Fountain Hill High School - Memoirs Yearbook (Bethlehem, PA)

 - Class of 1938

Page 1 of 104

 

Fountain Hill High School - Memoirs Yearbook (Bethlehem, PA) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 104 of the 1938 volume:

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MEMCDIQS l'11l1l1'.vl1U4I If-x' Hu' .Sl lvinr L'l41xx uf l"n1rlll411'1l llill lliflh .Yfluml VOLUME TWO NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT FOREWORD To YOU, THE MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED THIRTY- EIGHT, THE STAFF PRESENTS THIS RESULT 'OF ITS EFFORTS. THE NINETEEN HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT EDITION OF MEMOIRS, WITH THE HOPE THAT IT WILL RECALL FOND MEMORIES OF FRIENDS AND ASSO- CIATES IN THE FUTURE. t I DEDICATIGN To MR. ELMER F. GREENE, OUR PRINCIPAL. TEACHER, GUIDE, AND FRIEND. WE THE CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED THIRTY- EIGHT, DEDICATE THIS SECOND VOLUME OF OUR YEARBOOK MEMOIRS. MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIG lAXClCf1OVVl2ClSmCfltS HE Memoirs Staff wishes to express its gratitude and appreci- ation to the following people who have so generously aided in the preparation of this book: Mr. Elmer F. Greene for his splendid cooperation. Miss S. Ruth Funk for her supervision of the art material in the book. Mr. Theodore A. Brown for his helpful criticism. Eleanor Landis, Claire Jacoby, and Gerald Bac-hman for their contribution to the Junior section. Mr. Gribbin's Senior Typing Class for their assistance in the preparation of the copy. Mr. David McCaa and Mr. Donald McCaa, photographers. Mr. R. J. Barton of Jahn and Ollier Engraving Company. Mr. Earl M. Schaffer of Lehigh Printing Corporation. Francis Bender, Francis Brown, Doris English, Harvey Moser, Philomena Oricko, Bertha Pongracz, Congretta Ronca, and Earl Sugg for their helping hand in the preparation of write-ups. eight TABLE OF CONTENTS MR. STETTLER'S MESSAGE MR. GREENES MESSAGE ' FACULTY A CLASSES ACTIVITIES HuMoR Y V ADVERTISING EMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT l 0 you, members of the Class of 1938, I extend congratulations on your completion of our High School course and to you I extend my sincerest wishes for success in whatever field of activity your further endeavors may be. It has been my privilege to work with you as teacher and as principal, with many of you through the Grades, the Junior High and the High School: with others only a comparatively short time. I have always been deeply interested in your progress and in your welfare. Now that you leave our school, I hope and trust that you will exert a strong influence for good wherever you may be, that you have the courage to do that which is right, that you are determined to "carry through" though many obstacles may beset, though there may be many hours of discourage-ment and even failure. May you make an earnest eifort to be of service to those about vou and may you do your part, humble as it may be, to help to solve the many problems that cause the unrest of today and the ap- prehension for the future. Thus will you prove to be true alumni of the school. .IouN S. S'rE'r'rLr:1:, Supervising Principal. ten NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO 0 thc mcmhcrs of this class my curncst wish is that you usc in Iifc thosc principles which huvc hccn taught to you in school. Your school has tricd to offer you za choicc of knowledge which you nccd for carrying on daily uctivitics in life. Yvhether or not you will succccd in your lifcis undcrtuking depends upon how you apply this knowledge. Each one of you has my best wish for fl happy future. XVll11t0Vl'T walk of lifc you choosc. may your :u-tions bring an honor to yoursclf and to your school. HLMER I". Gm-:ENr:, High School Iiflllfilllll. 1'li'r'cu EMO RS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Theodore A. Brown A pleasing personality and a cheerful dis- position have made Mr. Brown the confidant of the Class of '38. Chosen by them as class adviser, he has unceasingly devoted his time to their interests. Following his graduation from Moravian College with a B.A. degree. Mr, Brown began his teaching career at Fountain Hill in 1933. The gratitude of the Class oi' '38 is extended to Mr. Brown and Miss Sand, to whose combined efforts it owes the success of its activities. Nellie I. Sand Miss Sand, although a comparatively new addition to the faculty, had no difliculty in winning her way into the hearts of the Seniors as is shown by the fact that she was chosen as one ol' their class advisers. She came to Fountain Hill two years ago after having re- ceived a B.S. degree in Physical Education at West Chester State Teachers' College. The Class ol' '38 deeply appreciates the interest she has shown in all its undertakings. Anna May Todd Another reason for Fountain Hill High School's reputation for a capable faculty is Miss Todd. She assumed her teaching duties at Fountain Hill in 1929, previous to which she graduated from Moravian Seminary and College for Women with a B.A. degree. She has since received an M.A. degree at Lehigh University. To the untiring and invaluable guidance and assistance ot' Miss Todd, the Seniors of '38 are deeply indebted for their yearbook. Irrrlfw' ETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO The Faculty I'llIlll'I' I". ciY't'l'lli"" l'ri11z.-ipal Zoltan B. Hiro---Social Sfll!llI'S 'lllll'0d0I'L' A. BrownfI'fl1gli.s'l1 fllarla-s O. lJ!iVlt'S-IIIIIIIS1Tifll .Iris Kathryn H. Dcily--iflonuf 1'JCOIlfIIlIiC'N Philip li. Ewing-Plzlysiral Iizlucnlimz Dorothy I.. l'lUSti'F+fl07lI7lIf'7'Ci!II Szllnjrclx S. Ruth Funk-.Alrf Joseph Q. CiY'll7l5iYlilllIIlIlVII'l'CiIII fSIllIli!'l'f-Y Vvrnu K. JJlYR'Vll'li'flllIlINI-I'l'Cll1Z SlllDjl'CfS Elwood S. xIllln'I'+ffl'l'IlI!lll um! Hand Mary R. Hobinsonffllusic Nc-llio I. Sandf--I'l1y.vir'z1I I':IlIll'IlflUll Je-nm-ttc M. Stclllyivljlrrariarz Myron StQ'l.tlCY'+SCil'IICl'.Y Anna Nlay Todd-Lzzlin and Frwnclz Gcorgv VV. WH-lrlm, .lI'.-JlIIf1lf'NII!fiCS Ill IIVYLTII - x '- Lt? J - Q V .1 g fmniiiiiiz, 4' s ., . .u6ds.r.i' 'u..ue.mn:zLz-L nr-In SENIQQS 3 I s a 2 I K NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO Senior Class History HE Class of 1938 launclled its meteoric career in high school as Sophomores of the Fountain Hill Junior-Senior High School. At the outset of our initial year as high school students, we, as undergraduates, were deemed too lowly to aspire to the privilege of electing class officers for the current year. Thus, when we entered our Sophomore year, we were at a twofold disadvantage since, besides the above, we had no senior class to guide us along the way. 1 The inauguration of the twelfth year of high school at Fountain Hill severed all hopes that our class would follow in the foot- .steps of our predecessors. In accordance with the custom of junior classes the following ofhcers were elected for the ensuing year: Chester Klotz, presidentg George Spangenberg, vice presi- dent, Marion Muhr, secretaryg James Moyer,'treasurer. Our Junior year was a most exciting one, with thelfollowing events standing out in our memories: the Jundra Club production of three one-act plays under the able coaching of Miss Kathryn Deily, and the high-light of the entire Junior year, the Junior Prom, which found most of the Junior debs in their first evening gowns and the boys in their best bib and tucker. Our Junior year was brought to a dramatic close with the receiving of our class jewelry in time to sport it at our Junior Prom. seventeen MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGH September 8, 1937 ushered in a new era of learning for us as Seniors, when we marched through the portals of the new and magnificent Fountain Hill High School for the first time. Our entrance into the new school also ushered in a new set of student rules and regulations such as: no loitering, no gum chewing, no date making in halls, and no two-way traffic. All in all we had a swell time. With the aid and assistance of our ever-faithful faculty we finally mastered the one-way traffic and learned how to "jimmy" our lockers. After the first few days of hubbub had subsided, we settled down to real business and elected the following officers for the Senior Class: Frank Mohap, president, Edward Mittal, vice- president, Marion Muhr, Secretary, Francis Bender, treasurer. Our Senior year at high school was the most enjoyable of all. We sponsored many successful functions including the sensational Class Minstrel, "Shirt Sleeves," Geraldine Snyder's Dance Revue, theater benefits, and the Senior Ball. The close of the Senior year found us in the usual hustle and bustle of being fitted for caps and gowns, thus consummating our high school years, which, we are sorry to state, went faster than anyone had anticipated. It is with regret that we terminate these happiest days of our lives, bearing this thought in mind - that we, the Senior Class of 1988, are the first Senior Class to graduate from the newly erected Fountain Hill High School. MAmoN E. Munn, '38. eighteen IIXIDIVIDUAIS I ' Fel vm , H. -sy ,-...f , - 'IF-1 ' 35 Q-1:3 - f' if 1 .' ,. ' . Tiff S 9 'jffsi QF. 4, 1 M If ej- - A N ', w., if :-J '11 ' ll 62" 's qv-,rv Xl K ?, ie ,. Q, F'-5-1. w .,,, ,l . R 1. R ,d Q 1 L F' ' U 1 .4 , AP 354, :4. I- P , at-5 I . Iwgyz- 1, I 4 NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO R Francis Paul Bender "Boy" "Bender" "Extra! Extra! Read all about it." Francis Bender is peddling the school paper again. Usually a quiet and reserved person, he's right in there cheering for all he's worth where the Tatler is concerned. If this boy continues in this same line of activity with his usual enthusiasm, Fountain Hill will soon have its own newspaper. Commercial Course Basketball 45 Class Treasurer 45 Tatler Staff 2, 3, 4. Stephen Bobick "Steve" "Bobick" Here is a boy who usually seems very quiet to strangers, but to his friends, he is just the opposite. One may usually find him at the roller skating rinks when no other pastime presents itself. Although a cheerleader, this boy is the safety valve on our wild spirits of excitement during a tense game, for no matter how excited others may be, he is per- petually calm. Commercial Course Cheerleader 2, 3, 4g Tatler Staff 23 Glee Club 2, 3, Dancing Club 4g Science Club 3. Edward Franklin Brown "Brun" Three years ago Brownie came to us from Salisbury Township Schools. He is an unas- suming individual who goes about his business with an air of confidence. He is rather short of stature and of quiet disposition. Although we know nothing of his plans for the future, wi wish him success in whatever he under- ta es. Commercial Course Athletic Club 2, 33 Glee Club 43 Industrial Arts Theatre Club 4. trvrnty-orlc MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Francis Brown "Pete" When a humorous remark is made in class, there is always one laugh that is more audible than the others - this is Pete's. Pete is the type that will laugh at any joke or pun. As to talent, we know he has an abundance of it in the form of the ability to play a red-hot trumpet, for its notes have been introduced to us many times in various programs and orchestras. Pete hopes to become a famous trumpet-player. Commercial Course Dramatic Club 4, Athletic Club 2, 33 Band 3, 4g A. A. Council 4g Glee Club 43 Star- dusters 2, 3. Anna Bruno "Anne" Quietness, reserve and good nature are Anna's most prominent characteristics. Anna is the type of girl whose appealing smile. and friendly disposition have won her the friend- ship of all her classmates. Anna has not re- vealed her plans for the future, but we know she has the ability to do almost anything well, and we're quite certain she'11 fulfill our ex- pectations. Commercial Course Home Economics Club 23 Dancing Club 4. Norman LeRoy Carl "Yok" Probably the most remarkable part of this dreamy-eyed boy's anatomy is his pair of artistic hands. These hands have enabled him to create marvelous works of art. Studies in charcoal, in oil, in water-color, trinkets in copper, in wood, in clay-- all these and more are created by this prodigy of Miss Funk. A prize won at the Allentown Fair this past year is proof that his talents are already being recognized. Commercial Course Band 3, 4, Art Club 2, 3, 4. twenty-two NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO R Frank J. Csrnko "Duke" When you hear the girls talking about a well-dressed lad, you can be sure they mean Frank. His customarily neat attire proves to us that he knows his fashions. He has a quiet manner about him, but this doesn't fool any- one. We know that he can be the life of the party. Some day Frank will be a model for what the well-dressed man is wearing. Commercial Course Science Club 35 Athletic Club 2. Marjorie Delp "Bebe" "Delpy,' 'tThe score was 6-3, 6-25 we knew she'd win." When you hear anything like that, you can be sure they are talking about Marg. If anyone can play tennis, Margy surely can. For the last two years she has been our ten- nis champion. Aside from being a tennis star, she is an industrious person. Someday she may be the center of attraction on the famous courts of Wimbledon. Commercial Course Glee Club 2, 3, 4g Tatler Staff 4. James Eddinger "Jimmy" Jimmy is the prodigal son of the Senior Class. He left us during his freshman year to attend another high school, but returned to us for his senior year. His willingness to participate in all school affairs has helped him to re-establish himself as one of the top ranking fellows in our class. Jimmy's main ambition is to become a crooner for a well- known radio orchestra. General Course Science Club 4g Dancing Club 4. twenty-thrc MOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Doris Louise English "Dar" "Dorie" Doris is one of the most attractive girls in the Senior Class. Although of a rather quiet disposition, she's always full of fun. Her out- standing abilities are centered around music and designing. As Fountain Hill's nightingale, her golden voice has thrilled many an eager audience and we all sincerely hope that we may often have the pleasure of hearing her in the future. General Course Cheerleader 23 Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4, Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Michael J. Ford Jr. "Mike" Tall, blond, and as happy-go-lucky as he is big, Mike is the most carefree member of our class. We know that the serious expres- sion on his face, as he rambles through the halls, is there only to fool the faculty. Gen- erally rather quiet, he is always ready with a wise remark. If appearance or manner of dress has any influence on careers, his lies in the field of journalism. Commercial Course Athletic Club 23 Tatler Staff 3, 45 Harmonica Club 2. Dorothy Gaal "Dot" "D. A." Dot, dash and dimples- these personify Dorothy. She's that chubby imp with the funny giggle. Dorothy knows how to take her part in everything, especially in an argument. Call on Dorothy for anything around Fountain Hill and she will bounce right in the middle of it. She would like to take up art and we feel sure she will be successful in it or any other career she chooses. Scientihc Course Dramatic Club 45 Memoirs Staff 43 Glee Club 2, 3, 45 Debate Club 2, 3, Oratorical Contest 2, 35 Basketball 2, 4. twnly-fum' NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO Michael Geiger "Micky " A whistle blows, the game begins, and on the court you will be sure to find "Micky." Geiger, a stockily built youth, is one of our outstanding athletes whose popularity renders an introduction unnecessary. If an amiable personality and outstanding athletic ability make for success,Geiger's possibilities are un- limited. Scientific Course Basketball 3, 4g Science Club 43 Athletic Club 3: A. A. Vice President 3, President 4. Evelyn Pauline Hafner "Evey" Herels one girl in the Senior Class who thinks so much of Fountain Hill that for two years she has come from West Bethlehem to attend our school. Evelyn can always be counted upon to give the correct answer to any question asked. She is one of the few commercial students achieving a "A" average consistently. Her classical features and sec- retarial ability will make her a striking asset to any office. Commercial Course Dramatic Club 33 Memoirs Staff 43 Tatler Staff 4. Betty Ann Hagy "Bets" Betty is our small but vivacious brunette with a super-abundance of personality. She possesses a "gift of gab," which is always utilized to its utmost extent. Her energy, however, is not entirely consumed by talking, since dramatics and gum chewing also take their shar.e of her time. We hope she will continue to talk her way into everyone's heart. Commercial Course Dramatic Club 3, 43 Memoirs Staff 45 Glee Club 3, 45 Oratorical Contest 2. tum-n ty-fi'z'r MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Thomas Haney "Speed" "Bill" This well-proportioned gentleman belongs to that group of the fortunate few who can wear anything in clothes and look very well dressed. His "Esquirean" appearance plus a very genial personality Knot to mention his cute boyish giggle! should pave the way for a brilliant future. Commercial Course Dramatic Club 45 Memoirs Staff 4g Tatler Staff 35 Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Catherine Harle "Kitty" Blue eyes, reddish blonde hair, and a friendly smile describe Catherine in a few words. Her pleasing personality and sympa- thetic disposition have created for her a host of lasting friendships. Catherine's talents are both artistic and dramatic. Who will ever be able to forget her Pennsylvania German skits? Scientific Course Dramatic Club 2, 3, 43 Glee Club 2, 3, 4. James M. Hobar "Jim" Fountain Hill's contribution to toothpaste ads is this dimpled, laughing-eyed specimen of humanity known to us all as Jimmy. His Hashing smile and sparkling wit have won him high esteem, especially among members of the fair sex. A crack rifle shot, a leading man in many of our operatic and dramatic performances, and above all, a ladies' man- that's Jimmy all over. Scientific Course Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4g Glee Club 2, 3, 43 Oratorical Contest 2g Memoirs Staff 4. twenty-:ix NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMOIRS Claire Mae Huff "Hl1ffy', If you see a tall, slender, happy-go-lucky girl, always laughing and giggling, you are looking at Claire. She is a lively member of our class who enjoys dancing immensely. It can be said that she is never at a loss for words, for she loves to talk. She has been a good commercial student-may she be worthy as a secretary! Commercial Course Basketball 2, 35 Tatler Staff 3g Art Club 22 Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Wallace R. Johnson "Joe" "Wally" "Why hurry? I'll get there." How often have we heard these words from Johnson, a happy-go-lucky chap, whose main ambition is to get through school with the least possible effort. Joe has inclinations toward U. S. Army service when he leaves school, which may account for the fact that he is often to be found at the Bethlehem Armory. Commercial Course Science Club 2, 3g Tatler Staff 43 Glee Club 2 3 4 e 9 - Chester Klotz "Chet" Chet's the great big fellow with the deep throaty voice. He is quiet and bashful with the opposiw sex, but this doesn't mean that he isn't an asset to Fountain Hill. His ability to handle a basketball has made him one of our star players. With his good sportsman- ship and quiet nature we believe that he will go far in whatever field he chooses. Commercial Course Basketball 2, 3, 43 Class President 3. f'lUL'JIfy4SE"l'2H MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Lewis Leach Jr. "Slim" On Major Bowe's program there are cow- boys from New Jersey, in Fountain Hill there is a cowboy from Gauffs Hillg this is our Lewis. "Slim'l is always ready with a song or a one-man band selection on his harmonica and guitar. He is one of our rare blonds, a happy-go-lucky fellow, with a smile on his face no matter where he is or what he is doing. Scientific Course Home Economics Club 43 Science Club 33 Athletic Club 2, A. A. Council 2, Glee Club 3, 45 Harmonica Club 33 Oratorical Contest 2. Angeline Lorenzo "Angel" The Spanish senorita of our class is Angel- ine. She is small and stout, and possesses a very Fiery temper. Angeline came to Fountain Hill from Liberty High School during her junior year. Angeline expects to enter one of our larger colleges when she leaves our Alma Mater. General Course Glee Club 35 Dancing Club 4. Martha M. Malburg "Matz" "Snoozie" Curls, curls, and more curls-red ones at that- are seen forever bobbing up and down above a clean-cut freckled face. Contrary to the popular belief, Martha does not have a fiery temper, but is one of the most pleasant and popular girls in the class. Her versatility is exemplified by her work in dramatics, her high scholastic rating, and her ability on the basketball court. Academic Course Basketball 2, 3, 45 Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4g A. A. Council 3g Glee Club 2, 3, 4g Memoirs Staff 4. tnienty-right NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO Charles I-I. Miller "Shorty" "F-O-U-N-T-A-I-N H-I-L-Ll' Charlie's booming voice rings out as he leads our school in another cheer. A full five feet of energy, "Shorty" will always be remembered as our outstanding cheerleader. His witty remarks and jokes make him a great favorite among his classmates. If he pursues a career with the same enthusiasm as that which he dis- played in school, we are confident that he will be a great success. Commefrogal Course Cheerleader 2, 3, 45 Dramatic Club 4. Edward G. Mittal "Eddie" Eddie, the scholar of the class, can be recog- nized by his intelligent expression. He's a bashful, quiet boy, who is forever studying. He possesses the rare gift of subtle humor. Although he seems to avoid the opposite sex, he is well liked by everyone. He received excellent grades and we hope that this success may follow him wherever he may go. Commercial Course Science Club 25 Memoirs Staff 4g Class Vice President 43 Tatler Staff 3, 43 Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Frank J. Mohap Frank is that tall, dark, well built lad pos- sessing a manly stride and a set of Herculean muscles. His ability at splitting the meshes has helped Fountain Hill win a major position in the Two-County League. He was elected to guide his class through its last year at high school. Commercial Course Basketball 2, 3, 45 Science Club 35 Athletic Club 25 Class President 4. twenty-nin e Mzmolas NINETEEN Tr-Marv-EIGHT Harvey Edward Moser The old adage, "Silence is golden," must have made a deep impression on Harvey, for he seems to be in quest of a fortune by strict adherence to it. Although our funniest jokes fail to elicit even a smile, Harvey occasionally comes out of his seclusion to delight us with his dry humor. The greatest contradiction in his make-up is his participation in the band, as Cof all thingsj a trombonist. Commercial Course Athletic Club 2, 35 Band 3, 4g Tatler Staff 4. James K. Moyer "Jimmy" James is a "what d'ya call it'?'l - a-a tall Irishman. We feel justified in using this ex- pression because he himself has adopted it as his standard introductory phrase when ans- wering any question. He is the boy who achieved fame for his Alma Mater by copping first honors in the bookkeeping event at the Pennsylvania Commercial Contest held at Bloomsburg. Commercial Course Science Club 25 Class Treasurer 33 Tatler Staff 3, 4, Commercial Contest 2, 3g Glee Club 3, 4. Marion Elizabeth Muhr "Touts" "We will now hear the secretary's report." That is where "Toots" comes in, for she has probably been secretary of more school organ- izations than any other student. Anywhere there is excitement you can usually find "Toots". She is a good cure for the blues, her continual wit keeps everyone laughing and accounts for her popularity with both sexes. Scientific Course Basketball 2g Dramatic Club 2, 3, 43 Memoirs Staff 45 Class Secretary 3, 4g A. A. Secretary 4, Glee Club 2, 3, 4. thi rty NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO Robert Nansteel "Bob" Bob's appearance on the mound and his ability to pitch the old apple down the alley have awed many a foe of our baseball team. Although also intensely interested in wrest- ling, his talents do not lie entirely along ath- letic lines. Bob's knack at playing a guitar, together with his dry humor, seems to make him the perfect cowboy. He is also proficient in his studies, particularly along scientific and mathematical lines. General Course Science Club 3, 43 Art Club 2, Industrial Arts Theater Club 43 Harmonica Club 3. Philomena M. Oricko "Phil" Flashing dark eyes, black wavy hair and an olive skin proclaim Phil a typical daughter of Italy. Her sparkling wit and charm make her the center of any group. She is ever ready to join in any athletic event, and when she does, she's sure to stand out from the crowd. Her keen appreciation of art and music is also noteworthy. Commercial Course Basketball 2, 3, 45 Dramatic Club 4g Tatler Staff 33 Glee Club 3, 4, Debate Club 2, 3, Oratorical Contest 2, 3. Robert Joseph Ormiston "Max" "Bob" "The harmonica wizard of Fountain Hill" -that is how we will remember Bob. He is the third portion of our hill-billy unit, and can also make a guitar talk tive different languages. Bob is of the long and lanky type, with a fine head topped by a mass of decidedly curly dark hair. His popularity with all who know him is due in part to his ability to tell and hear jokes. General Course Art Club 2, 3, 45 Glee Club 2, 3, 4g Dancing Club 45 Harmonica Club 3. thirty-one OIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Grace Louise Ovcrdorf "Gracie" Grace is the girl who is always seen hurry- ing through the halls laden with books and pencils. She's generally chattering when you see her, although it isn't about lessons. Grace is one of the best commercial students of the class. Grace possesses dark wavy hair, brown .eyes and a great deal of musical ability. Most of her time is spent at the piano, lessons and business meetings. Commercial Course Tatler Staff 2, 4, Glee Club 2, 4, Junior Red Cross Council Representative 2, 3, 4. William Pfeifle "Bill" Bill is that long, lean and lanky student with sandy hair and smiling eyes. His pet aversion is playing the fiddle, but it is our hope that if his attitude changes, he may someday become asecond Rubinoff. He can be either a quiet or a noisy individual, his disposition varying according to his mood and environment. Commercial Course Athletic Club 2, 3. Bertha Amelia Pongracz "Bert" See that tall dark girl with a "continental and very feminine air" coming down the hall? Well, that couldn't be anyone but Bertha. Bertha is very popular, a good sport and al- ways on hand for a good time. She is one of our few students who has struggled through four years of Latin and we feel sure she will succeed along that line. Academic Course Basketball 2, 3, 4, Tatler Staff 3, 4, Glee Club 45 Debate Club 2, 3. ' thirty-two NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMOIR Edward Posch "Wally" Posch is a short well-built fellow who seems to be always dreaming. Whenever a sarcastic remark is made in history class, all eyes are immediately focused on Posch. His dry humor has been the source of many funny incidents. The least of his worries, as we all are in- clined to believe, is studies. Commercial Course Home Economics Club 43 Art Club 2, 3. 4 Congetta Ronca "Dolly" Dolly is a pretty, dark-haired, dark-eyed Italian girl, displaying a radiant smile and sparkling eyes. She is a bundle of energy, loves fun and jokes, and is usually heard ta- te-ta-ing some popular song. We believe she also likes to talk a lot. May she have success in whatever she undertakes. Commercial Course Dramatic Club 43 Glee Club 3, 4g Debate Club 35 Oratorical Contest 3. Harold Shelly "Menu" "Hiram" Hiram, a rather tall, gangling youth, is Coopersburg's contribution to the Class of '38. In class he seems always a bit flustered. When called upon to answer a question, he rises with shirt-tails dangling, turns red in the face, and stutters and stammers out his reply. But among us all he is a very talkative, good- natured fellow. He is adept at tootin' the tuba, and actlng the part of an adolescent young- ster in dramatic productions. General Course Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4, Band 3, 43 Glee Club 4, Stardusters 3. Wir tllfrty-111 wr MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Eugene I-l. Shurts "Jeep" "Gene" A small boy, a hearty laugh, and a perfectly creased pair of pants - that's Eugene. Eugene is one of our quiet boys, as far as quietness among the Seniors goes. He is always ready with a good joke and a hearty chuckle. He is one of the flashiest dressers in the class. Small but mighty, he is bound to succeed. Commercial Course Athletic Club 2g Industrial Arts Theater Club 4. Robert W. Sloyer "Bob" Robert is a very quiet boy, who seldom smiles. No, he isn't snobbish, he is just very reserved and minds his own business. He is well liked by everyone, although he is quite shy toward the fairer sex. Robert is well- known in basketball circles, formerly as a member of the Nativity team and now as a member of the high school team. Commercial Course Basketball 45 Athletic Club 2. Beatrice Snyder "Beatsie" Beatrice, with her rapid speech and mincing movem.ents, is always welcome wherever she goes. She is a small, compact bundle of tem- perament under a crop of long, blonde hair. Her sunny disposition is usually hidden be- hind a frown, but at the proper moment seems to reach out and win her many friends. She is one of our few commercial students who manage to keep out of trouble. Commercial Course Basketball 45 Dramatic Club 43 Tatler Staff 2, 35 Glee Club 2, 3, 4g Junior Red Cross Re- presentative 3, 4. thirty-four NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT NIEMO George C. Spangenberg "Spongie" Tall, handsome, a patch of brown hair combed back from a pleasantly smiling face describes 'tSpongie." He is a good natured fellow who is ready for an argument at any time. He can usually be found around our prize examples of femininity. We're banking on your success in life, so don't let us down. Commercial Course Dramatic Club 2, 3, 45 Memoirs Staff 45 Class Vice President 35 Glee Club 2, 3. John Spirk "Johnnie" "Spirky" "Who is that blond, good-looking boy drib- bling up the floor and sinking the ball in the basket?" Of course, .everyone knows it is John. ln John we find the rarely combined qualities of star athlete and honor student. He is the possessor of a very clever wit. His pleasing personality and perseverance are sure to aid him in achieving his aim in life. Scientific Course Basketball 2, 3, 45 Science Club 45 Athletic Club 2, 35 Memoirs Staff 45 A. A. Treasurer 4. Earl Sugg "Clifford" Earl is that enviable possessor of qualities that combine to make him the "answer to a maiden's prayer." He is a tall, lanky, light- haired youth with an attractive personality. He has gained a reputation as a smooth dancer and it is our hope that he may glide through life with the same ease. Commercial Course Basketball 25 Dramatic Club 3, 45 Athletic Club 25 A. A. Council 45 Glee Club 2. tllirty-fiwr MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Edward E. Wesenberg Jr. "Butch" 'KMan Mountain Dean" is what he likes to be called, and We really don't blame him, because "Butch" is the tallest and heaviest fellow in school. He helps develop his stature by dipping ice cream at a local store. He is always keenly interested in scientific events or happenings. Score-keeping at basketball games could never be handled without him behind the table. Scientific Course Basketball Manager 2, 3, 43 Science Club 2, 3 4. 1 James C. Zimmerman "Zitz" It is easy to pick Zitz out of a crowd. His walk is like that of one who has springs on the balls of his feet. Basketball is the sport in which he excels. He has an effervescent humor which is continually bubbling up in the form of witty remarks boomed out in a deep bass voice. Commercial Course Basketball 2, 3, 4g Athletic Club 2, 3g A. A. Vice President 2. thirty-six M X X JUNICDTQS l i 1 4 1 i W I r 5 I , ' , 1 X , w I KL Ikx l F NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMOIRS Bruce Bachert Gerald Bachman Henry Baumann Ruth Beardslee Grace Beck Edward Beier Louis Broderick Helen Check Paul Cope Earl Cressman Lawrence Durfey Anne Marie Eddinger Jean Edwards Lloyd F atzinger Verna Fox Paul Gilbert Anna Hanner Charles Harlor Rosemary Hartzell Charles Ihle Claire Jacoby Pearl Keck Helen Klusek Junior Class Roll J abo Dates Hen Ruthie Becky Eddy Irish Checkie Copey Squirrely J iggs Giggles Jean Fats F oxie Gilbe Midge Snuify Rosalie Butch Jackie Pearl N oddy May be Eddy Duchin II. Keeps that telephone busy. Our flashy center! Reserved and very studious. Tickles the ivories. The timid soul of the Junior Class. Very interested in opposite sex. That fast little guard. The boy with the subtle humor. The Junior sheik and drum major. A lad of very few words. Seen laughing most of the time. Most of us look up to her. Enjoys arguing and singing. Keeps photographs in her notebook. Stamp addict. Has skill in writing and bookkeeping "Do you have your excuse, Harlor?" Manager of the girls' basketball team Promising basketball hero. Enjoys sports, writing letters, dancing Our timid accordion player. Very quiet, with lovely brown eyes. thirty-n ine MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Gertrude Konrad Viola Kotz Olga Krivy Jeanne Kunkle Eleanor Landis Eleanor Manners Edna Marsteller Eleanor McLaughlin Richard Morrissey William Noctor Samuel Ottinger Walter Pierok Raymond Ramson William Rice Alfred Ronca Robert Rothrock Madalynne Shurts Florence Stehly Philip Vooz Martin Wieand Margaret Yost Warren Zingler Jumor Dolly Toddy Joddy Kunkie Ed el Elley Tarzan Mac Dykes N octe Sam Porky Bob Ricy Gussy Garra Nan F lossie Phil Matz Peggy Diapers Class Roll A guard on our basketball team. A swell little pal. Rates high as a dancer. Our very talkative little cheerleader A loyal supporter of basketball teams Has a very promising voice. Anybody need a chauffeur? Our worthy scorekeeper. Jayvee flash. May become a flying ace. Our popular class president. Jovial and musically inclined. F. H.'s Marconi. Beau Brummel. Late! Who will buy him a clock? Likes to tinker with radios. Our high scoring forward. Will she open a beauty shop? Dances well and goes in for jazz. Hobby - designing airplanes. She has that thing called "It". Our baby artist. fvffy NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMOIRS Junior Class History EPTEMBER 8, 1937-:1 momentous day! It marked thc beginning of the third lap of our journey toward graduation and the end of our career as underclassmen. VVe then bore the dignified title of "Juniors.,' At the first Junior Class meeting, the class was organized and the following officers were elected: Samuel Ottinger, president, William Rice, vice presidentg Margaret Yost, secretaryg Charles Ihle, treasurer. Three events made this year a memorable one for the Juniors: the arrival of class rings and pins, the presentation of the first Junior Class play, "China Boy"g the reception held for the Seniors. And now, upon the threshold of our senior year, we extend our heartiest wishes to the Class of '38 who are about to leave us and start upon their careers. MAnGAnE'r Yos'r '39 forty-one -1 v '-nu' 'Swv'-fn .': 9,5 . . is yn 1 L fy ' 'T-2? . ' V' z. -1-' 71 . , 4 in P.. 5, .K 'F .. 'T , 4. .X ,L-1 ' -.F A .:-X. 3. . 45:-f QQ: is. -u1"'Yl r .. -..X A . . 1, , LQ? -N 1 -' 1 1 fag ,if-1:'1s55i3LLf.va?'3.,N . r .w ' 5, A AA. Y--iw .3.px,i ' , ' Q Q r m .nr 4: . Q -. -...4H.,'.,--sa 7- - 2 ' fy SQ- P27 L43 , Q 'PH' I 11.913, ,- 5.4, r,: g .. -:, , -iQ4.v?exz. -. '-2-1:....2-Dmgiffg' 'Riagg 4- WA, f-.,-Q - gm ...,. A -. .. 1, 1, -.. 1,.x rc-- Z 11, 1-1 I . , p ,ffm -FL. 1 mx " ' . ' f 4 , V1-PU 1 ' .L x ' f W, x ' ff' 'h S 4 .' 4 QQ f. ...- n -,Az-1 L.. 'A- , Q- w.sf:L -2 ' , -F .uv Ay ' ' A '1 A -1 - '23 .-' ,J Y. . . f ---if-,f -1 ' u, .,4,,3-mv-El..-,,.L.. , -'N 5 ,fy f pr-3' -q.,.v.Q'J', M33-.-' i,.. L ,L . ,J n Q,-K P71-5, J'5-1.L,p5':,,1'fiq'gr'71,-f . ,vf-cfggifii '1-fri",-1 9 .:f.:,"-!.gx 4.--,Q 4,5g,,5.j:. ., :J 5' 554- '12 . 1 J.. , 1 . .. .v- 4 -1-2 QW:- WK' v A ,, ' liixw i':..-5 ' , fy Qin 'fi 'W 3 R Ak f ,lit ul u Qi ff F .14 'I I , 2 , P N K. "f QW . A , :J I 1 Q-4, sf? I ,UI A 'XL 'Nik' if f: ,fwf lff 1 fl mf 5 A X l - 4 I f I ju? 0 3, 5,1 levi fl ,"'2 M-, , v 1.7 :' Q , 4 4, tuvifr' W fs r 'N N' A' I QNCARL SGP!-ICDMCDIQES NETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMOI Sophomore Class Roll Catherine Andrasko Gcorgine Barick Betsy Beardslee Anita Bender Bessie Bradford Donald Bramwell Dorothy Brown Mildred Brown Richard Brown VVilliam Brown Geraldine Clauser Ruth Cornfeld Grace Cressman Joseph Csrnko Phyllis Decker John Fatzinger Robert Ford VValter Frick Leona Friedman Geraldine Hahn Anita Harle Lester Himmelwright Amelia Iasiello Marie Janie Erwin Johnson Frederick Kluge Charles Kuhns Stephen Kutosh Gloria Mecse Martha Miller Verna Miller Louis Mirro Diane Morganello Margaret Overdorfi Florence Pachter Jennie Perrett Anna Pierok Ruth Ross Jean Ruth LeRoy Schaller Norman Sehuler David Scohlionko William Seifert Doris Shaner Anna Shine Doris Silfies VVilson Sloyer Guy Smith Alma Sprague Raymond Strahlo Gloria Torda Francis Wagner VVilliam Walp VVil1iam VVard VVanda Williams Florence Yerk Helen Zatovich forty-five MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIG Sophomore Class History URING the month of September a meeting of thc Sophomore Class was called by Mr. Greene for the purpose of selecting class advisers. Mr. Davies and Miss Robinson were chosen. The following class oflicers were elected at that time: William Brown, presidentg Donald Bramwell, vice presidentg Guy Smith, secretaryg Jennie Perrett, treasurer. In December the Sophomores sold magazines to raise money for the class treasury. Prizes were awarded to some and a theater party was held for those who sold more than five subscriptions. Later in the year a bake sale was held. The climax of the year's program was the Sophomore party and dance. Throughout the year the members of the Sophomore Class sup- ported all the activities of the school and are now looking forward eagerly to an active year as Juniors. JENNIE Paanmr '4-0 fortyhaix KX ACTIVITIES A. x l E., , ' 1 Q CE ive ' 1 l . ft ! 9 fre' , . ' ff'-W 'fl ' ' .- ' 'A vi" - -...gr ,,Qv,,' T. , V 'ig-2 gf .-'Z' .1 ' if , 1: ' . me 'L 71-5' 0 "' ii: ' '-xi A '.- , 'x- .Fm ' fukin X. ,K 'ff I1 ul- I - Q r Y. Y 1 Eg? . .Qi , gig JW X , lv' -f I- AP L' W ,fi , . A .wk . -J- ' mb.. , . ,. Q 'wi 4 K -'ff-1: ' Y an ,971 If Q L. . E ik' ' ' 1 j Pl. X .. Eve.. 1 5 k P' ' 1 ,FF , .Tl . 1 ug, ' 4 .-Q 1'i 515 ' sf N 1 1 l' . l Z f . , V F' P. , 5 - if . -Q. af' 't '-,L ' 51,4 M -it ,3. :- ,QV K-Y V ' 4 fy - ',: 9 , ,. a- . A ' 1 f ,A-.-V , , 4- 'fff "5 W sg: 'F'-' lg ,ff , ' '. . 1. 13,2 i' ,,-A .51 'b -. I 've' f - 5" . 9 i, if., I 44. ,1 , .V 1, I ,A ,L ,.,f , , 1 , ff 7.11 W, , , , v ' 1 1 4 HM i-MMS. 1 .. ,Q ,. ' V 1 f ,IIS , S -. ' -. if s , 1 . w , -4 .,l 4 - A ' , I , . I. , I- 1 X 1 I , . v 1 W 1 'V la -, jN,.a ,. F , pg, I ai ,,, X , . -..aLd.fm1a!..ws.ua1L.m.ieg.i.,""i 1 -- I4 g- 3 : - - , -. ' Qui 3-. A- 1: .p'?1,.RLt .Tm ':' - ,A V A 4 5 'if ' ' ' - '- K. '-"' ' ' .f'- ,. ' ' .ps- .,,?5,'. .W .1 f ,, .i.,' ,N .Qg.'.f" " ' f 1" .J,: , z NETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT NIEMO Ifflifflluill-l'IIil'f'. . Al.v.v0cif1l1' 1X'llif07'8. ,lrf lfffiifzl' ..... I"1'f1furr' Ifzlifor .... Al1'Iiz'ifir'.s' Editor. .. Humor Ifrlifor .... Memoirs Stall' l,1I0f0g7'Il11lI Erlifnr .... . . . Edward Mittal . Hvclyn Hnfnvr NI:u'H1:1 Mzllburg . .Dorothy Gaul ...lznmws llolmr . . . .Bc-tty Hagy .IPIIOIIHIS HJlIll'j' ........Jolm Spirk l:1I8iIlf'.V.Y Jlllllllgff' ......... , . .Gvorgv SlHlIlg'L'Ylbt'!'2.f ,l.v.vi.vfal1f Ifllkilll'-YS .xIlIIII1f1I'I'. .. ....... Xlnrion Muhr l"!IC'Illf'l1 ,lrlz'i.vr'r. . . . . . . .Miss Annu Huy Todd forfy-Hill EMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIG I',vIlilfIl'.. ., . lfl1.vinr'.x'.v .Um lfnys' Spurix. Girls' Spnrls. llunmr ...., . 1':.I'l',l!lN!Il'. . ,lllIlIllli.. l,ffl'l'!II"lf .... .Irf IJl'Sif1II.Y. Sh'nr'il.s'. . . .winwnyruplz . llzuwcv M1 l11gr'r.s'. . . uxvl' lusupll C arnku Yiulzl Kntz l. I :n'1.Itv Xclvlsrr ... Tatler Staff 1x'1'pnri1'rs Rivlxzuwl Nm' Typfsfx .Mum Hamm-1 fifty lfrlwzlrrl Mittal YI sm-y . .l'wI'2lIll'iS lim-l1dm'l' . . .AIllI'g2ll'l't Yost livrtlm l'm1gr:u'z . .NY:1ll:1c-c .lulmsun . . lim-rtlm l'ongr:u'z . .Miclnu-l Ford ....Olga Krivy . . .151-tty Ilolmvrls ..-Hvlvn Klllsvk Miss S. Ruth Funk Xvillifllll Rvppm-rt .Jmm's K. Moyvr HYK'lj'Il Hufm-r AI!lI'.i0!'il' lh-lp ..I:um-s K. Moya-r l"T!lllL'iH xxv7lQ,'Yll'Y' 1n'zlc'4- llxicl'1ln1'f I2w:x1l'ivc Suycln-r l'c:ll'l Keck ....ML Alnwpll 4iriNvi11 NETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO Academic T 'ping Club llli Ac-:1dc111ic Typing fllllll was organizvd hy Miss Fostcr to gin' ili'2llll'lllll' Stllill'TIt?-l :in opportunity to l1':11'n how to typv. TI11- work of this club should provc Vvry 1':1lu:1hh' to its 1111-111- lwrs for it givcs tlll'II1 il clianvv to ch-vclop :in ability Sl1llli'lt'Ilt for their pvrsonul nccds. VVC are sure that in the flltllfl' more non- l'0IllIlH'I'K'iZll stud:-nts will take !lKlVilTlt1lg'l' of thc lim- opportiinity off'1'rm-rl hy this club. Thi- following urn- 1111-111l1n-rs: Ilcisy lk-:11'mlslcv Ruth lla-airvlslcn' Ruth f4lYl'Yll,l'lIl H:11g:11'1-t Ovi-rnlorf llovis Siliics fifty-11114: EMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGH Dramatic Club llli l7r:nn:atic Uluh with Mr. Brown as clircctor has volliplm-tccl Illl0tllt'T' ycnr of sl1cc'csst'l1l work. 'l'hc ww-lily lllt't'tlIlg'S wvrn' dm-votvcl to thc rcuding' and discussion of various plays. Th:- rllvixlln-rs :ittvmlvrl scvvml productions of Plays and l'l:lyvrs. Tha- outstanding vvvnt of tht- yn-:lr wus the clulfs proaluction of thc Sm-nior Class Play, "Shirt Sli-1-ws", :i comm-dy whim-h told thc' htory of how thc various I'1l1'Il1l!CYS of thc ltzmd family cop:-d with thx-ir 1in:mc'i:1l misfortunvs during thc dvprc-ssion. All im-mlwrs of tha- club took part in thc production. 'l'In- social :u'tivitim's wvrx- CllIll1lXl'd hy tht- :mnual picnic' In-ld in Juno. Thx' lllt'IIllN'I'S of thc 4-lulm uri- :ir-a follows: l'rm-sillm-ut ..,..,. .... l in-orgv Sp:i11gL'lllw1'g Yicc l'rcsirln-ul... ,,.,.. Mzirlhzl Mznllmrg Svcrrtnry ...... ..... ,... l l stty Ilngy 'l'rv:wurvr .... , ...,...,,.... .,.,. l Curl Sum: l'-I'ZlllL'lS llrown l':Ltl1m-l'im- llzxrle l'I1ilon1vim Uriclm Doris lfllglisli -l1llll4'S llnlml' Voiigcttzl Roxlczx Ilorolhy Gaul lillIll'll'S Millvr llnrolrl Shvlly Thonms llxmuy lllziriou Muhr llvntricc Smyth-r liftyrltvu MEMOIR NETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Industrial Arts Theater Club HH Industrial Arts Tlivatcr Club was organized by Mr. Davies, our new Industrial Arts tcuc-ller, for all boys intrr- rstcd in swnory construction and stage settings. Tin' club has done' I'Cll12ll'li?llllt' work tllI'0llglI0lIt the year, especially for tllv .lunior :ind Senior Class plays. If the club fulfills thc promise of its suc'c'e-ssflll first ywir. we feel surc that tllurf- will ln- lviggcfr :ind butter drumaitic productions in the future. Manager .......... ,,... . . .Francis Reed Assistant Manager , ,. . . , . Rziynlond Ramson lile-ctrician ........ . . . ...... . . . Robert Rothrock Gerulrl Baclinmn Louis Mirru Eugene Shnrts limlwzird Brown Rohm-rt Nnnsteel tiny Smith lfairl fre-ssnmn Alfred Ronczi Martin NYM-zuirl VValter Frick XVa1'ren Ziuglcr f fiflj'-!ln'1'z' M NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMOIRS The Minstrel HE Senior Class presented its annual minstrel on Novem- ber 12, 1937. This event marked the opening of the new gymnasium to the public. Despite bad weather conditions, the class had a large turnout for its program. The part of the interlocutor was very well handled by Thomas Haney. The room resounded with laughter at the jokes and crazy antics of the four endmen: Philomena Oricko, Charles Miller, Mar- ion Muhr, and James Zimmerman. The chorus was made up of all pupils in the class who did not present individual performances. The program consisted of the following: Solo: Congetta Ronca-"You Can't Have Everything" Specialty Skate Number: Beatrice Snyder Endman Solo: Marion Muhr-"You Can't Step Me from Dreaming" Trio: Congetta Ronca, Doris English, and Martha Malburg-"Harbor Lights" Tap Dance: Lucille Dougherty Solo: Martha Malburg-"Roses in December" Endman Solo: .Tames Zimmerman-"VVe're Working Our Way Through College" Pennsylvania Dutch Skit and Song: Catherine Harle Solo: James Hobar-"Where or When" Endman Solo: Charles Miller-"Sing You Sinners" and "Hallelujah" Solo: Doris English-"Alice Blue Gown" Skit: "Romeo and Juliet" Solo: James Eddinger-"Have You Ever Been in Heaven" Combination Tap Dance: Betty Hagy and Beatrice Snyder Jiffy-HW EMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIG Dancing Club HIS yi-ar was markvd by thc introduction of a new club among' our activities. Miss Sand, acting upon the rcquvsts of many studn-nts. organized a Dancing Club which has conu- to bm- vxcvvclingly popular. Thi- aim of this group is to di-vclop a sm-nsv of rhythm and to tcach thc fundamental danm- stops. Om: important outcome of this activity has been thc' incrcascd plcasurc which many studvnts now Hind in attvnding' our som-ial affairs bc- vausc- the-y havc lc-arnvd how to dance. l'i'o.-sirlm-ill .. ,..ll6Ill'j' Baumann 'I'n-asurur .. ....,,....., ....... Q 'harlcs lhlc I'atlu'i'inc .Xmlrasko l'aul fiilhvrt Iiiam' Nlorgancllo lirun- llJlK'll1'fl Anna llauiivr Samui-I lllllllKCl' 114-ralcl Hachman Rust-:nary llartzell Flor:-ncc Pncliter .Xnila lin-min-r Amelia Iasirllo Jennie Perrett Sh-plwii Iiobick Claire Alacoby VYaltvr Pierok Ili-ssic Hrsulforil Marin- .lauic Ruth Ross Ilimalil liraniwn-ll Holm-n Klusck Ilaviil Scolxlionko Louis llrorlm-rick lic-rtruilu Kouraal XVilliam Seifurt Xlihlrml Brown Yiola Kotz Iloris Shaner XYilliam lirown Ali-anne Kuuklc Anna Shim- .Xnua Hruno liln-aiior Lanilis VViIson Sloyvr lfarl lil'l'SSl!l!llI .Xngvliiic l.o1'm-uzo Alma Sprziguc firxwc Cfrcssinan l'lll'ZlllIlI' Mauucrs Florence Stehly .-Xlma Marie- l-Iihliugvr liehia Marstellvr Philip Yooz l.Io3vl l"1llZlIlllt'I' lflvanor AlCl,HlHIl1llll VN'illiam Vfalp Rohcrt Ford filoria Mm-sf' llvlru Z2llllYlL'll I.wma lfricihiiau fiffy-.vim NETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MENIO Art Club HE Art Club under thc skilled supervision of Miss Funk, with nn-mbership cxc-em-ding that of last year, has produced rc- markablc work this souson, The accomplishments of the mem- bvrs wvrc' displayed in thc art room, giving it :ln artistic effwt. Among thc projvcts were charcoal drawings, carving' of book ends, decoration of waste-pzipvr baskets. soup Carving. stencil. clay, :md poster work. The members are: lic-orgine Ilarick Anita Hurlc Robert Ormiston Dorothy Brown Frcclcrick Kluge Raymond Struhlo Norman Farl Viola Kntz fllorizi Tordu GL'I'E1l1llllC' Flzluser Ye-rna Miller fifty-.u'm'1z I J NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEM OIRS Glee Club HE Boys' and Girls' Glee Clubs were combined into one group this year under the leadership of Miss Mary Robin- son. This club furnished entertainment for assembly pro- grams, P. T. A. meetings, and other school events. Inasmuch as no operetta was planned for this year, the most important events were the Christmas Cantata and their participation in the annual spring music festival. Bruce Bachert Gerald Bachnmn Grace Beck Edward Brown Francis Brown Mildred Brown Richard Brown Ruth Cornfeld Marjorie Delp Doris English john Fatzinger Lloyd Fatzinger Dorothy Gaal Geraldine Hahn Betty Ha y Thomas liiney Anna Hanner Anita Harle Catherine Harle Rosemary Hartzell James Hohar Claire Huff Amelia lasiello Claire Jacoby Wallace Johnson Frederick Kluge Gertrude Konrad Viola Kotz Charles Kuhns Jeanne Kunkle Eleanor Landis Lewis Leach Martha Malburg Eleanor Manners Gloria Meese Edward Mittal James Moyer Marion Muhr Philomena Oricko Grace Overdorf Florence Pachter Jennie Perrett Bertha Pongracz Congetta Ronca Norman Schuler William Seifert Doris Shaner Harold Shelly Anna Shine Doris Siliies Wilson Sloyer Beatrice Snyder Alma Sprague Florence Stehly Philip Vooz Wanda Williams Florence Yerk Helen Zatovich VVarren Zingler Christmas Vespers HR annual Christmas Vespers, under the direction of Miss Mary Robinson, were presented by the Glec Club, assisted by the Junior Chorus, on December 22, 1937, in the school gymnasium. An orchestra, led by Mr. Miller, furnished the music. The Glee Clubs sang the cantata "The Childe Jesus", while the Nativity story was portrayed in tableaux, arranged by Mr. Brown. The program consisted of the following: 1. The Annunciation 2. Apparition to the Shepherds 3. The Shepherds Journey to Bethlehem 4. The Wise Men 5. The Holy Family 6. Wise Men at the Manger 7. Mother and Child fifty-nine EMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGH A llli Q! 1-5 M .. Home Economics Clulr U'l'll buys :xml girls nn-vt wvvkly in tln' Ilospitulity llmml limlvr tlln- g,flllClilIll't' of Miss llvily for thu' purpose of lm-:n'n- ing how to :ulupt tllt'IllSl'lYl'S to various social Sltllllllflllfi. 'l'ln- lmsir rulvs of vtiqm-tte-, tho :nrt of talmln- sn-tting. :xml dutivs nl thi' host :mil lmsh-ss urn' not only stmlicml but :xrv put into pr:u'tim-m- by tlle- clulm Im'n1lu-rs. l'1'm-sirlullt ,.,... .,.. l 'lrlw:i1'fl Puscli Yicm- l'i'n'4i4lz-ill ,.. .,.. Richxlrfl llmwii Nm-i'!'rl:1ry ...., .,.llL'i':ilmlii1m' llllllll 'l'l'4':uixl'vl' .. . ,. ... ..... .. ..... l'li:nl'la'w llzlrl-n' lfwIxx.n'4l lh-ir! l.Lwt:-1' llllllYlll'llYl'l,11lll Rlvlwrt Rullllrwk llvlvn V111-ck lfrxxiu Vluliilsmi ,lL'llll Ruth l.:mlm-m'i- Iiuvfvg lmwis l.m-:ich Mzulzilynm' Sllllflb -lwlllx l":1!zimgm'x' Nlnrtllzi Mill:-1' XY:u1il1i Xlilliailxls X mlm INN XYllli:un Rim- lflmwlice- Yvllx .v :fri rv NETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO cience Club lllf S1-icnvv Club with Mr. Stcttlcr as supcrvisor is :in or-1 in ization for all boys intern-stvcl in laboratory work pvriods :irc spent in performing clitfcrcnt vln-111ic':1l cxparl nicnts. Rvprcsc'nt:xtiVcs of tllm' club axttcndcd tlu' :mmml nu-1-ting ot the Junior Awuclmliy of Sc-it-m'v. which was llvld :nt Bm-lam-ll l nn sity. The ontirc club took :n trip to Nvw York Vity in tlu sprl Tllvy visitvd Radio City. the xltllSt'llll1 of Natural Historx im various othvr placcs of intervst. Thr following arc iucmlmcrs: Pxwsicln-lit 'l'rczul1rc'l Sccrclzlrx' Ilrnu' Ilziclic-rt -lzinlvs lfllnlingcr Su-plicil Kutosh Rohn-rt Nnnstcel XYultc1' l'ic-rink LeRoy Srlmllcr Norniazi SUlllIl0l' xvllllillll Seifert .YI-.I'fj'-Oil! ....Klicl1:wl Uoigzi ,,,,,,,IoI1nS1vl1k . . . , . Rolla-rt lfu l'llili11 Yooz xxlllllfllll xvilfll llclwurml XYQSL-iilu-rg. NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMOIR Band HE band, with Mr. Miller as director, celebrated its first anniversary November 17, 1937. lVhen the announcement was made that a school band was to be organized, only five boys and one girl responded. These members were Francis Brown, Walter Pierok, Norman Carl, Francis Reed, Paul Kipila, and Alma Fry. Due to growing interest the band now totals fifty-three members. However, without the aid of Mr. Stettler, the financial support of the P. T. A., and the courtesy of the Moravian College Band, which lent a number of instruments, this organization would have been impossible. The school board also helped by purchasing a sousaphone and other equipment essential to the band. They have entertained us on many occasions such as assemblies, P. T. A. meetings, patriotic programs, and basketball games at which they increased the enthusiasm of the Fountain Hill rooters. A bigger and better band should result in the future due to the fact that it is comprised largely of students from the Junior High and early high school years. Clarinets First Second Third Fourth Lloyd Fatzinger Ruth Cornfeld Wilson Andrew Harry Bender Jeanne Kunkle Dorothy Hottle Louis Fodor Claire Harrison lilizaheth Mcl.ay jean Overdorf John Hardenherg Marie La Penna Dominic Plantone Jean Ruth Jennie Perrett Elizabeth Oricko Helen Redline Norman Schuler Cornets Sala First Second Third - Francis Brown Bruce Bachert Donald Braniwell Kenneth Breidinger Walter Pierok Robert Behr David English Evelyn Miller Francis Reed Norman Carl Merritt Stralo Jeanette Miller Robert Thornburg Philip Sabatina Trombones ' Baritones Basses First Raymond Frederick Charles Harlor William Seifert Lewis Cass Raymond Ramson Second Harold Shelly Harvey Moser Charles Wolk Third David Allen Albert Eschbach John Kipila Bass Trombone Louis Mirro Horns Robert Hartzell Oliver Nonnemacher Elwood Nonnemacher Flute Virginia Brown Percussion Richard Brown George Bruno Earl Cressman Felix DeCan1pli Joseph Orhin sixty-three MEMO IRS NINETEEN THIRTY- IGHT Music Club HIC Music Club was organized by Miss Mary Robinson for students interested in instrumental music. The members with their instruments are: Pearl Keck and Charles Kuhns, accor- dionsg Grace licck, pianog and Phyllis Decker, guitar. During club periods they perform for one another, and criticize musical radio programs to which they listen individually outside of school. From time to time Miss Robinson discusses with them var- ious phases of music appreciation. Library Club NLY two students, Anna Pierok and Doris Shaner. respond- ed to the call issued by Miss Stehly for student librarians. This club should prove more popular in the future, inasmuch as it gives its members an opportunity to learn how to operate a library. The club periods were spent in arranging books on shelves, checking books in and out, mending old books and caring for new books. Debate Club HE Debate Club was organized late in the year by Mr. Biro as it was necessary to recruit an entirely new group of mem- bers, Some of the subjects debated upon were: Chain Store Problem, Unicameral Legislative System, and the Anthracite Coal Situation. Several debates were held with neighboring schools dur- ing the year. The members include Betsy Beardslee, Ruth Corn- feld, Samuel Ottinger, and David Scoblionko. Junior Red Cross Representatives UR Junior Red Cross Representatives, Grace Overdorf and Beatrice Snyder, have attended the meetings of this society for three years. These girls have served as a connecting link between the organization and our school. sixty-four ATI-ILETICS ENIOIRS NIN . ETEEN THIRTY-EIGH l'r1'.s'i1l1'l1f .... fin' l'r1'.wi1lr'u Sf'z'rr'!nr'1f .... .l.x'xixf11l1f Srcrri 7vl'!'Il-VII rrr .... Athletic Association . . .xiitllilvl G1-igcr f.. . ...liurl f'T'l'FSHl!lTl ...... ...Marion xillill' ary. . . . .Ruth Iiwxrdslvc .... ...John Spirk ADVISORY FOUNCII, l'r:-sulx-ut ,. ....Hr. lflmvr I", 4ix'L'L'lx0 SL'L'l't'IIll'j' ....,......,.,. ........ ...... , , ..M1u'i-nl Nulu' l1'AK'UI.'l'Y NI l'1MBl'lIiS NIV. Zwllxul Hum Mr. Myrml Slulllcr Mr. Philip liwin ' Miss .Xmm Mug' 'l'mhl M iss Ncllxc Sunil CLASS R HPR HSEN'I'A'1'IVES S'4'l1fnr lurlful' l-rum-is Iimwn S!l!l'IllL'i Uttingcr Iinrl Sum: lla-nry iilllllllilllll I .Yuflmnmu XX llmn blnyu- Stn-1111011 Kulush si.1'ty'si.v NETEEN THIRTYfElGH'T' MEMOIR Girls' Basketball Pouch .......... .... ll liss Nellie I. Sand Faculty Manager . . . . .Miz Myron Stettlei' Manager ......... ..... R osemary llnrtzell Assistant Manager . ..... Eleanor McLaughlin LTHOUGH somewhat handicapped this year due to the fact that an almost entirely new team had to be developed. the girls, team was quite successful, losing only seven out of the thirteen games played. The following Senior girls have spent their last year in coin- petition: Martha Malburg, Bertha Pongracz, Philoinena Oricko, Congetta Ronca, Dorothy Gaal, and Beatrice Snyder. YVith the following girls left as nucleus and with the same co- operation as was given this year, a splendid team may be anticipated for next year: ltlargaret Yost, Helen Cheek, Bladalynnc Shurts. Isabel Taylor. Gertrude Konrad, Anna Shine, Geraldine Hahn. Altllea Steinke, and Caroline Frederic-ks. SCHEDULE F.H.H.S. Ofpolrmztx F.H.Il.S. flf"f'!7ll!'Ilf.f 2.1 Faculty I 'S IU 'Quakertown .ll El Alumnae Hellertown 13 32 Quakertown NVilson liorough 44 45 Bangor Moravian Prep. 14 24 Bethlehem Catholic High 'llcllertuwn .W 42 "Moravian Prep. +XVilson Borough 46 ' Away games 'Bethlehem Fatholic H igh Zll 'i'ty-.vczfmz EMOIR5 NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGH Boysl Basketball l'w.u'Ii ..,.,......., ...Mit l'hihp lf, lixxiivg lfzu lllly Xlzvnsngvi' .. ..Xli, Xlylwm Sli-Hlvl' Stiirlviit Xlxlrizzgn-1 . .,.l'lslw:il'el XYL'suiilwm-rg .Xwlxhmi Nlxmngvi' . , ,., ,....... .,...... .,,. S 1 ilmu-I llttingvl' UNll'lf'l'lXfi in its 5l'C'0llKl sm-:imnl :lm :1 l1lL'll1llt'Y' of thi- Two- lllllllll.-Y lmngliv. our lmys' tvzun :ll'llll'YL'tl :in i-nvi:xhlc rm-corcl of i-igliti-vii vii-turivs :mil four clcfn-nts. with mn' gilllll' fm'- ll'Ill'll Qllll' tn :nl lIlt'llgfllll1' playvr. This ymirk hlllliltl was 4-mnpmmwl of IJl'IH'lli'1llly thc mum- nivinf hi-rs :ns that of lust yi-ur. Six "first stririgi-rs" will gr:ulu:xtc this -Vl'Jll'. lIJllllt'ly NllQ'll:ll'l Gvign-r, f'l11'sh'i' Klutz. l'll'IlIIli Nlolmp. Roh- vrt Sloym-r. .lnlm Spirli. and .lLlllll'S ZlIIlll1L'l'IllLlll. Ilt'Yt'l'tlll'lL'SS I1 highly vl'l'icin'nt vumhim- l't'llli1lll3i to uurry im. in llcnry li:uun:mn. William Brown. lYilli:im Him' Lwho saw litth- IlK'tl0ll this ycur lll'l'ill1ht' of illnvsxj. :xml ll'ils1m Sloynr. toggctlu-1' with Sl'Yl'I'Ill !ll'0lll- iwing prmpm-tm from thi- .l:iyvu' tm-:nu :mil thc Junior lligh S1-lmol. Chnrlvs lhh-. ll .limmr Illt'IlllJl'l' who pluyvd wi-ll this yi-:ir will lw im-ligilili' ln-czilisu of thc l'. l. A, A. Nl'llll'Htl'I' ruling. lull. Uflx I-Ill, llfijv, Iill. Url. 11 l":w11lIy Itw ,224 'Qlizilxn-l'1nxx1i .17 ll Nzifqlrvtli .57 ll .Xliimlvi .ll .il 'lf. Struiiulelnlrg .ll SN lf. Stn-inlslnl1'g .311 lf' 'l".nXI-nu ll lil 'l'vii .Xrgyl Jn IX l'i-ii .Xrgyl I5 IH fjllzilwvluxxlu JN H Ili-lh-rthwli .ll JN lllvllurtnwll ll .il Ihuigin' S -lil XYils-in limmiigli JU .H 'Wilsmi lllrmiigli JN wil Ihplgii QU JS 'Villvlxly flll l'lr1y-'iffy 32 'Nnxih XX Iixtmhill -ll? ll S-llilh XYhita'l1:ill 3.5 U Smith XYhilvh:ill .55 '7 'Xzmm-Ili Ill tfiwfi-in-ill .KU Suuth xx-l'lIlt'l1Llll 41 .vi.i'l-x'-r'iglllI NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO R l"'l'l'llt winning three warm-up games and giving a magnificent battle to Haston High, the team launched it- self whole-heartedly into league competi- tion. winning its first two games, then los- ing a thriller to South VVhitehall. Yvhen the first half storm was over and the smoke of' hattle had cleared. the ,Hillers were tied for tirst place with South Vilhitehall. ln the resulting play-off Fountain Hill played inspiring haskethall, comhining beautiful passing coordination with accu- rate shooting to take the game. Al- though no player stood out for his indi- dividual performance. scoring honors went to C'het Klotz and Frank Nlohap, with thir- teen and ten points respectively. A slow start. with the loss of the first game in the second half series and the dis- appointment of forfeiting its second vic- tory over South VVhitchall. did not dampen the spirits of lltlltfl' tram or supporttrs. Both showed their stuff during the re- mainder of the season which was traversed without a setback. Outstanding in this series was their Victory ovcr East Strouds- burg. a close game. packed with thrills. Hy virtue of having won the first half championship, Fountain Hill niet for the fourth time their arch-rivals. South XVhite- hall. the second half champs. to decide the league championship and the one to rep- resent the league in the P. I. A. A. dis- trict play-offs. After a nip-and-tuck hattlc throughout the game. and with the score standing at 39-39 with hut fifteen seconds to play. a desperate shot hy the South lvhiteliall captain laid to rest our hopes for this year's title. As in all their games. the team played excellently. with Spirk standing out with fifteen points. sixty-:lin EMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGH Cheerleaders l'l'll nmppy 1-ln-ers :xml l'l2lSlly uniforms. our m-ln-erln-:ulcrs ll2lVl' had no clilliculty in arousing tlu- K'lltllllSlIlhlll of the lxillllllillll Hill rmmtvrs :At all pep llll't'tlllgIS :mtl utlnlf-tic 1'ol1h-sts. 'l'lll'lI' l'JIltlll.lllIlt'SS :xml lmrrl work 1-mxtrilultm-rl il gn-at dl-al to flu- sl1c'1'1'ss of tllc' twnlll. Stl-lrlu-11 Ilnlmiuk lilcmun' Alzmlvcrs l'l1:u'Iv-4 Miller .ls-:umv lilllllilt' fllm'i:1 Illvvw suzfcuty I-IUMQR MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY EIG Class Ballot Girls l'haracteri.9tic Did most for F. H. H. S. Most beautiful girl Most popular Best dressed Wittiest Best natured Most bashful Best athlete Biggest eater Most talkative Man hater Most studious Most likely to succeed Boys Did most for F. H. H. S. Handsomest boy Most popular Best dressed Wittiest Best natured Most bashful Best athlete Biggest eater Most talkative VVoman hater Most studious Most likely to succeed Name , Marion Muhr Doris English Philomena Oricko Catherine Harle Philomena Oricko Evelyn Hafner Anna Bruno Martha Malburg Dorothy Gaal Betty Hagy Anna Bruno Evelyn Hafner Evelyn Hafner Edward Mittal Thomas Haney Earl Sugg Frank Csrnko James Zimmerman Edward Posch Harvey Moser Michael Geiger Edward VVesenberg Charles Miller Chester Klotz Edward Mittal Edward Mittal .seventy-two NETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO R Last Will and Testament of Class of 1933 E, the high and mighty Class of Nineteen Hundred Thirty- eight, having reached a stage of development slightly higher than that of imbeciles, are about to leave behind forever these broad halls, Qlockers includedj, left through the compliments of the Public lVorks Administration. After much deep and serious concentration, having found ourselves of sane mind and more than sufiicient reason, we do hereby make public our last will and testament, declaring null and void all preceding documents of like nature and content. We, the Senior Class, bequeath to our successors, COI1! how we love themj, the honorable right to walk from the assembly exercises while the rest of the school looks on. VVc also honor them with the privilege of sharing the first floor with Mr. Greene, our guiding spirit in our last year at deah old F. H. Hear! Hear! YVe also leave our ability in salesmanship and poster printing to those who must remain for another year. Theirs is also the problem of expenses. fNote-we would like to leave our sophistication to them also, but they seem to have learned that from us during the past year.j Special bequests left by members of the Senior Class to members of the Junior Class are as follows: Frank Mohap, Chester Klotz and John Spirk leave their power to sink the ball on the basketball court to Henry Baumann and VVilliam Rice. Earl Sugg, the Fred Astaire of the Senior Class, leaves his truck- ing ability to Philip Vooz. Doris English bestows upon Eleanor Manners the privilege of warbling like a nightingale. James Zimmerman bestows upon VVarrcn Zingler his ridiculous puns and bum jokes. Francis Bender bequeaths his adorable school girl complexion to ll'alter Pierok. Marion Muhr gives to Margaret Yost the job of handling all of the Senior Class records. :mfcnty-tlzrrc MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIG "Butch" Wesenberg wills some of l1is westward expansion to Charles Harlor who might be able to make good use of it. To Madalynne Shurts and Helen Check goes the knack of getting around on the basketball floor from Martha Malburg and Philo- mena Oricko. The members of the Senior Class who hail from Salisbury Town- ship wish to hand down the privilege of using the new cafeteria for noon-day victuals to their successors from Salisbury. George Spangenberg bestows on Sam Ottinger the job of taking care of most class activities. Jimmy Hobar's smile of beauty goes to Lou Broderick. To the Juniors, also, go the rights of getting into Miss Stchly's hair through their escapades in the conference room. Marjorie Delp leaves her talent in "tickling the ivories" to Bruce liachert. Norman Carl wills his paint and brushes to Rosemary Hartzell. Catherine Harle hands to Ruth Beardslee the thrill of standing behind the footlights on opening nights. The gift of gab leaves Betty Hagy at this time in order that Jeanne Kunkle may carry on. Our little piece of femininity, Evelyn Hafner, leaves her charm and pleasing personality to Grace Beck. Edward Mittal and "Greg" Moyer cease their studying so that Alfred Ronca and Robert Rothrock may begin. The "gang", with no consideration whatsoever for the teachers, pass on their ability of getting in bad with the faculty to the Junior "gang". The members of the Class of 1938 do hereby appoint Lord Hammon Rye and Sir I. Vill Forgetit to see that every clause of this will is carried out in full and that the beneficiaries of said document receive their alloted bequests as above stated and use them to the best of their ability. VVe hereby sign and seal this last will and testament of the exalted Class of Nineteen Hundred Thirty-eight. CATHERINE HARLE '38 GEORGE SPANGENBERG '38 .seventy-four I EEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMOI Prophecy of the Class of 1938 YVO members of the Class of 1938 met by chance in Italy many years after graduation. Having heard no word con- cerning their former classmates, they were eager to seek the cave of Sibyl, as Ulysses and Aeneas once did, in hopes of finding on the mystifying leaves the fates of their classmates disclosed to them. These were the prophecies read from the leaves: Francis Bender, after many years of struggling, has become Secretary of the Treasury in the President's cabinet. Marion Muhr is the owner and manager of a large meat-packing plant in Schnecksville. Grace Overdorf has recently been elected president of the Beth- lehem Red Cross Chapter. Doris English has established herself in a deluxe salon on Fifth Avenue, under the name of "Dee". John Spirk is now head basketball coach at Pitt. Michael Geiger is taking it easy and is now engaged in writing a book on "The Moral and Social Conditions in the U. S." Catherine Harle and James Zimmerman are broadcasting over the Red, White and Blue Networks of station I. C. U., doing a Fibber Magee and Molly act. Harold Shelly and Norman Carl are touring Africa, hunting big game. Martha Malburg is "swinging" her way over the country, singing with Genny Boodman's famous band. Frank Csrnko is the editor and fashion designer for "Esquire" Philomena Oricko is the owner of a spaghetti palace on East Third Street. Francis Brown is "going to town" with his own inimitable "swing band." Marjorie Delp is defending her tennis title at VVimbledon. Dorothy Gaal has done the unexpected and has become the first woman president of the U. S., as a successful candidate of the Socialist party. Harvey Moser, tax assessor, was recently nominated a candidate for Mayor of Salisbury. Congetta Ronca is teaching ballroom dancing under the capable direction of Arthur Murray. Lewis Leach, Robert Nansteel, and Robert Ormiston are now being featured as the "Razzle Dazzle Hillbillies" in the Gold Room in Michael Ford's ultra-modern cafe on School Street. sezfraty-irc M IRS NINETEEN THIRTY- IGHT Bertha Pongracz has just been crowned "Miss America" for the third consecutive year. Earl Sugg is "tripping the light fantastic" with his partner Beatrice Snyder at the Waldorf-Astoria. James Hobar is using his "Pepsodent Smile" to the best advan- tage, and is posing for toothpaste advertisements. Chester Klotz is president of the Street Cleaners Association, and is assisted by such invaluable men as Edward Posch, Edward Brown and Stephen Bobick. Claire Huff is doing magnificently, managing a turkish bath, establishment. Frank Mohap is playing professional basketball at Madison Square Garden. Edward Wesenberg, now known as "Man Mountain Butch", has ust been crowned the new "bone breaker" champion. VVilliam Pfeifie is an instructor of ethics at Cedar Crest College. Robert Sloyer, an admiral in the Navy, is cruising in the Med- iterranean Sea. Betty Hagy is doing some vigorous campaigning for an anti- noise reform. George Spangenberg is president of Bethlebem's largest bank, assisted by l1is worthy secretary, Evelyn Hafner. Thomas Haney, the handsome brute, is posing for collar ads for a famous magazine. Charles Miller is hitting a new high in touring the country with his all-star minstrel show featuring James Eddinger, who is crooning his way into the hearts of the fairer sex. YVallace Johnson is now quite prominent as a captain in the U. S. Army. James Moyer is judging baby contests for Bush and Bull Cor- poration. Edward Mittal, through long years of study, has succeeded in becoming president of Lehigh University. Eugene Shurts has just been crowned "heavyweight champion" in the Bethlehem Globe-Times Boxing Tournament. Anna Bruno has left this country and is now in Japan doing missionary work. Angeline Lorenzo has gone back to her native land, Spain, and is teaching English in a high school. Thus the leaves had prophesied, We record the fates of this class, hoping for the indulgence of our classmates if some fates are a bit misconstrued or misinterpreted. E l MARTHA MALBURG '38 FRANK Moxuv '38 seventy-six NETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMOI If she If she If she If she If she If she If she If she If she If she Advice to tl1e Lovelorn fliy an Electricianj wants a date. ...... . wants to call .... . wants an escort ...... . . . . is narrow in her views. .. picks your pockets. . . goes up in the air. . . is hungry ...... is cold ......... is a poor cook ...... fumes and sputters ..... Poem There was a young lady named Stella, Fell in love with a bow-legged fella, This risky young chap Let her sit on his lap, . . . . .lllrtrr . . .lfcccivrr .flonductor .flmpliffr . .Detector f'071dl'118l'1' . . . .Feeder . . .Heater Discharger . . .Insulator And she fell right through to the eella, A.Girl Is Like . . . A book: usually bound to please. A train: often gets on the wrong track. A magazine: lots of fiction beneath the cover. A program: subject to change without notice. An automobile: often runs people down. A lamp: apt to Hare up and get turned down. A banjo: often picked on by her friends. A thermometer: often of very high degree. A cigar: inclined to be puffed up at all times. A stove: often needs a new lid. seventy-sezfen MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY EIG Name Francis Bender Stephen Bobick Edward Brown Francis Brown Anna Bruno Norman Carl Frank Csrnko Marjorie Delp James Eddinger Doris English Michael Ford Dorothy Gaal Michael Geiger Evelyn Hafner Betty Hagy Thomas Haney Catherine Harle James Hobar Claire Huif W'allace Johnson Chester Klotz Lewis Leach Angeline Lorenzo Pet Saying Yeah, sure. Oh sure, I did that. Oh no, I don't mean that. Oh yeah! Is this right? Hey Shelly! Hey Klotz! Keep quiet. She's swell. Oh no Y Hey Zitz ! For heaven's sake! Take it easy. Pardon me. Isn't that awful? Do ya know what? Hobby Basketball Roller skating Woodwork Sports Cooking Art Basketball Tennis Basketball Singing Basketball Art Basketball Tennis Dancing Shooting Ain't I the one, though?Dramatics I reckon so. Cut it out. Oh yeah! Listen here now. Oh that's nothing. Oh no! Shooting Dancing Basketball Basketball Music Reading seventy-eight INETEEN THIRTY-EIGH T MEM OIR Pet Aversion Favorite Rendezvous Typing Klotz's gas station Social Science Coliseum Girls The Hill fGauff'sj Bad trumpet playing Dance halls English Home Business Correspondence Stony Lane Studies Garland's Service Station Social Science Mowrer's Physics Cherokee Street Jazz Home Economics Room Office Practice Gurgling with pop bottle Getting out of bed Filling stations Droopy people Telegraph poles Being stared at Dancing Sober people Business Correspondence Lessons Lessons Social Science Jack's Place Mowrer's F. H. A. C. The Barracks Beth-Allen Casino Seneca Street Movies Russell Avenue Mowrer's Armory Jack's Place Barn dances Spanish Club seventy-nine MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Name Martha Malburg Charles Miller Edward Mittal Frank Mohap James Moyer Harvey Moser Marion Muhr Robert Nansteel Robert Ormiston Philomena Oricko Grace Overdorf VVilliam Pfeifle Bertha Pongracz Edward Posch Congetta Ronca Harold Shelly Pet Saying Oh yeah! Hey! Listen here. Gee whiz! What do you mean? What do you call it? Quiet! It's a wow! Who dat man? Oh my gosh! Come on babes. And ...... Oh, come on. That's all right. Shut up! y You're telling I. lsn't that right? Eugene Shurts Cut it out. Robert Sloyer Oh yeah! George Spangenbergls that so? John Spirk You've got something there. Beatrice Snyder Yeah! Earl Sugg What's the diff ? Edward Wesenberg Here's the gum. James Zimmerman Ah, get out of here. Hobby Dancing Cheerleading Journalism Basketball Mimeographing Baseball Sewing Baseball Stamp collecting Dancing Playing piano Driving Strutting Roaming Dancing Playing in band Sports Basketball Arguing Sports Tap dancing Dancing Hunting Wrecking around eighty NINETEEN THIRTY-EIG HT MOI Pet Aversion Bad music Not enough eats Yearbook write-ups Flat tires Being left out Girls Druggist Trig Making posters Office work Large assignments The fiddle Being a wall-flower School Homework Office Practice Being called "Jeep' Talkative people Hospitals Social Science Social Science Walking Score-keeping Studying Favorite Rendezvous Beth-Allen Casino Keiffer Street Room No. 209 With the gang School GauH"s Hill Butcher shop The Barn The Barn Home Church Keiifer Street Mowrer's .lack's Place Mowrer's Stony Lane Hellertown Downtown Russell Avenue Jack's Place Home Country Club Avondale Keiffer Street eighty-one EMO IRS NINETEEN THIRTY- IGHT Definition: Education is the inculcation of thc comprehensible into the ignorant by the incompetent -X' 'I' 'X' 'X- Philomena Oricko: "Did you hear about the skunk that went to church." Charles Miller: "No, why?" Phil: "He sat in his own pew and gave a Qsjcentf' 'X' 'li 'I' 'li' Frank Csrnko: "Let's cut classes today and go to a show." Wallace Johnson: "Can't do it. I need the sleep." 'I' 'X' 'I' -X' Description: It takes years of practice before a ski-jumper stops looking like someone being thrown out of :1 saloon. -I' -K' 'X' 'I' Frank Mohap: "What's worse than raining cats and dogs?" Claire Huff: "I don't know, unless it's hailing a street car." -I -X' I' 'I- Mr. Geiger: "Well, I received a note from your teacher today." Michael: "Honest, Pop? Give me a quarter and I won't breathe :1 word about it." ' ' -1- -ll' -l- -li- Betty Hagy: "Can you drive with one arm?" Bill Haneyz, "Sure, I can." Betty: "O. K., have an apple." 'I' 'K' 'I' -K- Dorothy Gaal: "I'm afraid to go down the street, it's so dark." Chester Klotz: "But I'm with you.', Dot: "That's why I'm afraid." 41- 'K' -X' 'I' A teacher called for sentences using the word beans. "My father grows beans," said the bright boy of the class. "My mother cooks beans," said another pupil. Then a third popped up, "We are all human beans." eigh ty-two NET EEN THIRTY-EIGHT MEMO A visitor at the High School: "Is that the English Department ,H over there. Francis Brown: "Yes that's our Chamber of Commasf' 5 -X' if -X- -I6 Miss Todd: "What does rex fugit mean?" Bertha Pongracz: "The king flees." Miss Todd: "Make it perfect tense by using has." Bertha: "The king has fleesf, 'X' 'X' 'K' -If An absent-minded man was deep in his work when his wife called out to him: "Henry! Billy has swallowed all the ink in the inkpot! W'hatever shall we do?" "VVritc with a pencil, I suppose," was the dreamy reply. 'X' 'X' 'X' -X- Mrs. Posch: "Well, Edward, what have you been doing all afternoon?', Edward: "Shooting craps." Mrs. Posch: "That must stop. Those little things have as much right to live as you have." -I6 'X' -if -X- Mr. Gribbin: "Zimmerman where's your pencil?', Zitz: "Ain't got one.', lNIr. Gribbin: "You shouldn't say that, listen, you don't have any, I don't have any, they don't have any, we don't have ..... " Zitz: "Well, where are all the pencils P" -If -X' 'X' 'K- "Toots,' Muhr fto the druggistj: "Could you fix me a dose of castor oil so the oil won't taste?" Druggist: "Certainly, Won't you have a soda while you wait?" "Toots',: "Thanks," fdrinks sodaj Druggist: "Something else, Miss?,' "Toots": "No, just the oil." Druggist: "You just drank it." "T0ots": "Oh dear, and I wanted it for my hrotherf' eighty-three MEMOIRS NINETEEN THIRTY-EIGHT Autographs , ixafvnxf- WL-74451,-ff. W Cgzlfgv' S J '- f N,-.P Xwrxvi , 4 LM QD W 6 I x O I N PC E if A T220 .4 5 ,4.'lIIQi.'L f-1E'fc'5.L..11-.152 ADVERTISING j 1 0 To Our Advertisers 0 The business firms whose ad- vertisements are found in this book helped to make this pub- lication of "Memoirs" possible. Therefore, the members of the Class of '38 take this oppor- tunity to thank them for their assistance. Patronize the man whose acl appears in this yearbook. O eighty-six KEMMERER PAPER COMPANY Distributors of Standard Products of America's Foremost Manufacturers representing the entire range of qualities for every requirement of the modern schoolroom BLACKBOARD ACCESSORIES PASTE COMPOSITION BOOKS LEAD PENCILS CONSTRUCTION PAPER PENHOLDERS DRAWING PAPER PRACTICE PAPERS DRINKING CUPS RULERS ERASERS SWEEPING COMPOUND FLAGS TABLETS INKS TOILET PAPERS NOTE BOOKS PAPER TOWELS WASTE BASKETS We also carry in stock a complete line of Milton Bradley Company's KINDERGARTEN and PRIMARY SUPPLIES 355-357 Hamilton Street Allentown, Pa. 1-igflnty-.vez en Compliments of Fiseher's Barber Shop 1065 Seneca Street Jerrv Ryan of Telephone 9280 Delaware Avenue and Bergen Street Esso Station Compliments of Gray Beauty Shoppe 836 Seneca Street Bethlehem, Pa. Phone 625 Hogan's Floral Shoppe 331 South New Street Bethlehem, Pa. "F lowers for all occasions" lt ill Compliments Of 1 Muhr,s Meat Markets Earl H. Gier Jeweler 129 West Fourth Street Bethlehem, Pa Next to Post Office . . . Phone 1067 fht Compliments of LIPKIN FURNITURE COMPANY Bethlehem, Pa. F. E. Weinland IIARDWARE, GLASS, PAINT . . . SPORTING GOODS Wholesale . . . Retail Broad and Main Streets Bethlehem, Pa. Phone 748 Howard R. Laufer Hardware, Glass, Stoves, Furnaces, Roofing, Paints, Oils, Varnishes Keys Cut, Lawn Mowers Sharpened 41 1 Wyandotte Street Bethlehem, Pa. Phone 990 I Shaner's Economy Store Fresh Meats and Groceries Seneca and Hoffert Streets Phone 545 Repperfs Drug Store 1061 Seneca Street Bethlehem, Pa. PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED FULL LINE OF GREETING CARDS Phone 9147 Agency Whitman's Chocolates Rexall Agency CIRCULATING LIBRARY Compliments of the LADIES' AUXILIARY ' of the Fountain Hill Beneficial Society t A 0042 7' '1 The Best Is the Cheapest ECONOMIZE WITH QUALITY Phone 1 78 'fr 6' !!6 fb Wm. Ihle 81 Sons Seneca and Bishopthorpe A COMPLETE MARKET ON THE HILL 0 off 441 QQ? I w 5 , 7, , W.. Frederick's Auto Body Shop Prop., O, G. CShortyD Frederick BODY and FENDER REPAIRING . . . WELDING and BRAZING 1125 Seneca Street Fountain Hill Phone 9226 Compliments of Harry Tachovsky 213 West Fourth Street Bethlehem, Pa. Phone 5512 f I DAVID J. MCCAA WM. D. MCCAA McCAA STUDIOS PHOTOGRAPHY SINCE 1895 Official Photographers for Memoirs 113 West Fourth Street Bethlehem, Pa. Phone 738 DALE GROVE "Quality Groceries at Lowest Pricesn 1031 Broadway Phone 1522 C. S. Walter Flowers for Every School Event We Telegraph Flowers Greenhouses . . . 817 Seneca Street Telephone Bethlehem 17 Bethlehem, Pa. uinrty-tlu'L'c Compliments of Bush Sr Bull Corporation BI'l,ll0h0lll,8 Shopping Center The M. 8 M. Market 912 Delaware Avenue Phone 1137 Stalls at South Side Market House Cor. Wcst Fourth Street and Brodhead Avenue Phone 4640 Hotels and Restaurants Supplied Compli ments vf LOVELACE Sl SPILLMAN ninrty-four "QUALITY" at the right price "ALWAYS" HOFFNERS Jewelers 111 West Fourth Street Bcthlchcm, Pa Compliments of A F R I E N D Compliments of the Parellt-Teacher Association PATRONS . . . E. O,Reilly Co. . . H. C. Laubach nirzely-ffm' ,1ef'Lf-f'i+ J ii, i N91-gi 4' J 'i 'X I ,ss ,sc . rv -1 P c' di if 'NN NXW QQAHN AND OLLIER AGAIN U", G 4 " V 'viii A fs. X X X 1 X il K t iw -rv 1 f i . "I . , ' V 4 1 wit W? H Wi ix L, W. i X XY . " ' Pi' wi ' ,xii iw tiixyi ' Repealed acceptance by discriminating Year Book Boards has inspired and sustained the Jahn 8. Oliier slogan that gathers increas- ing significance with each succeeding year. ..-I .. .,. I , 4 vi NJ. 'Q 'u. -I . A 1" .XJ . .-Ti' .- . I I w- .I I. ., 1 M" ' I -: I "Milf uf ,I--1. I ku- .I 61.1 ' . V . 8. I .. .. fr ' ' 'W' - . .' ,L ' '- 4ff?fi.wLv. ..: is f yi. 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Suggestions in the Fountain Hill High School - Memoirs Yearbook (Bethlehem, PA) collection:

Fountain Hill High School - Memoirs Yearbook (Bethlehem, PA) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

Fountain Hill High School - Memoirs Yearbook (Bethlehem, PA) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

1946

Fountain Hill High School - Memoirs Yearbook (Bethlehem, PA) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

1950

Fountain Hill High School - Memoirs Yearbook (Bethlehem, PA) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 66

1938, pg 66

Fountain Hill High School - Memoirs Yearbook (Bethlehem, PA) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 31

1938, pg 31

Fountain Hill High School - Memoirs Yearbook (Bethlehem, PA) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 23

1938, pg 23

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