Frankfort Community High School - Red Bird Yearbook (West Frankfort, IL)

 - Class of 1926

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Frankfort Community High School - Red Bird Yearbook (West Frankfort, IL) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Cover
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Text from Pages 1 - 154 of the 1926 volume:

The REDBIRD PUBLISHED BY THE SENIORS OF FRANKFORT COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL Volume V 1()26 WEST FRANKFORT, ILLINOISspiring and unsurpassed teacher, cheerful advisor and great understander—-whose commanding personality, and whose earnest and untiring efforts have idolized him in the eyes of every student, leaving an uplifting and guiding impression -unaffected by the ravages of time or the altering of circumstances—we, the staff, sincerely dedicate this volume of The Redbird to Alfred Paul Smith. 2ALFRED PAUL SMITH Staff AdvisorThe Staff 'fi fi Edna Maddox .....................Editor-In-Chief Robylec Spence ................Sophomore Editor Paumita Dawson ...........Assistant Joke Editor Esther McCollum ................Freshman Editor Wooda McCollum ....................Senior Editor Alma Randolph.........................Art Editor Ted Davis .....................Assistant Editor Fairy Davis ...................Assistant Editor Joe Odle .................................Business Manager Willie Cremer .........................Circulating Manager Louise Miles ..........................Joke Editor Dean Fly...........Assistant Circulating Manager Ray Dove..............Assistant Business Manager Edna Henson ........................Society Editor Nellie Tonnazi ......................Junior Editor John Flannigan ........................Snap Editor Ralph Roberts.........Athletic Editor No picture 4B. E MONTGOMERY B S. McKcndrcc College Assistant Principal Chemistry and Music MRS. VONN1E B WADE Gregg School Shorthand and Typewriting E. S. SHONK A. B. Missouri Wesleyan Manual Training GRACE STEWART Ed. B S. I. N. U. Mathematics 8 MRS. ANNE BARNES LUCE B. S. Monmout. English G L. WINSTON LUCE B. S. Illinois Wesleyan Mech. Drawing DePauw Univ. I. S. N. U. Normal III. U. of Chicago AGNES SLEADD A. B. Georgetown College U. of III. U. of Ky. Harvard U. Math, and Amr. History EDWARD W. EBBLER A. B. McKendree College University of Illinois Science and B. B. CoachMYRA JANE WHITLOCK. B. S. Illinois Woman's College Cooking and Civics 1 LEONA GUIRL S. I. N. U. Sewing CAROLYN HELMING A. B. Cornell Colle Math, and Latin RUTH M. BRISCOE A. B. DePauw University U. of Colorado English V PAUL SMITH Ph. B Shurtleff College Am. History and Economics MAXINE S. TUCKER Shorthand and Typewriting GUY E. TUCKER B S. McKendrec College University of California Mathematics LILLIAN HESS A. B Hanover College English and Music 10OPAL T. HACKETT A. B. Illinois Woman's College English MARK THOMPSON A B. Eureka College University of Wisconsin English LURO ANDERSON B. A. Illinois Woman's College Northwestern University Psysiology FLOYD WROUCHTON B. S. Eureka College Biology and Football 11 MALCOLM P. WALLACE A. B. University of Illinois English and Civics I '■ I r y JlL HAZEL McNARY A. B. DcPiOiivv , ' V (1 A i S' LAURA L. HESS A. B Hanover College French EDITH BEAUFORD OUR LIBRARIAN When you walk into the office, probably the first thing you see is a barricade on the desk, composed of books, books, and more books, with a telephone and a typewriter thrown in for more work. Then, behind this barricade you see a lively young lady, working hard and smiling. This is Miss Edith Beauford who has been our librarian for the past three years. During that time she has become well known to every student in High School and she has proven her capability and efficiency in that capacity. To every inquiry as to whether a certain book is in, she invariably gives the same answer, “I'll see!" We can never forget Miss Beauford for her willingness to work, her readiness to help, and her everlasting cheerfulness.14 § WILMA CARLTON—“Billie Winter Garden '23: Sewing Club '22: Class Carnival '24: Class Musical 25; Camp Fire 23, Treasurer 24. President '25; Intellectual '24, '25; Latin Club '25: Black and White Musical Comedy '26; Girls Athletics 2 5; Bachelorettes 26. “Cute, clever and classy." TED DAVIS Red Bird Assistant Editor 25. Clas Basketball Team 22. ‘23, 24, 25; Class Secre tary 22; Class Treasurer 23, 25; Class Play 24; Track 25. “Appearance to save, his only care So things look right, no matter what they are. GENEVA HINDMAN W'intcr Garden 23: Sewing Club '22: Eng-lish Club 22. “Just a good pal who takes life as it comes and never complains.” TOM WILHITE Thompsonville H. S. 3 years: Socratic Literary Society. “An industrious worker and a loval friend. FAIRY DAVIS "Keig Sewing Club 22; Winter Garden 23: May Fete 24; Class Carnival 25; Secretary of Class 25; Pep Club 24. 25. 26: Pep Club Pow Wow 24, 25: Pep Club Quartette 25; Annual Staff Assistant Editor Red Bird 25. “Just what her name implies.’ 70. A 16MARGARET RUSHING Winter Garden '23: Sewing Club '22: May Fete '23; "The Sweet Family" ’25; Class Carnival '21 Spanish Club '24; Pep Club ’24, '25: Pep Club Pow Wow '24, '25. "Give me my way and I'm happy." LILLIE THOMAS Chorus '22, '23. "My tongue within my lips I reign. For who talks much must talk in vain." RAY DOVE Football '22; Track '23, '25; Orchestra '24, ‘25; Band ’24, '25: Class Basketball '24, '25; Boys’ Quartette '25. “He never raised a dust storm. But he got there just the same." HALL1E KARNES—"Hal-Winter Garden ‘23; Sewing Club President '22; Class Carnival '24: Camp Fire Girls '22; Press Club '25; Pep Club '24, '25, ’26; Pep Club Pow Wow '24, ’25. "A smile for all, a welcome glad. A jovial, coaxing way she had." WILMA TONA22I—"Bill" "The Charm School" '22; "The Winter Garden" "22; Sophomore Carnival '24: Chorus '24, '26; May Fete '24: Cap and Bell Club '25, Secretary '26; Debating Club, Treasurer ‘25, Vice-President ’26; Vice-Presi dent Senior Class '26; President French Club ’26; Home Economics Club ’26; Typist of Press Club '26; Bachelorctte Club ’26: Junior Musical '25; Black and White Musical "26. “If F. C. H. S. ever produced a thorough student, it's Wilma." 17EDNA MARIE HENSON Sewing Club '22: Winter Garden "2 5: Cla'» Play '25; May Pete "22. '23; Pep Club ‘24. '2 : Pep Club Play '25; Annual Stall, Society Editor '25. “Sincerity has such resistless charms. She oft the fiercest of her foes disarms." WILLIAM MYERS Mt. Vernon High School: Cap and Bell Club "25. '26: Caesar Club '24: Wrecking Crew '26. "A good worker, ever dependable. Steadfast and sincere.” MARY McKEE Masquers '24. '25, ‘26: Chorus '24, "25; Secretary Cap and Bell Club '25; Girls’ Athletics ‘26: Rescue Team ’26. "Light hair and a sunny smile, combines." ROLAND CRAMER "Possessing both diligence and skill." MARY JANE MORSE LASTER Vice-President Class '22. '23: Orchestra '22. '23: Quartette '22, '23, , '24, '25; Class Musical "24: Pep Club '24, '25: Pep Club Quartette '25; Intellectual "22. '23 . '24 . ’25; Little Ten Conference '24, "25, ' 26. “If no one will disagree with me I will disagree with myself."19 ANNA GENEVICH Winter Garden 23; Class Carnival ‘24; Dramatic Club ‘25. “Sparkling with life, and the joy found in giving joy to others." CATHERINE CRUISE “Orphelia" A youth of gentle air. With the light of sunshine on her hair.” CLYDE NEAL Business Manager, Annual Staff '25. “I have an ambition to be tuff and drink pop." ALMA RANDOLPH Literary Society 24; Latin Club 24; Chorus ‘24, 25; Red Bird, Art Editor 25 Home Economics Club ‘25; Cap and Bell Club ‘24. 25; Debating Club 25; Girls Atfv letics ‘25; Camp Fire Girls 22. “Her talent as an artist will some day bring startling results." BLODWEN COLEMAN Masquers 24, 25, 26; Chorus 24; Vice President Masquers '26; Rescue Team ‘26; In three plays given by Masquers 24. “A tender heart; a will inflexible.” 20JEWELL ROWE Sadalitas Latina '25. "It is tranquil people who accomplish things." LESLIE DIMMICK Track Team; Senior Class Basketball; Wrecking Crew. “Often serious, often glad. Another jolly Senior lad." VIRGINIA V. COVER Galatia High School '23, '24; Epicurian Society '23, '24; Girls' Basketball ’23, '24; Class Play ’23; Orchestra '23; Socratic Society "23, ’24’; Class President '23; Intellectual '23, '24; Dramatic Club '25; Sodalitas Latmas Club '24, '25. "Her very frowns are fairer far. Than smiles of other maidens are." GLEASON B LEE—"Brute" Track ’24. '25, '26; Masquers '24, '25, '26; Dramatic Club '24, '25; Cheer Leader '25, 26; Class President '24; Annual Staff '25; Pep Club Play '24; Senior Play '26; Masquers Play '24. '25; French Club ’26; Debating Society '25; Advertising Manager, Annual Staff ’26. "Greater men may have lived before, but I doubt it.” HELEN DUDENBOSTEL—"Ted" Secretary Sewing Club ’22; Winter Garden '23; Orchestra '22. '24, "25; May Fete '23; Secretary English Club '22; Class Musical '25; Junior Musical '26; Pep Club Secretary "24, '25; Pep Club Pow Wow '25, '26; Pep Club Quartette, Pianist '25; Pep Club Play '25; Annual Staff, Literary Editor "25; Press Club '25; Xmas Program '25; Vice-President Latin Club '25; "The Sweet Family" '25. "A train of well-dressed youth around her shown. And every eye was fixed on her alone." ruby McFarland “A jolly girl always looking for fun and ready to laugh.” HARRY BAREN Gym Team '23: Class Play '23, 25: Class Carnival 24: Track 24, ’25: Press Club 25; Class Play 26; French Club 26; Class Basketball ’25. “There is nothing ill can dwell in such a temple. ' LUCILE KING St. Francisville H. S., Freshman; Gilbert, Ark. H. S.. Sophomore and Junior; Pianist; Member of Literary Society: F. C. H. S., Senior; Secretary-Treasurer of Debate Club: Member of Affirmative Debating Team “I'm a man hater, but the Bible says, ‘Love your enemies'." JOHN ROBERTSON Buncombe High School, 2 years: Anna H. S., 1 year: Football '24. '25: Track 25. “Don't take yourself and others so seri ously." LEAH BENNETT Saladitas Latina 25; Cap and Bell Club '25; Debating Club 25; Class Carnival '25; Press Club 25. “A still tongue makes a wise head.”LUCILLE NICHOLSON Sewing Club '22: Winter Garden '25; Camp Fire "22; May Fete "25: Class Carnival ’24: Pep Club ‘24, '25: Pep Club Pow Wow '24. '25. "Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow. " ED STEPHENS "Satan" Secretary Class 25: Class Basketball '23, ’24. "25; Class Play '24: Debate Club '25; Press Club ’25; Sodalitas Latina '25; Class Play ’26. "Honest and trusty and full of pluck." ETHEL L. GETTINGS Secretary Cap and Bell Club 24: Chorus '24. '25: Intellectual ’24. '25; Sodalitas Latina Club ‘24 Dirty Dozen Club "22. "A ripple of laughter is worth an ocean of tears." J. WARD MOORE Worry never made men great. Why should I worry?" MABEL L. POOLE "Bubbles" Winter Garden '23; Class Play '22: Chorus '24. '25: Class Musical "25: Camp Fire Girls 22: President English Class "22: Class Carni- al '25: Sewing Club "23: Black and White Minstrel ‘25: Cap and Bell Club ’25; President Bachclorcttes ‘25: Press Club "26; French Club '26. "A hearty laugh, a cheery smile. Yes, she's merry all the while." HELEN DEMPSEY Orchestra '22: Chorus ‘24. "Such joy ambition finds." TOM GRIFFIN Class Basketball Team "23, ’24; Class Carnival '23, '24; Caesar Club '25; Debate Club '25. "He longs for knowledge, but the path seems difficult at times." CECIL SANDERS Cadets ’22; Orchestra '24. '25; Band '24, 25: Chorus '24. "Music hath its charm." CLARA HEDGES Ewing High School '22. '23, '24; Class Play '22: Thalia Literary Society "23; Lo-gossian Club '24: Class Play '25. "A brilliant scholar with a distinct personality." JOHN FLANNIGAN Herrin High School: President Press Club: Class Play '26; Class Basketball '26; Annual Staff '26. "Why hurry? There'll be time after I'm dead." . 24MARIETTA HAYES—"Jerry" Class Musical '24; Junior Musical '25; Orchestra '24, "25; Jazz Orchestra '24; Camp Fire Girls ’25; Press Club '25; Minstrel '25: Cap and Bell Club '25; Chorus '25; Athletic Club '25; Pianist, Girls' Quartette '25. “Her accomplishments are many and her faults are few.” PAULINE TREAT Camp Fire Girls '22; Debating Club 26; Class Carnival ‘23. "Sweet and reserved. A very admirable girl with many friends." ELOISE AVIS Sewing Club '22; Winter Garden '23; Class Carnival '24; Chorus '23, ‘24; Cap and Bell Club '25; Black and White Musical Comedy ‘25; Home Economics, President ’25. “Her lovely personality has made her many friends and admirers." RUTH D. CARDWELL Zetic Society, Thompsonville High School; Agriculture Club, University H. S. Carbon-dale; V. H. S. Junior Play, Carbondale. "A girl who is equally well liked by her school chums and teachers." MARJORIE MAYE PALMER—“Marge" Chorus ’22; Winter Garden 23; Class Carnival '23; Class Play '24; Bachelorettes' Club "25: French 11 Club '25. “A conscientious student and a loyal member of our class."GH-S-fe Jjft Jii AVA STONE Winter Garden 23; Sewing Club 22; Literary Club '22; Chorus '23. “With grit and determination that will bring success." WILLIE CREMER—“Bill" Class Basketball Team '23, '24, '25; Chorus 23; Class Musical 25; Circulation Manager, Annual Staff '25; Cap and Bell Club '25. “Wisdom personified and sawed-off." HELEN HENDERSON “Biggie" “One whose character will stand the acid test." JOE T. ODLE Play 23, 25; Intellectual Meets ‘23, '24, 25, 26: President Cap and Bell Club 25; Class Treasurer 25; Business Manager, An nual Staff '25. “I have done the school good service and they know it." VIVIAN AVERY Winter Garden 23: Sewing Club 22: Chorus 24. 25; Class Musical '25. “Whom not even critics criticize."  PEARL DORRIS Sewing Club '22: Winter Garden '23. "Big favors arc done up in small packages. LOREN McCLERIN—“Funy" Class Basketball Team '22, '23, '24, 25: Football "25: Track '25. "Gee, I wish I were as big as Bill." HATTIE LACNEETA HICKS Ina High School. “On studies most my mind is bent. GEORGE CH1SMAR Virdcn. III.. Member of Football Team 23. '24: F. C. H. S.. Football Team "25; Track Team ‘26. “Serene, and resolute, and still. And calm and self-possessed." MILDRED LITTLE Class Carnival "23: Chorus 24. 25. "She's such a little girl to be so efficient. 27 ENID MARTIN Class Musical '25; Cap and Bell Club '25; Debating Club "25; Negro Minstrel '25; Chorus '25. “She likes to laugh, she likes to sing She likes to do most anything." V1RGEL F. HAMMONDS Football '23; Latin Club ’24: Debate Club '24: High-Y Club ’24; Published 1925 Yell Book. “Wesley Barry, incog." HELEN NEWLIN—"Zebe" Winter Garden '22; Charm School ’22: Chorus ’22; May Festival '23; Class Carnival '2 3; Class Musical ‘25; Camp Fire Girls '25; French Club '26; Bachelorettes; Press Club. "A firm yet cautious mind sincere." LINDSAY WILSON—“Puny" Football '25; Class Basketball '25, '26. "Thoughts inspire my youthful mind To be the greatest of mankind." BERTHA HEARD Winter Garden '23; Carnival "24: Musical '25. "Bertha likes good times and friendliness opens the way for them." 28ESSYE E. RACEY Sewing Club '22; Winter Garden '23; Chorus '23. "Her hair is no more sunny than her heart." WILLIAM BERGIN—"Bill" Class Play ’22; Winter Garden '22; May Fete '24; Class Carnival ’24; Debating Club '24. Treasurer '25; Dramatic Club '25, Secretary '25. “A jolly good fellow at play; An earnest student at work.” EDNA MADDOX Class Play ’23, '24, '25, '26; Literary Society '23; Class Carnival '23; Class Editor '24; Quartette '24, '25; Little Ten Conference '25, '26; Intellectual '24, '26; Chorus '25; Cap and Bell Club '25; Camp Fire Girls '25, '26; Girls' Athletics '25; Red Bird, Editor-in-Chicf ’25. "Illusion and wisdom combined are the charm of life and art.” WILLIAM GOLDEN Football ’23, '25. "Come what may. Bill is always equal to the situation." NELLE BOSKE Winter Garden '23: Class Play "23; Cla s Carnival '24; Cap and Bell Club ’25; May Fete ’24; Class Musical ‘25. "A quiet dignity and a charm of gentleness adheres." 29SYLVAN WILLMORE -"Bubbles’ Winter Garden '22; English Club 22; Sew ing Club '22: Chorus '23; Class Musical '25. "Faithful she is in every way. Always the same, day after day." LAWRENCE ALLEN ‘A kindly, courtly soul, we deem Him worthy of our high esteem. DOROTHY SINKS Winter Garden 22; Caesar Club '25; Rescue Team '26; Girls' Gymnasium 26. “Quiet and sensitive as she seems. A doer of deeds, not a dreamer of dreams." RAY JONES Class Basketball Team 22. '23. '24, '25. "Basketball is his hobby and making friends is his gift." MARY YADRO Winter Garden '22; Sewing Club 22; Girls Chorus 24. "A face with gladness overspread. Soft smiles by human kindness bred." ANNA ZUBRUS Hume Economics Club '24, '25. "Silence is the most perfect herald of joy." WALTER NILESKI Debate Club '25; Press Club "25. "No sinner, nor saint perhaps But—well, the very best of chaps. ANTONIA YADRO Sewing Club '22; Winter Garden '23; Chorus '23; French 11 Club ’25. "A hand led by intellect will achieve." BARTWELL O'CONNOR—"Bunny" Football ’23; Class Carnival ’24; Class Play 25; Orchestra 24; Band '25; Red Bird, Calendar Editor; Wrecking Crew '25; Press Club '25; White and Black Musical Comedy '25. "My home is in heaven; I'm only here on a visit." ANNA HUDACHKAO Virden. III.. Basketball '23. '24. "Not for great deeds, but for good alone."  WOODA McCOLLUM Winter Garden '23; Sewing Club "22; Class Carnival '23: May Fete '23, '24; School Quartette '23, "24, '2?, '26; Class Play '25, ’26; Class Musical "25; Class President ‘24, '25; Dramatic Club "25; Camp Fire Girls '25; Minstrel '25: Chorus '24. '25; Red Bird, Senior Editor '25; Intellectual '23, "24, '25, '26; Little Ten Conference '24. "25; Girls' Athletics '25; Literary Society '23. "Speech is the index of the mind." MARION QUICK Football '25: Track '25. "Marion is one of those solid fellows who is blessed with a good disposition." JESSIE JOPLIN Class Play '22; Class Musical '24; Camp Fire Girls '23. '24, '25; Dramatic Club '25; Class Carnival '23; Cap and Bell '25; Bach-clorettcs '25. "Majesty sits enthroned." ELMER McCLINTOCK Quartette '25; Chorus '25, '26. "Quiet and unobtrusive, but always present when great things are being done." MAURIENE WEBB—"Babe" Winter Garden '23; Chorus '23, “24; Class Carnival '24; Camp Fire Girls '23, ’24, '25; Black and White Minstrel '26; Cap and Bell Club '25; Vice-President Bachclorettes '25; Treasurer French Club "26; Press Club '26. "Her cheeks reflect the roses bloom. Her happy laugh dispels all gloom." RALPH ROBERTS Football '22, "24, '25; Class Basketball Team Captain '22, '23, '24. '25; Track '23, "24. '25; Class Play ‘22, '24, '26; Annual Staff. Athletic Editor '25; Orchestra '22, '23; Boys" Quartette ’22, '23, '24. '25; Latin Club '24, "Mischievous, kind, good and true. Of boys like you, there are but few." EVERETT McKEE—"Possum" “If you would have a thing well done, do it yourself." PAUMITA DAWSON “Tom" Class Carnival "25; Pep Club '24, '25, "26: Pep Club Pow Wow "24, "25; Camp Fire Girls '22, '23. "That queenly air and beauty give her a touch of dignity acquired by a select few." KATIE BENBROOK Orchestra '22. ’23, "24. '25; Winter Garden ‘23; Camp Fire Girls '23, '24. Treasurer '25: Class Carnival 24: Class Musical ’25: Junior Musical ’25; Black and White Musical "25; Jazz Orchestra '25. “With a violin tucked under her chin Katie can charm us all with the music that lies at her finger tips." MADGE CULLEY Cap and Bell Club '25; Class Carnival '23. "Speed is worth a great deal. Accuracy, a great deal more."LOUISE E. MILES—“Elisa" Winter Garden '23; Camp Fire Girls '23; Sewing Club '23; Sophomore Carnival '24; Junior Play '25; Pep Club '25, '26; Pep Club Pow Wow '25, '26; Pep Club Plays '25, '26; Black Cat Tea Room '26; French II Club '26: Joke Editor of Annual. “A smile for all. a welcome glad, A jovial, coaxing way she had." PAUL DAWSON “Always ready to lend a helping hand to friends." DEAN FLY—"Calamity Jane" Class Vice-President '22, '23; May Fete '22, '23; Winter Garden '23; Pep Club, Vice-President '24, '25, '26; Pep Club Pow Wow '24, '25; Most popular girl in F. C. H. S. '24; Annual Staff, Assistant Circulation Manager: Sewing Club '22: Pep Club Play '25; French Club: Pep Club Play '26. "A charming maiden, quiet, serene, Held by all in high esteem.” ESCO ESTES—“Doctor" Class Basketball '25: Track '25, '26. “Their smiles and censures are to me the same, I care not what they praise nor what they blame.” CLARA McGARITY Class Play '22; Chorus ’24; Dramatic Club 25; Sodalitas Latina "25. "Her eyes are blue, her complexion fair A maid like her is very rare." GEORGE BARTER—“Biscuits" Junior Play '24. “Nobody, but my mamma and me, knows what a good boy I am." BURNELL HENSON Class Play "24 "I never trouble trouble, till trouble troubles me." Senior Class History Yes, we were green Freshies one time. It was in September of the year nineteen hundred and twenty-two that we entered F. C. H S. as Freshmen. We were just like all Freshies—"green,” we did not know where our class-rooms were, so we ganged in the corridors; we felt as if we were the center of attraction. The upper classmen were directing us but when we reached the place it proved to be another joke on us. After a few weeks we fell into the usual routine of high school students and the upper classmen had almost forgotten about the little, helpless, green Freshies. We elected class officers and advisors. The officers being: President, Elma Elkins; Vice-President, Mary Jane Laster; Secretary, Dean Fly; Treasurer, Ted Davis. We then presented two plays, "The Charm School" and "The Winter Garden' each one was successful; the advisor. Miss Spencer. After two exciting semester examinations and a refreshing vacation, we entered school again in September of the year nineteen hundred and twenty-three but this time we were Sophomores. We elected class officers: President, Elma Elkins; Vice- President, Mary Jane Laster; Secretary, Dean Fly; Treasurer, Vanda Savage. We also elected advisors: Miss Briscoe and Mr. Montgomery. To gain enthusiasm we gave a party, which was enjoyed by those present. We gave a Class Carnival which was another success. In the fall of twenty-four we entered high school again but as "Jolly Juniors." This year marked the beginning of hard work. Wc elected officers: President, Wooda McCollum: Vice President, Dean Fly; Secretary, Fairy Davis; Treasurer, Ed. Stephens. We also elected sponsors: Mr. Smith and Miss A. Sleadd. We gave a play "The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary," a farce in three acts. It was produced under the able direction of Miss A. Sleadd. To our joy it was a wonderful success We sold refreshments at the Athletic Field during the football season. Because of the departure of Miss Sleadd at Christmas, we selected Miss Grace Stewart to assist Mr. Smith in advising us. A class musical was given. After raising funds, we were able to give a Junior-Senior banquet in May, the most beautiful and delicious banquet ever given for F. C. H. S. In the fall of tw'enty-five we entered dear old F. C. H. S. for the last time; this time as "Dignified Seniors." This was the year never to be forgotten by the members of our class. We elected officers for the last time: President, Wood McCollum; Vice-President, Wilma Tonazze; Secretary, Ed Stephens: Treasurer, Ted Davis. We elected sponsors for the last time too: Mr. Smith and Miss A. Sleadd. The first thing we began on was the "Red Bird. We selected our play, "Adam and Eva ; it was given February the sixteenth and seventeenth. It was a roaring success. We intend to give a Senior Faculty Banquet in the spring. We, the class of twenty-six, are sorry to leave this beautiful building and all that is connected with it. We w'ant to express our sincere appreciation of the splendid help given to us by our advisors, Mr. Smith and Miss Agnes Sleadd. ■ July, 2, 1941-. Mr. Smith and Miss A. Sleadd, West Frankfort, Illinois. Dear Class Advisors. Replying to your letter requesting information as to the whereabouts of the members of the class of '26 of F. C. H. S., I desire first to thank you for your kindly interest in us, and shall try to comply with your request as fully as I have been able to ascertain. You will remember that the Class of '26 numbered 95 members and only a brief mention of each will be possible in this short letter. To begin with, several of the Class have moved to the thriving City of Plum field. Gleason Lee, being the Mayor and one of the leading citizens, has contributed much to the economic growth of that city. Mayor Lee informs us that much of his success as Mayor is due to the capable assistants of his office force consisting of the following: William Bergin ..............................................City Clerk Cecil Sanders ..................................Police Magistrate Clyde Neal .........................................Chief Police Carl Taylor .................................................Fire Chief William Meyer ......................Superintendent Water Works Harry Baren ...................................Justice of Peace We note also that Captain Elmer McClintock and first mate Lawrence Allen, and Pilot, Ed Stephens, of the steamship "Belle of Egypt plying between McLeans-boro and Murphysboro on the Newly canalized Big Muddy River, also have their homes in the city of Plumfield. While visiting with Rachel Webster in the Mayor's office last week, she showed me a letter she just received from Fairy Davis Flannigan, who resides at Bug Tussle, near Christopher, Illinois. She wrote that John, her husband, has won an aluminum loving cup for delivering the best oration on "Why Men Leave Home. She also writes that Priest Odle is minister of the Catholic Church at Bug Tussle, and that they were very fortunate in securing Miss Helen Dudenbostel for organist. She also stated that Geneva Hindman was taking in the "Hard Iron" selling canary birds in that city. Wilma Carlton who is matron of the poor farm at Pumpkin Center, was visiting friends in Bug Tussle last week-end, and informed them that Margaret Rushing, Dean Fly, and Edna Henson are making a drive for the Near East Relief. They have relatives there and they think that's a good way to help them without spending any money. 37 1 Poole, and the secretary. Pearl Dorris, have erected a home for Old Maids. Maunene Webb, Wooda McCollum are the "Spinsters-In-Chief” and Bertha Heard is house keeper. Louise Miles keeps the spinsters amused by the funny jokes she writes. Really this home is quite a success; insomuch that Andrew Stewart who married Marjorie Palmer, and who resides on a farm near Number 15 mine and who has eleven in the family, says he wishes his wife was an old maid so she could live there. Leslie Dimmick, who is editor of the “Pumpkin Center Times," a weekly newspaper, sent me a copy last week. While glancing over the Want Ad Column, I read that “Fritz" Mitchell was advertising for second hand clothes that were still fit to wear, because his house burned down and his clothes burned up. Hallie Karnes and Edna Maddox were advertising for an old hand-organ. They intend to sell pencils and play the hand-organ on the Square in Pumpkin Center. They are neither blind nor crippled, but their teeth are all out. I also read where Paumita Dawson and Lucille Nicholson have started a matrimonial bureau. I understand that their hopes are that they "Profit" by this great enterprise. Pity they didn’t start it sooner, probably there would have been no need for the old maids’ home. In reading the personals, I noticed where Ralph Roberts stated that he would no longer be responsible for any debts contracted by his wife, Eloise Avis Roberts, or any member of the family after said date, since she had left him without just cause. I noticed where the following had applied for a position in George "Biscuits” Barters’ Shoe String Factory: Lillie Thomas, Pauline Treat, Elfrieda Stephan, Ethel Gettings, Anna Zubrius, Anna Genevich, Alma Randolph, Vivian Avery, and Nellie Boske. This is a new industry and "Biscuits" says he just can't keep the girls away. I glanced at the society column and noticed that Leah Bennett, Catherine Cruise, and Mildred Little were entertaining the members of the "I Doubt It” Club with a six o’clock dinner. You remember Ava Stone and Helen Dempsey, well they are dancing instructors in the thriving City of Plumfield. Bunny O'Connor is pianist for the following chorus girls: Essye Racey Helen Henderson Jewell Rowe Jessie Joplin Sylvan Willmore Helen Throop Ruby McFarland Opal Carter Clara Hedges Ruth Cardwell With the assistance of their very capable director, Mr. Lindsay Wilson, they are making a great hit in Plumfield, Webb City and other large cities. George Chismar seems to be gaining fame right along. He is still coaching the F. C. H. S. football team of which Ray Jones, Loren McClerin, Bill Golden, William Myers, Marion Quick, Thomas Wilhite, Walter Nileski, Paul Dawson, Virgil Hammons, Roland Creamer, Ray Dove are members. Just how and why these boys are still at school I can’t find out, probably it was their sincere love for knowledge. 38The following girls seem to be contented with their sad lot in life and have settled down as old maids. They are: Helen Newlin Mary Yadro Antonia Yadro Hettie Hicks Virginia Cover Katie Benbrook Jeanette Lutz They are making rather good though, I hear, since they have started a poultry farm. Their only trouble, I hear, is that they fuss continually about who is going to feed the dozen chickens they own. Dorothy Sinks, Enid Martin, and Marietta Hayes are professional Basketball players, traveling around the world, and as far as I know, their last stop was Persh ing, where they put into practice their famous new rules, playing only three on a team. Ted Davis, a pack peddlar, is seen every day, walking the streets of Orient, singing as he goes, "Scissors to grind." Bill Cremer, is a street sweeper at Baker-ville. Bill Golden had just edited a new' cook book on "Balanced Meals and How They Helped Me to Live." You remember Mary Jane Morse, who married Bill Laster, early in her senior year? Well, I suppose she thought he would “Last'Her" through life, but he left lust after Mary Jane graduated, and has not been heard of since, so she's a merry grass widow, making her way in the world dancing in the noted theatre located at Bug Tussle, Illinois. I believe this includes all the members of the class of '26, and if not I shall be glad to inform you of them if possible. Again, I wish to thank you for your interest in us and shall reassure you that your good wishes are fully reciprocated. Yours, AL. K. HALL.1 KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS: That we, the undersigned members of the Class of 1926 of the Frankfort Com munity High School, being more or less sound in mind, memory, and understanding, and about to separate, co-jointly do make and publish this will and testament, revoking and making null and void all former wills by us at any time, severally or collectively, heretofore made. ITEM I. To the entire student body, we bequeath a verdant memory of us as the most brilliant class in the history of this institution, performers of a host of noble deeds that ought to be recounted with regularity as a means of uplift and inspiration for coming generations. ITEM II. To the Board of Education, the Faculty, and the custodians of the building, we bequeath our regrets for the inconveniences, humiliations, and disappointments our carelessness and negligence may have caused, and we herewith register our sincere wish that all future classes may be more appreciative of the faithful efforts of these splendid men and women who have directed our school activities for the past four years. ITEM III. PERSONAL EFFECTS. The following items are respectively bequeathed as follows: I, Bill Bergin, my friendly disposition to Dexter Bush. I, Racheal Webster, my winning smile to Bill Simmons. I, Nelle Boske, my coal black hair to Alma Colemna. I, Gcniva Hindman, my ability to talk to Andy Hiduck. I, Fairy Davis, my school girl complexion to Raymond Medlin. 1, Bertha Heard, my height to Ralph Medlin. I, Margaret Rushing, my brown eyes to Arleen Enders. I, Wilma Carlton, my smartness in dress to Maxine Rodenbush. I, Enid Martin, my ability to play hookey to Clyde Mitchell. I, Everett Mitchell, my ability to “get by" to Roy McGowen.. I, Jessie Joplin, my fast talking to Donald Seal. I, William Myers, my knowledge of Caesar to anyone who wants it. I, Marietta Hayes, my ability to tickle the ivories to Florence Green. I, Dean Fly, my winning ways to Gladys Racy. I, Marjorie Palmer, my quietness to George Cully. I, Helen Newlin, my seriousness to Donald Drayer. I, Clara McGanty, my love for chewing gum to Evelyn Houlle. I, Tom Dawson, my dancing ability to Louise Roberson. I, Jallie Karnes, my sweet disposition to Thurman Teague. I, Cecil Sanders, my gracefulness to Ray Lamont. I, Louise Miles, “my dates" to Nellie Tonazzi. I, Mauriene Webb, my lipstick to Lillian Campbell. I, Edna Maddox, my ability to argue to Harold Henderson. I, Helen Dempsey, my ability to ask questions to Clifford Barger. I, Bartwell O'Connor, my place as "senior fool” to Andy Hiduck. I, Anne Genevich, my ability to obtain knowledge to Gladys Hoswell. 1, Marian Quick, my studious disposition to Virgil Murry. I, Katherine Cruise, my short hand knowledge to Marie Simmons. I, Jewell Rowe, my ability to Made A's to Imogene Smith. 40LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT -Continued I, Virginia Cover, my ability to study to Eunice Wasson. I, Alma Randolph, my debating ability to Carl Ridenour. I, Eloise Avis, my wonderful expression of eyes to Carolyn Mooneyham. I, Wooda McCollum, my popularity to Earl Duncan. I, Vivian Avery, my meekness to Ethel Morris. I, Wilma Tonazzi, my wisdom to Buell McDaniel. I, Dorothy Sinks, my shortness to Emogene Moore. I, Edna Henson, my demureness to Catherine Margelli. 1, Essye Racy, my old maid actions to Mary McKee. I, Madge Cully, my ability as a typist to Helen Mabry'. I, Carl Taylor, my knowledge of the farm to Nancy Fern. I, Mary Jane Laster, my matrimonial views to Edna Fae Syfer. I, Clyde Neal, my dignified senior airs to John Sherman. I, Elmer McClintock, my “Lizzie" to Elmus Miles. I, Lawrence Allen, my boldness to John Callussi. I, Ted Davis, my wicked ways to Mac Fox. I, Ralph Roberts, my skill as a heart smasher to Ralph Echols. I, Mable Poole, my talkativeness to Madeline Cravens. I, George Barter, my football ability to Ralph Eadie. I, Ethel Gettings, my jovial disposition to Dorothy' Leslie. I, Pauline Treat, my knowledge of Eng. IV to Gladys Joplin. I, Edd Stephens, my position on the Annual Staff to Donald Seal. I, Elfrieda Stephens, my ability rn reciting to Mary Belas. I, Ava Stone, my “Good times" to Dorothy Crowder. I, Anna Zubrus, my faithfulness in school to George Cully. I, Joe Odle, my ever ready spirit to Thelma Dorris. I, Katie Benbrook, my “cute ways" to Eleanor Echols. I, Hettie Hicks, my’ modesty to Edity Brock. I, Janette Lutz, my ability to make perfect grades to James Wilson. I, Harry Baren, my superior attitude to Tony Lavish. I, John Flannigan, my good looks to Roy Perrine. I, Loucile King, my standing with the teachers to Claudia Stokes. I, Thomas Griffin, my serious looks to Earl Duncan. I, Pearl Dorris, my cuteness to Susie Laponis. I, Walter Nileski, my good grades to Thelma Thomas. I, Helen Henderson, my successful dieting to Waive Vaught. I, Leslie Dimmick, my friendly disposition to Aldona Lenok. I, George Chismar, my silence to Samuel Robinson. I, Everett McKee, mv ability to bluff to Elizabeth Moore. I, Bill Golden, my wise cracks to Nado Burkett. I, Esco Estes, my seat in the ninth hour to George Potts. I. Leah Bennett, my height to Maud Creek. I, Helen Dudenbostel, my pretty hair to Aileen Blake. I, Opal Carter, my frivolity to Mildred Beabout. I, Clara Hedges, my winning ways to Anna Serota. I, Ruth Cardwell, my dainty figure to Reba Hankins. I, Virgil Hammonds, my slow motions to Florence Green. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto subscribed my name, this twen ty-eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and twenty-six. A1 K Hall.AUTOGRAPHS 4345WAIVE VAUGHT "Is life worth living"? said she, "Yes, when 1 have a date you see." ROBERTA REYNOLDS Quiet and studious is she Always busy as a bee. THELMA THOMAS Cheerful and gay. She travels life's way. SUSIE LEPONIS “I count no time lost I give to pleasure. EARL DUNCAN Just a classmate good and true And an athletic fan through and through. DALLAS CHILDERS There is mischief in this man He'll be good whenever he can. DOROTHY CROWDER Her friends, they arc countless, her foes they are few If I were Homer, I'd give her her due. HETTIE SINKS Happy 1 am, free from care Why aren't they all content like me? MYRA STONE A head of curls She's very much adored. ELLA GUIDITAS We love to hear her merry laugh She deserves more than a pat. MARY BELBAS She is just the quiet kind Whose nature never varies. HELEN LOUISE DIXON A dear little lady Who plays the violin well. LACY WRIGHT As a pal your joys to share There's none with him to compare. TILFORD WITCHER The teachers always discover my faults They never appreciate my charms. ANTOINETTE YUSKALES So modest and sweet As ever a maid could he. JULIA SIDNAVITCH Fair haired, good natured and blue eyed She did her work without a sigh. RUDOLPH SPRINGFIELD "I am the happiest of men,” quoth he, "When the teachers smile on me." DONALD SEAL He has nothing to do and plenty of time to do it in. GLADYS RACEY She always appears smiling and neat And as a classmate she can't be beat. THELMA DORRIS She finds no trouble in acting her part For she is always merry at heart. 47 MARGARET 1NNIS She smiles and all the world is gay. KENNETH CHARON Industrious and self-possessed He always knew and never guessed. JULIA TIMKO Do noble things, not dream Them all day long. CLIFFORD BARGER Ability speaks for itself. GEORGE POTTS Tho red be his hair He rules the ladies fair. ETHEL MORRIS Judge not by Ker face For she's a girl good and fair. NOLA MILLER We place her quite proudly In wisdom's great chair. buell McDaniels "Let me live to be a hundred I'm needed on earth." RALPH MEDLIN This lad with work is pressed But he climbs upward with the motto “Success.'’ NELLIE TONAZZ1 Nature used her very wits Made her wise and good and true.  BETH TRITT It is easy to be a friend to her Because she is a friend to you. LILLIAN CAMPBELL This young lady is studious and bold And certainly worth her weight in gold. ALDONA LENOK Just a lady very shy Always smiling, always sighing. WILLIAM SIMMONS They call him big-feet for a name. But in football it is his fame. RAYMOND MEDLIN As a football star he brightly shines And as a junior classmate he certainly is fine. EDITH BROCK Always merry, always gay Always has a word to say. THURMAN TEAGUE "Strive and succeed," is his motto. JOE PONGONIS One who seems to be successful in everything he undertakes. JESSIE JENT A world of knowledge A world of power. CATHERINE MARGELLI Fortune was kind, it made her gay With a smile that will win her way. EUNICE WASSON She has the most graceful airs That show she is wise and fair. ROY McGOWAN King Solomon has nothing on him for • knowledge. ROL1.A RAINS He gives every man his word But few his ears. EVELYN HOULLE Sweet is her disposition Marvelous is her work. MILDRED BEABOUT Beautiful and wise She never knew She always guessed. CLARENCE HARRIS Athletics is his yearning Along with his line of learning. FRANK VANCE He is a genius in mathematics To obtain his records one has far to go. ELZADE McGHEE She climbs the ladder of success step by step. CLAUDIA STOPES Talk, laugh and be friendly For there always is ninth hour. ROY PERRINE He must have a lot of work in him For none of it ever came out of him. 50 1 I- c’fix.niozK ' ’27 EDNA FAE SYFERT Always bright is her heart Whether she studies or works. GAYLEN STEPHENS “I can't make up my mind If knowledge is easy to find.” ELMUS MILES Here is a youth strong and gay May he continue thus in his days. MAXINE RODENBUSH Lovely and modest is her way. Whether in work or in play. Junior Class History On a golden morning in the autumn of twenty-three, we frcshics, about two hundred in all. began our journey through F. C. H. S. Like all freshies of the past and like all freshies of the future our chief characteristic was greenness. The upper classmen had a lot of fun at our expense, but we kept our heads up and went through our journey until we were soon used to the methods of the Frankfort Community High School as were those who were already acquainted with it. We made the upper classmen take notice of us when Everett (Lefty) Lock-man made the Frankfort Community High School basketball team. By the kind advice of Mr. Wilson we organized and chose class officers and advisors. Social gaities which are most promi-nent in the freshman year drew our attention. The result was several memorable parties and truck rides. Our Sophomore year which began in the year of twenty-four diminished our number to a low percent. Wc started the year with a lot of pep and did not lose any time in organizing our class and electing officers. They were: President Joe Mondino, Vice-President; Ruth Har-man. Secretary Maud Creek. Treasurer Earl Duncan, Advisors Mr. and Mrs. Luce. The first social function was a hike and wiener roast to the first dam, when all had a good time. Music was furnished by the Luce's portable “Vic”. We were well represented in both football and basketball, the boys being W'llliam Walker, “Lefty" Lockman, “Cowboy" Witcher, and "Musty" Mitchell and a few others. This year closed with no other activities given besides parties and truck rides. In the glorious fall of twenty five, we enrolled as Juniors. Wc are striving to make this year a successful one as it requires responsibility and work on the part of each and every one. Wc feel that we have advanced further in our path of success. We called a meeting early and chose as officers, the following: President Maud Creek, Vice-President Clifford Barger. Secre- tary Maxine Rodcnbush. Treasurer Florence Green. Our funds were very low and by the advice of our advisors. Mi. and Mrs. Tucker, we gave a Junior musical in the auditorium of our high school. It was a success and we were much pleased as it was one of the first activities put out by our class. Wc are working on our class play, which is called “Betty's Last Bet," and are determined that it is going to be a success. We are striving to make our High School proud of us in the years to come and will do our best to fill the vacancy which will be left to us by the Senior class of '26. 52 SOPHOMORE CLASS■ Sophomore Class History Wc Sophomores this year started out to prove to our upper classmen that we no longer possess our greenness of last year but are really and truly full of pep and willing to work. At the first class meeting we elected as advisors, Mr. and Mrs. Luce, who have been loyal sponsors in all our class enterprises. The social season began with a Hallowe en party given at the high school gymnasium. The gym was beautifully decorated with corn stalks, pumpkins, black cats, witches, and orange and black lanterns. A majority of the students were present and came masqued for the oc-casion. Because of the successfulness of this party, another was planned. This occasion was followed by a Thanksgiving party, November the thirtieth. Christmas was celebrated by a party given in Ward Dimmick’s barn. It was decorated in accordance with the Christmas spirit. The refreshments consisted of juicy apples, crisp pop-corn, and fruit punch. About seventy-five Sophomores were present and all seemed to enjoy the entertainment. Besides being prominent socially, we arc up to the minute in sports. On the first team in basketball we have Barrett. Poole. Dimmick. and Harris. Barrett and Poole starred during the district tournament. The Sophomore class team has proven to be one of the best class teams in school. During the class tournament they defeated the Freshmen and were beaten by the Seniors, one point. We also have several Sophomores who were on the football squad and are entering track. We arc planning to make our Junior year as jolly as possible and are already forming a class treasury by each individual paying a ten cent monthly fee. and by giving a play this spring called the “Hottentot". It is full of pep. humor, and life because it is based upon a horse race. We hope to make it a success and are sure you will be thrilled at its presentation. The returns will be placed in the class treasury for our Junior expenses. You will perhaps hear more about us next year because we are a peppy crowd and intend to have our Sophomore class the best ever in F. C. H. S. ooSophomore Class Roll Officers President ..... Vice-President Secretary ..... Treasurer ..... ....Russell, Otto .Dimmick, Ward .....Keele, Laura ...Gileman, Alma Aiken, Chalon Gileman, Remmel Green, Isabel Allen, Laren Cook, Aretha Grenke, Isabel Austin, Dallas Cox, Mildred Griffin,, Fred Avery, Ellis Cover, Clavis Grimes, Aileen Ballard, Audrey Cowan,, Ruth Gunn, Frank Barrett, Reginald Creek, Evelene Gursky, Frances Biros, Ann Criley, Pearl Hall, Ruby Blackard, Arnold Davis, Diavid Hall, Vivian Boatwright, Walter Davis, Floyd Hancock, Ostler Bolen, Madeline Denton, lone Harris, Charles Boner, Lyndell Devlin, Drewett Harris, Lester Bost, Daniel Devlin, Frances Harris, Virginia Bost, Mildred Dimmick, Ward Hartley, Velma Bowden, Unth Doneley, Thomas Hathaway, Harry Bowyer, Nola Dorris, Wallace Hawkins, Clyde Bozarth, Elston Dunn, Leonard Hayward, Clarence Brock, Rudolph Dunning, Hal Hayward, Edith Browning, Buries East, Leonard Henderson, Lorene Bryan, Larene Edison, Esther Hendrickson, Marie Bublis, Norbert Fife, Delmas Henson, Glen Burke, Hugh Fleming, Don Henson, Walter Cantrell, Edith Ford, Zella Hesler, Rex Carello, Carl Fort, Dorothy Hicks, Pearl Carpenter, Clarence Fox, Gerald Hobbs, Clyde Carter,, Porter Foy, Mabel Holoffe, Clarence Casey, Robert Gambill, Fay Hopkins, Terence Casey, Guy Garrison, Herbert Hubbard, Winnifred Clem, Myron Genevich, William Hiff, Burl Cole, Howard Gilbert, Nellie Jacobs, Frances Coleman, Elma Gleaton, Odell Johnson, Junious Gileman, Glen Gare, Edward Jones, Alma 56 SOPHOMORE CLASS ROLL Continued Joplin,, Grace Katusa, John Keele, Laura Koehl, Julia Koehl, Louis Kolesar, Mary K ravens, Agnes Lange, Paul Lauderdale, Estella Lemon, Marguerite Lindsmovich, William Lorace, Little Mahon, Evelyn Maddox, Lora Martin, Bessie Mason, Kathleen Mayer, Fern McCain, Mary McClintock,, Marion McIntosh, Margie Mikutis, Tony Miller, Helen Mitchell, Beulah Mitchell, Tony Mixirc,, Audrey Moore, Edith Morgan, Nina Morris, Walter Morrison, Ruth Murphy, Ruth Neal, Lillian Nicklevich, Adolph Nicklevich, Edna Odle, Walter Palciecushy, Chester Palmer, Edna Patchett, Helen Patchett, Mabel Peacock, Martin Peters, Edith Pharis, Bill Pittman, Frederick Poole, Russell Presley, J. B. Price, Dorothy Pyles, Jewell Ragsdale, Ira Rains, Max Randolph, Silas Randolph, Versa Rawson,, Grace Read, Zella Read, Hazel Redfeam, Orvalette Reynolds, Dorothy Rhineholtz, Fern Robertson, Virginia Roberts, Alex Rowe, Venettia Rushing,, Marie Rushing, Thelma Russell, Otto Sanders, James Sbabo, Harold Seully, Kathryne Seargent, Burnell Shannagle, Elfrieda Shaw, Clara Shoemaker, Delmar Sinks, George Smith, Estaleda Smith, Henry Synder, Oscar Soffranko, Joe Sparks, Kenneth Spence, Robylee Storey, Georhe Stratman, Elsie Strelicky, Alex Surgey, Vonda Sutherland, Robert Syers, Marie Taylor, Elma Teague, Ruth Tresso, Louie Trunnel, Sylvia Turnison, Walter Vaughn, Viola Wade, Harold Wahrenberh, Anna Waller, Bonnie Walley, Irene Waller, Nine Walters, Syble Watkins, Mary Watson, Opal Wautellete, Albert Wells, Elizabeth Webb, Frank Webb, Roe Weighton, Mary E. White, Andrew White, Beryl White, Clara Whittington, Gladys Williams, Gayle Willmore, Anna Willmore, Elsie Wilson,, James Wilson, Thornton Wisoekis, Anna Witty, Floreine Wajdechowski, Tony Wood, Collie Worsham, ClydeAUTOGRAPHSH MoRGhn. f. FRESHMAN CLASSFRESHMAN CLASSFreshman Class History At the first meeting of the Freshman Class of F. C. H. S. the following officers were elected: Kenneth Rodenbush, President; Lura Lee, Vice-President; and Elea nore Clark, Secretary-Treasurer. Mr. Wallace and Miss Anderson were chosen as class advisors. The most important class activities were a Christmas play given on December 11th and a party given on February 18th. No special effort has been made this year to win social, scholastic, or athletic honors, because of the established custom of allowing the upper classes to participate in most of the school activities, but the class believes that it has in it as good talent can be found in any of the other classes, and in the next three years hopes to demon strate in a convincing way that it is capable of upholding the highest ideals of the school, and herewith dedicates itself to the unfinished task of perpetuating those principles that represent the best things in High School life. Freshman Class Roll Adams, Jessee Burbndge, Bernice Dunning, Adeline Albert, Norman Burkitt, Russell Durham, Raymond Allen, Elsie Camp, Daisy East, Earl Alich, Augusta Cardwell, Ruth D. Ellis, Agnes Arnold, Charlotte Carlisle, Lottie Estes, Nina Auge, Alfred Carpenter, Cecil Finney, Arthur Aubrey, Alverson Charles, Ruth Ford, Marie Bakuzone, Vera Charles, Wesley Forkum, Jesse Baren, Bessie Clark, Eleanore Frasier, Palestine Barr, Frank Clem, Cecil Gant, Allen Barstis, Mary Cooper, John Gerrison, Norbert Batteau, Roy Cruise, Kenneth Gemer, Martin Batts, Cecil Cutt, Clarence Geter, Glen Bazules, Antosie Darden, Wesley Gilbert, Della Belbas, John Deering, Milton Gore, Melville Benbrook, Clarence Dees, Burlis Gray, Wrethel Bennett, Ruby Dempsey, Agnes Grazulis, Alex Berry, Daniel Depriest, Genieve Griffin, Ruth Biggs, Bernice Dial, Ruth Grinus, W. M. Blevins, Henry Dickinson, Wallace Hargrave, Murl Borella, R. J. Dodds, Evelyn Harris, Buelah Bost, Robert Dovin, Joe Harrison, Lucille Brannan, Marie Dorris, Morris Hatmaker, Anna Bristow, Lloyd Dorris, Wayne Hermetz, Joe Britton, Mildred Downen, Olen Herron, Tony Britton, Reta Dragines, Ellen Hicks, Floyd Brock, Sizzella Duncan, Alberta Holbrook, Dorothy Brown, Virginia Duncan, Ernest Howell, BillFRESHMAN CLASS ROLL Hughes, Thomas Inee, George Innis, Edith Innis, Daphine Jasinsky, Mary Johnson, Dwight Jones, Edna Jones, Helen Jones, Bill Jones, Bill Kelly, Reba King, John Henry Kline, Mary Kolesar, Johnny Lamb, Wesley Lamont, Mada L. Lango, Lorene Launius, Opal Lee, Laura Lemon, Bessie Leslie, Edwin Lewis, Arnette Lewis, Glenn Lewis, Dorothy Little, Lizzie Bell Lukasevich, Bernard McCollum, Esther McDaniel, Gladys McElmurry, Elsie Mckee, Mae McReynolds, Ethel Mabry, Pauline Mangum, Edna Mason, Ruth Matalonis, Anna Matthews, Ernest Matalis, Thomas Meeks, Avery Meeks, Bart Metelinas, Joseph Miles, Harold Maloney, Edna Moore, Amil Meyers, R. Stanley Nolen, Gladys Nolen, Clara Odle, Clara Oluf, Paul Owens, Cleta Pavelich, Anna Payne, Roscoe Peek, Vernon Peek Pauline Peacock, Martin Pecelunas, Anna Phillips, Eugar Pollock, Russell Powell, Vernice Presley, Alien Quick, Cletus Racey, Frieda Rains, Bob Ray, Oscar Redfeam, Gene Redtield, Mildred Roberson, Edward Robinson, Essie Mae Rodenbush, Kenneth Roe, Lenora Rushing, Gus Rusites, Katie Senefsky, Agnes Scrota, Elsie Sharkey, Barbara Sharp, Hazel Sharp, Helen Sherman, George Shoemaker, Ernest Shoppell, Naoma Simpson, Mildred Slayden, Lois Smith, Arthur Spisah, Edward Stelznede, Franlin Stephens, Geneieve Stephens, Richard Stepenson, Slinley Stephens, Gaylen Stokes, Guy Story, Jesse Sturgeon, Orval Sweet, Ethyl Svinkunis, Della Tlarwater, Evelyn Tedeschi, John Thomas, Willard Trunnel, Sadie Vaughn, Beatrice Vancel, Gladys Vick, Jeanetta Wade, Harold Waldron. Leo Earl Walker, Albert Waller, Buelah Walters, Eugene Walton, Zora Warren, Harvey Wautelet, Victor Webb, Bertha Williams, Cinderetta Willmore, Kermit Willmore, Noble Wilson, Lucille Wise, Algia Wittcamp, Walter Woods, Ruth Wright, Geneive Yadro, Eva Zichol, Irene Z'chol, TillieTh is club composed of the peppiest bunch of boys in the school, was organized for the sole purpose of putting pep and enthusiasm in the fans who attend the athletic games of F. C. H. S. This organization selected gray jackets and red skull caps as official paraphernalia. The boys expect to do some peppy cheering for the track team. Their special yell is: Yea wrecking, yea crew. Sis bang boom, Yea, yea wrecking crew. The following are members: L. W. Luce, Sponsor Joe Odle, President Ward Dimmick, Secretary John Sherman, Yell leader George Storey Buell McDaniels Silas Randolph Arthur Smith Kenneth Rodenbush Thurmond Teague Wayne Fox John Henry King Clarence Cutt William Myers Walter Morris Dwight Jackson William Bonstead James Wilson Kenneth Charon Dexter Bush Norman Albert ■X 66 Bachelorette Club President ...........................................Mabel Poole Vice-President ...........................................Maunene Webb Secretary ............................................Edna Maddox Treasurer ..................................................Pearl Dorris The Bachelorette club was organized November 10, 1925. The meeting was called to order by Miss Lillian Hess, the officers were elected and a constitution was drawn up. Dunng the year a number of parties were given at the homes of several members. The parties were given in the following order: Thanksgiving Party ..........................................Jessie Joplin Christmas Party .....................Lillian and Laura Hess New Year's Party...............................................Club Valentine Party ...............Velma Hartley and Edna Maddox Kid Party ....Wilma Tonazzi, Maunene Webb and Mabel Poole Apnl Fools' Party..........................................Mauriene Webb Tacky Party .................Marietta Hayes and Helen Newlin Six O'clock Dinner............Eloise Avis and Grace Rawson Mothers' Day Banquet.......................................... Club Pirate Party ...............Wilma Carlton and Katie Benbrook Slumber Party ..............................Wooda McCollum fi 7Camp Fire Group III President ........................................Ruth Teague Vice-President ...................................Lorene Bryan Secretary .....................................Virginia Hams Treasurer .............................................Lura Lee Guardian .........................................Lillian Hess Ruth Murphy Mada Lamont Vemice Powell Thelma Rushing Charlotte Arnold Grace Rawson Campfire Group 111 was organized November, 1925. The purpose of Campfire is to foster the spirit of service in the girls and to give them a chance to develop any talents they may have in any direction. The group has earned money to pay for the things necessary for this organization such as membership dues, books, etc. This money has been earned by sandwich and candy sales at school games, etc. The girls have been especially interested in the Health Chart, which each member has kept. They have taken many hikes to nearby cities. They plan many delightful camping trips for this Summer, which will give them wonderful opportunities for winning honors. They expect to grow and develop into one of the best organizations of F. C. H. S. next year. 68 Camp Fire Group II Aokiya Camp Fire was organized 1922 by Mrs. Edith Reigel Small. She was Guardian for two years. Much was accomplished those two years, giving morey and toys away at Christmas and going on the annual camping trip each spring. In 1924 Miss Leona Guirl was elected Guardian. The group won first prize for the best float in the Home coming parade in 1924. They also helped victims after the tornado in 192T Miss Ruth Briscoe became Guardian in 1925. The camp followed its custom and helped the poor at Christmas time. Camping trips will be possible by selling candy during the school year. Officers for this year are: Wilma Carlton, President; Evelyn Houlle, Secretary Katie Benbrook, Treasurer. This organization met every week for the purpose of helping others and inv proving the life of each Camp Fire Girl. The standards of the National Camp Fire are high and every member must hold these high and cannot help but improve herself and community. 69Press Club This club was new to our school this year, and it has proven itself quite a bene fit, not only to the school proper, but to the community also. Each evening, a column, single or double, appeared in the “Daily American," which gave current news of high school activities. Some of the items are assigned to the various club members and each takes care of his own department. Some of these divisions have been: "Who's Who”; the "Inquiring Reporter”; "Question Box”; "Books We Have Known”; "Song Hits”, editorials and original writings. Our columns give the "budding journalists" a place to display their talents, and a chance to show others the activity earned on in our school. The meetings of the Press Club are held each Tuesday evening, after school. Our advisor is Miss Ruth Brisdoe, and we need her to help keep us from the arguments that are sure to arise. Our membership is made up of students from the four classes, and we try to make the "High School Notes” cover the news and activities of the entire school, as best we can. The officers for the year have been: John Flannigan, President: and Robylee Spence, Treasurer. 70r Debuting Club Debating as an activity in F. C. H. S. is only two years old. While we have not yet produced winning teams in the Southern Illinois League, we were able last year to get one vote out of three from Benton's Championship negative team; and this year we got one vote from Du Quoin, whose teams won in our triangle. That interest is becoming more general throughout the school is being shown by t.he series of debates between the Freshmen, Sophomore, and Junior classes this spring. This interest among the lower classmen is just what is needed to interest students who will develop into good debaters and later produce winning teams. Next year promises to be a good one. 71Cap and Bell One of the most progressive, wide awake organizations on our campus is the "Cap and Bell" club. It was organized last year as a result of a desire for a club which would care for the dramatic needs of F. C. H S. This fall, under the sponsorship of Miss Anderson and Miss Stewart it began with all the pep that a crowd of young people could muster. Among the 1926 milestones are: "Black and White Musical Comedy, "The Kid Party," "Cap and Bell," “Masquers Turnout," and “May Fete We, as a club, know that dramatics play a huge part in helping us on our way to an efficient, self-confident career. No student life is complete without the profitable, spicy bright spot that only dramatics can give. 72 « 2 •F-OH-SjHj •' uLe Cerclc Francais At the beginning of the second semester of the school year 1925-26, the students of the French classes planned to form a club. This club was to be composed of students of the French II. classes, and it was to be used as a social as well as a business organization. As much as possible, the business and social work of the meetings is to be in French, and we hope to acquire a greater knowledge of practical French. A constitution was drawn up by an appointed committee, and the officers were elected by popular vote. The officers for the year are: President ... Vice-President Secretary ... Treasurer ... Sponsor ..... ...Clara Hedges ...Wilma Tonazzi ...Edna Henson Mauriene Webb Miss Laura Hess In accordance with the purpose of the club, the social meetings have entertainments of songs, poems, stories, and the like, all to be given in French. As a fitting title, the club has been named “Le Cercle Francais.” 73Rescue Team At the beginning of school a group of girls met and organized a pep club, which they named the "Rescue Team.” This club or team was organized to arouse the interest and pep of the girls (and to yell at the Basketball games). The team sponsor was Miss Briscoe. We elected officers and started off. Most of the members belonged to the Gym Class. We had our picture made for the Annual. I am wishing for a larger and better team next year, which I am sure we can make with every girl doing her part. 74Latin Club SODALITAS LATINA The Latin club was organised at the beginning of the term. All those taking Latin 11 were allowed to become members. At the first meeting the officers were elected who were: Rudolph Brock, president; Helen Dudenbostel, vice-president; Robylee Spence, secretary; William Myers, treasurer; Miss McNary, our sponsor. The object of the club is that those taking second year Latin may become better acquainted with each other. The membership of the club has become fairly large. The club meets the first Friday in each month. At the meetings the business matters are discussed and an entertainment committee appointed for the next meeting. Many good times were had together and the club plans to have many more. We hope that this club will continue to be organized each year.Home Economics Club All girls of the high school, whether or not enrolled in the department of home economics, were given an opportunity this year to become members of the Home Economics Club. Almost seventy-five girls took advantage of this opportunity. Meetings were held every two weeks, each meeting taking up a special phase of the home, such as Etiquette, Home Furnishings, Health, Meal Planning, and Appropriate Dress. In addition to the regular meetings the club very successfully sponsored the Black Cat Tea-room in connection with the Black and White Musical Comedy given last November. At Christmas time the girls decided to re-establish the custom of carol singing and made the hearts of many shut-ins happy with their songs. Throughout the year, the girls have tried to uphold the purposes of the club as expressed in the constitution —to form a connecting link between the home and the school; to train young women to be active and efficient leaders in home and community life; to furnish an opportunity through organization for social life, such as programs and social gatherings. Officers of the club for 1925-26 were: President ..........................................Eloise Avis Vice-President ................................Louise Robinson Secretary .....................................Thelma Rushing Treasurer ..........................................Lorene Bryan Sponsors....................Leona Guirl and Myra Jane Whitlock 76The Masquers’ Club The Masquers' Club was organized in 1923 under the supervision of Miss Coy; deriving its name from the type of play known as the masque. The club was organized for the purpose of developing dramatic ability and studying the various types of drama from early to contemporary times. Officers of 1926: Maud Creek, president; Blodwen Coleman, vice-president; Florence Green, secretary; Kenneth Charon, treasurer; with Miss Hackett as sponsor. 77 c Betty’s Last Bet THE JUNIOR PLAY OF 1926 Judging from the proceeds, crowd, laughs, and thrills, the Junior Class play was the best play ever given within the doors of F. C. H. S. The play was a comedy and everyone in the cast played their part with exceptional ability. The coaches (Mr. and Mrs. Guy Tucker) felt that their efforts, as well as the efforts of the whole cast were appreciated when the play proved to be such a wonderful success. More money was made from one performance of this play than has ever been made from any play ever given in the High School. Left to right in the above row are: Ralph Eadie as............. John Sherman as ........... Clifford Barger as ......... Mrs. Tucker ............... Donald Seal as ............ Raymond Medlin as.......... Guy Tucker ................. Lower Row: Florence Green as........... Mildred Beabout as.......... Aileen Blake as............ Maxine Rodenbush as ....... Edna Fay Syfert as ........ Nellie Tonazzi as .......... The proceeds of the play ...........................Col. Richard Wentworth .....................................Edgar Darling ......-............................Jack Van Dion .............................................Coach ..............-...................Percy Wentworth ...............................Hamilton Moriarity ...-.........................................Coach ............................................Hannah .....................................Peggy Darling .....................................Betty Darling .....................................Kitty Darling ...................-.................Dolly Darling .....................................Mrs. Darling went to the Junior-Senior Banquet. Pep Club President .........................................Alieen Blake Vice-President .......................................Dean Fly Secretary ..................................Helen Dudenbostel Treasurer ..................................Maxine Rodenbush The club was organized Tuesday, October 21, 1924. It is next of the oldest club in F. C. H. S. The meeting was called to order by Miss Guirl. Officers were elected. The club decided on several things. Ruth Harmon and Gleason Lee, the yell leaders of 1924-25, were sent to Champaign. Christmas, New Year's, Leap Year, Valentine and numerous other parties were given. The club gave an athletic banquet in the spring of 1925. The club has been very active in the Home Coming parade of 1924 and 1925, in which their float won the first prize in 1925. They gave two Pow Wow's, one in 1924 and one in 1925; at the former the play "Not by a Dam Site” was presented and at the latter, the play "The Sweet Family.” The club did much towards decorating for the tournament held in West Frankfort. Miss Caroline Helming has recently been chosen as sponsor of the club. The club spent a week of last summer's vacation in Shawneetown, Illinois, where had a very enjoyable time. They expect to have another good time this summer. 79Our Advertising Managers Ed Stephens and E. Mitchell, these are the two young men to whom we owe a great part of the financial success of our annual. They were, one would say, our “friends in need. When the financial cloud loomed dark upon the horizon and threatened the otherwise happy state of the would-be editors of this book, these two "hustlers" went forth with a fierce determination, and by staunch attempts finally succeeded, in the short period of six days, to raise the financial standing of the annual above par. They did this, however, not without first overcoming great difficulties in every phase of their task. For this reason and many others they are to be congratulated upon their ability to secure advertising. Thank them for the unmarred publication of the 1926 edition of The Redbird. —- BACHELORETTES B—is for the bunch as a whole. Each one of them has a high goal. A—is for aim for they all have ambition, And they never will lose it, under any condition. C—is for the club so classy and keen, They are always jolly where ever they're seen. H —is for their home so sacred and sweet. They receive a warm welcome from each mother they meet. E—is for education, which we all strive to gain. To work for our country, and aid in its reign. L—is the link that binds them together. They'll stick with each other through all sorts of weather. O— means "over" the top they will go, With successes, and honor, though their progress be slow. R—is for reputation, and theirs you will find. Is being cheerful, loving, forgiving and kind. E—is for "each" a short name you might say. But to see them perform, a price you must pay. T—stands for the many good times they have had. And not one of them has ever been mad. T—again stands for their members so true, Who will always be happy if their duties they do. E—means almost the “end” of this poem so long, 1 hope you've enjoyed it, but maybe I'm wrong. S—is for the secrets locked up in the heart, They'll never, never tell them though destined to part. 80 Girls’ Quartette First Soprano ................................Grace Rawson Second Soprano ................................Edna Maddox First Alto ..........................Wooda Dell McCollum Second Alto .........................Mary Jane Morse Laster Director ..................................Miss Lillian Hess The Girls" Quartette of F. C. H. S. is composed of three Seniors; Edna Maddox, Wooda McCollum and Mary Jane Laster, and one Sophomore, Grace Rawson. Until this year the quartette has been under the leadership of Prof. B. E. Montgomery. This is the first quartette from F. C. H. S. to be placed in the Little Ten Conference Meet and in the Southern Illinois Track and Intellectual Events. Last year the girls won third place in both events. This year the girls under the direction of Miss Lillian Hess have been doing splendid work. They have sung at the Woman s Clubs, Rotary Club, Older Boys Conference Banquets, Church Socials, parties, etc., and at the annual Teachers Institute held at Benton, 111. They hope to win first place at the Intellectual Meets this year. They will sing the selection ’"The Bridal Chorus from Rose Maiden by Frederic H. Cowen. Music Music is a pleasure evoking emotion. It stirs us to depths of despair or the heights of happiness. In the early beginning of music it was interpreted by savage dances which tried, in a way, to reveal the emotions of love, anger, terror, hate and happiness. There is no other art which gives us such a powerful appeal as music; no other art tells us more about ourselves or bares our souls. Spencer says, "The emotions are the masters, the intellect is the servant.’’ Music speaks a language which cannot be translated into words, but is understood the world over. Music like any other art requires study to master and to appreciate it. For example, the works of some of the masters such as Bach, Beethoven, Chopin and others cannot be appreciated by those who have not learned, either by experience or by education, to understand and interpret such music. These men were keen intellectually and swayed by deep emotions. It should be the goal of all musical training to prepare and teach one to understand and appreciate the finer things of art. Thus far our attempts in our schools have been very feeble yet worthy, of note. In this school, we have tried in our orchestra, this year, to work out some of the simpler selections which are full of beauty and harmony and in this manner gradually raise the standard to the limit of our ability.'M.FRflNWFVKT The Bund The High School Band was organized this year with thirteen pieces. Solo Cornets, Ray Dove, Rudolph Brock; First Cornet, Geo. Sinks; Alto, Junior Syfert, Lyndell Boner; Trombone, Gus Tolbert; Baritone, Glen Henson; Base Drum, Cecil Sanders; Snare Drums, Emmett Dunn; Clarinets, Walker Jones, Nado Burkitt. The band made practically all the football trips and played for most of the basketball games. The Band and Orchestra arc under the direction of B. E. Montgomery.' THE ORCHESTRA The F. C. H. S. Orchestra has been in existence practically ever since the High School has been organized. The Orchestra has made quite a bit of progress this year, playing a medium class of music and some of the more difficult popular selections. The number increases every year. This year we have six first violins, six second violins, three cornets, one horn, one trombone, drums, two clarinets, one banjo and one piano. . Srfag, ORCHESTRA OUR SCHOOL AND ITS WORK SHOPSSEWING CLASS COOKING CLASS 87 88 Our High School By Bernard Hampton Frankfort Community High School District was organized by a popular vote of the people during the summer of 1919. This action caused the union of the West Frankfort High School and the Frankfort Heights High School into what we thought at that time was a large school consisting of an enrollment of the combined schools of ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SEVEN pupils with eight teachers teaching full time and two teaching part time. The Board of Education at that time consisting of W. H. Mogg, Sam Binkley, J. S. Camp bell, Coleman Jones and Bernard Hampton, began immediately to plan and devise means for the improvement of the school system and for the building of a High School building suitable for the needs of the school, should it grow as we anticipated that it would. Plans and specifications for the new building were drawn up by Wm. B Ittner. Architect of St. Louis, Mo., and the contract was immediately let to the E. C. Gerhard Building Co., of St. Louis. During the construction of the building there was never a sign of any friction between the contractor and the union laborers and this alone shows the general public that organized labor was one of the strongest supporters of the new school system. And the fact that the enrollment of the school has increased to MORE THAN SIX HUNDRED during the 1925-1926 term shows that the laboring man was only waiting for a chance to give his children a better education. When this district was organized the high school had an accredited acceptance with the University of Illinois for SIXTEEN units of word. Under the Frankfort Community regime this has been increased to THIRTY-TWO AND ONE-HALF units of credit and was last year admitted to the NORTH CENTRAL ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS, showing that the great Educational men of our great State consider the teaching ability of the TWENTY-FOUR TEACHERS now employed as above reproach and the general government of the Frankfort Community High School to be of a very high standing character. We boast, and are justly proud of having the best High School Building in Southern Illinois and feel that our High School work is far above the average High School work considering the age of the school. 89r WOODA McCOLLUM Most Popular Girl In F. C. H. S. Wooda was voted the most popular girl in F. C. H. S. dunng the year 1926. She was president of the Junior class in 1925 and president of the Senior class of 1926. Until she became president the class had never done anything, but she told us what we should do, and with her help we did it. We now have a successful class. Wooda is blessed with a beautiful voice and has sung in the high school quartette for three years. She is also a member of the Baehelorette Club. She always has the same sweet smile and word of cheer for everybody, wherever one sees her. To her wonderful personality she owes her popularity. And we all love her for her own charming self. 91 SUPERLATIVES Who’s Who in F. C. H. S. Question First Choice Second Choic Blonde Shakespeare Tennyson '...Poe Longfellow Nothing ? ... Yes, 33 ? 7 History Walker, Wm, Wallace ....Maurine Fairy McNary Henderson Benbrook Ted Barter King Dudenbostel Bowles Louise Puny James Wilson ...Fly Lutz Bush ...Tom D. Barrett ...Thompson Rachel 92n Football Football in F. C. H. S. this year was very successful, from the number of games won, and the financial standpoint. The team won five of its eight games, finishing third in the conference. Football in F. C. H. S. was at low tide in '24, but through good coaching on the part of Mr. Wroughton and Mr. Tucker a formidable team represented the school this year. Coach Wroughton will be with us again next year and will make things hot for the other teams in this part of the state. r The Season of 25 The team opened the season with Fairfield at Fairfield. The “Red Birds" won by a score of 27-0 the game was filled with fumbles and "Musty’s" good work shown brilliantly. The next game was with Marion, at home. The field was wet and the game was slow. Frankfort won by a 19-0 score. The next game was with our neighbors on the south. Johnston City. This was a very close game, the score being tied until the last two minutes of play. Miles scored Johnston City six points by drop-kicks while Frankfort’s touchdowns came from a pass, Mitchell to Poole and a blocked kick by McClenn which Hiduk fell upon. Score 15 to 6. Our next opponent was the Harrisburg “Bull dogs." The team put every ounce of energy it had into this game, but through "bad breaks" was defeated 26 to 12. The machine of F. C. H. S. was in two yards of the goal the last quarter, but a fumble, which one of the Harrisburg backs scooped up and raced for a touchdown, lost the game. This was the first time the goal line of either team had been crossed. Then came the Anna game which was the Homecoming Game for F. C. H. S. The team received a severe blow when Bill Golden was injured in this game. The "Red Birds" won by the score of 2 to 0. The team lost a game to Murphysboro in a sea of mud, through over-confidence. The score was 13 to 0. The absence of "Big Bill" was felt greatly. Vienna came up all pepped up, but went home on the short end of a 19 to 6 score. The Thanksgiving Day game was the hardest to lose. It rained all morning and the field was a sea of mud, nevertheless, a large delegation went up to the "Fifth Ward" to see the game. Benton scored early in the first quarter when Ross of Benton went over. Then through no other reason than using the "stiff arm" Capt. Mitchell was put out of the game. The referee did not see the play, but it seems that the Benton players made it so vivid that he took legal action and removed "Fritz” and penalized F. C. H. S. half the distance to the goal line. This put the Red Birds on the fifteen yard line. Walker called a punt which was blocked and rolled over the goal line and a Benton man covered it. The try for point was successful. Then the fire works begun. The "Red Birds" came back with fire in their eyes and scored two touchdowns in the second half, but failed to try for points. They were on a steady march for the goal line when the final whistle blew with the score standing 13 to 12 and Benton was happy, they had won another "fluke" victory from F. C. H. S. 95FLOYD "FRENCHY" WROUGHTON Coach “Frenchy" came here in a time when football was at a low tide. He struggled through the first year with only one victory and one tie, but near the end of the season he had a line which was showing the effects of capable coaching. This year he put forth a team that lost only three games. He never gives an “2 libi.” He isn't very loud, but we like you just the same “Frenchy.” His team was the only one to carry the “pigskin" across the Harrisburg goal line and they did it twice. We are for him. A better team in “ '26.” GUY E. TUCKER Assistant Coach Coach Wroughton was ably assisted by Mr. Tucker. He developed a second team that furnished plenty of opposition for the first string men. He was on the job every afternoon and deserves much credit for the team's good showing. EVERETTE MITCHELL, "FRITZ" Captain R. H. B. This was Captain Mitchell's third consecutive year on the varsity. He was a triple threat man and owing to his great burst of speed, change of pace, and driving power, was a much feared man by his opponents. His defensive work was of a calibre that is seldom seen in H. S. players. "Fritz” is a senior and will be missed greatly next year. 96WILLIAM WALKER, “Willie” Q. B., Capt. Elect This sturdy quarterback piloted the team of F. (-. H. S. through one of the most successful seasons of any team the school ever produced. He also was a triple threat man and was noted for his ability to keep cool when in a tight place. “Willie” was the fastest quarterback in the conference. He is a junior and will guide the team again next year. CLYDE MITCHELL, “Musty” L. H. B. “Musty" was the smallest man on the team, but the mightiest tackier in the conference, his speed and tacking ability made it almost impossible for a man to get by him. He could pass above the average H. S. player and when it came to hitting the line “Musty” couldn't be beat. He is a junior and great things are expected of him next year. ALBERT WALKER, “Nick” F. B. Albert was the only freshman to make the team this year. Being a triple threat man with much speed he was one of the best fullbacks in the conference. Although good at carrying the ball. “Nick” showed up best on the defense. Albert has three more years in which to develop into the best fullback in the conference. 97. c- . . £ ir 1 ANDY HI DUCK, “Ducks ' R E. “Ducks” was the best end in the conference, being fairly shifty and a good tackier he was a good man on the defense. He is known all over this part of the state for his spectacular catching of passes. If the ball ever touched his hands it never hit the ground. He is a junior and greater things are expected of him next year. RUSSEL POOLE, L. E. Poole, like Hiducks was adapted to making good catches, but on the defense he shown brilliantly. He was a good tackier and good at dissolving interference. He was always there with the pep and spirit. Poole is only a sophomore and will be one of the best ends in the conference in another year or two. GEORGE CHISMAR, “Cheesy” L. T George came here from Virdin, Illinois and proved himself a football player of rare ability. "Cheesy” was especially good on the defense. He was a hard tackier and on the offense could open holes. He is a senior and will be greatly missed next year.RALPH ROBERTS, R T. This is Ralph's second year in football, last year at end Ralph did some excellent work and this year stepped into a full time berth at tackle where he furnished a world of excitement for those who played opposite him. Beside of being a tackle of no mean ability, he had the power to analyze the opponents plays and successive moves. This is Ralph's last year and we are sorry to lose him for his place will be no easy one to fill. We hope to hear more of him in college. WILLIAM GOLDEN, “Big Bad Bill" R. G. Bill was “Biggest Asset" to the team. He weighs close to 250 lbs., and being rather active for his size was soon found to be a hard man to move. “Bill" showed that he was of all star calibre at Harrisburg when time after time he stopped the rushes of the “Bull Dogs." He was very peppy and had the fighting spirit. Bill graduates this year and it will be hard for Coach Wroughton to find a man who can do Bill's work. He was chosen on the second all star team. WILLIAM SIMMONS, “Feet' Center Bill came out for football last year and was faithful m practice but never got into a game. However through graduation he got his chance and readily proved himself a good center. He could pass the ball back well and was especially good on the defense. He is a Junior and will be back next year to show his stuff. RAY LAMONT, "Doc” Backfield Ray is the kind of a sub that a coach can put in and not feel that his team has been weakened. He is probably the most versatile player on the squad. He is a Junior and will fight hard for a regular berth next year. JOHN ROBERTSON, “Johnie” Line John came to us from Anna, Illinois, and was a consistent man in practice. He could step into the game and play like a veteran. He is a Senior and his absence will be a severe blow to the team. LOREN McCLERIN, "Fuz” Line “Fuz” came out for football for the first time this year and was readily put into action through injuries. He played like a veteran in the Johnston City Game, blocking a punt in the last two minutes which won the game.•F-C-H-S' LINSDAY WILSON, “Puny", L. G. This was Wilson's first year out for football and he readily proved himself capable of holding down a berth at left guard. His weight and tackling ability' made him a hard man to go through, on the offense he was an adept for opening holes. He will graduate this year and will be greatly missed. Opponents F. C. H. S. Marion, here J. City, here . Vienna, here TOTAL 27 19 13 12 21 0 , 6 19 .13 12 — 64 127 The players who were awarded letters are. E. Mitchell, C. Mitchell, A. Walker, W. Walker, Hiducks, Poole, Roberts, Chismar, Golden, Wilson, Simmons, MeClenn, Robertson, Lamont. 101Basketball 25-’26 Basketball in F. H. C. S. during the season just past was not as true a success as it had been in preceding years. The team lost ten out of the twelve conference games played, defeating Harrisburg once and winning the conference for Benton by de feating Marion in the final conference game. They lost twelve out of twenty starts in the season's schedule. During the early stages of the season the wearers of the Cardinal showed a weakness in basket shooting. Coach Ebbler worked with them untiringly and at the last of the season they showed the skill of a good coached team by going to the finals in the district tournament with Christopher. They were defeated by the close score of 12 to 14. As for the personal of the team it passed possessed four veterans in E Mitchell, Barrett, Poole, and W. Walker. A. Walker, a freshman, played center and was a good floor man but showed a great weakness at putting the horse-hide through the net. E. Mitchell played the greater part of the season at running guard, but was displaced by the fighting Hiduck in the last few games on the schedule and in the tournament. W. Walker played a consistent game throughout the year being one of the leading scorers in the conference. Barrett played his usual fighting game at back guard. He was noted for his long shots. Every player of the team which played in the district tournament will be in school next year and should develop into a peppy aggregation. A brief account of the game follows: The team opened the season with Salem and Thompsonville here, winning both games, but showing that they needed much practice at basket shooting. Following these two games came the game with the Johnston City team on their court. The team took the short end of an 18 to 11 score. The team showed mid-season form by defeating the strong Mt. Vernon five in a hotly contested battle by the score of 8 to 10. The “Red Birds" defeated the strong Alumini squad. The score being 23 to 16. Murphysboro came over and knocked our hopes in the head by defeating the wearers of the Cardinal by a 15 to 10 score. Slaughter of Murphysboro was the outstanding player. Things began to look brighter when the “Red Birds ' took the Harrisburg 'Bull Dogs” into camp easily by a score of 31 to 17. C. Mitchell was high point man in this game. Benton, our friendly rivals on the north, trimmed the men of F. C. H. S. in a game on the Benton floor. The score being 11 to 6. Johnston City again defeated the “Red Birds" on the home court. The score was close for three quarters, but the J. City team had more endurance. The score being 22 to 10. Manon 28, F. C. H. S. 14. Marion showed good pass work and shooting ability in defeating the F. C. H. S team. Pully of Marion starred with 16 points. The team journeyed to Salem and took the Manon County lads into camp by a 29 to 5 scores. “Musty" was the leading scorer with 17 points. Mt. Bernon 23, Frankfort 16.rf- • . ’ jftJlL. " (gD L" -..l-ril.--E-sST BASKETBALL Continued G x)d long shooting won this game for Mt. Vernon. Barrett was the Star of this game with eleven of Frankfort's points. Murphysboro 15, F. C. H. S. 10. Slaughter lived up to his name and scored 12 points for Murphy. The men of Ebbler took the fast Centralia squad down by the score of 16 to IS. W. Walker played exceptionally well. Harrisburg defeated the "Red Birds" in an exciting game by a one point margin, 24 to 23. Carbondale also defeated F. C. H. S. by one point lead of 22 to 21. Benton came down and showed us their stuff by leading the scoring 22 to 10. The "Red Birds" got the most shots, but couldn't make them. The team went to Carbondale and lost 15 to 10. Trout's Bunch from Centralia defeated the team of F. C. H. S. 23 to 22. Marion came up with the reputation of a state championship team. They were leading the conference, but when the "Red Birds" were through with them they were in second place and the sting of a 26 to 20 defeat in their hearts. This victory game the pessimistic rooters a more hopeful outlook for the tournament. The tournament, which was held in West Frankfort, was just three days of upsets in "dope" and big surprises. It seemed that the team with the least chance won its game. The big surprise was the good showing of the Bonnie and Ewing teams. Benton lost to Christopher in her second game. Christopher had a slight advantage due to a forfeit to them from Waltonvilles, West Frankfort went to the finals with Christopher and was defeated. The team could not stand the hard grind to which it was assigned by the drawings. 103 E. W. EBBLER Coach Mr. Ebblcr is the kind of a coach who doesn't say much, but does a lot of acting. He has won four successive district tournaments since he has been here and has won many friends for himself. He knows how to manage players and can make them give their best. Although his team has had a bad year we will boost for him next year. F. W. WROUGHTON Assistant Coach Mr. Wroughton besides being an excellent Football Coach is a Basketball Coach of some ability. He was a hard worker and the boys all liked him. He deserves credit for his faithfulness and hard work. EVERETT MITCHELL, "Fritz" R. G. Capt. This was Captain Mitchell's fourth year with the squad and he did some commendable work throughout the season. He was an exceptional floor guard and a fair shot. He had a useful habit of scoring when it was most needed. 104 WILLIAM WALKER, “Willie” R. F. Capt. Elect Willie was the most consistent man on the squad Though playing with a losing team he was among the leading scorers of the conference. He has the fighting spirit and it will be hard for the opponents to stop Capt. Walker and his team next year. He was chosen Capt. of the second all star team. RUSSELL POOLE L. F. Poole is the kind of a player who never says much but acts a lot. He is an exceptionally good long shot and a fast floor man. He had hard luck during the season with his shots but in the tournament he showed the pepper. He was chosen on the first all star team. Russell is only a Sophomore and will be back to fight 'em next year. REGINALD BARRETT, "Barecat" L. G. Barrett deserves much credit for the team's good showing during the tournament. During the season he had a habit of making spectacular shots from the center of the floor, besides being a good long shot, no opponent ever had an easy time under the basket with Barecat. He was picked on the first all star team in the district tournament. 105iw-F-GH' ALBERT WALKER, “Nick" Center Albert, a sturdy freshman, played a consistent game at center. He was a fast floor man and could pass well, when he has had experience he will furnish a world of excitement for his opponents. ANDY H1DUCK, “Ducks” R. G. Hiduk was the most versatile player on the squad. He could play any position well, but at floor guard he shown brilliantly. When an opposing forward tried to go around “Ducks" they found all hands and feet. His best bet was his long shots which he placed in the net in every game he played in. He was chosen on the second all star team in the District tourney. WARD D1MMICK, "Tobc” Forward Dimmick was the kind of a sub who could go in to the game and play like a veteran. He was always good for his share of the scoring. He is a sophomore and great things are expected of him in the next two seasons. 106 _  CLYDE MITCHELL, "Musty” Forward "Musty" was a very fast man, but was handicapped by the lack of stature. He possesses a fast shot and guards close. He is only a Junior and will make someone step for a place on the team next vear. CHARLES HARRIS, “Charlie" L. G. Charles was a guard of no mean ability who, during the absense of Barrett played a stellar game. Hams w'ill make a good guard with a little exper CLARENCE HARRIS, “Tommy" Center "Tommy" came to us from Eldorado, he readily showed the fight that a good B. B. player must have and did some good work during the season. He is a Junior and will strengthen the squad next year. 107 Schedule Scores Opponents F. C. H. S. Saturday, December 12th, Thompsonville, here... 5 24 Saturday, December 12th, Salem, here............ 5 24 Friday, December 18th, Johnston City, there.....18 11 Wednesday, December 23rd, Mt. Vernon, there.... 8 10 Wednesday, December 30th, Alumni, here..........11 23 Friday, January 1st, Murphysboro, here..........15 10 Saturday, January 2nd, Harrisburg, there........17 31 Friday, January 8th, Benton, there..............11 6 Saturday, January 9th, Johnston City, here......22 10 Wednesday, January 13th, Marion, there..........28 14 Saturday, January 16th, Salem, there............ 5 29 Friday, January 22nd, Mt. Vernon, here..........23 16 Saturday, January 23rd, Murphysboro, there......23 22 Friday, January 29th, Centralia, there........ 18 26 Saturday, January 30th, Harrisburg, here........24 23 Friday, February 5th, Carbondale, here..........22 21 Friday, February 12th, Benton, here.............20 10 Saturday, February 13th, Carbondale, there......15 10 Friday, February 19th, Centralia, here..........23 22 Friday, February 26th, Marion, here.............20 26 TOURNAMENT 10S ALUM CLASS OF '13 Ruby Durst, Mrs. N. E. Burke......................................W. Frankfort, 111. CLASS OF '14 Vcrda Griffin, Mrs. B. K. Wentworth...............................W. Frankfort, 111. Irene McNamar Mrs. Clyde Boughers ................................W. Frankfort, 111. Nell Karnes, Mrs. N. J. McCollum..................................W. Frankfort, 111. Bernard Hampton, merchant.........................................W. Frankfort, 111. CLASS OF '15 Mabel Cremer, Mrs. Paul Watkins................_.....................Detroit, Mich. Daisy Rotramel, teacher...........................................W. Frankfort, III. Eva Fox, Mrs. Herbert Mrotz...........................................Chicago, III. Helen Jones, Mrs. Rasmussem...........................................Chicago, 111. Blanche Campbell, Mrs. Floyd Clark.............................................. Died CLASS OF '18 Orval Davis, post office..........................................W. Frankfort, 111. Herman Karnes, miner .............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Don Monti, at home................................................W. Frankfort, 111. Dorothy Musgrave, Mrs. Alexander..................................W. Frankfort, III. Helen Gettings, Mrs. Paul Baldwin.................................W. Frankfort, 111. Minnie Smith, Mrs. Ritchie..........................................Walterville, 111. CLASS OF '19 Harriet Jacobs, Kohl 6? Myers Grocery......................................Centralia, 111. Irene Culley, Agnes Memorial Sanatarium.......................................Denver, Col Mary Douglas, Mrs. Thomas Wilson..................................W. Frankfort, 111. Ola Pitchford, Mrs. H. E. Garrison................................W. Frankfort, 111 Vivian Gambill, Mrs. Don Campbell.................................Christopher, 111. Ralph Greathouse, electrician..........................................Miama, Fla. Cecil Hampton, dentist............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Ben Fox, U. of I....................-.......................-........Champaign, 111. Edith Jent, Mrs. D. D. Hatfield.....................................Christopher, 111. Vemita Jones, W. F. Bldg. O' Loan Ass n...........................W. Frankfort, 111. Edd Mitchell, miner...............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Monica Mikalauckas, teacher...........................-...........W. Frankfort, 111. Clytie Musgrave, Mrs. Thomas Stevens..............................W. Frankfort, 111. Anna McKee, Patterson's Cafe......................................W. Frankfort, 111. Wesley Whittaker, miner........................-.....................Lee, S. Dakota Loyd Lemasters, Prof. U. of I........................................Champaign, 111. Negley Williams, post office.......................................W. Frankfort, 111. Mary Springfield, Mrs. Peters......................................W. Frankfort, 111. Helen Wilderman, Mrs. J. J. Ellis.................................W. Frankfort, 111. Bert Broshears, miner.............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Bess Gladders, Mrs. Earl Lashmet..................................Died Dec. 3, 1923 109CLASS OF '20 Raymond Pittman, electrician........................................W. Frankfort, 111. Julia Miklauckas, teacher...........................................W. Frankfort,111. Thelma Jones, Mrs. Jesse Farthing................................W. Frankfort, 111. Sylvia Rains, Mrs. Elmer Lovell..........................................Zeigler, 111. Marian Kelley, at home...............................................W Frankfort, 111. Louise Smith, Mrs. R. L. Flannigan................................ W. Frankfort,IH. Maye Parker, deaconess....................................................Joplin, Mo. Conrad Ellis, Chicago U................................................ Chicago, III. Ruby Ice, teacher................................................ W. Frankfort, 111. Genevieve Horrell, Mrs. David Lawrence..............................W. Frankfort, III. Frank McAuley, art institute........................................... Chicago, 111. Ruth Dillon, Mrs. Joe Halligan......................................W. Frankfort, 111. Bessie Howells, Mrs. Warren............................................ Peoria, III. CLASS OF '21 Gwen Fox, Mrs. Raymond Pittman......................................W. Frankfort, III. William Howells, clerk..............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Maude Musgrave, Mrs. Neal McKnight........................................Herrin, 111. Irene Porritt, Mrs. Orval Horrell...................................W. Frankfort, III. Edith Jones, teacher.....................................................Zeigler, 111. Egale Gray, miner...................................................W. Frankfort, III. Nina McClintock, at home........................................... W. Frankfort, III. Sylvia Griffin, teacher.............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Yale Downes, Coalfield store..........................................Rend City, III. Ethel Coleman, Leader store.........................................W. Frankfort, 111. Opal White, Mrs. Eulan Patton.......................................W. Frankfort, III. Louis Rodenbush, miner..............................................W. Frankfort, III. Addie Moore, bookkeeper...............................................Detroit, Mich. Lloyd Shipp, mechanic...............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Lucille Gray, bookkeeper..............................................Detroit, Mich. CLASS OF '22 Dode Gladders, Perdue U...............................................Lafayette, Ind. Lelie Martin, Anderson Bible Seminary........................................Anderson, Ind. Cloyd Thompson, state work....................................................Jackson, Ind. Louise Arnold, stenographer.........................................W. Frankfort, III. Ruby Wilderman, Mrs. Raymond Landers................................W. Frankfort, III. Uhlan Henderson, Fresno State U.......................................Fresno, Calif. Blanche Norman, stenographer........................................W. Frankfort, III. Ralph Hinckle, miner................................................W. Frankfort, III. Pearl Murphy, teacher...............................................W. Frankfort, III. Pauline Hunter, Mrs. Thomas Yutz.................................Eagle Rock, Calif. Virgil Burgess, clerk ...........................................Johnston City, 111. Dorothy Jacobs, working St. John's Hospital...........................St. Louis, Mo. Bessie Pitchford, Burg's Store.................................... W. Frankfort, 111. Daisy Ingram, Leader Store..........................................W. Frankfort, III. Leon Henson, mechanic...............................................W. Frankfort, III. Lillian Grose, teacher..............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Helen Willmore, W. F. Bank Trust..................................W. Frankfort, III. Frank Jacobs, bakery.....................................................Chicago, 111. Noble Rains, clerk .................................................W. Frankfort, III. Nannie Jones, teacher...............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Elma Wise, Mrs. E. E. Meagher.......................................W. Frankfort, IIICLASS OF '22—Continued Marie Odle, Mrs. Gnari Richardson.................................W. Frankfort, III Vit Krivenas, factory...................................................Chicago, III. Roberta Miller, Mrs. Gaat................................................Joliet, 111. Susie Mars, bookkeeper................................................Detroit, Mich Edith Beauford, F. C. H. S. Librarian.............................W Frankfort, III Taylor Harris, Oil Station............................................St. Louis, Mo. Zetta Kelley, teacher.............................................W. Frankfort, III Vivian Knight, Mrs. Elmer Davis......................................... Marion, III. Don Henson, mechanic..............................................W. Frankfort, III. William Monti, salesman......................-....................W Frankfort, III. Margaret Leponis, Mrs. E. R. Bevis................................W. Frankfort, III Thomas Blake, merchant................................................Frankfort, III. Leslie McFaddin, V . F. Bank £sr Trust Co.........................W. Frankfort, 111 Arty Martin, miner................................................ W. Frankfort, 111 Charles Pittman, miner............................................W. Frankfort, 111. CLASS OF ’23 Burl Darnell, Oil Station.........................................W. Frankfort, 111. Ray Shuffle-Barger, salesman......................................Lake Worth, Fla. Paul Hays, William-Jewell College............................................Liberty, Mo. Marion Summers, Dentistry School .....................................St. Louis, Mo. Louis Weinberger ................................................................. Cyril Jones, H. N. Garage..._...................................W. Frankfort, III Ervin Auten, Accessory Co.............................................Centralia, 111 Carl Sanders, I. C. Station.......................................W. Frankfort, III Scotty Mygatt, Mygatt's Store.......................................W. Frankfort, 111 Ralph Dorris, miner............................................... W. Frankfort, III Jesse Cremer, Mercantile Co.......................................W. Frankfort, 111 Henry Jones, Mercer College ..............................................Macon, Ga. Joe Hale, Hale Music Store........................................W. Frankfort, 111. Gilbert Crain, Miliken................................................ Decatur, 111 Leslie Reinheimer, Fashion Shop...................................W. Frankfort, 111 Earl Williams, miner..............................................W. Frankfort, 111 Omer C. Lee, U. of I..................................................Champaign, III. Neal Ellis, DePauw ...............................................Greencastle, Ind. Frank Good, garage..............................................................Ezra, 111. Beryle Baxter, at home............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Buelah Logan, Mrs. Miles..........................................W. Frankfort, III. Dollie Hill, bookkeeper...........................................W. Frankfort, 111. Beatrice Griffin, S. I. N. U.........................................Carbondale, 111. Gladys Shipp, teacher.............................................W. Frankfort, 111 Grace Downen, stenographer........................................W. Frankfort, 111. Louise Eistrup, L. A. Harris Store................................W Frankfort, 111. Margaret Eistrup, Mrs. Harold Howell....................................Chicago, 111. Helen Harper, stenographer........................................W. Frankfort, 111. Mora Cabom, Mrs. Howard Russell...................................W. Frankfort, III Orpha Randolph, Mrs. Allan Edwards................................W. Frankfort, 111. Halene Harrison, W. F. Bldg. 6? Loan Ass'n........................W Frankfort, 111. Illah Jackson, Mrs. Bill Mitchell.................................W. Frankfort, 111. Helen Douglas, Strand Theatre.....................................W. Frankfort, III. Lola Elders, Mrs. Everett Gettings................................W. Frankfort, III Maxine Blake, S. I. N. U.....................„.......................Carbondale, 111. Evelyn Greenbaum, U. of I.............................................Champaign, 111. Thelma Pharis, teacher............................................W Frankfort, III. Geraldine Houlle, S. I. N. U....................................... Carbondale, 111CLASS OF '23—Continued Amelia Sharkey, Northwestern U........................ Italene Lament, Mrs. Marion Summers................... Anna Stephens, at home................................ Stella Henson, Henson's Cleaning Shop................. Marguerite Howe, Mrs. Earl Bozart..................... Dorothy Lewellyn, Art School.......................... Mary McIntosh ........................................ Marguerite Bandy, stenographer........................ Gussie Pitchford, Mrs. Virgil Lipscomb................. Hazel Lee Yehling..................................... Rex McIntyre, merchant................................. Walter Gladdcrs, at home............................... Zelga Pulley, at home.................................. CLASS OF '24 Mary Hancock, Daily American................... Myrtle Pyles, teacher.......................... Joseph Koehl, working.......................... John Whittaker, U. of I........................ Roy Bolen, Westerfield's Grocery............... Rose LeMasters, U. of I........................ Earl Dean, W. F. Accessory Co.................. Beatrice Fox, teacher.......................... Kenneth Hall, Cline's Drug Co.................. Jonathan Read, farmer.......................... Loretta McGinty, Mrs. Lawrence Dunn............ Lewis Forkum, carpenter........................ Walter Forkum, at home......................... Eloise Handegan, Mrs. Walter Groober.... Winifred Gipson, teacher....................... Harold Culley, miner................ Walter Chase, working.......................... Edwin Bartleson, bookkeeping.................... John Willis, Hart's Mercantile Co... Joe Genevich, clerk............................ Lillian Murray, Parker's Music Store........... Corrine Moore, stenographer.................... Olive Boner, S. I. N. U........................ Crandall Koons, S. I. N. U..................... Robert Eadie, U. of I.......................... Anna Sharkey, working.......................... Clyde Smith, miner............................. Albert Wise, working........................... Alfred Thompson, C. B. Q..................... Nellie Horrell, S. I. N. U..................... Frances Sinks, teacher......................... Imogene Gross, teacher......................... Mae Goddard, McKendree......................... Mary Cummins, at home.......................... Elsie Davis, Woolworth's........................ Waller Aiken, hospital......................... Zelma Whitson, Mrs. Raymond Kuykendall......... Foster Smith, U. of I.......................... Maxine Smith, Mrs. G. E. Tucker................ Gertrude Bennet, fashion shop.................. .....Chicago, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. .W. Frankfort, III. W. Frankfort, 111. .....Chicago, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. .W. Frankfort, III. W. Frankfort, 111. .W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, III. ...F. Heights, 111. ...Champaign, 111. ,.W. Frankfort, 111. ...Champaign, 111. . W. Frankfort, III. W. Frankfort, III. W. Frankfort, III. ...Mt. Carmel, 111. . W. Frankfort, 111 ...Lake Worth, Fla. ..W. Frankfort, III. W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. .....St. Louis, Mo. ...St. Louis, Mo. ...Harrisburg, III. ...Detroit, Mich. W. Frankfort, 111. .....Jonesboro, 111. ...Carbondale, III ...Carbondale, III ...Champaign, 111. ......Chicago, III W. Frankfort, 111. ..........Anna, III. -W. Frankfort, III ...Carbondale, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. ........Lebanon, 111. ...W. Frankfort, 111. ...W. Frankfort, 111. St. Bcrnadina, Calif. ...W. Frankfort, III. .....Champaign, 111. ...W. Frankfort, 111. ...W. Frankfort, 111.CLASS OF ‘24—Continued Byron Fuller, U. of I..................................................Champaign, 111. Maud Dimmick, Mrs. Wilbur Wilson...................................W. Frankfort, 111. Wayne Parkhill, Filling Station....................................W. Frankfort, 111 Helen Peters, mine office..........................................W. Frankfort, 111. Blanche Summers, Plaster's Casteel Store.........................Thompsonville, 111. Julia Bulmer, teacher................................................Christopher, III. Max Kaiser, miner..................................................W. Frankfort, III. Clyde DeCastro, S. I. N. U............................................Carbondale, 111. Julian Porritt, miner..............................................W. Frankfort, III. Maggie White, at home..............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Dorothy Robinson, at home..........................................W. Frankfort, 111. Ruth Hays, teacher.................................................W. Frankfort, III. Thora Seal, S. I. N. U................................................Carbondale, III. Lucille Lee, Mrs. Bill Monti.......................................W Frankfort, 111. Mary Crawford, Cathedral of St. Mary's............................Garden City, N. Y. Ervin Sullivan, Walker's Store....................................W. Frankfort, III. Andrew Mabon, miner................................................W. Frankfort, 111. Heartley Arnett, post office......................................W. Frankfort, 111. Edward Syfert, miner...............................................W. Frankfort, III. Lela Vaught, Mrs. C. H. Mears............................................Herrin, 111. William Brummett, Joseph's Store..................................W. Frankfort, 111. Florence Crain, Mrs. William Brummett.............................W. Frankfort, 111. Bessie Murray, at home............................................W. Frankfort, 111. Buelah Summers, Bank Trust Co...................................W Frankfort, 111. Levi Russel, U. of I..................................................Champaign, 111. Ruth Willhite, teacher..................................... .......W. Frankfort, 111. Otto Mayer, farmer.................................................W. Frankfort, 111 Anela Ellis, Working Liberty Hospital.................................St. Louis, Mo. Jewell Richerson, working in bakery......................................Miami, Fla. Theone Lutz, stenographer........................................................... CLASS OF ’25 Gladys Austin, S. I. N. U................ George Taylor, at home................... Margaret Teague, McKendree College...... Clarence Miles, miner................... Howard Stelzricde, U. of I............... Lorenc Sawyer .......................... Ruth Eadie, S. I. N. U................... Teddy Williams ......................... Truman Calhoun, teacher................. Fred Gray, Columbia Candy Co............ Paul Randolph, S. I. N. U............... George Chaniot, Miliken................. Harold McCullough, miner................ Leitha Burkett, Stotlar Herrin Lumber Co Pauline Powell, Jacob it Lane Jewelry Co. Cora Dell White, Coalfield Store........ Gladys Harper, Dr. Estes Office......... Marion Dixon, at home................... Ellsworth Wilson, U. of I............... Merle Rineholtz, Crane College.......... Effie Moore, S. I. N. U................. Grace Mooneyham, stenographer........... ....Carbondale, 111 W. Frankfort, 111 ....Lebanon, 111 W. Frankfort, 111 ...Champaign, 111 Carbondale, 111 ........Vienna, 111 ...W. Frankfort, III ...Carbondale, 111 .......Decatur, 111 . W. Frankfort, 111 ...W. Frankfort, 111 ...W. Frankfort, 111 ...Christopher, III ...W. Frankfort, 111 ...W Frankfort, 111 ...Champaign, 111 .......Chicago, III ...Carbondale, III .......Chicago, IIICLASS OF '25—Continued Earl Brown, Plumblee's Store................ Elbert Durham, at home....................... Harry McClintock, Shurtleff College......... Lorena Bagley, Daily American................ Ella Bristow, telephone office.............. Ruth Blackard, Cline’s Drug Store........... Densil Hammond, Daily American............... Marion Harris, factory....................... Carthol Walston, Miliken..................... Ruth Glidwell, at home........................ Margaret Moore, Zwick's Store............... Helen White ................................. Russel Martin, at home....................... Pearle Norman, S. I. N. U.................... Helen Kuykendall, Parker’s Music Store........ Emerson Rankin ............................... Gaila Boren, stenographer.................... Viola Parkhill, stenographer................. Bessie Aud .................................. Floy Downes, Zwick's Store................... Dorothy Wilderman, stenographer.............. Cyrus Austin, Assistant Manager Woolworth's. Helen Mauldin, stenographer.................. Millage King ................................ Steve Brondas, U. of I....................... Annettie Whittington, S. I. N. U............. John McSparin ............................... Vesta Harper, Miliken........................ Walker Jones, Mercer College................. Ivan Lee, Lee Feed Store..................... Vernon Mahan, at home........................ Goldia Martin, stenographer.................. Royal Mooneyham, miner....................... Emma Murphy, bookkeeper...................... Carl Williams, at home....................... Harriet Gladders, Mrs. Arthur Durham......... Earl Bozarth, S. I. N. U..................... Emmett Dunn, traveling with orchestra........ Joseph Spires, Coalfield Store............... Buren Wallker. miner......................... Leone Wilson, W. F. Motor Finance Co......... Harold Harrison, U. of I..................... ...W. Frankfort, III. .........Orient, 111. .........Alton, 111 W. Frankfort, III. W. Frankfort, III. W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. .....St. Louis, Mo. .......Decatur, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. Cape Gerardo, Mo. ....Carbondale, 111. ...W. Frankfort, 111. Buena Vista, Fla. W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. ...W. Frankfort, 111. W. Palm Beach, Fla. Champaign, 111. Carbondale, III. .......Decatur, 111. .......Macon, Ga. W. Frankfort. III. ..W. Frankfort, 111. . W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, III. . W. Frankfort, 111. ........Orient, 111. ...Carbondale, III. W. Frankfort, 111. .W. Frankfort, 111. W. Frankfort, 111. ... Champaign, 111.115  MOONLIGHT RED BIRD CONFECTIONERIES Boosters of F. C. H. S. First, Last and Always The Best Home Made Candies and Ice Cream of the Finest Quality Light Lunches in Connection Red Bird Half Block West of High School MOONLIGHT CANDY CO. 116 r School Child: “Well, it’s had a had relapse!” Ted Eubanks: “Helen, dear, let's set our wedding date for next Friday night." Helen Dempsey: “Oh, hut 1 can’t. I’ve a date for that night.” And the little rabbits all exclaimed, "We're Game." Mane Rushing says: "Some dumb people won't get this one." If you don't like these jokes, And their dryness makes you groan. Just call around occasionally, With some good ones of your own. FEED FLOUR HAY CITY FLOUR COMPANY 117CAMPBELL HARDWARE COMPANY The Winchester Store QUALITY — SERVICE MASONIC BUILDING PHONE 171 FIRST CLASS SHOE REPAIRING Everything Electric An F. C. H. S. Booster J. W. GREENY Opposite P. O. FRANKFORT HEIGHTS John Sherman: “What practical use is derived from Geometry, such as judging a man's character, and the like?” Miss Helming: “Judge from the circle of his associates, investigate the line of his ancestors, and then you will have his sphere in life.” Freshman ................... Emerald Sophomore ................ Soapstone Junior .................. Grindstone Senior ................... Tombstone Caesar conquered nations, A mighty man was he; And in the second chapter. He nearly conquered me. Plumlee Plumlee PLEASING YOU Wholesale and Retail Means Success To Our Business General Merchandise, Dry Goods Preach Cleaning Co. Meats and Groceries a Specialty We Call For and Deliver To Phone 472 1201 E. Main St. All Parts of the City West Frankfort, 111. Phone 84Motor Oil—SHELL—Gasoline We Give Service First C. E. Pitch ford SERVICE STATION Son Girncr of State Road and Main "He said that I was a thing to adore.” “I guess he meant a knocker." “No, a belle.” Laura Keele. Were there any marrying men at the beach where you were?” Mary Jane: Yes, two ministers and a justice of peace.” What was the name of the last station we stopped at, mother?” I don t know, lie quiet. I'm working a cross-word puzzle.” It s a pity you don’t know the name, mother, because little Oscar got off the train there!” After School Is Over Thoughts Turn To a Home Let Us Help You Think and Plan Our Plan, Service and Personnel Are Always Yours PHONE 21 Stotlar---Herrin Lumber Companyn %. wr Jewell Williams INSURANCE Room B.ink and Trust Building PHONE 249 Evtrythinj; for the Car but the Engine West Frankfort Acc. Company R L. FLANNIGAN, Mgr. "You big honehead," shouted the construction superintendent to his Swede foreman, "I told you to fire that man and you hit him with an ax! Well, boss, does ax she have sign, ‘For fire only'!" Miss Anderson: "How did you get along with your French in Paris? Miss Laura Hess: “Wonderful! I found two women from Chicago who could understand me!" Edna Henson: "Gleason, I hope 1 didn't sec you smiling at that creature who just passed." "Brute” Lee: “I hope you didn’t, M’ dear. Bill Pharis: "What if your mother would see us here in the dark1 Revalee Kieth: "My mother is not a cat!" Ralph Roberts: "1 never saw such dreamy eyes." Eloise Avis: "You never stayed so late." A gentleman of Jewish descent was required to fill out a registration blank ,iik1 after deep thought he answered the questions as follows: Name: Abraham Cohn. Bom: Yes. Business: Rotten. Mr. Smith: “Why are you late to my class every day?" Everett Mitchell: "The rest of the class comes too early." The Herrin Supply Co. Drayer Electric and Hardware Company The Best Place to Shop After All 226 East Main St.—Phone 6 LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR General Hardware—-Devo Paints and Varnishes Millinery, Dry Goods and Notions Dennison Shop and Variety Store Upstairs Western Electric and May Tag Washing Machines Atwater Kent Radios Electrical Contracting and Supplies 120 STRAND—REX THE HOUSE OF SUPERIOR ATTRACTIONS “ONLY THE BEST" The sweet young thing had broken her glasses. She took the remains of them back to the optometrist. ‘Tve broken my glasses," she said. “Do I have to be examined all over again?" The young optometrist sighed: “No," he answered, "Just your eyes." Mrs. Roberts: “Is your son going to college next fall?" Mrs. Dove: "He hasn't said, but he has bought a second hand ukulele." Senior: “Do you know what a test is?" Freshie: “A test is a period of rest for the teacher." Mi ss Briscoe: "A fool can ask more questions than a wise man can answer." Roy McGowan: “Yes, that's why I flunked in my last exam." “Is there no cure for lovesickness?" asked Arnett Lewis of the doctor one day. "Yes," spoke the doctor in words of wisdom and with dismay, “Let the boys alone, and go back to your toys and play." ' Here lies the remains of Paul Smith, (He was in an awful fix) He helped the Seniors put out an annual In Nineteen Hundred Twenty-six. "John, Charles, William," cried the boys’ mother, "where are those peaches I left here?" “In our midst," returned the boys. 121West Frankfort Pure Milk Company 408 EAST MAIN PHONE 286 Where Quality, Service and Satisfaction Meet PASTEURIZED MILK AND CREAM Delivery To All Parts of the City Miss Sleadd: “My father gives me a book every year on my birthday." Mr. Smith: “My, what a large library you must have." ' “Sir, how did you dare kiss me?” “Well, it was rather dark and I didn't get a very good look at you." A TOAST “To the ladies," said the bootlegger, looking at the address on the package. WHOA ANDY! “The Bulgarians have gone to war against the Greeks.” “Well it’s about time somebody did. Their prices are terrible.” “Poor John, he didn't graduate from Harvard.” “Why not?” "'Cause he went to Yale.” Carl Taylor: “Say, Fritz, what's a bigamist?” "Fritz” Mitchell: “A bigamist, son, is a guy with enough nerve to out-talk two ten.” “Be sheeted,” said the Kleagle to the Klansman. “I can’t see any of this stuff,” said Milton, as he dictated “Paradise Lost.” “Can you tie that?" yelled the crowd when the score was 7-0. J. V. WALKER SONS Incorporated 122THE WOODWAY IS THE RIGHT WAY IFoodway Stores, Inc. Stores in A 'I West Frankfort, Benton, Johnston City, Christopher and Ziegler THE WOOD WAY IS THE RIGHT WAY SHOEMARKET 206 East Main Street WEST FRANKFORT’S LEADING SHOE STORE Footwear For Every Member of the Family RUBE LASKY AL CANTOR Mr. Thompson (Eng. 4, making an explanation): “Now watch the board while 1 run through it for you." "Just cutting up a bit," remarked George Washington as his father spied him near the Cherry tree. Bible: “Why did Moses take the tablets?" Daze: “He had a headache." Fairy Davis: “Don’t you hate crowds?” Margaret Rushing: "Do I? At the last football game I fainted and had to walk three miles before I could fall down.” Willie: “The old folks are playing football in there." Billie: "How do you know?" Willie: “I just heard pa yell that grandma had kicked off." POLITE? Helen D.: “They say you have a good ear for music." Mary Jane: "Yes? Never mind, keep right on playing." Wooda (at the Red Bird): “Waiter, there's a feather in my sausage.” Joe (soothingly): “Oh, that’s all right. It was made from a bird dog." Teacher: “Write a theme of three thousand words." Edna Henson: “I don't know that many." B. F. J. Furniture Co. Furniture, Stoves, Rugs Musical Instruments Edison s ■sJSSL Phone 129 311-13 East Main St. Call at E. R. Brown Furniture Co. West Frankfort’s Leading Store We Guarantee Our Prices With Any Concern Your Home Furnished Complete Phone 105 403-405 E. Main St. 124 Gifts for bung Men Who Graduate This Month NO GIFT is more appreciated by the young man who graduates than the gift of a fine, reliable watch, for it is destined to be his constant companion through life. In selecting a watch, make certain that you choose one that is worthy of the occasion, and qualified to render satisfactory timekeeping service for years to come. Waldemar chains, scarf pins, cuff links, smokers' accessories, rings, either heavy gold signet or set with semi-precious stones, as well as numerous other gift articles from our comprehensive displays will be welcomed by the young man who graduates. Selected at this store and bearing our name, a guarantee of correctness in style and worthiness of quality, your graduation gift will be doubly appreciated. Jacobs-Lane Co., Inc., Jewelers - Optometrists 125 Try Our Special Sunday We Guarantee Our Vulcanizing To Outlast the Tires DINNER Goodrich, Kelly and Dunlop We Make All Our Pastries TIRES CARTER CAFE Kokomo Tire Co. Logan and Main Sts. 102 West Main St. Phone 582-W “Peggy" Henderson: “Do you know how to approach a girl with a past?” Elmus Miles: “How?” “Peggy": “With a present." Sea Captain (to Bill, leaning over ship's side): “Weak stomach, lad?" Bill Golden (nervously): “Well, ain't I putting it as far as the rest of them7" Minister (to one of his flock): “Drunk!" Drunk: “Hurray, sho'm I!” Dean Fly: “What's this Spencerian pen 1 hear so much about?" Hal Karnes: “That's where they send forgers.” Edna Henson: “I wouldn't think of marrying such an intellectual monstrosity and physical misfit as you are—you numbskull! Do you get me?” Brute Lee: “Well, from the general trend of your conversation, I should judge not.” Elbert: “You got a letter from your girl today.” His roommate (just coming in): “Did I7 What did she say?" F. A. Wilson: “If Mr. Simpson calls today tell him I'm out.” Edith Bcauford: “Yes, sir." F. A. Wilson: “And don't be doing any work or he won't believe you." Mr. Luce: “It’s a rough district. I think I'll carry my revolver." Mrs. Luce: “You poor dumb-bell! And have that stolen too?” E. V. SIMPSON PLUMBING AND HEATING Agent For Ideal Areola Heating Systems and Ideal Veco Stoves 111 NORTH EMMA ST. 126"THE BANK THAT SERVICE BUILT” The West Frankfort Bank and Trust Company RESOURCES $1,000,000 We Grew Up With Our Clients But Not Away From Them” FIRST NATIONAL BANK WEST FRANKFORT, ILL. The Friend of Community High Since Its Inception out. Doctor: “Congratulations, Governor, you're the father of triplets." Governor: “I demand a recount." Photographer: "Watch the camera and you'll see a pretty little dickey bird come Modem Child: “Oh, don't be an ass; expose the plate and let's get this thing "Why are the men working on the stadium crying?" “The plans call for it to be built in tiers.” Robylee S.: 'Tell me, what does the Christmas tree stand for?” Helen D.: "Well, it would look sort of silly lying down." Senior (after paddling Freshman): "You can sit down now." Freshie: “Liar!" Miss Helming (explaining diagram): "Can everybody see my figure?’ "Oh!” Edna Maddox: “Are all these jokes original?" Louise Miles: "No, I made them up myself." David, vere are my glasses?" “On your nose, fadder.” "Don't be so indefinite!" 128 BOSTONIAN SHOES FOR MEN AND YOUNG MEN Styles That Stay Arsht’s Shoe Store A Dress For THE Occasion And to Suit the Chami of the Individual MISS THE FASHION SHOP EXCLUSIVE WEARING APPAREL AND ACCESSORIESMALLORY HATS Packard, W. L. Douglas and Glove Grip Shoes Cooper’s and Allen A Underwear and Hosiery Hall Mark and Wilson Shirts ZWICK MERC. CO. ■+ LADIES’ DRESSES In All the New Shades and Materials Prices: £4.95 to £24.75 LADIES’ HATS Chick New Styles in all Hi Shades and Fancy Patterns £2.95 to £4.95 Ours is the Outstanding Dry Goods Department of Egypt If It's New We Have It ZWICK MERC. CO. THE STORE THAT REALLY SAVES YOU MONEY 130BURG’S SMART WEAR FOR WOMEN “Why do you keep Pearl's picture in your watch?” Leslie Dimmick: "I think she'll get to love me in time.” Raymond Medlin: “Great Scott, I've forgotten who wrote ‘Ivanhoe’.” Earl Duncan: “I'll tell you if you'll tell me who in the Dickens wrote 'The Tale of Two Cities'." Aileen Blake: “Oh, John, why did you ever fall for me?” John Flanigan: “I guess your line was just low enough to trip me." Teacher: “What was the charge of Gettysburg?" James Wilson: “$30.00, and Pa called the garage man a robber.” • Leonard East: “Oh, what would this world be without women?” George Potts: “Stagnation." Mr. French: “Did you want me to take your picture?" Elmer Me.: “No, I wanted to get one.” Edith Beauford: “Do you support any charity?” F. A. Wilson: “Yes, I've a son in college.” ' Mr. Ebbler: “How long can a man live without brains?" Gleason L.: “Why, er how old are you, Mr. Ebbler?" Elma Taylor says that a calorie is the amount of heat required to raise the tern-perature to a pound of butter. We all ask in unison, “What next?" FISHER’S FLOWER SHOP Phone 169 J Carp Company Offers The Newest in Young Men's SUITS at 131 Shari Toilet Products Artstyle Variety Chocolates Symphony Royale Stationer}' A Good Drug Store CLINE’S The Rexall Store Young Folks and Old Folks are all Patrons at Our Store KODAKS- CIGARS- CAND Y SODA-SPORTING GOODS Cara Nome Toilet Goods Klenzo Dental Products Rexall and Pure Test Commodities Man calling a bluff: “Here Cliff, Here Cliff." “Puny” Wilson: “Did you ever take souvenir spoons from hotels?" Andy Hiducks: “Not so's you can notice it.” Ray Jones: “What color is that red dummy?” In advanced Algebra Miss Slead was inquiring about the root of an equation. Miss Sleadd: “Why is the value of X, (the unknown) called the root of an equation?” Thurman Teague: “Because it's the end of it.” A Senior—Deep wisdom, swelled head, Brain fever. He's dead. A Junior—Fair one, Hopes fled; Heart busted, he’s dead. A Soph. —Played football, ‘Nuff said, Broke his neck. He's dead. A Freshie—Milk famine, Not fed; Starvation, He’s dead. I saw a loving couple. By moonlight shadows screened; I could not help but notice How singular they seemed. BERNARD HAMPTON W. A. KELLY Class of 1914 HAMPTON KELLY Sells For Less DRY GOODS—SHOES—GROCERIES 132 122 WEST MAIN STREET WEST FRANKFORT, ILLS.If It’s New We Have It We Are Headquarters For STETSON HATS MANHATTAN SHIRTS HART, SCHAFNER MARX CLOTHES JOSEPH’S The Store for the I,ad and his Dad A H. JOSEPH LEO KRAUSE, Mgr. LIMMERICK Wholesale Grocery and Sanitary Meat Market We Sell Cheaper Because We Buy Cheaper Phone 540 Free Delivery A dusky son of Alabama was busily engaged in a cootie hunt, when asked by a Sergeant what he was doing. He replied: I se a huntin fo’ dem ’rithmetic bugs.” "Why do you call them Arithmetic bugs?" Cause dey add to ma misey, dey subtracts from ma pleasure, dey divides ma attention and dey multiply like hell.” Debs, did you try putting an iron in your bed last night to warm it?" Yes, mom, and I had the iron almost warm by morning." Mr Barren to Harry: "Harry, mein son, why for you go der stairs up two at a “To save mein shoes, foder." “Veil, he careful you don't shplit your pants." Sugar is sugar And salt is salt; If you laugh at this, It's your own darn fault. J. H. BARTER For Good Photographs As Good as the Best and Better Than The Rest T. H. GILCHRIST GROCERIES AND MEATS Fresh Vegetables of all Kinds Phone 451 714 East Main St. Ill South Monroe St. West Frankfort, 111.Bowyer Hardware and Furniture Company BED ROOM SUITES LIVING ROOM SUITES Hardware, Stoves, Rugs and Linoleums THE HOME OF THE EDISON TELEPHONE 253 206 EAST MAIN “Girls," remarked George Barter, “are prettier than men "Why naturally,” Rachel exclaimed. "No," George corrected her, “Artificially." Bunny O'C.: "What’s on your mind?" Ralph R.: "Lots." Bunny: “I'll bet that they are vacant." Ted Davis says: “Some girls are homeless, but others are homeless than others. Bill S.: “I don't think that I deserve a zero." Teacher: "I don't either, but that's the lowest mark that I am allowed to give.” “Hurrah!” exclaimed Bob Casey (one of the famous Casey brothers): Febru' ary has only four bath nights.” Miss McNary: “Have you done your outside reading yet?’ Mac Fox: "No, it’s been too cold.” Frankfort Heights Candy Company All Kinds of CANDIES AND DRINKSDodge Brothers Motor Vehicles Beauty, Comfort and Dependability GARRISON MOTOR COMPANY PHONE 233 209-11 WEST MAIN ST. ODE TO ELMA TAYLOR Nothing is more pitiful, taking in consideration all rice, than for a Sophomore girl, in Cooking Class to find a worm in the rice. A dispute arose between two old ladies as to the name of the music the band was playing. It s the overture from ‘The Mostersingers'." Rubbish! declared the second, “I should think I know the 'Prelude from Lok-engrin' when I hear it!" As neither would give in, number one consulted a notice board. We re both wrong, she announced on returning, "It’s ‘Refrain from Spitting’." I hear that James left everything he had to an orphans’ asylum." Is that so? What did he leave?" Twelve children." Fritz Mitchell: "What is your chief worry? “Musty" ditto: "Money.” “Fritz ’: "I didn t know you had any.” “Musty": "I haven’t." Daisy MRS. S. J. HOULLE Holland Bru n sw ick—Pan et ropes 3200 East Main We Clothe The Tiny Tots Phone 41R Phonographs and RecordsCOLE GLOYD “PAINTERS IN FACT" 322 East Main West Frankfort's exclusive paint and wall paper store. We are sole agents for Sherman-Williams paints and varnishes in West Frankfort. Also the best and newest in wall papers. Remember our store as the place where you can get practical advice on any job of painting. Reliable Contractors of Painting and Decorating Mr. Wallace: "What are you giggling at? Are you laughing at me?" Class: “No, sir." Mr. Wallace: "Well, what else is there in this room to laugh at?" Puny Wilson: "I sure knocked 'em cold in my courses." Bill Golden: “What did you get?" Puny: “Zero.” Maxine R.: "Did you ever take chloroform?" Mildred B.: “No. Who teaches it?" Freshie: “When do the leaves begin to turn?" Soph: “The night before an exam." This apeared in a Freshman's composition on the civil war: "General Lee had on a fine uniform, shiny sword and spurs, while General Grant had nothing on but a ragged old Union suit." T. B. Spence and Co. c. c. c. Up-To-Date Merchandise Get the Best with the Rest Dry Goods, Work Clothing, Notions Toasted Sandwiches And Shoes For Everybody Columbia Candy Co. 212 East Main St. West Frankfort, 111.Wishing You All the Happiness and Success That Life May Hold in Store For You GARDNER JEWELRY COMPANY THE GlFf SHOP “True Love", as quoted by Lindell Boner: A glance A dance Entrance Advance Romance Finance. Peggy Henderson (to librarian): "Could I take “Lorna Doone" out tonight?" Ed Stephens: “Don't answer him—I think he is trying to pompous." Victim: “Can you help me out with this problem?" Mr. Tucker: “I would but I don't think it would be right." Prof.: “When did Vergil die?" Stewed-dent: “51 A. B.” “A. B ! Don't you mean B. C.?” “No, sir, 51 A. B.—51 years after birth." Miss Hackett: “Earl, tell me what you know about the age of Elizabeth. Earl (sleepily): “She'll be 18 her birthday." HOTEL DIMMICK F. W. DIMMICK, Prop. 56 Rooms—Private Bath Rate SI.50—£2.00 209 East Main St. Egyptian Cleaners and Dyers L. H. HENSON, Prop. We Call for and Deliver Phone 349 West Frankfort, IllinoisCity Meat Market MANTINO LEONE, Props. Fresh Meats, Groceries, Fruits, Vegetables, Etc. Telephone 68 130 East Main St. Lady to Mr. Luce, in booth: "Look here, you've been in there 30 minutes and haven’t said a word.” Mr. Luce: “I've been talking to my wife.” He: “I just went out to get a breath of air.” She: "Yes, I can smell it.” Hamilton Furniture Co. 214 West Main BUY NOW—PAY LATER Cash If You Have It Credit If You Want It Dum: "When you were in Europe I suppose you saw the great tracts of barren waste.” Dummer: “Yes, he has a wonderful estate.” Wooda: "Marry you? Why you low-down, dirty scoundrel. Oh to think why. I’ll call my father.” Suitor: “Am I to take this as a refusal?” Wun: “Asona is always in Fashion.” : “I hope to strangle; she's so up to date she gets spring fever in October." “I say, Hydrocephalus, get your mind out of the gutter." “No, Clepshydra, I refuse to curb my mentality." 138LLOYD L. PARKER THE MUSIC MAN For Everything in Music 224 EAST MAIN STREET Frankie D.: "I don't love Mildred anymore.” "Have a quarrel?" Frankie D.: “No, I broke my arm." Ralph Eddie: "What’s an usher?" Otto Russell: "The guy who takes the leading part at the theatre. Louise Miles: "Mother, I can’t go to school today." Mrs. Miles: “Why?” Louise: "I don't feel well." Mrs. Miles: "Where don’t you feel well?" Louise: "In school." E. B. Pharis Insurance of All Kinds 108 South Emma Phone 363 We Clean Anything Elk Cleaners Dyers JOHNNIE CROCKER, Prop. Work Called For and Delivered 106 South Emma Phone 419 Quality—Courtesy—Service Coalfield Company Home of Richelieu Brand Foods They Satisfy Free Delivery System COALFIELD COMPANY Quality—Courtesy—Service Hudson Coach $1259.00 Essex Coach $ 829.00 Delivered Includes, Bumpers, Front and Rear, Electric Wind Shield Wiper, Stop Light and Mirror. Modern Garage 306 W. Main Phone 324“JAHN OLLIER AGAIN FINE annuals, like brilliant victories, are brought about by the co-ordination of skillful generalship and trained effort. The Jahn Ollier Engraving Co. is America's foremost school annual designing and engraving specialist, because in its organization are mobilized America’s leading creative minds and mechanical craftsmen. THE JAHN OLLIER ENGRAVING CO. Photographers, Artists and Makers of Fine Printing Plates for Black and Colors 817 W. Washington Blvd., Chicago 140AUTOGRAPHSaWe do it all and do it well” For sixteen years many annual staffs have found that annuals are successful only when the responsibility for the production of the book is placed with one organization. We plan, design, engrave, print and bind annuals under one roof and one supervision. Service to the editor, the business manager and the entire annual staff in the form of personal and written instructions and in the creation of new ideas is rendered by men who understand all phases of annual work. staff of artists, capable of grasping the spirit of your school life and transferring it with pencil and brush to the pages of your book, is ready to assist you. Skilled engravers are here. Eager, they are, to use their knowledge of the production of fine printing plates in engraving your book. r in ting craftsmen, typographers, pressmen, binderymen all familiar through years of experience with the problems of annual publication, will complete the work of making your year book a worthy achievement. LET US TELL YOU HOW WE CAS HELP YOU PUBLISH A SUCCESSFUL BOOK Keller'Crescent Company Artists—Engravers—Printers—Binders High School and College Annual Specialists EVANSVILLE,.......................INDIANAx'l— -Vs-r IP (_ i V 'V yrwagpw-vj Tfs j 7 »« ' jj7)lrw'f fr , irf vO 9 l1' 'u


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Frankfort Community High School - Red Bird Yearbook (West Frankfort, IL) online yearbook collection, 1921 Edition, Page 1

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Frankfort Community High School - Red Bird Yearbook (West Frankfort, IL) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

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Frankfort Community High School - Red Bird Yearbook (West Frankfort, IL) online yearbook collection, 1925 Edition, Page 1

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Frankfort Community High School - Red Bird Yearbook (West Frankfort, IL) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

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Frankfort Community High School - Red Bird Yearbook (West Frankfort, IL) online yearbook collection, 1928 Edition, Page 1

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Frankfort Community High School - Red Bird Yearbook (West Frankfort, IL) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.