Floyd Parks (DD 884) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1959

Page 1 of 52

 

Floyd Parks (DD 884) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 52 of the 1959 volume:

, :jr ,l'.m'2::fz':::qgxr':-.,z fri:-'rf'-2-g-a::Af,1 , ' .1 ,I , - -:fszi-gqpwf '4' iv:--U-1 I 1 1 V .M - , '.E.w,. ,. 11-f'fffv.2:-fclifwni-QEQF?H+?1::iw:'I-v'1?f?i1! 5f!i'Y:ffifssiviib:f.f'Yw.229axf:1:?'J:f1Qr.-.-fri-sivrhr?1-'-F'-uw-:if-I H - H+ .- ...- A--' . .-,ia il we F" A -. - .,-f ,'w'r' LSB Us .Y,L1J, X. 'EMM " -- ' . ui X ff- ---,M--1.-f....L ,. . . - , , , . ,. . .. ,.. .. ,,., .. --:. -Q.-J,.-'fx are W? I ' I S . USS FLOYD B. PARKS tDD884l HISTORY The U.S.S. FLOYD B. PARKS is named for Maior Floyd Bruce Parks, U.S.M.C., a marine aviator reported missing in action 4 Iune 1942 in the defense of Midway Island against the assaults of the Iapanese Navy. Maior Parks, bom in Salisbury, Missouri, was en- listed in the Navy for two years prior to his appointment to the United States Naval Academy in Iune, 1930 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps on 31 May 1934. He rose through the ranks in the Corps to be commissioned Maior less than a month before the action at Midway. Maior Parks has been awarded the Navy Cross, Special Letter of Commendation from the Secretary of the Navy,'the Purple Heart, Presidential Unit Citation, American Defense Service Medal, and Asiatic-Pacific Area Cam- paign Medal. - The Parks was the ' ship of Commander Destroyer Squadron ONE from 1945 until December 1958 and serves in the U.S. Pacific Fleet under Commander Cruiser Destroyer Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet. One of the GEARING class, the Parks is 390 feet in length and 41 feet wide. She displaces, fully loaded, over 3000 tons and has an average draft of 15 feet. Her two engines, developing a total of 60,000 HP can drive the ship in excess of 30 knots and at cruising speed can drive her without refueling over 6,500 miles. The ship's keel was laid on 30 October 1944 by the Consolidated Steel Corporation in Orange, Texas, on the banks of ine Sabine River. Mrs. F. B. Parks, widow of the late Maier Parks, sponsored the ship at her launching on 31 March 1945. Ths Parks was put in commission on 31 Iuly 1945 proceeding from Orange, Texas to the Todd Ship Yards at Galveston, Texas for final alterations. CDR Morgan Slayton was the first Captain. After completion of altera- tions she proceeded to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for her shakedown cruise. Following this cruise, she proceeded to Charleston, South Carolina in October 1945 and celebrated Navy Day by taking part in ceremonies conducted at Pensacola, Florida. In October 1945 the Parks received orders to ioin the U.S. Pacific Fleet and proceeded via the Panama Canal to San Diego, Cali- fomia which was to become her new home port. On 28 November 1945 bad luck first struck the Parks. Upon en- tering Pearl Harbor on her first cruise to the Far East she ran aground off the entrance to the harbor. She entered the yards at Pearl Harbor to repair damages suffered in the grounding and remained in dry dock until 24 Ianuary 1946. Leaving Oahu she set her course for Hong Kong, where she arrived on 9 February 1946. CDR I. H. Brandt relieved as Commanding Officer in May. The Parks operated in the Hong Kong-Hainan area until Iune, then moved to Shanghai. She then proceeded to the Guam-Saipan area, operating from this point until relieved on 28 Ianuary 1947. Upon being relieved she returned to the United States via Pearl Harbor. CDR Richard E. Nichols relieved as Commanding Officer on 3 October. In February 1948 the Parks proceeded to Iapan for her first tour of occupation duty. During April of 1948 the Parks represented the U.S. Naval Forces in the Far East at the funeral of President Roxas of the Philippine Islands conducted at Manila. One officer and twenty-five men paraded in the funeral procession. On 30 September 1948 the Parks was relieved of duty in Iapan and proceeded to San Diego via Pearl Harbor arriving in time for Christmas Holidays. During February of 1949 the Parks partici- pated in the cold weather exercise MICOWEX visiting Kodiak, Alaska. During April, May, and Iune of 1949 the Parks was in Mare Island Naval Shipyards. Valleio, Califomia, completing the over- haul on 10 Iune and proceeding to San Diego where she con- ducted local training exercises until October of 1949. CDR Herbert G. Claudius became the fourth Captain on 16 Iuly 1949. The Parks left for her third tour of duty in the Far East arriving I I r x Q I ...x . Avg- I 1 71,515.7 2 in Iapan in November of 1949. During her eight months stay she visited such interesting places as the Philippine Islands. China, Malaya, and crossed the equator on a voyage to the South Seas and Singapore. The Parks returned to San Diego on 12 Iune 1950 and at the out- break of the Korean War returned to Hawaii and was in stand-by condition preparing to assist the Naval units in the Far East until September at which time she was returned to San Diego, Califor- nia. She spent two months in local exercises operating out of San Diego, then proceeded to San Francisco for a regular Navy yard overhaul. In the early part of 1951 she left the United States for what was to be her first Far Eastern cruise during the Korean conflict. On 17 March 1951 she ioined Task Force 77 to help screen larger ships from enemy action and support anti-Communist air opera- tions off the East coast of North Korea. At Wonsan on 30 April the ship encountered gunfire from enemy shore batteries for the first time, and helped silence them after a two hour battle. The Parks spent a total of 60 days in the enemy harbor of Wonsan and fired over 12,307 rounds of five-inch proiectiles at the enemy. This perhaps was one of the longest sieges in U. S. Naval his- tory. CDR. Iohn Foote relieved as Commanding Officer on the 15th of December that year. ' Again in May 1952 the Parks left for another cruise in Far Eastern waters. Her duties on this cruise consisted of shore bom- bardment off the shores of North Korea, screening units of Task Force 77, patrol duty in the South China Seas and the Formosa area, and blockade duty in Wonsan harbor. The Parks spent a total of 34 days in the blockade of Wonsan harbor, and was not to arrive back in San Diego until December of 1952. On 5 Ianuary 1953 she left San Diego to enter the U.S. Naval Shipyards at I'Iunter's Point, San Francisco, Califomia. On 11 April while in the yard CDR K. B. Hysong relieved as Captain. In May she left the shipyards and proceeded to San Diego. During May, Iune and Iuly she conducted local exercises in the San Diego Area. The Parks left on August 7, 1953 for another tour of duty in the Far East arriving in Iapan on 23 September 1953. She operated from Iapan conducting local exercises until November when she departed for patrol duty in Formosan waters. The Parks proceeded to Hong Kong for a brief three day visit on completion of her Formosan patrol duties. Disaster struck while on patrol duty off the North Korean coast. The Parks struck an uncharted pinnacle and was forced to proceed to Sasebo, Iapan for a two month yard period to repair damages suffered to her propellers and shafts. On 1 March 1954 the Parks left Far Eastern waters arriving back in San Diego on 21 March 1954. - During her stay in the States she participated in local training exercises operating out of San Diego and was to take part in two Pacific Fleet training exercises. On the latter of these exercises the ship proceeded to Seattle, Washington for a three day visit in con- junction with the Seattle Sea Fair. The Parks left San Diego for duty in the Far Eastem area on 28 September 1954 arriving in Yokosuka, Iapan on 21 October 1954. She conducted brief training exercises in the Yokosuka area and then proceeded to the Philippine Islands anchoring in Subic Bay. 'The ship conducted local training exercises and patrol duties out of Subic Bay and was forced. on four separate occasions, to leave the area to avoid typhoons. CDR I. F. Gustaferro relieved as Com- manding Officer on 2 December 1954. During the month of Ianuary 1955 the Parks was present in the 1 t 6 . , 1 J A. ... , Formosa area during the outbreak of hostilities in the troubled waters around the Tachen Islands. She was one of four destroyers present in this area until relieved by forces of The Seventh Fleet which were to assist the Nationalist Chinese in the evacuation of their personnel. After a much needed rest and upkeep period in Subic Bay the ship proceeded to the British Crown colony of Hong Kong for a seven day visit. On completion of her visit the ship proceeded to Sasebo, Iapan operating from there for a short period before pro- ceeding to Yokosuka, Iapan for upkeep and repairs prior to leav- ing for the United States. On 9 April 1955 the Parks returned to San Diego, California and after a month's leave and upkeep in San Diego she proceeded to the Long Beach Naval Shipyard for a three months regular Navy overhaul. On completion of her yard period. the ship re- ported to Fleet Training Group, San Diego for underway training in preparation for deployment to the Far East in November 1955. The Parks departed for WESTPAC on 9 November 1955, made Singapore and Rangoon two of her ports of call. and operated with TF 77 until the disaster of 11 March. On that day she was involved in a collision with the heavy cruiser COLUMBUS. result- ing in the loss of a 40 foot section of her bow, and the death of two men. Prompt action by all hands kept the PARKS afloat, and she was taken into Subic Bay for emergency repairs. There a tem- porary bow was devised, and the Parks departed for Long Beach Naval Shipyard, arriving there in early Iune of 1956. The bow of the deactivated DD76l was taken as a replacement, and in early August the PARKS reported ready for sea. In mid-December of 1956, the PARKS preparations for WESTPAC were interrupted by an emergency deployment during the Mid- Eastern crisis. She was deployed to Pearl Harbor, returning to San Diego on 6 December. The Parks began her ninth WESTPAC cruise on 14 Ianuary 1957. She made Sasebo, Okinawa, Hong Korg, and Pearl Harbor her ports of call, took part in Operation Beacon Hill and a three week HUK operation, and operated with TF 77, retuming to San Diego on 16 Iune. She entered Mare Island Naval Shipyard on 2 August for a maior overhaul, and remained there until late October. Shortly after her retum to San Diego, the PARKS was called upon to participate in an unsuccessful Search and Rescue mission for a downed commercial airliner. Upon her retum she began preparations for her tenth deployment to WESTPAC. On 13 February 1958 the PARKS departed on her WESTPAC cruise. She visited Pearl Harbor, American Samoa. Auckland. New Zealand, and the Fiiis prior to participa' in three months of special operations at Eniwetok proving grounds. From the Eniwetok-Bikini operations the PARKS steamed to Iapan where she participated in a HUK exercise operating as plane guard for attack carriers. Ports visited in the last two and one-half months of the deployment included, Yokosuka. Kobe, and Beppu, Iapan and Hong Kong. On Iuly 21, 1958 while operating with TG 77.4 off the coast of Iapan CDR Emmett M. Compton. USN, was relieved as command- ing officer of the PARKS by CDR Walter F. V. Bennett USN. The change of command was unusual in that Captain Bennett came aboard via helicdpt . on 19 Iuly and CDR. Compton left the ship in the same manner upon being relieved. Upon completion of her last commitment in August she retumed to San Diego. While at San Diego, the PARKS provided various services and mtinued training all hands in preparation for deployment in 1959. de USS FLOYD B. PARKS had the distinction of becoming the Flagship for DESTROYER SOUADRON ONE during the latter part of the cruise when USS HULL departed for the United States for final acceptance trials. The Commo- dore is Captain Iohn L. Foster. The squadron consists of DESDIV ll and DESDIV l2p eight ships and their crews totaling more than 1,800 men. The administrative and tactical command of this group is the job of COMDESRON ONE. Plans and schedules for movements and operations must be worked out: training exer- cises for the ships and their personnel must be coordinated, morale and welfare must be at- tended tog and physical and mechanical readi- ness must he insured. To assist the Commodore with these functions he has LCDR D. L. Banks, Staff Operations Officer, LT E. L. St. Ville, Staff Engineering Officer, LTIG K. W. Larabee, Staff Communication Officer. eafcwa Une Captain John L. Foster COMDESRON ONE LT. E. L. Sf. Ville, Staff Engineering Officer, LCDR. D. L. Banks, Staff Operations Officer, I.Tig. K W. Larabee, Staff Communication Officer. .j - H--------------I------nnu-nnnnnnnunnInununIgIgIIlI1IIIIlIIllllIllllllIllllllllllIlllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlIIIlllIllIlIllllIIIIIIlQlIllIIIl!llllIlI1QIIlllIIQ5IglIlllllIIIlllunnlllnlulnlluluulplgg 1 i i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 4 I 1 4 1 1 1 Commander W. F. V. BENNETT 1 Commanding Officer A I I V i 1 1 U.S.S. FLOYD B. PARKS IDD 880 i s.Z'2.'ZLZ1ZIlT'E31!L3'.. 1 MEMORANDUM FROM THE CAPTAIN TO: Officers and men of the USS FLOYD B. PARKS CDD BBLD 1. This cruise book marks the completion of a rewarding and highly successful deployment with the SEVENTH Fleet ' the Far East. The following pages tell the story of that cru e quite well- the routine Q of shipboard life, our operations at sea and th interesting places l visited. Howev th p' ture would not be complete without a recognition of the spir't h d work and loyalty demonstrated by 1 the men of the PARKS on th deployment tour. That portion story cannot be hilly treat cl by pict es or pr t. This we carry in our hearts with the k 1 dg h rved our country ll 2 Th' b k d d t t fine ship and the men who made h . , w. . V6 Commander, U.S. Navy 1 1 Commander Walter F. V. Bennett became Com- manding Officer of the USS FLOYD B. PARKS in luly 1958 after having served in the Atomic Energy Division of the office of the Chief' of Naval Opera- Hens Commander Bennett was commissioned Ensign in 1941 from the U.S. Naval Reserve Midshipman School, Northwestern University, after graduating from Manhattan College with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics and Mathematics. His first assignment was as instructor in Naval Engineering at Cornell University followed by duty as Executive Officer and then Commanding Officer of Submarine Chaser 655 which participated in the invasions of North Africa, Sicily and Italy. At Salerno he was awarded the Silver Star for con- spicuous gallantry in action against the enemy. Later he became Executive Officer of the Destroyer Escort COLE followed by Commands of the COLE, DE l-l.C. IONES, and the Radar Picket Destroyer Escort FOGG. After a tour as Officer in Charge of the Naval Recruit Station in Louisville, Ky., Commander Ben- nett did post-graduate work at the U.S. Naval Academy and at Ohio State University where he received a Master of Science degree in Physics. Since then he has served as assistant Progress Officer of the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project, Edgewood, Md., and prior to reporting for duty at CNO's Atomic Energy Division was Tactical Officer and Navigator of the heavy cruiser ALBANY. Besides the Silver Star, Commander Bennett holds the American Defense, American Theater, African- European Campaign C3 starsl, Pacific Campaign fl starl, Victory, Occupation, and China Service Medals. l-le presently resides in Coronado, Califor- nia, with his wife, the former Kathleen Eleanor Nestor of New Rochelle, N. Y., and their two chil- dren. Y' -'-x:'1-- -- Q I LODR Yerly reported to the PARKS in February 1959 return- ing to destroyers after having completed a round-robin of Pacific Fleet Force Commands. l-le has served in OOMAIR- PAO, OOMPHIBPAO, COMORUDESPAC, and COMINPAC. Previous destroyer experience was gained as Operations Officer aboard the USS LOFBERG CDD 7595 and as Executive Officer aboard the USS OURRIER CDE 7005. He Has also served as an instructor at Fleet Sonar School in San Diego. '7"'k 5?,k...iff..C.g, ,K I , , I ,. . f ff. , A 7 , , Yflwy' an F X , or -f f fy air--' ,. f , M 1 Q jj:'Mfg,oi-.,yi4iVf,s .- , . ,. :X ,ff fo 1- ,M i ff X f ,fgrkfrgywyyw X fl. - , ,K . , K K K - 7.5: LCDR. T. W. McNAMARA Operations LCDR. H. L YERLY i l l i . I r 1 1 l 1 i . l LTIG. T. F. ARNOLD Gunnery Q 1 J LTIG. E. B. MILLER ' Engineering V 6 LTIG. I. V. BELL Supply f! I I LT. R. A. POTTS Rel. Operations Officer ENS. B. A. ROBBINS, III First Lieutenant ENS. R. T. OLLIVIER Communication Officer LT flql T. P. IAMES, IR. ASW Officer and Navigator ENS. A. L. ALLOU CIC Officer Electronics Material Office ENS. D. L. WHITHEAD G Division Officer ENS. W. A. DEMCHAK Damage Control Assistant ENS. K. R. KNOBLOCK D Division Officer 1, ENS. W. T. WIRTI-I Main Propulsion Assistant ENS. R. H. WINTZ Asst. Communication Officer I GF 7 ' I 'Me 646654 Front Row: L. D. Ollom. B. Ialacki, V. L. Kelly. Back Row: F. F. Thompson, D. L. Eisenbcxch, R. E. McAnnc:11y. C. O. Starkey. R. S. Lowe. I g ! ' I I I "Get your nose on that icecube!" NHC!! G0fChU fi1'Si!" S -5- Used to those things?" "He's mine!" "YUM-' YUM! O I 6' +3451 '- X A Navy ship has often been called "a floating city" and this description is a true one. And like any community of people there must be organization. We must have administrative leadership, a court system, a police force, and a fire department. And what is a community without churches and hospitals, theaters and athletic events. Cur floating city must also have a barber shop, a store and a laundry. But above all, our ship has people: repairmen and deck hands, shiptitters and yeomen, siqnalmen and qunner's mates. The USS FLOYD B. PARKS has its community orqanized into departments and divisions. ln the pages which follow, these divisions and men are pictured and described. V .JL mluffvm WJ-ii'.5" f -""Lv ,cp H -F 1 r N 1 F I I I l I l I 1 l 4 3 2 r ? i, l L lt r I I i if u E First Row I L Carey I H Peach W B Sullenger Ens Robbins M. H. Gooch, I. B. Wade, A. A. Guthrie, W. I. Marsh. Second Row: M L Colledqe I F Connolly L C Smith I R Castro T R Belongie, I. G. Wickizer, G. L. Upton. R. I. Bemhardt, I. R. Gossett, R. D. Lemons Third Row R Stmnett E P Van Fleet I D Franks H R Roberts, P. K. Aaron, A. F. Suko, H. D. Golden, H. I. Blevins. Fourth ' Row H Cole R Montgomery I D Melton M M Sonnabend C F Killingsworth. I. W. Sullivan, W. A. Vaitkunas, C. L. Wright, R. G. I Iohnson UE? f 1 ' W Naam did ya buy in Honq Kong Ieleneckzo WYFD ff, it J QDQXVQN KSU!! fxlcwslx ws N. .qi Q5 ll 1 ,X' 2 I . " .' Mad Boats'-"' R f . . V' HS V ,'."'ff ,Tx f ,Ig ae-ff E' VM '19 .J, ' ' J 5? x 4 - 1 I . N' , ! t w K .V ,, 1 ' J l .fr A ' X j'. .. f 7 ' NX viz! .: ' . 1 . , f y., X , .1 -Q. ,liz I I 7 , f 'X ' IO OOO .. O 1 is 0 f 600000 -is O O O O O "You mean this is secured?" 1 l ln..- , ...,..,,...-. . "YOU missed CI S-PON" "Rig out the boat, boys." "Gutter, the slave-driver." Accommodation ladder going down The first impression one receives upon com- ing aboard the PARKS is that of the exterior appearance, which is reputed to be among the finest in the Pacific Fleet. The function of keep- ing this appearance in top shape is ably per- formed by the Deck Division. The seamen led by the boatswain's mates spend many long hours chipping, painting and cleaning the top- side spaces. However, replenishment at sea finds them at all stations transferring ammuni- tion, fuel and provisions and in port they are responsible for seeing that the ship is properly moored or anchored, and that the motor whale- boat is manned and cared for. Both underway and in port, men from Deck Division stand vital watches: messenger, helms- man, lookout, and supplement repair parties, fire and rescue parties, landing parties and so on. The men must be versatile and be prepared to perform a variety of tasks for they are the strikers to be of the petty officer rates which are trained in the technical aspects of the ship's operations. Sometimes it is not until an impor- tant inspection is impending or an emergency arises that their full value is realized but they can always feel proud that an essential job is well done. AHA! A mermaid! "But we just did this last week!" "I hope the secx plug is in!" ll 70195105 HX , 1 11 11 1 1- + 1 I V TQ1 1 , ff ,X U S S W- 1 1 ,1 1. 142 1 - 1- 1 1 ,VZ K! 1 1.7 K ,1 64,6 K k 1 10 J, 1 11, 1,1 K -fkf, - , XL ' ,' 'LW 11 'O 1,7 1515 1 1 ,1 1, ,.k- , - , I wg., x , , 1 - ' f, 1 ,,1, , , . 1 x 1 1,1 11,11 1 171 Qfj,1V,,'9gA,11A' ,1, ,g- 'A"' ' ' ' in 1 ,Z 11 'X H fh A ' ,11 S ' 11 f -1 1 351.11 ' ,, 1' , 5 L',L, 1, fa 1 f 1 ' ' ,,1' , K, , -'-11 11-::11,1-11,1 - ,11-1-114:1- 11' 1, A Qxif A if N 1 51 , ,ji1 A 1 h h S 1 S 1 'V , 1-1, 1- , 1 ,---1 ,1 1 1 1 5 1 -1 1 v+ 1 g if 1 , ' , iw' ,,,.' 1 711,11 '-.' 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I - ., 1,,1,-V-, , ,11, 1+ 1-,414 1 1-4, 1 , 1, K, ,K 11 1- 1 11 f , X"-- 25? 1 ' 1- --h' T Y 1 1 ' 1 ' 1, ,1 " " i1 1 f-'1 Q wifi ,1f1,11 1:-i1iK5' 1n 1f'- '1-- 1 '1 11 ,1 1 -1 ' ' , , 1 1 -11,, , -1-1 1, I ,'11 1 -L11, 11 1 1 - 1 , A - 1'7-',j,kjj,,y1 ,j L- 1- - yi, iff 11 "" - wif- 51-',f,i:1,-11-2,1 Y -, i ,'11, f j f, rf, ff 1 1 g n-u-.ui-,... - f ,-,' - , 1111? 3 -1 1 1,-1 --- , ,- ' 1 - fi' i 1 1 5' ' ' ,,,, , 1 3111, 191,'gQf,g,13'Q,11j,11 I ,, ,117,1 , 1 6 ,, "1 'C ',r- P 1 1, 1 V-, -, w ,,1-, 1 541, 11.1, ff -f K V nf f111 f ,. Q' 3? I f ff , f fl ff f 1' , I I 15,15 -, f , 1 X 1 ,,,1Qf!C,11 ' H ' L 1 i A f T Q13 1, f 'X f 1 z,,....0.1 -F A X 72 ?-, , -1 ,,1'1-1 1,',j1L,11,,V,V,,1,f,y1r,1',f 51 11 11,-,111 1,111-11195111 1 11-, 1151- 1' 131 1' f , 11,11-111,11 1 1 1 , 12011, 71,14 X Front Row: M. C. Barnhort, F. D. Lux, D. E. Garner, LTig. T. P. Iames, Ir., H. L. Schultz, R. A. Konkol, R. W. McMahon. Second Row: I. C. Garcia, M. M. Laviollette, R. A. Hcrrrsch, D. W. Shircx, D. Adair, G. T. Atkinson. Third Row: E. F. Nobregcr, D. W. Williams. H. L. Gcxncr, V. R. Mears, T. D. Mcrngum, T. I. Sorenson, T. A. Desmcrrcris. O O o M i Q Q f 5 0 o ,fu fl ' r --.-.-.-.........,... fit? 0 :ffm 0 -rt - .. 1 0 j...,rf-ff! Q 3 C! 0 -'f':"1"'7-"5 N -...........,.l 0 1 o ,, " o 1'y b .-.--.44 ...,........-...-9- G I , 1 Q 0 ' . -. . . J X Q 'tu ,,.-'...,..,.......Ij i Q ....--.,.-v-j-.-'- fl, ga ',,,,,.-w-S-- fa 1 ' 4:1 ...g....L,...-,N Mg,-lj, lr .. " Q 0 6- -Q . . 1 1 0 0 Q --. . ' ' V Cc' 3 G o Q Q G C341 0 - -1 0 g V . Ot: 0 Q.-QQ 1733- -C'::r zf 1 0 W :,.... , ' N. -cw? 1 , ,,,l,'..i-I--W1 ml 0 .1 -nf I, l -+A N, J ' ZLQP-icq: 0 - ' 5 'ajguk 0 I I A 'Lu U U'- 0 -.5 1i',,4, .V 0 , V .. ,ooui-Ati: 1 Q r , I--. ' ' ' I " " fl OL' 1 ' 9 I, v , , l ' X 1' J Y 1 - 1 D -rx 3 D 1 I ' 1 " x - :YQ ict .f '----'- u U C: G 6 1 il 0 0 U 1, lcf Q 9 t 4? 13- X 3 Q T he 37 1:-, M.- r ' 5 -" r g" 5, ,-jj! 40- CJ ' ' , I J ?h 5 , AD 'J . Lf x Q 09 Digi 0 v o 1 .1 ., .- 1 j- V f ig 1 ..L........-.-,tk:"5'5 rg Ls. ,, . . ' ' ' " 4 ,.,, , ? 1 1 , gf c gf 00009 ig f ll P fx C' D . 1 ff, .A 1' I r ' KW 'K ----fw-1-rf"'- .' ' . , 1, !tfi'?f, 0 , , "H 4 Q a.1!l3',1'111 . wg- - - ' "HIC!" 1 ' V , ' J 5 , YET-.. wwf" 'Q12 . ' ' ' "I understood it line until I ,, ., , looked at the instructions!" SONAR CONTACT ' ' Foxtrot Division is composed of Torpedomen, Fire Control Technicians and Sonarmen who have differ- ent hut allied duties. The Torpedomen, who have fired four of the 2l" torpedoes successfully this year, are in charge of the depth charges, surface and ASW torpedoes and their associated equipment. The FT's are responsible for the accuracy with which the guns are layed and the speed with which the air and sur- face targets are acquired. The Sonarmen seek out the undersea craft which are the chief worry of most surface sailors - the sulomarine. Besides standing watches in port and underway, Foxtrot Division aids the Deck Division in its duties as well as keeping its own spaces, both external and internal, in good condition. The many excellent gun- nery and exercises this year are a credit to the division and the intense training has made many a boot into an experienced old-timer by the end of the cruise. Cadillac and Shultzie on the 37 Director." "Beware the Mealy Bug!" "Huey, it can't be a seagull!" -'Happy in their work." "Harry supervising . . . Hmmm." Now when this light comes on . . . " "The Old Man and Mac playing TWIST THE DIAL." "How can you tell it's a female whale? 4 YWY,7,7,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,W7 7,7 ,,,7,i,,, ,Y ,,7,Y,7Y7i,77,,? W W72777777777 w y 1 fi 4 l fy fix S f fgff VPK! 'Sce- haha I- K, I , AA'AA- i ? K 1 , . cwwfav ,vp H 3-...Y , 1 A a 'V'-, K ,JXZKI I 1 -5 , rv, , ff i 4 ,KJ 'KLV V -VVV -y VLL- , K V' K VK VK K V Y Q "M 1, I V gr ,I'K ' f I D7 I I I if ' ' 5 K ff X K f' K ,V.VL frfyk rrlk Lki, ,L7r.k VVI' .yky 'V 'L ky If Yr -K I ,'K' fa- -.4 ,VK ,. ,-'Y' -g , 4 K, f 1 K.,,, ' :Q Q43 I , ,K X, K-,N iw.- '- K .,v- f , K K,s,,,,. 5' I K k,g: ,,,AV K Kkyyyky Vrkiyy Al , -, W. ,,., , K ' ' 'f 'S' - L2 ' ' -, " Sw X W? ' gy X A , K K - K V ,, . X , .,,f,g,a9'.f K K , 1 . ' to , ..J,"' , wx. K ,,,,K.'- nay 1 ,, ':'.,-,ew 'f ,.,K2K',K55- .' ,' ' K1h if W , M14 ,. 'K,,y,, w K , f, , KJ r , Aj fl I ' I . ,V ,M K 1 4 I 96 .,,- - 'K si? S ' 'K' K' W f',1' ,CW gf X W., KK 'X f - ff f f , yn. , ,K- ' . . ,. " ' ff' W Off O, ,off K K IK. . .Q n A. . ' :z,,'- 4, ,V VX "m' Q - ,KKL K K Front Row C H Allman Ens D L Whitehead, V. L. Kelly, E. Childres. Second Row: I. I. Dickson, Ir., F. W. Morales, S. Lopez, W. A Messick III D H Petree Third Row W L Gutheridge, M. L. Booker, W. D. Doyle, R. L. Edwards, W. W. Davis. Iwllv. S KK L ' 5 HUT iv I ' '5 2 i ."'1+ :El 'wth Nf I S , Q, X s xii?" , , S N f "A My X 7 IN l l I XX I 09 E ! 0 -Q C ,f E W, Y' ' Qflllx. X 5 Q l "How many times have I told I "But Morales . . . do you think it's that much "Come on, Gutheridqe you re oil you to tow a sleeve when in their area?" V I we re easier than MT 33 to keep c1ean?" ihe Ship ROW!" 'w' K,-fx Q' N, y ...,,- K f f, 1 ' , " . 3 K K. Q AY w , X' A K fi' ' an K KVV, .V I ,X 11 yi my K' V'jL3f7j1QifL 1 V ,Ksm f 5 K., 6 , N , A 7 J Q ff f Y ff X . ffKK,K ,K,,,Kf ,KGKA K X A f W A .Q ,, -j",1 'f-2,-P' ' rf f A 4 , ' ' fr SN v , rg, 7 2,-3,1 1 ' I -" .fi f X VKX' X 4 5 7 fy 4, X f 5 NW 4 X , , W f lg fav fl of v f I . f , l 4' A , , . 1 4 4 ,. ff . .. f fffvf yy ff 4 ' J, V l .f n ,W XI vfwh gyf , X ,ff V : . . , . . . ' A , , . . . : . . . N K K I X E l l Q X X "fl f H Z -1 ff U ,V ff fgbif, ..,Q,5q-Vyifgy k!40,!,fV..M,f V, , , Wy ,f yy if 7, ,, M ,, ww, yfff ., yqfywyw vyfyl1.5-z,f,,ffMz4,f44f.1f,,X,f'w,f1 qy f 'f 4-fyww f, if f.fffff,fwy f ffm .f ,Q.f1,y!,,,.f g ,J f, f-,f f ,iv fffff. ,f fm ff, 1- 1 f i mfr fr 1 r ff f if f 1 1 1 Qc f' f W7 fy C 1-C 4271505 V Z. fix Q 'f ' f 4 OffW,W7ff.fvL?:527. T75 57 of mmfe M f My ,f,1f'gw3f', f my ' f ,Z f? ,ffH4Ay.,f,.g,fp.f,?,ffy', M.,-'fQf,ff1-f.f,f ff iw 1:2 ,ya W . f f,f- - ff. WMM fpfffamif .ffiffgf',f,f, gf i f 'f ZYJWJffffkiiff'f f Y we 24'Wz',ffXJ."f,f-ff.WMwif f ff :W ? f gy,,3K,4,f5,,ff.WV .,!4f.!f 'xv 0, ,ff ,ff :,vfw,f-.ww.wwf f f. H f f 7 y ff ,M ff ff , if fix'-f,fM, M 4-QQ ff ,f fr f Qfiwfg L41 ai Qgfgs , X X ff Xu 4 J., .ff-'f,ffy,,f , 4,1y,!. .,f.,. -4-qs, ',ff, 'f ,f,A 1 7-V.-W'Q.-A ff! ff-WWW! ffff f' f of f'ff'n ,K f . 5 f ' ' if-fx Q.-,if ff MW .V V . f 'f 1" -f 4 f- -. .yr ,r 4, w,.-,fy ' +V Fwzf MW - Y z ., . - r i A+. ff W., W w e-e f, -M-1 -f-' -ff , 1 K iff 'V'w..i.,g4:fg,,-z,,f-, .- 5 s , -y , mf A. . s . 4' -r ft H " ' Q1 . . . 2-if-1 r " f- 0 3 W -W infant . , . ,if-My vw-wsZpQ,.f X fy fl N . Kgyf I , ww-,J vg,,5,".,,i.,f-wfexf4e.,..f, , ' , M , ffmff., .. if . Q, , 1 . ,. E ,, .,,..,. . " f r , 1 "Good shooting, huh?" Cne of the most important facets in the history of our Navy has been the ability of our ships to lay accurate, rapid and continuous fire against the enemy. The nucleus of the team reql, 4 to attain this ability is the Gunnersmate. During the '59 cruise the gunners were given ample opportunity to put their technical knowledge and experience to use. Exercises such as anti-aircro ', shore bombardment, surface sled, and star shell shoots were conducted many times calling for a great deal of preparation and maintenance. From the Gunnersmates point of view, their greatest achieve- ment Was reached shortly after being detached from the For- mosan Patrol. A Nationalist Chinese aircraft towed a sleeve which on four successive passes was neatly severed from its cable by direct hits. All hands were exhilarated by the fine exhibition and have since recalled the sense of satisfaction over the outstanding efforts of the Gunnery Division. It's up here. somewhere. u "Figaro, Figaro. Figaro "This one has a fine action . . . " "Yo-Ho . . . Heave, me hearties!" "Boy, is it ever hot in here!" I5 . , - , . K .. f. 1 . 1,44 5 . -I . - . I' ' ' 44,-- '.., .-... ff." Lf' .- - I5 -' "' ., 1-'-'- f f-"-? - J ,..., -- ' -"Q,.,5.' jg.. . '.g1 -151,131-Qi,-: fill.-,'1..,f,i ,T' 115,'.,: Front Row: C. L. Attaway, R. A. Vetkos, LTig. I. V. Bell, I. C. Davis, W. I. Stoker, R. A. Winston, Ir. Second Row: H. I. Hardy, M. Savage, I. D. Respicio, W. A. Hirschkorn, A. G. Nott, D. M. Hermoso, T. H. Cruz. Third Row: L. E. Passey, D. R. Kinamon, W. P. Ienkins, C. H. Stanford, L. W. Shelnuit, L. W. Atterholt, I. L. Mainor. Fourth Row: C. W. Kirby. I. M. Pence, P. N. Wilson, R. L. Shaw, Ir., E. L. Dowling. G. Wade, R. E. Bahler, D. L. Stonaker, I. M. Maluski. X GFICE - 4 - C-1 I ', X I Q 0 ' 0 . 'I ' I 0 0 ' I 9 0 4, me v .. 00 Q i 8 0 0 m A K I Q . SW 'G .. Z Wo 'Cb' "' 4 , 2 4? Liar' . 5. Q A71 1 i X N D- 1, " "' S- .L - - ' on, on 1. e rr- . . . ay ay or e crew. I . 2 Uwe take pride in our stew N -9 A-fu PARVQ P d 1 th " aa 7: I6 "Who ordered 5000 cases of beer???" "Yes, we're having steak tonight!" The Supply Division is made up of six different Navy rates: Disbursing Clerks, Storekeepers, Com- misarymen, Ship's Servicemen, Stewards, and Hos- pital Corpsmen. Personnel in each rate perform specialized functions aboard ship which provide Well balanced and prepared meals, clean clothes, pay, medical care, and tools and working materials. The Disbursing Clerks handle pay records, adjust- ing individual changes in pay status, and submitting monthly returns. The Storekeepers are responsible for the ordering and distribution of all material and replacement parts needed in the Ship's Store, pro- "Hurry with those sandwiches. Cole!" "Now this sells for the low, low price of only . . . " visions, and the operating budget. The Ship's Serv- icemen operate the laundry, Ship's Store and barber- shop. The Stewards prepare the Officers meals and keep officer country spaces clean. The Hospital Corpsmen attend to personnel medical care as Well as keeping rein on the sanitary condition of the ship as a Whole. The Supply Division is charged with a great re- sponsibility in providing these services that will not only supply each man's minimum needs but also contribute to a high state of morale by improving shipboard standard of living. "Requisitions, Requisitions, Requisitions! ! !" "Are my khakis ready. Stoker?" "See daylight, DOC?" "Who Cuff- YOUR hair' Beale?" f 7,f Front Row: A. W. Porter, Ens. A. L. Allou, Ens. R. T. Ollivier. W. I. White. Middle Row: I. D. Ford. R. L. Tegen. G. A. Davie, C. T. Hol- land. Back Row: D. E. Brodeur. F. E. Newell. C. A. Chapman, I. C. Barton. C. W. Williams. uc . U "Combat sees the HULL and Fmld 'l be ff 4PR60? the CRAIG merging! a s" xxiii Q L, I 1, HZA A .j -Q . 'i5 g5,g3,.1-i1ig- ,l.. AIQA ,.,i,..-,,.. : g I,I ggi'.1.ii..Z ,Qf V-XX W XS hx b ff P Q . f V ...,V., R f 'ff f mf. Zff ZYAW' J 1 How lar away did you say that typhoon was?" . 1 L I I I w l Z X I 1 i X P. ll S I ln "Inspection? What Inspection? ? ? " "Cl" division is part of the Operations Department which has been appropriately termed the eyes and ears of the ship. The division is composed of Elec- tronic Technicians C?l and Radarmen who generally are recognized by their deathlike pallor after being cooped up in dark holes watching PPI scopes and repairing huge masses of electronic gadgets too corn- plex to mention. The ET's are responsible for keeping the compli- cated electronics equipment on board operating at peak efficiency, a job next to impossible but ably performed. "Bogey one, bearing . . . " The Badarmen in Combat Information Center use search radars, plotting tables, charts, display boards and voice radio gear to keep the entire ship "in the know" on the ever-changing picture of fleet opera- tions. Besides this the division keeps CIC, Radio Ill and ET shack, and the Ol level sparkling. A petty officer from the division is always selected as mail man and his actions are closely followed by everyone on ship, especially in port when a mail flight has been known to come in . . . my course finally arrived." "I see you in there!" "How do you spell pregnant" "I think Chartreuse is a GOOD color!" "Oh no! We plot on top of Mt. Fuji!" M' If W. .,f. . ff wr: g of o s I 7 we f f Front Row: Ens. R. H. Wintz. Chief C. O. Siarkey, B. E. Wigginton, LTig. K. W. Lcxrcxbee. Middle Row: W. T. Pugh, R. E. Kriens, W. H. Rogers, V. D. Herrick, III, G. E. Ackles, R. I. Ledford, R. E. Turner. Back Row: I. D. Petty, A. C. Fcricxrdo, N. E. Wagner. A. I. Sepolpo, I. W. Ford. I. G. Pendergraft, S. W. Billie, Ir. , ,ff '4 Z N, x, - "1 V J 5 " Q M . V 14 ff Q Q - yn V t X1 but ga ' I? ' O .- - 5 ' 'w ex? 7 , 5 J 'P' A Il W Q A 0132? V, 1 Q i .4 ,-- 1 K ,IX f N me W! 7 Wm 1 F l , Z, .. I. . Z I ' f 1 0 fg yff Q pl B I Z L I' , Z ! I 6 f HW' '! 7 E' .s,. up N an -- 4- A Q:- .-Q.. -2.1. ' ' ' "But you said BOX the Compass. n "The Ship's Office." .- W 1 Q ff ES W f ZR, I I ,ff f I - Z if "H...e...l...p" ,,, 7, 7,7 "Hel1o . . . Come in Mars . . . ?" "OC" Division is composed of Radiomen, Signal- men, Quartermasters, Yeomen and Personnelmen. First the Signalmen or "skivvie wavers." These men are the cleanest people on board the PARKSQ 'X Q "They say they don't have any 1ettuce." for all day we see them drying their laundry on the halyards or waving it about on sticks. They are re- sponsible for all visual communications, which con- sist of flashing light, flaghoist, and semaphore. Next are the radio or "dih-dah" boys. Sometimes they dream in Morse Code and answer your ques- tions by tapping their fingers in CW but otherwise "What came after EMERGENCY . . . ?" Dih...Dah...Dih...Dup...Dah...Dop...Dunk..." carry the "Message to Garcia" via routing boards as fast as the news comes in. Next come the "pencil-pushers," more commonly referred to as "YO-YO's." From their tiny cubicle comes the clacking and scratching noises which keep the ship's administration up to date. The Quartermasters are the Navigator's assistants and keep the charts and ship's logs in good order. Ably assisted by some stout volunteer yeomen, they are the chroniclers of every movement of the ship. "They're sending us ice cream!" "Where are we, Wiqqie?" fy, Quick. the alter head is over flowing - 'W' 'Y J I -' ""' 'ii mnill 'V' T hiir Q ,qw -W e .V :Z QM, X f . V, fm, W N ' 1 , If ' K f ff ,-,f f ', .K K ..VV .K ,kyk 1K VVV-V,,k KKK Qwwwe. .. ee. , 59 , ,K , mmm l, -' 1: , . gl, .af if fl E., , . I X, X 'K . K K K K K 4 . , ,... 3 ,Mg , -fy -if . G . , 0 -4, H JK, W . if K KKggw , , hge V, , 4, ., f 'L,L 2 E D ffl L"L 'K" ' 'f ,, L V 5 f R ' ' ,r.. l . . X To T R , .1 X "!L L," , x v? 755. ' - H . f .- 3 K, KKK,,KK..- w .KWQIIJ K KK Vi? KK,K,KKK.i K ' -KK 'W , A L. K ,, ff, f , 5 ' ' KXK ,KK 5.7, , , KK gegr , rerr F T. he T of , . i . ., a , T do T T 1 T. ,rie , T i,.. T , G 'i ff. ff . . ii ff ff? 2 -1 'G Midi? . , . , i ' 'ff ' K, K, KKKKKKKKK KKK. ,X ,K, KKKKKK. ,,.-,KK KK KK,K ,K K, ,K .-M 0 KK . K , K . K W , R ., . 1 , f ,. , , f . 4 ,.-- .., V .4 , - , -, , X K! KI I .K ,KKK.!,K.K mU,,KZKK,! KK K , Z ,VKKK KKKK..K,., . .yi KK -f'jQyf.f.f5g w "fj'1g.'- .3 'f ,g ,5.-N f--- ,. 'f '- . '- 49.4, Y ., f, f. 1,,Q,V,f , 4, ,.-' ' - 1 - ,- f,'L ,,,,, , . f ,4-,Off ' . f'fv.V1'f' -!k'!"fi3l -' f :1f'ffff-:fi 2 Y, ' ' V F. ,WVZGXL .F r "' 1. . , vw 'M fp.,,'1 W 'f 5-ff i..-..,. ' i - , I f ' N '1W'Wv..-ff f'-h, " ' 4 " . 4, '." T - . , a , ,,,, 4 U, KK .,.K.Q,,3Kf- ,,,.. ,, 6,35 -X KKKK ... -f K ... K , .Y A ,.: X ,V . ,KK 7, -.fy 33' 'KW 4 ff' 'Q,'i'f-z lf' ' fjy1'.l'f- H 'lilf' W,-ff W,-' 1- 7 ' N - . -,., ' fi !4,,f,"Z . Wx .. ZF ,-,- - 'fi' ,,i .ff CQ' ' 'f ff ,'f,Q1. ff 'fi iff 'f ff. J-fj'jfVfQf,, ' 'f-' ' . f a nx ww ' f ' on Q if f T R ioo. , . R ' Q .Q X fj f ' WWI- ' X , ,. . Front Row: B. G. Wright, H. C. McNeill. R. W. Van Dyke, G. Bentley. F. F. Thompson. B. P. Kolodzieiski. Second Row W A Keller. D F McMahon. M. L. F crrmer. D. I. McMahon, W. L. Schmaltz, H. R. Hubler. Third Row: M. A. Evans. T. W. Powers. T A Nalley R R Iurs, A H. Buehnamcxn, S. E. Wheeler, M. G. Casad. ILE?-7 444 X , ,--' 95 .5 i :I 'J A 2 I A ff ,. ' D O -Q l W T7 QQ X , ,, ,. E3 ln "What did the Shipfitters think of your suggestion. Mr. Wirth?" Thr-If ll ieuch hlm to -W Often called the "shipyard within a ship," R Di- vision is responsible for maintenance which assures the ship of fulfilling her mission. The division is al- ways ready 24 hours a day to replace or repair defective equipment necessary for the ship's opera- tion or the crew's habitability, whether it be a stopped drain, burnt out light bulb, or malfunctioning air conditioner. The division is composed of three gangs: the Elec- tricians and IC men, and the Shipfitters and Damage Control men. The "E" gang maintains electrical equipment such as switch boards, main generators, interior communications, alarm systems, gyro, light- ing circuits and electrical visual communications de- vices as well as caring for and operating the motion picture projectors for the morale of the crew. The "A" gang keeps such auxiliary equipment as the refrigeration plant, low pressure steam system, gig engine, anchor windlass and boat winch in top shape. The "SF" gang keeps the hull and its fittings re- paired and are the builders or "jack of all trades" who make anything from storage bins to coffee cup racks. Although divided into three gangs, the word "co- operation" expresses the thought and spirit of R Di- vision among themselves and with the whole ship. Is that the smallest wrench you could find, Wheeler? "Lessee, I should be able to get Perry Como on channel 2." "I think we've found Uranium I ! !" And when you flip this switch, the ship stops." "Now I see why they call it a dog!" "And to all you people out there in radio land . . ,vi If H .g':" fe ,.V,7p' - , f V A E Y I , 'ik ..', 5 .,.4 - , Vf.pi,Q,,V- .V , 4ifV?jVVVf V, ,, ,, I kgs.. , t .F - f, t F 'Sy , .'-f 52 ., .Y ...ji If Q . p I r , , . . I "i 5 C 'I t I I' stttyt if i I qijgg F V - 'Q "Zm1,' k". ' ,,' -,' I Q "" I if . , ' V ,, , V V . I I I A A f ,V V . V V , V V, 1 SV! -, V VV V ,' . ' -I V V Zi .1 , I f , V Xf,Qx'Q ygydvwnw , f AIU 'c?'dq 4 ' ' i k . - A f s ys-Wywwv . , . f L , , I t F ' at f t t B , ff ' I , - kk,V V V V , , V VVV ,V V V VVVV V V ., VV ..hkv , V , V .'t,i t f , ' , A sf I ?l I .1 3 I A ,"' 2. V A ' V V- 4 I' 'IV ' '--- V . V f ' . . g.iVg'1VQVV, V, 1 fV,VVV V,VV V V W gf , ,V ff VI H f h I Httl A H A Ttti , It f, , I I . 5 47 A wi A I fh , " ' A '... ' I A ' , , , , , ,. , 2 V , V 1. ,V V, VV V, VV V, .,V. V ,VV I V . A I Q ' f ' . . ',., , - -' J ' VVVV, V ,V V VfVV 4.3, 4' V VVVV , VVVVV . V, Vg . - ,VVV VV . V V if I Xfgixz , Y 4 V V V VV,V7 VV Q . ,QV . , X f, f . ",' . f , I V, ,' . . F , B A 1 l V L, ' ,I , t , 2 sttt A I ' 4 f , f A, ft f A t , , f , s ,I H 2 I 'LYAT B , , A . ,t H Q , I I B V B f , J , B ,.j V fVV,V V V X ' A V .V., , 'V ,, ',..' ,V ,V ' ,,5,VQ. 1' V . V V . ' T V " 1 ,,'.' - A :f f .l -, - . . . f ' y I H I f H' 71 if , , ,. if ,.. f A-A1779 I Y f ii, !"A V ,, I A A 1 , , , t f ' I f 1 1 f ' Qf QQQTEJ t H I , ' 252 A , ,. , l , V VVVV VV VVVV V ,,,V i I V Q,f . ' H F Front Row: S. Pagan, M. H. Hutchison, S. I. Manriquez, G. D. Russell, LTiq. E. B. Miller, W. W. Chesser, B. Ialacki, I. D. Stanley, R. H. Larch. Second Row: R. E. McAdow, G. A. Griffith, H. H. Higdon, A. D. Hicks, S. A. Kinney, R. K. Kendall, W. W. Becker, B. D. Duke. Third Row: I. A. Deckard. M. W. Bearden. C. W. Grayson, R. E. Masters, G. A. Stevens, C. W. Gahaqan, L. R. Brown, R. D. Bailey. Front Row: W. D. Fanchier, B. G. Davis. LTiq. E. B. Miller, L. D. Ollom, A. L. Allen. Second Row: C. C. Twigqs, E. Martin, M. L. Ramsey. I. C. Casias, I. T. Rogers. Third Row: L. F. Palmer, D. K. Williams, C. H. Davis, D. E. Stwalley, D. L. Prince. G. W. Logan. Fourth Row: 4 R. H. Wa11ace,VR. F. Coon, A. F. Perrin, T. R. Terrel, G. D. Stricherz, W. H. Bauer, B. C. Mitchell. 1 Division is subdivided into two separate groups of personnel-the Machinist's Mates and the Boiler- men, collectively endeared by term "snipes." The MM's perform various jobs in the enginerooms which include maintenance of the turbines, reduction gears, con- densers, and such related auxiliary equipment in the engineering spaces as pumps, compressors, evapo- rators, governors and propeller shafts. As watch stand- ers, machinist's mates stand pump watches, evaporator watches, phone talker and throttle watches while the ship is underway. The BT's maintain the boilers and fireroom equip- ment, transfer, test, and take inventory of fuels and water and serve as members of damage control parties. Without the long acknowledged proficiency of these men, the ship would have no illumination, no fresh water or prepared food, no firing of guns, no electronic communication and no movement of the ship. "Wonder if they'll ever air-condi- And This 9111 SCIYS fo me tion this place?" "A little paint always makes the gig more cheerful." I l l l "How do you make a V2 RPM?" "And there I was, flying at 30 000 feet ------e - "Besides looking good it works' t9!R?T!H.'5:1f,,.. 4 N -4. ng squfr f"'- cf - , " l v 5 3 1 l 5 4 1 I W 1 L ii 1 N 1? 1 Q 2 Y 5 I ,,, , 5 1 l E 1 I I L 3 1 l + i I I I 4 L l 4 i 1 - V , I I L ' ' l ' ' 'X' ' A' A' 5'5"::' ' 'f- ' 11 ""' - ' "9f"E1'-r.s:,:if'Q'1-L1JLf'AL..gc',,Lv--rf-f-f.--,:,-.::..4,.. -'.'-..zf ,sJ.L,+.n.-1f.- -55 ,m Qi .b,:'-fu ...q.. 5 ,,. ,, ,. A-J U W , Wczwculd The first stop on our cruise was Pearl Harbor, situated on the island of Oahu. This island is the famed vacationland of Hawaii, a land of smiling people, soft breezes, swaying palms, and the gentle, undulat- ing rhythm of the hula. Here too is Waikiki with its coral reefs and shimmering blue waters, crowds of sun worshippers, outrigger canoes, and monumental Diamond Head. Pearl Harbor is the inlet on the south coast of Oahu, six miles west of Honolulu, which forms a landlocked harbor used by the United States as a coaling station and then as a naval base since 1887. There are few traces now of the tremendous destruction wrought by the lapanese here on December 7th, l94l, except for the USS ARIZONA which lies on the bottom of the channel, a memorial to those who gave their lives for their country on that fateful day. Hawaii was a fine starting point for our cruise, and our only regret was that our stay was such a short one. From Pearl Harbor we sailed to Guam for voyage repairs and a View of the island called the "most beautiful isle on earth." 27 The PARKS arrived at Guam fully expecting the island to be an unexciting and uneventful dot in the Pacific. But after the swarms of laborers from SRF left the ship in the after- noon, and before the night shifts began, the liberty parties streamed ashore to play softball, go bowling and skeet shooting, and hold some dandy beer busts at exotic CPD Gab Gab beach. Trips to the colorful southern end of the island for water skiing were undertaken and drives around the island were rewarded by scenic views of quiet bays un- touched by civilization, remindful of the island paradises that everyone has dreamed about. The turnout for division softball play was overwhelming and competition for the beach party given for the winner was keen. Most arguments were quickly settled when the beer stacked in ice was unveiled and when Operations came out on top, everyone agreed that the best team had won. Upon leaving Guam the PARKS headed for Kao-hsiung, Formosa, and duties with the Seventh Fleet on patrol. 28 Km-W ' The PARKS came to call Kao-hsiung the "in and out" port, for it seemed as though we never spent much time there but always stopped on the way to or from patrol or an operating area. The name Kao-hsiung goes back many centuries and originally meant "beat the dog gracefully" or some- thing to that effect. An interesting fact about Formosa is that it is said to retain some of the true "Taiyal Men," a cannibal race of an ancient strain of Chinese. The word "Taiyal" means "Real Men." Not knowing how real they were, none of the crew ventured to find out. The Formosa Patrol consisted mostly of a battle with the elements as it rained so much some of the men claimed they were growing web feet. But our real rea- son, that of acting as an instrument of United States Foreign Policy, protecting Formosa from threat of inva- sion was never overlooked, and it was a worthwhile experience just to operate in such a focal point of world tension. Next stop - Subic Bay. A WWW Hong Kong-gateway to the Orient, is a city of con- trasts where a cosmopolitan atmosphere and elegant homes seem out of place with the teeming harbors of junks and sampans, The population of Hong Kong ap- proaches 21Ai million which is a sizeable increase from the 500,000 inhabitants the island had in 1941 when the Iapanese seized it. No one really knows how many peo- ple live on the junks and sampans choking the harbors but the count is increased weekly by refugees swarming over from the Chinese Communist mainland. Hong Kong, which is actually only the name of the island whereas the city itself is called Victoria, is a place of beauty with its breath-taking views from Vic- toria Peak and Repulse Bay and the grotesque attraction of Tiger Balm Garden. Fine beaches and swimming re- sorts provided many hours of enjoyment, followed by a quiet dinner in any one of the world-famous restaurants scattered throughout the island. The PARKS found shop- ping in Hong Kong and Kowloon, across the harbor, rewarded by purchases of tailor-made clothes, gold work, jewels, pure silks and intricate lacework-basic elements of centuries of Oriental trade. When we put to sea again with our lockers laden with Oriental treasures and our pockets empty, we said good- by to an exotic, friendly, and fascinating world of people living inside the dark shadow of the mountains to the north - mountains of Red China, and sailed to Tsushima Straits for ASW operations. Coming soon - our first stop in Iapan . . . Sasebo. 31 , W1 1 1 i1 i i 0 3 ,-1 'Qi w 525 ,1 f 7 11, 75 4 wi- f 1 7 yi? 75 A Qi ,Q A cv A 4 Q..- V ,,.,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,v,,,,.,,,.,,....um..,..,.-v...u-w f-ff W wW.,n.wm,,,,,,,,., W ,W YYVYY -,..-.,.,,.....-.- - M Waikiki Beach cmd Diumondlheud House Gm The Luke THE CR MSE IN CML UR Hong Kong L15 r Dqiim Jen Je-ms J:?Q3?'Ef.1. 4..,v.. ,- w r gimguvfx :Ml '1i5.. 3514 ,:. 13455. V, ' ff ' ', ' Arn .x f ' ' , W-ff-4, x X w4,fg9' fr riff-tm, , xy, H ,.,, ,, Qi "L ,4 55511 I' Qf:,QL.M, 1ii' V 'Tix 321 ' -,ffi , ?w',fif'9:lQi'fv2 ' ?fw'i"' , -- efg7'f7f?' r1?,'l.'fff26i'6m,Lffy V- ,, A , ,- '.vf,1-fyxzww, M,.,f:+, v ',f.-prfffmtgf ' f' ',gy3e,p.- , YJ, ,-sffqff, , li Q. , 27,73 f 2VS,13'm L22'v2'ffQ5"'G ' I AifzsiffvffeffJw Z". f fy f?1'fifliZ, lP'l3z,. f - ?,:,g,g1:, f .MX ' , Q' 4-0-4 5vf.ffLg,j.:-, , , . 4-H ,. f?wff:Jf4fva-,-sqm-ffw.':",2:ff1yf,'Ivg4''iff'fwfr,mil-,.9fF:::f3',ffZfwms f , M , , , 1, ' Q. 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H' ' wwfXvmyrf'z,ff,gW4fraGf,:f1,wr,pg,f,fg43fff:fmaf'2s'Wm:1age'fvmHqzfawfgwzfzvwr-:AQx viiriw f mfzdasifiifzkiiiwggq-,, , Qs f 2 1 4 v f Msn-44 'w.'fv:f"fmS'wfffHU-W -M MXN we 12:1-N354 Q -- " -.wwvzh-,,,f. w , A:3-,aww-QXrw,'f,vwf51f.AM,,' "Zw.,,,wx-ff wx Q Y 'fw"'H -5 ' 'f .- ff: 1, gx.,3Wf7Q4f3w:9wf'sfz4,'Q-fffxwfxm, ,W vi -1 3, A f' ,Z:i: l4'- V . l 2 , , J -1' ,f I .gy V , X 6. ,gg 335:,!wg551q1fr2fg,"jdj--,V325.g,v,-i'5Q5,fJgfifi,j ,5gAgf:,.X?,i1X.f 5 'L .x,:Y4,??'4iZ1",w,f 14 mfffv Zf ' J V fi-syf Wffg - ,f fwv'-Zu.'w ' .f fmkm-.-L1-ww ,M W ff. ef .wyf.,,m,fw-frt-1.-.H',-wwp AN fy :W X www- s...,fff,,w-yr M-40 fwx. ax f 3931? qrgmLwgfgiawmgtaxiwrey-an..-2,mffkfmz f :ww .- ga- ' 1:1 -' 'GE' Q Ui"1f'JZi1E'ES, .nz Q 7 Y- fgnx-luxe. -. . Y ,.,,,,,4:,, ,Z ,Y mix, , :- iz- Gateway K, XZ, Drymg Qiaihes - KawHaam Sffyie Beaffs Near Hang Kang Pagoda Em Tiger fS3aHm Gardens - ' 1 , - mEmsinreI1,H,.. .. T534 L Q! -vjggf x 'ff 4, , , 1 77 ff 'm" X 1, f ', Hffff fr' f f, '57 , E Wa 'ff ffm M, , F . -' ' ' WM' 2 3: X 'ff' Q" l ' M51 ,. I I ri: of Y ,xy Q. : 1 , 11 1 f L , x 'm 4 f fgvwl y Wxrxgk. I From ASW operations in Tsushima Straits, scene of the great naval battle of the Russo-lapanese War, we sailed to the southernmost of the lapanese Islands, Kyushu, and the seaport town of Sasebo. Sasebo Harbor served as a focal point of Naval operations during the Korean conflict and as a re- sult some commercialism still prevails but the true small town atmosphere exists in abundance. Because of a threatening typhoon, PARKS liberty was somewhat curtailed and we missed our oppor- tunity for a tour to Nagasaki, a city renowned for its recovery after it was atom bombed in World War ll. A highlight of the visit for many people was a tortuous taxi ride up the hill overlooking the har- bor for a SUKI-YAKI dinner at an authentic Iapan- ese hotel and a view of the port below, framed to the west by lane Russell Hill. We left Sasebo for a week's operation with USS HCDRNET once more, looking forward to our next port of call - Nagoya. ' ': w ' 1- ' '.--I "1-4" '--'-' '. hz-. f f-..4.-...-14.4 'MM-E .. .- ,M I , .. k in ,. - I Jh,,K.,.,,'.,4G'Al M,.,,,,- L V, U- , A. ..g ff ' - 7 -E 'Bikini'-' ' ' ' "'1""-"""""""'u"'- Nagoya was a real test of our grasp of the Iapan- ese language, for there is no Naval installation there, and contact with Americans is not as great as at Sasebo or Yolcosulca. The city is located about five miles from the seaport proper but the transportation problem was easily solved by rented buses and a plentiful supply of taxis. The harbor was a beehive of activity with merchant vessels of many nations plying their trade and we saw Norwegians, Chinese, Canadians, Greeks and Portuguese merchant sailors mingling with the crowds in the city. Not far from Nagoya is the town of Gifu, famed for its trained Cormorants, birds used for fishing by the ......E,.,-........ ...V . ...Y --.-.5 Iapanese. These birds, restrained by long leashes, dive for a small fish peculiar to the area, and drop their catch in baskets in the fishing boats upon being pulled in. Tours through the city included stops at a brewery, an ancient Iapanese castle, and a trip to the top of an Eiffel Tower-like television structure for a pano- ramic view of the city. After saying "sayonara" to Nagoya, we left for "Operation Tall Dog" with elements of the Seventh Fleet. Afterwards, a visit to our last WestPac port before going home - Yokosuka. -1, Y ,,21AQ!Y - ----. , ---,,,,,-...-...,.,....-...--,,,,..-- -......,,.--1...-.....-..-..:-11:,-..r11-.gg-:g:.1....-.,l-5 -----A x sv Yokosuka, a typical lapanese seaport with a slight commercial air provided us with a glimpse of the beauty tor which lapan is ta- mous, for a short distance away was Mount Fuji, a towering volcano that rivals the Rising Sun as the symbol ot Iapan. Standing guard over a land oi shimmering lakes, tall pines, and an atmosphere ot serene calm, Fuji beckons to the weary traveler to come and view its tranquil domain. Nearby also is the quiet village ot Kamakura, the home ot the Diabutsu, or Great Buddha, and many interesting shrines and temples. The cap- ital city ot Tokyo is only a short train ride away and no one wishes to miss the thrill ot seeing the lmperial Palace, the internationally famous Kokosai Theatre, and the bustling atmosphere ot one of the three largest cities in the world. We lett Yokosuka with mixed emotions, sad at leaving such a wonderful country, but happy to be going home to our wives, sweethearts and loved ones. 2,IS5ZQ2EiQ,111S'?CULf"v-v4 E' ills , 1 f- x-naw:-.1w - If - fm-xfrg.:.n:u'11ae uma:-mu-.H-1-'15 ri: fm-L-. , -NA, A s 1 y I-f, -:, j,,f uf. f- I f nfl ,L gf, ' ii-U, H , A f ' . ,wwf I , f . I , , l , 5 Swv .,., , 5, I 1, 415 ,f MW 1 -f -V17 ,ifw,.-,- gi., f gdefwf' .Wm ,. , ,ef 7 K Y, , . ,X . ,. M 5 I-5475 I . -WN .L fs' ' F' -' S 4 K T- 5 -f 7' f :-- , ,A Q p b ,gay -. 4' -I -'f , k , -'gas ,Q- ' 7 2 '- fPw4if.i ' . H A 'WW Q, K .,.. . ,S WVVL -, ,Eg g 2 119 14 cf 1 ,V 4 .. . I 1 Jw fig! ffi Ii-,. X ffpfmy ffff,,,WffWWfff,Wf f fffwffgfzfgfywyfyffy 71 MW! yy W m' PL1. -vh'. f m ' A i i , . , ' WM f ff ff ffff f f f , ww ff ,Wa ff ff fyfjWfff fff fwwfwyfz, wg jfffyfwjfyfffff aff ffflymf jf X ff 1 f fffaff , X 5 fb! ffyjfff, jf f XXWX X ff fff f ffm! W ff ff w f, , f f WV, M ,f ff' 4, 5,Z7,?5!f7'gf'1",-1,44 ,ij W! 17 ,540 ,gg "-- k,g2g4"f,.-yifff-Vggkff ,V.-- 2 fkk- 2 22,1-f,L'c WUT: Af Z y-',5',?yi5 '7'X,'f? K, V W 'f cfigfj "Q f -ffl!!-W, f !f,?ff,fff.,,f,y.f,fmfffkfffyyf 1,77 .,q, ,,,,,,, K, ,I , WM! 4' fzfv-A-fdfy, frgfwgww Hiwyy- Zvi , yi , , . - ,nrzilhfgviui 0166 The USS FLOYD B. PARKS departed San Diego on April 15, 1959 at 0830 with DESDIV ELEVEN enroute to the Western Pacific Operating Area via Pearl Harbor. After refueling and two days of liberty and recreation at Waikiki and Honolulu, the Parks headed for the island of Guam for an extensive two week Ship Repair Facility availability. On 18 May the Parks was underway from Apra Harbor for the Formosa Patrol making a short visit to Buckner Bay, Okinawa for refueling. The Arduous Patrol commenced 25 May with the PARKS using Kao-Hsiung, Formosa as her base of operations and only liberty port. Upon completion of this operation, the division sailed for Subic Bay, Philippine Islands for a destroyer tender availability from 22 Iune until 5 Iuly. While in Subic Bay, the PARKS and the other three ships of DESDIV ELEVEN represented the United States at the Filipino-American Fiesta celebrating the independence of both countries on the 4th of Iuly. In Subic Bay, the PARKS embarked eight Midshipmen from various NROTC units and the U.S. Naval Academy for participa- tion in the 1959 Midshipman West Pac Cruise. Upon leaving Subic Bay, the division ioined the USS HORNET for advanced ASW exercises which were to keynote the PARKS operation for the re- mainder of the West Pac deployment. From these operations, the entire Hunter-Killer Group steamed towards the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong for a well-deserved period of recreation and sight-seeing in the "Emerald of the Orient." On Iuly 23 the PARKS left Hong Kong with the division and ac- companied the HORNET to Tsushima Straits for coordinated ASW exercises with units of the Iapanese Maritime Self Defense Forces and land-based patrol aircraft. After this exercise, the PARKS pulled into Sasebo, Iapan on August 4th and settled down for an eight day tender availability. Typhoon Ellen, however, blew in from the China Sea and cut down the work period as well as curtailing liberty. Typoon con- dition of readiness Il was set and maintained for three days. During this period the embarked Midshipmen departed for the United States. The PARKS then re-ioined the HORNET for more ASW work prior to entering Nagoya, Iapan for a week of liberty and recrea- tion. While in Nagoya preparations were made for "Operation Tall Dog," which involved a maior portion of the units of the Seventh Fleet. The exercise provided valuable training under simulated war-time conditions and was the operational highlight of the Cruise. Alter a two week Ship Repair Facility availability at Yokosuka, Iapan, the PARKS was scheduled to depart with DESDIV ELEVEN on September 'llth for San Diego, but world tension over the in- vasion of Laos by the Communists caused the division's tour to be extended in WestPac, and the ship left Yokosuka for Subic Bay instead. Shortly after passing south of Formosa and out-running Typhoon Sarah, the division ioined with attack aircraft carrier HANCOCK for operations in the South China Sea before entering Subic Bay September 19. On September 21 the PARKS headed home via Guam and Pearl Harbor. San Diego was truly a wel- come sight. mi1-GB:r'-EQizmmu-Tf--'-:f- Un ' Ill Ill 11nlm mi-,ian ,W ,-i,....,...,Kx.r...1,. -u. -,... ---Y.....:T,. ,.. 3-1:-1-..-.'.u .....--1 1 --- LW - . , , ,, 7446! WMM: X -qi iN 4 li 144 ff "QQ-ox-,,, fx 0 rf 1 H, , , , Q 1 I 1'- Z! 1' 0, C 1, ' 4 v of 1 U ' . g 1 44 . Q 01 2 il , i I M 1 L 5 , 1 I , E f 2 Q V , 1 1 E 5. 1 . N , , IV 1 5 N t 5 X , 4 2 , , , S V X H fl ''x-.'HeFwvEm1KEUQ1f'gf gfmqgmfvpizryxrygvgnirplfv-1::W-' Qqrgggifl H 1, fi z uemg g Bpfxiteflfi - ,tmggigigif 'Y : 3. "6 ' ' ig -A , ,.. H.. 0-r' G og 5 ' lx v',-'jk 61, 'c C'1'3g r-11211 ' X,'1l1 O '5, '? X ' ,L L" ' lv 'wi' ,r, '15, Q H 1. 5 7 3 " 5 V I IFA to I -"I 'Ht 4,5 07 ' l , k . . 1 , , , .,,, ,V 5 .. ' ,l- 0 iff' ,, ,Q ' H, U 4" 3. "','V QI I Q f 1.351 ' . 3 .O D, Ant v NAL Aff! "xt 1' ""' 5 XA ' AQ," Q f fx f , ' VX L ' If A - . .. ul ' :AR ff' ' , ' K I.',5 I E ' p f2 , 1 I 1 . Af, X 4 , .', ,f , . q ,,, 0 f - .uc ,fr . , f I A ,D I ' - , , A . , I . 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C 1 fx J '- IO.-CE EVERETT DIANE WINTER PAT WISNER Y f X7 L ff- M 5 f f f Q f fo -M - ' 64: f -4 2-pw-My-Q...Z.-2.--f . f.Ww..f.- ...f ff,gM- awww- zyf- f-- z-ff wf.-W.-',...-WW.. y.4..f,ty,.W,..,.., .,gpfg4M, f,.-fwyy,W-wW...,,.,.4f,,..-WMA. f ,f,f.fi.fzi Ei. fx ffifzff-it -' .4 Q zfffgfnygfyfy of-'ffisfffl f f'-'yew--WW Q.-4.-ffy.. W.1z 4:2 .rp ' TQW-Q?-WWQ'2-fn-W-W , , f14f::f2?2fvfiztiiff 'ypfff 451.24-wav -U ,.-ww! ' .7,,.ff,..v47fM9' Wg ,..y,.:1f,,.uy6y1Q 51,035 . ,,, .vw ,...,,...,, ,,..,,,,.. ... ow., .V If fy, ., ft, , ,., ,,.. ,.-s,,.-m-wfs- fs-V sf SMMQW ..-y -yy.-f gf 1, frlpffwcr qw-yf"fv-vff'f ffs-'Mnf-vfs".s'Z:",x'W, E' , L vyi'JQ'LJ'iGf'i12 'UW' 42" SYZSV'!g'YWWffif',-W4-Sfffi SW? .SVGQISSTQGV f!fi'!Q'QWQ6' 557 -'fi 1. f, -4 . . .. .. f ., .. . .- X IVE w.-fm.-4iff4'.Jb ff JL I5 if -Q f s Zak W 52. - 2 - f S2,5h!Af',.-P .iyfil !Z'7'Vp'7fi" 4,-'4 V00 -"ff5Z4'us-'Effo .ff .ff ! 'If' ff"4-"f ff f--9 J , , t, . ,.,, , M., . , 4, - -3 swf f M221Q,"'f.".3:..gf.if,'P rw.....'4.1a,..,...,.fp,xt,'.-fzxwt 2-'fv.-4-M fi-nw er.-w..-f,.w,f.ff 9 WW,-1" " l ITEM-SAN DIEGO EVENING TRIBUNE: "DADDY HASN'T SEEN HER- ' ' Mrs. Shirley White holds her 6-week-old daughter, Su Ann, for her first photo. The Evening Tribune is sending the photo to her father, RD1 William White, of the USS FLOYD B. PARKS, a Destroy- er now at Hong Kong." x -We f-.,m,-,Zuni f 'f -f.w.f w--zSw,Q..-M..-W,f'.5 ,w 1.11, zz, f , fgffyf ffffkyc f X f , X, . , ,X X ff ff... Ml... ...K 4, kg, gy I t l Idtsi 1 if lisi ,ssi tw X ,'t',t gfgyf: fi X M . ', I, , ,c,u,,,. 5.222 Vi' ,. X xg, r,,' ...I ,spyii , , . M .ff y V +., , , ,Lf . 5- J ' V ,,....f? I I ,t.V , ? . i .1 , . V M- Yr X VK K ., 7 lrkk .1 , K.: V U .k.,., ,, , . ..r I .5 g llg. , E . I? wg glsg t l.ll A H .-,V , I . . Q I V " , ' U . KSVI wx K K V ff. KL' , I' , X' g ' f r'.,' . I I ',"'i' V M V ,Y if , ' ' , . T, . , '.'. ,, 1. . g.gt Af by VA N7 , .V ,, I .gg I 5 A Stragglers are usually thought of as "the ten per cent who don't get the word." However, most of the men pictured here were standing watches at camera trme. Front Row: W. C. Roberson, G. Recio, Ir S d R ' ' ' econ ow. L. A. Herrera, R. P. Ielenlckr, I. E. Shaw. Third Rowr R. E. Benfield, T. G. Iohnson, H. T. Adler, S. C. Donson. ..-... :g4.,..-.aff-...srsig. ...- -J'-H. 4 H.. t -.- f " A ' I ' " ' I ' R -R. E. 4. 144. 44.44 4-. M- ws 1 - V , A, Ugg: J 0 H. WA. ,,k,,,. Y, 7777 W-Y v...- V V .. ..... ML .,f:,f,1,A: ,, . 1 .-...s..4,m.pu---w qvma-Awgngaw-'up Ze Our tr1p back to the States was saddened by the loss of GEORGE BENTLEY SF1 who passed away September 23 as a result of a heart at tack Bes1des being a capable and wlllmg worker BENTLEY will always be remembered for hrs cheerful disposition by his shzpmates aboard the PARKS On the left the Squadron Chaplam conducts a Memorial Service for BENTLEY on the fantarl On the right is probably the last plc ture ever taken of BENTLEY as he Jolned m wxth his guztar during a Happy Hour held at sea Rescued from the HANCOCKS crashed helicopter the Pilot and Inspectwn GY Sublc BUY crewman smile before being transferred back to the carrier I 4lll1 u . I 1 ' . . . - - . . . . . . 1 1 . I - . - . . a u ' . . - . . . . u 1 o U I I I u . . .u 1 . . 1 ll 1 "Congratulations, Chief!" "ALLMAN wins a camera." r - f f IRR0-GRAPHIC CRUISEBOOK STAFF lf EDITOR . . LTIG T. P. JAMES, JR. Produced by TYPIST ..... BARCELQNA, FN 'HEUL'QfQ'f,,Z2V2'Qf"' PHQTQGRAPHER. . DESMARAIS, FTSN san 0:32 com' SUBSCRIPTIONS . . . H .,.-, VJ. V. .:,,,.q. ,,, ., , - .-, , ,,, - : '- 1 4-And-1 ' a"1 'Vai' ' "" ' '.' 1... 1 ' I4 4. W m,,,,,,,W H,:,.,.,,,-..-,.'.V-f.-.A,...,,-1,f...'f-n-J, - -uf ,-f - .' . f 4- - - V ' , x .,., ,X-. . . . , . .. . ,-1.1 gr' 1 . . . . ,- X . . 1- ,, 4. ',. .- ' ,' ' ,,2 -,1v.'.'-w"1,, 'V'. ' ' f - V. E... -1 - '---' "'-.. '- -J' .- '- '- ' 'ff +......g.. vw-f..'1--wa .Jw zu .sx-J' Q, A- ur- wffnlrqxvQ4+.1..-'X-xf....'44.:.,..la4-A4xq:ck-:nf-.ie.,4ikli"ili'1k4i.4J-H4aauiziir-.nh-I Ja' ' .Ay . . r. -L . 1- . ' - '


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