Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC)

 - Class of 1928

Page 1 of 74

 

Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collection, 1928 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1928 Edition, Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1928 Edition, Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collection
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Page 10, 1928 Edition, Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1928 Edition, Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 74 of the 1928 volume:

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" Leaf Published by the Students of Franklin Hkih School May, 1928 THE LAI REL LEAF ELOISE GRIFFIN FRANKS who, during- her years as a teacher of ours, has always proven herself to be a friend of youth and to be possessed of that rare understanding which youth so often needs, this volume is affectionately dedicated Page Two FORKWORD To the casual reader this volume may seem dull and uninteresting, but to us it is a mirror—cracked, perhaps, in a few places and maybe dulled in others and with flaws in more places than one—but still a mirror in which is reflected our life and our school. In it we can look through the coming years and there find reflected ourselves and our school mates and the things we like to think upon. We hope you like it—We hope you ap¬ preciate its meaning to us now, and most particu larly in the future years—We offer it to you for what it is to us and appreciate your interest in it. If you just can’t like it, and if you find it unbearably dull and uninteresting—If it seems childish and immature—All of which we admit— Then—Close it up and lay it aside, for after all, nobody cares an awful lot wheth¬ er it pleases you or not. THE STAFF. Page Four I FREDERICK JOHNSTON HOUK Mascot Class of 1928 G. L. HOUK Principal FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL Page Eight TTnJs EN6US ' mm eKsractjjiovj HOME ECONOMICS HiSTOR. te n . oaney ■aum L J i - MATH - omse FRENCH LATiN Wulicm D.l esie- SCIENCE ATHLETICS Page Nine SENIOR CLASS 1928 OFFICERS President.Martha Pearle Cunningham Vice-President.Mary Enloe Secretary.Mattie Wilkes Treasurer.Philip Newman Faculty Advisor.Mr. W. R. Kesler Motto: The class that works—The class that wins. Flower: Daisy. Colors: Yellow and White. Page Ten H)2S NANCY CAROLYN JUSTICE “And grace your simple rustic gown with a beauty more than queenly.” Nancy is always jolly and full of fun. She was elected the most at¬ tractive girl in the class, which shows how much we all think of her. We have all expectations that she will some day tread the path of fame and make our class famous by her re¬ nown. MATTIE MAE WILKES “Live to learn and let the world turn round.” Secretary of Class ’28; Annual Staff’ 28; Library Staff ' 27. “Buzz” flew down from Trimont into the heart of each and every one. She is very studious and does not lay aside her books until she feels she knows her lessons well. No mat¬ ter how hard the task, “Buzzard” al¬ ways takes it cheerfully and we can find much fun in her. We prophesy for her a happy and prosperous futu re. CARRIE LEE PANNELL “Remember that time is money.” “Lee” is dutiful, earnest, unassum¬ ing. She has pursued the quiet tenor of her ways through four years of High School and has won the respect and confidence of teachers and class mates alike. She has appealing ways, in fact, she seems more like a little girl than a grown up Senior. ETHEL LOUISE CALLOWAY “Strict punctuality is perhaps the cheapest v.rtue which can give force to a character.” Ethel is jolly, gay, and likeable. Although she did not join our class until this year, she has won many friends in and out of school. She has gained the respect of her teach¬ ers by the thorough preparation of her lessons. Page Eleven ELMER WILSON CRAWFORD “He who feeds men, serveth them; He serveth all who dares to be true.” Annual Staff ’28. Stern, though gentle; bold, yet not too bold; studious, although not a slave to books; sweet is the true im¬ pression we all have of our quiet unassuming friend, “Brilliant” Craw¬ ford. This young man needs only to be known to be liked. Fate is very fickle yet we dare predict for him health, wealth, and happiness. ELLEN BRANDON CORPENING “Far may you search before you find a heart so noble and so kind.” President Class ’27. “Brandywine” is one of the most popular girls in our class. We can easily sec why it is though for she is gay, pretty, sweet, attractive and friendly. She is not only a good student with a ready answer for the questions asked her by the teachers but she is also an excellent leader and is always willing to take part. BERTHA ANNE SOUTHARDS “Gratitude is ' the fairest blossom that springs from the soul.” Literary Staff ’27; Basketball ’28. “Birdel” is the sweetest girl in our class. To say she is good natured and kind-hearted doesn ' t half do her justice. She is straight forward and takes hold of things with a determina¬ tion to win. She never worries, but she shows sympathy for the fellow who does. FANNIE SAVANNA CONLEY “Virtue made visible by outward grace.” “Jo-Jo” says little but thinks enough to make up for her silence. If anyone is looking for an old fashion¬ ed wdfe—one who is a lady—just call on “Jo.” She has been willing at all times to help others and she has a quaint charm all her own which has endeared her to many friends. Page Twelve PEARL NELL PHILLIPS “Laugh thy golden laughter, but the moment after weep thy golden tears.” “Tiny” has the qualities of an earn¬ est, loyal and true friend. In all she undertakes to do she is gay, fun loving and kind. Judging by her smallness one would think she shouldn’t be a Senior. What she says, she means; so we all know who to trust and depend upon. MAUDE VIRGINIA BURLESON “The sweetest and the fairest in the fairest colors dressed.” “Bill” has the qualities of a true and loyal comrade. She is sensibb and sweet and we have a notion that she will make a name for herself. She has already made a name in the Senior Class that will take some time and effort to erase. KATHLEEN BERNICE CONLEY “What liberty a loosened spirit brings.” Annual Staff ’28. Since “Kat” entered the Freshman Class she has always endeavored to do the tasks assigned her. She is one of the smallest but by no means the laziest of this illustrious band. PHILIP GEORGE NEWMAN “A little nonsense now and then Is cherished by the wisest men.” Annual Staff ’27, ’28; Football ’28; Basketball ’28; Vice-President Class of ' 28. Philip has been a strong member of our class for four years and is one of the most popular members. His fun and his pleasing personality have made him very likeable to the entire class. He takes great interest in the ladies as well as athletics, and is one of the best athletes in school. Our wish for him is that he wall at¬ tain happiness and success in any¬ thing that he tries. Page Thirteen THE hAURE 1. K V GEORGE DAVIS CARPENTER “Music, when soft voices die, vi¬ brates in the memory.” Basketball, 26, ’27, ’28; Annual Staff ’28. “Horn” is one of the most popular, as well as energetic, cheerful, and en¬ tertaining boys in school. He will undoubtedly make a success of life; that is, if he goes into it with the same determination that has charac¬ terized him all through his school career. He is worthy of the best and we hope he will reap a golden harvest from his field of ability. MARTHA PEARLE CUNNINGHAM “A noble type of good heroic wo¬ manhood.” Library Staff’ 28; President Class ’28. “Gimlet” has made her influence felt to no small degree. Although she studies a great deal, yet even her best friend would not call her a bookworm. To a stranger she gives the impression of being shy and quiet but she is just the opposite with her friends. She has a joyful disposition and carries lightly the great and aw¬ ful dignity of a Senior. SAM McSWAIN ROGERS “Both to will and to do.” Glee Club ’26; Annual Staff ’28. Sam is the same yesterday, today, and tomorrow, and through this he has won many friends in the school. He is very studious and makes good grades. The algebra that has caused most of us to pass sleepless nights never gave him any trouble. It ap¬ pears that he never lets the girls give him serious thought. We believe that in time to come he will gain for himself honor and fame and re¬ flect credit upon his school. ONNIE LEE CABE “A friend in need is a friend in¬ deed.” Library Staff ’28. “Short” is a strong believer in free¬ dom of speech and is as straight forward in her actions as in perform¬ ing her duties. Onnie is one of the best sports in our class. When a practical joke is played upon her she just “blushes and smiles.” We hope, Onnie, that your act of blush¬ ing will some day win you that “nice young man.” Page Fourteen 1 1) s BESS WIDBY NORTON “A few moments of keeping your mouth shut may save you an hour’s explanation.” “Besh” is one of the most ou ' : spoken girls in our class. She looks after her own affairs and expects other people to do the same. Bess is a girl that we all can trust and depend upon. Her originality in per¬ forming her duties and her out spoken ways has made her a favorite of our class. LOUIS MICHAEL YOUNG “He is only a well-made man who has a good determination.” Basketball ’27, ’28; Football ’28; Annual Staff ’28; Glee Club ’26. Determination, consistency of effort, a will, purpose—these are the ele¬ ments of success, and it is these qualities which give “Curly Locks a bright future and has attracted to him many class friends. We can well predict to the fair one who will call him her “better-half” that he will be well worthy of the name. JENNIE HAZEL CABE “O mistress mine, where are you roaming ? Oh stay and hear! Your true love coming.” Library Staff ' 28. “Hez” is a tireless worker and siezes all the opportunities cast her way. She studies day and night, either her text-books or about “Sharp.” Her ideas are always good for she never argues foolishly but proves her points so clearly that she is victorious and cariies away the spoils of a “good grade.” ALEXANDER WLMER CABE “They also serve who only stand and wait.” “Alex” is one of the quietest mem¬ bers of the Senior Class. It is a pleasure to know him, because even though he speaks seldom, his words are those of wisdom. “Alex” is un¬ selfish and always ready to help a friend in distress. We know that he will succeed in whatever he undertakes and lead a life of usefulness in the days to come as he did at F. H. S. WILBUR WILSON TEAGUE “A little nonsense now and then is cherished by the wisest men.” Wilbur is popular, jovial, and takes life as it comes, yet he leaves an im¬ pression of dependability. His great¬ est characteristic is his power of making friends. He’s a good sport, and his smile always brings gladness to those with whom he associates. MARY ELIZABETH SLAGLE “The word impossible is not in my dictionary.” Annual Staff ’28; Library Staff ’28. “Libby” is among our best students. What ever she undertakes she puts forth every effort to accomplish which is a lot said in a few words. She is a girl whom we all respect and admire because of her unselfish and serious personality. We are sure that the future holds much in store for Elizabeth. TERRELL COGGINS PARRISH “Act well your part, there all your honor lies.” Football ’28. Always jolly and full of fun, he has had his pleasures, but he has worked too. It is his firm belief that one must discharge his duties well to attain success. He- is full of determination and he has the persis- tance to work at a task until it is finished. Wc know his ability will win a high place for him. PEARL ELIZABETH BLAINE “Here’s a girl with a heart and a smile that makes this bubble of life worth while.” President of Seco Home Economics Club ’26, ’27. “Jack,” as she is called scatters sun¬ shine wherever she goes, though she seldom speaks. We all know that a smile will go a long way. We shall watch with interest her progress through life. Page Sixteen 1 ( 4 -, J HAZEL VIRGINIA PENLAND “Obedience alone gives the right to command.” President of Class ’26. “Coz” as a friend, can’t be equaled. When literary, social, or scholastic duties call she never fails. In ad¬ dition to these rare qualities her good common sense and ready smile have made for her a wide circle of friends. That life may be good to her is our earnest wish. NELL WARE CUNNINGHAM “An artist, a musician and a come¬ dian all in one, who has in stock ten million pounds of fun.” Vice-President of Class ' 27; Annual Staff ' 28; Library Staff ' 27, ’28. Nell has won her way into the hearts of every one in school, especial¬ ly the teachers, because she does such excellent work. You never see her report without at least three 90’s. If you are looking for a con¬ scientious worker, as well as a pal, she is there “with bells on.” A true and loyal friend; one who believes that in order to have friends one must be a friend—what greater com¬ pliment could be paid her ? JOHN PAUL DALRYMPLE “Smile and the world smiles w.th you.” Dalrymple, large of statue, and large of heart, is loved by all who cross his pathway. He is a very sociable fellow. It will do y ou good to know him. Now take a trip and get next to him sometim " —if you can get him away from the ladies long enough. JAMES RILEY FERGUSON “Nothing is impossible to the man who can, will, and then does.” Here is one who thinks it is well to have some fun as he goes along. He is up to some mischief now and then but he doesn’t forget his re¬ sponsibilities. He is an earnest, faith¬ ful worker whether in class or plot¬ ting some trick. He has not made known to us what he will do, but whatever he may do, he will be a credit to his profession. Page Seventeen ROSS CLAUDE ZACHARY “This man who has a thousand friends. Has not a friend to spare.” Eootball ’28. Ross is the ladies’ man of our class; but that is not his only asset. He is one of the best all-around boys in school. We all admire him for his quick wit when he is unexpectedly called on in class, his executive ability, and his readiness to take any re¬ sponsibility placed on him. May his life be like a snow flake, which leaves a mark but not a stain. MARGARET ELLEN ANGEL “Come what, come may, time and the hour runs through the roughest day.” Annual Staff ’28; Library Staff ’28. In an age when young people are inclined to choose the easy way of ac¬ cepting ready made opinions, it is refreshing to find some one who is original and expresses her thoughts without fear or favor. May Margaret continue giving her own thoughts and a success is assured for her. Page E SARAH ELIZABETH WOMACK “There is no pathway of flowers leading to glory.” “Lib” is a sweet, jovial, fun loving girl. Her heart is warm with the friends she has made during her school career. She is very ambitious and is usually found worrying about her lessons or grades. We give her our love and hope her ambition will bring her luck and happiness in the future. GEORGIA ROSETTA HOWARD “Kind thoughts, contentment, peace of mind, and joy for many weary hours.” Library Staff ,28. If Georgia has any faults they are yet to be discovered by her class mates and friends. She has all the qualities that go to make up an ideal personality. “Miss Bill” has never worried or grumbled about the diffi culties of life. She is always smiling and in a cheerful mood. With her unselfish and good natured ways admiration of her teachers and class mates THE l„ A I ' H KL LEAF ETHEL ELIZABETH CUNNINGHAM “With a face of lily beauty, With a form of airy grace.” Basketball ’27, ’28; Annual Staff ’28. “Bug” has the well-deserved title of being the “prettiest girl in the Senior Class.” With her happy, care¬ free ways she has made a host of friends. We know not what pro¬ fession she intends to follow, but we are sure she will always have many friends to crown her in whatever suc¬ cess she achieves. MARY ELIZABETH ENLOE “A soft answer turneth away wrath.” Class Treasurer ’28. Another girl like Mary is hard to find. She is one of the most likeable members of our class. Her sweet smile and friendly manner has won for her a place in the heart of her class mates and teachers. All of her class mates admire her for her way of “tackling” history. We wish for her much success in whatever she may choose to do. FRANK LEONARD GUEST “In crowds I encounter, with cour¬ age I endure.” Basketball ’26, ’27, ’28; Football ’27, ’28. “Buster” has many friends and has gained many while in Franklin High by his sporting ways. If you are ever in need of a true and loyal friend “Buster” may be counted as one. We hope him the best of luck in his future years. Fage Nineteen - HATTIE KATE REECE “A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue but the parent of all other virtues.” “Jakie” is one of the most likeable girls in our class. She is sweet, at¬ tractive, and always helping others who are in trouble. She has won the hearts of all by her winning friendly smile and lovely disposition. Whatever she does is done well, for she is a conscientious girl and is sure to contribute something of value to her chosen profession. GLADYS LORENA PANNELL ‘‘No one is useless in the world who lightens the burdens of it for others.” “Duddy” is one of the best natured girls in our class. She is a loyal true, and faithful friend to all who know her. She is loved by every one, especially her little “Sunbeams " to whom she devotes much of her time. Keep up this noble work “Duddy,” and you will surely reap your reward. CECIL LYMAN LEDFORD “Your spirit shines through you.” “Smiley,” as you may gather from his name, has smiled his way into the hearts of every pcv.on in High School, especially the teachers. A finer speciman of physical development is seldom found. This lad is one of our handsomest, with dreamy, blue eyes and hair of the Rudolph Valen¬ tino type. We wish him all the suc¬ cess that goes with a smile. Page Twenty 1 i) JS MARGARET HENRIETTA CUNNINGHAM “There is nothing half so sweet in life as loves’ young dreams.” Annual Staff ’28; Library Staff ’28. “Pole,” the best all-around girl in the class, has a host of friends both young and old. She seems to be interested in a certain “Jimmy” at the piesent, but she says she in¬ tends to remain an “old maid” so we still have hopes. As long as “Pole” has been in High School we have never heard her utter a cross word. MYRTLE INEZ VINSON “You may wear your virtues as a crown as you walk through life serenely.” Class Prophet ’28; Library Staff ’27, ’28. “Myrt” came to us from Dillard High School and we have all learned to love her. Her motto seems to be, “Silence is Golden.” She has shirked no responsibility and has al¬ ways shouldered it with a smile. All her class mates admire her for her brilliant mind and her perfectness in preparing her lessons. WILLIAM GERIHNE CRAWFORD “I dare do all that may become a man; who dares do more is none.” William is one of those most mod¬ est, reserved, and unassuming individ¬ uals who doesn’t have much to say, but is very prompt in the performance of his duties. As a man of high ideals, strength of character and de¬ termination, William will surely at¬ tain distinction for our class. Page Twenty-one CLASS HISTORY The class of ’28, like all people, has made a history. This history may be divided into four distinct parts or chapters. Each chapter lead¬ ing upward and forward to the final goal—graduation. The scenes and facts which compose this history are indeed worthy ones, which stands out in the eyes and minds of this small band very distinctly. However, these facts probably are very different from the dreams and aspirations of some of us. The sterling page of the first chapter commences, when this brave and gallant band of youth entered the columns of F. H. S. in dire search of an education. Their ideals were high and cast upon that ultimate end —education, although they were out for the one hundred mark strong. Some of this beloved band fell by the wayside, some sought other in¬ stitutions of learning, some were pierced by cupid’s dart. There were steep hills and stony paths to be trodden during the first part such as, getting acquainted with new school mates, a different curriculum of study and learning how to study, but all those who were earnest workers surmounted these difficulties and thus ended a splendid and glorious year in high school. During the second part those who returned came with a still greater desire and determination to strive harder for the purpose they had set out—to receive a high school education. In this period this band furnish¬ ed a host of material for the athletic teams, literary societies and the various other school activities and as in all other cases the struggle was successfully waged. The third chapter starts with a greater pride and zeal than ever be¬ fore. We had come a great distance over the stormy sea, although we had encountered severe battles such as, English and Math., but these we mastered with heads held high. Indeed it was a bright and happy moment which ended the third period. Upon this last and final chapter of our history do we like to linger and read. It is with pride that we think of ourselves as Seniors, and yet this pride is mingled with regret when we realize this is our parting day at F. H. S. The struggle is about, ended, the shore is in sight, but too much can’t be taken for granted for we may have trouble. Not only in the class room and literary work has the class of ’28 made a record to be envied, but also in athletics. We have contributed liberally to all the teams and have produced some of the best athletes the school has ever had. Listen, class mates as we go to our respective places in life after graduation let us look back with tender feelings on our high school days spent together and forever remember each friendshio formed here. Let us ever hold dear to F. H. S. and to each other with loyalty and devotion. Let us strive to attain a higher goal in life. May we be master of our fate and carry with us the spirit and aspirations which we have gained here. MARGARET E. ANGEL. Page Twenty-two CLASS POEM Come, old Senior pals, pride of F. H. S. Our class is headed for point success. Four years have we knelt as wisdom’s fair shrine, Begged of her humbly to gild and refine. Elated we stand in confident pride, Facing the future whatever betide. At times the grade has been stony and steep, Our’s not the spirit to pine and to weep. Onward and upward, earnest endeavor, “Try” as our watchword now and forever. Wise were our tutors, they lead us aright, With love as our star and truth as our light. Serene were they, patient, thoroughly, strong, Their’s was the battle, our’s the victory song. Dear senior friends, though our ways here sever, Let Cardinal and White live on forever. The happy free days of high school are gone, Years heavyfooted may now lead us on. Where shall we go in this world so wide? Ah, feet are reluctant where trails divide. Though none may be rich and few may be great, A rousing cheer for class ’28. ELIZABETH CUNNINGHAM. CLASS PROPHECY This morning as I glanced over the front page of the famous New York Times, published by the noted editor, Thomas Henson, I noticed several paragaraphs which greatly interested me. I thought of the class that graduated from Franklin High school, May, 1928 of which I was a member—now only ten years ago. I re¬ ceive very few copies of The New York Times without noticing some¬ thing of some member of our class. I decided to go over the copies of the last few months, before I began my office work, and see how many of my class mates had been fortunate enough to obtain personal mention in the noted columns of this paper. Here are some of the extracts I collected: Cunningham beauties—Nell, Elizabeth, Margaret, and Martha Pearle Cunningham—noted for their beauty, musical voices, and toe-clan ing, gave a wonderful show at the famous Idle Hour Theatre of Franklin, North Carolina last night. “Little Boss,” the heavy weight champion—Robert Curtis, acconv paniecl by Mrs. Curtis, one time Elizabeth Slagle, motored to New York last week. There he defeated his opponent in forty-five seconds. Honored guest at White House- President Louis Young received Admiral Philip Newman as a guest at the White House last week. Dead—Ethel Calloway attempted a flight to Mars—plane fell and she died immediately. Drowned—Gladys Pannel tried to walk the Pacific ocean, by means of her faith, as the Disciple Peter walked the Sea of Galiilee. New prohibition officer elected—George Carpenter—taster of Georgia line liquids. Great masterpiece entitled, “Cure for Laziness”—written by the all ready famous author, Alexander Stewart. Angels Hospital of Franklin, North Carolina to be congratulated up¬ on obtaining the efficient Cabes—Alex Cabe, as laundryman, has no equal in the United States; Hazel Cabe, competent of cooking for kings and princes; Annie Cabe, janitoress, makes everyone feel as if they were in paradise instead of a hospital. Injured for life—Multi-millionaire, Cecil Ledford, walked knock-knee d —fell down and broke both hips. , Signs contract World-wide contractor. Ross Zachary, going to build dog kennel for King of England’s royal dog. k inally flew—Mattie Wilkes, known as “Buzzard”—started by plane for Greenland and landed in unknown space. Great Ministers sail for Africa—Rev. Sam Rogers and Rev. Wilbur Teague—America’s two most widely known ministers decide to give up homes, friends, civilization, all, in order to carry Christianity to darken¬ ed Africa. Slayers of women caught—Elmer and William Crawford—$500,000 reward each—Two reproductions of Slippy McGee—After years of out¬ witting policemen, detectives, and other officers. No longer an Angel—The former Miss Margaret Angel poisons hus¬ band and thus relinquishes her claim to the title “Angel.” Page Twenty-four Lost in the wilds of Africa—Pearl Phillips, Elizabeth Womack, Kath¬ leen Conley, Hazel Penland, Joe Meadows, and Frank Guest sailed last year for a short hunting expedition in Africa—Never been heard from since. Senator Terrill Parrish of North Carolina visits White House—En¬ counters two of his former school mates—Bess Norton, maid and Riley Furgeson, butler—considers himself so much their superior he does not recognize them. Largest family in North Carolina—Paul Dalrymple and his wife, formerly Miss Rebecca Meadows—parents of twenty-one beautiful, in¬ telligent boys and girls. Famous “Nancy Duet”—Nancy Justice and Nancy Patton to sing at the leading opera of Paris—President of France has seat reserved. New Superintendent of Morganton Asylum—Because of his love for helping his fellowmen who are in trouble, Phill McCollum agreed to be¬ come superintendent at Morganton. First woman Vice-President of the United States—The great politi¬ cian, Fanny Gibson, reaches the goal many women have longed for. Two great mediums visit St Louis—Carolyn Nolen and Carrie Lee Pannel—large congregation communicate with their departed friends and relatives. Webster’s Dictionary discarded—Georgie Howard replaces it with a more conventional one. Great discovery—The real North Pole discovered by Maude Burle¬ son—excited as she was, she tried to climb it—great catastrophe follow¬ ed—fell and died of atmospheric pressure. First champion woman football player—Bertha Southards—few men equal her. Ford car in garbage can—New one manufactured at Franklin, North Carolina by Bearl Elaine, excells the Ford in all respects. Harvard chooses new French Professoress—Brandon Corpening who, as a French student, always led the class. Famous musician plays in London—People of London were enchanted by the music of violinist, Kate Reece. Great mystery—Mary Enloe refuses to marry an English Lord in order to become matron of Thomasville Orphanage. After reading all these articles, I sat wrapped in thoughts of our happy school days at Franklin, North Carolina, and wondered if any of us would ever again experience such happiness, unmixed by worries of the outside world. Suddenly I noticed black words staring up at me from the front page of a paper I had dropped on the floor. How could I have missed it while looking through the papers? This is the extract concerning our dear sponsor of the Franklin Senior Class of ’28: Retired from high school teaching—Mr. W. B. Kesler has retired from high school teaching and is now teaching kindergarten. He has a dear and loving wife, once Miss Cora Lee Mozely, the French teacher of Franklin High school, waiting for him at home. Eleven little red¬ headed Keslers stand just outside the school room door ready to conduct their daddy safely home. MYRTLE VINSON. Page Twenty-five CLASS WILL STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF MACON, FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL. Knowing full well that we are fast approaching our end, that “it won’t be long now,” also realizing the fact that we must leave to our friends and comrades our most beloved possessions we, the class of ’28, do hereby will and bequeath the following to them: To our teachers, we, hereby will and bequeath our sincere thanks for all they have done for us, also our sympathy for the loss they sus¬ tain through our departure. To the School Board we hereby will and bequeath our sincere thanks for their part in our education. To the school, we leave the brilliant suggestion, that it erect a monu¬ ment on “Knowledge Hill” in honor of the class of ’28, and that all future classes of Franklin High school adopt us as their highest ideal. I. Elizabeth Cunningham 1 , do hereby will and bequeath my beauty and flapperish ways to Margaret McGuire, with the advice to use discretion. I. Alex Cabe, do hereby will and bequeath my ability to shoot craps to Harry McDowell. I, Onnie Cabe, do hereby will and bequeath my seat on the bus to Blanche Vinson. I, George Carpenter, do hereby will and bequeath my musical ability to George Jones trusting that he will leave the “Homebrew” in the cellar, I, Elmer Crawford, do hereby will and bequeath my noisy ways to Charles Davis. I, Fannie Conley, do hereby will and bequeath my little “yellow rain¬ coat” to Hazel Vinson hoping that she will receive continued service of it. I, William Crawford, do hereby will and bequeath my “Bellowing” on the football team to Harry Thomas. I, Kathleen Conley, do hereby will and bequeath my beautiful hair to- Helen Enloe. I, Robert Curtis, do hereby will and bequeath my nickname, “Boss,” ' to “Tiny” Barnard. I, Brandon Corpening, do hereby will and bequeath my winning ways toward the m’ale sex to Mary Snyder. I, Paul Dalrymple, do hereby will and bequeath my red hair to Ray¬ mond Dalrympie. I, Martha Pearl Cunningham, do hereby will and bequeath my physics note book to Helen Jones. I, Margaret C unningham, do hereby will and bequeath my famous nickname, “Pole,” to Kathryn Siler. I, Riley Ferguson, do hereby will and bequeath my “Twisty” wavs to Nell Hudson. I, Thomas Henson, do hereby will and bequeath my hunger for crack¬ ers and Coca Cola to Harold Dalrymple hoping that he will be luckier than I in getting filled. Page Twenty-Six I, Nell Cunningham, do hereby will and bequeath my beloved geometry book to Lu Ellen Davis. I, Mary Enloe, do hereby will and bequeath my ability of writing to Nellie Womack. I, Fannie Gibson, do hereby will and bequeath my basketball career to Sophie Ray. I, Frank Guest, do hereby will and bequeath my famous name, “Buster” to Norman Blaine. I, Cecil Ledford, do hereby will and bequeath my French ability to Clarence Henry. I, Ina Henry, do hereby will and bequeath my musical ability to Beul¬ ah Sprinkle. I, Georgie Howard, do hereby will and bequeath my dignified ways to Alice Slagle. I, Nancy Justice, do hereby will and bequeath my beautiful eyes and hair to Hoyt Ledford. I, Rebecca Meaedows, do hereby will and bequeath my love for mathematics to Mildred Cozad. I, Pearl McCoy, do hereby will and bequeath my ability for making biscuits to Kathryn Franks. I, Carolyn Nolen, do hereby will and bequeath my curly hair to Paul Womack. I, Bess Norton, do hereby will and bequeath my curls to Johnnie Rogers, advising him to use the comb one each week. I, Carrie Lee Panned, do hereby will and bequeath my babyfied ways to Alice Henry. I, Gladys Panned, do hereby will and bequeath my beautiful hair to Jessie Ashe. 1. Hazel Penland, do hereby will and bequeath my popularity to Susan McClure. I, Nancy Patton, do hereby will and bequeath my good looks to Lois Garner. I, Kate Reece, do hereby will and bequeath my height to Lola Ramsey. I, Bertha Southards, do hereby will and bequeath my ability to play basketball to Bob Norton. I, Myrtle Vinson, clo hereby will and bequeath my fondness for Eng¬ lish to Agnes Smith. 1, Mattie Wilkes, do hereby will and bequeath my famous name of the “Buzzard,” to Wilma Had. I, Elizabeth Womack, do hereby will and bequeath my ability for algebra to Fred Childers. I, Margaret Angel, do hereby will and bequeath my act of blushing, when called upon in class, to Glen Patton. I. Pearl Elaine, do hereby will and bequeath my beauty to Edna Snyder. I, Hazel Cabe. do hereby will and bequeath my seat in the “Chivie” to the one who chooses it. I, Maude Purleson, do hereby will and bequeath my cute ways to Virginia Norvell. I ’a.LA ' Twc nly-scvcn I, Elizabeth Slagle, do hereby will and bequeath three feet of my height to Jeff Enloe. I, Joe Meadows, do hereby will and bequeath my old pipe and can of Prince Albert to Elmon Teague. I, Phill McCollum, do hereby will and bequeath my good looks to Rutherford Snyder. My position on the football team as quarterback, I bequeath to my little “bud” John. I Philip Newman, do hereby will and bequeath my “way with the women” to Perry Pendergrass. I, Terrell Parrish, do hereby will and bequeath my beloved name, “Soc” to Irvin Strain. I, Sam Rogers, do hereby will and bequeath my studious ways to J. D. Gibson. My name, “Sham,” to Neville Sloan. I, Alex Stewart, do hereby will and bequeath my ’ole boots to Frank Henry hoping that he will keep up the noise that caused me to wash so many boards for Mrs. Franks and the other various teachers. I, Wilbur Teague, do hereby will and bequeath my famous position as pitcher on the baseball team to Rogers Sutton. I, Chester Wilkes, do hereby will and bequeath my ’ole basketball shoes to Johnnie Young advising him to turn the hose on them once each year. I, Ross Zachary, do hereby will and bequeath my winning ways and good looks to Billy Sloan advising him to let not girls place their lips upon his face, as this would forever destroy the fame. I, Lewis Young, do hereby will and bequeath my place in the hearts of the teachers to Myra Stribling. To Clay Compton, I will, and do bequeath my ability to work geometry. Page Twenty-eight WHO’S WHO IN THE SENIOR CLASS Mary Enloc. Fanny Gibson. Elizabeth Cunningham, Margaret Cunningham Nancy Justice. Nell Cunningham. Margaret Angel. Carrie Lee Pannell... Gladys Pannell. Bertha Southards. Kate Reece. Hazel Cabe. J’earl Phillips. Pearl McCoy. Onnie Cabe. Georgia Howard. Rebecca Meadows. Ethel Calloway. Myrtle Vinson. Nancy Patton. Brandon Corpening.... Elizabeth Slagle. Maude Burleson. Mattie Wilkes. Fanny Conley. Hazel Penland. Carolyn Nolen. Bess Norton. Pearl Blaine. Elizabeth Womack.... Phil McCollum. Philip Newman. Thomas Henson. Riley Furgeson. Chester Wilkes. Ross Zachary. William Crawford. Elmer Crawford. Paul I )alrymplc. Robert Curtis. Sam Rogers. Louis Michael Young.. George Carpenter. Alex Stewart. Alex Cabe. Frank Guest. Wilbur Teague. Terrell Parrish. Joe Meadows. Cecil Ledford. .Happiest .Most Athletic .Prettiest ...Best all-around ...Most attractive .Most popular .Most studious .Cutest .Best natured .Sweetest .1 faultiest .Most musical Most kind-hearted ....Most reserved ..Most out-spoken .Most cheerful .Most sedate .Quietest ...Most intellectual .Biggest flirt ....Most conceited .Most likeable ..Most indifferent .Wittiest .Neatest Most Independent .... Most unselfish .Most original ....Most graceful .Laziest .Best looking .Most popular .Wittiest ... Most courteous .Best Athlete ...Most conceited .Most intellectual ....Most studious .Biggest flirt .Noiscst .Most bashful ...Best all-around .Most musical .Laziest .Quietest .Best sport ..Most indifferent .Best natured .Biggest shiek .Most out-spoken Page Twenty-nine ikeh CLASS OF 1929 Page Thirty-one CLASS OF 1929 MILDRED COZAD LAUREL LEAF STAFF OFFICERS President.M ildred Vice-President.Elmon Secretary.Mary Treasurer.Howard Sponsor: Miss Eleanor Sloan. Motto: “Esse quam vediri.” Colors: Gold and White. Flower: Shasta daisy. ROLL Mary Berry M ildred Cozad Mary Sue Cunningham Ruth Cabe Laura B. Dalrymple Helen Enloe Lois Garner Nell Hudson Wilma Hall I leleti Jones Genett Mallonce Elizabeth Meadows I’earl McCoy Susan McClure Margaret McGuire Virginia McGuire Frances Nolen Jessie Ramsey Lola Ramsey Katherine Siler Ruth Slagle M ary E. Snyder Agnes Smith Hallie Stiwinter I torothy Stewart Flora Talley Lora Talley Elmon Teague Howard Wilkie Howard Barnard (ieorge Cunningham Clay Compton Cozad Teague Snyder Wilkie Harold 1 )alrymple Berry Earnhardt Clyde Enloe John Genet Alex Howard Frank L. Henry, Jr. George Jones Sanford Mann Harry M cl )owell Perry Pendergrass Alex Setser Richard Slagle Rutherford Snyder Irvin Strainc I larry Thomas Page Thirty-three JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY AGNES SMITH LAUREL LEAF STAFF What a day! It seems babyish and trifling now as we look back on it, but then it didn’t. Oh no! We thought it was the greatest day we had experienced because we were entering high school for the first time. It wasn’t such a serene feeling either. In fa:t, we were frightened and wondered if we could posisbly stay in that wonderful place. We stood in awe of the Seniors and thought we would never reach that high goal. In spite of all our worrying, our freshman year went along very smoothly. Our English seemed to be a little doubtful as we had a hard time keeping the teachers. We had three that year but much to our pleasure Mrs. Franks came to our rescue and has been with us ever sin r e. Mr. Eramlett was our principal that year and we liked him very much. After many seeming disasters, we reached the Sophomore class, be¬ ginning with a new principal. Mr. Houk was and is a principal we could certainly brag about. He is the most popular one we have had in F. H. S. That year we began to look with longing eyes at the Seniors. We thought there was a little chance for us to become one. During our Junior year we felt more safe and really didn’t think it was very hard to be a Senior. All of us will admit though we have had more fun this year, with Miss Sloan as our home teacher and spon¬ sor, than the previous years. We hope next year to actually be Seniors and write what happened that year. We are patiently waiting to receive our beloved diplomas. AGNES SMITH. Page Thirtv-four THE I.Al ' KEl. LEA CLASS OF 1930 I ’aii ' c Thirty-six CLASS OF 1930 LOUELLEN DAVIS LAUREL LEAF STAFF OFFICERS President.John McCollum Vice-President.Blanche Vinson Secretary.Roger Sutton Treasurer.Florence Stalcup Sponsors: Mrs. Harden and Miss Mozeley. Motto: “Labor Omnia Vincit.” Colors: Blue and Gold. Flower: Rose. ROLL Rebecca Angel Ralph 1 lean JIda. Russell Norman Blaine Ima 1 lockery Alice Slagle Howard Bradley Arthur 1 )owdle George Slagle Douglas Branch Ella Earnhardt Billy Sloan Wiley Brendle M ary Elmore Jack Sloan Jack Brown Catherine Franks Cleta Smith Robert Brown Grace Fouts Edna Snyder Stella Brown Alice Henry Lois Snyder ' I liad Bryson Clarence Henry Margaret Snyder John Bulgin John Holbrook Florence Stalcup Nell Byrd Eloise Jamison Myra Stribling Fay Cabe Hoyt Ledford Roger Sutton Iris Cabe John McCollum Russell Vanhook Nellie Cabe Annis McDowell Blanche Vinson L. H. Champion, Jr. Charlie Morrison John Waldroop bred Childers Robert Norton Eugene Welch Leona Clark Virginia Norvell Virgie West Helen Cunningham Charles R. Patton Thomas Wilkes John R. Dalrymple Glenn Patton Flora Wilkie Rogers Dalton Jean Porter Nellie Womack Charles Davis Arry Pressley Paul Womack Loucllen 1 )avis John Rog ers John Young Page Thirty-seven CLASS OF 1931 Page Thirty-nine CLASS OF 1931 THE LAUREL LEAF NEVILLE SLOAN LAUREL LEAF STAFF OFFICERS President.Harry Jones Vice-President.Virginia Calloway Secretary-Treasurer.Mary Jacobs Sponsor: Miss Lunsford. Motto: Excelsior—Higher. Color: Purple and White. F ' lower: Violet ROLL Clara Allman Plelen Grasty Everett M ashburn Eva Angel Shirly Grasty Helen Patton Jessie Ashe Ora Anna Green Ruby Potts Clint Byrd Junior Howard Velma Peek Thomas Branch Nicholas Hunter Annie Potts Paul Brown Bill Hauser Nell Penland Louise Bingham Fred Hopper Elbridge Pendergrass Noleta Bradley Mildred Harrison R. L. Poindexter M arie Cabe Hattie Hodgin Sam Reece Virginia Calloway I )orthv Hyatt f. M. Roane Oran Cunningham Annie Mae Higdon Sophia Rav Lela Cunningham Helen Hall Beulah Sprinkle Blanch Curtis Florence Henson Mary Louise Slagle Sue Curtis Ida Lee Hunter Hattie Slagle William Cabe Edna Jamison Elsie Sanders Hilton Calloway Mary Jacobs Neville Sloan, 1 r. R. L. Cloer Harry Jones Carl Swafford John Cunningham Lee Keener M ary Straine P Chard Conley Ira Keener Annie Lee Setser Frank Carver Hazel Kinsland Blanche Teems Kate Donalson Lucile Kimsey Adeline Teague Ned Dowdle M arie Liner Hiram Tallent Nclle I )owdle Ruth Earn hart Pauline M cCoy M ildred M core Hazel Vinson Jeff Enloe Annie Moore Carl Vinson Will Elmore Eloise Morrison Ralph West Vance Fouts Stewart Mason I )aniel West Pauline Fouts Marie Fisher Lydia Gibson James Myers Don Morrison Perry Matlock Wiley Waldroop Reed Womack Gertrude Guffey Roy McCracken Noel Yancy I J agc Forty-one TEACHER TRAINING CLASS LEATHER TRAINING CLASS MISS HELEN BURCH, Teacher OFFICERS President.Hattie Lee Cabe Vice-President.Arthur M ashburn Secretary-Treasurer.Alice Cunningham Librarian.Veva Howard Motto: With the ropes of the past we will ring the bells of the future. Colors: White and Green. Flower: White Rose. ROLL Lula E. Allen Hattie Lee Cabe Alice Cunningham Ila Elliott Clara Hall Louise Henderson Veva Howard Arthur Mashburn Mae McCoy Airs. Claude Roper Freda Siler Page Forty-three HOME ECONOMICS CLASS LEAP THE LAUREL HOME ECONOMICS CLASS MISS MINNIE GRACE MORGAN, Teacher ROLL Clara Allman Helen Hall Florence Henson Pauline Fouts Marie Liner Pauline McCoy Kate Donalson Sophia Ray Adeline Teague Annalee Setser Alary Straine Lydia Gibson Louise Bingham Blanche Curtis Sue Curtis Nellie Dowdle Helen Enloe Gertrude Guffie 1 da Lee Hunter Dorothy Hyatt Edna Jamison Hazel Kinsland Rebecca Angel Pearl Blaine Helen Cunningham Lora Belle Dalrymplc Eloise Jamison Rebecca Meadows Virginia Norvell Frances Nolen Lola Ramsey Katherine Siler Lois Snyder Ruth Slagle Bertha Southards 1 )orothy Stewart Agnes Smith Pa ge Forty-f ive 1 928 1 92H Page Forty-eight FOOTBALI Football was a new thing for Franklin this year both from the stand¬ point of the players and from the standpoint of the spectators. In view of this fact the record Franklin High made is not at all bad. Eight games were played and of these Franklin won three, lost four and tied one. Franklin scored 80 points to her opponents 82. The team was green and the schedule was rather ambitious for a first year team. From a financial standpoint the season was not as successful as it might have beeen as Franklin has no field where regular admission can be col¬ lected with any degree of certainty and here, as everywhere, there are still people who figure that in a case like this a quarter saved is a quarter earned. This is the same class who get out the pans, the ham¬ mers and the greased skids if the team loses. The members of the team were: Howard Wilkie... Harry Thomas... William Crawford Philip Newman... Frank Henry. Chester Wilkes... George Carpenter. Arthur Mashburn. Lewis Young. Alex Stewart. Phill. McCollum.. Terrell Parrish... George Jones. Howard Barnard.. Frank Guest. The schedule: Franklin. 7 Waynesville 26 Franklin. 0 S. C. 1. 3 Franklin. 0 Cornelia 35 Franklin.18 S. C. 1. 6 Franklin. 0 Toccoa 12 Franklin. 0 Cornelia 0 Franklin.27 Hayes illc 0 Franklin.28 Cherokee Indians 0 Total .80 2 .Left end .Right tackle .Right guard .Center ...Left guard . .Left tackle . ...Right end ... Right half .Left half ... .Full back Quarter back .Guard .Half .End .Tackle Page Forty nine GIRLS’ BASKET BALL Easketball has always been a major sport at Franklin High, that is since Franklin has had any form of inter-scholastic athletics. At the opening of the season there was considerable speculation concerning the teams for the great girls team of the year before which had been broken up by graduation, there being only two members of the cup winning aggregation of the year before left to form the nuceleus of a new team. The boys were not quite so hard hit but this team too had lost the two first string guards. As with most new teams the girls team was an “in and outer” rising at times to heights unexpected and winning games when the result had been in doubt while at other times they would lose just as unexpectedly and for reasons that were rather hard to find. Taken all in all, how¬ ever, the girls season was very successful and laid the foundation for a great team in the next year or so. The present aggregation will not lose but one player by graduation and we may expect a much stronger team next year. The girls team plaved 10 games this year. Of these it won 3 and lost 7. The players arc: Sophia Kay . Forward Virginia C alloway . Forward Virginia Nor veil . Korwa rd Ina Henry . Forward Sue Curtis . .. (iitard I ' -innie Gibson . . .Center Helen Jones . . . Guard Bertha Southards. . . (iuard Elizabeth Cunningham.. . . . (iuard Genett Mallonee. . . Guard The schedule: Franklin . ....38 Whittier 15 Franklin . .... 15 Wavnesville 18 Franklin . 22 B-vson City 28 Franklin . ....24 Wavnesville 28 Frpnk ' in . ... .16 S C. 1. 10 Franklin . ... .38 Whittier 17 Franklin . .. ..18 Bryson C ' itv 19 Franklin . ... .13 Almond 26 Franklin . ....14 Almond 21 Franklin . ... .16 S. C. 1 . 19 Total . .. .209 181 Pago Fifty- me BOYS’ BASKKT BALL With three regulars from the team of the year before reporting for practice prospects for a strong boys basketball team were bright. Nor were early season indications misleading for Franklin High was repre¬ sented by one of the best teams which ever represented the institution. One fact that is not often taken into consideration in comparing teams of by-gone years with those of the present is the improvement in the quality of basketball that is being shown by all of the teams in this part of the country. This improvement has been general and is not confined to one or two schools. It is therefore not so noticeable to the average spectator when two fairly well matched teams are playing but it would be immediately seen if one of the average teams of this seection at the present were to go up against one of the best teams of five years ago. For the first time since Franklin High has had a representative schedule of games it has not during this entire year lost a single game with a boys team on the local court. Altogether the team played 14 games, 10 of which they won and four of which were lost. The players arc Chester Wilkes... Phil 1. McCollum.. Alex. Howard. George Carpenter. Lewis Young. Philip Newman... 1‘oger Sutton. Frank Guest. The schedule: Franklin.21 Dillard 10 Franklin.37 Whittier 12 Franklin.20 Waynesville IS Franklin.17 Bryson City IS Franklin.24 Waynesville 28 Franklin.13 S. C. 1. 1 1 Franklin.31 Whittier 11 Franklin.20 Clayton 15 Franklin.12 Bryson City 10 Franklin.32 Almond 21 Franklin.36 Almond 6 Franklin. 7 Leicester 44 Franklin.12 S. C. I. IS Franklin.40 Sylva All Stars 38 Total .324 263 Forward Forward . . Center Forward .. Guard . .Guard . . Guard .. Guard Page Fifty-three JOKES Kate Reece—“Have you any two cent stamps ?” Postmaster (getting out sheet of same)—“How many?’ ' K. R. (looking them over carefully)—“Give me that one, please—fourth from the left and seventh row clown. Charles Davis—“I know how ugly that I are, I know my face ain’t no star, But I really don’t mind it, Because I’m behind it, And the fellow in the front gets the jar.” Clarence Henry—“What do you think I have stolen?” Cop—“A horse and wagon.” C. H.—“Search me.” Traveling Salesman—“Haben’t I seen you some place before?” Elizabeth Cunningham—“Possibly, some times I am a little careless where I go.” Robert Curtis—“Papa, what do you call a man that drives a car?” Mr. Curtis—“It is according to how close he drives to me.” Brandon Corpening—“You know Carl took me straight home last night.” Martha Pearle Cunningham—“Oh! the brute-” Mrs. Harden—“You know my husband kissed me right on the street.” Miss Sloan—“Another case of mistaken identity, I guess.” Bertha Southard—“What do you do with the holes in doughnuts?” Pearl Blaine—“Stuff macaroni with them.” Georgie Howard—“I know an undertaker who was killed yesterday.” Terrell Parrish—“I bet he didn’t make anything out of that funeral.” Georgia—“No. In fact, he went in the hole.” Judge—“I can’t understand a big husky fellow like you hitting your wife.” Mr. Houk—“But she kept nagging and taunting me until I lost my temper.” Judge—“What did she say?” Mr. Houk—“She yelled, ‘Hit me! I dare you! Go ahead! Just hit me once and I will have you dragged up before that bald-headed old fossil of a judge.” —“Case dismissed.”— Nell Cunningham—“I hear ankle bracelets are going to be taboo.” Elizabeth Cunningham—“Does that cost more or less than platinum?” Miss Morgan—“These eggs are too small.” Grocer—“They’re just fresh from the country.” Page Fifty-four Miss Morgan—“That’s just the trouble—these farmers pick their eggs before they get full size.” Mrs. Franks—“Doctor, my husband claims he sees dots before his eyes.” Dr.—“That’s no cause for alarm.” Mrs. Franks—“But he tries to sign his name on them!” Charles Morrison—“I went to the doctor and he says I have clothes disease.” How’s that? C. M.—“He said I had a coat on my tongue and my breath comes in short pants.” Houk—“The idea of letting your girl tell everybody she had made a man of you! You don’t hear my wife saying that of me. Kesler—“No, but I heard her say that she was doing the best she could.” Miss Mozeley—“Will you join me in a cup of tea this evening?” Chester Wilkes—“Well,er—ah—yes—that is if you’ll get in first.” Alex Howard and Brandon Corpening were out riding. Alex had one arm around Brandon when the car hit a bump and skidded. “Oh. Alex,” gasped Brandon, “Use two hands.” Can’t,” says Alex grimly, “gotta drive with one.” Baul Dalrymple—“Have I any mail?” Bostmaster—“What is your name?” Baul—“You’ll find it on the envelope.” Mrs. Harden (in biology class)—“Would anyone like to ask a question?” Bob Norton—“Yes, mam, when is a worm lying on its back?” Mrs. Harden—“Would anyone like to answer Bob’s question?” Mr. Kesler—“Describe the mechanism of a steam shovel.” Red Stewart—“Don’t try to kid me! You can’t carry steam on a shovel.” Margaret Cunningham had a little lamb, Given her to keep. It followed her about at night until— It died for want of sleep. Cecil Ledford—“Oh, I got a big load off my shoulders.” Thomas Henson—“Huh? What’s matter? Washed your neck?” Harry Thomas—“Are you cold?” Janette M.—“Bout to freeze.” Harry—“Want my coat?” Janette—“If you please.” Harry—“Want it full?” Janette—“No, just the sleeves.” Mrs. Franks—“Do you know Lincoln’s Gettysburg address?” Terrill Parrish—“Why no! I thought he lived at the White House.” OUR ADVERTISERS We call your attention to the advertise¬ ments on the following pages. The liberal support of these firms and individuals has made this book possible. We thank them for their support and for their interest in this publication. We have found that this same spi rit of service is carried into every phase of their business, and we suggest to every student his opportunity of showing his appreciation of this support bv, at all times, giving his patronage to these firms. By doing so you will make possible the yearly publication of this book and at the same time will be sure of receiving the best of service possible from thoroughly- progressive and up-to-date business estab¬ lishments. Help those who help us In- patronizing our advertisers. Page Fifty-seven 1DSJS FRANKLIN’S LEADING DRUG STORE PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST PHONE 119 JOINES MOTOR TRACTOR CO., Inc. AUTHOR I ZKI SALES AND SERVICE LINCOLN FORDSON i SERVICE I CARS, TRUCKS, TRACTORS Franklin, N. C. SQUARE DEAL SATISFACTION RIGHT NOW REECE MOTOR CO., AGENTS Franklin, N. C. DODGE BROTHERS STANDARD SIX VICTORY SIX SENIOR SIX GRAHAM TRUCKS FRANKLIN HOTEL AND RESTAURANT MAIN STREET EUROPEAN PLAN Quick Service, Excellent Sanitation OPEN DAY AND NIGHT C. W. HAMES, Mgr. Sluder-Garrett Furniture Company A General line of Furniture, Talking- Machines and Records, Funeral Supplies and Embalm- ers. FRANKLIN, N. C. DAY PHONE 126—NIGHT PHONE 7405 l 1)2S GRADUATES WE GREET YOU Franklin’s own drug store with a reputation that has stood for ages and yet continues with a constant increase in patronage. TWO LICENSED PHARMACISTS AT HAND CONSTANTLY ‘WE ALWAYS SELL THE BEST” W. B. McGUIRE REAL ESTATE Room 15 Bank of Franklin Buildin PHONE 63 FRANKLIN, N. C FRANKLIN HARDWARE COMPANY DOORS LUMBER MOULDINGS WINDOW SASH BUILDERS’ HARDWARE DEALERS IN LIME CEMENT PAINTS AND OILS HARNESS, WAGONS OLIVER CHILLED PLOWS GALVANIZED AND ASPHALT ROOFING AND SHINGLES Get Our Prices Before You Build “A man’s a man for a’ that But a Ladv is known by her Hat. Mrs. W. J. Zachary MILLINERY SLOAN BROS. CO. FINE GROCERIES FRESH MEATS Electric Refrigerator CENTER NEW HOTEL BLDG. Page Fifty-nine WE STILL SET THE PRICE IN MACON COUNTY J. S. PORTER COMPANY BILL CUNNINGHAM, Manager Bank of Franklin Building - Franklin, N. C. PHONE 30 COZAD ICE COMPANY PHONES 2103-2104 FRANKLIN, N. C. CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO THE GRADUATING CLASS SOUTHERN MICA COMPANY FOR QUICK SERVICE Eat At J. R. Pendergrass DEALERS IN ARNOLD’S CAFE GENERAL MERCHANDISE Franklin, N. C. Franklin, N. C. Page Sixty THE HOT DOGS ARE HOT Barnard Clothing Co. AT MEN’S AND BOYS’ Blame’s Sandwich FURNISHINGS NEXT TO MUNDAY HOTEL Shop Franklin, N. C. A LINE OF GENERAL MERCHANDISE Everything New OUR PRICES ARE THE LOWEST NORTH OE THE SOUTH POLE E. K. CUNNINGHAM CO. “THE LITTLE STORE WITH BIG VALUES " PERRY-JONES CHEVROLET CO. for r •»nomical Transposition SALES grr TafF ' SERVICE Gulf and Standard Wrecker Service Genuine Chevrolet Gasoline and Oil Day and Night Parts PHONE 45 Our Shop Is L T nexcelled THE COUNTY BOARD OE EDUCATION AIMS that every normal child in the county shall he able to read, write and think. S. H. LYLE CHAIRMAN Page Sixty-one It takes eleven years with one hundred eighty school days a year, ordinarily, to acquire a High School Education. Is it worth¬ while ? It takes approximately six and one-half years, fifty-two weeks in a year, through the Building Loan plan to lay aside by week¬ ly installments an amount sufficient for a College Education. Does it pay? Macon County Building Loan Association ROOM No. 2, BANK OF FRANKLIN BUILDING Franklin, N. C. OPPORTUNITIES The opportunities in Macon county for young men and young ladies are unlimited. After graduation look for the op¬ portunity at your own door instead of seeking employment else¬ where. The Franklin Press CO N G R AT U L AT IONS TO THE GRADUATING CLASS FRANK I. MURRAY George B. Patton ATTORNEY AT LAW Franklin, N. C. DOUBLE DAILY BUS LINE TO DILLSBORO AND SYLVA Jitneys On Short Notice SADDLE HORSES COAL T. W. ANGEL Page Sixtv-two CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF ’28 H. J. HURST ANDY REID GENERAL LINE OF MERCHANDISE GAS and OIL FRANKLIN, N. C. A High School gives the young ' ladies and young men food for thought, but when you desire food for the body patronize the store where you can get the best for the least money. In other words— The Farmers Supply Company IF YOU WANT QUICK SERVICE!— Then Call at “Shine’s” Place The Log Cabin Service Station LOCAL AND OUT-OF- TOWN DRAYAGE The Price Is Always Right G. E. MASHBURN Page Sixty-three J. FRANK RAY, Jr. ATTORNEY AT LAW Franklin, N. C. For the Quickest Service in PLUMBING Call or Sec W. G. HALL Franklin, N. C. rHE PICTURES IN THIS ANNUAL Are the work of J. T. McKAY PHOTOGRAPHER Franklin, N. C. Hurrah for Franklin High School They know their onions, when it conies to books and basketball, but this is not all they should know. They should learn to save MONEY. Lay it up for a rainy day, for the time is coming when they are going to need MONEY, and if you have a nice little BANK ACCOUNT, to fall back to, the cloud soon passes away. So, why wait? Start today. Others are doing it. Whv not you? THE CITIZENS BANK Alwavs At Your Service Pa e Sixty-four W. N. SLOAN CIVIL ENGINEER Franklin, N. C. IF you want your clothes Cleaned and Pressed ; or if you want them Altered so as to fit more neatly, see N. G. GIBSON a man of seventeen years ex¬ perience here in Franklin. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED Franklin Insurance Agency FIRE AND AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE H. VV. CABE, Manager WE FIX ’EM WHILE YOU WAIT Angel’s Shoe Shop CON G RATULAT 10 N S AND BEST WISHES OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION ALEX MOORE DR. S. H. LYLE, Chairman C. W. DOWDLE M. I). BILLINGS, Superintendent Page Sixty-five CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1928 Western Carolina Telephone Co. WISHING SUCCESS TO EVERYBODY When you want a bargain see me. Drygoods, Shoes, Notions and Ready-to-Wear Specialty. “My Prices Are Lower Than the Lowest ' ’ JOS. ASHEAR COMPLIMENTS OF Macon Insurance Agency R. S. JONES, Manager CONGRATULATIONS Street Printing Co. “PRINTING OF THE BETTER KIND” Those graduating from High School this year are thinking of their life’s avocation. Some will doubtless continue in school— others will seek employment. Employment on the farms of Macon County offers the most pleasant, profitable and healthful employment of all vocations. THE FARMERS FEDERATION Page Sixty-six THE BANK OF FRANKLIN CAPITAL $50,000 SURPLUS $50,000 Our Motto: Safety and Service OFFICERS DIRECTORS LEE CRAWFORD President T. B. HIGDON Vice-President H. W. CABE Cashier GEO. DEAN Assistant Cashier S. H. LYLE Chairman W. A. ROGERS W. B. McGUIRE JAS. A. PORTER LEE CRAWFORD E. H. FRANKS C. F. MOODY i !r, ' « . « • - V -- . V ' l., - .■“ y fo., ,., - . -•■ • .. a " ■• 4. ’ - •• - ’ ' J ■ ..S i. t . " W.’I ' .Wj ' •AiS ' . f-W ft 1 ■- -w ' • ...V y «, ts ■ ■i Vi-. . , .T»-4 .5 v.V v ‘ " ; y -. ■ - . . 3 » ' ' . • %V - . ' .;v ■■• 4‘ ' S - Wt ■ • ' ■ w »? • ' • ' tt . .. ;. 4 . •• • •. ••• r . 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Suggestions in the Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) collection:

Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Page 1

1926

Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

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Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

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Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 1

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Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

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Franklin High School - Laurel Leaf Yearbook (Franklin, NC) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.