in Its setting and the moss of half A ccnt’ry to it clung— Yet we raised it. And now fair ray Whose motes are mcm’rics of Man’s happy days, Go wing thy way. —Board ov Editors.hi c rraO IQ ) n v .ljfuvman ‘University. Ebc past. HFTY-OXK years ago it was decided l»y tile Bap | l »t hosts of South Carolina to establish Furman 9 University at Greenville. A dusty old room, a few rickety wooden benches, three instructors, and sixty students were present at the opening session. What a Faculty! But these men were the greatest of their day. They placed their ear close to nature and caught the sound of rumbling, rushing progress. They served well their own generation and won the gratitude of posterity. They dreamed and planned and acted. The dawn was bright and hopeful, but soon the shadows came. Where is that Southern school that did not feel the rude shock of the war trumpet's blast ? After a decade of growth, the school closed its doors, and two hundred and sixty young men went forth to the bitterest conflict ever waged. When the little Hag was furled by a brokenhearted ami desolate people, the first thought of the maimed heroes was to reopen the school. For years the wav was dark and failure imminent, but with sublime courage these men brought Furman safely through. The character of the melt who founded the institution is stamped forever on its work. Other colleges may become tainted with modern materialism, but this one. never! Students will continue to lie taught to walk in the footstep of the lowly Nazarene. and follow ing this pathway in the search after truth, they will come at last into the light and life of eternal day. Ebc present. It is hard to write of the Present of an institution which advances as rapidly as Furman. To day has not what tomorrow will have. Kvcry year thousands of dollars are expended in new buildings, new schools and departments arc added, and the student-body grow year by year. The first effort of the present administration was to place Furman prominently before those whose duty it is to give it their hearty support. This effort has produced fine fruit, and to-day every lisping Baptist child knows and loves Furman University. The Baptist have lieen taught that it is their college and they ure justly promt of the work which it is doing. The faculty have assimulated all that is best of the old and the new methods of instruction, and the thoroughness of the course is unexcelled. No other institution in all this Southland is better known than Furman University. The larger and older colleges of the north recognize her degrees at their face value. The records of Furman students in the northern 7universities are sources of pride to the friends of the Baptist university of South Carolina. The present then, is full of work, of energy, and of enthusiasm; there i pride in the past, glorious achievement in the present, and hope ami ambition for the future. Cbc future. Out of n struggling past, out of a present, as it were, pregnant with hope, l-'urman Cliiversity will come strong-armed for the future. Dangers gloomy and dark have beset Iter, hut the crisis has l»een passed, and she looks to the years to come for the crown of glory that awaits her. First, there were school days, days of trials ami difficulties and hopes and plans. Then came college-life, strong. brave, courageous, and the future will see Furman a uni versity in fact ns well ns in name. In the young days of the present century new department will be added, the student-body will grow from hundreds into thousands, and the whole world will know Furman by her works. The dreams of the fathers will be realised when the university which they founded is looked down upon by the mid-day sun of the twentieth century. And never once will it have turned aside from its purpose nnd end—the betterment of man and the glory of Cod. The solution of the problems which are vexing the minds of the thinkers of the age is Christian education, ami the day is not distant when the great hosts of students will he turned into the wall of denominational colleges. Then will Furman come into the light of her true day. 8'University Ialcnt ar. 1901. June 9-13—Commencement Exercises. September 25—Beginning of Fall Term. November 28—Thanksgiving Recess. December 16-20—Fall Examinations. December 21-Jan. 1—Christmas Recess. 1902. February 1 -Beginning of Spring Term. March 26-29—Spring Examinations. April 5—Field Day. April 15—Anniversary Society Debate. May 2—Annual Picnic. May 28-June 7—Final Examinations. June S—Commencement Sermon. June 9—Contest for McMillan Medal. June 10—Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees. Address before Literary Societies. June 11—Alumni Exercises. June 12—Closing Exercises. Conferring of Degrees.faculty ANDREW I'Hl.Ml' MONTAGUE. A. M.. I'll. ! .. L.L.D.. Resident and Professor of .atin. CHARLES HALLHTTIi JUDSON. Dtan ami Senior Professor of Mathematics amt Astronomy. HARVEY TOLIVER COOK. M. A.. Professor of ( reek. WILLIAM FRANKLIN WATSON. A. M. Pro essor of Chemistry ami Itiotogy.. CORDON BEVERLY MOORE. t . I).. Professor of Philosophy, Political Science and History, and Director of the Summer School. EDGAR MAXIMILIAN von FINGERMN. Ph Pii. L., ll’nivcwil)' of Rome, Italy.) Professor of Modern Languages. MARSHALS. DglJ'Il HARM-. M. A . M. M. I . Professor of Physics and Mathematics. HKNNKTTH EUGENE GEER. M A.. M. M. I'.. Professor of ling ish and History. ANDREW HILL MILLER. M. A.. M. M. I1. lush actor in Latin and Secretary of'the -'acuity. I-Konissok E L. HUGHES. Lecturer on Pedagogy. HUGH CHARLES llAYNSWURTH. Headmaster Pur man Pitting School. COLUMBUS REN MARTIN. 15. A.. Instructor in Mathematics. CHARLES McKAY McCKK. B. A.. Instructor in History.I ANDKJiW I'll II.IT MONTAGl'K. A. M., Pll. D.. I.J. .D.. TaMuauh.CHARI, RS IIAI.I.KTTH JUDSO.V. l».. DRAY,HARVKY TOI.IVRR COOK, M. AWIM.IAM 1'KAKKI.IN WATSON. A M CUKOON HKVHRI.Y moork. d. d.MAR4HAM. PKM‘11 KAKI.H. M. A.. M. M. 1 .UKSNKTTK Kl’GHKK CKKK, M A.. W. M. f ANDREW HIM. MIM.XK. M. A . M M. P.KKV. I . M. KAMSHY. U. U. PKKMOliXT 1IOAKII Tm STf.M FCKMAV U9MVEK 1TYBonrfc of trustees, With Expirations of Terms of Service. Rkv. I). M. Kamrky, t . D„ President, Charleston. S. C Rkv. J». W. Kr.v. I» ! , Secretary. Greenville. S C. Mn.lt I . McCBK. Auditor. Greenville. St. C. l)K J. II. KABLK Greenville. IIon. J. A. Kant Union. l»u. Jami-n MelNTOAII Newberry. Mb. V K. Cox Anderson. W. C. Mu.1.KB. l Sy Charleston. f MK. R. J. AIUII8MAX Akolu | Mu. Wm. L. Dc«»t ........................... Greenwood Itoi ; W. II l.vi.ns. Kmt. CoIuiulHa. j. W. tfllRLOB. Wslhalla | J. I.. TRtnnLK. Kim Amlcraon. mu ( Mh U V. t onx ] Mk.C K. Hkmokmcox . Rr.v. I . W. Kkv. I). I». M» J J Uwrox r K. Kkooks KCTL t«J|: I'arksvilie Aiken Greenville. IlnrUville. I‘tore nee. i Mr. J. A. CARkoi i. Gaffney. I Hon. ). II. llt-intoN . Hennctl«vilh two Kkv. W. J. I.ASufcTOR. 1». II Greenville j Mb. It. H. McCU Greenville ! icon, s G. m.vvi imi Denmark tvm KKV. H. C. UUVKHOLYA ... Chester II. Havnnwoktii, K«U- Greenville. Captain J II. Moxwoniirv .SvarUnbarg. Kkv l» M. Ramskv, D. I Charleston Kkv. A.C. Wilkin . l I) lutcstmrK. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. Mu. II. I . McGi i. Chairman Rkv. ! . W. Kr.v. 1) ! .. Secretary I x. J ll. Kablc. II J H avnswobiii, Km - Rkv. W. J. I.anc.ston. II l» II J. llAYXSWOKTH. K Q.. Treasurer of Ihe University. II. )!. Gkkb, M. A . As»i»t.int Treasurer. II. T.Cook, M. A.. Proctor. '9Blniuni association. 'resident, Rf.v. W. T. Tate, - - Williamston, S. C. Vice-! ’resident, O. B. Martin. .... Greenville, S. C. Secretary, A. H. Mim.hr, .... Greenville, S. C. B. K. Geer Treasurer, Greenville, S. C.ftKMOK CJ.ASS.Colors. Old Cold nut] Navy Blue. Yell. Re! Ro! Ri! Rum! Nineteen naught one! Furman! Furman' (Motto. “Carpe Diem.” Officers. I). R. Wilks........................ President W.M. W. Colkman....................... '» «•• I'rnidfKl C.KORO. : Tinoal. Srrrttary and Treasurer J. E. BRAKKPIXI.D, B. A. W. W. COLKMAN, B. A A. I . Hickson. B. a. . J. A. Hunter, b. a. W. H. McClain B. A Roll. . l.owryvillc. . . Johnston. . . Gaffney. Bamberg. Cam po hello. W. I,. Nkwbv. B. A. S. R. R hooks. M. S J. W. Tavlok. B. A. Gko. Tindal, M. A D. R. Wilks. M. A. . . . Bellevue. . . Kershaw. . . . Well ford. . . . Felder. Wilkshurg. 3Ibistor? of '01 “ARCKLY four years ago the Class of 01 crept into cxistenec. Through college life's stages ami experience , this class now stands almost at the terminal point of it career. Looking hack memory display to our minds the failuns and sue-cease which have attended our effort . Kver struggling toward the goal, encouraged and spurred on by aspirations instilled bv thought of progress made toward the fund mark, the Senior Class of 1901 appears in full view of that toward which four long year of toil has been directed—graduation. Does clearer vision of the end satisfy our exalted expectations? 1 the end what we anticipated when we, as Freshmen, stopped to contemplate the future? It may Ik- confidently said that the goal which then appeared as a crowning star of life’s ambition now shines but to point u to the real goal yet in the dint and |uivcring recesses of the future. We realize that we are only on the mountain side catching the glimmering light of successes which only now l om up over the craggy peaks of toil and endeavor vet to be scaled. And. a forcibly as did we four years ago, so do we now realize that we are Pmhmcn-Freshmen then in the college realm, Freshmen now in the world-college. The University register told of a large class of Freshmen in ' 7 With crowded rank and confident hearts the struggle began. Hut, a the year have glided by, a change has taken place, a thinning-out has liccn in proce . Some with false conceptions of the work to lie accomplished, have fallen by the way. Still other through the force of necessity. Other disheartened and catching at the three-year degree, B. Lit., a a drowning man, with deep icgrct departed from our ranks last June. What i« the result of the action of these various force upon our once crowded cla s? Only ten survive to reach the final victory. And who are they? -Brake.” the influential matt among the students: "Little Dave." with a recordWare,” our ladies' man; “ Taylor," the photographer and musician ; “Chiny,” our orator and parliamentarian ; •'Mack,” who is all right; "Mr. Newby," the oldest Senior: ■•George," the honor roll man; "Jacob Aquilla," a future politician. and " Samniie,” the color bearer, is as bright and as modest as his "college girl.” The cla « is small, but what of its record ? Through it entire career it has I icon a noted one. In the Literary Societies and in the public meeting of these, the 1901 class hat. takeu an eminent stand. In athletics she, though not the most successful! in contests, has always l cen a most enthusiastic supporter of all thnt pertains to physical perfection. In recitations it cannot l c excelled. Three of our uutnbcr have taken the five year course in four years anil at the same time kept their names on the University honor roll. Indeed this roll has ever contained a greater proportional number from our ranks than from any other class. A brighter anil more enthusiastic class can rarely lie found in college annals. When about to separate to parts unknown, to destinies unforetold, we can but realize the ties of friendship and unity of purpose which have characterized our days spent together both outside and within the class room. Few arc we in nunilwr, but great are the cords of union. The Seniors of "ot arc indissolubly liound together. With a significant feeling of the results of our happy association, it will be hard to part. But the class was born for greater things. As college successes are but a delicate index to what the future record will ! c; the destiny of these ten can but l»e a glorious oue. We have |»a cd from the little college world out into the great wide world: let us continue the climb toward that diadem which crowns the rugged and perilous mountain of success. 5Mbat Me Mere JOEL EDWARD BRAKE FI ELD — Philosophian Society: Sect..‘97; Sr. Critic, 98; Chaplain. '99: Pres., ‘ot; A Ed. of I'urmun Echo, '98, '99, '00; Prc . Ath. Asa., ’oi. WM. WARE COLEMAN—Adclphiau Society; Censor. ’99; Sect , ’oo; Ass. Ed. of Furman Echo. ‘00: Sect, of Ath. Ass., '00: ' Varsity " Rase Hall Team. ‘99. 'oo; “ Varsity" Foot Ball Team, ’00: Treas. of S. C. I. O. A., ’oi: Chairman May Picnic, ’ot. ALISON PUGH HICKSON—Philosophian Society; Critic, '98; Vice-Prc ..’99: Treas.,’oo; Pres,. "01; As . Ed. of Furman Echo, '99; Ed.-in-Chief, 'oo; Speaker to S. C. I. O. A.. Vsi. JACOB ACHILLA HUNTER Philosophian Society; Censor, '99-Caterer of Mess. 1, '00. 'oi. WALTER HERBERT McCLAIN—Adelphian Society: Librarian, ’99; Sect., 'oo: Pres., ot: Ass. Bus. Mr -. Furman Echo. '00; Ass. Ed. '01. WM. LEROY NEWBY- -Philosophian Society; Critic, 9S, '99. ‘ot; Censor, ‘ot; Ass. Ed. of Furman Echo. '99. '01. SAMUEL ROSEBOROl’GH RHODES Philosophian Society; Sect., ‘oo; Vice-Pres., ot : A » Ed. of Furman Echo,'00; Ed.-in-Chief, oi. JAMES WM. TAYLOR -Adelphian Society; Sect., ‘oi ; Ass Ed. of Furman Echo. oi. GEORGE TINDAL—Philosophian Society. DAVID RICE WILKS-Philosophian Society!; Censor. ■97, Sect., '98; Trea ., ’oo; Vice-Pres, '01 ; Ass. Ed. of Furman Echo. '00. 26Statistics. Naftie Known as Striking Feature Noted (or By word Afterwards a Brake field Brake Broken . Breaking hearts • - Oh! I'm broke . . . Broker Colon An Ware . . Slick hair. Being in love Consider Farmer Hickson .... Cblny .... Bumpy face Chewing and smoking at the same time Durn it . . . Bachelor liuntcr . . Sorrel-top Feet . . Perfect recitations . By dicks .... . Barber McClain . . . Mac ... Red eyes . . . Cutting . . Unmentionable. School teacher Newby. M r. Nov by Red mustache Hconomy with soap and wster . Kr-or-ugh .... . . . Missionary Rhode . Sammy Coquettish smile Height Confound it . . . . . Moon fixer Taylor . . . Music Taylor Curly lock Singing Good gracious Street musician Tiinl.il George . . . Nose lagging By George . . . Jockey Wilks .... Dave Kars . . Growling I)ad-jim-it Peddler 7fl ropbec of 01 IkRK it possible to draw aside the veil that cut | off our vision from the future. 1 imagine there _______j would l»e revealed works too mighty and deeds too wonderful to relate: or if one should consult "Old Probability," it is quite certain he could give information that would startle our most sanguine admirers. This prophet, however, cannot foretell everything which will happen : so. trusting to his own inspiration. he will tell only what he saw. I was seated beneath one of the pleading oaks which •dom our campus, with tablet aud pencil iu band.looking lor some sign of the future of the class of ’oi. The harmonious songs of tile hints and the dreary roar of brave little Reedy dashing at the fool of hover's Leap, dulled my car . The cool zephyrs cooled my brain and fanned my eyelids together. I passed into another world. In my dream twenty years had gone by since the boys of 'oi had gone out from their Alma Mater, and this is the way they are situated lifter that time had elapsed : There isj K. Brnkrficld. pastor of the first Baptist chinch iu a flourishing Southern city, lie has overcome, by his good judgment and self-examination, the tendency to self-conceit. and has won the confidence of all who know him by his kind disposition and firmness. V. V. Coleman is as jolly as ever. He was married long ago to one of the sweetest, the noblest and (he thinks) the prettiest women in all the land. Though neither an office, seeker nor a politician, he has held many places of honor and trust. He has served two terms in the State Legislature. and is now in the Senate. A. I . Hickson graduated from the law school of a great Northern university in 1904. after which he returned home und began the practice of law, in which he ha proved very successful. Seeing the need of a helpmeet, Mr. Hickson married a woman in 1905 who lias done much toward correcting his somewhat irregular, though not erratic habit . He keeps abreast of the times, being well-informed 011 all political and social questions, and on these lie writes quite ably. Ann.ng other books, he wrote one entitled. " The Psychic Relations of the Individual to the Social Group J. A. Hunter preached some after his graduation, but gave most of hi attention to t aching, for which he shows a decided talent. He has taught with great succes in some of the strongest school in the Slate. At the present time he is president of a large and flourishing military school. Mr. Hunter still like the girls, though probably he will never marry. Walter H. McClain kept a country stoic for four year after graduating, during which time lie married am! moved to the city to engage in general merchandise, which proved to be quite a success. Later on lie zSIwcame identified with the banking business and is now director of two banks. one of which he is president. V. L Newby is still slow to act and as careless about his dress as he was in former days; and he still has the power to make things turn out right in the end. After leaving Furman he attended the Theological Seminary three years, completing his course there. Afterwards he was sent as a missionary to Mexico, where he is still laboring to rescue the country from Catholicism. A man, who has made the pedagogue’s profession a decided success and who. in 1892. married a very short little woman of the most charming beauty, is S. R. Rhodes. His lady has enabled him, in a large measure, to overcome his tendency to grow despondent. He taught a few years in the public schools, then in a city grailed school for a short time, and after that lie served for a numlter of years as principal of a flourishing graded school. Mr. Rhode is now the Professor of Ivnglis.h in one of the best Southern college . J. V. Taylor has the tact for doing a great amount and variety of work in a short time. He is deeply interested in photography, sculpture and music. Having taken a full course of music in Germany and Italy, lie has taught 2 music very successfully for n number of years, ami is now the director of music in a prominent female college. Five years ago Mr. Taylor marries! one of liis pupils, who is now the graceful queen of his happy home. George Tindal became a lawyer in a remarkably short time after his graduation. Overcoming a strong inclination for horse-racing, he ' settled down " to business and soon built an enviable practice. By has pleasant address and courteous bearing he has won the friendship of n large class of citizens who have drawn him into politics, very much against his will. He is now a Member of Con gress for his district. Mr. Tindal ha never married, but is deeply in love with an attractive young widow of hi own county. Another man who has adorned the legal profession is David K. Wilks. He ha distinguished himself in both the State and the 1'nitcd Stales courts as au attorney. Being a profound scholar, an eloquent speaker, a strong logical reasoncr. he i always in demand when speech making is desired. Helias served as solicitor of hi district for three years with great ability. Mr. Wilks is very happy in his home life, although Mr . Wilks has considerable executive ability which he allow her to exercise quite freely. 9XCbc Dolce of INOWI.KDCK. thou lair hand-roaldof wisdom With unloosed sandals we bow, | To supplicate In our humility A |ir«l from off thy Crowned brow. Stretch forth thy hand of arrowy purity Ami y.raap from wisdom' altar a glowing coal. That wc may Inhale the mySerin of thing unicoown Kvaporating from its in moat shining aoul. Kugatf us. trailing hand-maid. with one look of thine Keflectcd from the mystcriousneas of thy sovereign lord That those enlightening rays may strike deep In our souls To raise u up o bit and yet to serve their ward, t.'iter but a word of encouragement o'er the abyss That we may rival each with each e'en for the echo. A warrior hold, and not indeed is hr far off from fame Who galneth such a gift, the least thou const bestow. Unthroned Wisdom, forbid it not thy hand-maid. Kathrr bid her grant our souls' profound desire. Thy realm i« far uplifted a tire heavens from earth. And yet doth Cod In heaven our wish inspire. We are thy subject , and thou, Wisdom, art our king; Andtbou, too. Knowledge, art our governor. We wrangle here to catch a glimpse of our mysterious king. Repealing acts set forth by our progenitor. 30 the Senior Wf bend amt sway beneath thy Kejiter strokes As rye stalks‘fore a frowning cloud. And oft-times lacking for a warning word Drop to abyssal deplh within thy shroud. Again we grasp and percbaoce we catch a fringe Out hanging from thy robe of samite pure. There lingering faint we draw oor fellows up To bind them fast upon thy lofty moor. Hut who can hope to take his aspiriog seat Kven at thy feet, fair ha ml-maid, if he be An intruder trying to steal thy priceless gilts Bestowed by that fair hand of knowledge on thee. To serve for thee, fair Knowledge, is our plea, I'or servants are served most royally, serving there Where btlss is mutual, and each seeker finds his bliss Within a circle small, of such an object rare. Bring us to the fountain-head of Pierian springs That we may drink the depth thereof and feel Therrin the freshness of those wondrous waters rare Kmbibed with truths unknown, sent from above. Por we have now heeu folly made aware. By gating on thy pomp and splendrous glory. That tolearn what mortals learn upon this earth Is but to learn llic vastnrsa of thy story.Maroon. Rieka, rick.i. rieka. Hry, liry, !ioo, I'm man, I'm mini, Nimtivn two. Yells. Horse ami buggy. Ponies too: That's the class of Naughty two. Rah! Officers. L. A. Jonks................ J. A. MCPlIKRSON............ O. W. Cunningham. .......... W. 12. I.aGronk............. . . . President ■ I'iee- President . . . Seeretary . . Treasurer BROWN. SOLOMON IIKNRV CAKTKK, r.HOkOR IIKNRV CARSON, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN COX. FORD TODD ......... CORBITT, I.INWOOD DOWLING Cl’NNINCRAM. CVS WATTS GRAHAM. AI.LKX JORDAN HADDOCK, IIKNRV CIIKSvroFM R HOLLIDAY. JOHN KOC.AR JOHNSTON. JOSHI-H KMIL JONKS. LK'LIK AUGUSTUS I.AGRONK. WILLIAM HI. .IK Me I'll KK - ON. JOHN ALHXANOKK MirCIIHI.L. JOHN IIAMPTON I'lrrs. kkuukn burton.. KICK, KNO .11 BLUR JR KOGHKS. WILLIAM COKKK aCAII-K, GLOVRK CONVKRS SMITH, J I.F.WIS TOWN!!-. McKKLLAR WATSON. JAMliS FRAtlC.IITMAN WATSON. 1‘ICKKNS IH'TI.KK ■ WORKMAN. JOSKfll BARNHTT YKI.DKLL. WILLIAM IIKNRV lliokcll .Greenville Saluda Fountain Iiiii Madden Greenville Greenville Toney Creel. Kofi: Hill Sally JoltUttOII Gtcenvil'c .Greenville Lauren .......Belton Society Hill Wood tuff WlllUtun Greenville Hilton Green villle WoodmfT l.ongmlrca IfotstorE of ’02 NOW wc stand upon the summit of the halved WJl W Junior Hill and view our first plodding' along lU JI the road of college life, it scents the far, fur distant pMt-uiore a dream than a Dal reality. When we enrolled a Freshmen the thought that we lo«» would one day pOUt» the wise look and heavy responsibilities of Juniors, hardly dared enter our tninds. After the ordeal of first exam , the Christmas Holi days came as a God-scud “damming the lh w of many .1 watery stream." Wc found ' fresh," at least, •• not very pleasant place, ami made such efforts to leave it that we entered Sophomore with almost a lull class. No senior then felt his importance half so much as w.-With our previous record behind us and the issumi.ee frotli the older boy that it would carry us through, our time was given to enjoyment. Some few even went to the extreme of indulging in love affair -. It wrought such havoc that one ol the professors offered to excuse those suffering most severely, (lie was married a short while afterwards). Through such allurements and impediment the class was made much smaller, hut leaving us a class that is to he complimented on the quality and quantity of the w rk it has done this year. Though some few have been almost drags, wc hope to‘drop them in the shade of final “exams” and enter Senior with the best claw Furman has ever known. 3 YK JUNIOR.S. P. Hair C. P. Parrott D. N. Dorn . Blue and White. Yell. Rail1 Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Re! We are the boy of 1903!—Buuo. Officers. ..................... ... President .... . . Vice President . . Secretary and Treasurer 'K sow. 33Roll. Alexander, Marshall Roy . . . . Racot, George Herbert ■ . . . Hell, John Milton............ niackwell. Benjamin Lewis . . Rranuon, James Herbert . . . . Brownlee, George............. Brovkin,m. Myron KrncM . • • Hr van, Isaac Mnrion, Jr..... Chapman, Howard Knocli . . Cheatham, John Henry . . . . Coker, Louis Shuck........... Covington, Percy Crosland . . Crouch, Horace Johnston.. . . David. Charles Klliott Dorn. Drue Nixon............. Katie. Claude Baker.......... Klgin, Thcron Karlc . . . Kick ling, Klliott Reed .... Funderburk, l'rauttis Hampton Hair, Simon Peter ........... Harley, William LcRoy . . . . Harris. Harry Hollingsworth . Harper, Wister Augustus Hatch, Chester Klhcrl........ Hough, William Stephens . . . . , Greenville . . Greenville . . Parksville . . Kershaw . . Brannons , . . I'airvicw . . Rcidviltc . . Greenville . Brannons . . . Phatiix . . Hartsviltc Spartanburg .........Klko . . Greenville . . Parksville . . . Central Honca Path . North Tradesville . . . Whaley . Augusta. Ga. . . Greenville . Hones Path Salem. Mass. . . . Lansford Jordan. Thomas Marion . . . Jordan. James Monroe . . . . Lanford. Rex .............. Martin. Furman I love v Martin, James Cloud, May field, Horace Kasley . . . Miles. Klias Allen .... Moore. Mis Margaret Louise Moore, Samuel Alexander . . Parrott. Glenn Peake .... Pittman, John Rowland . . Preston. James Braiuerd . - . Putnam, Klmer lingerie Ridge)I. KIT............... Sams, Miles Brewton .... Smith, James Lee ...... Stnoak. David William •. . Strong. Julian Hartridge - . . Trowbridge. Silas Duncan Watson. Stephen I iwton . . While, Miles Hunter . , . Wilder, William James . . . Williams. James Rowland . . Wright. Lucius Lawton . . . . . Johnston . Greenville . . Greenville . . Greenville ...........Ora . Baton Rouge . . Greenville Greenville Siurpsonvillc . . . . Clinton . Greenwood Greenville . . . Barksdale . . . Bntesburg Newborn. Ga . Spartanburg . . Smoaks . . . t’lmer . Piedmont . . Sellers . . Sumter . Sumter . . Norway Honca Path 34Ibistcv? of ’03 HK great scientific subject, evolution, since the days of Darwin lias occupied the minds, to a marked extent, of a large per cent of the world's thinking men. During this period as well «» prior to it many and varied have licen the examples illustrating such a theory. There lias possibly, however, never been an example so rapid and at the same time o complete a that afforded by our class of 1903. Why. a little less than two years ago what were we? Nothing hut an ignorant set of simpletons with gaping mouths, gazing eyes, and trembling knees, wcuding our wav to the president's room for organization. And now ? Why the Juniors are so envious of our sporty appearance and brilliant successes that more than one from their nuniWr has stepped backward a year and joined the class of genius. And the Seniors ! They have almost proven that man came from a inonkcv by the example afforded by onr progress. Now about our relation with the Freshman? We can answer this no better than by quoting the statement of the Nobleman: "I say to this man, go, and he goeth: and to another, come, and he coincth.” I'pon entering this year, the very consciousness that we were no longer ’•Fresh” caused us to take on an air of authority and a countenance, ns Shakespeare would call it, of profound conceit. This, together with the “ warm ” reception given the Freshmen, in the way of initiation. accounts for our present sway of authority over them. A few days liefore ” Field Dnv" of last year it was announced that the fair ones of the female college across the way were to give a cake, prepared by their own tender bauds, to the winners in a tug of war contest between the Freshman mid the ' Wise Class” (Soplisl. Representatives were appointed from each class to enter this contest, which promised such a feast to the winners. With the determination that has always characterized the class of ’03. our box entered the “ war.” and of course walked off with the "Sophs." The cake was then given them and they immediately repaired to one of their rooms to lest its qualities. Rut oh. such a disappointment! It wt»s one sinuliar to that of the Prince of Morocco in hazarding for the hand of Portia. lie beheld the out ward beauty, and forgetting that •' Gilded tombs do worms infold,” ojiciied the golden casket and there learned the lesson. ” All that glitter is not gold.” With anticipations equally pleasing and confidence similarly deceptive, they proceeded to begin their feast ltul my! Instead of a general mixture of delicious sweets they found it to lie a plate of salt nicely covered with a cake pan, beautifully iced and decorated. Great was the disappointment, but remem- 35bering that they were " Fresh," received the salt in good spirits and consoled themselves with the idea that in a few short months they would no longer need such seasoning, as they would then be Sophomores. The present year has l cen one of almost perpetual triumphs. One great calamity, however, befell us. which left a large number with bleeding hearts and tear-stained eyes. This was the loss of our only co-ed. We had all the year boasted of being honored with the only one in the University. This may account in part for our unrestrained conceit. Having her in our class, however, served « far greater end than this. The fact that she would hear us recite was an inspiration to many to sit up even Iteyoml the midnight hour thinking in vain for an excuse to keep from reciting the following day. And her presence in the class room did wonderful service in helping us to enter understanding!)' into the study of some of Shakespeare's most beautiful and idealistic 3 character . Thi state of thing lasted only until the Xmas Holiday . When we returned from our week of festivities we were made to mourn and call down vengeance upon the sister institution that robbed us of the star of our class and the object of our affections. Would that this were the only unpleasant affair we had to recount. Such, however, is not the case. While the above statement that this year has been with us one of almost universal triumph , yet that '‘almost" is essential. In the room of one of our most loved professors no small number met their Waterloo in one certain study-Trigonometry. And their minds have ever since been alarmingly confused with such terms as sines, tangents am! secants. As such stumbling block a the above are rare in our course, we think it would be but wise when we rcllecl upon our past record—so grand and illustrious to predict for us a destiny such as is allotted to but few. Colors. Roney, Samuel Eli ..... . Green am! Garnet. Brown, William James Bryan, James Andrew . . Hendersonville, N. C- Bryant, William Raymond . . Orangeburg Officers. Butler, Henry David .... Saluda J. G. I. AN DRUM J. C. Kttvs, Viif-Prfsidrnl Cnllison. William Clarence . . Greenwood J. M. Daniki Cole, Stephen Berryman . . . Gilbert, N. C. W. M. Pack Critn, Henry Geddes Culbertson, John Manning Greenville Daniel, John Mobley . . . Roll. Edwards, John Walter Allison. James Andrew Everett, William Thomas . . . Maryville. Tenn. Bass. Junius Law . . • Darlington Kick ling. Guy Edgar .... Knotts' Mill Bentley, Benjamin Alexander Gentry, Claude I’rue 37Gentry, Robert Alexander...........................Ida G randy, Lloyd Henderson.......................Pickens Groce. Elliot Orr............................. Duncan Harper. Robert George.........................Anderson llawkin . Wyatt Eugene...........................BUbop Haynsworth, Clement l-'urnun ...............Greenville llopkin , Janie Guyton...................Fork Shoal Howie, Crawford Toy........................ Darlington Huff, Janie Gih on.................... ... Greenville Huff. William Edward ........................... Farr Inman, Essie..................................Ml. Joy Kelley, Janie Randall.....................Itlaekville Kendrick, Vernon Vanderbilt................... Gaffney Keys, James Crawford ... Greenville Landrum. John Gill........................... I.andrum I.anhaui, John Frederick.....................Summcrton Lawrence. John Thomas ....................... Gramling I.eatherwood, Janie Homer.....................Laurens Lipscomb, Lewi Moore.......................Ninety-Six Lipscomb, Janie Edward........................ Aaburv Lodge. James Edwin................. Gaithersburg. Md. Martin. George Allen..........................Anderson Marett, Keel Walker...................... Fair Play 3 Mauldin. Robert McIIardv.....................Greenville McAlister, Alexander Archibald...............Greenville McColl, James Hickman................ Quitman, Ga. Milhouse, William Caper .....................Blackville Pack, William Marion.........................Greenville Pott . Jamc Walter.....................Pleasant Valley Price, Samuel A..............................Greenville Rogers. Paul Hamilton.................. Society Hill Scruggs, Alexander McBce................... . - Greenville Shirley. Joe Fletcher.................. Hoiim Path Shirley, Frank Hczckiah................ . Anderson Smith, Lam-thin Bartholomew . ...............Balesville Smith, Glenn......................................Union Smith, Matt Gary..............................Balcsburg Sublet!, Alvah Tindal . Sumtnerton Turner. Bovce I,................................Gaffney Vass. JMines Iceland, Jr. . . Greenville Vaughan. '» liUr ton Ulcn....................Greenville Ware. Kdwiti Finest ....... .... Greenville Watkins, Sloan Duncan........................Greenville Watson, James Hunyan...........................Johnston Wheeler, William Brison.......................... Nora 8iwetorie of ’04 0 PON me lias devolved tlic task of penning the history of the infant class—'04. In the beginning «How me to express my sympathy for the reader as he attempts to digest this composition. The Freshman Class is always looked down upon by everybody, ami is regarded as having no rights; but this year the "Frcshics” asserted their rights and have been regarded from the first as the most important and most powerful unit in the College. We arc not only strong in numbers, but in every respect. In the class room, on the diamond, and on the gridiron, wc have distinguished ourselves. I.. M. I.ipscomb, Inman and Watkins bid fair to Ire scholars of renown; l.andrum. better known as “John Henry." will, no doubt, win honor for him. self in the musical world as a soloist. YK FKKSII Well, when I undertake to enumerate the men who have won honors on the athletic field, I find It an almost endless task. There are so many who have distinguished themselves that it would lie an injustice to the class to fail to mention a few at least. Sublet!, the old reliable full-back and twirler, will always be proud that he was a tneutlier of the Class of '04. Then there arc Lawrence. Turner and I.atihnm, who have also done good work on their respective teams. As ati orator. Daniel has already proved himself worthy of the name. In conclusion, let me say that if nil of the preseut Freshman Class should return next year, it will lie the finest class that will ever wear the name of Sophomore. Thanking you for your kind and liberal indulgence, I remain. 19Specials. Hatch, Howard Ernest, . Boston, Mass. Jordan, Henry D., . . Johnston, S. C. McGee, Charles McKay, Greenville, S. C. W'olfk, Sam Marion, . Charlotte, X. C. 41IN MEMORIAM. SJelikving in the wisdom and justice of E the Faculty and Trustees of Furman University, we humbly submit to the de parture of the very flowers of our student body—the Co-eds—who promised to be the darlings of many hearts. 4 rAIN MEMORIAM. fifiin- ' B. Lit.” degree of our dear insti-lution died on the 15th of June, 1900. The loss of her is a dire calamity. Her numberless friends, and especially the Class of ’02, have the sincere sympathy of all the friends of our University. -i.iH ©oubt KATIK DKAR. My heart, my tear l alt for thee, my luby bride: Kor I have »eeil Thy glance to keen l n h mthtc ty my heart a vide. But Katie dear l ull many a tear Hath watered mine eye for thee: The aentry'a call When the hour are matl l» a familiar vound to me I'or you are there No matter where In ray dream of wakcfnl night; And I have aeen That radiant gleam In thee a vtalcly hcaion tight. 44 'Ti only I. lO needle »{gh) Who fear hU Katie may foritet. But would today Would chaw away Thta lone which hold me yet. For 'twa U»t year IKiwn there on the jdet Vou gave youraelf to me; Ami promiaed to wait liven if il were late, When I came hack again for thee. And tho- the tide Kiaea high and wide •Tween me and ray love!) Kate l 1 won't feel and Tho' a doubtful lad Alway wonder If hi girl will wait. J. W. T.3bdv 3Last Joltc HR1JS1IMAN TIioiiiiih Fowler was the hardest proposition the Sophomores hml to solve. He wa a sharp-eyed, wary youth with a lurid of resourcefulness an«l energy that completely non-plusscil his scheming tormentors. If. while standing under a window, a pail of water should descend, he was invariably out of the way before it struck him; if a scheme to abstract his clothing got or , foot he was generally the first to hear of it. At the beginning of the term, he had been given a small room at the end of a hall in the dormitory, with only one door opening into it. This he had made strong against assault ; and in the security of his room he could bid defiance to open violence. But at the end of the first month when all their efforts agaiust him had been in vain, the Sophomores seemingly gave up the idea of hazing him. Instead he became a kind of honorary member of the gang, and his natural inventiveness and ingenuity jwas of no little aid to them in their designs against the Freshmen. One by one his suspicions were allayed and he dropped most of hi usual precautions Itr addition to his other qualities he had a prolific imagination, llis conversation at times abounded iu mentions of buried treasure, of pirates, ghosts nud such, and his room was decked out in pictures which designated a like 'taste. His favorit books were those of adventures in unknown lands, and seafiglttx of pirates ami Indian talcs, all of which bad been noticed by his patronizing friends. Added to tins was n shade of superstition which had been fostered night after night in his childhood by the negroes on his father's plantation in the low-country. where often he had crept home at midnight from some cabin on the quarter with his head full of “bants," and such spirits, which have always bothered the darkies. I.ate one stormy night itr October a group of boys were lounging in the room of John Hueklcy, a junior. From examinations and foot ball the conversation turned to stories of adventure. “ That reminds me of a tale my grandfather told me once." said Hueklcy, when that topic had been disposed of. “ In fact it is about a buried treasure that is said to be somewhere otl the campus." He glanced at Fowler when he spoke, and he was all attention. "Tell it,” cried several, and he proceeded somewhat impressively. 45"The hero, if auch he was, was an ancestor of mine, who came from Scotland some two hundred years ago with his wife. They left a Scotch seaport in some crazy sailing craft and meant to go to Virginia. But a storm came up when they were somewhere out in the ocean and drove their ship far out of its course and nil hut wrecked it. and before it could get right, a pirate ship came along and captured her. They hurtled the ship and killed most of the crew, but saved a few. among whom was my ancestor and hi wife. "Now. the latter, ns you may have guessed, was a very beautiful woman. Indeed, she married my father and left the old country to escape the advance of a prince of Hugland, I don't remember exactly who. "A it happened, the Captain of the pirate ship, who had once l cen a gentleman, fell violently in love with her. and to get her husband out of the way he shut him up in a room below, reserving him for a future fate. Of course she received the attention of the pirate coldly and with disdain, like any other woman in her place would have done, and she liegged him vainly every dav to put her husluiud and herself into a l oit and cut them adrift. “During all this time the ship was steadily sailing toward the West Indie where the treasure-laden Spanish ships were a rich harvest for free l ootcr . But as most of the captain's attentions were centered on my ancestress, he did not attend to his other affairs a» well, and at length there grew up a mutiny on board. the result of which was that the captain, my ancestor, :m l his wife were imprisoned down helow and the cruise continued with a new leafier. " Shortly afterwards an English man-of-war engaged her iii fight, anil while the action was in progress the pirates, seeing disaster ahead, released the captain, whose presence incited them to light with greater desperation. But the Englishman had the advantage ami soon they reduced the pirate ship to a sinking condition, when they surrendered about nightfall. " But some few escaped, knowing they would he hung after capture. Among these was the captain. I uring the light lie had been struck by a cannon ball and I oth legs and an arm were cut off. but w ith the help of others lie got into a l»oat, carrying his sea chest ami my ancestor and his wife. “To make n long story short, they got away from the British ship ami the next day were picked up by a vessel sailing »o Europe, which was to touch at Charleston. Here they landed together. It sceuts that since Captain Davis, for that was his name, hnd tieen of such service in allowing him to escape with him. that my ancestor hail resolved to care for him the remainder of his life as he was a hopeless cripple and broken by hard service, and the captain more than once hinted that the chest, which he had brought with him, would more than compensate him for his trouble. “ My ancestor was a pioneer in this part of the Slate, and his home, by the way, was on this very hi'l. He never suffered so far as money matters were con- 6Ctrned, for the old captain always seemed to have an inexhaustible supply, coining from the old sea chest. “ But, at length, the old fellow, following the example of most people, laid down and died. A few months liefore, however, the chest had disappeared and with it the supply of money. But the old gentleman had left a letter behind him, to lie opened a year later. Why he did this and why he hid the treasure, for such it was, could only have been explained hv the eccentric obi pirate himself. The letter said that lie hail buried the treasure, and gave a chart with a description of the place and its surroundings, hut no amount of la'tor and search has ever brought it to light." • Pretty good yarn,” said one, “ Where did you get it?” “Took place on the campus, too,” said another, ..that heightens its great interest.” A few mote criticisms, favorable and otherwise, greeted the speaker when he stopped, but only one gave bis opinion that the idea of there being n burled treasure on the compus was probable. This was Thomas. All his imagination had been at work during the brief story, and already an idea had entered his head, which soon changed to determination. “Are you sure,” he asked, “ that none of your later ancestors found the treasure and kept it a secret.” “Oh, dead sure,” was the reply. “ There have been but very few wealthy members of our family in times post, and that can be traced to a source far different from finding a bn lied treasure. The chart, which he left, lias •1 remained in the family a an heirloom ever since and 1 made another one from it last summer. 1 thought if I were ingenious enough I would do wliat a lot of my .-incestor have failed to do; but I have given it up after thinking of the trouble it involves." “Would you mind letting me see the chart if you have it w ith you ? " asked Thomas. "Certainly not," replied lluekley. ..You can keep it if yon wish." After rummaging in his trunk for a few moments he found a piece of pasteboard six inches square, much soiled on one side and with some rude diagraming on the other. • There is something else, though. I forgot to tell you about it. At about the beginning of this century one of my later enterprising ancestors took it into his bend to find the treasure, lit- succeeded, it seems, in finding the right spot and was digging away for the treasure when suddenly spadefuls of dirt began to he thrown into the hole. lie looked up and saw nil around him large white objects; but being a man of iron nerve lie paid no attention to them, and went on digging ; hut for every spadeful that he threw out several more were thrown in by the guardian spirits or whatever they were. This angered him. and jumping out of the hole he attacked them, but did not touch them, 1 do n't suppose, as nobody ever heard of a human Iwing hurting a spirit. Finally he left and spent the remainder of the night in bed. hut the next morning when he revisited the place he could sec no sign of 7where he had been digging. The people he told of it swore that he had had a nightmare, hut he still stuck to it." "You had better have left that off." remarked a listener. "It had some probability about it before, though very little ; now it has none." "Oil. I don’t ask any one to believe it." he replied : "but a story that no one believed would hardly be handed down for two hundred years." Here Thomas returned to his room to study over the chart, his mind a chaos of dreams of treasure. After leading of it in romances he had never thought to have an opportunity of hunting it himself; so, naturally, his imaginative and active brain had already pictured himself as rolling in the wealth of the old pirate. He soon decided on his course of action. He would search e.ery spot on the campus until he came to the right place, and he would then dig for it by night. Failing to find the place, or other obstacles in the way never entered his enthusiastic mind. Long he studied over the chart that night, but before he retired he had decided on almost exactly the place where the treasure must lie hidden. One night at about nine o'clock, a week later, lluckicy secretly called into his room a dozen of his friends on particular business, lie was a leader among his set in all matters of mischief and none of these had any doubt that that was his object for this night. "Boys." he said, "to-night is the ending of a little scheme I have bccu working for the last week and A it is in our power tonight to make a success of it. It regards no less a personage than our young friend, Mr. Fowler, who has heeii so slippery for us.” "Go on,” said several of his friends, somewhat mystified. Thus adjured he said, " I suppose you who were here remember a little story I told about a week ago in this room concerning one of my ancestors." "Oh yes." was the reply of one. "a big fake talc about buried treasure you thought wc would bite at" " Well, I'll admit that the thing existed only in my imagination, hut Mr. Fowler took me at my word and he has been looking for the treasure ever since. The fact is. I told the tale to catch him and he jumped at it at once. I drew a chart of a place on the campus that could't be mistaken. and lie 1ms found it and intends to dig to-night." A burst of laughter and many compliments for his shrewdness, was the reply to this, bnt he continued, "I brought in a little tale about ghosts appearing before my mythical ancestor, and I think a few figures in while would go far toward impressing him with a sense of the sublime.” A few hours later a figure crept out of a room ut the end of the hall and started out into the night, going toward the most unfrequented place on the campus, down near the river. The moon was shining feebly and at times was obscured by the clouds racing across the sky, while the brecrc brought up odors and sounds from the river which was flowing near at hand. In a slight depression at one place there were two alarge stone placed about forty feet apart. Thomas measured a place exactly half way between them and began to dig. Soon he had excavated a hole several feet deep, but he still worked on faster. The chart had said that the treasure was seven feet below the surface an I to get to it and then afterwards conceal it would take most of the night, so he lost no time. Suddenly he became conscious of the presence of someone and just at that moment a spadeful of earth was thrown into the hole. He sprang up and glanced around him and an expression of horror struggled to his eye . A dozen gigantic figures in white were almost surrounding him. only a few yards away. The breeze had suddenly stilled, and in the dead silence the only sound to be beard was the swish of their ghostly garment as they glided around. One of them stood some distance away with it head uncovered and with long black hair hiding all it face but its eyes. They were glinting and burning Strangely, and to the atTrighted youth, who hail sunk to his knees, they seemed to grow larger a the figure approached. At a gesture from the latter several of the spectre approached nearer and began to throw the earth hack into the hole. But at this the look of frozen terror on the boy’s face grew to one of blind desperation, and springing out of the hole at one bound lie leaped straight at the figure in front. He was easily avoided, and stumbling forward lie fell upon his face. When lie had slowly picked himself up there was seen to be a look of raving idiocy in his eyes. He began to point at the moon which had emerged front behind some clouds and to laugh childishly. " See how pretty," he exclaimed, and a the wondering spectators began to gather around him he regarded them quietly. ' He'S cra v boy’s," said Huckley. and taking the sheet from around him he continued in an awe-struck voice. ’’ wc’vc scared him out of his senses. What must we do " ’ Let’s all ow n up," said one of the crowd. “ It’s the best thing to do. and its our last joke I suppose." And the wind that had risen afresh and was coming up from the river seemed to echo it like a sob of despair as the sobered crowd returned with their victim. P. C. Covington. »9Zo jfurman of destiny, of |Kinry horn. Sweet emblem star of sanctity, of thee I sing. Innumerable voice called thee. Innumerable souls do lull thee, Forman ' Full many are the youths whose minds thy mould. Hath ably shaped and left divine Impress Upon their characters. Yet many. too. Arc they who ’ne-ath the mark hath (alien, but To thee no blame attaches. Alnta Mater, Anil from their deeds pray Coil thy cheeks with shnme May never blush—for ’neath the nations’ sun Thy sage proudly walk. Thy grimtar£hway And penciled walls: the old mahogany clock With muffled tick ond faded dial that lias tolled the generations by and still Tick on in solemn way the moment as They go; the towered bell upon whose face The name of tunny a truant is Inscribed. Hath each its tale to tell. Thy shaded slopes; The tiny streams that trip and break o’er pebble And stone and wind through blossoming dell where zephyr IK come and drink sweet fragrance, and the birds Arc wont to sing, all make our task less irksome: Our stay more pleasant : leaving more reluctant. For half a century thou hast stood, ami yet. Kach year add rad I dice to thy halo, and New laurels to thy wreath. With one accord l.et ’% swell the oratorio until One grand continuous song thy praise shall Kesound throughout eternity. -8. M. Wolfs 5«KDITOKS OH T1IK StONIIOMIK.Published Annually by the Students of Furman University. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF. DAVID K. WILKS. ASSOCIATE EDITORS. W. w. COLEMAN. R. L. BLACKWELL, R. B. PITTS. W. S. HOUGH. A. J GRAHAM. J. C. KEYS. BUSINESS MANAGER. J. B. WORKMAN. ASST. BUS. MANAGER. S. M. WOLFE. ARTISTS. 53 C. F DAVID. S. D. TROWBRIDGE.KDITORS OF TIIK FL’R MAN KCHO.Published by the Literary 'societies l Furman Ualvtnlty. KALI. TERM SPRING TERM. Editor-In-Chief. Editor-In-Chief. A. P. Hickson. S. R. Rhodes. Associate Editors. Associate Editor . Adctphian. Adelphian. J. P. Watson. L. L. Wright. J. W Taylor. W. H. McClain. R. B. Pitts. Ph i tosopti ian, I'ft ilosoph ian. S. R. Rhode . S. P. Hair. W. L. Newby. G. C. Scaifc. Alumni Notes ■ . . Prof. A. II. Miller Alumni Notes..................................Prof. A. II. Miller V. M. C. A. Notes . J. E. Brakcficld V. M. C. A. Notes.................... . W. S. Hough Business Manager . W. Iv. LaGronc Business Manager.............................. . W. K. LaGronc Assistant Business Manager..............J. E. Johnston Assistant Business Manager .................J. E. Johnston 55sfipjvj r fj'ujrr nvyr v {i1Officers 00, Ot. FALL TERM. W. II. McClain..............................President K. B. Rice, Jr.................... . . Vice-President V. E. I.aGronc ................Recording Secretary R. B. Pitt Corresponding Secretary J. F. Watson................................Treasurer J. K. Holliday.................................Senior Censor L. I Wright...................................Junior Censor J. F. Watson. . . '................Senior Critic R. B. Pitt . . . Junior Critic SPRING TERM. E. B. Rico, Jr.............................. President J. K. Watson .... . . . Vice-President J. W. Taylor . . . . Recording: Secretary R. F. Cnr on . Corresponding: Secretary L. L. Wright ........................ . . . Treasurer W. H. Ycldell............................Senior Censor KIT Ridgcll.......................................Junior Censor J. H. Mitchell....................................Senior Critic W. K. I.nGrouc....................................Junior Critic 5»Roll. G. H. Baeot, H. I). Butler, M. K. Brockman, J. II. Brannon, V. V. Coleman. H. E. Chapman, P.C. Covington. B. F. Carson, J. M. Daniel, C. B. Earle, I, . B. Grandy. E. O. Groce, W. L Harley. C. K. Hatch. J. K. Holliday. J. M. Jordan. V. V. Kendrick. J. C. Keys, . V. 13. LaGrone, J. G. I.andrum, J. E. Lodge. L. M. Lipscomb, J. T. Lawrence. W. H. McClain, A. A. McAlister. J. II. Mitchell. F. H. Martin, K W. Merilt. R. M. Mauldin, R. B. Fills. J. B. Preston, Rufus Ray. E B. Rice. Jr.. Kff Ridgell, P. II. Rogers, M. G. Smith, J. L. Smith. I.. B. Smith, A. M Scruggs. J. W. Taylor. J. F. Watson, S. L. Watson. L. L. Wright. S M. Wolfe. W. II. Veldell. 59FAM. TERM. SPRING TERM. J. E. Hrakcficld . President A. P. Hickson .... I). R. Wilks . Vice-I'resident S. R Rhodes . . G. W. Cuiiingham . . . . . Recording Secretary B I.. Blackwell ... F. T. Cox G. C. Sooifc . . . Corresponding Secretary W. I,. Newby . . . . . Senior Censor Allen J. Graham . Senior Censor I. I Coibill J. R. Pittman . Junior Alien J. Graham ... . . Senior Critic W. I.. Newby . Senior Critic B. I.. Blackwell . . . . Junior " W. S. Hough .... Junior " A. P. Hickson .... Treasurer S. A. Moore .... F. H. Funderburk . . Chaplain F. T. Cox J. It Workman C. T. Howie W. S. Hough J. E. Brakeficld .... J. H. Strong M R. Alexander, J. h. Bass. J. M. Bell. R. A. Bentley, B. L. Blackwell. S. F. Boncy, J. K. Bra Icefield. S. II. Brown. V. J. Brown, V. R. Bryant. . J . B. Cole. J. P. Coleman, I,. I). Corbitt, F. T. Cox, 11. J. Crouch. G. W. Cuninghaui, I . N. Dorn. T. E. Kljtin. K R. Fielding, F. H. Funderburk. C. P. Gentry. R. A. Gentry. Allan J. Graham. S. P. Hair. H. C. Haddock. H. H. Harris. A. P. Hickson. J. G. Hopkins. W. S. Hough. C. T. Howie. J. A. Hunter. Roll. E. Inman, J. K. Johnston, L. A. Jones. J. R. Kelley. J. E Lipscomb. G. A. Martin, J. C. Marlin, 11. E. Mayfield, W. C. Millhous. S. A. Moore. W. I. Newby, G. P. Parrott, J. R. Pittman, E. E. Putnam, S. R. Rhodes. M. 11. Sams, G. C. Scaife, E. II. Shirley, G. Smith, J. 11. Strong, George Tin dal, Boyce Turner, T. U. Vaughn. W. II. Wheeler, W. J. Wilder. I). R. Wilks. J. R. Williams. J. B. Workman. 6i'99-‘oo J. E. RraktArld V. S Hough J. K. Johnston H T. Cox . OiyrtCT-- The evangelization of the world. Officers. 'resident Vice-President Treasurer . . . Secretary . . 'oo-'ot . - J. H. Mitchell F. T. Cox E. K. Putman • • J. F. Watson Okvotionai.. Dibi.k Study, Mission. . -Mkubkksiiip, Hand Book, Committees. ............M. B. Sams, Chairman . J. F. Watson. Chairman W. S. Hough. Chairman . . li. I.. Blackwell. Chairman J. E. Braketichl. Chairman Statistics. Year ending February aStli. 1901. Membership, active, . 50 Membership, associate, 30 Bible Classes, ....................................j Average Attendance................................jo Regular Meetings held ............................36 Delegates to Summer Conference .................... Delegates to Convention ......... 3 6364J. E. Brakcficid George Timlul . Allan J. Graham J. K. Johnston . A. II. Miller . G. C. Scaifc . . C. M. McGee . . IS. B. Rice, Jr. . OFFICERS. ..................... ’resident .................Ciee-President ......................Treasurer .....................Secretary . . . Manager Foot Halt Team ........Captain Foot Ball team .......Manager Base Ball 'team ........Captain Base Balt Team 65Btbletic association 1btstor HE student-body of Furman University met in the University Chapel. February Jl. 1S9S. ami organized an Athletic Association. This association has for its object the promotion of college spirit and the placing and maintaining on a high plane athletic sports. It has under its direct charge the Base Ball Team, the Foot Ball Team, and Field's Day. The officers of these different organization and occasions arc elected by the association. The first president of the association was Mr. C. M. Horton. Much of whatever good has been accomplished by this association may lie traced back to this beloved alumnus of Furman. Mr. Horton was ably assisted in his work by Mr. S A. Agnew, the first secretary. During the next session of school. tS9S-‘99. Mr.J. H. A. Carter was president and Mr. B. F. Kennedy secretary. In January. 1899, Mr. Kennedy having left school. Mr. W. F. Scott was elected to fill his place. During this year the base ball team was rc-e |uippcd throughout In June, 1S09. the following were elected officers or the ensuing term iS99-'oo: W. C. Allen, president; A. I . Mnnvillc, secretary. During this year, through the skillful management of Mr. Allen, a large part of the outstanding debt of the association was paid. The present officers arc given on preceding page. Since the organization of the association a greater amount of interest has been taken in athletics; but never has this interest been greater or more universal than at the present time. A larger percent of the students nrc members than ever before and as the season grows older the enthusiasm continues to increase. For the last three years we have not liccn allowed to play foot ball. At the meeting of the trustees of the Uni versity held last June, the piivilegc of playing this national game was again granted to us. As nothing in this line had Iwcn done for three years and all our material for a team was unskilled and untrained, we could not be expected to do very much. Yet, in the lace of all these drawbacks, we put a team in the field that Furman could Ik proud of; and. though we won no victories, our team won fume for itself and proved that with another year’s training it will be second to none. This year's team was managed by Prof. A. H. Miller, " cuplained” by Mr. (1. C Scaife.’nnd trained by Mr. Frank Spencer. Professor Miller was very successful us a manager and as a proof of this fact he has been re-elected to the same position for next year. For three successive years f M-’97) Furman won the championship in college base ball for this State. Since that time she hasn't been so successful until this year. ('01), when she defeated Clinton, F.skine, Wofford (the champions), and Clctnson. who forfeited a game to her by failure to appear on their own diamond after time for tile game. Her record cannot be beaten. She lias won the championship of this State for the season of the year 19 i. 66Team of oo. Manager, . , . Prof. A. If. Miller. Captain.......................... G. C. Scaifc. Center A'us ), ... . . J. B Workman. Left Guard,. Boyce Turner. tight Guard,, . . . Left Tackle,................J. T. I.a vrencc. Right Tackle...... Left End,. . . ... McKclIar Townra. Right End.......... Quarter Hack, . . ....... C. R. Hatch. Left Hat Hack................G. C. Scaifc. Right Half Hack, . . Enlt Hack,.....................A. T. Sublctt. Substitutes, I . II. Shirley, J. G. Graham, J. H. LeaJhcrwood. . . . W. R. Sloan. . C. H. Workman. . . GoerRC Baeot. . . . . E. Hatch.in r ot'K TilK ('AMK, AinritK thb r.A«K.Manager...........................C. M. McGee. Captain, E. R. Rice. Jr. Catcher,..........................F. G. Lanhain. Pitchers, W. T. Everett. A. T. Sublctt. It a sc men, Ist. E. B. Rice, Jr.; and, Ira McTeer; 3rd, A. T. Sublctt and W. T. Everett. Short Stop.................... . . . J. C. Martin. Fielders, Left. C. II. Workman; centre, I.. E. Wright; right, L 0. Corbitt. Substitute,......................K. A. Gentry. 69TRccoit of tfoc Scant of 01 LL ye cranks of base ball, behold these University in the year of 1901. scores achieved by the giant team of Furman I'lTKMAN VS. CLINTON. Furman....... 30.130404 0—17 Clinton....... 12000000 0—3 FURMAN VS. WOFFORD. t a 3 4567 3 9 IQ Furman....... 510020000 2—10 Wofford ..... 200000042 x—8 FIIRMAN VS. KKSKINK. • 3 4 - S 6 7 9 Furman........ 34301000 o—11 Krskine....... 00010000 o— 1 FURMAN VS. COR NULL. 1 » 3 4 S 6 789 Furman................. 2000 toox x—3 Cornell............... 10290 o o x x—12 FURMAN VS. IIINGMAM. • a. 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 (Furman . ... 1200 2 o o i 3-9 Bingham. 1011 O o o o 0-3 FURMAN VS. WAKE FOREST. « » 3 4 s 6 7 8 9 Furman . . . 4 3 o o 0-9 Wake Forest. o o o o 3-4 FURMAN VS. S. C. C. 1. 12 3 4 5 6 7 S 9 Furman. . . 12 1 O 4 t It 2 o 7-3 S. C. C. I. I o O l 0-7 FURMAN VS. F.RSKINF.. •234 5 6 7 8 9 Furman ■ . . O O 1 2 4 o 2 2 X —11 Krskine. 1 1 O O o o o 2 x—4 At a meeting of the Athletic Association May 25. the following officers were elected for the ensuing session: President.....................G. W. Cuuingh.im. Secretary..........L. L. Wright. Manager Foot Ball Team, . . . J. B. Workman. Manager Base Ball Team, Vice-President.........J. B. Johnston. Treasurer,............... OP. Parrott. Captain Fool Ball Team. A. T. Sublett. • A. J. Graham.10. JO KVHXJ. E. Johnston . . . S. R. Rhodes . . - V. Cunningham W. S. Hough . . . OFFICERS. I’t esideut ..... Vue- President Secretary and Treasurer .................Manager MR MBERS. B I.. Itlnrfctvcll, It. F. Carson. J. A. Hunter. J’rof. H. C. Huyn-worth, A. 1'. Hickson. V. S. Hough. J. Ii. Johnston, C. M. McGee. J. R. Pittman, J. B. Preston. A. J. Graham. G. C. Scaifc. W. C. Milhous. S. R. Rhodes. G. V Cunningham. I) R. Wilks.flDcss {Three {Tennis Club Officers. J. B. Workman..................... W. C. Rogers . . Jlembsrs. I . C. Covington. H. O. Crini. C. K. Hatch. W. A. HarjK-T, J. C. Martin. C. W. Mullins C. II. Workman. .... ’resident business Manager J. C. Plowden, I-. Kidgcll, 1 . H. Rogers. L. B. Smith, J. I . Watson. S. I.. Watson. I. I. Wright,74fllMtsic Club. Motto. The night shall he filled with music. Yell. Tra-la-la-la, la-la, la-la, In-vocal-instrumcntal, rah, rah. Members. Prof. H. C. Haynsworth, G. V. Cuninghatii, J. W. Taylor, K. T. Cox, J. G. Landrum, I). R. Wilks. Sl M. Wolfe. Elmer Putnam. Vocal Quartet. First Tenor, . ». W. Cuningham. Second Tenor, ..................... . . . . F. T. Cox. First Itass...................Prof. II. C. Haynsworth- Second Fuss..............................J. W. Taylor- Pianist for Cliapel Exercises. J. W. Taylor. Elmer Putnam, Assistant, 76fUMnstrel Club. Officers. H. H. Rice....................................Manager J. R. Ifayncs . . .............S'fag? Director V. S. Hough.......................... Interlocutor End Men. J. R. Haynes. J. Lewis Smith, A. T. Sublett. C. W. Mullins Warblers.' F. T. Cox. G. W. Cutiinjjliam. J. G. Landrum, J. K. Johnston, T. M. Jordan, L. L. Wright. 1 . R. Wilks. J. A. Hunter. I. It. Workman. W. I-. LaGrouc. 77IRobah Club. Officers. J. W. Taylor, President A. J. Graham, Vice-President C. !-. Hatch, Secretary and Treasurer Members. S. r . Trowbridge, 1’. It. Watson. R It Pitt . A. O. Gratiam. II. J Crouch, W. C. Rogers II. G. Crim. W. C. Milhous. W. S. Newby, C. E. Hatch, l». N. Dorn, J. W. Taylor.l!?e jfacult? Choir. Object Organist Stage Master . . . . Good Music at Chapel Dr. A 1 . Montague ... Dr. C. H. Judson Ye Sopranos and Top-tines ( Gordon It. Moore ( Marshall I). Karlc Ye Tenors . (1 larvcy T. Cook [ Frank Watson Yt First lassos f Bcnncltc Ii. Geer. Hdgar M. von Fiugvrlin Ye Second lassos ( Andy H. Miller (A. P. Montague Critics: Criticism : Kvcry one of our dear professor graduated nt tlic Boston Conservatory of Music, for we cauuot appreciate the delicate, complex harmony. SoColors. Sky Blue oik! White. Veil. Holtainnle! Hottamalc' Mess Number One, Coot! and jolly, good and jolly, best under the nun, Merry, yes! Marry, no! always full of fuu : Bless your life, leave your wife, and come to Mess One. ’resident . . Vi re- P tsidcHt Secretary . . Treasurer . . Caterer . . . Officers. S. R. Rhodes . V. S. Hough J. G. Landrum It. ],. Blackwell . .J. A Hunter Members. J. K. Brakefield. J. A. Hunter, It. !.. Blackwell. W. S. Hough. S. H. Brown, C. T. Howie. J. L. Bass. J. G. Landrum. It. P. Carson, F. H. Lanhani, G. V. Cunioghain, H. E. Mayfield, II. J. Crouch. W. C. Milhous. S. It. Cole. W. L. Newby, T. K. Elgin. G. 1 . Parrott, J. G. Graham. J. K. Pittman, W. II. Goodwin, E. E. Putnam, W. I.. Hurley, S. R. Rhode . J. S. Harrs . R. S. Ray, A. P. Hickson, J. L. Smith. Statistics. Most studious man .... B. F. Carson Jollies! man . . W. S. Hough Most 'dignified man Greatest ■' calico" man , . . . Wittiest man Most influential man . . Biggest cater . . H. E. Mayfield Most bashful man J. G. Graham Meekest man . .... Sportiest limn Most popular man . . Grummest man . . W. I,. Newby “Cutest man " Stingiest man Neatest man The most social man . . . . . The biggest bum The most truthful man . C. T. Howie The biggest Muff ... W. C. Milhous The best writer . . .... S. B. Cole The biggest llirt A. 1 . Hickson The most musical man S. II. Brown The moral man . . . . J. L. Smith The nearest married man . . . . T. E. Elgin The most graceful mini . . . W. If. Goodwin The most seiisimeiital man J. G. Landrum The best bicyclist . . K. S. Kay ("Geezer ') The best athlete . !• . J. I.aiihnm 2TUnber the Olb Oah. Almost without exception, every boy in some of them: Old "Sister Newby" said to me, Rays lie, "John Henry," lieneath this tree, This dear old oak. the pride of Mess One. Let’s hide n moment from the sun: For " Cole" lias gone and •• Springtime's " come. Shines the green Mayfield ns though it were " June." Just then "J. Powtand" came along. And feeling good, proposed a song; So calling “ Goose " we started on A song which brought the " Gin-house " down. Down he tumbled with a funny Crouch, Which we longed to see though it was not much. 'Till "Solomon in all his glory" appeared. Looking wise indeed, w ith his four day's l c rd : Just then the hooting of an “ Owl" Broke up our song, and with u scowl We looked up, up. way up. oh! my, We saw '• Pike's Peak just 3 miles high.' To renew our song, wc tried again. But without a " hake" it was in vain. So giving it up we idly sat Mess One has a nickname. Here are Listening to “ Polly's ” senseless chat. Now and then ignoring the bird. As “ Logician’s " ha, lia's of logic were heard, And the cablegrams from " China " which we daily received Were answeied by " Stevy" with tales tinbelieved. All at once a great shout from the " Widow ” wc heard And Mr. ' Whiskers" appeared minus his beard. For months oil his chin he had sported some reel That shone like a Pay from "Sorrel Top's" head. "Go Study!” shouted " Goodman," " Hoys, it is late"— Wc looked at our " Elgin " 'twas a qnaiter 'till eight; But before we go in our real names you must know. So in the order above they'll follow below. There’s Newby and Landrum, Cole. Blackwell and Mayfield. Cunningham. Millhous, Crouch, Brown, Howie, Rhodes and Brakcfield. Parrott, Carson. Hickson. Hough, Putnam. Smith—still more. Rav, Hunter, Goodwin, Flgiu, which make the twenty-four. “Iborse Sboc Club.” A. P. Hickson, . S. R. Rhodes,. . W. S. Hough J. K. BrakefieM. J. h. Bass, B. P. Carson, G. W. Cuuingham, C. T. Howie, . . . President . Vice-President Trainer H. H. Mayfield. W. C. Milhous, G. I . Parrott, J. R. Pittman, R. R. Putnam. Object. To Ring the Stake.' Members. IRubbcr IRcchimj JSvtoabc. Commander-in Chief . Captain ............. Lieutenant i irderty Sergeant . . . G. I , l’ar roll . . . J. I,. Bass . V. S. IIourIi J G. i imilrmn Company ••A.” II. J. Crouch. C. T. Howie. K. Ii. Futnnm, J. F. J.auhiim. B. I.. Blackwell. J. A. Htinier, J. R. Fitlmnii, W. C Millhous. S K. Rhode . J. K. Brakt field. Motto: To helo poor Shoemakers. Object: To make Goo-Goo eyes. 85Cbc Scvcccbcvs ’resident Vice-President Musical Director Vocal Direclot ...... PIKSTTKNOKS. O. W. Cuuiiigbam, J. A. Hun Ur, W. C Mil lions, SUCONI) TKNOKS. A. 1 . UickSOli, J. G. I.andrum, G. P. Parrott, J. K. Pittman, . . . J, G. I.umiruin . . . G. W. Cuiiinghnm • • . . E. K. Putnam lrIRST BASSOS. 1 H. Itrakcfieltl, C. T. Howie. T. E. Elgin SI-CONI BASSOS. J. I,. Pass, II. K. Mayfield. V. S. Hough. S. R. Rhodes. A'csiif , “ Envied by Mess 3." Object, "To alnrnj the- m-igliltorliood.' 86“ lketcb= up Club.” " Chic Swiper." Horace J. Crouch First Assistant,. I!. Jones Crouch Second Assistant, . . II. J. Crouch Intercessor, ... H I.. Blackwell Solicitor............................ . . . W. S. Newby Coneeator amt Abettor.................. V. C. Milhous Headquarters......................... . . Cox West Object .............. .... To. possess Members. Crouch. Crouch, Crouch flgntu. 87Base Ball Club. Captain Managa Treasurer t 'oaeher . O. P. l’atrott J. A. Hunter ................ J.T. Howie . II. J. Crouch Line Up. S. I? Cole . . G. V. Cumngliiiui (J. P. Parrott C. T. Howie J. I., lias W. C. Millions S. R Rhodes . . J. G. I.andruin V. S. I lough . . Catcher . . Pitcher First base Second base Third base Short stop . Right field Center field . Left field Substitutes. Itrnkefirld and Hickson. SSZEbc TRat of fIDcss ©nc "Whiskers! Razors! Scissors! cats’em alive!" Such was the cry in Mess One, one cold night in January. The wind howled through the tree tops scattering snow flukes here and there, but the chilling breeze was not enough to cool the ardor of the picked few. As suddenly as the noise arose it died away, the lights were all out and silence reigned supreme. Did you ask where the noisy crew had betaken itself? Cast your eyes toward the University, and there you will see them stand tug in the shadow of the building talking earnestly together. Presently two leave the crowd, one with a large towel thrown across his shoulder, the other with a large pair of shears attached to his waist by means of a string. They went to the front door and to their chagrin found it locked, evidently fit had taken a hint from a former visit. The two returned to the expectant crowd and held another short consultation. This time they leave in pairs. On the corner near the door Hough ami haudrutn sta-tioued themselves; below them near the entrance Putnam, Crouch and Pittman, while Blackwell. Millhous and Bass stood scntioucl not lar distant. Three others stood in the shadow until all were posted Then Hickson. Howie and Parrott withdrew from the shadow, sat dow n on the hard frozen ground and divested themselves of their shoes. Suddenly Hickson disappeared around the corner of the University, entered by some unknown means and opened the door from the inside, then noiselessly the other two entered, closed and locked the door behind them. The three stood for a few .minutes in an undertone conversation. Hickson moved to the flight of steps on the left, Howie and Parrott to the right; one, two. three was counted in a rpiick undertone voice nml we hounded up the steps like :i " blue streak of greased lightning " Just as we reached the top wc heard a chair turn over and we knew the culprit had begun his flight. As wc hurled Open the door on one side we caught a glimpse of his sail-flown coat tail passing out the other, hut they arc on him, and ns he leaped fr -m the second story veranda n hand was thrown out which seized his flying coat tail. He dangled for u few moments head downward, hut by the united strength of the three last named lie was hauled over balistrade and his shaky understanding placed in the right position. A low whistle is given and all gathered together to see him who dared to defy us on two former occasions. As lie viewed the mighty throng gazing at him with "Goo Goo” eyes his downy lips trembled and hi knees drummed to the tunc of ’• Yankee Doodle,” and lie cried out: “ Oh! for the wing of n pigeon, how soon I would be with my mi!" As he thus sat groaning in spirit the towel was suddenly thrown over his face and knotted securely behind his head, his delicate feel and hands were tied together by means of ropes, and he was borne into thecourt for trial. By request tile blindfold was takeu off. his glosses placed upon his nose, his feet loosed and crossed and his arms folded on his breast. He listened elated to the eloquent speeches of Wolfe and Strong in his defence, but when Rhode and llr.ikciicld rose up for the Mess his crossed feet shook apart, his tongue lolled from his mouth. tears dropped from bcucath his beloved glasses, and his cherished derby fell unresistingly to the floor. The jury was charged; they tiled out and silence prevailed. Presently the tramp of their feet was heard returning. They entered with sad and solemn faces. Newby, thelforeman, renders the verdict, “guilty.” The prisoner was put in the hands of Sheriff Carson, who again blinefoldcd him and led him into an antechamber to prepare for his punishment. The Indoved boy fell on 9 his knees and begged the jailer, Hunter, for a bite of bread, saying he was faint. But it is refused him, for the executioners are at hand, lie was tied back in his chair, his mouth propped open with a chip—“click, click," went the dull shears jis they moved over the downy surface. One by one the tears rolled from his eves. It is finished ; the exultant and revenged hoy gather in one corner of the dusty court room and its walls echo with : llottamalc, hottaniate, Urn Number One, Coo.1 and jolly, Rood and jolly. t -»l under the »un. Merry, yes ' tarry, no 1 always lull ot fun, Uet your life; leave your wife' «n l conic to Mess One. Tile sound dies away, only the wind i» heard whistling through one side of llnrley's whiskers, for the other half lies dy iug on the floor. G. P. p. oI . J ) ) £ w Q,MRSS TWO.Statistics NAMK. NICKNAMK. CHARACTRRIST1C NAMK. NtCKNAMK. CHARACTERISTIC Allison, J. A . • . . . Jim .... . Isolation Inman, Essie . Pete .... . Gentleness Ilentlcy, B. A. , . . Bob .... . Quietness Jones, I,. A. .... Fatty . . . • Sharpness Burriss. Samniio . . . Buck . . . . Dissatisfied Laurence.J T. . High Temper Butler, I!. IX . . . . . Solomon . . . Assertiveness Marett, K. V. . Possum Eye . . Clownishness Caldwell. J. C. . . Shyness Martin. G. A. . . . Mamma . . . Love Sickness Carson, B. I • • . Omer . . . Dryness McTcer. Ira . . - Coolness Babishness Pinson, B. F. . • Overbearing Cox, P. T. • . Ann} Sarah . . Pinson, B. J.. . Little Pete . . . Pleasantness Edwards, Walter . . Fracus . . . . Bossivcncss Rolierts, J. W. . • Amativencss Ga»ton, J. M. . Bonus . . - - Loafer Rol crts.R. T. W. Jr. R.T.W.-X.Y.Z. . Laziness Gentry, R. A. . Rag .... Shrewdness Sams, M. B. . . . Sambogu ■ . Individ ualitivcnexs Glenn, Frank . . Meteor . . . . Transient Seaife. G. C. . . . . . Conjer . . . . Prospectiveness Going. J.T. . . Idealist Shirley. F. II. . .... Lye .... . Emotionless Greer, B. K. . . . . . . Corbit . . . Greediness Simpson. 11. E. . I.ankey . . . . Gassy Hawkins, W. E. . . . Hawk . . . Noisiness Sloan. W. R . . . Bigum . . . . Inquisitiveness Hopkins, J. G. . • Sweet Heart . Contentedness Smo ik. 1). W. . Smokehouse . Childishness Hughes, I- V.. . . . .Jack Meekness Yeldcll. W. II. . Yaller-gal . . . Bullhcadcdness 93Clubs anb Societies. ORCHESTRA. Singrrs. V. T. Cox, L. I). Corbitt, W. II. Yeldcll, K. W. Mnrett, Ira McTecr. Violin............................... .... F. T. Cox Mandoliu......................... . Walter I'M ward lattjo . • • J. T. Lawrence Organ............................. . . R. F. Carson Guitar ................................ Ir.t McTcer Harp..................... .... J. T. Going DANCING CLUB. G. C. Scaife, IWsidrnt. Mtmbrri. J. C. Caldwell Walter Fdward . L. A. Jones. Kssic Inman. J. G. Hopkins, W. H. Ycldell. 94MARBLE CLUB. R. P. Pinson, Preside !. M. B. S»n». Members. F. T. Cox. B. F. Carson, B. K. Greer, f. T. I,awrcuce. W. R. Sloan, R. A. Gentry. TOBACCO BEATERS. P. T. Cox. President. Essie Inman, J M. Gaston. B. F. Carson, W. E. Hawkins. J. T. Going, V. R. Sloan. BASK BALL TEAM Inman ...................... Shirley . . . . ... Edwards..................... Lawrence .... .... Corbitt..................... Soaife (Captain) . . . Gentry...................... Martin...................... Cox . . .................. Smoak, substitute. . . Pitcher . . Catcher . First base Second base Third base Short stop Center field . Left field Right field ■PHONE FI.IRTERS. H. K. Simpson. 'resident. R. A. Gentry, W. R. Sloan, F. T. Cox. L. W. Hughes, L. A. Jones. Essie Inman.r „) ,2 £3 € £5 a'®W. H. McClain. . J. B. Workman.. Officer . . ‘resident . . Caterer Color . Ketl and Green. Yell. Rickety, Rackety. Rip. rah, rcc. Furman, Furman. tJni-ver U-tee: When you come Come mid ec The jolly boys Of Old Mess Three—Rah. Loafing Place. West Mini Drug Store. 9 Statistics NAME J. B. Workman,. . C. H. Workman,. . J. C. Plowden, . . J. H. Cheatham. . E. Ridgell,. . . J. F. Watson,. - . J. 11. Leatherwood. S. I . Watson. . . W. A. Harper. . . C. W. Mullins,. . I . L. Wright, . . J. P. Shirley. . . C. K. Hatch. . . I, . B. Smith, • - • W. H. McClain.. J. I.cwis Smith,. . W. C. Roger . . . . P. 11. Rogers. . . P. C. Covington, W. T. Everett. D. H. Wolfe,. H. G. Criin... . S. M. Wolfe. W. R. Bryant. . . Loadholt......... S. E. Boncy, J. C. Martin, . . Garvin. . . NICK NAME . . Big Jim Pete . Old Lady . . Johnnie . . . Kid . . Parson . . . I'm . . . Foots . Wiss • • Nig Little Doc . . . Jimho . . Chess . Old Socks . . . Mack . . Fido . . . Bill C. . . . Polly . ... Kit . . Tcnny . . Student . . . Babe . . . Lupus Rcymond . Loadstone . Skinny . . Shorty FAVORITE EXPRESSION NOTKD FOR Good granny......................... Buying soup bone By golly......................... Writing to Maggie Plague it................................... ’Phoning Hang it.........................................Growling Good gee ..............................Making a fuss Lciume tell you........................Peace making Get out................................ . Bumming Look out now .......................Playing with his feet The devil . ... ............................. We'll get 'em....................................Arguing I’ll Ik-Joe douse...............................Studying Keep on now...................... . . Scribbling Datnfi no..............................Playing tennis Say boys....................................... Swiping Be hanged........................................Smoking I'll be jumped double............Studying—devilment By sixes..............................Taking pictures By George....................... ... Going for the mail Dog. gone...................... .... Cussing his luck I'm looking at ye................ . . . Chewing tobacco Gee whir................ . Attending recitation You flew .... ..............Being fresh Damn ... . .... Arguing with professors O hello . ... Packing sand on Washington St. Dog on your skin....................... Wearing ring By George • • Prevaricating Hey there . . ...................Playing ball Well, I declare • • Nothing in particular 99flDees Ebree PON a hilt In Greenville Town There live a noble band, We have our fun. as .ill ought to Hut ore as noble as are in the laud. We arc up-to-date in every respect. In affair we always take the lead ; And if anyone ever wishes to catch us He mutt surely quicken hia speed. We dwell In castles three. Hut not protected as those of yore Por they were a I raid of the people abroad, Hut of us this Is certainly not so. In numbers we may not excel. Hut In other respects where nre we There nre no ones but will say. We'll give It up to Mess No Three. We are twenty in number : Hut quantity doesn't cut any icc As lor quality you all know well None can. on us. put a price. l-'roni what yon have heard. Vou all will surely agree In giving with voice- strong and clear " Three cheers" for ' Mess No. .V —Mr.csTuur.i: Timm IOOSIGKLTTI IO Officers. (Members. W. If. McClain..............................P'resident V. C. Roger . . ..................Vice-President J. 1 . Shirley................Secretary and Treasurer E. Kidgcll................................... Scorer Motto. Watch ami piny. HIRST HOUR C. H. Workman. C. W. Mullins. W. A. Harper. J. I,. Smith, SKCOND FOI R C. E. Hatch. J. H. Cheatham. J B. Workman. I,. B. Smith. The present high position which this club occupies is due in a large measure to the noble and untiling efforts of " Tigc " and “ H," champion of their day at No 3. 101Mater JBatallton. C. H. Workman C. E. Hatch . . 1.. L. Wright J. F. Shirley . W. A. Harper 1.. B. Smith . . Captain i $t Lieutenant } t Lieutenant thicket Fillet Winder Wetter Drown Jet Privates. J. H. Cheatham, W. C. Rogers, C. W. Mullins, J, B Workman. J. F. Watson. E. Ridgetl. foi Chief Object . Chief Delight Keeping Away •‘Burns” Wetting New SuitsSfcUlct Club. Ofliccrs. Eff RMgcll . K, 1$. Rice . . Captain . . . . istLieutenant W. C. Roger . . . . jd lieutenant I.. L. Wright Chief Cook and Hot He ll'asher 1’. C. Covington. J. It. Work mini. T. B. Smith. J. H. Cheatham. Members. J. W. Shirley. I . II. Rogers. J. C. 1'lowtJen, C. II. Worfcmiiii. W II McClain. IOtjforaoers’ Club. COMMISSION!-,!! OI I ICKKS C. V. Mutlin ..............Commander in Chief J. II. Cheatlinm................Manager S-jintd I.. B. Smith...........................Captain Guard W. T. Rvcrctt.. . . . Rear Sentinel NON-COM. ORKICKKS W. H. McClain, i t. J. B. Workman, )il. W. A. Harper, » 1. P. C. Covington, 4th. J. I,. Smith, jih. IOKAOKRS AT WORK 104Statistics of flDembcus. “A sh love dark nets rather than light.'' C. W. Ml'1.1.1 NS—Famous (ot hi brave midnight rAtds on chicken-tree . and for the skillful wav in which he fill hi spacious pockets while contemplating making a purchase, i justly termeil commander-in-chief. J. II. Cli HATH AM—Manager, baa tn.vV himself famous by bringing in. at one haul. six bottle ink. eight tablets. one dozen pencil , and sufficient stationery for twelve month use. I., ft. SMITH—"Cop." Guard. ha developed the art of "cop" dodging into a ncience, also ha the money saving art of procuring coal down "pat." Hi books give account of many successful raid on the ''cop ." W. T. KVKRKTT Ha proven hi ability as sentinel ill hi round with the boy , and i noted for using those bow leg to perfection when caught in tight place . Also ha wonderful carrying capicity. W II. McCI.AIN Terror to book store and fruit Mauds ; also well posted as to the situation of garden and Mrnwberry patches. V. A. IIARPKR ha a special aptne for sighting chicken coop , and provide meal that would do honor to any i|iiartrr ma»tcr. . J. ft. WORKMAN is without doubt the most successful tobacco ••bummer” in the fniversity: also ba» other talent which, when luffici-nlly developed, will lie of great benefit to the club. I . C. COVINGTON, noted for bravery in acting a scout and i skillful in wiping live slock and decorating some for the pleasure of other . J. b SMITH ha been known to carry iso pound of coal, upon hi back oue-fourth mile in icu minute through pouring rain, and over rough and muddy way . Al o make a specialty of photo .from tbc Bulletin JBoarfe. 1.. B's reason for not buying new ock is tb.it the washwoman charge only half price for nocks with no feet. P. has Wen unable to go out lately on account of delay in construction of a pair of new No n's to 1’. (who has (Knight a pair of drop stitch socks) -Say. I ., you got cheated in those s“ck ; why. they are full of holes already. Who wet Prof?Cbc Do ice. K chanced to hear it the Voice—one duy while he was waiting at the telephone. It was low, sweet ami tremulous, at the Mine time full, rich ami clear. It sounded as if the owner spoke with some decree of hesitancy, probably from timidity, but that instead « f detracting, added to the peculiar thrilling tone which had tirst arrested his attention. Indeed, there must have been something very unusual about the Voice to have attracted this young man, for it had never been his inclination in life to pay attention even to the faces of the fair sex, much less to their voices. This seemed almost a pitv, loo, for he was young, handsome, and talented, and would have played the part of the suitor well, hut it was little to his taste. His mother had died when he was quite young, and since that time he had been thrown almost exclusively into the society of men. In fact, the old hou ckec{»er, whom his father had retained after the death of his mother, was about the only woman with whom he ever talked. In view of these facts, therefore, it cannot be counted strange that he should care but little for tilt-society of the opposite sex and that his mind should have been turned early toward that phase of life, which some men consider the most essential—making money. Neither is it surprising that, with the early development of this talent, he should have been successful in his business undertakings, and that, even before the zenith of his manhood had been reached, he had acquired no small share of this world's goods. But to return. The voice he had just heard affected hint strangely. There had been not more than a half dozen words- just a call to central fo« some number—but it seemed to him as he held his ear to the leceiver, that he was listening to a sweet, beautiful melody, intended only for the soul. After the voice was no longer audible, lie-stood for some moments as if lost in some faraway dream, then, on coming to himself he hastily rang up central again, forgetting his first purpose in coming to the'phone, which was, no doubt, something concerning his business, and asked who it was that had just rung. Central, as might have been expected of one in her position, had forgotten, and the young man was turned away disappinted. " Oh ' well," lie said to himself, ns lie walked home that evening, • After all, it was only a fancy. I'll sleep it off tonight.” But sleep did not conic so readily as lie had expected. There were in its stead thoughts of the Voice. All through the night the young man found himself listening over and over to the words that been spoken. Then lie would picture in his mind the one that had spoken them. That she was a lady, young and beautiful, he was 107sure. N’o one without those qualities could possess the tunes to which he had listened with so much delight. The voice also showed refinement and culture ; hut of any of the circumstances of the owner's life he did not feel warranted in querying. He had no doubt that if he should ever see her, no matter when or where, or how tightly her lips might be sealed, he should know her as the one he had heard that day through the telephone Ik-forc morning a determination to search out the owner of this bewitching vocal power seized him. He realized that life would contain no satisfaction now, until that was done. Something would always he incomplete. All at once a dreadful thought struck him. Suppose it should ! e too late when he found her. Suppose she should have already lx»cn claimed hv another. He shuddered. Other fears that she should be below his rank, or that she should in any wav prove inferior to him. were of short duration. This oue alone remained. During the two years that followed, our hero, for a such we must now recognize him, met with little success in his search for the Voice. At times he had almost been at the point of giving up in despair at the fruitlcssucss of his clTorts, when some new plan would suggest itself to him, ami he would renew the search with increased energy. Once, indeed, he thought his search was ended. He was seated in one of the great cathedrals, where he had gone in the furtherance of his one purpose in life, listening to the splendid melody of the big choir over his head. All at once n note like that of the Voice reached him above the swell of the great organ. Scarcely daring to breathe. he listened for it again, through the next chorus, and the next, hut he could not distinguish it, and scarcely were the services ended before he had taken his position at the foot of the stairway by which he knew the singers would descend. They came down two by two. There were many fair mauls and beautiful Indies among the throng, but not one of them bore any resemblance to his idea of the Voice, and once more he was turned away disappointed. Many incidents, similiar to this occurred during his search. Oftentimes, while seated among large congregations. he would fancy that he could hear the voice, but there would never be a person to correspond to it. One day, a year alter the incident in the Cathedral, our hero was seen on one of the jioorcr thoroughfares of the city. He had come there to look after the repairing of some of his tenement houses,long rowsof w hich stretched along either side of the street. He had stopped for a moment lieforc one of the largest and most dclapidated of the buildings, and on which a big sign " lodgings at small cost,” was conspicuous, when a song suddenly lloatcd from a window in the third story. With a cry. ” The Voice! The Voice! at last I have found it," he rushed into the house, much to the astonishment of some loiterers that were hanging around the door, hut were-ncverthlcss, afraid to interfere, and he ascended the rickety stairway. Not until he reached the door of the room from whence the song had been heard, did he pause. Then the suddenness of hi discovery for the first time struck him. Had he really after liis three long years of searching found her? And if he had what might it mean 10$to him and to hi future happiness. Who. after all, was t' e occupant of this room on the third story of this delapi-dated building? As these thoughts ran through his mind, he heard again the low notes of the song. What if it should be a mother soothing her babe to sleep. Yes, he would fain have retreated again, but it was too late; lie knew his steps had been heard within. Scarcely more audible than the beating of his heart was the knock he gave on the door, but it elicited a response, and the voice, in soft musical tones, bade him euter. The room in which he found himself was large and scantily furnished. Its barenness gave evidence of great poverty. A table on which were a number of medicines. a tumbler of water, a saucer containing a half-eaten egg and two or three crackers, occupied one corner of the room. In the opposite corner, with the wasted form of a woman, evidently in a dying condition, stretched upon it. a bed was conspicuous. The woman, who was apparently asleep, seemed about forty years of age. ller face, though now emaciated by great sufferings, still Imre traces of a once great beauty. But neither the bed nor its occupant was seen by the young man. That, and that only, which held his attention, was the marvellous beauty of a young girl, not yet in her twenties, who sat in a low chair at the bedside. She did not arise when he entered, hut turning her large, dark eyes on him as if to learn what the intrusion meant, pointed to a vacant chair, at the same time warning him with a gesture not to awaken the sleeper. Seeing his look of surprise as his eyes, now for the first time, rested i on the face of the invalid, to which the girl's bore a striking resemblance, and, ns if to answer the iui|uiring look which he turned towards her, she whispered, “ My mother." No sooner had the words escaped her than the invalid opened her eyes and smiled. Then, seeing the visitor and supposing him to have conic for the monthly rent of their miserable room, she began, a deep flush suffusing her face, to explain that shc was unable to pay. Glad at hav iug found an excuse for his presence there, but sorry of the pain he had occasioned, he hastened to assure her that it was all right and that lie had only dropped in to see if there was anything he might do for her. “ You are kind," she said with a grateful look that repaid him for his falsehood, "but I shall, in a few hours, be where I shall not need anyone's help. In heaven God will supply all mv wauls." She had not ceased speaking before a paroxysm of pain seized her and she fell back, gasping for breath— dying. Hastily pouring a few drops of wine into a glass, the girl approached the bedside, motioning for the young man to assist her. As the eyes of the dying mother rested on her daughter, a shadow passed over her face. " Mary," she gasped, "you have been a good daughter and it pains me to part with you. but as God wills it. I know it is all for the best." Then, turning to the young man. she said. "Oh. sir! promise me that you will befriend her. Help her to find her grand-parents, ami tell them, for my sake-for their poor, dying daughter's sake—to be kind to her." It was the old story. She had married early in life. 9against her parent ' will. They had disinherited her. and she and her husband had drifted to a distant State,where he died, leaving her and an infant daughter almost penniless. With an eager light in hiseve . the young man suddenly bent over and whispered something into her ear. She did not comprehend at first, but it finally dawned on her what he meant. Turning her gaze for a moment from his face. no which bore so well the stamp of true manhood upon it. she sought her daughter's. Then, taking one of her hands aud placiug it into that of the young man. she said, “ He loves you. Mary, and—and I hope sometime he may win you." For a moment the young lady raised her dark eyes to meet those of her lover. When they fell on her mother again she was dead. J. C. L.Solitude. S sweet to dwell a little while Away from life beset by worMly guile. Where thing annoying come not nor pax by To tantalize enchanting picture borne not of the eye, Within the MCnd realm of solitude. The heights supreme of all the joyous bliss Hnraptured by the absence ol things amiss. Arc picked out one by one In endless space. The plclurcs'jueniisof images which Interla e The nucleousof truth olinc In .Solitude. Vet not within the sweet comjiaiiloiishlp of nature I o pleasures gleamed from wordly man like this endntc The moment of u thought, c'tc present to the last Chased thro' it winding courses of the twist The play thing of a world of solitude. Ill Seen In all their mystic maxes of dltguiw, Untangled withes, turning to our mental eyes. The thoughts pass l y in mingled rank and file, «hir being paralizcd with stillness all the while. And then arc gone Into the land of solitude tint it i» not a step of far descent. W hen silently returning, for now our time is »j cnt. To view once more the monotony of life, Kmtmicing all the drsiic for gain 'mid strife Things ne'er venturing into solitude The fairy land of that sweet state, immortal, A council hath enshrouded in her portsl. Inviting all to enter and receive The silken web of thought her children weave In solitude. —Willis Tavlostulips. One is bliss Hut never antis . Is the plnr.il nnmlier of .1 ki . If you steal it, She can't repeal it. And then if sweeter, She'll blush, 1 know Hut doesn't that show She's a little hit pleased with the way you do. One would suffice. But they nay its nice. If you ean, to kiss her twice. little Ml So it's nil right boy . To play with such toy . But then don't let the old folks hear the noise. illH Simple IP1135IC. I‘‘tw men call gucM what riddle mean t'nilo the problem into light I{enolve the mystery, when unseen. M nke clear the things that now are night. A riddle, now, I give to youth N or must they wait for other might : So note the rhyme, and guv the truth. Many men admire it much. 11‘« loved by those of beauty ; N or fail to move the good and uch So hating all but duty. To those who arc old it help , and those Itefusing luxury' visit; K’en these and all. when naming it, I »ovc much to vsy exquisite. ”5H Xctter to a 5U l. DUE crown of the King I «Jo not wish ; Nor all an Emperor's power: Nor stone colossal o’er my head ; No mansion's stately tower . Nor armies great at my command . And banner all victorious: To force e’en fate to honor me. And destiny call me glorious. To sit on throne so cold and proud. And flattery bow before me ; Deception's voice throughout toy court. Destruction hanging o’er me. No. no. these thing 1 do not wish. No prince’s path to tread. No ruler’s joy. nor a ruler’s faults To answer to a God Nor riches great, for luxury’ Joy I here but for a season— A snake that sups from manhood's soul The gems of thought and reason No place that man can here bestow. No grand and honored station ; No. none, save one, can crown my hopes,— No. noue in Cod’ creation. And dear. Hurt one—the only one. Who hold reserved such power--Ah 1 shall 1 tell or do you guess Well hasten then the hour. That forest gem. that God could spire. In his great world l' invest it— The only one who holds my heart. Ye , now I know you've guessed it. —You ’ in Earnest Il6■Cable of Judson Alumni Hall................................... Title Page............................................. • Dedication............................................ 3 Greeting................................................ 5 Furman University,. . . . 6 Furman University......................................?-S University Calendar, • ................................. 9 Faculty.............................................. 11 Dr. A. P. Mountaguc....................... .... 12 I)r. C. II. Judson..................................... 13 Prof. II. T. Cook........... .................. 14 Prof. W. F. Watson and Dr. G. It. Moore.................tj Prof. M. I). Ivarlc mid Prof. I{. M. von Fingerlin, . . 16 Prof. B. K. Geer ami Prof. A If. Miller, .............. 17 Dr. D. M. Ramsay........................... ... iS Board of Trustees...................................... 19 Alumni Association........................... • 30 Academic Department.................................... 21 Senior Class. ...... . . 21 History of'01........................................ 4 25 What Wc Were........... . 26 Statistics............................................. 27 Prophecy of ’oi......................................28-29 The Voice of the Senior................................. y Junior Class......................................... 31 History of '02......................................... 32 Sophomore Class......................................33-34 History of '03.......................................3S‘36 Freshman Class,..................................... 37‘3$ History of '04......................................... 39 Specials,.... . . 41 In Mcmoriam,......................................... 4 In Mcmoriam.......................................... 43 Contents A doubt..................... Their Last Joke............. To Furman....................... College Publications........ Editors of the Bonhomie, The Furman Bonhomie, . . . . Editors of the Furman Echo, Furman Echo................. Student’s Dream,............ Literary Societies,......... Adclphian Literary Society,. I’hilosophian Literary Society . Y. M. C. A.............. . Athletic Clubs........ Just Through Exams.,........ Athletic Association, . . . . Athletic Association History, Foot Ball Team,............. Before and After the Game, Base Ball Team.............. Record of the Team of ’or, Team of ’ot................. Town Tennis Club............ Mess Three Tennis Club. . - . A Lady Killer,.............. Clubs.......................... Music Club.................. Minstrel Club,.............. Kodak Pictures,............. Kodak Club.................. Ye Faculty Choir............ Mess One.................... Under the Old Oak,.......... It 45-49 5° 51 5 53 54 55 56 57 S»‘ 59 6061 62 63 64 65 66 6? 6$ 69 70 7» 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 So S1-S2 83Horse Shoe Club,".......... Rubber Necking brigade. . . The Scrctehers............... " Ketch-Up Club,"............ Base Ball Club........... The Rat of Mess One.......... Mess Two................. • Clubs and Societies.......... Painting Doctor's Horse, . . Mess Three............. . . . Mess Three................... Signtific Whist Clul..... • S.j Water Balaliion.................................... 102 85 Skillet Club....................................... 105 86 Foragers'Club................................... 104105 S7 From the Bulletin Baud............................. 106 . S8 The Voice.......................................... to . .89-90 Solitude............................................ in 91-95 Tulips.......................................... in 9t 95 A Mistake.......................................... 115 • 96 Dreams of Bliss.................................... 114 ,97-99 A Simple Puudc.................................. 115 100 A Letter to a Girl..........•...................... 116 101 Advertisements,.................................... 117 .EVBETISEMBITTS.WE WANT TO INTEREST YOU IN OUR Jewelry I)epartment IN' WATCHES. DIAMONDS. JEWF.I.RY. Medals, Bulges, Prise . mid gift of nil kinds. wedding. holiday or 1 irth ! iy. AND AI.SO IN OUR OPTICAL DEPARTMENT Where vrt tiuikc no charge for examination and furnish high-grade optical good , correctly fitted, at lowest possible prices. We make The Furman Pin. GILREATH-DURHAM COMPANY. MAIN STREET. NEAR MANSION HOUSE. SMITH BRISTOW HIGH-GRADE CLOTHIERS AND HABERDASH ERS Exclusive Aneu's for STETSON’S STIFF HATS The best $3.50 shoe 111 at money can buy..... Not how cheap, hut how good, is our motto. Mail order receive prompt attention. Or.c price to everybody. SMITH BRISTOW MAIN AND WASH 1NGTON STREETS GREENVILLE. S. C.W. It HOUJTON BRO., Book Sellers tan Stationers. EASTMAN KODAKS AND SUPPLIES. BOOKS. MAGAZINES. NEWSPAPERS. BLANK BOOKS. STATIONERY. XMAS GOODS. PICTURE FRAMES. PICTURES. ETC.. 122 MdlN ST. QREENVILLE, J. C. R. L. R. BENTZ, Leader in Low Prices. Dry Goods, Notions, Carpets. Rugs, hosiery, Handkerchiefs. Underwear and Men s and Women s Shoes. CORNER ENTRANCE MAIN STREET AND McBEE AVENUE. GREENVILLE. S. C. GUARANTEED AT FITZGERALD'S GALLERY.... SPECIAL PRICES TO FURMAN BOYS. All Photographs in this Book were made by Fitzgerald. GET YOUR TURNOUTS FROM W. M. TANNER, PROPRIETOR OF Washington and Laurens Streets Livery, Feed and Sale Stables. Special Rates to Students. BELL PHONE 243.WON AT LAST! The reputatation of keeping Choice Meats of all kinds. Our meats have been used on the campus during the past season, giving universal satisfaction. We tender our hearty thanks for past favors and earnestly solicit your patronage in the future. C. M. TURNER , CO., Both Phone . 309 .Main Street. PLUMBING. GAS AND STEAM FITTING- BICYCLE and LIGHT MACHINERY REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. AGENTS FOR THE RACYCLE THE LIGHTEST RUNNING WHLEL MADE. FAHNESTOCK BROS., WASHINGTON ST.. GRKKNVIM.K, S. C. T. J. SEYLE. L. C. RICHEY SEYLE 6c RICHEY, DEALERS IN STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES, HAY AND GRAIN. 608 Pendleton Street. SOLE OISTRIOUTORS SPECIALTIES. MELROSE COFFEE. COUNTRY PRODUCE. POSTEL S ELEGANT FLOUR FINE JERSEY BUTTER For UP-TO-DATE COLLARS, CUFFS, NOBBY NECKWEAR, UNDERWEAR, The Styles in Hats and I'p-to-dale Suits at “ Wav Down ” Prices see THE MANUFACTURERS OUTLET, 21© X7pper ICvlo-in Street. MANZ E NOPAVEPS CHICAGO THIS V IMPRINT 011 an P.NGR A V I N G i» the Stamp of Quality. When in need of High-Grade Engravings, and Electrotypes write us for samples. J. MANZ ENGRAVING CO. CHICAGO. ILL. CHARLESTON ANO % WESTERN CAROLINA • • » v • • • • • .'Vi RAILWAY. J|5 y• wjJi y • •y ; ■0 ys y : m THE SHORTEST ROUTE aerweeN GREENVILLE AND NEWBERRY. COLUMBIA. FLORENCE. CHARLESTON. Through Vestibule Train between Greenville and Charleston, without Change. -- For Information as to Rates, Schedule, etc., apply to GEO. T. BRYAN. G. A.. Greenville, S. C. J. W. CRAIG, G. P. A., Augusta, Ga. J. W. JONES.T’k’t Agt.. Greenville. S.C. •?: . • • j; • • •.. . ■ • • •. V; • •; • . : •. $ - • •. • • First Edition Sold Before Publication. Second Rdition on the Press. RALVn rirtRLOWE By DR. JAMES BALL NAYLOR. Who has an aptitude for portraying country life, village scenes, odd characters unrivalled by few writers of the present day. The Most Charming Novel of the year. A tale of Ohio life full of excitement and romance. Ralph Marlowe, the hero, is strong, firm and sincere; the eccentric Doc Harwood is a study in himself: and the loquacious Jep will provoke many a hearty laugh by bis apt remarks and pert sayings. Dr. Naylor hos told his story so well that we think of the " Ralph Marlowe" characters us actual acquaintances. Its 111 more American : •’One of the best leal, human, modern stone that has been written fora Ionic time.” ••Ralph Marlowe" I a homely and a pica.Inn a. "David Hanna ' and has the sweetness and richness of" liben Holden." World-Herald. Omaha : •• Few hooks have appeared during the past year which are litis ouc‘» espial. Ohio State Journal: "The plot i» roi»»title.complicated and intensely interesting." Pittsburg Leader: "The most intertaining novel of the year." Ctcseland Plaindeatcr: " An interesting story and worthy of attention on account of its strong • local color• and .jiuint and pithy savings." Hinghampton Leader: " nietids the charm of romance with pleasure that amusing incidents afford. It is a delightful story happily told." THRILLING. REALISTIC. LAUGHABLE. PATHETIC. FASCINATING IS RALPH MARLOWE. Handsomely Bound In Cloth; Gold Lettering; 12 mo. $1.50. For sale at all book stores, or sent, postage free, on receipt of price by THK SAALFICLD PUBLISHING COMPANY, ozzzo.Always in stock. Complete lines of Gent’s Furnishings, such as Underwear, Shirts, Collars, Cuffs, Neckties, Socks, Suspenders, etc., etc. McAlister Beattie, Greenville, S. C. YOU ARE INVITED TO CALL AT COX WEST’S FOR YOUR GROCERIES. FRUITS. CAKES AND CANDIES. A GOOD ASSORTMENT ALWAYS IN STOCK. WE THANK YOU FOR PAST FAVORS. COX WEST. CORNER PENDLETON AND RIVER STREETS. M. Jo Po Qirusle, bumsT, V4SHIKQTON STREETS. OVER LEWIS HdRTZQQS STORE, «0 VilLE S. C . r.Of ; Ss IIS WASHINGTON ST.. F. H. LYNES, . . Proprietor. A first-class Restaurant for Ladies aud Gentlemen. Everything in season. Furman boys always welcome. A lady in attendance.A. P. MONTAGUE. Pm. 0.. L.L. D., Pr£6 0£nt llwo courses are offered leading to the “■ degrees of bachelor of Arts (15. A ) and Master of Arts (M. A.). Library, Reading Room; well equipped Chemical and Physical Laboratories; excellent Dormitory Facilities. For catalogue and further information apply to DR. A. P. MONTAGUE, President, or. DR. C. H. JUDSON, Dean, Greenville, S- C. Greenville, South Carolina. Blue Ridge section; beautiful Location, and unsurpassecd in health-fulness. Invigorating climate, free from malaria. Pure water from Paris Mountain, 2,000 feet above the sea. Repainted and renovated. Buildings. Every music room a parlor. A new building is being added for Lecture Rooms, Auditorium, Dining Room, Dormitory, etc. Full collegiate and special studies of Music, Art, Elocution, Pedagogy, Stenography, Typewriting, etc. Curricu lum. Expert teachers, selected for Faculty. technical skill, moral worth, Christian devotion and social excellence. Classic music taught by experienced and distinguished dircctoreducated in America and Germany. Individual attention. Applications for rooms should Ik made in advance. Several have already applied (April 25th). From present indications, the building with its large new addition will be full. For catalogue address E. H. MURFEE, LL.D., President.p tv College men know and the New I aven Union says, apropos of . term-end with its good-bys: "The question of what in the world to give a friend at parting seems to have been solved by the publication of Songs of All the Colleges which is alike suitable for the collegian of the past, for the student of the present, and for the boy (orgirl) with hopes; also for the music-loving sister, and a fellow’s best girl." " All the nkw songs, alt the old tongs, 4 and the songs popular at all the colleges ; " a welcome gift in any home anywhere." AT ALL BOOK STORES AND MUSIC DEALERS $!.$ • -r nit an .if} a! fjr tir nl tUari, $1.50 Postpaid. HINDS NOBLE, NEW YORK CITY Dt. n. K.irlii Tr.iHtlil.iKt, SlugmlC Ai.lt — S.ha.'liaaii » all ittUiitri at « ttfrr. LlTwu iu


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