Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY)

 - Class of 1955

Page 1 of 250

 

Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1955 Edition, Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1955 Edition, Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 250 of the 1955 volume:

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I Q 1 Q "Q , I E"'li'x,A ' -- ' - 9, Q' 4- -51.9 if 'Q' ' ' lxiyff' 1-gl' ' - ' 'f"-'ft--A 1- H . 1 v " D' 4 N 9 , ,. . 4. . F 4 -,A ' A 4' 4 M v 1 4 Q, ,, - . , A h ' f' J- i J. . af' ' 4 , K V' -:-:- L -if ' 'J 5. .. - . .. . ' ' W' A W , . 1 AE ff: , It 'fx if .' D' -Z :fi -""3?' VJ.: s 1. Q . t -'.,'.dlu v pn. -. .1 1 S ,' 4 . . ev E l 3' ln Q' "" 9 he 'vQ'.' le'N K 8 ,A - S. . .ixss P' 4' A . Q , u . mx T. UZUZHUZJ Four years at Fordham leave a lasting impression on each of us. The influence of the education and experience culled from these years will be of great importance as they are applied to the different facets of the modern world scene. With this in mind, we have attempted within these pages to reach three objectives. We sought to provide the means by which each of us may renew and cultivate those meaningful impressions we have gained at Ford- ham. An attempt was made to demonstrate how this institution, tra- ditionally concerned with the liberal arts, provided training for the economic, sociological, political, philosophical and literary Helds, and instilled an awareness of the need for placing this Christian back- ground in the cultural world of 1955. We aimed, finally, to portray in picture and in word those places, people and occasions which were an integral part of our lives during these last few years. 6 co ww I - . : :.:'. ..' .-5 .g . . '-I I I I I . l:.:. 'Q' I - . . Q 'k':l.:':'.:' U Q' I .I I l - I g -5 '.'.I' '.I':l'.':I U.: :I I . '. . I - I :-'2-:!-:D'I-:--2-:--Z-:--:- .- - . .- -11:2-5522325555-25:2-:Ia .2:2-:2:- " . .2 5 - '- - . 'I lgl. ' .?S.:l::.:f:':g P:l:2:g. .l::::-:: . I I :'. g::l:::.l- U. I . ' Q .:: l...l....::::::::::::: '.:'.l'n' l 1' ' '-I'.:::::o' . - . 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"..gn- W - 4 JA--Q wwfv- ' A "" -1... .J . :fp-pil' V , . ,V 1 .... I H H , VL ,f4iV,,g,m,4,-f N- """, .fg.m-....."V V Vw, --- xml an W -- - 1 4' 'lu .... ,nm ... . VL -.M v X MTI' "",,,, 4... .-rf "' ,,,.. -M da- .9-A- -vu 'Y - M .V M Li" " Mu ..,, . -M an-V -5 ...W 'K H., A, Q5 ORDHAM COLLEGE, like all Catholic colleges, has taken upon itself a difficult and complex assign- ment. Fordham must educate its sons in our American culture and its heritageg this alone is a task big enough to sustain many non-sectarian institutions. But the Catholic college must also teach the more subtle points of the Faith and it is in this union of objectives that Fordham finds its goal. The success of other academic departments can be examined and measuredg the success of the Theology Department cannot be so easily meted. Perhaps the actions of Fordham men in later years reveal the merits of this basic Department, for they indicate an acceptance or a rejection of their religious studies. By attempting to follow the sound teaching prin- ciples of the Society of Jesus, the Department aims to bring Fordham men to a greater knowledge and a deeper love of God. Here, then, is the Theology De- partment of Fordham Col- lege. "The true Christian does not renounce the activi- ties of this life, he does not stunt his natural facultiesg but he develops and perfects them, by coordinating them with the supernatural."-Pope Pius XI in his encyclical letter 1J1fw1'ni Illius Magistri. just what facilities have we at Fordham to aid us in becoming 'ftrue Christians" insofar as this coordi- nating process is concerned: Primarily we have our academic courses in theology ranging from apolo- getics in freshman year to a study of God's nature, attributes and personality as revealed in His creations, in senior year. But despite the completeness of the curriculum nothing but the seed of knowledge can be planted in the classroom. VVe must use our own re- sourcefulness to develop tl1is theology into an art or business making use of the knowledge we have acquired. "The Sorlality also helped comlucl the Mnrimi Year Mass, which wax ullemled by some 10,000 slurlenls from local colleges." College and University-wide functions such as this year's Marian Year Mass and our First Friday devo- tions begin this process by forming for us a connection between everyday lile and religious ceremony. The prayer at the start of each class, a daily reminder of the annual Mass of the Holy Ghost which is offered at the beginning of every year, demonstrates to us our dependence on the Almighty even in such rela- tively unimportant matters as success in study. Even more striking is the realization that the Almighty is concerned with even the slightest of our activities. The retreats which we make each year further pre- pare us to effect this coordination with the super- natural through which we will acquire the tradition- ally Christian "totality of view"-the habit of seeing life as a whole. But besides these more formal type activitles, sev- Rev. John F. Dwyer, S.J. Clmirmrm. Department of Theology Rev. Elbert J. Rushmore, S.J. Rev. Ignatius W. Cox, S.-I. t E Rev. Philip S. Hurley, S.-I. eral extra-curricular organizations direct their ellorts toward the development of the truly educated Cath- olic. The oldest of these groups is the Sodality, which aims at training college men to be leaders not only in their lields ol business or other endeavors, but mostly in their Faith. This training is accomplished in a very special way-a way whose goal it is to produce Catholic men who will meet the growing tide of irreligion and immorality by bringing lirst them- selves, and then others closer to their Creator. The need for such leadership has been expressed by Pope 1' ' . ' .-,T . , . g ". . . such lay apostles must come from well-ordered and active sor1alities." Rev. Robert Roth, S. J., moderator, and Ed Zahn, '55, prefecl, keep the Fordham College Sodality in that category. Pius XII, who realized that such lay apostles must come from well-ordered and active Sodalities. There- fore, he has written lor them an Apostolic Constitu- tion, setting lorth their general principles and rules. The Fordham Sodalist, by the end of his probation period, knows his rules and follows them closely. This probation period prepares him well for carrying out the duties of a Socialist throughout life, in what- ever career he may choose, as his condition and cir- cumstanccs permit. His work is never completed as long as he livesg there is always more to be done. " . . . dedicated to lhe glory of God through Mary . . . " Fordhamen form a "living roxaryl' on Ihe Kealing terrace lo begin the May rlevolionx lo the Mother of God. "A Imrlure enlitlcrl 'l'rogr1'xs in u Puerto Rican Parixlz' Ilflffl' Il crllmcily crowd as flirt the xynrposiunz on llm 'Twenficlll Crfnlury ljorzcrfpl of the Illflillifllllllfu AI lluf Ialler, Rev. jo- seph, P. F itzpatriclc, S. j., speaks ns Rev. J. Qzmnlin Lmufr, SJ., Mr. Philip j. Slflmrper, Rev. 1. Frmzlflin Ewing, SJ. um! Dr. Louis S. JIIITIIX lixlcn and rc- zficw their own llzoughlx. As in previous years, the Sodality has undertaken n1any activities, all of tl1e1n llllllll2llCly dedicated to tl1c glory ol' Cod through Mary, its PILLTOIICSS. ,In October, the Zlllllllfll Harvester dance, witl1 tl1is sea- son's theme, "Venice", was again a huge success. A lecture e11titled "Progress in a Puerto Rican Parisl1" drew a capacity crowd as did the SyllllJOSlll111 on the "'1'wentieth CCIILUYY Concept olf the Individual". Such spiritual activities as'lfirst Friday devotions, campus rosary, Lenten Zlllll May devotions, Ztllil. weekly student Mass were sponsored. l.ast SUIIIIIICI' the gro11p was represented at the Summer Schools of Catholic Action l1eld in New York and Chicago. The Sodality also l1elped conduct the Marian Year Mass, which was aLte11ded by so111e l0,000 students l.l'Ol11 local col- leges. Me111bers ol' tl1c Sodality freely participate i11 other college activities, a11d Sodalists are found 011 various social committees, i11 Student Government, college sports, Zlllil i11 many olf the other clubs on CZIIIIIJUS. l,iving a good Catholic life and an active, influential college lil'e will prepare these men excellently for the positions which God l1as chosen for them to assume when college days are past. .'Xll0lllCl' activity whose Zlllll it is to prepare Cath- olic men lor the part tl1ey will play as college educated lay111en is the National Federation of Catl1olic College Students. 'l'he N.l"., as we are accustomed to calling it, is an intercollegiate organization whose purpose is to coordinate intercollegiate activity. The organi- zation is based Oll the belief tl1at an exchange of ideas between activities is of primary iI1l1J0l'l2ll1CC ill llllf I'urthering of extra-curricular activity. The extra- curricular activity is a necessary con1plen1ent to a student's CCllll'2lli0ll and as sucl1 serves as a training ground for Catholic leaders of l.OlllOl'1'OXV. Archbishop Cicognani, Apostolic Delegate to the United States, says tl1at "in guarding certain positions Zlllfl effec- tively deI'ending LllCl1l, and in keeping alive the enthu- siasm ol' the young for the cause of religion, a general organization spreading over tl1c entire nation is of utmost val11e. And it is l'CllLlCl'CCl ZllllllOl'lUlllVC and ,.....-.- The Forrllmm College Soda!- ixlx will: lheir moderator, Rev. Rolmrl J. Rolh, SJ. J If f EL- -1 . ' -'JIYKEGYEIT Ill lv - . 15. - -ui 4 Members of the Fordham College clmpler of Ihr' Nalimml Fezlernlion of Calholic College Slmlenlx, an inlerrolleqinlc' nrguniznlirm wlmw jnarjwsr' is lo rmxwliunle l!lll'I'l'0lll'glllll' rlrlirfily. receives its sanction from the lztct lhzlt the Bishops have been put :it its head." This national orgzinixzition which now comprises QYCI' 200 schools from New York City to Sun l'vl'2lll- cisco, was founded in the lute 30's by Winilred Byles ol Mzinhzlttzinville College. Since that time the N.F.C.C.S. has grown in leaps :ind bounds. 'I'here are I9 regions, each ol' which has oihcers who run the liiiv2lil'S ol' their pzirticulzlr region. For the first time in the history of N.l"., an lfordhznn student, 'john Mayer, class ol' l955. was elected :is regional president lor the school vein' lilo-l-'mu 'I'he lfordhznn delegation lor the past three yezns h'ls been especlzlllx' active in the zillzurs ol N.l'. l'ort h nn College is the seat ol the llllCl'll2lll0l12li Relations 1 Connnission whose tzisk is that ol' coordinating the activities ol' the lnternzitionzil Relations Clnlms in the 22 cilllllfliii' schools within the New York-New lersex region. 'l'here ure seven other like connnissions ivhich deal with the following fields: literary, student got ernment. lziniily lilie, i ' ' . , ' ., ,. . , , i 1 Xhniology thc Conh ilunity oi Christian Doctrine. IOILIISICS and interrziciztl justice Rev. .Ivsepll A. 0'l.'onnm', SJ., RW. Sleplien L. 0'lh'irm', SJ., Rev. jmnex E. Henmnvxy, SJ. mul Rev. Tlummx J. Jlefiizrly, SJ., all of Ihe theology rlepm'lnu'nl. The Sain! john BU!'ClIllIllll,S Sociely here par- ticipates in ilu: jnvcesxion before the Marian Year Jlasx. The National Federation of Catholic College Stu- dents attempts to serve as a voice of the Catholic College students. This is effected by the Policy Reso- lutions Committee which accepts resolutions from any and all Catholic College students and then distributes them for discussion to the student governments throughout the country. The N.l". holds an annual congress every year so that the students from every part of the country can discuss common problems and help each other to develop a spirit ol' true Christian community through the framework of the organization. The last Congress was held in Chicago during the sunnner of l95cl. lfordham was represented by -lim Heffernan, I.arry Sullivan, Mike Drew and .lim lfarrell. A newly organized group, known as the Catholic lividence Cuild, trains students to speak on the vari- ous aspects of Catholic theology. The members are prepared to explain aml defend-anywhere and at any time-the Catholic position on subjects of vital in- terest. The Saint Vincent Dc Paul Society is another of the quiet but zealous groups whose devotion to the tradition of Christianity is manifest in its Christmas collection. The funds obtained through a College- wide appeal are used for a children's Christmas party and in donations to various orphanages. The Saint john Berchman's Society performs a function of immediate importance to a community such as ours at Fordham. These men, most often boarding students, assist the Jesuit Fathers in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass during the early hours of every morning. They volunteer their services for all the religious ceremonies on campus and so are a famil- iar group to all of us. And so in its many activities and organizations as well as its theology department, Fordham gives to its students those facilities they need to lfulfill this spir- itual portion of their Catholic education. There can be no better preparation for lacing the materialism of the modern world. "ln October, the annual Harvesler dance, wilh Ihix seaxorfs theme, 'Ven- icel, was again a huge success." JQFW 5. ag fl o -as i f f , ' 1 X 1 A ' .R ,Iv ,Q -1 e ,- .I "if -AJ ff an 5 '7' 'A- 5 '-4-V '90 .u.. , 'lv l '?n 4 saf gf, , t. 9, l .- 1 Q ' 45 ,. J 'R' nil A .bg , .1.."-Vg -. ' fy . - K J If-1 ' 4 ' ,' i . Y 4' . Yu , V-f. I .flu .ff-,Q - ' ,z il.-. JF' .r 14 ... ' " kk. I.: v f Q VI gc, Q' Ia, 'bl , "" 1 . ' ff " .0 1 ,u 4 0 " :Ji ' v -'. 'YJ 1 : ' 1 ., . , I . ' Z 1 - l L . 5 I "I 1 A '4 I 2 4 J I, , ,rw U 4 A v' ,, f f s ,. -r N" I " ' 4 'wt p 4 . , , ' ' ' -.. ' .0 1... 1 3. Fat, ann,-'1,,,t , 1, ,I 10. Q. ,. , 1 . . - , 1' N ' - 'SQA ' ' Y , Nqr- , Azfiwf A , 'H' 'fig nw 'T' ., , 'Q' ' -J" Qfjw' --+1-,. -in 4 1' s . ?3Alv,'.sf..: If A. a s ,..'.. ..' ps -'A " ,Fa-22.13 -mf" H - ' Y' am!-.-. ,' Wy" - ,.,..-fn .413 .nf -- yr "f3'ef'r+y,, ,wx- I ,. A., .flip -. L f -u E , .,. .lu 1 ' kuh ' 'f'Q'u'a if . ' .- 51" d THE VERY REVEREND LAURENCE J. McGINLEY, SJ. President of Fordham University For tl1is is your connnencement: the hour when Fordham says to all who read, "Into the hands ol these, our sons and daughters, we confidently entrust those values for which this University stands." They are many and precious, these values of your Fordham heritage. "X'Visdom and I,earning": truth and beauty and goodness-henceforth they are yours to understand and cherish and defend as did the saints and scholars who guarded them well on this campus a hundred years ago. On this our parting day, I would speak specially of one of them that you may ponder it and live it and pray over it in the years to come: I want to speak to you ol our lrnnmn freedom. What is this freedom? lt is simply this: that at each oi life's crossroads you may turn right or lelit, advance, retreat or just stand still-simply hecause you will to do so .... It is not a casually acquired dexterity like the ahility to speak French. lt is, with Gods grace, the center and source ol' your own special personality. lfor you are unique. God made no other like you nor will He. You have a special purpose for your existence- one all your own. .Xnd freedom is the dynamism out of which you are to achieve that particular human destiny for which God made you . . . know always that to achieve freedom is a spiritual task and it will require all the powers ol' your whole being in its attaining . . . the victory is worth the battle and none of you will ever light alone. From Fnllwr MrGinIf'y'.t rulclrexs In lhe grmlnaling class of 1955. I8 THE REVEREND CHARLES -I. DEANE, S.-I. Vi1'1'-l'r1'xi1l1'nl mul Sl'l'I'l'l!lI'y Iir'm'rnI THE RICYICREND LAN'RlE.NC1li A. YV.-Kl,Sll. l'rn1fu.vl THIC REVISRISND EDWVIN A. QUAIN, .1r'ml1'mif' I' in'-l'ra'sirl1'nl ADMI ISTR TORQ Tllli RIQVEREND XVILLIANI NIIILCAIAIY, l"il'l'-l'l'l'.Yi!lI'Ill for lfuxin1'sx mul Finmuv' Tl-Ili REVERENII VINCENT HART. l,iI'l'l'f0D' of Unim'r.viIy lh':fl'l0jnm'nl X A., THE REVEREND CHARLES P. LOUGI-IRAN. S.j. ,flmxixinnl Io Ihr' Drnn of Ihr' Collrgl' V NMMA 4, ,.. . , ' M., ., ' Q. 5 K, .. ir' MR. ARTHUR G. IQICRGICR lfrfgixlrnr 1 THE RILVEREND THOMAS li. BRADY. Sal llwm of 'll'lI MR. JOSEPH T. HART Lihrnrirm THIQ REVEREND VICTOR R. YANITELLI, llirvrlrn' of Slmlnll l'1'rxunu1'l 5 75-1 K wg. . 4: ff MIS. N THE REVIERENID HAROLD NIULQUIQIZN, S.-I. Slurlrul flnunwllor 5 ll RIQVILRICND TI'll'10DORl1 'II FXRLIQY, S.4l. Slurlwni llmmswllm' ,v4,.1 Wmxffm f - R 2 gn-ag v SYNONYMOUS with any Catholic education is the study of philosophy. This is especially true of Ford- ham. In a university which has the largest enrollment of any Catholic institution in the world, Fordham Col- lege naturally has a highly diversified curriculum in the arts and sciences. But underlying and basically uniting these courses is the study of philosophy. The study of philosophy at first seems to be an ephemeral inquiry. Its practical value is not so easily recognized when balanced against other fields of en- deavor. But, as every Fordham College student comes to learn, philosophy is the fountainhead of all human knowledge. Aside from the intricacies and deepness of the subject, philosophy could well be placed at the be- ginning of man's quest for knowledge, for, indeed, to philosophize is to know. To many it may seem like belaboring a time-worn point, but the fact remains that in this world which is -drowning in a Hood of Communistic philosophy, the Christian concept of man's meaning and destiny is the force which can avert and eventually stem the tide. 22 Although al l'iOl'ill1Z1lll we do not come ill contact with formal philosophy instruction until junior year, we become aware, early in freshman year, of the pres- ence of a very delinite philosophical concept in each and every one of our academic subjects. YVC learn to interpret literature with relerence to traditional Chris- tian philosophy-we are shown how the Christian concept ol' man is at odds with or in accordance with the many forms ol' government. lVe begin to see the very lundamental connection between our philosophy and ethical business, politics and medicine. By junior year, after a course in logic, we are ready to approach all these ideas at their beginning. At Hrst confusing but soon parts of a well integrated whole are courses in ontology, epistemology, natural theology and cos- mology. The cafeteria soon echoes with the discus- sions of men whose contact with these abstract notions is for the 11lOSt part new. The psychology and ethics we study in senior year are perhaps the two phases in our philosophical studies we find most interesting, for in these subjects we apply in a visible way all the notions we have managed to retain from junior year. Greater are the discussions for at once we have abstract notions and practical applications of vital concern. lVe have been brought to the realization that there is an importance to every act we, as the rational creatures of God, perform. Rev. joseph Taylor, SJ. Rev. Francis V. Courneen, SJ. Rev. Frederick J. Helbig, SJ. 1.23 Rev. Edward J. McNally, S.J. Rev. Rev Rev Rev Rev Rev. James M. Somerville, S.-I William L. Reilly, S.j. Charles A. Matthews, S.j Francis V. Courneen, SJ Robert J. Roth, S.-I. joseph F. Donceel, S.j. gf, -fu ' f 'M I I X! M . v s 1 .Wax X l 'N Ju w "' V 7' ,U 41. ' . sw: ,, -, ,,, Z' , ' 1 D 'f . 'I -, u, -1 y 'Y 1 y ,N f 1 ' ,A ,Q 5 1 I ,, 1 l , 1 'ul - 7 u K . ,, . V nuyz. , A X A .A -'wma ,, - ' ' - f . ,A 1 D, W., . . ,3 ' N A. ' h W! ', 1 1 ., lflwfs :,' fl l 5 4 gh N .N 1 5 .- ..-, . , W , . , nag A' S! ' 7' ' 'J' QF? ,,. - 4, 1, .,, I.-, ,W MT . H A 1 , . W mf-'fda Af, ' . . V: . -- , -nil ' I Yxfr ' ', , 1' 1 df - . ,ggi ' .Q y - 4 H' Y Wu -'Vp . 4 ,j y ."'v W M . .As H, -wbx W, 'O 1 ' Q' ff... -- .,,.,,. 1 M .... wg , , , -M71 4 ,, -.. , I ' . ' "' "li-us-.,p -gva--..w, I, ."""cr:yf . I X , ,,. , ,1 ,I . 'f4"f'f! .1 , a' 2 spa , ' - n 4 I 'rw , v ., 4. !'- N ' , , D. K. . 4 'I 43 - Ax ,HL .lv 'u J4, '. V. 1 1' 'lg .'-': ' f v -Q., -.C J. ,' i tr fn, -g ,'-.1 ' QFIJJX.. . ,, , I I: ' , . , -'1 r",,:,, n V 4 if-' - 'f . . pm ,Jr , , ,!- L fix. . . -,. f " 'H fri .. "P V.. , . "4 , Jx .,g.L . H..,'., -H - ..- w,'1'1N1-QA 'fu ., , , 4. ., I -'-' ' J' . f ., Ml In ,.-x,x'5 M . ,J A . 1 t xg ,Il 'I .1-.. ' 4: A . in fsif',.f"' -- . ' in 314.9 ' 'A It ' x .- , Vi. ' .. "fQ7?.NA ' w" -' " "Q W i A . 1, V: Y 4 I . h Y A Q , W , , ' A az: , 4 n '. md' l , -. .49 N ,W-. ,HE .1 ,., .fl :I , H uf. X Wgitxfvl l f ' I ,.' Ln.. M' I . lm' g'. 59' - ' " '1 'sw 'A yr -.sp V 1 ' if t " ml PM f HMP :Rf f - ff Q l'.- r EATING HALL, with its classrooms, cafeteria, oflices, Blue Chapel and radio station, is the center of student activity on the Fordham campus. It is cer- tainly appropriate that this building, which is the nerve center at Fordham, should house the ofiice of the Depart- ment of Communication Arts. While it is not the big- gest department, numerically speaking, it is definitely one of the most influential since this department is capable of reaching every student in the College. Under the auspices of Communication Arts, Fordham students study the fields of broadcasting, journalism, public rela- tions and advertising. While attention is primarily devoted to the technical aspects of each area, the moral responsibility of the individual in his profession are not ignored. All training schools can teach the techniques of mass communications, but Fordham-like all truly Christian institutions-must cultivate in her sons a love of the Truth and an un- swerving dedication to the principle that all men must be allowed to seek out the Truth. In this search for knowledge then, true men of Fordham in the commu- nications profession will not only transmit ideas but also evaluate them. 25 5 llighlightiug a year ol' activity, exmipliliecl by .Xs co-eclitors-in-chiel, Iroin September to hlauuary, initiative and originality, the IEP5-'l-55 eclition oli 'l'he .lack Shanahan and Bob Spelleri surrounclecl thein- R.-XM reached its apex with the publication ol' The RAM Literary Supplement, the lirst issue ol its ki in the Fltihyear history ol' the paper. 'l'his 20-page eclition was typical ol' the spirit los terecl ancl luaintainecl bv the eclitors and stall ol' The R.-XM throughout the year. K. V Edward .-K. Walsh Cumnmnimlion Arlv I,lfIIIll"Hll'H' Jlorlcralnr of Thr' Ram I x .f X selves with an eclitorial boarcl seconcl to none in the ranks oi' the collegiate Fourth Estate. 'l'heir capable clirection brought 'l'he RAM a first place award in the national press competition and provided their successor, Warren Spelhnan. with an exceptionally well-coorclinatecl stall. WV ,il "Scoop" lfoxxerl poumlx oul lllc lates! while Editor Spell- llmn foul rmollwr xlnjj mrfmbcr look on in mn1mfmz'nI. N A- J' . uirshmb f Could il be llml Ilwrr' ix youu' l'onm'rlirm ln'lzw'on Afl- rfcrlixing Jlmmgcr Kmnmllyiv grin mul llml ll:lrlzw'i.wl' ml he lmx lnrforo him? JllfllIlIl'I'S of THE R.-IM xlujl' group around Exrlumgtf Ellilor Sorrc for ll pi1'Im'1' during one of llu' quiolm' lll0lllf4Hl.Y in ilu' ofliro. uw One olf those who contributed to this success was .lim Prior, Managing Editor, who also found time to author the consistently witty "Ramblings" column and review Fordham's theatrical productions. Competing with Jim for the title of the most pro- lilic writer on campus was Ray Schroth, Editor of the liditorial Page and "Between the Lines" columnist, whose uncanny ability to provide student discussion was matched only by his exceptional insight. ln the capable hands olf Jim O'Toole sports cover- A busy xtnlj writes, re-reads, and eur- ieelx copy for the next ixsue ax a rov- ing reporter prepares to "blast-oH" after the hottest news on eampux. age of all lfordham teams reached a new peak. As an extra attraction, jim furnished his readers with a keen analysis ol the sports scene with the return olf the "Looking 'Em Over" column. Rounding out the senior members olf the editorial board was Jack Kennally, Advertising Manager. The only litting' tribute to Jack would be the words of Prof. Edward NValsh, '1'he RAM moderator, following the last issue, "Unbelievable, The RAM is solvent." The leaxt recognized but lmrflext zvorking element of any publication, the typists, look up from their labors to give the photographer rt smile. 28 Rev. john W. Kelly, S.-I. Clmirmrm, Communication flrlx lJeprn'InufnL 'l'he YVIVUV Radio lVorkshop isa non-credit, extra- enrriettlar activity, established in ISH7 to provide a hasie training lor potential XVl"llV-FM stall' memhers. 'l'he XVot'kshop is directed hy Ralph Rourke. Program llireetor ol' XVl"UV-FM, attd is operated under the auspices ol' t.he Department. ol' CIommttnieation Arts. lfaeilities available lor use hy the Radio X'Vorkshop eonsist ol' the studios and equipment. ol XVl"llV-FM, the non-commereial hroadeasting station ol' Fordham University. X'Vl"UV-FM is licensed hr the lfederal LIommttnieations Commission to transmit seven days a week on an assigned FM carrier l'reqttent'y ol' 90.7 Megat'yt'les on Channel 2l-l. 'lihe station reaehes an audience ol' over I25,0llll persons in the New York Metropolitan area. lVl"UV's Radio Xklorkshop tneets once a week lor a one hour leeture. Laboratory time is put in at other times during the week. Memhers are encouraged to come up to the radio station antl wateh various depart.- ments in operation. Membership in t.he Radio XVorltshop is eonlined ehielly to lfreshmen. Upperelassmen. who hare sue- eesslully eompleted t.he lVorkshop course, are admitted to the radio station stall. lfreshmen are not admitted to the stall' ol' lVl"llV-l"M tmtil the completion ol' the lirst SCIIICSICV. During the lirst semester there is a screening process to determine the indix'idual's par- ticular talent. 'l'he only requirements lor membership in the Radio lVorkshop are a sineere interest in radio and attendance at meetings. Upon admission to the stall ol' X'Vl"UV-l"M the individual assutnes the responsi- bility ol' the prolessional hroadt'aster. .llmlcmlor Ralph ill. Rourke inxlruels lH!'lll1I1'l'X of Ilie Ru- rlio lVm'It'.vlmp on llu' leeh- uiques of rmlio lnfuulrrnsling. Harry Dmllaio signals lo Vince Guinea as lime runs out on lack Reynolds, be- hind the mike. Memberx of the Radio Work- xhop lixlen lo an explanation on lhe use of a piece of radio equipment. These men will In: trained lo be the fu- lure broaflcaxlers and tech- nicianx of WFUV. 'l'he Mimes :mal Muimners. one ol' the olclesl extran- n'ui'1'ieul:n' zlelivllles in Lhe College, lhis yezu' presenlecl the first oll'-llrozulwziy prmluclion ol' "'l'he Caine wus, "raves" lrom the Ram were in orrler. 'l'his wus ,l V 1 cf I ,ff ,I . Mminy Courl Mzn'li:il". Dillieull :ls the emlezivm' 'ill f Xu. 4 Xf' the only llllll-lkfllglll play ul' the year, hui the Mimes ffjj, mlicl Lrezll the College Lo many one-:1eL shows, some 2 X' 'W x xx kk -F. V original, during lunch periods :incl :1l'Lei' classes. The XA f Us A 4 l,l'CSlllCllL this YCZII' was Phil Sehlusser and the mocler- Z-' NW N W .0 2ll,0l' Mr. Vzluglm Deering. ,,1'l' ' 1' X ,av 5, M ., 7 . -L ' H- Q -K f L' ' Q f W 'X Dial: Prim' lakes Ihr' xlaml in Caine .lluliny Court Martial." Vaughn Deering, moderator, I1 a relufrnwal. -,...,-,.....:.fs.z- W --T'-, , ,-..--. .-in--ggi .1-1 ..-.1-ug 1- .. f."i39--- , -...,.-H?-,,...1...,-.5-.,, ,A 32 V ........,.-. , , ,,,.,.F,,gT:- .. .- --. l. - - . ,.., .fT.' :- riffs raxl and .vlagchamlx lrcforr' Jlnnberx of Hu' .llimu aml llummeis pore fm a palms' :Im ing one aj their nmclmqx ni lollnn ludnlmuun ,. I L 1. af lx x jf' 41 A rf, H ff-An!! 1: - "0 .U 'VA vo' Collins Hall is another of the bee hives on our campus. It is a rare Fordham alunmus who cannot recall having spent many hours here. All who have participated in class shows or Mimes and Mummers productions rehearsed hard and long and then performed in the audi- torium or the little theatreg few students missed having at least one class in the Collins first floor classrooms. Even the basement with its R.0.T.C. lecture hall, armory and rifle range can bring back pleasant although tedious memories to some. And this is not to mention the many meetings in its lobbies and classrooms and on its steps. 32 A 'l'l1c Classics Dcparnncnt has long been an impor- I ,. A tant part of l'lOl'tlll2lll1 Clollcgc. Jxlllltlllgll it lms ' tlwincllccl somewhat in thc wake ol' tlic vast post-wal' it Q interest in connnunications and thc political sciences, thc intcrcstccl scholar. 'l'lic classical languages still are a necessary part ol' sonic ol' thc more nioclcrn "sri- cncics" and so, apart lroin its svliolarly scrx'ic'c, thc classics clcpartnicnt serves a practical one too. Y-X -V... M87 Rvv. Rudolph Arbcsman, O.S.A. Clmirnmn, Classics Dzfpnrlmenlv I gk- Rcv. James H. Reid, S.j. Acling Clmirman Dr. Stanislaus A. Akiclaszcek W Dr. A. Paul Lcvack ' Chairman, Hixlory Dlfparlmfrnl 33 it ncvcrtllclcss still ollcrs a complete c'ui'riculun1 for One of the newer organizations on campus, the History Society, has made itself seen and heard in the college during the past year. Pri- marily this had been accomplished through its publication, The His- torian. Not stalled solely by history majors or restricted to any particular phase of history, it contains articles of interest to almost all who are conscious of the importance of history. The publication has completed four successful years, this year having as its editor Frank Crowley, with Dr. Robert Remini as moderator. Articles are written by stalf members and interested faculty members as well as other college members whose articles qualify for publication in The Hislorirtu. 'l'he History Society performs another service to the school by sponsoring lecture series during lree hours by various members ol' the faculty, this year including Dr. Louis Marks, Rev. Franklin Ewing and Samuel 'l'elfair. Near capacity audiences have not been rare at these lectures, their topics being of universal interest, and presentation ol' superior calibre. Richard Strattner was president of the Society. Rev. joseph R. Frese, S.j. Rev. Charles P. Loughran, S.J. Dr. Gerhart B. Ladncr Dr. Robert V. Rcmini Stall' numbers of "The His- torian" discuss copy with moderator Robert Rt-mini. Members of the History So- ciety pose for a picture with copies of their publication, "The Historian." Rm-v. Vincent C. Hopkins, SJ. Rev. John WV. Bush, SJ. Szunucl F. Telfair, jr. jznnvs A. Brundngc Dr. Gcrhnrl Lzulnvr john C. Olin f"?"1 ww 'V Dr. Francis X. Connolly Edward T. Callnn Rev. john P. Lnhey, Andrew B. Myers Dr. Grover J. Cronin Dr. Paul E. Memmo Dr. Erwin W. Geissman Philip J. Sclmrper r. Gabriel M. Licgcy Dr. Grover J. Cronin Clmirnum Dr. Robert M. Brown Acling Chairman Imerican. Cizriliznlion Ilcjmrhmml 36 Fordlumi College rlcbulers pnrlicipnled in 204 debates mul were rfidorious in into-Ihirds of llzsm. Close to the top on the list off "silent toilers" at liordham College is the Debate Society. During the l95ff-55 forensic year, our speakers competed in no less than 204 debates with ninety-five other colleges. They were victorious in liifi of the events, or two- thirds. 'l'ouinament activity on the Chinese recogni- tion policy ranged as far south as Washington, where Vice-President Charles Angelino and Mike Lanzarone tied for first place in the Georgetown Cherry Blossom tournament, to as far north as Syracuse and Boston wllere Fordham won the LeMoyne tourney and was a semi-finalist at M.l.'l'. On the western front, Fordham traveled to Pittsburgh to finish fourth out of twenty- seven in the University of Pittsburgh Cross Examina- tion Tournament. The longest trip of the year was the experimental flight out to Notre Dame which saw Mike Driver, Pete Golas and -lim Baclnnan repre- sent the college as members of the newly formed Air Force R.O.'l'.C. debate squad. On the home front Fordham competed in speech events at St. -Iohn's, Fordham School of Education, Hofstra-where the college placed second-Brooklyn College, and New York University. On the campus the debaters sponsored the fifth annual liather Gan- non '1i0lll'llZllllClll for High Schools and the Eastern Forensic Association Speech Festival. l"ordham's speaking activities in the New York area were not confined to the tournaments. Debates be- fore clubs in the area, Communion breakfast talks, lectures and panels before Newman clubs and high school groups gave opportunity to thirty-one college men to speak in public. President Bob Baldauf and Mclieough were guests on the Tex and tlinx pro- gram over XVRCA where they discussed the Far Eastern situation with a team from Oxford, England. The year closed with an exhibition by six of the Freshmen on Parents' Day with the customary prize debates. Charlie Connolly and joe Gormley were the winning team in the upper class debate in which .-Xngelino was voted best speaker. jim McMahon and Lanzarone won the Freshman prize over Colas and Tom Buckley, with Lanzarone as best speaker. For his work as debate manager and his record of victorious debating, Charles Angelino won the annual award given to the man who has contributed most to Fordham by his work during the past year. President Bob Ifalduuf tries out one of his agirmalizve argumenls on ollier members of lhe club. . . . 4. 5 '-7-0. Gibb ' ,QT ' 1' " s 1 u a ' - , , A . 2: ' ' " ' 1, ' ' ' 1 s F. I II I II, Ir,.I I IQ!! I'-I. I r . I IIE 0' rt,I , Q w I. , I'i,IXI , .II.. 'a fy.l..I,I I. II 0 7 1 Iwlof, 1' , -,I, fy I I II fIIII,fv.IyI. III II I pk.. ,III ,If I Is, N ui 1 o I I . I4 If D. Pig, K. ,I I tplufj I 2 lf . I .. . D ,I I I, I X. I' I I III I I II I . ,I I 'a ' I. ' e iffy-'4.'.':-f.5?I': fi' IA. 19, . "A '.' I ' ffl I , . 1 , :I'II I I lap' nazi- N II, I I I, yxn' ' 1 ' l'. " "' ."' ' '4-"' 1" - ," l 'Q .-I, vf - , I ' 1 4 ... J . ' I B I V -ff - III-Ia. ifigfi I I I -- .. If ' . A - I. -1 . .4 fn 5, .- .- . . 0 - - - - '. 5. - f 4' I 1 , ff vI.-.1.ur-,- 1 lv, 1,--. Ion.. . I I I ,. It -'QI , 4I.I I. I -sa 1 'x' . fl M Hgv' ' v ' T AK, Q v ' " ' - . ' -1-9 'T e,-1.,I'A. Z' ,gfff 9 w 1.4, .. U Jvk Inf. l.i57 M: . '. .- ' - H ff' "--' 1 OI, ls 64, I , .I AI... f,III15: I ' .-gI 'jj - I .gm ,QJ"'H7l1jIv II HI? 3232! 'I p.:I .', QQ' ii- J.. 7" I 1' . .I I- VI fifwzllis- 4?f.,.?I5'f: m' QI .':, r HW. ' Hx. 2 .Q-"3.XYf6x:"" 'ff4,'. . . n '- ' ,, gf -T, - .I . 'Wg I ,, -..- , . L , lf? f flf.! lg, l 4 s s1.,L1, Ig' .41 ' 1 gf.. B 1,1 . ' ' At Y l- ' I X, ,lg 'tif-.. I.,,'4?.f 5 xxx I . .bv if-gin' , 1: ' I t' II -.,f.' I. 1- C M' ' . " 'RV'-1 " 'Q 7f"f'1+'?-"I.J '-. .-. ..' -Abu' II I x I I fUJiII:I,f Is. I LII E I' g' ,,.f uw' '!.f.ts' 'e' if 4.1 v, I -. I ,1'i2.-,Q .I , 1 - s 5-' I' .:4',.,,!. ' I s I I X A 3' IJI - Ib I. - II'.II 3 ' ' " ..7' rfb" 'uf ,r 1 ' - 1' ," ,tif 5,32 9' g 3-.A ' . 4' ' -9 1,11--4 , ' 4 1. ,117 .fu sr. r, Q 4 ,I . NI, I-Ufgf, Id1I,5.g:d ' X' O- . --- U ,V ' ' ' 1o'4'-. ' --,Q w I. A 31 ' -Q ' X!" '.I!,l'N1'q. fr - A I IGI. I . I ,I II. I:b'.I . V' '- ' Iv ' " J' f'-1 A'.1siL.a1ia4A.3 I - .44 I' -g f ,st J SI I I I I IIuI,lI I I-If-.I ,IILI ld . 1 '.A,k-1, ' f.-g.---- , , -3 . 5 I I,I'- C . . .. ..m, 1,34' - .-I.N3I I.gI 1 .ff "l"'7x' ' 1'1" 1 is Q' ' 8' - 4' ' f . . . -1. ".,f z.' TL,-L J- " 1 II I-I, fy' - IA'I 1 .eh qu., vI . -:'4"if4f?'.g3.- 2:1 I ' " 1 ZZ? Aw-si.-H?+ i , 1 II,,,I x..I.-IJL.' ,f'."7.,I4 Lr,zI'f' 1 '1-. - ' W' "fK"' :E ew'-'N -1 pf: I I -I . V.. W., 'xg 1 ,L - 7 A , ' A ,. - nge! , -. , ,'v.,'..-fa vc --V , ' ew.--1-"..-Ad. 21 I , 4 . ' ' .' , . r I ' ' P . ' I I , R i- , 3 .J "- ' -. . . I I -, 4..,: ' p- -. A'-faq lj -. X3-. o .. I , - A ' NI . I, . 5 . - f .Q k f' L," Q - .- .. ' - 4.1, ' . 5 AY . , 7 I PA I ,041 I 1 1 . ' X' -'q'?Q,',-gr" 1 1 n'v'tY I . .I. I, I , . I I -.'Q -2' fr J, . ' -x " H- II IIM3, .I u - - I .Igng','.I.. ., I, ', 4. f. .- I .. J,,5-I, ,I- ' ' 1' fur' MQ. II ,III I ,I I I I... fax. I I ,dw I I I I Q.,-Q.. ..., . , ., , X . I . - I my ,I .' , - f .4-Q , ..- . v. ., :P ' f , L . z-- .-1 .Y f .'III1,, Ix I. .zip 4 I J ' gp Q' - . ffl-1 Pix I I 5, - , ' W '- , H. Q . ' nw: f"If'.H L K . "-' . ' ' 'qv I, 12.9 I . A 'Q -" 3 ' "- ' 1 a. f 1 f Q ' I1 ...On I -, 'ttnl It f N , I ' J- 1' 'I . ' II I 'I " ' I. A' ' I I i . . 'I,fII3' lr. Lv' o I 4 ' 3 I "' '4 1 , 1 , I I , it V L. - ' . ' ' 4' -ru - 2-:J f w 1' ,II f he - 1 . I , . : re... 5 J ' hh' .' I -M L,......... .-2 I ,- . H , -1 ' ' ' I -f I SI uni ,I , . I . 1 5 Y L HK I a- , X, ov'- II- Q. I ,ap I, IIIIIII II . ,,..,,,,, .mf.,5aI-5.7,.,,,,.,:.I5,IIIIIIW., ,. .,I ,.,,.. Mi'1lLT,'.1'Zl.?1IQj.,....,,,J- 1-I " ' ,I I I L ..,,1n',,g I XI Am 'Of-Q Y , .v,..,,,,g, I ,MHA--f-.H - ' M 1- 1 I IL , I, - . on "' , V.-'ani' . " ' ' "A nu ff' J vw", ""h""' . I ,I... , ' - . I ' . I ' 1 , ,, 1 I Q ' . . qv: -f-'1'f"- 11. -. - .,., I I-.rig I1-4I, ,I II.I .As-III . I ' 'gli - IJ, ' -. if ' ,, I, 1 u ESIDES the many activities which have at least some relationship to academic studies, there are some which serve merely to develop us culturally and socially. There is no question of the importance of such development when we realize the weight placed, in our contemporary world, on an individual's ability to enter into social relationships as part of both his business and private life. The ollice of the Social Directress at Fordham is designed to create opportunities for the men in the col- lege to meet college girls under circumstances both acceptable and enjoyable. Such organizations as the Philharmonic Society develop an appreciation for music while the Glee Club and Band offer a market for talent as well as the satisfaction of combined effort in "making" music. A chess club for those who enjoy the game, a sailing club, a hunting club and J the Hemin wa s for those ' Q., . . . . ,e A who -1 ust enjoy the C0l1V1V1Zll- Q ity of college associations. 'ff These are the things which make college years memora- b g ble' ' f lg., a s Q M ix p x , X KU?" , ixx Q 7-"?' ' Q fW ,si x f f l. ,f ft 'TEX 1 .1, IL. T1 :S If tt -t 'lf r if: z S '7 i 13-:TE i ' i sc g tv ls X as I uit W . 4- -, L :, 39 lVhen appointed live years ago as l"ordham's lirst llirectress ol' Social Activities, Mrs. .'XlCllIl l,amm had no idea what exactly her duties were. 'l'he general purpose ol' the newly established ollice was t.o make social life lor lfordham men more interesting and enjoyable. 'l'his much she knew-but where to hegin? Here is Mrs. l.amm's own progress report: "'l'he ollice assigned to social activities, Keating lll8, soon took on an air ol artistic conlusion. It serves as a place to deposit hooks. a unilorm jacket with last minute insignias to he sewed on sleeves, record players and classical and dance records to he stored 'til the next l'hilharmonic concert or dance, etc. On the table underneath a not too artistic hut arresting picture ol a lishing hoat in distress Qdone hy the bocial llirectress hersellp, Pogo and Charles Addams comics lie side by side with lolders ol' reproductions ol' lamous paintings. But hecause the ollice was warm and lliendly and "welcome ever smiled" as the H150 yearbook described it, soon the young people started to drop in and inlormal and enlightening discussions were held, with me doing most ol' the listening and learning and the students expounding their theories and ideas ol' what we could do to enliven social activi- ties and also how to lorm stronger social ties with nearby Catholic girls' colleges. "As the second year approached, definite plans which had been lound successlul the year helore were now put in scheduled operation. One ol' the lirst items on the calendar as soon as school opens in the lfall is the opportunity lor every student, hoarder or day student, to learn how to dance. lfree lessons are given successively once a week by young ladies lrom nearby schools until every Ifordham, man who has signed up dances well enough to leel at home when Senior Class Prrrsirlenl Bill Rnflixcliilrl prcsenls Mrs. Lnmni a lumqmfl of roxrfs ns a loken of appreciation for her help in ninlring Ihr' 1955 Sr-nior Week a .mccesm "lnl'ormal dances with a small admission charge ol' 25 cents grew to such proportions that these "Open llouses" now have to he held in the Gymnasium. 'lfhe "Open l-louse" socials give the students an opportu- nity to hecome hetter acquainted with lellow students and also to meet many young ladies lrom Catholic colleges. ., t. V . ,. . . a i' I. , ' " ' going to one ol' the larger dances. . , . I I A i ii W Sm'ruuml1'rl by mm inlrrcxlcrl in ' how lo form sfrongcr xocinl lies zuilh. nearlzy lalholic gnli c:1ll1'gr'.v", illrx. Lnmm gum nluml hm llllllfl Many Fordham students enjoyed skiing at Eastover Lodge last. year. This weekend trip was arranged with Mrs. Lamm's help. 'lh -Q, . .., ka . f. 'A' nl LV . A 'N t--':'2'n'2 ,Mu 1 1" H I Ls: u',.4,...v.i,5,,,,.k,,:h ' 'if' "" ' . P' 'N 'rx , 'mf 'Hgh tn. ' .- . , - - Y' "i3l'i"':'L'N . .Fri . ' .ft 2 I I v. ., Jkklffg-vf x N , MW ek L all """- .. " . -z..1"' ,, , c .,. . ,Q , , . V N ,K "ge in A l. ,g f'V' V x ' ' Li Ah, 5- K ini' Y, , '- .i .. , , . ' - , '- , E- 7. , Q V ,Q Xl: , 3 ' yd i ' ' -. lf. "Last year lor the lirst time, weekend trips were made to ski resorts which were tremendously success- lul. "l would like to close this interview with a word of thanks to all those who have made my live years here so enjoyable and without whose help and support the artistic confusion would have remained confusion and nothing else." Arranging for an "open house" is no simple chore. Here. with some assistance, Mrs. Lanun makes last minute plans. The Philharmonic Society, reactivated by Mrs. Lannn, prepares for one of their concerts. Music programs range from symphonic to musical comedy and the cluh's record collection is rapidly growing. 41 'I u X , QL- ff" Q 1 L 5 fiffia 65 N if ' Mr. Frederic Joslyn Forrlhum llrtiwwsily Glen Club Conductor ln a university as old as lfordham, tradition is a xery important aspect. Through the years since its inception as St. .lohn's College in I8-ll, there have been many traditions begun. Some have been tramp- led o11 by the speedy feet of progress: others have been improved or altered so that they have lost all sem- blance of their original identities. .-X few have sur- vived and remain-time, progress, and two world wars notwithstanding-virtually the same. Outstanding in this select group is the Fordham University Clee Club. The history of choral singing at Fordham dates back to the St. Cecilia Glee Club founded in lS5l. Through lack of funds, however, this first clttb passed out of existence until ltlfltf when a choir was organ- ized which, after another period of inactivity, was to become the Clee Club as we know it today. For the past twenty-nine years the Club has been guided by the Rev. Theodore T. Farley and directed by Mr. lfrederic lloslyn. Without the help of either of these men the Club could never have risen to its present, position of prominence in the liast. In lEl55, following a time-honored custom, the Glee Club's big event was the Town Hall concert. This performance is rapidly becoming the highlight of the social season at Fordham. As usual the Club made numerous appearances at the various young ladies' colleges in the East, as well as performing at a larger number of public gatherings. As a representative of Fordham, the Clee Club has been a service to the School in bringing people closer to the Fordham man. l lts members have never failed to make the impression a favorable one. The policy-making group of the Club, the Board of Directors, plans the concert schedule and directs all problems concerning members and their activities. This year the board was comprised, in addition to Father Farley and Mr. bloslyn, of its Chairman, -lames Conway Richard Cieciuch '55, Harold Greer '55, Stephen Mahoney '55, .joseph Doscher '56, -john Manning '56, and Bernard Dengler '57. Its most note- worthy achievement was tlte breaking of a long-stand- ing tradition by performing the Town Hall concert without the aid of sheet music. This indeed was a break with the past'which must become a precedent for the future. The main function of the Clee Club is the presen- tation of musical entertaimnent. This task was per- formed with the usual lfordham perfection as wit- nessed by the thunderous applause afforded by a capacity Town Hall audience. But the greatest bene- fits the Glee Club can offer are known only to its tnembers. To them it brings a sense of "belonging", of camaraderie, of fraternal enjoyment of a well-sung note or a solid chord. The Glee Club means little things like bus rides to Boston, the annual outing and banquet, or the Octet rewriting a song while singing it. But to all at Fordham and to those who have heard its performances, the Clee Club represents the spirit of brothership, for which we in a Catholic College so diligently strive. xi P' ' SU 9: 5 wil!! L iq, Bsmf. lk. it A ,Q ,- . tx' 5 . ya... ' 'V' 5'-v YM ax f' Mfg P5 'YM xr .3 5 V Y yn X . :s'1 X'? gh! X R 1- af 'V if L A in ' - NSN! V' .K ' daily-. Q f K., '1 "Q V . . G-nf igg f- '4 X,- Q ', , ,- , . 4 . , ' , i f The nflufrlrsulx in 1'l'I'Hllll, tlml, xlumlc Ihc !'1IlHIl1lK.' The Fowllmm llniw'r.viIy llmul Alum! 1llll.Vll'l' George Slmlfcrl. 'l'ltc lfoullizttii Unix'ct'sity llztml wus 0l'gQIllllCll in lEl2'l utitlct' tltt' iiiutlcrattiutt ol' lfzttltut' ll. QX. Clztytim ln its l'ornt:ttix'c ycztrs tliv mxtitt lillllflltlll ol' tltt llztncl wats to pc'rl'm'm :tt :tll llotttc lootlixxll gztmts 'mi llow'cx'ct'. in tltt' cottrsc ol' time it ltzts tlcvclupul salsa. lIIllSlCZllly :tml t1tttm'i'tt':tlly so tltzit it lizts lmumnic : 1 Smit, uutstzmcling Olgllllllllllilll in tlic liatst.. ln Illflli tltt llztntl wats illt'lllklt'tl in tltc rcrcitmliics wtrlconting ff llztrtlitiztl l'ztc'vlli to tlic Unitccl Stzttcs :tml sinu- lt is cc Q- gona on to ztppt-att' in wm'ltl-lztmccl Clztriivgit' l'l:tll. ' C jk llmlci' tlttr prcscttt tlit'ct'tion ul' Mr. Cicorgc Scullctt gif ii thc llztntl lists mzttlt- titttnt-rolls ztppc:ti'1tm'cs tlirouglt -xx Gsm LL out thc liztstctii Scztlmtmrtl ztrczt. lt is tttttlct' tltc motlu m 4' :ttion :tml glllililllll' ul' lfzttltcr llztmltl Mulcplcctt, AV XE 1 X wlto has lit-ltl tltztt position silica' lEl2!l. lt is in lfzttltu fl' V' , I Multptcclt tltzil tltt' lmztml mt-mlmcrs Iiml tlicii' slltlltggl' t , f ! :tml most, ztppi'uc'iztlix't' sttppm'tt't'. llt- is sytmntntotts xi' with tlicm :is lit' is with l"ut'cllmnl. ', ,, Own' :tml ztlmtwc its lim- colin-i't ztppcztixtttccs. ttttlsl X l"m'tlltzmt mutt will l'cit1c-ttilwt' tht- llzmtl lm' its rliytli mit' support ol' :ill R.O.'l'.i1. l't1ttt'tiutis. ltigltliglttctl lax tltc St. l'zttt'ic'k's llzty l':trzttlc. l'l'llll1ll'lly, tltc llztml rcmititls tltc 1lllllllllllH ol' at wisp lull clan' in at t'i'owtlul 1 Nlilllllllll wltcrc tltc' music' risinsg lrom thc mill-licltl t scc't.ion cmlmtlics thc spirit ol' futltpt-titix'tr sport :tml lcllowsliip in collcgv. 1 V ff, i, .pg - 'f ' 4 1 it M ','Liwkf',':- ' . ga c N. ,,-1y,,.- , ' ,V ,, . A .T vw,-he Q., f -, , - I ' 1- .,,,5..,1-..VI',g V ww: A . g ., Q .P'.1.V: .4 aw 31: 1' , wr' W .Vs .,,yf:Vggp,:'a4v? M, ., , 'I f f " 'n',-fy1w-,..,:,'- .V V V17 MJ xx A 1 A Mg - 'LV QQ . VJ. V"'a4' KV'-f 'nf 754 I . Xu ',VVtQ,,,' is ling ',N,.,, . 1 -Cggmug , gn QV Q or QQ , 9' f .Ji ' I X t I P 4 'vf , ' ' Fx , Q f - " ' ' V 77 52'f1'5N' ' ' l ' ' f --Q. 71" . ' ki 1 .A- Vf' I, , K. ' ' ,A " ' ' " K. Ig' J. SQ 5'+u 'T' 'nf X 5A 4. "Nm , In 5" "U xi -.- V V '.,"-' ' 12' 'V .M If E4 " , x 'fi fu D , 5 A . . 'Vs A , Xl ' 5 Us 15, Q, 4,1 .I -,-4 A ,s-Ls C . I.. N Q, N A. xi, ,l f- '- 1 . r' , 1- lj fl' 'Ui ,v f V. ,ix , VI V,' ., J 4, -,rf - A 1 - ,Lag -- V s , l , . 1--- - ,, . P 1 . I-J lg, ' E 'Z 5 V' . 3 .4 F 'Q ' 11 l Pa, wa g . vt: 4 -V P . h .. - -. H sf. -- N r '. .. - A 'V' ' .""i, Sf V- V' Q2 ' ,+V Ililfl . ' . 'SG b I V, Z1 . V -f ' f f .. - ' '. lr' 'jg ILL' 2 af ' ff" 9. , 3 3' ,IY I ' rl: " .UL P' H 'M ' 4 V x 'F ' i f ' '. ' '. VST' . V.',.,V.,,L,1fAfi,,,, , 2 ., Q -I A 7.,l:,'f 9- cn' .w ' F: .Ali I '1 W . ..i f 1 '-: , " - 1- V- ' . -g 5i! Hf " V .5551 'Sxf' 7: T f-.'45" ' ' W 1 - -1:"1Q-Y' -K' 'tsili '?- - .H-4 - V gf ', ., 115 Y , ,- , J -LA :jf-3 .45 1-ggsssw. 5,1 N! ' -J V N' I . H. J swag.. Aw sstn xxx K '. l ' .74 ,f f' 'Q' swcssstm'-ffg'2""""" 1 - 5' - Qi., , 4 I' bvtvsosmmsxxx y ' 'Q gi, , ' 2 ' .X f" xi ' , ' ig '- 'fg ' .' , , ,,, ' Il ,- .V -I-. J . fi' Q +5 Tsf2"iH ll L if M -L' . - - -'.3-,' V v ' -4 F ' . 2 .,.V , ' V '7' .V i ' 3 .fi-5 3" - ff' Q I V115 F!C""" .. - K 'Q ' -gf? HIE' ' ' ' MLS' , , . ,,,.4 V A A f 1 L v L . UI , I .xy I ... I D, V .ik ,..-v I'-, KL ,N -JY n ' ' ' 1-41, f ' 'F' .L ' ,4 I r 1 ' I .,',.l.' V -J ff T -3, ,I t... -A . . .-' K VM-.,,....,4,,,g,,-, pit- fl- 'N 3 A My . V, ,W,.,,.,,.. .,.,,W,M, . -x V X -' 5'-1g,.'-.-V""a' , Veg - V Wifi, , ' """" z Mrfi' - , ITH the world becoming "smaller" every day, thanks to better communications and transporta- tion, the need for a knowledge of foreign languages and a familiarity with foreign customs is constantly increas- ing. The need is perhaps greatest in a city like New York where, besides the occasional traveler from abroad, reside immigrants representing every race and national- ity. We cannot know these people and understand them without first having at least a basic concept of their philosophies and the way they lived in their native lands. The Modern Language Department at Fordham gives the student first a working knowledge of the lan- guage-French, German, Spanish, Italian or Russian. Then, through reading and conversation he learns of the people who speak the language. But only so much can be covered in a class hour and for this reason each lan- guage department has its own club. It is within these Phu Tm h clubs that ideas are ex- changed, that interests are HHN' aroused and that an interna- G . tional spirit is fostered. 47 mu u num smu ue u sawn M, ,m,, 1 V M, if X FR i Dr. Fernand Vial,CrightJChairman of the Mod- ern Languages Department and Jost? I. Nieves of the Spanish Department. Members of the French Club with Dr. john F. Winter, moderator, listen to a lecture by Alfeo Marzi. Here the Gaelic Society hears Dr. john V. Walsh of the Classics Department speak on ancient Irish history. The moderator is Rev. John P. Lahey, SJ. MODER ANGUAGES is-f 48 ,I Dr. Basil G. D'0uakil Albert F. Kaelin Dr. Kurt B. Gohla Dr. jean P. Misrahi Alfco H. Marzi Dr. Fernand Vial Samuel 0'Neill Dr. Richard M. Chadbournc Dr. Vinccntc Gaos josd I. Nievcs Adolfo F. Argucllcs Dr. john F. Winter The French Club posex with President Loic Gnllais fccnter, fronlj before one of lhz-ir Friday mrelings. The club provides an opportunity for members to further lheir knowledge of French rullure mul history as well as tha- Iflllgllllgf itxclf. x AT W ,,, . V ,.VL .v sy ft '- L ai- .. I U fy K .. . -s std' Ol the language clubs at Fordham, only one now remains without a corresponding credit course in the Department. That, of course is the Gaelic Society. It remains, nevertheless, one of the most spirited and active groups. Besides being noted for publication of the "Gaelic Ram" Qoften the center of healthy campus controversyj, its beer parties are famous. The "Gaels" are the only civilian contingent from Fordham to Mr. Alfeo Marzi, moderator, sits with the Italian Club ogicers during a meeting to plan future activities. march in the St. Patrick's Day Parade up Fifth Ave- nue. The remaining clubs-French, German, Italian, Spanish and Russian-contribute much to the activi- ties on campus during school hours. The lectures and discussions they sponsor draw many non-members to their meetings, as do their occasional "socials" such as the Italian C1ub's annual banquet at "Mama l,eone's". The members of the Italian Club treat themselves and the rest of the college with lectures by outstanding people who speak on subjects from Dante to modern Italian politics. .WWA X ABOVE: The Gaelic Society assembled during an activi- ties period and intent on absorbing a bit of Irish cul- ture from their speaker. RIGHT: Moderator Fr. Lahey and society omcers sit in front of an Irish flag and other Emerald Isle memorabilia. On the table are copies of the Society's publication, the "Gaelic Ram." The Spanish Club listen to their mod- erator, Jose I. Nieves, and learn a little more about our Latin Ameri- can neighbors. This club publishes "La Fordarnensev which contains ar- ticles both in Spanish and in English on topics pertaining to Spain and South America. -va-ogy WE? XVith the ascendency of the Soviet Union to its position as one ol the world's great powers there arose a, corresponding necessity lor considerable and detailed study ol this new colossus. To this end many Ameri- can universities set up faculties for the study of the Soviet Union. But it was soon realized that in order to fully understand the complex Soviet Union it was necessary to study the entire cultural development ol Russia. lt was for this purpose that tl1e Institute of Contemporary Russian Studies was founded at Ford- ham University. A short while later the Vladimir Soloviev Society was organized in order to enhance the study of the cul- tural background ol Russian civilization. From the be- ginning a varied program of activity was initiated. The backbone ol this program in the l95Ll-IQ55 academic year consisted ol' a series of lectures given by members Rev. Walter C. jaskievicz, SJ. Director of the Russian Institute of the Institute faculty and by guest speakers who are recognized authorities in the various disciplines in the field. Moreover, field trips to points of interest selected from the standpoint of Russian culture are another facet of the program. ln order to keep the faculty and students of Ford- ham and those ol other centers of Russian Studies informed of the activities of the Society the "Soloviev Society News Notes" and DRUZHBA Clfriendshipj are periodically published. The latter takes the form of a cultural publication while the former is an informal news bulletin with an occasional short article of gen- eral interest. ln addition to this the Society's Speak- ers Bureau, trained by the Jesuit Fathers of the Russian Center and specializing in the Eastern Rite, sends its members to communion breakfasts and dis- cussion clubs outside of the campus. Rev. George Bissonnette Crightj Assumptionist priest recently returned from Moscow, discusses present day Russia with the Rev. Niekolai Bock, S.j. of the Fordham Russian Center. Father Bissonnette visited the university to speak to the students at the Institute of Contemporary Rus- sian Studies. Prior to his Moscow appointment, Father Bissonnette had studied the Russian language, Marxism, and Soviet economics and geography at Fordham. He received his M.A. degree in absentia in june 1953. Dr. Serge Levitsky Mrs. Nina Lindsay Helene lswolsky Dimitri lvantsov ps ,,. .1 In the social realm the Society keeps in close contact with other similar groups by means of short stage productions, a glee club, debates, parties and dinners. In these varied ways the Soloviev Society lullills its function as the extra-curricular right arm of the Rus- sian Institute. In this sense the Society is the vehicle for a more integrated approach from the standpoint of culture to the chief world problem which confronts the lfordhani graduate of 1955. The Vladimir Solouiev Society. Ed Dclfraneo, Chip Kennedy and Dick Mills, oyicers of the Soloviev Society, with Dr. Serge Levilsky, moderator. ,.. rf -5 , J-rx xv P5 ,QV ,MA 3:4 ' S :M 3 -?g'fCtw's.tf. L 4-I,-:"f'Qff, if if. "Q if n,..-, A ': 5' 1 ' w ,v qi ' ,Nev-N,.I.v' .-x.--In :V-:N . lx. 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Ii , 1 ' 11 -L-154 Hvi. 111-11711 The Political Philosophy Department at Fordham is perhaps the fastest growing and most influential in the extra-curricular activities. While there is no direct con- nection in many cases between the activity and the de- partment, certainly the college student government, the class governments, the political party clubs and all the club organizations themselves are outgrowths of the aca- demic studies in political philosophy. just how vital a citizen's knowledge of politics, eco- nomics and sociology is may be easily seen in a quick glance at the world about us. Our own domestic govern- ments, local, state and federal, are built around a com- plex political system. In our international relations the need for studied experts becomes greater each day, and how can we weigh the merits of an economic system with- out a basic knowledge of the science of economics? Being exposed to as diverse a community as New York City, we soon become aware too of the extreme lack of under- standing between national and racial groups-basically caused by complete disregard for the science of sociology. Christianity being all in- clusive as it is, cannot neglect these political and social sci- ences. For, in their many departments - among them government, international and labor relations - the moral aspects are many and too often overlooked. g. 55 'l'he Student Government of Fordham College en- joyed, during 195-l and what may be considered its most successlul year to date. It all began in Feb- ruary of l954 when a new constitution as well as a new set ol' officers were elected and inaugurated. The new constitution introduced a tripartite government equipped with an upper and a lower house. It out- lined very distinctly all courses ol' action and was a welcomed though weighty replacement for the hap- hazard governments ol' the past, The new ofhcers, Dick Rack, 'l'ed Stanton, Lang Toland and Matt lslllgllllillll were all well experienced in school poli- tics lrom past work in class organizations. Many ol' the well-worn campaign promises were realized such as the used hook exchange and activities calendar. More ol' the student hody was ahle to participate in the government through committee work than ever helore and cooperation lrom the administration was greater. .lliss Scully of the Dean's Omce is the "angel" of student gov- ernment as well as all other activities. Her help and above all, her patience zvilh us rendered "possible" many "impossible" situations. Sladent Government onicers at a policy meeting or perhaps lrying to interpret some disputed portion of the constitution. Left to right are Ted Stanton, vice-president, Dick Rack, presi- gnulully rlent, and Langdon Tolaml, secretary. Matt Fitzgibbon, treas urer, was not present for the photograph. . IIC tkm Jr fs.--3 . The Suarez Society began its yearly activity in the political-socio-economic field with particular vigor this year. lnterspersed among the various intra-club activities such as lectures, debates, movies, etc., they were invited to a number of extramural activities. ln October they attended the annual conference of the Catholic Association for International Peace held in Washington, in November they attended the sub- region of the Association of International Relations Clubs, at the New School for Social Research. Representing Russia at the Model Security Council at Pace College, they discussed such topics as the Cyprus question and the threat to peace because of National Chinese troops in Burma. West Point in- vited them to a tri-college discussion where they voiced an opinion on the partition of Germany. On Febru- ary 26, they attended the Foreign Policy Conference of St. Peter's College. Suarez sent delegates to both Yale and Dartmouth for their annual meetings. The Collegiate Council for the United Nations saw Suarez representation at the annual meeting in Chicago this year. As the sole organ for presenting the political thought of the Fordham Student, Suarez is eager to attend the various intercollegiate functions in the East. Aside from these extra-campus trips, Suarez has developed a series of Forum debates featuring promi- nent faculty members as well as members of the stu- dent body. They have initiated a Radio Speakers Bureau wherein the members were afforded a good opportunity to speak on the radio on current topics. The Suareziun, the magazine of the Society, published three issues during the year in which political and economic problems were developed. April l, 2, 3, brought eight members of the club to the University of Pennsylvania where they attended the Model General Assembly. X'Vith sixty colleges rep- resented, Fordham was delegated the Soviet Union and debated such topics as underdeveloped countries, Cyprus, Charter Review, South Africa and others. As a member of the Association of International Rela- tions Clubs, they attended .the annual convention in St. Louis. The Model New York State Senate was held in Albany to which eight delegates were sent. Suarez was represented at the National C.C.U.N. ln- stitute at Finch College as well as the C.C.U.N. Chicago meeting. Perhaps one of the more important activities was the Charter Review Seminar held on April 30 at which Fordham played host to sixty colleges. To round out their program, they sponsored two spring lecture series. Assisted by their moderator, Mr. John Logue, the officers, Alfred Crisci, Aaron Schwartz, Joseph Peden, Frank Tuzzolo and james Feeny, provided for a year of varied and unusual activity. The Suarez Society sponsored a debate between candidates for student government president. Here Suarez president Al Crisci presides while Ken Donnellen speaks. Mike Drew is seated, center. Record crowds attended the Suarez forums during activities and lunch periods. Dr. Robert Remini speaks at a forum on contemporary politics as Ken Donnellen, Conny Munster, Al Crisci,Don Cody and lim Farrell, fseated from lejt to rightj, look on. Constantly vying for position as the larger organ- ization arc Fordham's Republican and Democratic Clubs. This year the Republicans are claiming the honor, but not without a contesting raised eyebrow from the Democrats. Both these organizations are, however, among the most active on the campus. They allord members ample opportunity to learn the lively art of politics while at the same time receiving an education on the operations of government. These are among the few college organizations with a scope of activity and inlluence that reaches out into the local, state and even national political scene. Club members The Democratic Club. learn their politics by putting theory into practice, proving scholarship and sweat are still the correct formula to produce that elusive compound: victory- sometimes. '1'hey work hard to prove that politics and morality are fully compatible. Stressing the role and duties of a Catholic College student in tl1e political sphere, both the Republican and Democratic Club emphasize purposeful action and participation in community political life. Members campaigned during the state and congressional elec- tions of 1954. Q..-Mu ..4. n The Republican Club. it 58 ,iQ George Benigno, president, chairs the Industrial Rela- tions Council in a discussion on the Department of Labor. " With the ultimate realization that the graduating Catholic student will either directly or indirectly be connected with management upon the termination of his academic education, the purpose of the Industrial Relations Council, as embodied in Article II of its Constitution, "Shall be to enlighten the student body at Fordham University in the social philosophy of the Catholic Church, the principles and practices of the labor movement and the inter-relation between the two and to motivate the students to work towards the organization of economic life and sound Christian principles of justice and charity." Since the objective of the organization is to acquaint the student with this practical aspect of life, the club has geared its activities to fulfill this end. The program was this year divided into four cate- gories. First was current labor problems, the second dealt with government-industry relations, the third concerned the various labor and social encyclicals, and the last was a general workshop on ' operating pro- cedures. Speakers closely associated with these various topics were invited to speak to the group and discus- sions among club members were held. Tours of the leading companies in the Metropolitan area, the sitting in on labor disputes at the State Labor Relations Board, a series of radio programs on WFUV, an intercollegiate conference and two socials all added up to a very active and educational vear to those who participated. The Industrial Relations Council. Rev. joseph Fitzpatrick, SJ., Dr. Wil- liam R. Frasea, Rev. J. Franklin Ewing, SJ., Lawrence W. Pierce, and Rev. Gerald Kelly, SJ., participate in a symposium entitled, "Can We Make Deseqregation Work?" The s 1 I K .y nposiurn was sponxored by the Interracial Coun- cil of the University. The lnlerraeial Council holds a discussion with Moderator Rev. Philip S. Hurley, SJ Inset: Council Officers and Father Hurley. sf 'K ,- -p -11 - f M . .IG M .iq ws wg, ,.. if 5 ,. . fl Members of the Sociology Club pose with their moderator Mr. Frank Santopolo, fseated, left , jrontj. Dr. William R. Frasca, chairman, political philosophy department. Father joseph F. Scheuer, C.PI'.S., of the sociology depart- ment, tdlks with members of the club in the sociology lab. ,i . 4 j X , ,.. Rev. joseph P. Fitzpatrick, SJ. Rev. Moorhouse I. X. Millar, S.j. ....X..,....,. Dr. Friedrich Bacrwald Dr. Constantine Rackauskas William M. Partlan Rev. J. Franklin Ewing, SJ. Mr. Santopolo and Father Scheuer discuss one of the Sociology Club projects in the lab. Ni-Q an ' a . R M , if ff R W i f 'I J . fixing Rev. J. Franklin Ewing, S.j. - h. -qngllfwgp, - Mr. Frank A. Santopolo 1,7 Future Sociologists tabulate a poll in the sociology lab. William M. Partlan 63 Dr. Mary Clarke sg? A 'Wx rw- L ...sry . f' v- "M- 'val Sivan i. 'wvwsw K '-Q. . 'N- bum fi .ve . ,nu ,ga .wk A , www ,,,ry"mq.,.. .rr , fo-,qi ' ,VW Ol' ,y ff yi!-1 'I --'F 5.0 M,-4 1 , , . V V 1 Q "4 I , , , , v ,af , ---an mv-A l."""'fw - 1 N ' gm' -. I ' 4 ' . f iv-' V. J 5 ' Q, fx 1 E: A The Natural Science Departments have long been out- standing at Fordham. But like at most colleges, the im- portant work is done on the graduate level. In these technical fields of chemistry, physics, biology, mathe- matics and psychology, one can but hope to acquire in four years a substantial basis upon which to build by study and research. The means by which science students at Fordham supplement their undergraduate studies are their various science clubs. In these organizations they are able to dis- cuss contemporary items of interest in their particular fields, invite guest speakers and conduct experimental research on their own. It is through these clubs that a real interest is fostered in a way that the classroom in-- struction could never accomplish. The advances in science during the past century have been great-the advances during the past decade have been fantastic. The pace at which we live today, and the constant desire for more and . better material comforts, antibiotics, superior weap- ons and a host of other items, requires that,we con- tinue to produce trained personnel capable of carry- ing on the research and ex- perimentation necessary to our further scientific devel- opment. 65 Rev. Charles A. Berger, SJ. -5 -+. '1 BICLOGY Dr. james A. Mullen Dr. james A. Mullen Dr. Louis S. Marks Dr. Eleanor R. Witkus Rev. Charles A. Berger Dr. james Forbes Dr. Daniel Ludwig ,SJ CH EMI TRY Dr. William F. 0'Connor chairman Dr. Norman 0. Smith 67 Dr. Leo K. Yamowski Dr. Michael Ccfola Sister Miriam Grace Dr. Norman 0. Smith Dr. Charles E. McCauley Dr. Charles F. Fcrraro Dr. Emil j. Moriconi Dr. Leopold R. Cerecedo Tilmr S. Laszlo Dr. Friedrich F. Nord Dr. WValter J. Schubert Dr. Leo K. Yanowski Dr. lVilliam F. O'Connor Dr. William A. Lynch thairman Bernard j. Dunn Dr. Victor F. Hess ff ,lf PHYSICS '91 Daniel F. McDonald Rev. J. joseph Lynch, S.j. William P. Hurley The Lnennee Conference assembled in a lecture hall for one of its Friday lectures. Dr. Hennessy sits with John Nitli, fsecoml from leftj, president of the Conference, and other ogicers. Dr. Douglas Hennessy, moderator, and group of future doctors are intent listeners. Dr. Hennessy is third from left in front row. 69 Unlike the other science clubs, the Laennec Con- ference is not restricted to majors in any particular course but is limited to pre-medical students. The intricacy of the medical profession makes its prepara- tion long and often tedious. The Laennec Conference tries to overcome the latter by inviting praeticingidoc- tors to address the group on items of general interest and by sponsoring, when possible, field trips to local hospitals where a more realistic idea of their chosen profession may be acquired. Donald Dillon Rev. William C. Bier, S.j. Dr. Robert T. Rock, jr. Dr. Dorothea McCarthy Dr. joseph F. Kubis Rev. Joseph G. Keegan, S.j. Dr. William j. Crissy Dr. William O'Connor Dr. Anne Anaslasi Dr. Alexander Schneiders Rev. Richard T. Zcgcrs, SJ. Father Keegan, moderator of the Psychology Club, poses with the club oyicers. President Tony Saintomas sits at'his left. The club studies and discusses developments in psychology under the direction of the departmental faculty aml outside speakers invited to its meetings. PSYCHOLOGY Here Father Keegan speaks to members of the club on some of the more basic physiological elements of impor- tance to the psychologist. 0 4 l Prior M. Curran William T. Shields Rev. lidwzml B. Berry, SJ. zrhairmmz Joseph V. 0'Ncill -Q Q Forrlhanmllr Club mmlernlor Francis G. 0'Ih'ien1Ii.vcusses n problem with ll club member. 3 . i, . Q X . .. ' .. i , X i . Q Franfis G. 0'lh'icn Raymond E. Ozimknski Frank B. Crippcn Jlurlmvllm' 0'lIri1'n liximis as n club nufmbm' allrmpis lo rlmnrnislrllif' ll Ilwory to llu' Forrllmnmlll Club. ATHEMATICS .S A A g f g kVAVih L, Iql x H if Q2 5 ,ia a.5 ""'Q' M ..., K . ' --Agw X U 1 Us if 4 --.II A .UAQQK 'il .ww ,JM . . gk? JA' A, D ' X Q A A ,' Q ,sn My I 4 A 1 X pgm if WM yhylk Kiqgw :WY xg, .W-ff' , L, + t K' 1 I Ag Q5 . K H Y V ,.,. Suk . K .5 K ,.. i 5 .. - ' ,xg-I my 0 V83 K 4 2 Q g - 4 . wx A 1 ,, .1 5 'rl S' li. r Q4 One of the more "visible" departments on campus is that of Military Science. Every Wednesday, about half of the student body, members of the Reserve Oflicers Training Corps, don their uniforms to participate in the weekly drill period. It is here in the classroom that these men prepare for their duty as reserve Second Lieutenants. The course of instruction begins in freshman year and continues until graduation when, along with his degree, each cadet receives a commission in the Army or Air Force Reserve Corps. During the summer between junior and senior years,' the cadets spend several weeks at an established Army or Air Force base where they receive an intensive basic training. Although we should like to believe that there is no necessity for the maintenance of military forces and therefore no need for military training, we all realize that to believe this is to be unrealistic. Few enjoyed the R.O.T.C. training-it was an infringement on our "col- lege freedom," and many will not enjoy their active duty tour. But deep within us each of us knows the debt i we owe our military forces D and the need for our per- sonal preparedness to up- hold and to defend by force when necessary those princi- ples of Christianity and De- mocracy so much a part of us. 73 !,,.p,X IIN Colonul Paul llnrns l'mjr'.mn' of .llililury Sr'i1'm'l' mul Tar,-Iirs l , . ' . . x X 3 Ll. Colonel Rohcrl F. Moorc Lt. Colonel Fl'lllll'lS King X 1 , ' 45' ' 5, . , ,J XXX I sl x xx ' ' ri," x X 1 I -. . . " l K' X . 1' Y . . 1. , ,f gg, w 1753 Colonel Raymond V. Schwanbeck Professor of Air Science .4- l inf... Sh LT 1- . Lt. Thomas J. Hickman TfSgt. Donald J. Mook TfSgt. Charles A. Wahler MfSgt. Leonard A. Anderson MfSgt. Woodis S. Chaddick SfSgt. Carl 0. Nave Lt. Col. Leon j. Friedman Major Charles W. Brion Major Marion A. Fontanella Captain Albert J. Bushong The Pershing Rifle Drill Team on Demonstration Day. Pershing Rifle Company D, 8th Regiment, was Hrst organized at Fordham in 1946. Since then, it has won national acclaim for its activities. While most Pershing Rifle units are primarily trick drill teams, Company D has always deemed it more important to acquaint its members with all the phases of military activity and to foster the fraternal spirit. It has nevertheless, won first place in the annual drill meet twice and has consistently placed among the top three units. A Hne record of awards and honors has led to great esprit de corps. The company is organized along the llllCS of the Infantry Company, and is captained by a senior. Four juniors are the staff and platoon leaders, and approxi- mately l00 freshmen and sophomores are the privates and non-commissioned officers. This year's captain was Bob Foy and,his lieutenants were Bill Mermagen, John Eyd, Frank Guilfoyle and Bill McGutl1. The non-commissioned ofhcers-are picked every year by the captain and his staff on the basis of their rec- ords from the previous year and their showing during Non-commissioned Officers' School. Attendance at the school is by invitation, the best men of the preceding year being asked. The school is held in early Septem- ber, before the academic year starts, and consists of intensive training in tactics, leadership, and related military subjects. This year 27 men finished the school and were appointed i'n the various non-commissioned grades. When the academic year starts, a recruiting program is carried out among the outstanding freshmen and sophomore R.O.T.C. cadets. This year 103 men made application. They attend drill once a week for two and one-half hours and are assigned pledge tasks dur- ing the week. After a hve month period of testing, training, and drilling, those men who qualify are awarded the distinguishing blue and white fourragere and accepted into the fraternity. During Easter week, the entire company goes on a bivouac at Camp Smith, near Peekskill, N. Y. Here the men live as soldiers for one week, going on tac- tical exercises during the day and night, seeing fire power demonstrations and qualifying with the Ml rifle. This is another unique feature of D-8, as no other company in the East goes on such a week-long bivouac. The company holds a Pershing Rifle Ball annually. This dance is always a success, and is a big event of the year for all P.R.s. Several other parties are given throughout the year. As only four juniors and one senior can remain active in the company, many men are forced to be- A rille is snatched away by an inspecting om- cer during one of the Pershing RiHe companys regular inspections. The trick drill team in action. Here they "Ex- change Arms." come inactive every year. This year, for the first time, an organization was set up to continue the training and channel the talents of these men. It was headed by Tom Ward, assisted by Guy Morse, Tom Fahey, Don Greene, Dick Coulter and Jack Murphy. The Air Force counterpart to the Pershing Rifles is the Arnold Air Society. Dedicated to the memory of the late General "Hap" Arnold, its purpose is to further the mission of the United States Air Force at college and university level by encouraging greater teamwork, technical knowledge, and cooperation among the students enrolled in the Advanced Course of the A.F.R.O.T.C. program. The Society is spon- sored by the Air Force Association, with National Headquarters in Washington, D. C. The Frank Luke Squadron of the Arnold Air Society, stationed at Fordham, has made fine contributions to the forma- tion and development of its members, who upon ini- tiation into the national organization, begin a series of activities intended to add valuable experience in preparation for active duty. Fordham received its membership charter on May 16, 1951. It was named in honor ofthe hrst member of the Air Corps to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, Frank Luke, Jr., a World War I ace. Just as the Arnold Air Society rapidly expanded to 161 squadrons, the Frank Luke, jr., Squadron has grown from seven members in 1951 to over sixty-hve active members, ofhcers and pledges, in 1955. The activities engaged in by the squadron include a weekly drill and command school period for the pledges which is intended to instil a strong espirit-de- corps' among the prospective members, insure their proficiency in the execution of drill and in the ability to personally conduct drill. To gain familiarity with military procedure, the members plan, organize and direct their precision drill team, field trips, lectures and social events. The climax of the year's activities is the annual military ball, at which pledges for the Society receive the distinctive blue and gold member- ship fourrageres, worn about the left shoulder. The Frank Luke jr. Squadron was under the com- mand of Cadet Major Long. who is assisted by a capable staff composed of Cadets Ed Dixon, George King, Gene Daniel, Bill Along, Ed Reynolds, John Valenti, Reston Myron, Jim Hagan and George Hol- brook. The Squadron is privileged to have Captain Albert Bushong, U.S.A.F., as moderator. Captain Bushong has motivated each member towards the so- ciety's goal of military prohciency and scholastic attainment. Lt. Col. Richard M. Gardner instructs a R.0.T.C. class in Ternan Hall. ROTC S.F.C. Edward A. Ruth S.F.C. Alex j. Balser 78 Passing in review to Cadet Col. Kevin Maher during one of the Wednesday drill peri- ods. Carle! Col. Kevin Jlaher receiving an award for being the oulslamling Army R.0.T.C. carlel. Nw . FKA Ollieers of the Cadet Oyieers Club. This club, open for membership to all commissioned Cadet omeers, sponsors a .llililary Ball each spring and a dinner for members before gradualion. The R.0.T.lI. cm-ps is rezficzvefl by Father McGinley and the R.0.T.C. omcers during the Demonslralion Day ceremonies. Cade! Col. Tom Fahey is commander of troops. ...is .T- .posvll"0"" L14 Y r -. av., J' a,,, 'Fl . nv' " ' 4 . . '-'M A , 9- . -:r:7f,-,.g,1-f,-Az, ,M 1. Q: 1' . X ,-1. lr,-, A , . '- qs ,f. - , ' K f'v:, C ,,,...-1- O sum .J-K M... V S 4 1 , ER CAMP ww. K rf Jn- W JJ: I 9 l nn. The A: rmul -v . 'xnpygf 4. ., ,,,,W,-- ,.... ,f,',,,.,',,..i.i:F., www x f 1 l' ,P ami' "" - 2 'sq' X ,HX f F ff' Qs ig, N43 W... -W ,NW ,qxm -vu 'A' :ruff Sgt lmrcu and llu, jnnrllull lunch. JR!ilEm"x ' i M ff ' Q f' !.- Telling the jollcx ull abou! il. -""?-su.. ?"'lllgq, Hunan 4...-. .44 'Q MJ' S 'X 1 livl thcm l'I1'm1, boyx, y0u'Il hmm Iwo n'lmlr' Imurx lo xlrwp lulvr. ff' u ,M I f fs , n , ff' ., ufxfilklflf xg P! 1 llu' c'ln.v.vmmn-Ilzz' llwory . cw ..: 0 111 ' I ' I :Nw W -if ci vp: I , -i, IA, hal lulcrs lnsl plum ul Fml Ihlq 1 t"w. sh sl -CJ in U ,WN As gr .1 M ..1,':g, f ,V A M- vw 1 ...- Q pf., "'r'.' 1, 1 1' 'K' .' . ,V , mx ij V, 'ye A ,V - ,, 'Ml ' ,4 ' W X. 'W QWJ K livfml-Wg.. , -' ' ' 4 A 4 4 1 .X ' 4'-'W ',- 0' 'tr A wfwirni V u '- Q L f . , , , I 4 '. ' .,"5Q.'v,.4 "V+ 1" 'fy -nf' 1 ' ,J FW- -,v-.,, N X, V 4, xg 1 Jimi? mc. ww 4 G M 'geihwvfdlw ggi' Ad gfq' J-aww. M' 1 ' V "M MM , ' " A ' 1 X af ALQJVVO' "3 H f,a1., ,Wa1m ., ,, A 'r .V 4, ,C-L ,fl I, N 4.-.ary 1 fs .gym uf' ,Q " ' ww-P, ,, , ',.h .ir 'e, '1., .-.Hi .1 ,4. -'f'f"4g? 7' 'GV "' ., . lx. V,-3, pl vi' 4 z L. Vw, 1 ,.- V VB ,own ,if-'5.'. ,www M V 5-4 f .L ' M ,fh,-an , , - ,- q QM L -- ,M-' ,www A,i,4r4,,,jV f ,W V ' ,J :- U Q 'M A G 'RQ lu If I , I ' 1 V, .. A iw , by.-, .-P' QINDW 0-'-w.'.,,,,, GMA 1 N .,,-.Q"9'I 4-4. S uc . .rw -fn-ww -M , X , -"' ,xt ,nur-,..,, M. ,, , The greatest contributing factor to the spirit of a school is competition, whether this be in debating or tennis, football or academic standing. But to the average American college, this idea of competition seems to be dominated by sports alone. Colleges acquire their "name"-are "put on the map"-by the proficiency of their football or basketball squads. Scholarships are offered to athletes with complete disregard for academic standards in order to maintain that uname." The place of the various sports in a college began as a part of the well-rounded curriculum which aimed at mental as well as physical development. Intramural competition built a spirit of cohesiveness among those who both worked and played together. Intercollegiate competition did this same thing while it was "scholar- athletes" who participated. But soon the spirit of small competition was lost and college athletics became a finan- cial joust. At Fordham, we lost the joust in the football realm. We hold our own in basketball, the 1954-55 season bring- ing eighteen wins against nine losses. We maintain baseball, tennis, swimming, water-polo, squash, cross- country and fencing teams. The track squad in the past year has set new world rec- ords. And we at Fordham can still pride ourselves as an academic institution. 83 ii' ' y WO" pn L 1 Q, V .Q Mun-w. ,rf 'fk 1- 1? 4 names: - ' ' W if on-1 54 if" 7 ' 1- 4'-.-in at v ,,. ., p Ugg gr-1. g. .,,,,,,,q? ' , "'. no Q M:g-' 1- X 0, 3,4-,. 'Twp' v " fu.. 'Fl "2""' "., Y ' 'H' , ' . - r Q '43 ' --erghlf-ff, ru" ..'v" ' J- ' D .sn J Q .UQ l - A tl ' K ' MM' " ' ' ' .4 1 -Q , 914 I 'K , Q . 3: 'J'o"Ny ' .ff r 3 Q. "' gm ' " W A-Q Pls , Om ' " N. 'T 1- 1. -1 2 Y . 4- ' "f Q o A " I "" fm- div 84 nz.. :Wg l 'KH FUUTBALL After autumn leaves had fallen and then faded on another glorious gridiron season across the nation, the sportswriters proceeded to close out the record book for 1954. The season provided much excitement and many thrills for the millions of football enthusiasts who watched the youthful Terry Brennan take over the reins and guide Notre Dame to another brilliant season in the tradition of Frank Lahey. The eyes of the nation were also cast upon the "Middies" from Navy, who after upending Army traveled to the Sugar Bowl to do the same to Ol' Miss, 21-0. Nationwide acclaim was also given to Oklahoma, U.C.L.A., and Ohio State for their untarnished records: the Buck- eyes later adding a Rose Bowl victory to their laurels. But with the highlights of the season there were also dramatic obituaries to be read. Football had lost two great friends in popular Grantland Rice, Dean of Sportswriters, and Pop Warner, masterful strategist of the Jim Thorpe era. And along with these obitu- aries another was solemnly written: although not as publicized as the others, it still struck-home to those who knew it and loved it, this simply being Fordham Football tradition. Fordham inaugurated football in 1883 with a single game which it lost to St. Francis Xavier College of N.Y.C., 12-6. Fordham terminated the sport in De- cember of 1954 with a season's record of one win, seven losses and one tie. Sandwiched in between these two dates were.sixty- three years of intercollegiate competition with teams both nationally prominent and those that played the sport on a small scale. There were lean years as well as great yearsg there was no victory too great nor loss too devastating to be forgotten in the records-all added to Fordham Football tradition. 85 From I883 to the dark days preceding the First World War, Fordham played its football on a small scale, as did most of the colleges, and engaged teams from the local East. Highlights of this infant era were the games with Princeton, Columbia, N.Y.U., Navy and the legendary Carlisle Indians whom the Ram de- feated 14-10 in 1915. YVith the realization of war, Fordham dropped football, as many gridsters ex- changed uniforms with Uncle Sam. Following the war years Fordham resumed the sport and saw its first Stal' of public note and All-American in a triple threat called Frank Frisch, "The Fordham Flash." These were the lean yearsg there was still a long way to comeg but the tradition grew. The twenties also had UPS and LIOWIIS but 21 HCW era was born in 1923 when a diminutive quarterback named "Zev" Graham, inspired by Coach Frank Gar- gan, led the Maroon to important victories over Lou Little's Georgetown squad and Chick Meehan's N.Y.U. Violets,' thus inaugurating the metropolitan championship games at the Yankee Stadium. In 1927 another land mark in Fordham Football History was established with the signing of Major Frank Cavanaugh who said while viewing the scant material left him after graduation, "Well, Rome wasn't built in a day." And in late November of 1929, "?N"'.lf' U I wr W , 2 W C F .Ax !r',f -H1 A : 1? Q .,1 't s . 4 N 'xW W sn :H I L XA -4 nm. ww M .mm . gk., X ...I 'Wu- M "HMM M fw- Mww' ,gp , ..w.. 'wi K . m W " 45 'if , .Y A . at ,W , aw W 4' . WW LMHM ' ws., 'M ' 5' M W K L, W W, f . M MWNQWW, 5 ilfg , Afufi A My ilu.. 5' wa at the Yankee Stadium before 60,000 cheering fans, "The Cav's" dream was realized in a final defeat of N.Y.U. and Fordham's first unbeaten season which talliedseven wins and two ties. This was the era of All-American Tony Siano, Tubby Beloin, Johnny Gripp and jim Delany, all Fordham greats who brought the Rams to the threshold of national promi- nence . . . And the tradition grew. The story of the thirties and early forties is the story of that national prominence. In 1930 St. Mary's "Galloping Gaels" from Califomia, upset Fordham 20-12 for the Ram's first defeat in two years, but one of the greatest inter-sectional rivalries ever played on the gridiron had been launched. The same year saw 80,000 fans jam "The Stadium" to witness Fordham defeat N.Y.U. 7-0 and again the following year, 80,000 more thrilled to a 7-7.tie. The fans not only watched and cheered but little realized that playing before them would be two of Fordham's All-Time All- Americans, bulwark center, john Del Isola and a young back from the farm lands of Riverhead, Long Island, Edward Danowski. The cheering fans also never realized that a tackle by the name of Connie Murphy, who in the season's finale with Bucknell had received head injuries, would never live to see an- other pair of goal posts tom down . . . Victory with heartache . . . And the tradition grew. And as the tradition grew so did public sentiment, the nation's eyes were cast upon Fordham. "Sleepy" jim Crowley was signed to the head coach position in 1933. Under guidance of this former member of Notre Dame's famed "Four Horsemen," further laurels were garnered as the Crowley-Men rolled to 55 victories against l2 defeats and 7 ties over a 9 year period. This was "The Golden Era" of Fordham Football. Ram gridsters were picked regularly on All-American teams: Les Borden '34, Amerino Sarno '35, Nat Pierce '36, An in 1937, Fordham, after a 7-0-1 season, re- ceived its greatest plaudit from the world of sport by placing three members on that All-American Team: Alex Wojciechowicz, Ed Franco, and Al Babartsky. These were the years of the immortal "Seven Blocks ol' Granite", of the scoreless ties with the Pitt "Pan- thers" in '35, '36, '37, of the intersectional rivalries with St. Mary's "Gaels," the Purdue "Boilermakers," and the traditional games with N.Y.U. of the "Ken Strong Era." The 1938 team was no less brilliant than the pre- ceding teams. Lcd by Dom Principe, Len Eshmont and Bill Krywicki, the Ram plummeted to a season marred by a single defeat, meanwhile setting another record in the attendance department which totaled over 280,000. A slogan had been launched, "From Rose Hill to Rose Bowl," and it rang in every one associated with the sport and the school. In December of 1940, the Rams were chosen to go to a bowl . . . the Cotton Bowl . . . and on january l, 1941, Texas A8cM had edged out a valiant Fordham team 13-I2 led by more Rose Hill greats: Jim Blumenstock, Steve Filipowicz, Lou Delfillipo and -lim Noble. Another year passed by, and this time, Fordham, Lambert Trophy winner, was invited to play the Missouri "Tigers" in the Sugar Bowl. Alter the mud and rain had been washed away, Fordham was on top 2-0 by virtue of Al Santilli's blocked kick and were promptly crowned Sugar Bowl Champs . . . The tradition had grown. .ia Y' 1- Mr' ,, Ill. ie . .feng ' v - I mx , -f ,J M1 A 3.15621 ' 'V'-A M.. I ,. g wif. d,yl . ' 5 , 6 0 X 6 . ' . f.' fin, - we ' nf- " ff,-nw' 4 U, - , ' ff wig. g...5,.f,-A t. . -w - f sf, , bw Nh. . , .I 1 S55 , L.. RG v'Q...W.av wg 'X?'53'-.1f'J'J- , f 'f- -.ey .5-I A Hgh ,. . -.J , 4 .L : +4 , hr c Fixx! f ?.f':'f 3 , 2 7 l , ,ig F! ,,i -I .--.ad .av -we . wl Q lik' 'X-1:',Q7:'Q. Rfk-and 5 af 'W 1 -' -., ' - F' 'F' '4 , .,, -44 , ,.'I,4v MH- -Xi. Q ,J ,K - 1"".d' z , - fp " , ' 1- . iff. I ,gl 9 -QQ 5531:-1 .rf 'gglfh 1-1 3 , B ,P .Qx x 1 ,g IQ lla, Q -Na 'w 4'. ." " ' 1 -ish" ,gtg . s,- ' Q U' Us DT' W wr. b -wp . agp? '31 4 J ' ..,, 1 -,.:,.-.Q.gi'J 'K' :pq Q .dl but 9' C -...f ' 13lNv"1bi". X with N I -4119 1- I ff' Another World War interrupted football at Ford- ham as uniforms were again exchanged with Uncle Sam: but in 1946 the sport was revived and the long trail back became a primary undertaking. But the sport was not that easy to revive as in the days of "Zev" Graham. There were post-war hnancial difhculties, lack of attendance, and a tendency to the red column in the record book. These burdens as well as an undermanned squad and a heavy schedule faced Coach Ed Danowski as he looked toward the l954 Season Opener with Rutgers. The Ram traveled to New Brunswick and then back again with a 13-7 win. Many mistakes were made but the outlook had brightened considerably. A week passed and the Ram found itself under the lights at Boston University Field, and as the lights were turned off, a 55-20 defeat was erased from the scoreboard. The following week saw the Ram in its New York debut, at the Polo Grounds, with Boston College and after 47 minutes of inspirational 7-7 football, Fordham suc- cumbed, 21-7, to the powerful "Eagles" It was on the road again, this time to Milwaukee, home of the Marquette "Golden Warriors," and before a home- coming crowd of 20,000, Fordham held the favorite to a I4-14 tie. Hopes were optimistic as the Ram in- Q awww vw O --an vaded the .Southland football powers of Miami Uni- versity and West Virginia on successive weekends only to have hopes tattered and torn to the tune of 75-7, and 39-9 . . . It was back to the Polo Grounds for the traditional games with Holy Cross, Syracuse, and Villanova . . . "The Crusaders'3 found holes in the Ram pass defense and eked out a 20-I9 victory . , . "The Orangemen" stuck to straight football and methodically drove the Ram under, 20-7 . . . A battle hardened "Wildcat" team exploded on the Ram by a 41-0 count, thus Fordham ended a season of one win, seven defeats, one tie. On December 14, l954, it was officially announced that Fordham had dropped football. And so a great and glorious tradition had finally come to an end, only the, trophies remained. But as football tradition ceased to be an active thing, another greater tradition was growing, is, and will continue to grow: this is simply the dynamic tradition of Fordham as a University. We still retain the indelible mark of football and the greats of yesteryear but now Fordham looks for- ward to the greater leaders of tomorrow and "our sacrifice is small." K at M -: '43 :eg WI Q' ' ' I f 4, -.... Q- A..-Q? ,I -any. '--ga, 'ff-'N ,v wx , I 'inlin- .. II, L. 7 5 Q fe a jj Q 4 w An,- Pf1f.' P01 . Q X r . I 1 51. , r . M --,-1. dun X I1 KETBALL When the 1954-55 basketball season came to an end, Fordham stood out among the best with a record of eighteen wins and nine losses. Starting off the sea- son with a loss to Niagara by a score of 65-71, the Rams equalized the balance with their next game with Syracuse which ended in a 60-56 victory. Duquesne and Pittsburgh pulled the Maroon down for 116-67 and 65-71 losses respectively, but the Rams retaliated with three wins, Colgate, Yale and St. Joseph's Q55-51, 78-58, 61-525. Georgetown broke what might have been an eleven game winning streak when they eked out a one point victory for a score of 70-71. Columbia, Idaho State, Princeton, St. Francis, Rutgers, Wagner and Columbia again all succumbed in that order, the Rams holding anywhere between a three to a nineteen point lead. Duquesne once again defeated the Ma- roon with a 56-67 tally. The Rams downed Seton Hall and Connecticut with easy 75-55 and 70-65 scores but dropped the next two to Villanova and St. xIohn's 69-79 and 56-611-. Four more in a row, Iona 52-45, Georgetown this time a loser by four points with a 62-58 tally, C.C.N.Y. 78-59 and Holy Cross 73-61. La Salle defeated the Rams fl-9-6-1, and the last two games were split with a win over N.Y.U. 167-565 and a loss to lvlanhattan 'Q55-605. On the individual scoreboard, big Ed Conlin hn- ished the season with 675 points to his credit. He racked up 2112 field goals of 563 attempted and had a 77 per cent average from the foul line. His scores accounted for almost 40 per cent of the total points scored by the team. Co-captain Dan Lyons finished with 280 points, Bill Lyons 220, Bob Reese 180, Ed Bngniazet 147, and Ron Kuehn 109. Team statistics showed 1650 goals attempted with 30.6 per cent of them made, and 69 per cent of 553 foul points made for a total of 1753 points for the season. it ,N f ww- ,I A f fl w ' E53 X! A ,fl ,Uv f-ur-1 vu ' ' ., ,3 ,.' The Team-27 games at 65 points each. Co-captains Ed Conlin and Dan Lyons. 97 Coach John Bach. iN Ill I' f r x X 4 1' I A 'Q 1 5 I , ly, Freshman 17, Cunningham. appears to be Ford- ham's answer for 1955-56. X ,......z: ru. ...J mm FQRDHAJS' ,f X 1 , Y ,MGR L 'F i 4 K i Y 101 The Swimming Team. Coach John Lyttle. SWIMMING AND WATER POLO The hard fighting qualities of any team cannot be measured at the end of the season by their record of defeats and victories. This is certainly true of our swimming team. Pitted against some of the most powerful teams in the East, these men, while not so successful on the scoreboard, most certainly left an indelible mark on each meet with their sportsmanship. Defeats to powers like Army, Yale, Syracuse, Colgate and Union prove little in the success of the team. What did count was that each meet saw a better team splashing up and down the lanes of the college pools, and Coach John Lyttle appreciated this. He realized that his hard work with this inexperienced team had really paid off. Terry O'Donnell, team captain and Most Valuable Swimmer was a very bright spot in this edition of the Maroon Mermen. Undefeated in Metropolitan Dual Meet competition, Terry was finally upset by a frac- tion of a second in the finals of the 50 yard freestyle, taking second. Backing up O'Donnell in the sprints were Ed Gaffney, John Schmidt, Tom Downing, and Walter O'Brien, with Gaffney showing excellent prom- ise. Dick Rack, Tom Parker, and Matt Kelleher, Cap- tain elect, formed the strong man trio, adequately representing Fordham in the distance races. .Willis Reilly and Dick Hurzeler carried the colors in the backstroke, while Dave Reilly and Pat McGrath per- formed the breast-stroking chores. Willis and Dave Reilly, no relation, doubled up by also swimming in the individual medley. Diminutive diver Harry Madi- gan showed himself to be one of the best divers in the City. And last, but far from least, comes Ray Portu, the utility man, who swam every stroke, depending on the needs of the situation. Water Polo had its beginning at Fordham in 1952, when Fran judge, a varsity swimmer, approached the administration with the idea of forming a team to compete in the then embryonic Eastern Collegiate Water Polo Conference. A receptive administration welcomed the plan, but had no coach to head the pro- gram. Judge, already the member of a national championship team, requested that he be allowed to .1 5 ff.,- f", 3 I ' ' X. I Z u al ,fel 9 Y iii'- The Water Palo Team poses . . . tutor the team. Succeeded upon his graduation by Don Valentine and this last year, by Willis Reilly, the team has progressed from its humble beginning to a prominent spot among the campus sports. Fordham is highly regarded, both in its Conference and nationally, having taken second place three times in the former and producing four national champion players in the latter. Fordham has finished as well as fourth in the Senior National Championship. Graduation Day, June, 1954, saw five starters pass through the portals of Alma Mater. When the call for candidates was issued in February, only four vet- erans were to respond. Again, the newcomers were green at the game, but fortunately, young, willing, and able. A new edition was molded with the accent on youth. Only three men, Willis Reilly, Terry O'Don- nell, and Tom Delaney, will graduate this year. Strong with sophomores and juniors, Fordham can be as- sured of a veteran team for at least the next two years. The Water Polo Team in action . . . High-scorer Don King will be joined by Marty Roach and Jim Maher at the forward slots next year, while talented defenders Matt Kelleher and Frank McShane will again ward off attackers who dare to fire shots at the nets that lanky Hank Boschen polices like an octopus. Subs Ed Gyger, Jack Sibilla, Mike Calhoun, George Satterthwaite, Tom Parker, and Pat McGrath will vie for the spots left vacant by O'Don- nell and Reilly. King and Boschen will return to the wars next year with reputations to protect, each being chosen for All-League Honorable Mention, as was O'Donnell. Reilly was unanimously chosen as a member of the All-Star team by the opposing teams of the league. The '55 record saw a defeat to Army by a score of 9-2, another to Queens by the same score. After a valiant fight with Manhattan, the Ramphibians emerged, submerged, 10-7. RIFLE -x pew ,x , J I, gf 4 , l., The team og for a match with coaches Sfc Joseph Burke and Sjc Edward Ruth. 104 I F , , me ,.,..,.... -.--A...--, The Rifle Team. Marksman Casey coaches a team-mate This past season Fordham entered its seventh year of intercollegiate squash racquets competition as graduation claimed the retirement of four varsity members. Although the squash team won only two of its eight matches during the regular season, it tied Adelphi College for the Metropolitan Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Championship. Captain Tom Garesche com- piled five of the team's points and Bob Coleman won his opening round for the hnal tally. In his post season competition, Garesche, who won top honors in the 1954 tournament, went on to repeat his victory. In the iinal match, Tom met Lee Kopman of Adelphi who had beaten him in two extremely close matches during regular season play. Under the guidance of Reverend Vincent C. Hop- kins, SJ., who is the moderator of the sport, the Ram squash team held its annual intra-squad tournament. For the Hrst time, it was made a Handicap Tourna- ment in order to allow freeshmen and other under- graduates to participate on an equal basis with mem- bers of the varsity. june of '55 sees only three seniors leaving, Garesche, Mike Gallulo and Paul Finn. Next year's captain, Kelly McLaughlin, linds a number of able freshmen such as Al Cummings and Ken McDonald, who should prove to be fine assets to the team. The Fencing season 54-55 saw Fordham step from the pack and establish one of the best records since the sport was organized on Campus a few years back. After humbly dropping the opening match to Yale, the team took hold and returned to the road for a victorious season scoring against formidable foes. Laurels were in order after fencing to a 22-5 win over Bridgeport University, and an 18-9 defeat for Stevens Institute of Technology. Other schools to fall victims of the Ram blademen were Newark-Rutgers, Univer- sity of Connecticut and Cooper Union. On the other side of the ledger were losses to C.C.N.Y., Brooklyn College and Rutgers of New Brunswick, all with mar- gins of but two and three points. This year's young squad was hlled mostly by Sopho- mores and juniors, and were coached by Zoltar Hra- detzky. The team was sparked by foilman Bob Gott- leib, a veritable D'Artagnan, whose personal record was twenty-one wins for twenty-four starts. Blending in behind Bob were Bill Driscoll, Gene Franks, Ray Pohl and Gil Simon. The winning ways of the Sabermen were a result of the stable performances of Manual Boccini, Pete Froehlich, Ed Kenna, Larry O'Neil and Carl Szutter. The Epee section, also vic- torious, was comprised of Co-Captains Pete Nuccio and .lim Wall together with Paul Berman, Bill Mc- Nulty, jack Murphy and Ernie Stoessel. This was the team which won a coveted bid to the 1955 N.C.A.A. National Tourney held in East Lansing, Michigan. N, , 'Is ,G 'Z ' ' A J its mln L 9 " ff 1 . ! D 105 tiff? '- w i if Q., fu n g i 1, W ap- ' if-g.gQ 3 .. va Q ' 113595 7?-Q72 f Q shui just . , 14 M. . L 1 ' " ', W y ,. 1 1 V' L' I - ,lla Aix 'I Liv 5 f V' -ix. -. - ,g' - -'52, 4 52 '31 'f fx , Mg ,. , -,q u ,A 1 sau H, 'f . " g . -i ..1. . 4, , V - lg 1. 4.1, A ., .Z .,. ,A gl i ' I V .M . V 2 ' w A s 1 T:-' ha f f 1 -' ' - .5 Q, .. . 4 st. .tt jaw: ' ,J - ' . -I ...wa s -is - . in 8 1 I i if 9 . 5 I t . V - ,.-... . 1 .4 The Fordham and Adelphi Squash partners who tied for the Metropolitan Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Championship. SQUASH EENCING rf: J' ,411- 516 'l'he Rams in the 1955 tennis season turned in a sur- prisingly good record of 8 and 3 after being hit hard by graduations from the previous year. Captain john Poster, a four year letterman, led the team through all metropolitan competition until May I4 when the Maroon tasted defeat at the hands of Columbia by a 6-3 count and lost their bid for the mythical Metropoli- tan Championship. Until that match the tennis team had beaten six oppo- nents including their traditional rivals N.Y.U. and St. .lohn's while losing only two matches, to always powerful NVest Point and Yale. Returning lettermen to the squad from last year be- hind john Poster were senior Tom Garesche, a three year man, hard hitting junior Pat Gubitose and juniors Bob Callahan, Bill Lee, Bob Dempsey and senior -lay Schaefer. The most promising part of the season was the increased keen competition that was seen for the last three singles berths among seven players. Bill Rokya and Nick Cooney along with playing manager Phil Carroll gave the team that added lift as they kept the ladder challenge matches tough and every man hghting for his position. Bob Cole- man was the only addition to the varsity from 1954's freshman squad but Bob did an excellent job in holding down the number three singles berth. Coach Tom Hamming was again guiding the squad for his second year and with his improved knowledge of each of the players was able to iron out some of the rough spots in their games which produced victories over N .Y. Maritime, Manhattan, C.C.N.Y. and Rutgers. The outstanding matches of the year were the N.Y.U. match, when Coleman came from one set down in his singles match to win. Fordham then copped two doubles matches to win 5-4. C.C.N.Y. was' defeated by the same score as the Rams won hve singles matches, four of these going the limit of three sets. ' Again on the Fordham courts the annual scholastic tennis tournament was held under the supervision of "Mister Tennis" at Fordham, Mr. John Rooney. Ron Homberg from Loughlin was the winner for the third successive year. The Rev. Vincent C. Hopkins SJ. mod- erated the team as he has for the past nine years and while keeping the enthusiasm high he has won a sincere vote of thanks from every member of this and past squads for his interest and inspiration to all who have come in contact with him. In the freshman ranks Fordham appears to have a great potential for the future. The Ramlets number one man, Ken MacDonald is one' of the brightest prospects on the scene while backing him are four solid contenders for positions on next year's team. Tom Courtney, '55, breaking a record. 1000 yards in 2:10.9. . f I N TRACK NVith his team-mates from last year's world record holding two mile relay gone, the burden of keeping Fordham a nationally ranking track power fell on the broad and capable shoulders of Tom Courtney. Through the winter and spring of this year Tom has been invited to bear the maroon in the major invita- tion races from 440 to 1,000 yards at such meets as the New Orleans' Sugar Bowl, Boston's K. of C. and B.A.A. games, the Millrose and N.Y.A.C. games, the N. Y. Pioneer Club 111eet, the Los Angeles Coliseum relays, the Washington Star games and others. ln these special races the "jersey jet" matched strides with the world's greatest middle distance stars such as Audun Boysen of Norway, Ron Delaney of Ireland and fellow Americans Mal Whitheld, Olympic Champ and the sensational Arnold Sowell, touted as the best middle distance man of all time by some. Tom never failed to place in these races and the only one all season to snatch a first place from Sowell. This took place at the Washington Star games where Court- ney took command for the first half, was passed by Sowell at that point, but '1'om's hnishing kick the last 220 was too much for t11e mighty Sowell who lost by five strides. The breaking of his own world indoor flat floor mark of 1152.7 by a tenth of a second at the N. Y. Pioneer Club games ended Tom's indoor season with a "Boom." Courtney's activities were not limited to invitational runs however as he captured b'oth Metro- politan A.A.U. and intercollegiate 600 yard champion- ships. Frequently Tom "doubled" and joined team- mates Bob Mackin, Ed McGurk, Tom Murray and john Tarsney to make up the Ram mile relay. During the indoor season Coach Artie O'Connor also sported a two mile relay composed of Ed Kelly, Walt Kocher, Paddy Malloy and Artie O'Connor, -Ir. This team ran runner up to powerful Manhattan in the Metropoli- tan conference championships. The mile quartet minus the services of Courtney took a fourth, in a field of twelve in the A.A.U. cham- pionships and third in the conference championships. In the Millrose games the team of Murray, McGurk, Tarsney and Courtney gained first place over Mary- land, Holy Cross and Providence witl1 Courtney stag- ing a come from behind victory. The Rams had vic- tory in their grasps in the New York K. of C. games until Bob Mackin, running two strides off the pace was spilled in a bad pile up, the ground lost being too much for even the powerful Courtney to make up. Lady Luck dealt the Rams a cruel blow as Courtney came up with a badly sprained ankle a week before the spring season began. Courtney ran the following week in the Collegiate Track Conference Relays but the week layoff due to the injury had taken too heavy a toll. Tom bounced back the following week at the Penn Relays as the miles took fourth place in a field of ten powerful contingents including Maryland, Navy and. Pennsylvania. At the Metropolitan Conference Championship Courtney rolled up a 1:52 to break his old meet record of 1:53. Other Ram scorers in this last major team effort of the year were Artie O'Connor, Jr. in the two mile, Ed McGurk in the 880, Larry Shanahan in the Javelin. A team of Bob Mackin, Bob Gambera, Tom Murray and Tom Courtney hnished second in the mile relay. The track team gets ready for afternoon training. Coach Artie 0'Connor. 'l. . -.,-2:-Q.,-55 U3 l , ,L -Q, v ,,.,5,.,lgp,1 - 1 ,. . , rl,-3 V ,,a.',5'i ' v .,i yy -,.,m ,V 4- ' .M ' f' - r igjiyh ' I -. 7,0111 ' 1 .ffl . A ij' 'ax " ' 1.Qi:..m :Ujg .313 333 'W f, 1 ggi.-.'-,-,','.:f., .. .-x ..1,. .- .:1g"'1:r,:t':...-. -1 -. my. 37133121523 ii.. -gs - .4 -' J. .. if .....--Y. ,-,'V-:n,,.fj,.,,.-'.',,,,,4 1 , ,. A . .,.....,, ,,,.. . - .:::g:::."" X' V113 53 ' :r:::':7!i!i2-. 555'-' '.'f.EE J Courtney bums up the track on Coffey Field. CROSS COU TRY The 1954 cross country season saw the Rams come through with a 2 and 5 record. This record however is misleading, for while winding up below the .500 mark in their dual meets, Artie O'Connor's boys, tak- ing each man's time separately made up the fastest cross country team in Fordham's long history in the sport. The competition came from the cream of east- ern cross country and included such powers as Rhode Island, Georgetown, St. John's and Syracuse. Val Sinnnons, a junior from White Plains, N. Y., was the outstanding individual performer being the first Ram home after the hve mile grind in 9 out of the I0 meets. "Virile" Val's IC4A set a new school record. Not far behind was Ed McGurk also under the 27 minute mark. Team captain Al Fitzgerald, Ar- thur O'Connor, jr., Paddy Malloy, Ed Kil Kelly, Walt Kocher, Stan Fitzgerald, and John Collin, the team's only Senior, rounded out the nucleus of the squad. On October 2nd, Rhode Island ventured to Van Cortland Park to meet the Rams on their ground. The temperature was 92 degrees, just right for a drive to the beach or a nap under the shade of the front porch, but definitely not the day for a 5 mile run through the steaming woods of Van Cortland Park. Fordham was apparently hit the hardest by the unsea- sonable heat as two of the reliables, Ed Kil Kelly and Artie O'Connor, Jr., were unable to finish. Kil Kelly required hospital care. The result a 20-35 loss. The next time out the harriers'fell victim to George- town and St. LIohn's in a triangular meet. The follow- ing week saw the Rams take second in another tri- angular affair with Princeton and St. Josephs The win column was broken into by successive wins over Yale and C.C.N.Y., Simmons, McGurk and Al Fitz- gerald starring. The N. Y. Metropolitan Champion- ship saw the Rams take a fourth in the team standing. The team proved itself one of Fordham's best by taking first place in the jr. Metropolitan A.A.U. Championship. Val Simmons again was the Ram pace- setter, taking second place covering the four mile course in a nifty 20:37, Captain Al Fitzgerald was fourth. N.Y.U. edged the champs in a dual meet a few days afterward. The collegiate season ended with the IC4A in which the Rams gave the winners a run for their money, as usual. The promising freshman team compiled a 4-I dual meet record. In the championship meets the frosh took a first in the Metropolitan freshman inter-colle- giates, second to their own varsity in the -Ir. Met. A.A.U. and third in the freshman IC4A. The out- standing stars of the team were jack Flynn and Art Cunningham who both broke Ed McGurk's freshman record of 15:43 running 15:33 and 15:31 respectively. They were ably backed up by the consistently good performances of Dick Tigue, Tom Ward, Milt YVil- liams, Gene Carbine and Rodger Livingston. 'MXL 'xx I 'Y - .M .iii.:.'wfgZrQ.f1, . v . . . mul, ph 1' A P I wif N- .. v , Q :jkvigig I K W 'fa N , .lx K K. ' -4 . 'L I 'i'lf3'??4f',rfif f , .W if .1 ,. . . F14 if wfs.f..,,epf""' ar- ',,-my 354-fy Q,'l:'7m2:,Q:' to ' ... ' 6' gk' Y ' ' Q 3 .. tw? 1. .,"-' V A. Ya 'f . iifflfxaighf I K -- Q 'V 1 A .K .,:.:.'s . ,kmpfef if . 'A . ' . . s .,a5fu,5-is-,5f,,ff:v4l3-gfnfg. .7 af-,,g,,. fs -- . . . , . ,Imp 2.-N-., . . 1. 1, . -. l N .. , . , ., , , - -A b . t' W-' tiara- "f?'f-vw-R ff" . . V' .vw . , . r if-f f. -. 1 'll V '.',f,,,Q4f'n1W.- "" X "mf A ff '10-5.5 " .,",,. , W . ,f',. '. Q ' ., --" -V ' ' ' X' ' "',- V, gn, 1 ...fb , a Y, , wg, , p.. ag , , . . .,.:. , in . , ws- .I . fAfi.-,1,.-, L' 3, ug:-f, 3144534 - A .ah Ur," D .. .ggxv ,V aqui Q all 5. s , , NV ,glgpae f farm was ,HQ if qffwfjv' 03,1-f-.".'.rf,f-.M riff.,-,ing nC?.'-fl, ,,, . f4w,1,Px,,,,.f1fwf -v .M , Q .W ,lv -4-,A , iiatuf, '!X?7.,.,':va-.Y,'lt'z'.'.f-1: 1-L., ,.. f . in-f '- .0-. ,Aw we -' . ' .-as . . -if f . A. . .. of ysfw..4i ' fu..- , SEB LL Conch lack Coffey. faq x10 109 Fordham has always been on the "top of the pile" when it came to baseball, and this year should prove to be no exception. With a very strong pitching staff, strong hitters, and an excellent freshman team up from last year, this club should improve over the impressive l3 and 6 record compiled last spring. That was the same team that just missed making the National Collegiate Tour- nament. The Rams lost the invitation on a famous but saddening play. With a last inning rally Fordham was trailing Villanova G to fl, and they put men on first and third base. There were two outs and a double steal was attempted. Tl1e throw to second was cut off and the hall was fired to home. The steal didn't work. Bill Hanrahan, who has starred on the mound for the past two years and is captain of this year's club, is expected to have the opposition in constant trouble. Bill has a terrific curve and fastball and is considered as a good bet for pro-ball. With his strong right hand and the needed experience he obtained last year, he should take right over in Charlie Dietlin's spot as the big winner of the club. Aided by several strong armed boys it should be a hne year on the mound. Henry Kapmeyer, a left hander with plenty of stuff, was mainly a relief man last year, but he should be a top starter this year. Along with his pitching chores Hank plays in the out- field in order to take advantage of his batting talent. Little john Carrie, another starter last year, is a ball- player who can always he counted upon. John never lets up and although fairly short, his sizzling fast ball leads the batters to think John is a big man. Taking into consideration the other regulars Bill Crowley and Bill Bowen as well as the freshman tosser John Mc- Quade, the pitching stall' is quite deep. The team will have the power of two big batters who are finishing out their last season. Jim "Red" Connors, a towering 6'4" and 210 pound baekstop -gqg.-,v who - - . Team Captain Bill Hanruhan. f'-X f- .....- ,I X? ff-Q- Rui , ,' H V V' Tx ff ,, ' 7 XY A 3 , ' 1 ' 1 - X J fx -,. - I K ff f --- . .,, -132, s ' Hum x ,, N- --W Bill Crowley 2 -.f" . f-Z 110 k,fvkg: K ,Q A-fn. 'lcv , in 4 ' me 'Q , 'Q John Currie mul Henry Kapmeyer. , fifties has been a valuable man on the club in the past and he will have to carry an extra big load this year, con- sidering the graduation of last year's captain Ron Ryba. .jim is a sharp hitter with a lot of power. The other big bat is wielded by Pete Krawchuek, a 6'2" IQ5 pound senior. Pete started out his baseball career at Fordham in fine style, leading the Freshman club in home runs. He has worked his way up on the var- sity club and this year his long ball hitting should really pay off. 'l'hird baseman Cene Caiafa who started as a shortstop but later found himself at third is a steady batter of the squad. He led the Rams at bat- ting last spring and will be trying to keep his title again this year. Joe Penaechio also puts a lot of wood to the ball and is expected to really produce this season. Add some excellent freslnnen players to this squad and it makes the future seem rosy on the Hill. Ray Holland, jerry Bochicchio, Paul Hunter, Don Haig and Ron Kuehn all appear to have a lot of talent and the coach Jack Coffee, the mastermind of Fordham baseball is preparing for the season with a pleased look in his eye. The positions and starters haven't been decided at this time but there are strong men to fill every spot. 'l'o face a schedule like the batting Rams play it must be a powerful team. Meeting teams like St. John's, Yale, Villanova, Navy, Georgetown, Columbia, Prince- ton and Army as well as many other good clubs, is no easy task. It will give the crew every chance they need to prove exactly how good they are. Coach jack Coffee hopes to make a repeat of the banner season of H352 when the Rams marched right into the NCAA play- offs. The Rams in action. 9' I . .Q QQ' 1 . Q Q ,Q ' - Q .- ', - . 'Qjv Q' T, 1 Q' 5 Q V I ' Q A Q id xq f' H" " ' 8 " X 5. -" I' ' 1 ' rv. 'Z' iff 'M :. " ' 'bf ff - - -. J' F ' - 1 ' - ' -:M ' Q ' 4 ' f - -1 '---'ff"-V .- -f'-.711 F -' -. 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Qzdj- . 44 .,.. , ' - . ---.....- , . 7 'fx i , -V - ----- - ' Q . .V Q ,df -. ' -41 at-Q ' 1 . ' .,,-27' '9+'f"' .. .,. ---""' mf- '5- ' 3' 'Arn I f'- , "W H' -1...V"' -,' - . 4. --I " , ' 'S V ' - "ff-Q' -"""" ' Q 'JM' jx A5 J?" f' '. V Q "'qg-.qi-'i "'.. 3-6 9 Q fb 'Z ' Q - - V - - - A.. "'--, -ek Q Q . f "'- Q R,.-..4:' I . , 5, . QQ . in ,,9' QQQ Q N:-R i I -ov' or Ja.. O s 'N ' 0 " 1 Q Q QQQ Q QQ iQ Q ..,. :J ' 5-N 1" :V .H- :Uk Part of the greatness of Fordham lies in the fact that each graduating class knows it is only a link in the lengthening chain of past, present and future-a link that spells out all the sentiment and feeling embodied in the words"'Fordham Forever." So, even while we glory in what the men of Rose Hill's past have accomplished, while we take pride in what we may have added to the heritage handed to us, we look to those who come after us with eager anticipa- tion of the things that they, in their turn, will do. Even now we see many indications that they will be worthy of the accolade, "Men of Fordham." The Class of '56, our immediate successors, has set a lively pace, ambitious '57 has made a name for itself in two short years, and '58, just turned Frosh corner, feels in its heart it will be the greatest of all. So as we bid farewell, we turn to those who come after us and say: "Hail, Men of Fordham, Hail!" 113 -l H w September, 1954 . . . the beginning of an adventure, an experience, a new life. We were "college men" . . . all four hundred and fifty-eight of us. We had come to Fordham from Bogota, Colombia and the Flatbush section of Brooklyn: from Hood River, Oregon and lower Manhattang from Santurce, Puerto Rico and . . . the Bronx. We were awkward and new as we entered on the Rose Hill scene. Our expectancy was mingled with some slight misgivings. But Father McLaughlin told us we could be great. He asked us not to let Fordham down. And we haven't. Our fine football team, our all- conquering basketball machine speak for themselves. There has been more, much more. In every campus activity we '58ers have made our mark. In some, such as the Mimes and Mummers, our contributions have been especially vital and productive. Wc're proud of our accomplishments as Freshmen. But it's a good kind of pride-the kind that makes us want to do better. We have three years ahead of us. We're going to improve on vit. We're going to show Father McLaughlin that he was right. 1958 With Freshman Moderator john Scott wielding the guy-lines deftly, our orientation got under way. The framework of the Class of '58 began to take form. Fordham's activities and clubs were paraded before us. We were encouraged to be active. We' were. Stu- dent Government entered into the picture with its book exchange and leadership program. We were given the chance to be part of that government almost immediately as each section elected its representative to the Student Congress. Retreat week gave us one final breather. The school year was on in earnest. We were looking forward to the football season. Meanwhile, tucked away in our drawers and lock- ers were the infamous "beanie kits" purchased more or P less voluntarily from our would-be sophomore tor- mentors. Tucked away in the back of our minds was a prophetic, "We shall see." Late October, and Haz- ing Week was upon us. High-water trousers and classy chapeaus were the uniform of the day. Night court was solemnly convened and the inevitable stocks readied for action. The reign of indignity struggled through two days and finally died in ignominy on an uproarious Tuesday evening. When the smoke had cleared and the "deluge" had ceased, our beanies were passe. Our rinkey-dink shoelaces still went well with white bucks. A certain high official and instruments of persecution returned from limbo. The Freshman Theater Party added a final flourish to our liberation. Cumpux jmiilirzv fnuml no lurlc of mllluasillxlx in mn' rmzkx. 01'lolu,r'.v c'I4'r'lionx plural Ihr' Him in Hu' lunula of l'rc'xirlr'nl Huy ll'nIsl1 mul l'1'z'p Hill Lwu'l1, llu' lzvn mm: to zulwm murh of our lulrr 1H'llil'1'I'Ill!'Hf um br' nllrilmlvll. TlH'0Ilgll01lt the war. zrurlciug along zrilh llu' .w-rlirm rr'pr1'x1'nlrzlizfrs mul ullrr- nnlrx in llu' Clnxx f,':umr'il. Ilwy gum' us Ihr' ll'Ill'l'l'Al1iII wr m'1'1lr'fl. Our nxl nigh! mal jouml us nnfmlmq lhc donnlown unnmn lmlwjul imlizvirluulx into u xolirl rlnxv. ll zunx a good jrrliug. of ilu Inq flly fm Hu rnnnml frulmmn lmnqurl nl th! H0111 Thr' Frz'.vllnum .-III1 ivory lirmrfl mn lukr' n lmzv fm' llu' nul- Rumfwll Two moulin luul IHIIQIIIIIIX mnmrlul Slplrmbu s vlmuling sur'r'1-xx Hu' lmnquwl n'u.v. "No wallliowers on Rose Hill" is the slogan of' the Intramural program. That particular species proved to be a rare one among '58ers. Section M showed the way to our entries in the football league though they eventually bowed out in the college-wide playoffs. Lunchtime sharpshooters made the gym hum dur- ing the winter months as 13 Frosh sections poured the points through the cords. Sections A, K and N battled down to the wire for Class laurels with N copping hrst place in the Hnal week. l Q All of us who attended the "grand opening" of Cafe Bclier on tl1e night of April 23rd had every right to be proud of the Dance Committees masterpiece. Up- wards of three hundred couples glided around the floor to Maurice Wo1fsie's music in a really pic- The campus never looked prettier, and we had never been so proud of Fordham as we were while "showing it off" to our folks on Parents' Day in May. The faculty, the upperclassmen and many of our own members played a part in the afternoon's proceedings. Our year was culminated with the presentation of our class gift-a scholarship fund. turesque setting highlighted by a Parisian skyline. French murals and flickering candlelight. Table service and a "maitre de" added the extra refinements to the social feature of our year. fx' The College Directory Stall with Elli- lor Ed Hawkins, fslmuling, jar righlj. 1957 Sophomore dass omcers john McCord, john JlcNijI, james Feeney mul Erl- mmul Farrell. 5 I 7 5 .3 3- I a 1 4, ' 1 V3 Z .. .--- , WT., A F it ve: - u .LMA .l l,.m. 1 , . . ' , ' ui 3 1 , ir .- .MH The Intramural Football Champs of sophomore year. 117 -lf fl w . 65 Q' 5 v v1.f-4-gfgfyv xfsifn-'Ts 1 its 23.1-Q s ' ' S X An artistic hand prepares the snow man for "Ice CIIIHIIIKSU the sopho more dance. Nobody axlced for your opinion . . . cut!-The Decoralions Committee and Designers. Keeping the score at Sophomore Sports Night. 1956 junior Clasx 0IIi1'1'1's Crix LnCoral1l, William Flallwy, Dan ,1llrCm'lhy mul john Currie. Scenes from the junior Show "Poison 'n Ivy". F' I l, P E 1 'M 1 'I' W 9 t Senior Cl .ss Ollieers. Left to right: Bill Rothschild, presidentg jim Conway, vice-presidentg Dick Cieciuch, secretaryg and Nick 0'Neill, treasurer. SE IOR CLASS The Senior section reps pose here with President Bill Rothschild. They did an excellent job of disseminating information on class activities to their various sections and did a still better job of collecting money for these same activities. 120 Key men in Conny Munstcr's "Ma- roon" llusincss Stall' with Editor Snl Pillittcri ffar rightj. Oro 06 ff- fd! M I, CJ' t 0 .gf ,--1 fn 1 , 1 1 if w L 1' P ml s., 1 .vi-4' .G m 4 1 V ... . X5 The Class of 1955 junior Prom was a great success. Left: "Figgy" bunny- hops it. Right: a look at thc crowded gym from upstairs. Staff members of the Senior Class Publication, "Tri F Reporter" with Editor jim Mclirlcan. "Angels and Angles" was the unforgettable Junior Show. which brought back the old Fordham tradition of class nmsicals after a conspicuous absence of several years. "Angels," a multiple plot comedy, concerned the discovery of bogus oil on campus, a French magazine, and an almost unbelievable array of celebrities ffrom 'l'allulah to Churchilly, engaged in a mad scramble for the oil profits. The show was written entirely by a junior XVriter's Committee during the Summer of l953, whipped into production shape during the lfall under the clever guiding hand of Director Bob Kennedy, assisted by stage manager, Phil Schlusser, and applauded with gusto by the audience when it opened in February, l95-1. Composers Al Crisci and Don Pizzarello collabo- rated with lyricist .lim Prior on the musical score, '55 sHoWs which included such numbers as "Let's Get the Show on the Road", "It", "It Depends On Where You're Sittiu' " and "Da Guy, XVhat Holds Da Dough." The sets, which were a nightly conversation piece throughout the four performances, were designed by the talented joe Saccio with aid from Ted Strehan. jim Mclirlean, Ray Hastings, Gene Matos, Ron Taggiasco, Lang Toland and Larry Dolan starred in "Angels and Angles" but Producer Dick Murdy stole the show Qlike jimmy Valentinej with his classic spoof of the Fordham Registrar. Businesswise too, the musical was a great success as business manager John McGovern and Class Treas- urer Willis Reilly saw their financial dreams come true in spades. Indeed tl1e show became a class tribute, one which was mentioned often and with pride by the class of '55. Helen Hayes, sponsor of "It's Ma- roon!" looks over the "Fordham Vic- tory Song" with Bob Kennedy, Dick Murdy, Jim Alford and Bill Roths- child. llli"'?' "lt was good theatre, it was good Fordham, it was indeed 'A Real Good Day"' Qto quote one of the songsj was Father Rector's capsule review of the daz- zling Senior Show, "lt's Maroonl", which brightened up the Collins Auditorium stage on December 9, l0, ll and l2. The first indication of the show's professionalism came long before the overture when Miss Helen Hayes, first lady of the American stage, agreed to sponsor the musical. VVith Miss Hayes' approbation, publicity was expanded to various New York news- papers in addition to the collegiate press. Cue Maga- zine's listing of "lt's Maroon!" under its oll'-Brozulway theatre section, was typical of the outside attention paid to the show. "lt's Maroon!" was the story of l"ordham's winning of the color, Maroon, which was the stakes of a highly contested football game with "Morley", a hctitious Ivy League college, which had also claimed "Maroon." In the writing of the book considerable liberty was taken with the familiar legend of how Fordham actually chose Maroon, but the color theme proved to be a natural frame for a musical comedy. The "colorful" legend was set in the year 1905 and members of the Fordham Class of '05, who were in- vited to the Thursday premiere, were particularly en- thusiastic about the production, which helped them relive their college days at Rose Hill. Among the clever portrayals in the show was Ron '1'aggia:-xco as the pot-bellied Jesuit, Father Duncan, who occasionally beat out tunes on his tunnny. Co- Nick Smcdira of the stage crew cutting out a scene by dimming lights. l The Stage Crew of "It's M aroon ! " producer Dick Murdy did himself proud as the dis- tinguished inebriate, Crmn . . . as did his "Morley" compatriots Dick Cieciuch and Hank Greer, who de- manded decormn as Crembly and Cripps. Bok Hawes put on a quick change act, reminiscent of Vaudeville's Owen Mcfliveney and was convincing in every role, especially as Commander NVhitetop, Chairman of Athletic Arts fahemj at "Morley" Legend as played by Lang 'l'oland was polished, suave, and legendary. The creative direction of Bob Kennedy helped im- measurably throughout the show and came to the fore brilliantly, especially on the well coached timing of the comic characters. The hit score for "It's Maroon!" was composed by Pete Pastorelle with lyrics by jim Prior. There were twelve songs in all. The show opener, "We Need a Color" was given a real "rah ral1" rendition by the chorus, which inci- dentally sparkled throughout the show. The counter point song, "Maroon" was also presented in excep- tionally good taste by the chorus. jim Conway, who played the "Frank Merriwell" role of the hero Fordham football player, Andy Mc- Kenna, excelled on his solo numbers, "Football's in the Air" and "A Real Good Day." The latter was done with a choral background. "Who Is that Girl?" was sung and soft shoed by Steve Huben and Carl Candels, who stopped the show as the ,audience demanded encores by the song and dance men. Steve Mahoney as the reminiscing alumnus wistfully sang "College Days." His rendition was very popular, especially with the understanding older members of the audience. Another hilarious show stopper was the entrance of Ted Stanton and Gus San Filipo as the two man "Happiness Army." They scored on the plea for good living and contributions, "Save Your Soul." The Rambler octet llawlessly offered the bouncy, "Too Much Ado About Love." They returned to oller Pastorelle's harmony arrangement of the poign- ant "Fordham Means to Me," which has since be- come the oflicial song of the new Fordham Club. There are many other reasons for the s11ow's suc- cess, not the least of which was the costuming, which was handled by Co-producer jim Alford, or tl1e sets, so well designed by joe Collinsg or the writer's com- mittee, headed once again by Kennedy and Murdyg or the backstage 'labor so ably supervised by the vet- eran stage manager, Phil Schlusser, and his right hand man Gerry Canavang or the live wire business staff managed by Willis Reilly with ticket promotion in the capable hands of Jack Gordon, and don't forget the playbill layout by jack Kennally of The Ram, or the swell appearance of the tuxedoed ushers out front under jack McGovern and Ernie Mullerg or the valu- able technical advice of the Rev. Leo G. Monaghang and of course it would be impossible to forget the spirit and encouragement which the Moderator, Rev. j. Franklin Ewing, SJ., gave in such abundance to the seniorsg but most of all to the many, many members of the class of '55, who worked, performed, sold, and bought, in the unsung hero tradition, which has made possible '55's two memorable hits, "Angels and Angles" and "It's Maroon!" Q 1 V 5 4 i Q 63 ij .Z Q 'ff YM' If. u ' s u .N Q Q xN' 1 X, 1 x is 1 X 3 ' Y . I - 1 U 5 N, w X' , 9 P in f' 1 . ,- Q- E E ' ' 5"f? ' 1 X' i -1 A., ? Ol F.. a'f" I 'I 5 if S Y S W I- Ui HH' The 1955 Baccalaureate Mass H' ,pn-,, Father McLaughlin addresses the Class of 1955 and their guests at "Encaenia." Prizes for academic and extracurricular excel- lence are presented at "Encaenia" by Fathers McLaughlin and McGinley. Cardinal Spellman addresses the Uni- versity Graduating Class of 1955 from the steps of Keating Hall. 126 fit D That first expensive salute is acknowl- edged by a newly commissioned Ma- rine Second Lieutenant. "The Ramblers" entertain the Class of '55 at their Prom in the Hotel Pierre. Col. Burns and Father McGinley pre- sent Distinguished Military Graduate awards before University Graduation Exercises. Air Force ROTC Cadets are sworn in as Second Lieutenanls on graduation day. uv l v -'VW 'Y LW 0 ' ,' .x ' 5 ,W H Y: 1 ' ,I 1 N I .Q 4 91 f r' ' lu I X L' I I 9' c' 'I . . v s Y -' 4 Q48 N ' , gg Q ,PW S i vez: 1' w 5 2 7655 , 1 dx V f Q.. I ' , A X 3, X 1 s . 3 'ix J I ,Nr xx 2 4 V xilrvt. ., 'i 4 21.-.r N as W :ihf"' X ,. 5 we W Jw b. " ' - K 'inf . z 'Wx ff? Sr www ', N I N-V M 1 Q M B' 'JB' if X 'kfqig A I wp Y 'Wig M 2:00 if ' 'As , A ' S. 1' b' ,H x RQ- .1 If 5 w 4 'A M..-' V ' " 'Wit 1-0 ag N' "' A "P f 'lf A 1 . lwnxl. ,N will 'J A ' - 'W -,mfr 'L 'vase , N- Q sv , ,F T H." 1... Q 59 ww ' N 1 I N -Y I Q ' I, 5 Q J 4 'mf' I 4 U I x ,S 'V 1 4 ' 4 , I 5 .,,xg,- ENV. V: ,,. . ,,, ' X.-Q r mv .. X -- I 'M .N jfir it fi-Q f,A,,4 WWW 15 r .Q 'Nav-fgjijf ,audi M .--'f ,,".1 , fi' Vgwli 3' V fi : ig? "' 51 ga ' A I .. 'ln . n, 'L -i Q ' I , . Q. .1 ' Q f , '!'. . 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A w 4 .w- .1 . - Tai" ri H- A sph + 2. il fe ' "'2r'1'xA?5Gi"i'iilFJ , ' ,J ' 4, . , -, 'flu ' f -u9'l':'f3Ek' "' 'L W A 4-Is' ' All 'f'1Qi1w"' W ' , J if 'j3J'f'f'i' E3-LL1.?f'r" ' I ,7 Z5 '. ,.4 , A ' -'Z' ,. J."--X 1. 4 , rj . ,Thr 1 il 1 U , , En A , , '53 F- il ' , . gg, 'W 3, - 1 355535.-4, lcie,-.55 A Ne" I .' A of ,-g1+f:1Z+ ewqipff . -'!4" l14l5Q:'-t7v"'." Y- ii-Wife: i- ,N-tl .:. V U W 3,1 I, 1. Q' ,A m, :WL 61"-X. rr. V . gy.: ., , , gg "1 3. -'z . ,lg QU' 14122,-IQ - gn , . I wg' " R 'J' M133 5 'r' . v.,i:.u I- 'IFF-if f. i,-,,R: A. ,. .....- ,f.,j'f",-f V , 4, ' 'g ,,e:' 1- 2 ,, '.:: -,, -I I-: I 221-FEV! 'lf 5' . gg gg IEA' L, ifizggggiy? :' Ljfxi .- -" 1 ' -f 'Z-rl, , ,- ,u L "1 . .. ff, 1, wn,:5ifzff'1+f.' 1' ia-191' 2 If :E .A-e-TM? I ,-43 .- WSJ? ie -iz' ,,"'l.,-' 'S' .WE -' ,. +15 , A MT , . , . J-I p 1. V. r. , , 'M . 1 -iff' n 1!""LL' -"GL " 'A5 . .:". iii, ,H " ' 'u5'r.-Q44 ' J. '- Q q a ' ' ,ff .- ' I an 5-f -'nl ,'f.'W'.4.'5' ., ff ,.,1- ffgzx Liga," wav: rig? ,V pffsv gfsqff Q' . K - 1 lx V M W, 1 1.6 X , I, ,J V Jr' V 1"a.,, 4 "'f'.f9',,-:',-fi H Fffhfvh z' ,tlkfis N N F 5'5- . in nga- . . -Jfyf' -,QI , 'wQ!I': 7 3-,rr A wP' f7f: i,, ' , liffl Wqfj--,. A . ,ri - q,g4z,,g,- rw' m'f""' --,-' Q' -Wm "'Qlffifi'fs'-F'ffl' effgxwzllfhlliee I I-A M 4 - J 'J 1 L4 . .X A x , A I 'W - .,,,1.',', 1. P L.. ,. c',,,.r-14-o,.44UH. ,,' E ,A 4. .- . ff ..l ,,. .. i,...., - A A , sl...,, f 1 V , ,,,,,,x' pn. 5-W. A ,. nu- . ..,. JAMES R. ALFORD Bachelor of Science -main,-If, ff--- -V, . . 4' ...ef .I Q . ' nag S English . WILLIAM ALBERT ALONG Bachelor of Arts LOUIS JAMES ANSALDI 7.-5 French Bachelor of Science Economics CHARLES J. AYER Bachelor of Science X Sociology l3O fo-in dll "N YTNCY' If 2 Av- , 1 '. 5, 4 u' r I 1 .cg , . lml mln collfqmle football qmm 'I J-V H61 5? gfegi :rer- ff ff f' 17' fa' vw ug, W P gp'-0,G,G50!llNI-v NT, P 2 " 1 ' 1 - A A u I -I kd A , 'y 1 U aw.- -'L-,r 1 1 J A an 'T' r 1 ."', 1 -M s I Q. l i A w J .,..i . . .UQ-'. -' I" If , ,. if 'M . . s-, A .kv K 'v , '5' L F1 fc 95557 x -, ' Q' If we 4-'lr ' wi ,4 AJ 1:5 lv ' N K 7 it vi' ..w. QI" KEVIN BEGOS lizichelor of Science American Civilization WALTER ANTHONY BEGOS, JR. Bachelor of Science History WILLIAM H. BERESFORD Bucllelol' of Science Sociology 1955 DONALD BIANCO Bachelor of Science Economics I32 JOSEPH ll. laisczocmo lizlcllelor ol' Arts lkycliology Ns! fs: JAMES li. BLACK, .IR. Bachelor ol' Science Sociology RAYMOND C. BONNAISICAU, JR. Bachelor of Science Pl'C-llllffllfill ENRIQUE BORRAS DE LA CRUZ Bachelor of Science Pre-meclicznl ' Nw" -'if lxw -gif Q vf' ' X I ,l P3111 ' ' 5 s " A - A' fyiiy' 5 : l - In X., 3 PHILIP BOSSERT lluclielor ol' Science Colnniunicution Arts CHARLES F. BRENNAN liaclielor ol' Science Philosophy X JAMES EDWARD BRENNAN Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy ALFRED A. BRIZZOLARA, JR. Bachelor of Science Chemistry RALPH J. BRONZO Bachelor of Science History DONALD FRANCIS BROWN Bachelor of Science Pre-medical X -H'-1-,W l'li'l'liR M ICH .-Xlil. BRONVN li Ts! Rx HIICIICIUI' of Arts linglisll ,'Xl,liliR'I' V. l5lIli'l"l'NliR linclmclm' ol' Science Clllcmislry I-IIQNRY li. lSlII.li'l"l'l llzlclmclor ol' Scicnfc l':l'0ll0lllil'S Ds' FR.-XNCIIS C.-XHILI. 3 lizuillclor of Sficllfc l'olitic'ul Pllilosophy 5Q5',f This is Martyrs Cnurl. ilu' orluvinmll hmm' nj Ilu' luulrflmw mul Ilwir day-hop mhorlx. I35 ffm' 'N' gm f 'iff K Q1+QF"? 3 - G+,-'3--JJ MT .. .blfigfliphir A If fl' 1 XR! l 1.4 -IOSIL l' I-I '1'Ul.I.Y CA I ,I A H AN lI11c'l1c-Im' ol' Sficllfcr Biology I! F ""x' 'F DONALD ll. CAMERON Ilzlcllclm' ol' Science l'oliLic:xl Philosoplmy ROBERT M. CAMERON BZICIICIOI' ol' Aus ROl5liR'I' FRANCIS CAMP Bacrllelor of Arts 7 rp-4 -.p 'X- MM ,Sa if I -N Rr ' 2 ' 1 . gk .yu 2, .-223 -1' 'f - I ff I ' 'T' 'P - -se- f - 'I . . :T,'i:.9! M :Si . .. -, If :TA . sip., f LL. I . 4 - l ' -L,-. .- . I - .rc ' 1437 .,'3gf:,.3v-'wit . I' 'If' 1-M , -. we. , , V. ., '- f., "':','1 -- fall. , I lfrcnch English 4 I tsl.. '4- 'WQAI FORDHA COLLEGE is 'ir W-,,. l36 Bzlclmclm' oi' Science lifc Jizxflmclm' of Science ' C1'1R,AXRlD lf. CAN AVA N momics CARI. .'XN'l'I-IONY C.XNDEI,S I syclmology CLAS OF 1955 ANDREW T. CANNISTRACI HZICIICIOI' ol' Science liconomics CHARLES CARMINE CARELLA Bzlcllelor of Science Political Philosophy FRANK 'YHONIAS CARNlfLI,A liilchelor of Arts Pllilosophy PATRICK .IOHN CARROLL lizlchelor of Science Iiconom ics PAa-.wig sr' WILLIAM K. W. CARRUTH Bachelor of Arts Mathematics MAURICE ll. CASEY Bachelor of Science Pre-medical CONRAD JOHN CASTELLANO Bachelor of Science Psychology JOSEPH ANTHONY CASTELLI Bachelor of Arts Economics X . 'N QQ ' ,, - ax, 113451 ,V , .X A vs 5 HZ 1 A N .9 -- A 'a G ' ,f .A 1 'ff' 1. vm I--A . P-M-1-.J-M ww-f f Q 5 sf, ' ifx wi' F1 I1.44xtr l W ' -M,-v ' .,,,g.. , .. Dwrfvf atv- 41:3 424 WA5? V 1... .,'l' ' - v . 1, m'577iif Az 'aw 1 '.-'fQ1:fj: ,, 4 1,13 1 A,'f,4'f-gf d liigxl w :' 4 -' gg V. f -wi 1' , X M" f, , ,M 1 1 fn' 4 I L 9 11 Q 5: ' A 5 5, .5375 pf 'ZZ' MDM. ALBERT RICHARD CIRILLO Bacrhclor of Arts linglish DONALD K. CODY lincllclol' ol' Science English JOHN A. COLLINS llznchclor ol' Arts ' l'rc-meclirul 1955 ' ' .N -fi., xv-,.,.,L,,,m ---'.,,,.,,X' JOSEPH BARRY CIOl,I.lNS Bachelor of Arts Sociology I40 XfVll,l,l.AXM CUNURICN Bawhclm' olf Arla linglish ui' ff C. S'I'lil'HlCN ClONNOl,l,Y Vfilchelor oi' Arts l'1'c-mcclirznl yxmrgs ly. c:oNNoRs liachclm' of Science licolmonlics -IOHN .pos1e1'H CUNRUY l3Zll'hClOl' ol' Sricnrc linglish A, 9 o JAY W. 1 N 1 f 4 - O w N L' -' ' F ,Z ' . 1 01 u Mlgb, , ' P - 1 'fu , Fas - I J-P ml. .7I 1' .ll aol' .A 4, 'Q axe.: 'a Rl CQ: xl ROCLCU HENRY CZONTICCHIO K 1 Bzicllclm' ol' Science Physics .r-"' S -IAMES G. CONWAY lizurhclor ol' Arts liconomics U! ARTHUR FRANCIS COOK, JR. Bachelor of Science American Civilization PAUL CORNELIUS Bachelor of Science English RAFAEL L. CORTADA Bachelor of Arts History JOHN V. COSTA Bachelor of Arts French Sf -s... Ilejinilely a posed shot! -IOSISPH Ii. COURTNEY Bachelor ol' Arts Psychology THOMAS WVILLIAM COURTNEY llzwliclor of Science Political Philosophy AI..FRED P. CRISCI Iiacliclor ol' Science Economics NVILLIAM F. CRONIN llzuthclor ol' Science English X FRANCIS -I. M. CROXfV1,EY liaehelor olf Science Hiswry l'Hll,.ll' -1. CURTIN lkzuchelox' ol' Science Hismry BliNjAMIN -I. D'ARCON'1'1i Iizurhelor of Science Communicnlion Arla JOHN li. DASH Baclielor of Science Psychology R , fi 5 : ' t .il f , . 1 'jk V . I f . 1 j .N i FORDHA COLLE J , N ,,,, . , , liDVV,-XRD Dli FR.-XNCO B2l1'ilCiOl' ol' Science Russian Suulies DOUGLAS D1iG1iLSMl'I'H HZICIICIOI' ol' Science l'1'e-lncclicul CLA S OF 1955 TOM DEIAHUNTY Bachelor of Science Cllcmistry THOMAS P. DEI..-XNEY lillchelor of Science Economies JOHN l'E'l'1iR Dlil,I..X R.'Y1".l'A l3zu'hel0r ol' .Xrls History JOSEPH ANTHONY lllil, PRIURE, JR. Bachelor ul' Srience Pre-medical PHA: M115 v, 1 . 'H L ., ' - li - iii, Ai' 5551 Q I. L- ,V - wif. A .r - i"' :"f. P-' EW- Qi .ls K l ' P V' l .' '- . , lil nr v 145 1 F753 2533 f- iii W" Qi! il 1 vi . H. 'iw f " 7- e "l 1 51 " + 1 'ff fl .f ff f- ' 'YI'-l f? fp . U 1 4 l K ' A'-,fn -.I ,- - .',fn. ' U. Na: I --.'i 65119 il i I Q 1 5 E-?fff'g'g ' D , K U 'fl , - -I li' 3, :flu ' ' " ' . Nfl '55 ' ' i ,Sig EZLJL - , , ri , L ' Ewliluff gf l I' ..1i,,-ez:-ii' . t . l' Q If 'ff , I .. , I A ki .J 113 n.g'1.. , rg pl E - lL1g,ql,: fill, filling 5, VQ15-'alll . " " S .--' " '. .'-. --"' " V' i. 'H ' , ' '!',1 J. ." i' lf . V . VJ Q-F Q, :J -,qt 17 gf? ,H li H . . 'cya ff." 'f'-" fi:-.fi 1'ssJ3?'1- l'4:zf5.u 3- -.-Q-."c,w J - 5.4. X.-434-', vi 5. .lx , Q- ' ,.l,:1,ifq ef ,rl,,,!. ', 7 LIIJS-,1--'f,g,' is -1a.7Q,4f' ,gf . " 1 fsarziz-4' v -gg." ,f if .. ,r,'gfJs vi-'ffl .--1...'lC'-pf ' V ,TQ l, Y fx! !'Z"' "f'5'7n. l' 'fl' -5- '-ft li ' ' i '-f5"n-'LE E t P' " 1. ' . ' I 'flu "HL HV'-QF '-'g 1-"fi:-'F ' Trfiw ,'- , 'fp' let, It-.,'.',,.i . Qiik-4 , 5 In N 'NST Q L-LQA ,':'L:'T:xA'41 yi- iff. , Wg, '," 'I nw, i 'l . .-4 3' it Eu. wwf.-'C I , -ff' -' ,, .21 ,. i ...,- -.s., W,-1, -im. - ns-, .I-... it AFA V5 .nfl-1 If - ...ff-4. ,MXLV N '. .'.- - - X . ' - 'z'.,,:"v.lA'-4.1.4 ..- ixvu ,X '1 ,' 4- - I fi- .Li 'll ,,. K . h if,- W " i' ' 7 ,fl 'P l " 'l ii 1 i fim' 1. ll! f 5493.71 L J..v1'xIIQ:zaisgy5lhExgh" ' , '-1 'ugfflli A - - --0-bf -V --'- -- W' - .. ' ' '-rw-, 1 LENO PETER DE LUCA Bachelor of Science American Civilization NJ ' PETER DE MONTRAVEL 'i.i' . V ll-,ly , Bachelor of Science History -D ' P ', N , A, . . iz' - -r EB.. 9.- lli . ' ., FRANK G. DE NAVE Bachelor of Sciencc Sociology , ARTHUR DE RUVE Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy X -'Sf ' 1 , ,IP 3 WH My N ROISICRT G. DICSMOND lizuclwlm' ol' Science Polilicrul Pllilosuplly BIAGIO A-XNTHONY DI BIAS! liachclor of Science l'1'c-dcnlal DOMIQNICIK -IOHN DI FRISCO lH:u'hcIm' of Scicncc Poliliczal Philosophy DOMINICK .IQXMIQS DI FRISCIO lialcllclm' vi' Science l'1'c-dcnlul For many of Hx. Ihis wax n jmnilim' xufnf: Kfuling Hall. wlzerr' zur zumllrl lmw' ll lair' xuppw' in llw f'uf1flr'riu mul tlmn go upxlnirx Io nigh! l'Inss1'x. I47 r..-... -- , L- H 64" ls i X 313 ii va.. ', K '1 11.41 1. J' 414 S 1 15, I X -44 I' "5f:?QfJ AIIWU5 '. Vwfgi .MQ,b.. ,, " ' b .,,i Z2 u U Z Q 3 K W I' I 5 4- Y-, ' !' ': 33' Q-7 . ' 'f 1. '-.S1'13'?T"'?'5"1'75,"'?ffw'- -.,., ,'.' .- .1 ' . Q . L 1: i:,- 7 'f 4- .I z-gf df: 1 -V Ax...-gm: -- .1 Hi? .1 1 4:-uw .- -. s f- . Xf.z,,--1v21:s- 24 . -' qv - . 7 f. . ,gf,J:4:.-..-" 1 ,- S 1 1. Q E '-+ -ei' 1--4 - 'Q 2iZ:Gl"l' V91 T 'K W- . ' 'T -5 4113 1 . " . Af'3f'JR,QfJf4f V Ah- r,'j,-L5,.'," ' 3021, '-.gL:xfL.f-?:.fsLf-gf.. ' .- 4- 1- 1, .ew , Z , ..-44343 . -. ,gt .-1-.-W-.-sr-.-.:' - - 'A -f 1 ' gg:,-,.-,f-,5,5,2-- . M 'L .HJ - -1 .. .W-E, .- -'r.--, -.1 .MV "3-r. v HES.. Q, :Q- +w,L. . 'PW -4 'E' DENIS E. DILLON BHCIICIUI' of Science liconomics 1iUGliNli GER.'XI,D DILZILR BZICIICIOI' ol' Science Communication Arts 1Qm1oN1m -1. DIXON, JR. BZICIICIOI' of Arts History 'K IMAXXVRIQNCIL DOLAN Bucllclor of Arts Political PIIHOSOIJIIY 5 I48 GEORGE DON,VXl.DSON . ml 5' S '1 xi av Q. t 'ing Bill'IIl?'0l' ol' Science l'hilosophy ,'IT'3T' D JM' - 1JAN1u1. 1xx'1'1uc:14 noNN1a1.1.x' , Q 1jgiij,32Qf'f7fZgq,7fh' Q ., BZICIICIOI' ol' .-his linglish E: 3' 4 if K . ' 2 5 4 Y, V S ff f -41:12,Qffi'3I5:f:ffgEfE2E'?5g..5 5 . ' A 57" I JA :Fil:f1:ia1EI1:I-ZQE1:fz'f?S255 553125. S x DAVID .-X. DONOHOE Bacllclor of Science English JOHN DOUGHICRTY liachelor ol' Science I'Ic:onomic's .. ,-vi gm.. RQ? X 1 V y I0 R f W W 1 1 " ' 3 ex , , ' f 0 X N f. ,Z5?4m CH,'XRl,liS P. DUFFY pq 7? Bactlmclm' ol' .Xrls l'1'c-medical THOMAS R. DUGGAN Bacllclm' ol' Sc'icnc'c lfgygglmlggy I49 THOMAS -I. DULLAHAN Bachelor of Arts Anthropology -lOl-IN DUl'l,liIX DE ROMOET Bachelor of Science English JAMES W. DWYER Bachelor of Science Physics WVILLIAM D. ECCLI Bachelor of Science Chemistry X Plxilusoplzy lexl and gown pu! In res! fm' another clay. 'IO H N A. 1il"FENBliRGliR Bachelor of Science Clmcmislry -IOHN A. 1-INGLISH llachclor ol' Science Mznlllcmutics FRANK -I. EV.-XNGE1.lS'1', JR. BZICIICIOI' of Science Political Philosophy THOMAS ll. FAHEY, KIR. Bachelor of Arts Pre-medical ,A Ka.: T- xv? Rm? f'-'WA "' '-:'?l A 'QQ ny' ' F '-sri! s x FRA NCIS K. FANCER Bzuctllclm' ol' Science History P.-XUI, xl. l"liCT1i,-KU ll2ll'llClOl' ol' Science Economics BERNARD ,-X. FICENEY Bachelol' olf Scicnrc English ROBERT A. FERST Bachelor of Scicncc Iicononiics -vfnr E7 an-. B FORDHA COLLEG , X '1'1-IOMAS FIGM I K liziclmclor of Science Political Philosoplly PAUL -I. FINN B2li'llCl0l' ol' Science Economics Clhkll CIF 1955 MICHAEL V. FIORE Bachelor of Science Psychology EDNIOND FITZ GERALD BZlCll6l0l' of Science Pre-medical NIATTHEYV F. FITZGIBBON Bachelor of Arts Economics XVILLIAM F. FITZMAURICE Bachelor of Arts History I 1"7h-'wig 'TIN' 'N THOMAS A. FLAGG Bachelor of Science Communication Arts -IOHN PAUL FLEK Bachelor of Science Psychology THOMAS A. FLOOD, jk. Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy IVRILIJIQRICK l,. FLYNN Bachelor ol' Science liconomics 3 4. 1' X Jigs:-5553, l 5' 'e."'s,l'x li 1, 4 5 N XVILLIQXM R. FLYNN Bachelor ol' Arts Political Pllilosoplly PATRICK FOLEY Bachelor olf Arts History f I -, 'Q my -V . A. ' L JOHN 12. l"ORRES'l.' Bachelor olf Arts History NIICHAISI, IVORZANO Bachelor of Science French ,fi - wr N- fff - Falher Ruslunore celebrating Maxx in the University Chapel. 'I' i v y it W P ' is A if 9 'ws ilfi?L l'?4l .1 QT 5.'Z?ff,51f u....,...- -J' 'a"""'5 wam'i:A:'1a L.A...anaw-1- udhmd eds was M f' ' UWT? :rm we-an -rw' Jw ' 1 53" ,1,-1755,-5--.Au V ., P-f--.i..s,,F, i' . J .,r Ml, ...rl QQMW.. ..Lu,,,.,fw - V 1.- Jf: 1 4 -- . 1 . ' " " 1+ ., .,.,.,fzgg:,A - 1, ...f A -11" 4 if ,f-1.:g:1v:l:' ,i,f: +1 ., ,, ..,. , 2,91 rf" . I. lain fx' ,Q-. - JT' pg fx" . Y' 0247 . q.:,f5'1,, W- ,, 'Weil 1' my f-if sl-533' ' L-7? ,," E t or A efgijgu A .H .dd 1" 1' V W rj,-,, 1 - . ,Q .i,,:. A 'Ulf Q Q llsnhl ROBERT A. FOY Bachelor ol Science American Civilization ROBERT GALLAGHER Baclielor of Science Russian Studies Loic GALLAIS Bachelor of Science Economics 1955 MICHAEL JAMES GALULLO Bti-f" " 1 'ic 1elo1 ol Science Political lhilosophy I56 RICH.-'XRD GARDNIQR Bzutlieloi' Ol' Science l'll1g1iSl1 THOMA-xs 14. C,-xRi1sc:HE li2lCi'lClO1' Olf Srience lfC0ll0lllil'S GEORGE C. CODFREY lincllclol' Ol' Science liconomics if xx 'ETS' JOHN ,x. GORDON Bachelor of Science Hislory .4f 'Qa:.P- Q lux., ko 7 aj - 5.1 IOR 1 1 X I5 mf N. '- .uf " ., .O,, V V , 5x ., I -W 1' V F" 0' ia 'I O Q11 XJ ":.:'-' PAUI, M. GRACE liuclielui' Oi' Arts Classics RICHARD IQDMUND GRANDA liznclielor Ol' Arts Psychology JOHN J. GRANDSIRE Bachelor of Arts Psychology DONALD GREENE Bachelor of Arts History GERALD F. GREENE, JR. Bachelor of Arts Economics HAROLD J. GREER Bachelor of Science English '55-x Tlac xpiril of Christmas al Fowllmm. JOHN Ay. csulgvurzlu,-xN lizuthclm' ol' Science liconomics VINCENT F. GUINEE llnchclor of Science Pre-mcdiczll Al.ISIiR'l' EDXVARD GUNN lSzlcl1clo1' of Science History PAUL lj. HACKE'1"1' Iiachclor of Science Economics -.S I K! 'Qi T' .1 I-.-i -'QNAK b ipklxiglxf fafs 1. - ,V xx? ,x -'peg' RQ-1'.j.'Qff' if mfs' Xb' K Y If' NX" :K QR 5 Q J' "f!Q.- ' , I! s nixmias ny. i i.xcs.xN ii2ll'ilCiUl' of .Xrls .Xnic1'ic'zm Clivililulioll GliR.XRD R. H. XI.1i Bzlclicloi' oi' Scticncfc Sociology li R N 1is'l' H .-X M M ICR li2lC'ilCi0l' ol' .-Xrls linglish EDWIN H.-XNISH lizlflicloi' ol' Scicnfc History FORDHA COLLE J , X XVIl,l.l.'XM A. H.-XNR,-XHAN, JR. BZICIICIOI' ol' Science CilCllliSll'y R.-XYNIOND IGN,-XTIUS H,-XSTINGS iizzchclol' ol' Science linglish CLAS A OF ROBISR' l' li. HAVliKO'1"l'l'1 Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy F ROBERT RIQDMOND HAYVICS Bachelor of Arts English MICHAEL A. HAYES, jk. Bachelor ol' Arts History ROBERT W. HILAIA' Bachelor of Science History PWR cull C' 4 my fl' -- I ' I ' .2 A -'ffi 1- a . -V ' 1-nymgi'-A.5.lx1. - , Kxljl -f we-Jaffa . ll"1"g"-'L 'J J?" . iii? -R f. - fa lf-'il + l Jill lf- e- " -1-51-wilt-lisfia XZ lb! - ' , ,. -a 'A -f.-H f -4-'fm--1" ,I E. ml ,Y .,1 45,-.4218 J ., '4.J-A , ta , 'fl' 'JSA 5 - ' ll H ll-"'l E"1'Hrii.,f'l .- .1 '1 f " 1 ' f ffjj. " T1 ' l 1 .ll , J 'Q-J'.-42 J E If ga? QT 'J 'rr . A Y. 15 A - S . w I -W :mf "ss-ie -' ff "L-'few , L my---fy-ii 1' x',iff'1'Q,-4 !7j'!'!.1gI5. -aff,-fi? 12. ,,,. n I 'i'pJ,,- ., lalrtl. .451 i,,'l J .'4jl'5-.g'-C2 Y . if .tap -Q.-f Fl9.zEE'i-iflll ms- ,.-.'.-ff-fE- -ji lf' ' 55,27 'ff-.g'--' '1""' -A:-.fi 1 f? all 233' v-.l'5212Q.kQ :" tl ff 1 ,S 5-". .'.+pU"-,"' .L ,'-w " - ' 1-::sqi.'e 1.44: 'ff1l,L-s'- -J r . Q5.,.-A -Q, -w 'gl ,.x. 4- WH... . --.l,,- . f I 'Y 'L -.,- . 16- M., ' ', - Ulf!! fi. 'J .--1415 A: 2? 4:1 - .b."J'f il ff' .'-IFJ-' .'--1 ,J cs'-EV'-1 ' V ' " x-'x'-' Q 'I ' 1' !'iAf Il " 1.3 'f ' .far 4,5 . , , 4: 1:---1.-"M:--3 ff., -rw J- J. W.. -. 2-342 J, ru' ,V IJ, I VI G-V 1,25 ,i F 'g.'g,,fv! 1 'i4N,. t ,l :.w.s3t? viii..-3, Zllzpg. '52-'-'G-ff WW- 1- ch lg- +A 4- P V -'llfnil 2" .r -'S--A-zz 1' N .r ef , 2,-'L - , , ,,- ,,.u ,J ly...-f ."n',U-,-.- vm.- lu' .I-J.. Qxgfnffl if -xv ll., 51 i ,gf-1.1: 1 ,ilggi-Qxf ,.- .,g--,V 44. 554 A-"Ez: 1' - ' -'fi--!', ' lflrl A :V-Y71' 'ff' F , S'-'if 'iff r"'1-f' 1 -. . '-+3 A f' m ln gl Z ' ' 1 ,."H,- ml... . .' :N - , -a, -.Q ,:IA 'A . , v -4 -W-f--. ls. - 2 J- . 'u J -555' in ' J -1- ,vi U-T' l id? 3.i,T..g,gg:l X in xlrxayjzllgfv--h'N',..n" ' W , I..-Ya-32.2 :utah . ' -- N., "l of 1' ,1..1 ' A .-n-'5,:,1-3'.'xA 4 -- ' :' JAMES P. HEFFERNAN Bachelor of Science Russian Studies KENNETH C. HELLWIG Bachelor of Arts Economics JAMES J. HERNON, JR. Bachelor of Science Economics C. J. PATRICK HIBSON Bachelor of Science Economics 4- ir'--rl' GORNELIUS HIGKEY Uucllelol' of Science Connnunicalion A115 GEORGE H. HOLBROOK Bachelor of Arts GERALD MICHAEL HOLDEN RIICDCIOI' of Science American Civilization KENNETI-I HOLDEN Bzutlmelor of Science Wlmt's the matter, 1lon'l you History '12 History g enough to cat in thc' dmmg mom?" fwfr.-3 1 fi WW! IOL 'Ck-ew :anew-.un fvQ"fm"" T' A 'WW q gfpqv-QAHDKIIMQ. gn 'ls W ,,. 5:5 '1 .V- lr .lf Y' ,-i' .-" -L, if 'I r ,175 . . I ., ,- .. J , Q"11'.,' . V:-' 3 I if , in-,'.' MN J - 1 41- , 4157?-,.. .-7 'X YA Q 'f y'-lJ'.' ri - V L" j'3T- '::.pf: '4' Til lf, ffif-'ff ,.i, '76 I . r,,f-4-une-, L.-. .w,:. My ,, V5 :.,:. A 4 L H I .,.... .,.....4,..,im, Q 4 , t-,,s V . 1 ,.ih,,M '--. -' --1 " -' ' - --:.Lw.f- I , .., , . , A U ,, -,,,.43--,,' ,,. ,:',,k"4 "I A-1 -Q'-., .. . 4. - s fy, .-if :fT.a.". 34- c 'V " ...fc 11 , ,.,h.,HQy5'..:-it , .-.6..,,5,.:.Q. .M ,.... "'i"5,g 1-ml' 3.3. Ia., gif? , - I N4 ' U Pflili a'fi52.'.'3'f5'Q?'fi'CiffiEi ' c. Q--1.f'.,'g f ,Ttflf I P gr., .195 ,.- : 'V 'if' fn- . - ' -5 , ...sr : .5 ,4 C. . - 1 i . ' . ' . Tiff-ra .1 f , :,.5: .V 'I a,v:J:' 'W -f'-:ii-N':' A "mfg - 441, Q4 . .ji- If rg Q13 I I gag fi nwfayjq. Sir 4 ' api. -' 'N':.'.'i::'J",5, .if fl 1 gif. ff '7 -. 'Q Eg. V .- f4j!"'A 'H z'-716 ggw ' 4 1'7'.l ' . -' I- ' - . . n - X .gli JAMES MICHAEL HORAN Bachelor of Science Economics FRANK W. HOWELL Bachelor of Science Economics 1'E'1'I2R D. I-IOYVLEY Bachelor of Arts Physics 1955 fu. , STEPHEN 1-IUBEN Bachelor of Science History I64 TAR.-XS HUNCZ.-KK BZICIICIOI' ol' Science lcliswry RX XVlI.l,I,-XM I". HUSCHLIC BZICIICIOI' ol' Arts History HENRY XY. QI,-Xlilil. Iiachclor of Science PXXHIOHIRN pmw w.Ax1:1'1aR -I,-XMICS -IOSI.-XH, JR. Bachelor ol' Science linglish .4? QfSrf Fr! "3-' f 1-,ec ko ! ' TQ4'H '76 - N J 4 -c TL M1 IOR 1 'r r 535 gg, Qf ifm : X. ,A IQ I A I" 5515.20 ir QI r X'-1' 'Q-1. I ul Q. tg-I" I f X I-I EN R Y ICIJNV.-XRD KA PM EYER 445 Bachelor ol' Science liconomics -IANIIQS -I. KAVANAGI-I Bachelor of Science History MICHAEL KELLEHER Bachelor of Arts Pre-medical JOSEPH REYNOLDS KELLEY Bachelor of Science History JOSEPH T. KELLIHER Bachelor of Science Economics FRANCIS J. KELLY Bachelor of Science Economics Q4 'r N. The Senior Show, "IPS Maroon." Dick Murcly, Hank Greer, Nick 0'NeiII, Dick Cieciuch. JOHN T. KENNALLY Bachelor of Science English ROBERT KENNEDY Bachelor of Arts Communication Arts WILLIAM KENNEDY Bachelor of Science Russian Studies THOMAS E. KENNEY Bachelor of Science Chemistry fkfivgfyefaf are - X: y wx V X if J bd X PE'l'liR P. K ICNNY liillillifllll' ol' Science Iiconoin ics H HNRY V. KICNSING Bzncliclor ol' ,-Kris History 'l 'I-IOM AS H. K IQRRI CAN Bziclicloi' olf Sricncc Political Philosophy BRUCE QIOSIQPH ANDREXV KHADABUX Bzichclor olf Science Political Philosophy 1- ' ASQ FORDHAM COLLEG , lv? 'l"""" GEORGE 11. KING, -yn. lbucliclor of Science Psychology' GORDON THONIAS KING Bachelor of Science EconomiC5 CLAS I GF 1955 'IOHN FRANCIS KING Bachelor ol? Arts Communication Arts MARTIN KING Bachelor ol' Science Economics .IOHN JAY KNOX, -IR. Bachelor olf Science Iiconomics DANIEL CHARl,I'1S KOZERA Bachelor of Arts Pre-medical -Ifflar 'F-r 'R U PETER KRAWCHUK Bachelor of Science Communication Arts ERWIN O. KUBEC Bachelor of Science Pre-medical RICHARD E. KUGEL Bachelor of Science Chemistry JAMES P. LARKIN Bachelor of Science Mathematics Joi-IN J. 1,,xR14iN 1iZll'llCl01' ol' Scicncc liconmnics A aw v-no XVILLIAM P. I..-XRKIN, -IR. Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy ARTHUR A. LA VAI.Ll'l j i Bachelor of Science Political Philosoplly if CICR.-XRD li. l,.-XVICRY liachclor of Arts Classics Sigisx 312, ER Wm fi? "1 - 'E ,7"'I'. -2 The Chorus Line from "IBS Maroon." v lgj i t . il: " 1 -Y Cs PM V , . it Y--1 f-:ef-4-"fsr45" Q25 '- "" -' HM ggi-.lf I Lf K " :staffin- I -Pkg ---5 il: ' at :i'li5'5i. aw, 1454.1 fp: ,rp- t 5 4 -',.,,:,i-I -Q., , ffl -'v.5- yr, .1 . 'fu' 'f1',Z w'1' g tal . f 'ffffll ' 1 ' lit ! f-:gill fbi l-SU! 2:17 " V ...7 ' - s.- "?'E'3 . I 'Nu' in-..h, -47 JEROME JOSEPH LIBASSI liachelor ol' Science Economics ANTHONY lf. LO FRISCO Bachelor of Science Russian Studies DAVID J. LONG, JR. Bachelor of Arts Matlienmlics 31955 V- Nu.. PHILIP JAMES LOREE Bachelor of Science American Civilization 172 JOSEPH 'l'. I.U'l"l'ON Bachelor ol' Arts lic'mio1nic's -.Q 'VS CH.-XRLICS E. LYNCH lizicliclm' ol' Sficnfc Hislory ROBliR'l' li. M.-XCKIN lizicliclm' ol' Science Politicuil Pliilosophy I"R.bXNCIS Y. M.-XGUIRIQ 1'-ucllcloz' of Science licronomics M imi A V9 ff' fo nb J, i. - -fig , N N vga' 4A.1'.1'-ri I Q i' 'A in i- Zz N7 vs ,if J, Q 'ry 2- f . up . W ' 'BA' ri 4, . x,, N 'Qui 94" NN I 'QV KEVIN l.. MAHER Bucliclni' ni' Arts History 113.7 STEPHEN -I. M.-XHUNEY Hucliclor of Science English NEIL J. MALONEY Bachelor of Arts English PATRICK MORGAN MANNING Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy PETER VINCENT MARINELLI Bachelor of Arts English JOHN EDWIN MARSIN Bachelor of Arts Pre-medical X -ll-"' f , . The Senior Slum' rzfIu'nrxe.v-Dirk Jlurrly, Hank Greer, Dick Cieciuch. l75 FELIX G. MARTINO liucliclor of Science Political Philosophy ANIELI., THOMAS MASTELLONE liuchelor of Science Pre-medical EUGENE M. MATOS Iiaclielor of Science Political Philosophy JOHN T. MAYER Bachelor of Science American Civilization 5,5 3 1 A N Wx? . ls Fixx'-ft Silt ,fwpf l, . 5 ' U G '--P S1111 gx 'Af A N1 9795 , ky y,Qg.',:. '9Q.v:f1? my - Q74 'ff X 'i'l2:v?'I 3' ir H xv 'h RO BERT' G. MCAL ISTER Blllllliflill' ol' Science Political Philosoplly I IQDXVARIJ G. MCCJXBIL, JR. llaclielor ol' Science l-lislory .1osu1'H D,-XY'l'ON Gicolzcsn MCCADDEN Buclielor ol' Science Russian Studies ROBERT KI. Mc:DOWEl,I, l52lCllClO1' of Science Biology 'Qs FORDHAM C Q L I, F, G , JAMES H. MCERLEAN Baclielor of Science Political Philosoplll' ARTHUR I. MCENVEN i 1'-uchelor of Arts Economics CLASS OF JOHN lf. MCEWVEN Bachelor of Arts Psychology .JAMES li. MCGARRY Bncllelor of Science Mathematics JOHN JOSEPH MCGLYNN Bachelor of Sciene e Sociology JOHN R. INICGOVERN Bachelor of Science History plkdbff -.cs i STEPHEN MCGRATH Bachelor of Science Psychology wAL'1'15R J. MCMORROXV, JR. Bachelor of Science Economics HARRY M. MCNAMARA Bachelor of Science Psychology BERNARD A. MCNULTY, Bachelor of Science English X JOSEPH R. MEEHAN Buchclol' ol' Arts Psychology RICI-IARD ARTHUR MENHINICK I'.:u'l1clo1' ol' Science English RICHARD MENNA BZICIICIOI' olf Science Cllcmislry 1AXVRliNC,1li MlI,l.liR Bzlclmclor of Scicnfc Biology Dick Jlurfly, jim Conway, Clmrlie lVemly-"IPs Maroon." 725 iw- 5 'Win' 4 ex. Pm Az. 1' sJ::-1-A-1 lift' www. '3gE7"'??fW5'5F" 1W'?P-355573440 wa I W +' My I 1 4 11.3 . K A V. ,, V Vps? ,ful .J ,- -' .. :wif iw 1 I 1 b .. -.-V .. 'BL7 ..," Q ' ' - mL:.fy'f' ' 1...-.v-'--7 fihii lf: 6221 , If 'LT ,,'f7SG54l'E --,-,M L... ML'-" 1 , ' K, , I I ,. .. . ,-q,,, f g ""1,ff-q,,,1.?5',Q'3 W '.f .y'. 3, - Q 392. ' . ' H -If.-,"j", . - -M ' ' . -x I . '.-19"s.' . ,, L.. ..,, wp- -f -vwrx. .-,,,.,..., . , h .I Q'-2' zffaa'-.'-1" ' ' , - -44.-51-,H:fgL,'.','.::q . "'r1,:"j""-,g .1 - -1. N." ',:Y'i'. 15' an T- I ':4,,,-'.,,:5fL" . , ' ,-,.. ,, , f - "I ,. :f --, ,.A V wf'-71 r jr . .,",, .4 ,ul L, ' 1' E van 59' .' -' affiri ' X ' ,ggrmx - - Ig V, 4-ny: 1 .L f, - . 1,1 :r -w T3 ' .. v '-'-,fzw ape' fini- sig: vw Zf iiiffv KW' I' .HQEL 13.3.1 .'-"-'3:2r.'9 . :AL gum .'-5,-4. '-Q g,sj- fffufa V fgfvffrrfk'-f."fi7, I 3 ,L.:v- 5.f5f'f"P.-1-212' . SEKZLQ ' '- vw .-'pp ' . I K. U .-. ,is "- ' --" ' 1. , Q 'B New A I L- z' , ROBERT MILLER i Bachelor of Science Economics RICHARD M. MILLS Bachelor of Science Russian Studies COSMO J. T. MIRANDA Bachelor of Science American Civilization J.. W.-XL'l'liR ERNIQSI' MISDOM Bachelor ol Science Matlleuultics I80 1955 wr' I .yU1.1Us Louis M1'1'A S. il ... ' ' ' 1 .1- , Bachelor ol' Science Poliliczil Philosophy . I 1 I f R 5' Nic:Ho1,As 141. MONCHAK 1 D Bachelor ol' Science Russian Studies 7 M' R 05996 2 R. M. MORIARTY Bachelor ol' Science Chemistry EMII. C. MORl5'1"l'l Bachelor olf Science Economics N IOR l8l . f . XP Lf R Vw ' .. '. ' R Jig ' 1 l f If! ' ' ' K .W fn I X. R as? 45' Q " ri ' x9 ' 'X C 5 U.. X i' I GUY P. MORSE ,lluclielor ol' Science Communication Arts LEONARD VV. MOSS Bachelor of Arts English IOHN MAT 1 HLXV M03 NIH KN Bachelor of Science History JOHN JOSEPH MULCAHY Bachelor ol Science Psychology l I A 1 PETER F. MULLANY Bachelor olf Arts English PATRICK FRANCIS MULLEN Bachelor olf Science American Civilization l im: Wulf-...V ,iw g e i s 12.5 --., 4 s 3 ak G 1 . 1 f C.. y 1 vi Anolher scene from Ihe Senior Show-the happy muple is Kevin Maher mul Sieve Huberh I83 ERNST I'. MUI.l,liR liachclor of Arts English GEORGE Cl. MULRY, -IR. Bzutliclor ol' Science English KIOHN Cl-I.-XRl.liS MUNNA Bachelor of Science Pre-mcclical CONRAD H. M UNS'1'liR Bachelor ol' Science Political Philosophy f, Jig lx N... X N. 5 4 Q ,I X, YK fax i:5rgF.,- If KXAXMEQ '43-' N' :ny flag!! J- - 'ui f ' 3'-'-1 .-.gif Y Qu, ' Q Nr-' XA ,WE 3 it - I, X RICHARD l'. MURDY lizlchcloi' ol' Science ,'Xmcric'an Civilivnliion AUSTIN PA'1'RICIIi MURPHY Bacllelm' ol' Science liconomics JOHN ul. MURPHY, JR. BZICIICIOI' of Science liconomics RESTON I". MYRON Bacliclm' oi' Arts linglish FORDHA COLLEGE HN! JOHN M. NACK lizueliclol' of Science Psychology ROBERT P. NEGRI Bzicliclox' of Science Chemistry K f , CL SS OF 1955 Q JOHN FRANCIS NITTI Bachelor of Science Pre-medical PETER -I. NOIAN, JR. Bachelor of Science Economics JOSEPH M. NOTARGIACOMO Bachelor of Science Economics PETER A. NUCCIO Bachelor of Science Biology PM - N Q1 Y ANTHONY OBADAI, AP-4" liachclor of Science Political Philosophy BRIAN Ll. O'BRIllN Bachelor ol' Arts Psychology THOMAS -I. O'BRlliN Bachelor of Science History Vp-54 1 BRENDAN lj. O'CONNlLl.l, Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy l86 Wll.l.I.-XM V. CYCIONNOR 15:u:l1clm' ol' Arts linglish NICHOIAS O'Nl'IIl,l. ll:1c'l1clo1' ol' Sc'icm'c liummuics ROBl'lR'l' O'SH ICA Bachelor olf Science lifonomics FR.-XNCIIS Cl. IKXR.-XSC.4XNlXJl..X Bactllclor ol' Science Political Philosophy Ray Sl'hr0Il1'x big momenl in "ll'x Jlnroml. f . V-A H g , 1. 3 , 13 V ' h . 'Zinn 'H , xx. GiQL',i: . '. X '- ,Q 1 " K5 ' f . 6 X, .. I l , A 11344 V534 19471 . ---11 ,"'.'g.f-f -: LA ,,, U.-W..-...-..+ , , .., . 5.m,ir,,92qv.,,,z . .. eg.4,.w, ,.,, 'f . 7- -V . . , 1. lf-- 'E5'7,z'?-"'- ffsgrfvr .. N ' wi'-. X - . ,L' , 'r ,fa " Q- aw' z . - . , xr af F' , QM nn-nt: ,H -.. .1 hiv" f-inf! v . ' ,.- r . . 'i -"-"1" ' Q 51 ,Q +f1 L ' -1:+ i'i2 'f wa: .ff I ,mv .',:,,'- ' ,g-V5-fmj Qjlj.. f ',-iafffzl V-hal' sfsifi' ',f'H'I V ,, F" if f 3, .U X .1, ,. 1 4- . 5. '.- , Q gl , 1 12 L' R I V id rg' ' '- 95-"' 'CMV X YVILLIAM P. PARE I Bachelor of Science Psychology linux -1. P,xs'1'oRu1,1,15 Buclmelor of Science English DONALD JOSEPH PAYTON liachelor of Science Economics 1955 -jOSlil'l-I ROBERT PEDEN Bachelor of Science American Civilization I88 H ENR Y A. PERISZ liachelm' ol' Science l'iC0l1OllIil'S SAL l'lLLI'1"1'1iRl Bachelor of Science American Civilimlion FRANK C. l'lN'1'O Bachelor of Science Ci1Cll1iSLl',' DONALD JOSEPH PIZZARELLO Bachelor of A115 Pre-lnedicui ' .222-, Y a I X I O R i A 'f f l'T'!'7 .TNI I If ko if A Vai -'59 ' .. l ' Q D2 A fi' 3 I .K , ix. Q I M X f' if N "' 'ull 4 J kl0HN A. POCLIJNCO lizichelm' ol' Science PVC-llICliiC2li WILLIAM PONVER lizlcllelm' ol' Science Economics JAMES A. PRIOR Hacllclor ol' Science Cmmnunicution Arts RICHARD F. RACK B11Cl1ClOl' of Science American Civilization ROBERT R. R.-XMl'INliLLI liachcloi' of Science 1 English CLORNELIUS A. RANDHARIS Bachelor of Arts English X ,-I rIean's job is not alwayx a dreary one . . . Father JlcLaughIin enjoyx a ln'il.'f rest with two of tluf Seniorx. who are experts nt llmt ,wrt of thing. JOHN M. REED Bziclieloi' of Science Economics XVILLIS -I. REILLY liucliclor of .Xiu .Mncrican Civilization G1iDk1MIN.-XS JOSEPH REINIS liuchelor ol' Science Chemistry EDWARD -I. REYNOLDS Bachelor ol' Arts Pre-dental l9l ICIJXVARIJ l'A'l'RlCli REYNOLDS liuchelor ol' Science English JACK REYNOLDS Buclielm' ol' Science Economics JOHN ARTHUR RIC1-1 linchelor ol' Science liconomics JOHN T. RICE PJZICIICIOI' ol' Science Physics I., A FORDHA COLLEG , J 2 fs j-1,.'+ -4 . J A . Ns X 'sf vw O 0 0' XVILLIAM P. RICHARDSON Bachelor of Science Economics JOSEPH MARIO RIGOLIO lizuiheloi' of Arts Political Philosopliy CLA SCH? 1955 ROBERT THOMAS ROCHE llaclielor ol' Science Econoniics CLARENCE GEORGE ROSENSWVEIG, Bacliclor ol' Science Political Philosopliy DONALD JOSEPH ROSENSWEIG Bachelor of Science English YVILLIAM E. ROTHSCHILD B2lCllClO1' of Science Russian Studies P'0touTg l93 f , gf, A .X 'I gl ' . bil' if-f ini- A -ll' .hflvl -,.i.l,1.x,lxi'i .f wx lf'lr , Img" -'ahljh-A-4u. inn Q K LQ? . 24.12 '-v. 'P-uf f,9'n.a 'VS' TF: rf.- ff. 5' paw: ..,y. B V I, ' T 1 will fo r- V i 4,4 72 4'f.jif"'Q!liiA Js in A - .. '-f ' . . ',43...,g:'y' - QN- 'ii QV ' f 52 of ,si ff I .ki ' ,f-, 4 . ,-U' 1 -.4,,4. Q - "-,Jag 'foggy' gg' 2.25 Y' ! W V -any I 4. in :ii .,'A . rl: f 1uJ'yf QQ 2'1" 'fg.Mg,.-175-iffiazg 'A fi -. ff-2+ ig- in y - - 5Q:13Yf'::5s.j,,,,qjgaW-"wg-fi y , '- , A IHEIQ'-',l",Q""t, ' 3 grfs' if '24 , l 7 f, gl' I. ' , ,- . ,y4L,,x.- A .- . :V ,fxv "' E ,::J'yf' 2 .,..'Ai1, , w J-4 LQ.-.5 if, , 1,1 .Qyf l!l.l5fr'S' ,' '- ,fggll ' - ..N'9"f ,S .. - th -"- -6 ww. mf-if L,-f ,,, b-.Q - Lvl 3, V ,.-,, .,.... fn , .J ,N 1' ,fi lk9i55'f5fr'L F' -img' 'AA , .- I 4 .1.7 v -1- 1 . -.g . 1. ,3- :U-SIU, 1-ill ,Vim '?,.. f ,Jan-4,02 . .1 A ' "WT ai l '.f'f:'z "W iii-ll 2.71-,QI . ff 14"ff'4F'.x ' I ,. nw. - 4 I Y 'A I 2 . '43,,y . ,f A - 4 ,,v b ,- '-- , 4'a'N-43,-:yu , .Q wig s. .."' .,' f?'5r '." 'il fill "3 b-Z .15"li 5-"N 'U div- "1 ,jf-'L b I, -if ,,,,,:-.,,,p j,r,:.,f ff:iq1fy.,,',iW,in-mr-'.sJg, .5 -hi, g,v.'rf,.+:y -1' -. - .f- so-441 Q,-+1 x--.. -f ' ' 1 -"1,' - -' -Iffff' ' lm! " ::-'--1.'- 1 rff ' twill - ful- A pw ,l-. rf ,, , ,,,. ,Q 4, , P , , ,. 1- ' -r. -lim r V1 in ' 1 9 ffm S 11- 'Q , ' VI uggj N 2 QL-J ll :Right wr if.. i ,..- ,- 'm..4,-, , 1 -1 .1 -H, , --nv -' '- ' - - ' -'fi' r---ag' --P " A , -. JOHN H. ROWLAND Bachelor of Science Economics ROBERT F. RUDDY Bachelor of Science Psychology N'!:.v RICHARD JOHN RUSZKAY Bachelor of Science Chemistry DERMOTT FRANCIS RYAN Bachelor of Arts Psychology Lx q,--1 JAMES JOHN RYAN Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy JOHN RYAN Bachelor of Arts Mathenlatics RICHARD 12. RYAN Bachelor of Science English FRANK JOHN RZIGALINSKI, IIR. Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy Gene Mnlos and Bob Hawes 'fueling up" in the Senior Show. , 3 Q 1 ,..... ..f V .'1"W',,?""'- weirfffi uilr'Ais'tE5s. viQK.fig3 M m1rw-arq:lr'wlIw- iz REQ Y' 1' -Je ,4 I' 3 fm 1 ,. an ,'i , , v 1 A 24, J , f M R! ,- My , 1 .--...-. rv- .A 1 in 1: L if 4-' .. Qt ,,.ff3b,9..g WN-,M p..'.,.w,- ,--,. . -, 'Fifi V, , . , . ' ' . 73.-T". , ' .4 : V ' " ' - 5,3--.'cr:"" '.---a'T'h-' l -' .H Li. .-'gif' ,'.,,'1 --vw - 3. ja? '. .- 'W F., , .3"vf" ' " f -' ' ' 'J A . . , .. . ,- I., ' .-'-I-1 "Y3'1""!l.Tf'r ' "M" """"2-:-Lum of .-' I ,. 1' " 'If Q.: ', H ':m..u:'f .-"" 1' - 47 ,,,,. ,,,1': I ' f .4 , , 'NM- Y , ., .. .1 Jw,zr-4?d?5wg?j1Ef!?:J'f ' Q .. ,VM Q ., H-- -v,. , rn .- .' -.-'Mau f A+ ii A - . 4 'Ri Lf ii' '.. 4 f S e41.:" 'f 5. V4 ,f::,:5-k,, .- .V , - P ,4'q.::g.1e.. .,.-:,::.-- f w, - 1' ., -.i'4f:1v-!y".f', if . .f. J- file" X"-f. 11f ,.',.'.-w,--:+:- nj . ' 3" ,Q ' l1'2:,3ZIL.f E. jfs" " ' 'ififgfftxzihli - .Q ' H' Vffif if-i4':v.2bf?i9g fi? '15 55312, x g,fv,,14:i,fff:-.1'.. .- 1:'.' K' 'Tw ' -. 'A . JOSEPH D. SACCIO - Bachelor of Arts l're-medical ANTHONY -IOSEPH SAINTOMAS BZlCl1C10l' of Arts Psychology LUDVVIG SALCIL Bachelor of Science CIICIHISU y THOMAS R. SALMON Bacllelor of Science Economics I96 21955 ue, .fJ'h. Obs AUGUSTUS S. SAN l"Il,ll'l'O liachclor ol' Science l'X'0ll0ll1ifS Louis 11. SARNU Baclmelor ol' S ' LIOHN P. SCI-Il.USSl'1R. IR. l'lClH'C l'1c'onmnims Bachelor ol' Scicncxc A lic'rn1mnirs RAYMOND A. SCHROTH, -IR. Baclmelor of Arts An1ericzu1 Clivilixzllion x 1 1 EU ' I O R N M 1 '.'Q5:5,-. .fr O if' .41 x .X 4 Xu' V. 2 X. j fa' g f f. un if 5 'XX 'xy X 5 " "-'fix aff iff' S'l'lCl'HliN D. SCHVVARZ l3zu'l1c:lm' ol' Arts Philosophy .XA RON M. SCI-I XfVAR'l'Z llzlclmclm' ol' Science Chemistry JOHN JOSEPH SCOTT Bachelor of Arts Psychology EUGENE MICHAEL SEIDNER Bachelor of Science Pre-dental JOHN A. SHANAHAN Bachelor of Science Communication Arts PHILIP T. SHANNON Bachelor of Science Biology X Jim Conway ix the singer with Gm S11nFilippo and Tell Stanton as nccomplmisls in "It's Maroon? I99 THOMAS D. SHEA BZlCilCi0l' of Science History TIMOTHY J. SHEEHAN Bachelor of Science Pre-medical JERRY SHERIDAN Bzurhclor of Science Economics PETER SHOWERMAN Bachelor of Science History ""s 'Fx ,J RX M' 'lil' A 1 . 2g 'W 1fi"L""i-rw' A Qi wff.6x,'ff4 ni AHXQSL-azz! .x'5a',34."""'7 'QQFI X ny . XJ wr, . 5 ALISERT SICREIC, JR. liaclielor ol' Science Clhcniislry .yoHN R. s1QowRoNsKi k I 'Q Bachelor' olf Science Biology V iv . Qi? 11. .K J Hx' 4 , NICHOLAS ANTHONY SMICIHRA liachelol' of Science licononiics cHA1u.igs 12. SMITH, -IR. Bnchcloi' ol' Arts English FORDHAM COLLEGE X RICHARD SMITH llncheloi' ol' Science liconomics ARMANDO ANTHONY SOLIMENE Bachelor ol' Science Psychology CIMKNN CH? 1955 ROBISRT V. SPELLIERI Bachelor of Science C0lT1l11lll1iCZlli0l1 Arts JOHN D. STANTON Bachelor of Science History ROBERT M. STANTON Bachelor olf Science Chemistry WVALTER X. S'1'AN'1'ON, Bachelor of Arts Russian Studies 7784: omg ASX L JOHN -I. STARKE Bachelor of Science Pre-medical P. CHRISTIAN STEINBRUNNER Bachelor of Science Sociology JOHN ROMAN STEMNISKI Bachelor of Science Chemistry RICHARD WENZ STRATTNER Bachelor of Science History JQ ilm THEODORPI I,. STREI-IAN Bachelor of Arts 1're-medical 1+ 4'1" TERENCE JOSEPH SULLIVAN lizxcthelor of Science COll1Illlll1iC2lliOl1 Arts JOHN F. SYVEENEY Bachelor of Science Matlremzuics 'ha' JOHN P. SZUI.G1'1' Bachelor of Arts Sociology 1: 37 - K.. gi ve Bob Kennedy fback to emnernj director of "IHS Maroon" studies "'. W W '-N A- the script during one of the many rehearsals. 'Ri-, I 'q' 'WE J i 5 n, p Q X 1' 1 fb ,ff X 1 DO" ' i !f??F ,f?4T1 -pf -va 'wr-0' my -A W f-":..'s.f5 "W1-Q 'dries ll' ev FAR 0' :rf W' JJPKUKNU '-f rf'1-'-'--'-fm A ""' " 3.4,-,, r --A-f-M---H-M I W Q51 - nw ,.- 'GG 'J " -- " ' ." Ig 'V "- ik ,. - , . -,' 1- . . i ,.4 -'H 3 -Lv-1 r....f.,,,f. V- ,. ,. my ,sv- -gfmi-E' df " J" ni ,,,,. 15, Lg-s -vw ' 4 "V - "Rn 'Isl A Ill.-1 1 Siu. 1'gf'.-:,'qT'w,w fp'-'12 .4 V,-ffg,-5 ' ,n I , A,.,g',- 'fi 1:,v1,l 'V Anlljff vr f -.TA 4 P, lv' ' 'Q' f . ,mf 5 'QM -' ,-ary, ii - 'rf' 'J fff?".rf gr ,Nfl I ,I-.I 'V Fan 2 ' J ii?" 4:2- .fl- .4 RONALD J. 'Il-XCGIASCO . lchelol' ol' Science Poliliczll Philosopliy JAMES G. 'I'Al,I,ON lizlchelor of Science linglish URBAN A. 'II-XRliN'l'INO Bachelor of Science Sociology 1955 5 K K , , , , WV iu.a.,p.. -i -sa, PAUL 'l'. 'l'I1iRNI2Y Bachelor ol' Science linglish 1 204 V JOSEPH li. 'l'lGH1'l BZICIICIOI' ol' Arts Psycrl1olog.gy 43' THOMAS F. TOBIN BZICIICIOI' of Science Political l'hilosophy VINCENT MICHAIQI. TOISIN l3:u'l1clm' ol' Science NIZllhClll2llil'S -IAMES JOSEPH TODD l3zu'l1clo1' olf Science Psychology zf 'QSv.M 4, s 1-gag, 9 "'o ' Y vf A IOR h 1 4 1: iff: 7 'O N :fe I ...'j' X5 5. - 41 ' A 5 I 'Q I XJ H. LANCIJUN 'l'Ol..fXND Hnclmclm' ol' Science English ur, "':- HENRY JOHN 'l'OR'1'ORzX liachclor of Science Polilical Philosophy FRANK G. TUZZOLO Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy CONSTANTINE N. VAGIONIS Bachelor of Science Economics JOHN ANTHONY VALENTI, JR. Bachelor of Science , History LEROY LOCKWOOD VALLERIE Bachelor of Science Psychology X 'CL' 2-6' Qu- 31.. A " "5 Don Camilla? Nope. Ron Taggiasco in the Senior Show. rw ' A 207 JOSEPH J. VELARDI llachclor of Arts Philosophy DINO I. VENUTO Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy JAMES XV. VOSKOVITCH Bachelor of Science Pre-medical JAMES DENIS WVALL Bachelor of Arts Economics -,st f N' 'L fl' A5 iHiX"iP?..g,v'.2.: . fi x' rr gc, x 'Kuff A ,--- jjfklvy iv X,-TQQ N M ' ,' 'HFSQU ' QF? W' :ff Ql.r,,, i ' s X ICIJXVARIJ XV.AXl.Sl'l, R. Buclmclol' ol' Science linglish KIAMICS .X. WALSH HZICIICIOI' olf Science Clmcnlislry -IOSICPH .fXN'l'Il0NY WALSII lluclwlm' of Science Pllysirs l'1i'l'1iR .XNTHONY W.bXl.Sl l liznrllclor ol' Science Psychology Y-'- 41, A'U- FY FORDHA COLLE J , .4 :ff X WILLIAM J. WALSH llachelor of Sctiencc PhysiCS JOHN JOSEPH NVAI.'l'liRS, JR. BZICIICIOI' of Science Econo111iCS -T .li t ,v -, 1 ' E .0521 , E I 'EVA I ' 'f - , U l, '13 1 ' jg: , ' VJ Kvijxigf ' - 4' A n 'lv, Lily' V ill fill K .auf . " I If 1:11 pyfw V1 af' ' :IQ zi'ls?F.1g 11 1,-xv' fy A , 3 gy-fefmsiz 2 ,A ' N1 L 41.1. . R 3251- 414' f -if V at . .. . A. .,,. ij-V: I b -2. ff il' -V W . f I, if' Tiff' V ' 'f 1 A ' .417 ' -if ' lil' '?3Vsl'C?i V. 3925? El If -lr 1 1 -2,1 -sit fb' I P f C1514 '1i ""-V 1 , ' '.,, i,'fv" ..4,p.gf- I EK5"'sr:'V:: """'J ' 1 f-'?a'I'- 'lib A 'Pa 1 '59-I . 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N ' W' """'ll' "' ' ,i a ' "' "" 1' fi' ii .A'IL'i'g,ja .M THOMAS S. WARD Bachelor of Arts History DAVID A, WEEKS Bachelor of Arts Psychology JEROME WEINREB Bachelor of Science Political Philosophy WILLIAM '11 WELLS, JR. Bachelor of Arts Economics ' 7 ' ' " A H" ,liH'9C1K .uv-N 'U' s CHARLES MICHAEL NVENDY, Bachelor of Science English RUPERT D. WEN'1'WOR'1'H Bzmcllclor of Science Cliemistry JOSEPH PHILIP WHALEN Bachelor of Arts Pre-niecliczll JOHN ANDERSON WOLF Bacllelor of Science Political Philosophy N N 'gk R- PETER GEORGE YOTNAKPARIAN QW. Bachelor of Science EHgliSl1 EDMUND KEAN ZAHN Bachelor of Science Pre-medical EDVVARD D. ZAJAC Batchelor of Science Economics 'W ,Q 'ka' Shift EDYVARD F. ZAWVESKI Bachelor of Science Chemistry Z, Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor TIMOTHY BROCK of Arts Psychology EUGENuJ.cALLAHAN of Science History ROBERT C. GROSE of Science Psychology THOMAS P. HENNESSY of Arts Psychology WILLIAM E. MCKENNA of Science Economics JAMES F. O"1'OOLE of Science Communication Arts 2ll - , D '71 .'., I I 1 I J lf' Thad? . u lr , .. -, E -- K 1 1--, L- . - ' 4 -i A ' Q, ,fx W: " 1' ""f "rr 5, My ' x" . krfgfuxff-, " -- .Cv L Q 'jf GL, mf" . 1 ,, . :BA K' .lr ,si 'FSL' ' gqqgi-. ,-.- j -.ysbgn X Y ti .-Q, P.. x Q11 . .1 ' .,4. ,r'. - A .,- ' iw, il. y . ' s W " 5. 5' 4 , '!'lx .K b -'AI .Q 1 uv '6 A 1 ' 'n ' s in is A W' iff J'- A 7' -' as s -la.. I av -- , -,- 1' uv? ff .,' L in qw' ' A - L, , ' 'Y' , 1" .. ' ' ?"T '2F7f'J'f' , -fm. 'A 4,713 S..-JM -.gf -' .M ,,, . , 1.-- ' ,.,. ' ,.' I Ave. . - ' ' N ':"'4q .' 'Y TAL ,5 ...f ' t , 4 4 L . 'A ' .'i?.:"'-ff-gg ' . ,, My ' 4. 'L .Y-tgg.. s,.?""m. W. ' . A V "'f'f' . i 4-.1 , . ,255 ...N i 3 or , .- .-, 1 V 5 .4 I A4 ,. X. . 'u ,uf fs,-M.: V ' f- 3 3 -1.5 . ,A ' -33 ' 5. nr, ". Q -:A wr 0 1114, A ,, , 'A' f ' R' A ' A ' N M K sp M . W? , 4 Q, A V V -' j "yLi..'f1 ,nX.y,iQ' A , ' ,hw . , + . ' W LV ,Q ' 4, Z - n-fu W W .kg ws, - A I 'W' W ' .,-1 'A .. yn ag' 49h vw Q ff, ev- I AWRFNCI I SUII IVAN d lcbl 11115 I 15 S1UAR'1 CARR d Nf'l1Lll 7 195' 'S-.. -rf- IOSLPH C Vl IRANO cl NKJNCITIIJLI 8 102 llll Ln: 1 111111111 A1111 Ill lvnlnslzvvg 115111 slum upmz 1111111 I -. C . 1 -, - J ' 1' . . 1 L li . .' , . .7 '."',l9T. N 1 ,V ." li A1 ,H 1 -y :off 1 5 'K , w 11 h , , ,L .K XYD5. t K Z If f 4, .X I VZ, if-ifqvf I A I , , 1- X 0 ' ' gl 1. . 1 A Xu. 1. sg 1 ' Alffjfjlfj g ' f' M' -1 "1 , , M:-:gig-. 1 A 1 A - 5 5, , ' A' . x X"f:Lff" f " , 5 ffl? U1 ' , 0 IJ nl, L: " , Rox! : 5:t.,',f .'f1.'f:, L 2I3 -el, 1 .-.E 3 ,g-t : ,v . 9, -ua mum 's .-, 1 - 'us ' -A , ., -'-:--- 85' . '-an rf' 1 'fl 0' 49' 1 ,I . 4 W 'Hi ul a E' 4' 'V' A in Y Y . zal SVN J, K Fl, LHT. 1- ...M N ALTERATIONS FR .-.M .--I a ',.: W' We sincerely hope that the transition from a yearbook to an animal will be one of' increasing and lasting enjoyment to the college and the students. Unlike a tradi- tional yearbook restricted to the interests of senior year. the l955 MARooN is in- tended to be reflective of' the spirit of' Fordham College as a complete, collective unit. in which each class, though retaining its own individual importance, has con- tributed its share to an accurate portrayal of academic life at "Rose Hill." Though an annual by classification, the foregoing pages contain and depict the growth of a college, its system of education. and the fostering of Christian principles which. having bound in the past, will continue to bind in the future all members off the "Fordham Family" to an enriching love off one to another, class to class, and all to Alma Mater. This production could never have been achieved without the diligent and conscientious eflorts of so many. The en- couragement received from Father Mc- Laughlin, and Brother Kenny, merits the greatest of thanks. With a deep feeling of' obligation we extend our sin- cere appreciation to Mr. Edward Walsh and Father Rushmore. for their advice and guidanceg to Mr. Howard Wohl. our publisher, for his patience and assistance, and to Mr. Siegfried Hariseh, our official photographer, for his kindness and understanding. These people, to- gether with the over-all support of the student body, our patrons, boosters, and advertisers, have made the 1955 MAROON the book it is. We hope you like it. Conrad H. Munster Business Manager THE 1955 M ROC TAFF EDITORIAL sal J. Pillittei-i lfflilor-in-Clzief Literary Staff ' A Richard P. Murdy, Editor AssIs'rAN'rs: George V. Benigno, Philip A. Bossert, Robert Prradley, James P. Carr, Alfred P. Crisei, James P. Hellernan, John H. McCord, Stephen Mahoney, Richard M. Mills, James A. Prior, Thomas J. Rush, Robert V. Spelleri, Thomas J. Mlard. Sports Staff Francis V. Maguire, Editor rXSSlS'l'AN'l'S2 'l'homas XV. Courtney, Paul Finn, 'l'homas K. Garesche, Robert E. Mackin, John J. Murphy, Willis J. Reilly, Jolm J. Ryan, Charles M. XVendy. . Pllotograplzy Staff Patrick C. I-Iibson, Editor Smi-'I-' Pno'1'oc:RAPmsRs: Jolm F. Bicking, Arthur J. Irons, Nicholas A. Monchak. ASSlS'I'AN'l'SZ John J. Conroy, Robert R. Hawes, Gor- don T. King, Joseph R. Peden, Richard E. Ryan. Art Layout Benjamin J. D'Arconte, Editor BUSINESS Conrad H. Munster Iiusizmss Manager Sales Staff John P. McGovern, Manager Rl-:rulast-:NfrA'l'lv1':s: James H. Mclirlean, Kevin I.. Maher, Edward P. Reynolds, Nicholas A. Smedira. ASSIS'I'AN'I'S-SENIOR Yi-:Alu Kenneth F. Fanger, Ray- mond Hastings, Charles li. Lynch, X'Valter McMor- row, John D. Stanton, Ronald Taggiasco. ASSlS'l'AN'l'S-JUNIOR rl-ZAR: Kevin Connolly, Joseph S. Domanti, William F. lflatley, Kenneth E. Lantz, Stanley Serocki, Mark A. Verriehio, Bernard E. l'Villie, Donald Yannella. ASSlS'l'AN'l'S-SOIWIOMORIC YEAR: Gerald Ardito, ',l'homas F. Casey, Richard A. Cavallaro, Joseph S. Coyle, Frank Crabtree, Thomas Dollard, Joseph V. I.ane, VVilliam H. lvlcllermott, John F. McGowan, Harold Madigan, Jolm A. Montague, Paul C. O'Connell, Thomas F. Parker, Robert XV. Wleimann. AssIs'rAN'rs-I-'RI-:slIMAN vi-1AR: Kenneth Dinnhaupt, Patrick J. Esposito, Gerard V. Frank, Jolm A. Gia- cobbe, John J. Hand, Michael A. Iacletta, Edward J. Jones, William F. Knobloch, William P. Lynch, Jolm A. Mastrangelo, Vito J. Morlino, XfVi1liam E. Oster- haus, Arthur B. Richardson, Carl F. Runge. Advertising Staff John S. Apple, Manager .'xSSlS'l'AN'l'SI Roland B. Dilfranco, Michael J. Kelleher, John T. Kennally, Peter Krawchuk, Daniel A. McCarthy, Henry J. Tortora. Patrons and Boosters Thomas H. Kerrigan, Manager ASSlS'l'AN'l'SZ John A. Gordon, Bernard Kerrigan. Faculty Consultants Brother J. Kenny, S.J., Prof. Edward A. Walsh. CONRAD H. MUNSTER Business Nlanager ,,.1,.- ,- C xv 7 PATRICK C. HIBSON Photogmphy Editor SAL PILLITTERI Erlzftor-:fn-chief RICHARD P. MURDY Lile1'm'y Editor BOOSTERS MR. AND MRS. S. BELLUSCIO ARTHUR J. BLANK, SR. EDWARD J. BOCART JOHN MATTHEW BRADY CERRY BRANDMEYER ROLAND M. BULLOCK, SR. MR. AND MRS. N. A. BURCHELI. JOHN BURLINSON MRS. HENRY REX BURTON MRS. THOMAS H. CAHILL MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL CAIAFA MR. AND MRS. MARIO CAMILLUCCI LEO R. CARDILLO WILLIAM J. CARROLL MR. PETER R. CELLA, SR. P. J. CERNA, M.D. MR. AND MRS. RALPH CIRILLO SHEILA CLIFFORD MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH M. CONCEL MR. AND MRS. THOMAS F. CONNIFF LT. JAMES J. CONNOLLY, JR. FRANCIS A. CONSIDINE MR. AND MRS. C. H.. CORDES MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM J. COUCHLIN JOSEPH R. COVIELLO MR. AND MRS. FRANK H. CRABTREE ARTHUR CUNNINGHAM ANTHONY DALLESANDRO FRANK J. DAVIES MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM J. DEMPSEY MR. AND MRS. TI-IEOBALD DENCLER MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY C. DE PAOI.I MARCARET HUNT DE ROSA ELVIRA DE DOMENICO THE DI FALCO FAMILY MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. DOWD MR. AND MRS. RICHARD T. DOYLE JOHN J. DWYER, JR. MR. AND MRS. EMILE L. FANNINC MR. AND MRS. JAMES J. FARRELL, SR. MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM FERGUSON MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM FEY. JR. JOHN I". X. FINN MR. AND MRS. LOUIS A. FISCHER MR. ARTIIUR P. FISHER MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM I.. FLECKNER EDWIN FREED, JR. MR. AND MRS. BEN FRIEDBERC MR. AND MRS. J. T. CALLAGHER MR. AND MRS. EMILE JAMES CEMAKE .IOHN T. CENERALE MR. JOHN E. CIACOBBE MR. AND MRS. JOHN HAND DAN HAWTHORNE, SR.. MR. AND MRS. C. S. HESS ALBERT HEURICI-I DEWEY C. HOLLAND EDWARD J. I-IUCHES, SR. WILLIAM K. HUMPHREY MR. AND MRS. CHARLES J. HUNTER NICHOLAS P. IANNUZZI MR. AND MRS. ED. JENTZ JERRY AND MURIEL MR. AND MRS. THEODORE KAMP WILLIAM J. KEARNEY JOHN K. KEEFE MRS. F. LA CORATA MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL LANZARONE LOUIS R. LA PORTE LOUIS LAZ MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM J. LEE MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM LEHMAN MR. AND MRS. WALTER J. LENNON MRS. JULIA LIVRERI MR. AND MRS. EDWARD J. LYNCH JOHN C. MAHER MR. AND MRS. JACOB MARESKI SALVATOR MARINELLO MRS. JAMES MoDERMOTT MR. AND MRS. W. M4-DERIVIOTT JAMES I". Mm-DONNELI. MARK T. MvCI.YNN MR. AND MRS. P. Mm-LOUCIILIN WILLIAM J. MuNAMARA ALBERT J. MERZ, SR. MR. MICALE JOSE ABEL MIRANDA MR. AND MRS. VINCENT J. MITCHELL CERALD MONAHAN MR. AND MRS. RAYMOND J. MONAHAN MR. AND MRS. JAMES R. MORATH PI-IILIP L. MULHOLLAND FLORENCE AND FRANK MURPHY MR. AND MRS. THOMAS NEVINS PATRICK J. NICHOLAS MR. AND MRS. JOHN F. NOWAK, SR. MR. AND MRS. C. NOWICKY THOMAS R. O'CONNELL MR. AND MRS. CORNELIUS P. O'CONNOR MRS. ERIC H. OSTERHAUS MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR L. B. RICHARDSON MR. AND MRS. CLINTON W. ROBINS ANTHONY J. ROCERS MR MR MR MR JOSEPH. M. ROMAN AND MRS. PETER RENALDO AND MRS. E. SABBATH AND MRS. MICHAEL SCAROIA .IOHN D. SCARZELLO MR. AND MRS. HENRY I-'. SEITZ MR. AND MRS. F. EDW. SLEDDEN WILLIAM SMYTH MR. AND MRS. AUCUST STELLWAC MR. AND MRS. FRANK LUKE STERBENZ JOSEPH J. SULLIVAN, JR. MR. AND MRS. PATRICK J. SULLIVAN MR. AND MRS. FRANK SZUTER LT. JOSEPH B. TAMNEY DR. AND MRS. JAMES F. TOBIN, SR. DOMENICK TODARO MR. AND MRS. DOM UNSINO DOMINIC V. URCO M R MR M R M R M R . AND MRS. CHARLES O. WOOD EDWARD A. WOZNICKI AND MRS. RAY ZABOROWSKI AND MRS. CHARLES ZANAZZI . AND MRS. JOSEPH P. ZIMMER ZIMMERMEN MR. AND MRS. WALTER J. ZIOBRO '7 '--s NUI' N. g's1. X - 1 tqxw QW' K '. p, .. n Dip Q 0 s 1 4 - 5- ,.J, W ,D rf' My Q' Krieg V 42-1 Jfrz ,Q af" - if A ,- A w' 5 -?'w"M .R Ya 3, 'N it , " eff ' V :V . "N M, , WI.. . X :J sw ' , . -.. ro V 1 f .t ' .sity ' , g Q ., ' H 'f I it . .xQ W f u , -Z, -'Q ' 2. 0 ' my 'rug . V t 5 J N. a J Complimenfs of o FRIEND fr!! 1 - f ily! 'X 1 .fr fa- --, :. ,wi Q XJ L. - . -. 'G fffin-x u'y',.,yy'j 5 I hriw W A 'xn!,a.,,,"'J,. 'M K ' Q- , r M ,vfs 'M ,.r-.41 f V' . W- Wu 'i'W,,., 'K Y" 'I' h - : Q' , . uf fm' my ,V 'Sr' i-. .Mp J if ,4 IQF v u- . 'I 1 . -4 I 0 ll' ,O AA. W ' 0 f D' J -' I Qin wg M . X . ..,"Q I, .mf AL WL ' R9 4 .If "W'. ' I x "-f"'v. i ,Q , GJ .gn- ' an 1, I, 'T' "1 'W - ,. WN.: 'wmv .M W N ww da y ,gwgwn Mk lmgv. WIP, ,. 'ML ,. W1 M yfllv 4,75 4 m i ,.. u M w"' lm ,X- 'E ,,,, ,. 'N wan uw , wx- qpwwvlym Nmw . A wwf.'1M"""' ' upiq, 'Quiz 4 , . ...,..g3 m x 'H A ' my M' .WSW RAYMOND A. SCHROTH SENIOR PATRONS MR. AND MRS. VINCENT ANSALDI MR. AND MRS. JOHN KING WILBUR J. BERNARD MR. AND MRS. CHARLES A. KOZERA MR. AND MRS. PHILIP IIISCOGLIO MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. LARKIN MR. AND MRS. JOHN RAIRD MR. AND MRS. HENRY LAVERY R. C. BONNABEAU MR. AND MRS. DAVID J. LONG MR. WILLIAM BOSSERT MR. AND MRS. EDWARD G. McCABE MR. AND MRS. A. A. BRIZZOLARA MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR I. MvEWEN MR. AND MRS. HENRY J. BULETTI MR. AND MRS. BERNARD A. McNULTY MR. AND MRS. R. I. CAMERON MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL J. MAGUIRE MR. AND MRS. WM. E. CARRUTH MR. AND MRS. GEORGE C. MARTINO MR. AND MRS. EDWARD I. CONDREN MR. AND MRS. JOHN MASTELLONE MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM F. CONNORS MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH H. MATOS MR. AND MRS. JAMES N. CONWAY MR. AND MRS. J. MISDOM MR. AND MRS. EDWARD L. DASH MR. AND MRS. J. MITA MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY DE FRANCO MR. AND MRS. JAMES MOORE MR. AND MRS. JAMES DELAHUNTY MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM MOSS MR. AND MRS. PIERRE DE MONTRAVEI. MR. AND MRS. PETER MULLANY MR. AND MRS. FRANK DE NAVE THE MUNSTER FAMILY ROBERT G. DESMOND MR. AND MRS. ANDREW NOTARGIACOM0 MR. AND MRS. JAMES DI BLASI MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL J. O'CONNELL MR. AND MRS. EDMOND J. DIXON, SR. MR. AND MRS. BARTHOLOMEW O'CONNOR F. L. DONALDSON, D.D.S. MR. AND MRS. HENRY PARE MR. AND MRS. V. P. DUGGAN MR. AND MRS. D. J. PASTORELLE MR. AND MRS. JAMES E. DULLAHAN MR. AND MRS. JAMES D. PAYTON MR. AND MRS. FRANK J. EVANGELIST MR. AND MRS. S. PILLITTERI MR. AND MRS. THOMAS J. FAHEY MR. AND MRS. A. J. PIZZARELLO FRANK L. FANGER M. G. POWER MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR FECTEAU MR. AND MRS. J. J. PRIOR JOHN F. X. FINN MR. AND MRS. FRANK C. RACK MR. AND MRS. EDMOND FITZGERALD MR. AND MRS. P. G. REILLY MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY FLEK MR. AND MRS. MARIO J. RIGOLIO MICHAEL J. GALULLO MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM H. ROTHSCHILD MR AND MRS. W. P. GARDNER MR. AND MRS. JOHN RUSZKAY MR AND MRS. FRANCIS X. GRACE MR. AND MRS. VICTOR J. GRANDSIRE MR. AND MRS. J. EDWIN GREER MR. AND MRS. J. N. GROSE MRS. KATHLEEN GUINEE MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM A. HANRAHAN MICHAEL A. HAYES, Esq. MRS. MARION T. HEPP MR. AND MRS. MR. AND MRS. EDWARD F. HOLDEN MICHAEL HOLDEN MR. AND MRS. H. SCOTT JOHN A. SHANAHAN MR. AND MRS. TIMOTHY J. SHEEHAN MRS. ANNA A. MR. AND MRS. NICHOLAS SMEDIRA MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL STEMNISKI JOSEF STEINBRUNNER MR. AND MRS. L. W. STRATTNER MR. AND MRS. JOHN F. SULLIVAN SKOWRONSKI MRS. THOMAS B. HORAN MR. AND MRS. PAUL A. TIERNEY DR. AND MRS. THOMAS F. HOWLEY MR. AND MRS. JOHN D. TOBIN MR. AND MRS. JOSEPH A. HUSCHLE MRS. GAETANO TORTORA MR. AND MRS. JOHN J. KAVANAGH MR. AND MRS. JAMES F. WALL MR. AND MRS. T. KELLIHER MRS. THOMAS WARD MR. AND MRS. WM. C. KENNALLY DR. AND MRS. MORRIS WEINREII MR. AND MRS. CHARLES F. KENNEY MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM T. WELLS MR. AND MRS. HOWARD G. KENSING MR. AND MRS. CHARLES M. WENDY MR. AND MRS. THOMAS KERRIGAN MR. AND MRS. EDWARD J. ZAJAC MR. AND MRS. GEORGE T. KING MR. AND MRS. FELIX J. ZAWESKI 220 ii? wi? its FORDHAM UNIVERSITY is happy to present its compliments to the Class of 1955 and to wish each of its members a rich life in ever-increasing devotion to God, Country and Alma Mater ik' wir ik I 221 gm wU09!!MZ00. . . ' in design crahsmaziship and quality 0 RINGS PINS MEDALS CHARMS CUPS PLAQUES TROPHIES JEWELERS FOR YOUR CLASS RINGS 5 A I f MANUFACTURING IIEWEIERS nlfufslllsllclusl osrou - 17 IUHN STREET, NEW YORK 8.N.Y. - rnovluencs 222 4 wi 1 Q 1 ',, by 1 .wr ,,,. 's 1 11 f may f ' - W- . . , I V ' .' ' 1' 'f. - "" 11.5 : x 0 4: ' v ' x ' . wg 'iq 77 6.-1,0 rr X-xv 'if 'K . X 4 I , . , Q' , 1 . . Q ' P N - Y uv- .-M5 ig .A.g.'ff'Q', W: Q' 4- .- ' -.- gi - L 12. -, - LW Q 1 Q A ' tl 4 . ' ' 4 0 I: r I Y lm x 1, ,L " ., ' ' N-1 fu? - ' 1' Q .Q I X 1' 'U' ' .' Y' . x "f, - ' . 7, Jn. -ewwfzhs M' f . ' V441 ' , ' Q " Q4 v , L 'l- J 4 ' 1 ' -- 1 ' H fix fw- ' mmf 6"1"- - rf? V M- 'if ... 3 - 5 2 R in 7, 'rf brat.: :lg-,f':, M ' f,: ,,,',-fin Q45- 1Py:' f . . 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Monday through Fridayj gxchddadq 142' '7fze ROCKEFELLER CENTER OFFICE OF THE NEW YORK SAVINGS BANK 1234 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS 16th AVEJ between 48th and 49th Streets Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation T Z4 IV..-.., -V ..... .- MEETS TODAY'S EXACTING LIIBRICATIDN NEEDS we ve rs ' C0RnosloN Ha! guna LUBRICAT 5 wg, . g:fil7?h:,.N . A X Qs Y r' SSN' , fb su, X. .st X, .Q 4- ,. T. v ,WJ gk' 3' . ' ' N' 4 ' lj i. X5 I k.r. m t Y Q 5. .U W Nqf. Mp, X.. ... " V lo 11: wg IA u rfxxf KJQFQ. ,??.- 4 Qs f M - f f 'us- 'Q R 5 ' v'f KN N ...gi N k ff A n" r, - I Q N HRK' u a -- .-sa-" Qj .' -'pls Z1 -5 -wa.. J rd U I gf I .l'H .mi nj 'YA f 11,1 If fg .V t xx I, , i -if, it , at sk K " 'lfys' Qyn, ,, , 7 4' 1' 'Q ' gl x 'F' ' , I n IX ,.,,. . 4'-'I c, v VW, , -. -,Agn Q' ,. F N' lvl I ny , ' QQ , S 'QA V' ,:. gp ' 3 V I 1 .. N 1 . ,Z L. , N '4 P ,, 5.1, A 4 5 f Ll , , f 5 1 Q 1 I ' . ' iff, ---13 3- , B , + X ' ' - ' f l .' ' ' 'in ' 'A ' -1 "Ka-J. If 5 4 4. I 4- A ' ' i X I , 1 . . ' 5 In , A - .M .. 1' X A 4 ' .1-Q 4 W , . X NA- L ., , , . . .W 1 ' ,N 5 M., xiii- f 6 f f Q """""" -5 ' E gn? Taft, 5 'iz' F 'il fi Q ti x '. y M r ' , -A P fl l :nj :: ,ar :apq ' . I I ' -1, YY' N., - if out V l 2 Y I w. 1 K . . sg, -4 K wi. '. -...J :in--I in 5'.,3r-? - R f " - ,- Q. 3 - L -i fl Y 'FQ'-,JL , . 539-1 7.-.-iran 'r' .gas . Rf' -! -- - 1 --7 1 W ,-. .-'- -- 1-'.e....... 1-1 .J-V - -- --- -- -- - K - - sz . W . ---- ""- " , . , f , RL 5 .Q ' 5 1 ' ' Q , , JE-Q . a - 1 1 LW, i. F011 AL WE ll . S SEB ICE modern ' convenient ' economical OUR FORMAL WEAR SERVICE HAS WON THE UNIQUE DISTINCTION OF HAVING THE LARGEST COLLEGE PATRONAGE 2371 Grand Concourse Q BRONX 68, NEW YORK CYpress 5-6020 AGENTS ron Tm: FORDHAM SENIOR AND JUNIOR PROMS ESTABLISHED 1902 - INCORPORATED 1911 GEORGE F. DRISCOLL COMPANY GENERAL CONTRACTORS O BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 41 East 42nd Street NEW YORK 17, NEW YORK MUrray Hill 7-4200 Builders of: Cranwell Preparatory School Science Building Lenox, Massachusetts Manhattan College Campus Studio Apartments Convent Fordham University Our Lady Queen of Martyrs 227 . Telephone: Klngshriclgv 9-8458 KENNEDY-RIEGGER DRILLING COMPANY, Inc LICENSED PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS CORE DIKILLING CONTRACTORS DIAMOND DRILL AND CORE BORINCS 5418 Post Road NEW YORK 71, NEW YORK CYpress 5-3400 RAM MOTORS, Inc. DODGE AND PLYMOUTH SIXES DODGE RED RAM V-RIGHTS 454 E. Fordham Road QNear Third Avenuej BRONX 58, NEW YORK 228 ' - --LL "-53 6,1 -- ,,, 'flfxv . Q . A Yi ff. 55. ' X "W, 4. . Wm- sg if ' "F , , I -.,,, 'idimg' 'MW- H AMW' 1 l .QNM ' ' '- M A 1 . 4, 'g 35-5 .:,, .. K.. A 1 1. 5 0 1 - S Q ug. M , 1 aw ' s 6 "U in .. my . 15Q W 5 fx"fMf'? . '-,J 'vw' ' - .f Win 4-,R .A I .Nj di is ,min- near x if '::..:Er F1 'fn' v-'A Y'f'A"" X -'Kin' ' a' 730. .f f' , , vgf' --, . wslvv ,L' A- 'iF"'.9'w 4' 7' V " , ,M A V,,,... K . r N Ax p I t ,M ' , fs! -,Y 'fr 'fn ',nx4,?f" uf fW1'kz 4 54 '41, V Q W ' .. ' ',n,n-v, ' ' ., .If ,W i, " - ' " f -A --- .f " Xwfmv " A7 J , . Wy ' ,s K A 1, , a Q A -' ' ' V I ' 4, . . M , 1 dl, 4. , At , J., , . Q' ', SU. . A yn' . K ."+ - ' ' , A v xiii: n ,ffl ,l':. .3232 ., Jvff .kr , A fwz 15- W Nw wv': f 'Ban A 'mg J," ., - ' W w . '. ' '- Ups Q 'ly' fl" L' x ' 'N f.. "' .1 1- f 1 ' - ' f 14 f , VI - ., ,- - -f J Q .ff ' ' Ng., 1 . I M.- A . ,W r ,-. b Jw, , U Q u c' ?.Qg 4 if X 4 'A l 's ' 'L Q6 " .No- ,. Q ' xv' ' ' - ' , Iv' " bv 'A 440 AAI' A 'A ' 2 D 1- , .' Q -' -5' M , f A 4"'8,v' I-x ' . , y" , 4... . ,gym 5' 'N i 4 1, s ,is .A - , ,- ' , J' ' , 'I ' uf. x . I- -N, .LTHQ ' fx u-. r--0.1 i PW '- f ' ff . ,Q . v-,. fa ." M x -- . f ,MAN ', M ' f' ' . , ', lg 'Z 1. " ' 4' , A. ' - ,K 4: 'K .I ' .Wh ' C' , .A w f" 15 4 ',',k". ' 3: ' '69 ,. . . van' ' 'V ' w -1 vj,g ,K A., 1 ggi' .1 ,JL-, ,K QQ' 1 X, ,,,.,v . A,.Q .A A J. . ,s 1 .- 0 - "., ,. , r .f ' E ,555 4' 1 1 n 'n 1,u, W w 4M . nr- 4,6 'LV :Hg , W, s- 5, w W, 'CW-A " ' . fn!! 'A x Presidenf Vice-Pres ,N ' lp , M 'i sr .fa--vm-, , 1 .wviifm .. w'?KZ'3W'N' 'T 4' 1 w-- my me V? fmfsgq 7 ' 'e . A , H ft --Q MCCARTHY JoHN cunnv 'CHRIS LaCORATA BILL FLATLEY DAN idenf Secrefary ' Trbusurer 4 -w?"uh 'Cm-W uw ' ' " , H Ryan .Q xrgr, , 'Mm ,xv 'N gf MQDONNELL 8: CQ: - STOCK BROKERS 120 Broadway NEW YORK FOR HIRE LUdlow 7-0412 FORMAL WEAR - SLACKS - PANTS MALFETANO Formal Wear of Distinction The Editors of this Annual and the Class of '55 wish to extend to Malfetano's their sincere thanks for the many kindnesses rendered to the College throughout the years, Their con- tinual support and interest in our activities shall always be remembered. 482 East Tremont Avenue BRONX 57, NEW YORK FOR SALE 230 . I , . . , Omcial Opticians to Members of Tm: MAROON Fordham College Annual STERLING OPTICAL CO., Inc. Office Hours: Daily: 8:30 - 6:30 - Saturday: 8:30 - 5:00 oPEN THURSDAY TILL 8:30 P.M. 138 Fulton Street-At Nassau Street NEW YORK 38, NEW YORK Phone: WOrtl1 4-0331 C12'f'DI'l1-W5 ESTABLISHED 1912 T. J. MacDERMOTT CORPORATION 551 - Sth Avenue NEW' YORK 17, NEW YORK 231 E A S T O V E R LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS For one of the finest weeks or weekends . . . All sports and II full program, for the young and young at heart Alumni reunions . . Reserve Now- Phone: Lenox 625 or W1'ite for Free Illustrated Booklet to EASTOVER, BOX 5, LENOX, MASS. Buy Your FORD at FORDHAM FORD . . , A FORD for-every FORDl1am Man . . 545 East FO1'flll2'll'Il Road LUtllow 4-7500 232 CUNNINGHAM BROS., Inc 700 Brook Avenue NEW YORK., NEW YORK ROBERT GLENNJHC. 101 Park Avenue NEW YORK, NEW YORK ...I The favorite place . For F ordluun men . . . And their dates , . . R Y A N CONTRACTING CORPORATION At the Watefs Edge . . . B A D O L A T O ' S GLEN ISLAND CASINO General Contractors and Builders DINING - DANCING Mamlgenmntz BADOLATO, '31 341 ERN 79ill Street NEW YORK 21, NEW YORK NEW ROCHELLE, NEW YORK Tel.: NIC 6-6500 RI'Iinelander 4-4015 -6 Tel.: Rlictor 2-3764 EST. 1915 Best Wishes from . HUMBERT De MATTE1 W-T! ' , , 1 CLERICAIQ ROBES i Q . - H S I x,,5,gl.E-L -- ' YOUR FDMILYJEUJELER SINCE l898 53 Park Place NEW YORK CITY 263 East F0l'Clll2llll Hozul Valentine Theatre Building BRONX 58. QNENV YORK 234 s xt l S Q ' : 1 1 U N x .. . 8 f u ix Q ' K ' A f ' x 0 ax 5 V U lo Q x x S R Q O lNf ' Y' -s . N 'Q . 'Y . A R ,in V.-41, .L F , K f.,yg N M :we-. - ' gf 'ww '- lug" ., - v i," L 4 , . .W , , .M 1. - Q N . . , - , " A ' 1,1-Msg". I . . , ...,'.4'C. ,Q ' . J H I ' '5 S: -'5 ' 1, K4 g Q .-f. . , ,. f r s x ,L - mf' 5 M?-3, , 'Tfg.r'uff ' gig'-F-fb :ge- 1fr". ,. R w ,. iz, ' 'Y' J. J- " ' 1 A :give ,qv G .4- 'rf 1. 2 Q . fav" ,. . uf .. .7., ,W ,. 1 :-'if f-'5' 'A .J T- Q2 fi' I ,,. J .. .. . .. N, .g h ' ' -Q N Q xr QM Aim A wr ,JSP- "2 S.. W .g J J . W : ky: La sh ' M gg M Q Q- A . " My-2 A f - ' - . -, ffm 5 f R" if .'iQ'.'4 ' M 'I A M ' Q"j,gy . S -. - I ,Q , . kyffpwv V ' .- 1 ax J x JACK MCCORD JACK MCNIFF JIM FEENEY ED FARRELL Presidenf Vice-Presidenf Secrefarv Treasurer BEST WISHES FROM HOTEL PIERRE 5th Avenue at 61st Street NEW YORK CITY THE 1955 MAROON IS BOUND IN A KINGSKRAFT COVER Manufactured by KINGSPORT PRESS, INC. KINGSPORT, TENNESSEE nit Pays to Play" TOM GODFREY SPORTING GOODS EXCLUSIVELY "Known for Quality and Service 3 Fourth Avenue MOUNT VERNON, NEW YORK MOunt Vernon 4-7474 - 5 FOrdham 7-8848 THOMAS KI-:CAN B L O S S O M FLOWER SHOP, INC. QUALITY FLOWERS 2539 Webster Avenue N. W. Cor. Fordham Road BRONX 58, NEW YORK ,, , ,..... -V ,. . ' 1 1 ' ' C O R O N E T MILITARY UNIFORM CO. Manufacturers of MILITARY UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT 817 Broadway NEW YORK CITY White Plains 9-5363 B O N D E D TREE SPECIALISTS, Inc. ,Establisllezl 1929 54 Custis Avenue WHITE PLAINS, NEW YORK W. IHENSYL RARDO BEekman 3-2593 EST. 1864 JOHN RANDLES, Inc. WHOLESALE GROCERS 208-210 Water Street NEW YORK 38, NEW YORK WII.I.IAM F. FENLEY, Managm- snoux couunr must COMPANY Established 1888 Member Federal Reserve Sy I M mber Federal Deposil I C GUNVENIENT IIFFIGES Main Oflice: THIRD AVENUE a'I' 'l48I'h STREET Third Avenue al' I37Ih Slreef E. Tremonl' Avenue al' Boslon Road Ogden Avenue at Universily Avenue E. Tremonl' Avenue y ol Bruckner Blvd. near 23ls+ Slreei 233rd Slreel' at While Plains Road Fordham Road al' Jerome Avenue I I Hugh Gran? Circle af Parlrchesler Broadwa 23 Comrplinwnts Of LOUIS MILANI FOODS, INC. A new Zee 5cHRAFrT'S Always the spot for FINE AMERICAN F000 BREAKFAST. LUNCH. DINNER TEA. COC KTAI LS COMPLETE RESTAURANT SERVICE FOUNTAIN CAKE AND CAN DY COUNTER GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS SCHRAFFTS C omplimonts Complunents of of JOHN ADAMS HENRY, INC. Wholesale Purveyors of FRESH AND FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES SEAFOOD - MEATS - GENERAL FOODS PRODUCTS 56-58-60 Harrison Street NEW YORK 13, NEW YORK MARNI'S Westchestefs Smartest and Largest SUPPER CLUB 1111 Central Park Avenue YONKERS Three Miles from New York City Make Your Reservations Help Our Stag to Serine Promptly Phone: YOnkers 9-9392 -Nar- 1 ' -. N. ws3?5.rgqg,,, "4ur,43'Q?"3 wh WWW!-Q 'MMM w., ' , 'W wwfix 1 . F. rr ff V, . ,N ,mm ,Wy I I i5.,1JfW'if' A+ u , , mr,,,.,, Q, xjw, .MW ,,. , N' .E Q e-All A-.-L' x Q., V . ' s. , Vw- ' ,M U, J A X,V,.-, :W ,Wm h 5 W x ..,, ,.,,?- ,H 1 ,. V Lf K W ,. x , , , 1 O. WWA , 1 .W .tw W i ,M W, r 'WJ . ww, ,-wx. U ,pfw ', rj ,- ,mtv ,Q ,vg Wh-F 1 A Mffwf, mhjgr. 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W WM, .As ,I X 'I Wm --tix vw! ,.. it , rf - ' .- F- 'A-1 V " TN x, "xv ' 'iq V+' , fn. " ' , " " L M" ww f f , L. , r M 'Mr . r ' - 2. . ' X 'my 2 57 , 1' WAV' f ' , ' V.. . 'x L- i E L , '-lx-xml'- Q B 4, A X, ,W .Q M g ,, ' 'F' ' Q 'Q 'f'M., Ny, ' - ' 4' ,v",x4"'3M ' ' v 'B A , x 31 'm M 1-. A., f . -sf- ,K . . . s v RAY WALSH BILL LYNCH BILL KNOBLOCH TOM KARWIN , J . . . Presldenf Vice-Presldenf Secrefary Treasurer 5 ' X , ii. .. ,' .f' "-,Ox , 'M ' rf r 1 : 4 "" .-f H ' Q. ff 4 , ' 2 ' 'wg .' r ,. ' :.- M Q ' ASQ.-, - + r - - K- I Y. H L. -.- M M .. L .Q mf Q- - ,,. ' Wg ,.. .F W.. Q, .. , r, A . L mm, . ,. rw Wim, - ' ,, xr r,,j,,q,5- .,w- , rg QR, fr 'nl 5u1gf'i-" 490 Q " w f,Z , ZX,j,f'h U, -1 Rf, A sw , f gk ,nip ,A V, pw" Q My 1 , ,jg '- ui j M33,,,,. H ,A jx, ' L+ J, , -' ,w , -G' ff , Y ' 1 Ji -my ' " 0' ' W y ' If N A M ,,, A . , by b ,V We N. .m,., B ,5 4 1 , N , N KAN ,W -, . Q4 A: K, KW ,H mm! .M , J- , ,..A,.d-nuff ,A L -, ' V . f . 4 ' W "' " . , wg ,..z. .N L 'W ' K W SFfIgwick 3-3558 ' ' 1 ll. DI LARLO. JR. fClu:-is ol' ,401 VICTORY PRINT, INC. L1z'l'1'Em'l:Ess - OFFSET .PRINTING 567 East 184th Street BRONX 58. NEW YORK Cllllllllljlll anis of For after class rcfrashnmnt . . . HOWARD .IOHNSON'S Cor. of Southern Blvd, and Fordllzun Road BRONX 58, NEW' YORK IHE BEST IN NEW AND USED TEXTBOOKS Translalions - Outlinvs BAUCOM'S TEXTBOOK SHOP 421 East Fortlhzml Rozul BRONX, NEW YORK . . . extends hearty congratulations 011' the occasion. of A i FORDHAM UNlVERSITY,S GLEE Cum 21sT CONCERT AT TowN HAI,I. 123 West 43111 Street NEW YORK 36, NEW YORK 240 .loe Casey Larry Fitzsinnnon Bob Caddy Mark Generali Holm Curken Jack Kane Ed Keane Bill Lynch .lol111 Macisc o Sal Maglietta Mike Mandzak John Materazo Shane McCarthy Dick Norton Compliments vf F R 0 S H 4 G 0 ' 9 and FRANK AND VINNY of HTHE WEBSTER" .241 Ray Nowicki Joe O7Conn0r Bill 0,Hare Phil Pelino Tony Pu nila 1 Hob Rizzi Lou Salvo Paul Schreiel Don Smith Larry Stoiber .loe Sullivan Dick Van Nxfilglltbl ,lim Walsll John Wood HOTEL CONCOURSE PLAZA il.61st Street and Grand COIICOIII 'flu' Business. Social and Sports Cantor of the Bronx FRANK NV. KRIDEL IJl'l?SiCll?llfl and General Manager C COM PLIMEN T S OF AN OLD STUDENT Compliments of L O U ' S BEDFORD PARK RESTAURANT 2872 Webster Avenue BRONX, NEW YORK For Your Outings and Sightseeing Trips . . . HUDSON RIVER DAYLINE STEAMERS and DAYLIGHT SIGHTSEEING YACHTS 303 West 42nd Street NEW' YORK CITY J Udson 6-5300 The Full Color Reproductions Appearing in The 1955 MAROON Were Reproduced by YORK LITHO COMPANY PRINTERS AND LITHOGRAPHERS Ofering a Complete Line Of Attractive Color Printing For Annuals and Yearbooks 134 Spring Street NEW YORK 12, N. Y. Phone : WOrtl1 6-1300 COMPLIMENTS OF E M P I R E OFFICE FURNITURE COMPANY 100 Pine Street NEW YORK, N. Y. Chairs - Silverware - Dinnerware For Hire and For Sale Tables - Glassware - Bridge Sets F OX'S CHAIR RENTAL SERVICE, INC. "Everything to Hire for Parties" 430 East 188th Street BRONX 58, N. Y. CYpress 5-4537 THE BETTER PIE CALIFORNIA PIE 81 BAKING CO. INCORPORATED 300 Douglass Street BROOKLYN, N. Y. Telephone: Tliiangle 5-2137 - 2138 243 COMPLIMENTS OF SIEGFRIED HARISCH OFFICIAL PHOTOGRA PH ICR FOR Ol 9 5 5 NI A R O O N DISTINCTIVE PORTRAITS FUR ALL OCCASIONS 57-44 Myrtle Avenue BROOKLYN 27, 'NEW YORK Phone: HEgeman 3-2390 2441 0 Alma Mater Fordham, How mighty is thy power To link our hearts to thee in love That grows with every hour. Thy winding elms, thy hallowed halls, Thy lawns, thine ioyfmantled walls. O Fordham Alma Mater. What memories each recalls. I :5 ll' L. If. - 4 V .. pi 1 4 1 , mf! ' ,l. . gi, 5 III IH l'.f?:ff.i.i E2-Lfldi ll T Ii '.I', l.l.U'lf- 9 -If if I.-1 RQ, r"ll!'ff s. 'lf'-93" 'li Q. gf T .ET Q- - Lv- p ACT - o" 7 I4 2" ' i w 4 I Fl .1 ? 4 1 ew il i, -1 -. 'I It lflf , ggori. r 1",,, I lens , s s y 44 L , If .1 E 1 5 t gf s 51,1 Jr'-m 1 'J' 0 Alma Mater Fordham While yet the life blood starts, Shrined be thy sacred image Within our heart of hearts. And in the years that are to be, May life and love be true to me O Fordham Alma Mater, As I am true to thee. 'L Y!


Suggestions in the Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY) collection:

Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

1947

Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

1950

Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

1951

Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

1956

Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

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Fordham University - Aries / Maroon Yearbook (New York, NY) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

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