Flora Stone Mather College - Polychronicon Yearbook (Cleveland, OH)

 - Class of 1945

Page 1 of 146

 

Flora Stone Mather College - Polychronicon Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 146 of the 1945 volume:

1945 H 7 Vi ' th " 5 ix , ,Af , f '. 'Ti '-' "fl - U ' 'll ,pm 'till ,1 "' ' 4 by 'ff at-1' 1 a ll f' " 112.3 ,I p wh' iz , - K :V I li t --WA t ll ,,, F11 IW: F OREWORD There seem to be two Worlds. We live in the ivy-towered one, the world almost as far re- moved as any could be from the maelstrom of the World of the War. Ours is the world which by virtue of our status as college students sep- arates us from the whirl of the war plants, from the training of the services. Basically it is the same world as that of other citizens-the routine reality of life, the commonplace of every day. The only difference is that our routine touches the exclusive realm of academic learn- ing, of technical specialties, rather than the everyday part of the war. The other world so rarely really touches us. That world is the actual and yet distant world of the war, with Saipan or peace conferences seemingly poles apart from the courses We take and the daily run of college life. It is only once in a while that the whirling terror of a far-off war dips down and breaks into the smooth sur- face of our serene college life, and, having hit like a raindrop in a pool of water, causes the circles of sympathy to widen and reach out until they touch us all. But the raindrops are falling faster this year. We cannot speak for those who have undergone the searing pain of losing someoneg for ours has been only the comparatively far easier lot of helpless sympathy for the grief of others. Now and then a dear friend, an acquaintance . . . and then there is only the questioning ache and the emptiness, and the hope that perhaps just our friendship will help. Then the feeling rises, Why are we here? Why should we enjoy a life of comparative ease when our friends and relatives, our classmates, are living and dying through the Belgian break-through or Iwo J imag when everyone else is suiering? There are many trite phrases going loose, de- scribing a future "better World." The phrases will die out, but there is still the world, and it is a sorry place. The world-society-is giving us four years in college because it wants trained people to make a "better world." It will be up to us to strive for anything that can aid that goalg to provide the trained hands for it. We will become part of the educated middle class this country is going to needy we will have to fight for the peace, at home . . . Dr. White told us how. But noblesse oblige ten years hence is not allg right here and now there are things that need to be made better. College training perhaps won't help as much in improving our own small Worldsg but anything we can do to alleviate the pressure of society's burden today is in slight payment for our debt to those who are fighting. There is also the culture and the education to be preserved-but that would be another essay. Society today, weary of war, is giving us four years in college, and this is a record of one of them. We are only transmitting to paper the life we see. May it be even better as recorded for the Polychronicon of 1946. il CONTENTS 4 Foreword ........ 2 Dedication ...... 4 Frontispiece ..... 6 Administration .... ....... 1 0 Faculty ...... ------- 1 1 Seniors ..... -.---.- 2 6 Graduation .... ....... 4 8 May Day ........ ......- 5 0 Class of 46 ...... ....... 5 4 Class of 47 ...... ....... 6 0 Class of 48 .......,. .......... 6 3 Monthly Events ...... ....... 2 ........ 78 Organizations ....... .......... 8 6 Sororities ..,... ....... 1 10 Advertising ....... ....... 1 23 -- E DEDIC TE This POLY CHRONICON to DR. WILLIAM HENRY TAEUSCH Friend to fill, his outstancliiig quality was the irispircitioii foimfl in his classes .... Mather said farewell to Dr. Tcieiisch last fall, cmd Wooster's gairi is 0-ur loss .... but the 'memory cmd the spirit of his being here will long remain. DR. WILLIAM HENRY TAEUSCH UR WORLD-this corner of college-is limited yet, to our life of learning, of working, of easy camaraderie from day to day, and of true friendships found. Bat the horizons are broadening as we read of others, think of others, on far distant horizons, and prepare ourselves to meet the challenge they give to ns. ,, 1 11 - 111' ', ' 2 .1 1 1,. xy 11 A -19.-.1-Gig' 1 ' 4- .1 11 1215. 111111 1i1f-'1 . 1 ': rf N111 1 ' 4..-+.1.1.f.. , lisa 11.1 -111,5 ' 1 111p,'1'11 111':.,,A "' " "'111111"' Wm' 111 152-1571 ' ,Q A-, ,, 1 1 I.-.215-I -4'-M-'V"'4"' ' ' 1 -at-iff--1 1 W .l . .,, 529 1 ,. ,' 1x!:'1'L-. 1.43 1' ,- I1g,11:., . ,.-e1 .1 xv ,415 -. :E g-4, VE' .,-1 X ' 81 -1 wig: 49 ix ' -f2:z1.., 't-1 1 3, S -., '-,rm E " ', X: 11 :,.- A .,. 1 I xg J! 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" '-SHA ESPEA E 776' OC 551V K FRHNLE Mg ,TER HFRICH 9 C OCEFIN QNERN t Q INDIFIN OCEFIN M5 HUSTRRX.-lA ADHGAS C NK 'FASMIQ l DEA DOLA Dean Eleanor F. Dolan's arrival at Mather coincidedlwith that of the present seniors, but in her four short years here she has learned all the ins and outs of the university-both pleasant and unpleasant. Her youth- ful Cand charming, appearance belies her mature Wisdom and under- standing. She handles knotty problems with amazing speed and ease, and her gracious manner is not easily ruffled. Besides other numberless duties which claim her time, she acts as class dean to the freshmen, most of Whom she knows by name. We hope that Miss Dolan is as proud of Mather as Mather is of her. sg ig mx: W wh mm m Som w W wwf lgfhzfh saw LF sm may-m sms sw sm mmm ' s Q s V, rg.w?5gma ,W --- ag,-a sa E Nl.E1gKgf...iij:sf1w new li glfiilizlii E ,EZSWQQ S- ggi W -X Wmmgs-2slaa.alai-.. ESM E , Era s w a E a a H - H waaaaaglsijfigggr its wx ",, H W f m m is I A M25-FS digg Q s,ugl.gs..aa a. my W a H B i E' sign Wanna-s,.a..ffa-fwfr '-Fliillillw a1.,ruQa.l..s. 'H H W-we .E H Qfaisalf-if Ewaa W fi as s : :E H E M saws aa.. W V E H E W Q E W S ' S xmglggmermaaiaigaiailil B all as mwmig W at-me a arm B a..f..,.,a N H a M as Q B aa ,N ,W it H Emily R. Andrews Physical Education Chief of Phys. Ed .... you'll like her even if you hate gym . . . writer, sculptor, and painter as well . . . Tal- ents in many fields, friends in many places. Donald Grove Barnes History The portly "Voice" with the distinc- tive haircut and the brief-case loaded with western civilization and English history . . . snappy lecturer . . . and term papers must be in on time. Harold Adams Sociology The twinkle in his eye betrays his classroom sternness. Charles C. Arbuthnot Economics Hammers economics into us under watchful eyes of Molly, his police dog . . . Handsome and white-haired, he can out-argue any would-be economist . . . Famous for his nifty ties. Sarah Field Barrow En glish Her quiet charm and gracious manner puts students at ease . . . scholarly ap- proach to English . . . has published several books and translations of noted works . . . firm believer in Eng- lish as base of education. sm as is s we sms is Bm - as M gr H H 3 Q H ig, W sais all E Victoria Ball Home Economics Mather girls learn tricks of the cloth- ing trade under her skillful guidance . . . Mrs. Ball plans wardrobes on a budget . . . but always looks as though she'd spent a million or two on clothes. Franklin J. Bacon Pharmacy and Botany Administrative officer of Squire Val- levue Farm . . . handsome and very college-professorish looking with his pipe . . . head of School of Pharmacy . . . busy man, he's also on Student Activities Committee. 12 Theodor W. Braasch German Conducts his classes outdoors in spring . . . genial and lenient . . . en- deavors to make the principles of Ger- man grammar and syntax as painless as possible. Stanley Butler Music Counter-point, harmony and just plain notes are his work . . . A most pleas- ant personality . . . a fine musician . . . a more-than-adequate teacher. as ss Clarence P. Bill Classics "When in Rome" . . . teaches college students in a college manner . . . pleasant, dignified, and very compe- tent. Harold S. Booth Chemistry A master chemist, a thorough teacher . . . Encourages initiative-you "think it out yourself" . . . jolly . . . marvel- ous intellect. William G. Cole Rev. Cole, the University Chaplain and assistant pastor at "Covenant" . . . also just plain "Bill", he's one friendly person and a grand friend . . . looks like another student, but his sermons have the wisdom of age. -is ss in 5 ,haf Q -A . lgatwxtm E. S in ss E! 'H nl Q E , ...singly ga tw . E as .E - 5 H , m saws B ss in an sisgfw Q e . W, fum. - .m- mmm eil an ss H. gm E e X as .W. R S . 1 ,. H the ss: we W Amy Bishop English Tactful to a fault . . . likes to know lots of people . . . her conversation in- trigues, her classes interest. Marion Cleaveland Chemistry Her limitless patience is marvellous, we think-she'll explain a dozen times . . . A genial personality and a bril- liant mind . . . does research in fer- mentation. ' if Q M ss sf an -is as 1: as s H s it E5 552452 msg . ki? 'Ears Ea , in ss . H .2 T ...mik- ss s an . 55 . e .BB ' ss . E E s s 1-' ss - s . - W s . s s H B M is ' s s . J H - E s H. H E. s ss s -iss W. .E - - E. H B H s H sa is E BEE fm . E H s mga at sl E B M as E E a B B sg H ages W X H, W. ,Maw E H ,Eye H maim Bi BZ iw B E nl nl mm W H H H H E H W E wie amass ms as Hmm Es ZF- as sw tow... B B H E H B W5 ws M H H ' . m -E lm W. at sem wy-:ss j Q gm-Zeigfff Sl figs?-guy 5135 sl Sze 155.15755 Sam M -Hag Wm me Yi we H H was H B sd H was ,sg H tm is tr 5 5 E 5 H ' ?: H 5 5 H Mary E. Collett H me H E as H E E - f W H Q 5 52,2 M E B H sm S is Physiology U-w-mf was -fi fe as s ,H sy W 1 . . , ggi? 3 H H Pt . H H 5 gg BUSY, Sympathetic, with a qulet sense M W B H of humor . .. . has an enormous and B W highly 1nfect1ous interest in her work 5 Q 5 ME . . . makes science come ahve for B -as-sg ecveryone . . . students learn and like 1 . maid mm a ss E Kwai! E B . Sjgftws H E H B WI.- sgz It fgjggng -E M ,,,, E ,X W S .X 5:5 E 55 Q .M e James E. Cutler H H H E l .Exilim Tet? es' . E H Sociology 'E fiat? H H Elgimslffigil E W3 Skis .ES W S - - dl. E E gf,WgLgls., qwgMgi.gf,lm E -1 W-eu iympathetic personality . . . a well- l gfgigw' H ygj W B W H 5' liked man . sold on the idea of field E mfg 5 so it 5 H gg topics in SOC10l0gy . . . quiet, deliber- : fs: - is W :ax W . E ate, and Very Capable- H .H 5 .. :gs ss ,fgigme W 'Q at is-lm T s E gifs-1515 E W:-s E assi? s Z' is ' rg: gg ? :S B 5 B 2 Q s ,. E H .Qj5Qmt5?s. as jjfV5.s5s i , H - essex- H , was H asm-2 :Hrs It H Dorothea Dolg E HBA E ' 5 B SS Hz W Xi H 5 ' ' B 5 H 5 ?j Music BFE Her quiet charm and poise make one's ,ug E 5 L my ggi entrance into the music house a pleas- -H H an' experience. 55 H Elizabeth P. Lam E W Q a o his S: 5 H Biblical Literature 35 ' v 1 Came to Reserve this year from Occi- lle e in California . . . tall, drawl and a B E-its . 6 s mr mm dental Co g Well-dressed . . . Southern delightful laugh . . . her classes are Versatile, she has writ- B' SS . Riagg . lg gxekgu E531 S8 mm W . .ii . .-.H tggsgisggrx taggsgasgfw' . Ska in E X si? H S s 'H ff S -X E B H H informal W S8 S8 S8 E 5 1 a 5 5 : if 2 H H E ten articles on fine art. E E ,. - i E Sliimtgffg? lf ZW: magna:-H lm sim WW K- sS'U?w 'fs-its 's fm W H yzw H f s gg 5 H W E 3 A as H s H - 2 1 fa 5 Henly F. Donnel B E B S8 B rm are gsm H my as Geology H D' if 5 ggi? H .tg , -ffm ,, The University oi: Michigan's gift to 1 E ' B H E WRU . . . memories told of a trip in E South Africa fascinate students . . . gm .E mu postwar plans include a return trip M 5 ? 1, was E EA 55 E Q for more geologic research. ll n E 5,35 i. S 2 N Walter T. Dunmore Died January 23, 1945. Q Q mx. E as xliu E H EQ me E 1 BEE sz-1 misss ss-1 w E ss ss M ll ug- gaqy a a A as H gms shgamgn s Es .H E E 5 s swam B Xi was as as mx M as H gas as Hwang E me at - s E swim Said wma 'Bm si E x mmm eww la W ss lm V 5 m.gi,,?B,Qsg is E trim ,. E .E H H s ', , was ' nm- , s L l' an W Lat so Sn in K W W. -X M so "W s m W E m m E Eiwmie E ass ESQ ming -' BSS W News H 49' H M mojo E E E H Agnes Dureau French the French cross tite ily identified by a charming, pe nse of it x H Eas u is 55 on her blouse . . . Ke H Qian. PM K- s ge B E Ugg? Z. B Frenchwoman with an alert se 22: S- .3 Egg humor . . . she's eager to help stu- ? E E dents . . . president of American Asso- W E E clation of Teachers of French. A ' S5 H ,i S Cornelia Edmondson 5 Physical Education 2 Q53 'B From North Carolina . . . likes to e 5 W sweets, play tennis, and teach modern H - dancing . . . and she has her classes H make up thelr own modern dances 5 W she's as sweet as her accent. ? -. s lil? . En- t s a H B 3 B H B s H a H . H B B Wi nl nl Ei Mef.f.l..s LUL5ii?g ff-X1 all W -ev E E H ,ati-M'-.steel atm ,ss B B W Q. H H B H ? E 2 H s 5 B H B ws H H ' W- Bi E , Mast, an at if m- E Max H. Fisch Philosophy His likable personality reveals a phil- osophy of his own. Russell L. Gee Music Choral groups are his specialty, and he gets good results . . . a gay man- ner, and an irrepressible grin . . . and a master musician. Charles E. Gehlke Sociology He's a first-rate criminologist, and has been on a leave of absence this year with the War Labor Board of the United States Government . . . He'll be back on Mather campus in October. Gerardl S. Gentile Dramatics Arts He used to help classes with their struggles in staging stunts. Blanche Harvey Home Economics Has classes in the Home Ec house all day-but also keeps ofice hours in Mather Ad, for harried Juniors look- ing for advice . . . a charming per- sonality, a lovely lady. Albert C. James Banking Banking and Finance is his field . and he knows it well. Gerhard Krebs Political Science One has to take careful notes during his lectures. William E. Lawrence Sociology Frequent flashes of humor in his classes . . . he likes to demonstrate the antics of monkeys to his Anthro- pology classes . . . competent and capable, and interesting besides. 15 EE si was gs as s .E use NESS S9 s s sis .- BHK s E s s an s s x sa is s W 2 s ss. si' s was .NEMWS E-me s s is 9? s as s all. s s n was E511 as as s WSWS H me E se as me H -in-.ws -fanart-'sr was mga Wzkgs gg. we H 2-2 sa. H sggsmsfflggsssl-eww-.im H B B . s s s sw rf s s s s swam sm s 1 B--FAQS? s s was 1- as s -EH ,-'E H as SSE saw S. s s I . . --WN' .Haw s E , s ,., . M K s a s .. Hamm age -me: sa me H mam sm-is E all ,5,,w.,s ' Q -isis E nl SS E53 EH nl Ii H 5 s Q was as sms sam H s H and IEEE E as use my News BNA nl HE swim H me age H E as sas ass s s ll s s if as as s s new emma asm saws :- me s sms as as if s . s me .s W sms sms s as W s s ss, ,lg s s Eggs 5-E sw s .,EgM.E ,Ewa me was we s 1 s A H E ms!! ESS HKS Bmw mm BEEN s sms New H s as s Xmm is SS s B488 me H me .se may hi mm H sam RRG? SSB I HS E H H: s E s -P 5 we ' his sl? we H H .s as asv- -Q sw s s as , Q .W EW. mn Er-:H s as sm SP1-fam H use s xsgfga W gs A E5 M H ma, N -A E, XG Q ,Wes H slugs s E. ESS s sa. B bs-, H- E mzsggcis Em xi EWQBE Q 8833888 at M355 sas-Q saw sp,- .H Ziyi?" ss .aw-H spam HB5 s Hes s H7 me s. -X Sims- s- s Hamlin sir s if E -fr ns K s as s s sis - a n asw- s sus s Hamm s s s 5 s 1 is is E K- EGRL H Bi as as Www like H s s s agree E we . we as was K D me M as s S8 mms' 'UAE Kiln-A RWM s H' :E at W' H was sims s all me s me ns am me sm mea s s stairs new mx me me sas s s as N M. My s .i s as s an H s s s i s s K s s ,s as sms sm w as is s as as s s EE HB sew H s sz s me s s s is all s s as 2 s s s mass n is as B si s s me s s s sam s me s s s s s s s s Es E E me E as E E me E E E E S E Ks E ESS SS H .H E E E .. E E E E wg .H is E E E E sk-is , E E E s-M as E K . -H B Q ss E sl Q -- SEHK? BB SS s s s K E we ass, .am We H Es x-x W as as s E B me Bas-' mms gs B me is s Calvin S. Hall Psychology Psychologist supreme . . . of the Freudian school . . . He keeps his iirst- year classes busy learning fundamen- tals . . . has a hearty laugh-and laughs often. Mildred Hart Romance Languages Moliere, Racine, Descartes-always well-interpreted by gentle Miss Hart, head of the Romance Language De- partment . . . rarely seen without a gracious greeting for everyone, and her pet dog Janie. Amos H. Hersh Biology A terrific interest in heredity and ter- rific success in breeding fiies . . . a true scientist . . . a fine lecturer. Christine H. Hillman Home Economics Genial and gracious . . . Mather grad- uate, Theta alum . . . adviser to In- tersorority Council . . . and mother and professor to the home ec students at May Squire house. Frank Hovorka Chemistry Guiding light of the chemistry majors . . . "You'll love physical chemistry" . . . He can always be counted on for any manner of helpful advice . . . his kindness and sympathy temper the hard blows of the returned blue books. Helen A. Hunscher Home Economics Head of Home Ec-and does she know her subject! . . . advocates lots of vita- mins and follows up with reasons why . . . "hard teacher," but well-liked. Charles W. Huntley Psychology Tall, boyish-looking dean of Adelbert . . . he raises Dalmatians . . . and he raises much interest in his lectures, which are lucid and well-organized as well as stimulating . . . his exams are stimulating, too,-in a harrowing sort of way. William F. Kieffer Chemistry His assured manner in Chemistry class belies his boyish appearance . . . outlines and lectures are well-organ- ized . . . a good teacher, he lays a firm foundation for advanced chem classes. gi 16 Herman P. Lankelma Chemistry Teaches chemistry with an explicit outline and an ever-present smile . . . he does research Work at the Standard Oil Laboratory, with an office at the power house . . . popular, he's a won- derful personality, a wonderful guy. Christian L. Larsen Political Science - Quiet and unassuming, he's an ideal lecturer, for his lectures outline them- selves . . . has 'a good sense of humor . . . and a passion for mid-monthly quizzes. Barclay S. Leathem Dramatic Arts Straightforward -- no punches are pulled . . . informal, yet definite, he knows all the ins and outs of his sub- ject . . . hobnobs with the best men in the theatre business . . . a hard but satisfying taskmaster. John T. McCarthy Physics Matherites find Physics lab a little easier because of his helpfulness . . . very young-looking . . . but with a stern air of dignity impressive to stu- dents laboring through his courses. Jacob C. Meyer History Brilliant . . . unlimited energy . . . his lectures are punctuated by vigor- ous gesturing and waving of his glasses . . . "Siehst du?" . . . his keen sense of humor plus a vast store of knowledge make his classes a sheer delight. Nadine Miles Dramatic Arts A former Matherite, Well-liked by all . . . for her pleasing personality as Well as her willingness to share the benefits of her extensive dramatic ex- perience . . . and she's indispensable, come Stunt Night. Clement A. Miller Music He's considered tops over at the music department . . . the rest of the campus would do well to get to know him. Jared S. Moore Philosophy Brown eyes and white hair give him a striking appearance . . . gives method- ical and detailed lectures . . . never misses a trick, never is at a loss. . , H .Eff 1,-E .,- P F? Harry W. Mountcastle Physics and Astronomy A fine and respected teacher . . . fer- vent admirer of Newton and Cavend- ish . . . his favorite phrase Qspoken with a twinkle in his eyej is, "The word 'student' is rapidly becoming ob- soletef' Ruth L. Porter Physical Education Peppy red-head . . . sports expert and a past master at the art of making others knock themselves out . . . that sometimes satiric exterior covers a very kind heart. J. Rogers Musselman Mathematics He seldom smiles, but you can't miss that twinkle in his eye . . . even the most unmathematically minded can grasp his simple and clear explana- tions . . . he takes time to advise the Record staff, too. Newbell N. Puckett Professor of Sociology Delves into different and interesting phases of Sociology . . . reserved, but with a friendly smile and a nice slow Southern drawl . . . a mild-mannered professor with a very pleasant per- sonality. Katherine H. Porter English As sophomore dean, she stresses lib- eral arts in helping make out sched- ules . . . she's digniiied, with a soft voice and beautiful white hair . . . in- sists upon note-taking and original thinking . . . has annual student teas at her apartment. Arthur Shepherd Music Criticism doesn't hurt coming from this mild-mannered head of the music department . . . he is well-liked for his unassuming attitude . . . and wide- ly acclaimed for his abilities as com- poser and musician. 18 Earl L. Shoup Political Science Gets in a plug for Kansas now and then . . . likes to give exams that take five hoursg must be written in two . . . has just Written a textbook for the beginning course . . . often launches into discourses about homesteading in the West. Marion C. Siney History History her profession, the Balkans her specialty . . . quietness and charm, these are hers . . . she enjoys having students in for wonderful teas at her apartment. Audrey Sims Psychology H Our lady psychologist . . . has a wealth of experience which serves to make psych lectures more interesting . . . sweet smile, soft voice. William G. Simon Mathematics, Arts and Sciences Has all the Mather students swooning over his bushy, black eyebrows. Sym- pathizes with Mather hopes for a big- ger and better university. John Hall Stewart History Plus his duties as history professor, he takes time out to direct the Re- serve band . . . tall, slim and smiling . . . an expert on the French Revolu- Helen W. Smith tion and Napoleon. Physical Education Variety makes her gym classes inter- esting . . . her energy makes them exhausting . . . a flash of lightning on the hockey field . . . never forgets a name. if. ,se '4 G H-J s s , mm: when sm sus as us: nn- Q mn nfs me-. s s mms ms s ss ss 5 E -fm :B'5'E"s's'mw gf wfssmsmagmn sim ss: W- rss s WWE ass' .sms Egxmigsxs mg?-E Q ss s E mag,-Eg E i-x ss gxyfgg' ggi ml gffgggrmwrgxe si E A 5 W 9-sz?-iss-ts ms ml :Emma .W- -:Bs We-'m is 5 in s in B ggest. st. ss as sr sf. is-ss E? we me s s s W-x as w s na ss as ss s sxm-x is-m m B ' w H s s . .Z S' I E, Qs: si s ligne s s g-s mmm-in s s ms msg s ss: Kill use m 2 sew-E75 ,.. -5 . yigg .sf E Ei s 5, s s 5 ENT W W W W, s E W Epi .s 6-xx s X. E s my me as mx sm as-mf m-Rx s. 5 Q.. si. is . is agen an -1 s sm-iz M sig M, we . M. . wma? s was Q sf-sw s 5 gil:- ss- S. w sm ss. s as sux mQg sf-aux assi msg si- s s it 5 -s s eu- 5. s if sswsmnx -ms is mug sm- was ss: BE in as ss- s-mg Wg. Mg mai t . E Bk We B525 tm W ss -gr. n-idx: W s w W. as sz nm as .gg K- 3 msn sr s s s it .. Eg H 2-is s s x ea ss-f s s sms s fs mm m 'ms X - '35-E153 s .i 1 E 1-is W msmg E Millicent Swain English Kindly and sweet . . . delights classes with anecdotes about trips abroad . . . Thackeray and Wordsworth are her favorites . . . recites poetry with feel- ing, giving students an appreciation of the beauty of Chaucer and others. Henry W. Taeusch English Although he left us last year for the greener fields of Wooster, his memory still lives on this campus. Eleanor W. Thomas English Charm and dignity of the Old South personified . . . Shakespeare is her speciality . . . she inspires students to put that "extra something" in com- position . . . a rare flash of her sense of humor will create delighted laugh- ter in her classes. Alice E. Treat Home Economics Left the campus to take over the dining room at the College Club. John P. Visscher Biology Head of the biology department . . . interesting and excellent lecturer- but oh, those diagrammatic tests! . . . guides freshmen through the terrors of beginning biology courses. Carol Wheeler Home Economics As Head Dietician, she directs the gustatory experiences of all dormi- tory students . . . she is quiet . . . looks young enough to be a student. Wilbur W. White Political Science Red-haired, gravel-voiced . . . crams his lectures with accounts of the "craziest darn thing you ever saw" . . . gets a big bang out of life in gen- eral, people in particular. Ethel M. Williams Spanish Ethel M. Williams is no longer Ethel M. Williams, and is no longer a mem- ber of the Spanish department. She is now Mrs. W. L. Plimpton of Wor- cester, Massachusetts. CAMERA SHY Clarence B. Allen Education Authority on education . . Mild, easy- going manner and very likable . . . fills lectures with anecdotes illustra- tive of his droll sense of humor as well as of his wide teaching experi- ence. Moffatt G. Boyce Mathematics Even math, his field, cant confuse him . . . sense of humor helps students through classes . . . informal man- nor. 7 Vivian R. Damerell Chemistry Inadvertent founder of the U33 Club" . . . well-known to struggling Quant students . . . brilliant mind, but un- assuming manner-this Wins him the admiration of many. Mildred Danklefsen Geography Friendly personality shining in her- smiling brown eyes . . . foolproof ex- cuses are needed for cuts in her class . . . but her classes hate to hear the bell ring, her lectures are so inter- esting. F. Karl Grossman Music A distinguished-looking, white-haired gentleman . . . with a twinkle in his eyes . . . instrumental music is his forte, but he shows his interest in other things and other people. Arvel B. Erickson History Very academic-looking-but he once participated in professional sports . . . one of the few authorities on Russia in the city . . . don't call him "com- rade", however . . . a deep and infec- tious chuckle. Oliver J. Grummitt Chemistry Powerhouse potentate . . . professor extraordinary of advanced Chem stu- dents . . . his quiet manner can't con- ceal his brilliant mind. - Dorothy C. Hockey English Likes to wear suits . . . likes Shake- speare-fact is, that's one reason she's an English teacher . . . little spare time, so for pleasure she reads Freshman themes . . . new to Mather this year, she's already like one of the family. Marqueta C. Huyck Home Economics Quiet, with a pleasant, smooth voice and a cute grin . . . earnest and seri- ous in her lectures, but she has an appreciative and lively sense of humor . . . sympathetic, in class, but never an easy mark. Mary C. Schauffler Sociology Likes statistics and history . . . is an expert on vocations for women . . . has a kind word for all . . . guides seniors through the horrors of gradu- ation credits. Joseph Remenyi Comparative Literature If you thought the Russians uncul- tured, you won't after his class . . . he's full of vitality, a rapid-fire lec- turer . . . spirited discussions follow up interesting lectures on Russian lit- erature. Margaret Stone Biology A newcomer to Reserve, the biology department recognizes her abilities . . dry wit . . . an excellent fund of knowledge. David H. Roberts Psychology Young, with a butch haircut looks like a college student . . . blessed with a sense of humor . . . definite in his ideas, in class and out . . . uses a new and original method for calling classes to order-an ear-splitting whistle. Daniel P. Quiring Biology "Dix Q." . . . has been to Africa sev- eral times, likes to hunt big game there . . . gives interesting lectures packed with interesting details. ff ,. fy W, ,. It , . fl Elinor R. Wells, always-busy U. ff' registrar . . . her dark snap- ping eyes impress one-but can't scare those who know .Taaiffx her hearty laugh. Her tiny ll i X' inner office-the center for grades, credits, dorm rooms . . etc. ad infinitum. 'sea-' mul i X V .y i D A wiv.- E 1 n Li. 2:1 , l WV ll ,E 1 ri The oflice is really Mather's clearing house, presided over by Mrs. Pae and Mrs. Seigrist. From change for a phone call to finding lost credits, they are the genial life-savers. Registration-"such frustra- tion"-begins and ends here . . . jams the office but doesn't ruffle these two. I Catherine Stanley. "When can I see Miss Dolan?"-and Miss Stanley arranges it. Between myriad duties and milling stu- dents she keeps calm and smiling, always ready to help the bewildered student. Lois Delamater . . . one of us a year ago, she assists in the dean's ofiice . . . and gives campus tours for Visiting dig- nitaries. , f 22 xjfa ST' aa Q? I w fl! 1' 'I ILQIY f yyW1f'W'fJ Kjfil lvl 32' jlinl AU Ili WXJYIYHQJN I ltyiixx XXX, IIE XYTJJXX , ,f 'Ayr girl., .-., ,,.a- 59434 cz, fun, Ala 14 16647- WHSHINGTUN if h MONTHNH NORTH DHKOTH Ii Q -V - ' i Z x 0R6601v 'Q SOUTH IJHKOTH ik h WVUNING ,NNN A Q NEBRHSH 'V J Q3 NEVADA UTAH h h h hh .2 COLORFUJO KFK!X15H5 2 W-WL Q- ,9 h , O ,fqmofwq New Manco + KLAHOMR L , IA R83 - S.-g-.l TEXAS LJ Say, s 't never heard YI, That isdb might in youth he gott . . . 0 3 -EMER QI C? MEX 1 C Q 1 Q Q-f 4 lL JL XLL QL .LJ l .i f-"'XX Q 'N D21 y ,X 'xl-Q-.xqixiwi -lim ,f dawg K -Q J --Q , ,ff 1 I 1 w. 1 9 4" X ' ,f sw4x11:f,,.:x ,ff- f f ' 5 'Q 5 f 4, y. 5, A C L ,QV 55 Liv!! 1? , . T -.X ' K 1" v. 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W E 'Q , RU 58,1 'W '3 V Lk L A ' E" vi 25 M f 4,1353 'lp X -A ""xL-fait-xv QE., R fx? fx 'ings f 2 2 5 l g JOSEPHINE SHIRLEY BAUMAN-Sociology Cleveland, Ohiog Stunt Night 4. RUTH ANDERSON- Lakewood, Ohio. BARBARA BEISTLE- Political Science Cleveland Heights, Ohio5 Transfer5 Sweetbriar College 35 Poly Busi- ness Staff 35 Delta Phi Upsilon 35 Treasurer 45 Stunt Night 3, 45 Hadyn House Committee 45 Present Day Club 4. BEATRICE M. ANDREWS- ' Political Science Mentor, Ohiog Stunt Night 1, 2, 45 Pan American Club, President 35 French Club 35 Phi Beta Kappa 4. . THALIA HOLLAND BELL- Personnel Admin. Shaker Heights, Ohiog Transfer, Duke U. 45 Radio Club 4. MARGARET CAROLYN APPLEBY-Chemistry Cleveland, Ohio5 Stunt Night 1, 25 German Club 25 Delta Psi Omega 1, Secretary 2. JUNE BLAN KEN BURG-English Lakewood, Ohiog Class President 15 Student Council 1, 25 Stunt Night 25 May Day Chairman 25 Y.W.C.A. 25 Mather Record 2. LOUISE BARNHART- Business and Economics Cleveland Heights, Ohio5 French Club 15 Outing Board 1, 25 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Third Honors 15 First Honors 35 Class Secretary 25 Record Business staif 25 Poly Busi- ness Staff 2, Manager 35 Student Council 2, 3, President 45 War Aid 35 Tribune Business Staff 35 Delta Phi Upsilon 3, 45 Lux 4. MAIDA SIMON BLOUCH-- Sociology Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. FLORENCE L. BROFMAN- Chemistry Cleveland Heights, Ohiog Tribune 13 A.A. 13 Stunt Night 3 5 Nu Zeta Nu 3, President 4, Sociology Club 4. ERNA L. BOROUSH-Biology Cleveland, Ohio. DOROTHY AURELIA BROWN- Sociology -Cleveland, Ohiog Transfer, W. Va. State College 35 French Club 3g A.A. 3. CATHERINE BOYD Wellsville, Ohio. GLORIA A. BRUCE-Psycholo gy Cleveland, Ohiog Transfer, Howard U. 35 Sociology Club 3. GLORIA J. BREMER-Psychology Lakewood, Ohiog Stunt Night 1, 3, 4 AA. 3, 4. DORIS IRENE BUMP- Social Studies Maple Heights, Ohio, Transfer, Kent State U. 29 A.W.V.S. 2, Gamma Delta Tau, 3, 43 Interso- .rority Council 4. BETTY COOPER- Sociology Cleveland, Ohiog Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 May Day 2, 35 Phi Kappa Zeta 3, 45 Mather Record 25 Poly Staff 2, 3, 43 Class Vice President 35 Honors Chapel Chairman 3. DORIS ELAINE CAMPBELL- Dramatic Arts Cleveland Heights, Ohiog Transfer, Northwestern U. 25 Stunt Night 2, 3, 45 Radio Club 2, President 35 First Honors 2. HENRIETTA J. CRIDER- Home Economics Girard, Ohiog Transfer, Ohio Wes- leyan 35 Home Economics Club 3, 45 Stunt Night 45 A.A. 4. MARY ANN CLARK-Psychology Canton, Ohiog Stunt Night 1, 25 A.A. 1, 25 Nursing in absentia. KAY ANNE CUMMER- Cleveland Heights, Ohio. SHIRLEY CLUGH- Peninsula, Ohio. MARYANN DALLOW- Psychology, Sociology Shaker Heights, Ohiog Transfer, Allegheny College 25 Glee Club 25 A.W.V.S. 2, 35 A.A. 3, 45 Gamma Delta Tau 35 V. Pres. 45 Interso- rority Council 4. DENA DOLORES COHEN- English Cleveland, Ohio, Stunt Night 2, 3. MARGARET McLEAN DELAPLANE- Sociology Indianapolis, Indiana5 Transfer, Harcum Jr. College 35 Sociology Club 35 Stunt Night 4. ELIZABETH EBERLE - Biology Cleveland, Ohio5 University Choir 1, 35 Stunt Night 1, 2, 35 Y.W.C.A. 35 Delta Psi Omega 35 Intersoror- ity Council 35 School of Nursing 45 CHARLOTTE LEE DEMBO- Drama, English Cleveland, Ohio5 Transfer, State U. of Iowa 25 University Players 2, 3, 45 Radio Club 2, 35 War Aid 25 Tribune 2. ETHEL DEN NY EMANUEL- Sociology Cleveland, Ohio5 Transfer, Ohio Wesleyan 35 Theta Phi Omega 3, 4. CLAIRE DORAN- Classics Lakewood, Ohio5 A.A. 1, 2, Treas- urer 3, President 45 Student Coun- cil 3, 45 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 First Honors 1, 2, 35 Phi Beta Kappa 45 Mather Record 3, 45 Poly Staff 35 Curriculum Commit- tee 2, 3 5 Mather House Vice Presi- dent 35 Lux 3, 45 Delta Phi Upsilon 3, Vice President 4. JANE ANN ELLSTROM- English Cleveland, Ohio5 Stimt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Alpha Theta Epsilon 3, 4, Vice President 35 May Day 2, 45 Curriculum Committee 3, 45 Inter- sorority Council 45 All U. Carnival Committee 35 Present Day Club 45 Bulletin Board Chairman 45 Phi llieciiatlliappa 45 A.W.V.S. 2, 35 War 1 . ELEANOR FRANCES DUNHAM Social Sciences New Bedford, Mass.5 French Club 1, 2, Treasurer 3, Vice President 45 A.A. 15 A.W.V.S. 25 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Delta Phi Upsilon 3, 45 Intersorority Council Vice Presi- dent 45 Class Treasurer 4. PHYLLIS 'AUDREY EVANS- Home Economics Cleveland Heights, Ohiog Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 45 A.W.V.S. 15 Stunt Night 2, 35 May Day 25 Third Honors 25 A.A. 2, 3, 45 Gamma Delta Tau 45 Home Eco- nomics Award 2. ARLENE MARIE FRANLEY- Home Economics Cleveland, Ohio9 Class Vice Presi- dent 19 Outing Board 1, 2, 39 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 49 May Day 29 Sigma Psi Omega 3, Treasurer 49 Inter- sorority Council 49 Home Ec Club 1, 2, 3, President 49 Tribune Staff 49 Red Cross 4. PHYLLIS S. EVERHART- History Cleveland Heights, Ohio9 Univer- sity Choir 1, 29 Stunt Night 1, 2, 49 Tribune 1, 29 Poly Staff 29 A.W.- V.S. 2g Present Day Club 49 Alpha Theta Epsilon 3, 'Treasurer 4. BARBARA ANN FRIEDMAN- Psychology-Sociology Cleveland Heights, Ohio9 Transfer, Miami U. 39 Third Honors 39 So- ciology Club 49 Stunt Night 4. PHYLLIS FATICA- Political Science Cleveland, Ohio9 Reserve Rostrum lg Reserve Tribune 19 A.A. 19 War Aid 19 Mather Press Board 19 Y.W.C.A. 19 Sociology Club 29 Par- nassus 29 May Day 29 Stunt Night 2, 39 Poly Business Staff 39 Pan American Club 29 Glee Club 29 Mather Record 3, 49 Sun Dial Staff 4g President, Present Day Club 4. MARILYN FRIEDMAN- Newton, Mass. BILLIE ELAINE FEDDERY- Social Science Shaker Heights, Ohl0Q Transfer, Penn Hall Jr. College 29 Stunt Night 2, 3, 49 Poly Staif 29 Class Secretary 39 Class President 49 A.W.V.S. 29 Phi Kappa Zeta 3, Treasurer 49 Student Activities Committee 49 Student Council 49 Y-Dub Cabinet 4s Gymkhana Chair- man 4. HELEN LENNIEFRUM- Canton, Ohio. ALMA G. FIDELHOLTZ- German University Heights, Ohio9 Transfer, U. of Michigan 39 Stunt Night 3, 49 French Club 3, Secretary 49 Nu Zeta Nu 3, 4. EVELYN RUTH FUERST- English-Psychology Cleveland, Ohio, Radio Club 15 Curtain Players 15 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 4, University Players 2, 3, 45 Tribune Staff 3. Music, German MILDRED ODESSA GILMER- Cleveland, Ohio. MARY ELLEN GAUGER- Cleveland, Ohio. FRANCES MARIE GLOWE- Mathematics Shaker Heights, Ohiog Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Gamma Delta Tau 3, Treasurer 4. MARGARET GEBERT-- Lakewood, Ohio, Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Outing Board 15 War Aid 15 Musician's Club 2, 3, 4g Mu Phi Epsilon 4, Phi Beta Kappa 4. EVELYN CLAIRE GOLDFARB- Sociology Charleston, W. Va., Transfer, Sul- lins College 39 Nu Zeta Nu 3, Vice President 4 5 Sociology Club 4. SALLY GILBERT- Fashion 8z Interior Decoration Newton Falls, Ohio, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Home Ec Club 1, 23 May Day 2, Poly Staif 35 Mather Record 3, 45 A.A. 2, 3, 45 Sigma Psi 3, 4, Secretary 3. DORIS GOLDSMITH- Cleveland, Ohio. MARILYN GRILLO- Sociology, Phychology Cleveland, Ohio, Sociology Club 2, ig Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 4, Red Cross MARITA GORDON- Home Economics Cleveland, Ohio, Home Ec Club 1, 3, 3, 3, Secretary 3, Stunt Night 1, BEVERLY ELAINE GRODEN- Chemistry Ellwood City, Pa., Sociology Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Present-Day Club 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3, Stimt Night 2, 4, A.A. 1, 2, 3, Nu Zeta Nu 3, 4. GLORIA GORDON- Mathematics Lorain, Ohio, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, French Club 1, War Aid 1, Theta Phi Omega 3, 4, Present Day Club 3, Freshman Handbook Staff 2. PATRICIA NELLE GROSSMAN- Dramatic Arts University Heights, Ohio, Univer- sity Players 1, 2, 3, 4, Radio Club 1, 2, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 4, Mather Record 1, Theta Phi Omega 3, 4. BONNIE ENID GREEN- Sociology Shaker Heights, Ohio, Stunt Night 1, A.W.V.S. 2, Sub-Cadet 2, Soci- ology Club 3, Secretary 4, Theta Phi Omega 3, 4, Treasurer 3, In- tersorority Council 3. LOIS MAE VIRGINIA HAASE- Political Science Sandusky, Ohio, Press Board 1, 2, Mather Record 1, 2, 3, 4, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 4, Poly 2, 3, First Honors 1, 2, 3, Phi Beta Kappa 3, 4, Radio Club, 1, Thwing Prize 1, Fresh-Soph Hop Comm. 2, Parnas- sus 2, 3, President 4, Sigma Psi 3, 4, May Day 2, French Club 3, 4, Student Council 4, Chapel Board, Chairman 4. LAVERNE ANN GREEN- Mathematics Cleveland, Ohio, Phi Beta Kappa 4. BEATRICE PATRICIA HARMON-English Cleveland, Ohio, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 4, Parnassus 2, 35 A.W.V.S. 2, Poly Staff 33 A.A. 3, 49 Gymkhana 3, 4, Sigma Psi 3, Secretary 4. JACQUELINE B. HOSFIELD- Chemistry Stowe, Ohio, Transfer, Kent State U. 3g A.A. 4. DONNA HARRIGER- Cleveland, Ohio. JEANNE COLLETTE HRUBY-- Sociology Cleveland, Ohiog Sociology Club 33 Red Cross 4. BLOSSOM KAY HOIST- Loram, Ohio. SHIRLEY HUMMERT-Sociology Wauwatosa, Wis.g Transfer, Mil- waukee Downer College 3g Sigma Psi 3, 4, Stunt Night 3, 4, Mather Record 39 Vice President, Smith Dormitory 3. MARGARET E. HOLLAND- Cleveland, Ohio. MARTHA JANE JARVELA- Home Economics Lakewood, Ohiog Transfer, Michi- gan State College 3, Home Eco- nomics Club 3, 45 Stunt Night 4. RUTH KELLER- Elyria, ohio. MARION JELINEK- Cleveland, Ohio. MILDRED BERNSTEIN KLEIN- Cleveland, Ohio. MARGARET ANNE J ONES- En glish Cleveland, Ohio, Alpha Theta Ep- silon 3, President 4. JANET DRAGIN KOBLENTZ- Sociology Cleveland, Ohio, Transfer, Ohio State 3, Sociology Club 3, Vice President 4, Nu Zeta Nu 3, 4. MARGARET ELIZABETH J ON ES-Home Eonomics Cleveland, Ohio, Home Economics Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, AA. 1, 2, 3, 4, War Aid 2, AWV.S. 3, Poly 3, Interdorm Dance Committee 4. ROSE MARIE KONYVKA- Home Economics Brooklyn Village, Ohio, Stunt Night 1, 3, 4, A..W.V.S. 2, Home -Economics Club 3, 4, Mary Eliza Parker Award 3. FRANCES P. JUDNICK- Chemistry Cleveland, Ohio, Delta Psi Omega BARBARA LARKIN- History Cleveland, Ohio, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, Curtain Pullers 19 Student Coun- cil 19 Committee for Formation of Rui Society 1, A.A. Barn Dance 25 . . 3. DAGMAR SIGRID LEWIS- Psychology Cleveland, Ohiog French Club 1, 2, Secretary 35 Radio Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, President 33 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Second Honors 1, University Choir 2, 3 5 Tribune Staff 2, 3, 45 Poly Staff 2, 35 Mather Record 39 Theta Phi Omega, Presi- dent 3, Treasurer 43 Curtain Play- ers 3 3 Intersorority Council 3. JEANNE LEGGON- Cleveland, Ohio, DOROTHY BEATRICE LISY-i Concentrated Science Cleveland, Ohio, Delta Psi Omega 3, 45 Senior in Absentia, Institute of Pathology. CATHERINE LEVATTER- English Cleveland, Ohio 5 Transfer, State U. of Iowa 2 5 University Players 2, 3, 4. ANNE LAIT LODGE- Chemistry Cleveland, Ohio, Transfer, Baldwin Wallace 25 Stunt Night 2, 4. FLORENCE LEVSTEK- Chemistry Cleveland, Ohio, Second Honors 13 Third Honors 23 Stunt Night 2, 49 Y..W.C.A. 2, Biology Club 25 Iota Sigma Pi 49 Delta Psi Omega 3, 4. LOIS LARUE LOESCH- Physchology Parma, Ohiog Gamma Delta Tau 3, President 4g Intersorority Council 3, fresident 49 Stunt Night 1, 2, LAURA MARGOLIS- Home Economics Cleveland, Ohio9 Transfer, Ohio University 3, Home Economics Club 3, 49 Nu Zeta Nu 3, 4. MARY McADOO- Home Economics Ashland, Ohio9 Home Ec Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 49 Stunt Night 1, 2, 49 flee Club 19 Gamma Delta Tau 3, RUTH MASSIEN- Concentrated Science Cleveland, Ohio9 Institute of Path- ology. JEANNE MARIE McGINNESS- English Lakewood, Ohiog French Club 1, Secretary 2, Vice President 3, Pres- ident 49 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 49 A.A. 1, 29 Second Honors 19 Third Hon- ors 2, First Honors 39 A.W.V.S. 2g Poly Staff 2, 39 Sundial Staff 3, 49 Sigma Psi 3, President 49 Parnas- sus 3, 49 Class Secretary 49 Mather Record 49 Intersorority Council 4. CAROL MAY- English Cleveland, Ohiog Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 49 Curtain Players lg University Players 2, 3, 4g Delta Psi Omega 3, 4g Phi Beta Kappa 4. VERABELLE MAILMAN- Home Economics Cleveland, Ohiog Transfer, Ohio University 39 Home Economics Club 3, 49 Nu Zeta Nu 3, 4. EVELYN MEZGEC- Cleveland, Ohio. FRANCES ELLEN MAKO- Sociology Cleveland, Ohiog Outing Board 1, 2, 3, President 4 9 Stunt Night 1,- 2, 3, 49 Third Honors lg Second Honors 29 May Day 29 Mather Record 39 Poly StaH 39 Third Honors 3g Delta Phi Upsilon 3, 4. DORIS JEAN MILLER- Home Economics Cleveland, Ohio5 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Home Ec Club 1, 2, 3, 45 Tribune Staff 2, 35 President, Guil- ford House 45 Intersorority Council 2, 35 Interdorm Board 45 Sigma Psi 3, 4. EFFIE LEE MORRIS- Social Science Cleveland, Ohio5 Transfer, U. of Chicago 4. JEAN MICKEY- Cleveland, Ohio. MARTHA ANNE MORRIS- History, Psychology Dayton, Ohio5 Stunt Night Liter- ary Chairman 1, 3, 45 Parnassus Club 1, 2, 3, 45 Radio Club 15 Mather Record 1, 2, 3, 4, Editor 25 Poly Staff 2, 3, Editor 35 Inter- sorority Council 3, 4, Treasurer 45 Y.W.C.A. Cabinet 3, President 45 Srfniiial Editor 45 Student Coun- C1 . SALLY MICKEY- Chemistry Cleveland, Ohio5 University Choir 1, 25 Radio Club 15 A.A. 1, 25 Delta Psi Omega 3, 45 Intersorority Council 45 Iota Sigma Pi 3, Secre- tary-Treasurer 4. MARGARET L. MURRAY- Dramatic Arts Larchmont, N. Y.5 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Radio Club 1, 25 University Players 3, 45 May Day 25 Phi Kap- pa Zeta 3, 45 Lux 45 Mather Record 35 Sundial 4. BETTY ANN MORIN- Chemistry- Canton, Ohiog Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Mather Record 15 Iota Sigma Pi 3. GERTRUDE CONSTANCE MURELL-Chemistry Parma, Ohiog Theta Phi Omega 3, 45 Iota Sigma Pi 4. MARGARET A. PEOPLES- Biology-Psychology Cleveland, Ohio5 A.W.V.S. 15 Tri- bune Staff 15 Biology Club 25 Alpha Theta Epsilon 3, 45 Presi- dent, University House 4. LOUISE NEVIN- Psychology Greensburg, Pennsylvania5 Class Secretary 15 Treasurer 25 Vice President 45 Record Business Staff 1, 3, 45 Y.W.C.A. 1, 2, 35 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Poly Business Staff 25 Phi Kappa Zeta 3, 4, Secre- tary 35 Junior Prom Co-Chairman 35 War Aid 45 Stunt Night Dance Chairman 45 Student Council 45 Interdormitory Board President 4. ELAYN E PHILLIPS- Biology Erie, Pennsylvaniag Stunt Night 1, 2, 3. PATRICIA O'DONNELL- Political Science Akron, Ohio5 A.A. 1, 2, 3, 45 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Press Board 15 Glee Club 1, 25 Delta Phi Upsilon 3, 45 Junior Prom Committee 35 Phi Beta Kappa 3, 45 Poly 35 Stu- dent Council 3 5 Class Treasurer 35 Lux 35 Vice President 45 Y-Dub 45 Intersorority Council 45 Calendar Committee Chairman 45 Mather Record 1, 2, 3, 4, Editor 3. MARY ELIZABETH PIPKIN- Sociology Cleveland Heights, Ohio5 Transfer, Mary Washington College 25 Stunt Night 2, 35 Phi Kappa Zeta 3, 4. LOIS GRACE OEBERMAN- Business and Economics Shaker Heights, Ohiog Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Theta Phi Omega 3, 45 Sociology Club 3, 45 Intersorority Council 3. ELEANOR BABCOCK PRINCE- English-Psychology Shaker Heights, Ohio5 Transfer, Leland Stanford U. 45 Stunt Night 45 A.A. 4. DOROTHY PARTRIDGE-English Cleveland, Ohiog Stunt Night 2, 45 Gamma Delta Tau 3, 45 Inter- sorority Council 4. QW 'ETH '. sfrm 555533 .mls - . '-fm as ,x .- E alfs mi- gangs fm Q .-is 525 is I . g.. ye' B1-m Y , 1 b 5 4 "H .umm 3.25 W s A J wss E E E -my wg B ea Ein v papa asia EZEZXSH ag M W l. 1 N J. in fa.-an :na- 2 ss 3 E JUDITH J. RAB- English Dayton, Ohio, Transfer, U. of Day- ton 4. LUCILLE RIGEL- Sociology Cleveland, Ohio, Transfer, Kent State U. 2, Sociology Club, Vice President 3, President 4, Third Honors 3, Present Day Club 3, Theta Phi Omega 3, 4, Radio Club 4, Intersorority Council 4, Stunt Night 4. NANCY RENDER- Sociology Cleveland Heights, Ohio, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 4, Second Honors 2, War Chest 3, Chairman 4, Poly Staff 3, 4, A.A. 3, 4, First Honors 3, 4, 'Red Cross 3, Co-Chairman 4, Phi Kappa Zeta 3, Vice President 4. ANN DOROTHY ROE- Psychology Cleveland Heights, Ohio, Transfer, Denison University 3, Stunt Night 3, 4, Phi Kappa Zeta 3, 4. ABEL RICKARD- Home Economics ANNE GERTRUDE ROGERS Canton, Ohio, Transfer, Miami U. 2, Home Ec Club 2, 3, 4, Stunt Night 2, 3, 4, A.W.V.S. 2, Mather Record 3, Reserve Tribune 3, 4, Vice President Tyler-Thwing 3, President 4, Poly Staif 3, Sigma Psi 3, 4, Interdormitory Board 4, Red Cross 4. Home Economics Cleveland Heights, Ohio, Delta Phi Upsilon 3, 4, Class, Secretary 2, Poly Business Staff 2, Stunt Night 1, 2, 4, Student Council 1, Home Economics Club 1, 2, 4, Treasurer 3, A.W.V.S. 2, 3, Glee Club 1, 2, 4, University Choir 3, Lux, Secre- tary-treasurer 4, Second Honors 1, 2, First Honors 3, Senior in Ab- sentia, Merrill-Palmer School 4. LILA LEE RICKEL- Political Science Cleveland, Ohio, Transfer, Ohio State U. 2, Stunt Night 2, 3, 4, Sociology Club 2, 3, Treasurer 4, Nu Zeta Nu 3, 4, Intersorority Council. JOANNA JACKSON ROGERS- English Wheeling, West Virginia, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, Third Honors 1, 3, Phi Kappa Zeta 3, Outing Board 2, 3, A.W.V.S. 2, Intersorority Coun- cil 3, School of Nursing 4. ELEANOR G. SAFSTROM- Home Economics Cleveland, Ohio, Transfer, Cleve- land College 3g Home Ec Club 3, 45 Stunt Night 3, 4, Theta Lambda Phi 3, Secretary 4, Intersorority Council 4. ' GENEVIEVE ANN RUPPELT- Business and Economics Garfield Heights, Ohiog Transfer, . Cleveland College 4. FRANCES RUSSELL- Warren, Pennsylvania. BEATRICE RUTH SCHWARTZ- Cleveland, Ohio NORMA SACKS- Chemistry Los Angeles, California, Transfer, U. of Michigan 25 Stunt Night 2, 45. Nu Zeta Nu 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Phi Beta Kappa 43 Press Board 3, So- ciology Club 4g Iota Sigma Pi, Secretary 3. MIRIAM SCHWARTZ- Sociology Youngstown, Ohio, Transfer, Ohio State U. 2, Avukah Student Zion- ist Federation 2, 3, President 4, Stunt Night 2, 43 Phi Beta Kappa. HELEN ALICE SALECHUK- Psychology Cleveland, Ohio, Transfer, Cleve- land College 43 Mather Record 4, Radio Club 4, Television Club 4. JOANNE SCHMIDT- Home Economics Canton, Ohio, University Choir 1, 2, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 4, Home Ec Club 1, 2, 3, 45 A.A. 4. DICKIE SHEPHEARD- History and Sociology Warrensville Heights, Ohio, War Aid 2, Chairman 3, Y.W.C.A. 2, Vice President 3, Chapel Board 2, 3, Interdorm Board, Vice President 3, Stunt Night 3, 4, Student Coun- cil, Vice President 4, Lux 4, Delta Phi Upsilon 3, President 4, Class President 1. KATHLEEN TAYLOR- Business and Economics Cleveland Heights, Ohio, Transfer, Allegheny College 4, Alpha Theta Igfasliloii 4, Riding Club 4, Sociology u . RUTH DORNBACK SHIE- Home Economics Bratenahl, Ohio, Transfer, Wooster College 2, Stunt Night 2, 3, 4, Third Honors 3, University Choir 2, Theta Phi Omega 3, President 4, A.W.V.S. 3, Home Ee Club 4, Red Cross 4, Intersorority Council 4. MILDRED THOMAS- Sociology Cleveland, Ohio, Glee Club 2, 3, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 4, A.A. 1, 3, 4, Outin Club 1 2 3, 4, Poly Staff ' g 2, Delta Phi Ilpsilon 4. SELMA SPITZ- History Cleveland, Ohio, Transfer, Ohio State U. 2, Red Cross 2, Stunt Night 2. MARGARET TIELKE- Sociology Rocky River, Ohio, Transfer, Oli- vet College 3, Stunt Night 3, 4, Sigma Psi 3, 4, Riding Club 4. PATRICIA HELEN SQUIER- Psychology East Cleveland, Ohio, Class Presi- dent 3, Student Council 3, Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, Phi Kappa Zeta 3. HELEN TURNER Youngstown, Ohio. MARIAN MacNAB WADDINGTON-Psycholo gy New Castle, Pennsylvaniag Home Ec Club 25 Stunt Night 2, 35 Sigma Psi 3, 4. HELEN URNER- Washington, D. C. 5Phi Kappa Zeta. FRANCES EVELYN WOLKOV- Psychology Cleveland, Ohiog Transfer, Cleve- land College 45 Parnassus Club 45 Poly Staff 4. JEAN MARIE WOLFORD- Chemistry Euclid, Ohio5 Transfer, Kent State University 45 Theta Lambda Phi 4. HELEN LENTZ WALTER- Home Economics Cleveland, Ohiog Transfer, Ohio State U. 35 Stunt Night 3, 45 Glee Club 35 Home Ec Club 3, 4. BARBARA VENDIG-Psychology Orange, New Jersey5 Stunt Night 1 2 3, 45 Mather Record 2, 35 Poly Stai 35 Sundial 45 Judiciary Chair- man 45 President, Mather House 45 Student Council 45 Phi Beta Kappa 4 JEANNE WASILK- Chemistry Youngstown, Ohiog Mather Record 1, 45 War Aid 15 Tribune Staff 15 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 First Honors 1, 2, 35 A.W.V.S. 2, 3, 45 Sociology Club 45 Iota Sigma Pi 45 Phi Beta Kappa 4. MARTHA JEAN VOGT- Chemistry Akron, Ohiog Transfer, Oberlin 35 First Honors 35 Band, Orchestra 3, 4 Glee Club 45 Iota Sigma Pi 4. ELLEN CLEMINSHAW WEAVER- Chagrin Falls, Ohio. JOY FLORENCE WITHROW- Sociology Rocky River, Ohiog Transfer, Cleveland College 45 Stunt Night 45 Alpha Theta Epsilon 45 A.A. 45 Sociology Club 4. MARGARET STANLEY WEST- English Cleveland, Ohio5 Transfer, Denison EI. 354Stunt Night 3, 45 Phi Kappa eta . HELEN JOAN WOJTOWICZ- Biology Cleveland, Ohio5 Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 45 Biology Club 25 Stunt Night 35 Delta Psi Omega 3, 4. WINIFRED WHEELER- Home Economics Jamestown, New York5 Transfer, Michigan State College 35 Home Economics Club 3, 45 Stunt Night 4. ESMA YAHYA- Chemistry Cleveland, Ohio5 Delta Psi Omega 3, 45 Iota Sigma Pi 4. BEVERLY ELLEN WHITE- Chemistry Chardon, Ohiog Y.W.C.A. 1, 2, 3, 45 Mather Record 1, 2, 3, 45 Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 45 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 A.A. 1, 2, 3, 45 German Club 1, 25 A.W.V.S. 2, 3, 45 Delta Psi Omega 4. JANET YOUNG-Political Science Cleveland Heights, Ohiog Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Class President 25 A.A. 1, 2, 3, Secretary 25 Phi Kappa Zeta 3, 45 Student Council Secretary 35 Lux President 45 Stu- ilent Directory Editor 45 Red Cross ARLENE WRIGHT- Chemistry Barberton, Ohiog Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 A.A. 2, 3, 45 Delta Phi Upsilon gn 415 Mather Record 35 Iota Sigma 1 . JACQUELINE YOUNG- Psychology Willoughby, Ohio5 University Choir 15 First Honors 1, 2, 35 Stunt Night 1, 2, 45 Phi Kappa Zeta 3, 45 Poly Staff 25 Phi Beta Kappa 45 Y.W.C.A. 45 Parnassus Club 4. EMILY A. ZWOLINSKI- V Chemistry Cleveland, Ohiog Delta Psi Omega 3, President 45 Iota Sigma Pi 4. JEAN YOUNG- Home Economics Meadville, Pennsylvania5 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Home Ec Club 1, 2, 3, 45 Sigma Psi 3, 4. JULIANNE ATWOOD WHITAKER-Psychology Cleveland, Ohio5 Stunt Night 1, 2, 3, 45 Radio Club 15 Glee Club 15 Tribune Staff 25 May Day 35 A.A. 25 Phi Kappa Zeta 3, 45 Poly Staff ELEANORE MARTHA ZULLO- Cleveland Heights, Ohio5 Pan- American Club 15 Sociology Club 45 Alpha Theta Epsilon 3, 4, Secre- tary 35 Intersorority Council 45 Stunt Night 1, 4. NANCY ELIZABETH ZUPNIK- Social Studies Shaker Heights, Ohio 5 Transfer, U. of Michigan 35 Stunt Night 4. '1 f f A4 Q ' 4 gg 7 V Y 1 , W -V ,A .1 .JBL ll- I I f P W X4 , W v ' f 'V ' ' If ' I I I . 1- Y , I ' 1 . I r r' 0. If ., 4 4 I if . - i I' ' Y W4 . 'Y fs, W , , ,Y - 1 'x Y ,, r' fa, ',, 4 'A ' 5 ,, U 1 T 'L 'uf :L fn," 1 ' :I-:VI 1. 1' ,, .. 'fl J' . f:,:"f-ff -L , 4 :ikU4.'.. 1" N. '. :Lf :tip 5 A . bi.- J r' 21,7 T9 , -.l"- . Lf, Y' 1 v. V . v-TQ. y 'Iv I ' I' .- " J . ' , ' ,N '1 . , 11- ' ,' ' , 1 , fn X I 1-A 0.21-A+ ., . , , Zlfs- fri FV - ' 'Vol .HY 101'-D - K ff . V .L A 3 , U9YTJ'f3f" t 1 ' -' P ' -1. -'pf' , - N ' 'gm-l.1'5iiffQ'-, f .,f:g,4,.f 5 -. Y - - , A A , 5523- .w , I 'wr .5 LJ Ai: . aaa, , - rf, ,Leg -155,95 it .- ,F -"I 'hw i U- ' 'i -"'f:Q1fQ , ' 512:51 S "T 2 '- ' " - f .nal 'J , X . 'f?1. S 'f ', lftg' H' f- ' ffsf 3 ,t W ,. .' Ilfw M . 1. ,,J. , ,. m2'T-53' ' 1, ,:.""'pL- ' ' ,v , ,Q r,i":35f , pf' '. 'J ' . , f., .N ' 1. ' , , '31 ,VA .MO ,gi , .,q.1.-, r .15 1 -Q f.f fafrfq. A- . 4- me 5' . . Q- ftfu 1 '. f-1 v -'Jw 2 .,, . at L' v .: , K C F rf . - -f . 1 ,... L- 1-1. - --.- -.d:.L. 'vb' - ,-uf fy, wx, 1 f 13. 'n 5, ..., 51 . .4 .. v , .,..,. ,c. H, V- J. 1 1-"-A V-6731 -eff W ...p. 411' Y' " , . 'l '-I 4 U ...Ng I Ei? 1 Q.. 1, .w , fm ,,, a - ' if-A., A .L , nf, . 5, X Q ,, AU. 1 . n 1 f x E s a 'iv-:J 4 1 K IOR President Billie Feddery . . . outstanding is her easy, graceful friendliness . . . she works hard on committees, has loads of good sense . . . Red Raider camp her forte. Vice-president Louise Nevin . . . "Mac" has a dry but delightful sense of humor that is all her own. Claire Doran . . . combines a Classics major with a Phys Ed minor with well- coordinated skill . . . very friendly, al- ways enthusiastic . . . she's president of A. A., and other activities, too, crowd her day . . . a member of Lux and Phi Beta Kappa to boot. Pat O'Donnell . . . a budding lawyer, "P. O'D." is "in absentia" at Law School, but all the work she still finds time to do at Mather! . . . she's a strong and loyal friend . . . has a flashing wit. Cal- endar Chairman, Sundial staff, Stunt Night Literary Committee . . . etc., be- sides studying law. Louise Barnhart . . . Student Gov presi- dent . . . with a quick flash of a smile and a sudden worried frown . . . and she has a laugh that's a cross between a chuckle and a soprano cough. A loyal Erie Railroad employee . . . a friendly soul, despite multitudinous student gov- ernment duties . . . a true friend-that's "Barney." Dickie Shepheard . . . soft voice, viva- cious and enthusiastic girl . . . friends in every class from senior to freshman . . . In between classes and practice teach- ing she sandwiches a host of extra-cur- ricular activities . . . plus piano lessons . . . plus that letter every night. . .O.C. cretary Jeanne McGinness . . . French student par excellence . laugh with her and forget your troubles. Treasurer Ellie nham . . . an Easterner, "bred in the bone"i stuff, but she es "our West". rtha Morris . . . "Boopsie" . . . gaiety expressed in a subtle, quiet -t of humor that sees amusement in practically everything' . . . mis- evous face . . . she deplores the unintelligent stands so often taken students and people . . . vital interest in everything . . . a writer raordinary, she revolutionized the Sundial. is Haase . . . easy-going, but she ows her stuff in all those Poli Sci sses of hers . . . she slowly drawls- right answer. She's undyingly loyal Sandusky . . . sociable, accommodat- friendly . . . chairman of Chapel and Parnassus . . . member of other activities. Murray . . . Mather's contribution to University Players . . . dark hair, gorgeous smile-career girl ap- she does everything with enthusiasm . . . adds vital- she goes. Between Eldred, songs, practice teaching, and . she does a lot. Vendig . . . Administrator of the Code . . . tall, black-haired, strik- . . . her smooth alto voice is beautiful when she speaks iape . . . lively humor, pleasantly , . . . Sundial, Phi Bete, Student are among her activitiesg psychol- her major. '7 was W vii GR DU TIO Graduation Week begins with Step Night and the Jun- ior-Senior Banquet .... it reaches the climax on Wed- nesday, Commencement Day, with exercises in Severance Hall. For some the Wave of the four years now iinished sweeps over them on the walk to Severance . . as even Euclid Avenue becomes memory lane. For others it is tl1e Sundial ceremony, or the Sanctum sanctorum of Severance, or that brief Walk to the front to receive the degree. Studied wisdom leaves, but the degree is here-concrete climax to college. Yet the four years held something greater than mere learning - living, per- haps. fi fw ,fu sfw fc if ,l in f 'X V K x Q Q ,ff ' ' ff' X X f 1 gl xl " fl 4 J , X l. fem-, X if 2 1-A 2 N X--X . X Chl fl," I l A l lx Rf' J I lk I r .f 'XLL 41' r: : .:' "-:I ff ,f ,J XB Tw o successful May Day's in two years . . . that has been the rec- ord for '44 and '45, In 1944, Alice in Wonder 1 a. n d reigned supreme, with hearts on costumes, tarts in b o o t h s , a n d Tweedle - dee and Tweedle - dum in the court. Queen Lou Von Menger- inghausen In a. d e a smiling "Alice" . . . Mary Jane L 1 e W e I lyn and "Skippy" Nosker gave the Whole day a lift with their screwy cos- tumes - "Louie" still has the scar on her knee from the spill she took just as the pa- rade started forth i n t o "Wonder- land." X K x 'M xx N ' Tp -1" f'7J7"c- J d ' X 'x Af, I N X AX XR X if w! J 3 N V 'Wi ff nf ..f 1" If N lx x Xl 'K X pi ff, J I I a, ' H+ lin ff 4 i ,M X f If X ' Ii JA!!! tri-lk .,.,, K X f I ,ll -+2 trial -, --7 T'was the Land of Oz we visited this year under Chairman B a r - bara C u r r y ' s guidance. Mickey McAffee as "Dor- othy" crowned vi- vacious Q u e e n Rita Bieber. And . . . hey! it's "Louie" again and this time she's the Scarecrow . . . you just can't keep a good May Day character down! Come to think of it, Rita Bieber was in the court last year, too. Both May Day's had to compete with rain and cloudy skies-but both May Day's won the competi- tion. LAKE Em 'D Mfg? Ewo0D E 4.552 QVLNULXL an I 'Z' cu N' B7 ' , effgngi M1 Q FI K? ww e . QD 7'liOI'l'! AVENUE I Q ' 119' 5' . O Q 0 We E Maggpofv 1,3 E E n Nui 3 . 'fm ' -' . 'Wi ' " A K I C' 440 E S " 1 'U cz ' A 2 x X .4 S Q9 . K0 . V I-N YS' Y-gkoe , W vvv wg! 'I' 1- E QP 'Z' W O I 9 2 S' ff 2 'ir cc - as fb Pleasure and lpzctzon melee the hows eem short. X , E 8700K H mmf Row -SHAKESPEARE 1 CNE HT g X, MP0 ,E 5 ! i ffm? M A Vw El!! V' Tix J' 'X X' ij V25 l ,ff X 73 if N 3' WT ,fix . if ff' N . at If 1 yy I LE .ff G1 X fl xiggx W 553 We fig v-... - Z-Jiri --.gi L , 2? v fi W X. , 'W 3 f X 3 L W V , if R 15 Qi x If XX I ' ff! F- Q Y RE 1 X RQX fl , Xggix .Ng ig DEEQEQRQEVSLYHK9 E- ' H 155 S135 gm 53 f' 7 X'x..,,,.f,--3-S-?:,!'LN " 47-'xf Cr, , fl A N ' ' fi ,f"7:mK f' X J J kyxx it - xx I I ffl I vkiv if ij fi X5 L-si - klfkj X Away back in '42 about 150 girls arrived on campus . . . the class of '46. Now they number 197 and are among the campus leaders. First event of the freshman year-the Flag Huntg but the square of red cloth was elusive that year, and the girls paid the penalty. As sophomores in '43, revenge was theirs, indirectly, when Commanding Officer Mary Clare Harmon and her staff commandeered the freshman "pri- vates". The shouted command of "Bombs away" from any soph brought a ten-gun salvo . . . of doughnuts! As sophomores, the class of '46 brought back childhood memories at May Day, with a theme of Alice in Won- derland. Alice, as May Queen, was por- trayed by Louise Von Mengeringhausen. Lots of Work was put forth by Rita Bieber, Theresa Sprosty, Jeanne Roecker, Wendy Hermberg, Peg Powell, and Betty Selden-chairman was Dickie Snyder. As for Stunt Night, the for- mula for winning the cup eluded the Juniors again, but this year they had lots of spirit in their "Mid-Stunt Night Drearn"g chairman, Phyl Ford, and di- ,ff-N C-SN, 1'-" fffixx, . If l , , .X ,IF gy ,fj if-if H -1 . f 'x U31 .I -lljg f ,f J L, 2 : Xp I, -' Q.-.41 -, rector, Lois Kelly, Worked doggone hard and produced the spirited stunt. Proms every year added a formal touch to the social life of the present Juniors, even though they did enter along with the war. Freshman-Sopho- more Hops, held at the University Club, were planned both years by a committee headed by Doris Alburn. This year Joan Pfieffer and Doris planned a dreamy J unior-Senior Prom at the Hotel Cleve- land. W A The "big sister" note was struck at the alumnae-sponsored tea for juniors and freshmen starting off this year, and the Big-Little Sister Party full of favor- ite fairy story characters Was held later in the fall, under the chairmanship of Rita Bieber. In June the mantle of the senior clasr: fell upon the Juniors, and they accepted the responsibilities and honors of the year to come. Symbolic of this was the Step Night ceremonies during gradua- tion week. Many a lumpy throat for the Juniors who lined the Walk for the Seniors, and held wavering -candles by which to sing their song to the abdi- cating Seniors. A ' 56 "Lovesick juniors" . . . that's the Way the traditional song has it . . . butlmany a junior Would quibble with that. How- ever, sophistication is beginning to creep in "and the freshmen do seem to be get- ting younger every year!" But it's a Wonderful year-they'1l all agree. None of the pangs of immanent leave-taking as might bother Seniors-yet there's a certain sense of feeling at home, of belonging, by the time you're a Junior. UNIOR Ann Regan charming, poised, and gracious, she presides with ease over the recalcltrant Junior class. Quiet and reserved, sh'e's well-liked . . . and most dependable and efficient. Ruth Buettner, vice-president . . . good-humored but ready to fight for a cause. Marge Estes, glamorous and efficient secretary. Phyl Ford, treasurer . . . a happy-go-lucky blonde, a fiend for songs and har- mony, but she never got in front of the camera for this particular page. Rita Bieber . . . her deep brown eyes and her oug . . . h 1' soft voice . . . all expressing ideas that pack a hard e punch. She's a Wonderful and enthusiastic Worker for any worthy project . . . and she's a real artist. Mary Clare Harmon . . . With boundless energy, a breezy friendly manner, a sparkling personality, she's popular with ' d t Gov and as Busi students and faculty . . . act1ve on Stu en - ness Manager of the Poly . . . a wonderful pair, Harmon and Hector fher back-seat-less carl. Wendy Hermberg . . . comes from Germany, Washington, D. C., and, in the summer, a Wyoming ranch . . . she's a whiz ' th Biology department . . quiet, dependable, and 1n e . assured, she has a peaches and cream complexion, blond hair, and a Navy Med student. th htful look B. W. O. C Fran Healy . . . one of the sunniest characters on campus, Fran knows everyone . . . and she knows all the news Hrst, too. Her chuckle is famous with Matherites. In her spare time-and she has little of that-she cheers patients in a dentist's office. Ginny Lou Wiseman . . . lover of the aesthetic and an idealist, she gets down to practical reality when it comes to putting out the Record once a week . . . try to read her handwriting once . . . she's sympathetic and frank, GLW of Canton and California. Peggy Powell . . . Tiny but dynamic, she has a talent for friendship . . . an eificient way . . . many hours she spends in pursuing paths of learning in her chosen field-chemistry . . . many more hours as busy co-editor of the Record . . . a score of other activities keep her going. Betsy Eickhoif . . friendly and sincere and she blushes so easily . . . her mood varies from sparkling to all worn out . . . with a capable finger in many Mather pies, she gets a big thrill out of: signing Student Gov checks . . . playing Rhap- sody in Blue . . . life in general. x Bm if E RISE-I 'fagfhg 'sa 55... wp,--g:::. ::- ,V A -1 ,s ' I ff ---' k PT 'Y wiv 7,4-X, -' ...,I,Igs.I, -?.,g " gg Q pg, . -fag I - .,.,:. 3 :::,.,. IKNQI my SS' v .. -5 . 5 gr- 'f2'fW ' 432' W ' 1. -'-' .... Q - ff 2 H E Q 3: f mi? , II . . -gf 9 " :sf I m B mmgigm S . Q 9- :Hg sf :f TK E' Q . wut Q 5:5 4 SAW E125 M K Y Mu, x H E 1 . 2, A I will-5 , s w ' ' sg B H . 3' H K W 'L .. . E . 533 A Egmgg v. - A1331 11? 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M A ' faq 'T' -- f ,M H 1v:1,,,U' W ,S-NS bnfgiv , r',,?L1,, :":5?fYms:p73S5f2aQx7 .6 biz aigiggaiggu., j 5 QT? ,ff ff x 2,41 g 3 ' -1 ,- ,, 59? z vw , 'R if ge- Hg 14 Q "'SfaS1m9AQ", .sfwf ii , 'L '39 w U A ,1 ,Q A mg Q 3 N ..f if 3, 5 ., ,M Y Y, . r ,V 'R X '- A Eff , ' fa as Sam ,Q ,X ,X WT? ' ,ff kg 3' E' N Q W , H , can 1 xQ.f1g5 7' f 1 ,QE-ix N 5 , Z - .' sz ii . ' -- ' J" wi Iii ' 1 A , K' A .g'Qqg 3,311 M5 Q ',-,. 2 W fa , - , 'TM' 1 'M' N? V WX K' , ffixsfx " 3.-ni' W H S f 253 Wig .QQL U Y, 'E-Glu, q- 1 I: f f 13 .p',g:5:q? .1:. ,, ' M- 5 w ' 2 Egg' J W A Kaz - . ,A , , , .R :-Q: f -I f- fffi 'Q' xy f . A A if f' X 5 " 1 H 535 L. .- I.: VJ, I ' jaw --'fav :f WL-', wif' -,sf ju, X!-.N A I. , A W 1 , f j ' v , " Q, Q ,mf . .is A Mg' " 3 if .5 5 1 I "rf" fx., , F 1 i - M ,fir fp p sm -'E . . "2 W WR WY ' B gf!! R . mm V w Wiz? gf , J ,, ' 'I H 2 ' E I1 1 sf -eAg,"'Y -Q... ' . is -is by Q. .. 0 Nb j, , 'F' s fn fl UNE ., M Q, w vw 1 . 1 ""H gg .QQ F +5 ' 3. Uiww, I-v ,.,S. ,QV Q :L :nw fi -n ss a m ms a , , ss a 'ri' as i vm E H H -' - ww- E -w as B Wigwam ws Us mm? an E E ms fm E . ,H H Emma W ,W . H ggi maumgm 3 1 PM B -awww 2 mm msgs sun ws- ss mips 'wg iii' gy E223 55 gig H all W qi H Wim fm gang--Q mn ZW ygm-1'-.ss B -. K7EB'EE SSE SSE mi mx ss -LBS -fc vgx. xx ms ss ss -an ss ss ss an uma nm ms ms wa san mn ws :Q ss ga as-4 55' E Q .-w , 59 x ms E ss x , .,,. Bbw Q: E ss mau- m H,V ss,-1" ms mwm. an wx mm-X 'W ,A M E E N M E M E E H H 55 Magi ,. H54 HKS , E ms m mn ms mn a X E Q ms SOPHO one B,W,0,C, President Jane Sutphin . . . "Irish", with the black hair and eyes just to prove it, and a lilting voice. Informal at class meetings, Jane enjoys them even more than the class . . . Vice- president Mary Jane Llewellyn . . . "Louie's" face and voice smile even when she's talking seriously . . . she's on hand when help is needed, to give help of the highest quality . . . Secretary Eileen Gunther was camera shy this year . . . but everyone knows pretty, vivacious "Pinky" anyhow . . . Treasurer Marge Dwyer made an efficient and popular one . . and "Vi" Gower acted as a masterful sergeant-at-arms. Betty Jane Carlton . . . effervescent BJ is always going on to the next thing to do . . . grinning in sympathy or fun . . . fighting for the Record or the Press Board, getting new ideas . . . she's a leader to listen to. Annett Francis . . . the red hair on top gives Annett's secret away, all you need is one glance to know the dynamic personality that burns insideg but the Wide smile and the twinkling eyes show the softness and the understanding, too. Peggy Ehrenfeld . . . busy business man- ager of Chapel Board, she sends out the "three absences" slips . . . she's forced to-sternness is farthest from her na- ture. Peg is quiet and sweet, and a won- derful sport . . . reserved, but her friends know her grand personality. Barbara Curry . . . "Barb" can keep you in stitches all of the time, if she wants to . . . her jokes are tops, but her ready quip, her almost too apt mimicing, or her midnight pranks have that special "Curry" flavor. 66 ll- RE HMA . . C. President Carolyn Sutphin . . . of the family of presidents . . . genial and pleasant, she s a most efficient and popular class president . . . she also served as director of the Freshman stunt thus adding versatility to her distinguishing characteristics. Ruth Schoner .... her bright smile and twinkling eyes can bring a smile to the gloomiest Betsy Barton is just as cute as the alliteration of her name promises, and a good class oiiticei to boot! . . . Ruth Badger . . . she has a bubbling quality, but a seriousness of purpose too Ruthie is well liked by everyone, one just can't resist her. Ellie Swain . . . is from Marion, Ohio, she will proudly inform you . . . and Marion can be proud of Ellie. She has the spirit and pep necessary for a leader, and a leader she is fast becoming. Mather House values her for all this, AND a voice that can harmonize on the traditional after-dinner songs. Alberta Lantz . . . she's "Bert" to -everyone who knows her well. She has fair skin and beauti- ful brown eyes and strikingly dark hair. Y-Dub representative for her class, she has performed her task with enthusiasm. It is always hard to compose a page of fresh- man B.W.O.C.'s, for in one short year, the frosh hardly have time to prove themselves. To pick only four would be impossible, for mention must also be made of: Mildred Juntoff, Robin Nara- more, Louise Scott, Mary Lou Daniels, Agnes Kopf, Mary Helen Hawke, Wanda Emerson, Betty Di Salvo, Pat Miner, Joan Sutherland, and Mary Lou Rusch. 67 gk FRESH Not so many months ago the freshmen were high school seniors . . . on top of the school. Now they're at the bottom of the ladder of classes again, but not because of lack of pep, ability, and brain. They've become an in- tegral part of Mather . . . a part We're proud of! The pep and enthusiasm of the frosh is a source of con- stant amazement to the up- perclassmen. From the very beginning of the year when they Went "all-out" for the Flag Hunt, the freshmen have never let up. They had a fine representa- tion 'for Stunt Night . . . and a clever stunt as Well, with 68 their Calendar capers. Never will they forget that huge cal- endar painted with the ends of a rope. They followed this with active participation in many fields . . . including, among other-s, the sing-out at May Day. They had their own original song for this- "Springtime"...plus "Mandy" to the tune of Bell Bottom Tfrozzscrs. The social life of the class of '48 was somewhat ham- pered by the manpower short- age . . . but they managed to turn out in large numbers for the dances at Mather . , . and for week-end dates as well . . . and no Wonder, it's a good class-not only in brain and spirit, but also in looks! 69 in am a ma Zara an ,...l an ms ax Q ss miss f s na M: s:m7m M- . .. wg ,, wg- will np, - N - S kv. " 'BF .1 f. ., , E ':-- I Ei E Lf ,Wi Us Qi W -s l gm xx , ss L 9, E W 1 ' kgs Aww sank 5 3-gum w an H ss . , H 1 an Q .1 B an ' ss m H E ss 1 w f an . Q w 4 g ,L .Ju ' 4' e- 'E ,VM Mfns X, Us f' ,mg me ms mf' a mn fa .:- 5 H Q ws 'ez w'h- Q W n . Q, mmm si E. sg: .. 1 gm Xi FEB 5'- F mm? ks? ss W W Jw 'kg mv' - s B. MW! mmgsm hw ws? E E Vw? ms' W 1 " ,Aff-235' H ss ms im xm s, v ss In . A .gigggf ,gi M , A . :il an H me 2 Msg:-S nl -5 sa. 5 5 ss 1 m maxim :mx Q '23 3 K E H sc hmmm II. H. .Wm , ml iw? Wg S ww :M Bw Ag sg H, sf' 3231 H , ga V. H WH m WW QMS mi -,iw W .. ,WS ,K ss ..h Q Kimi, , za.. H n. 5 E ss' ss QQ E lg, Em kwa F .H E BE :IE W si S'f?Q .BL-,ma .. ss ss mx w w H 'lm an xx is KWH" 0 B N E ss-X.m ,. B WH ".. -:SB H N H E B E B H H B 5 B .E E EP1m,.H,,, E mm K B B 'E . Wkzafguf E, H H H, H - si wmv ' Q , wma. I Us , -' M, ' ,X as 'i Yu H'--ws. W W v , H H E . ie? J.: ws wiiizfflf ' '-Bi - 1 I ,w,,9'x '7' ., 1 H-A H H E N L 7.1 w as H ms kmgglks- i ,ni A H ' ,E f J- J - 5'- - - ,Q H. W ' wi - - E ,Wu ,.,....... 1. , mi . , H -5 H H Y, I .. HN X H W 1 ' fix .N -Q ' A. -, H f ,J ffm W.:-..: I x " :-: ' ' H T s B8 .. .. W' ' .- 'ss - .M :.:.:: 5 mf H 'EM ..!. -': :'::::' 2:2 -'-'- ' E+. 5 1 - E nw -NM f , 5 H 'V E H 3 A , Q W E E1 . E K W as E-EN Vi Hangs: Xmm k ' -. mem N mg NEB W,,g?gg5yz.g E,,mE.mQ. Ex Q H, M B . M, 5 Q M, H E'wi""SH H M H H M M " M A f H " :N ' g ' xx mm . mm.-' w Q sz ms ww H gms- H mg W WA Q 1 A - ' ,xi H 2 B six ' H., ,Ewa ww E B' , B- B ' F ma. 53,1152 E B E B A mn ,is m,M ,Q www Q ,. . E ,H EN ,. H2 ' E Fin 1 W JK Amfffmln 'H mg H gm Z SS B ' B SS B M . X H E . A - B Q ss sms " - mm as E A ,, 'sm A . , I ' . . . . 1 Y ,,5, V. W , M 5 sg? Rim , , ,mu In . Q, - gay'- -a, 53232 ' E gg ggggg ""'QEm'm mam E M515 E E wmv mam- Q E mmm-gps is E 23115155 New nam BK: E M H, me W H H mme ge mm B we me W ES mm E E mf mn mme nm an ,ss a mn was me as me a ss ss sms mn ss ms x-:mn nm mn w ss nm - m gs Em nm ss a ss mn ms mn pm mn may was use aw. 535' H5 nm ' a a mgzm-Ryan a,a'n ss E E. mxximx- 1 , .' -5.55 'ms am nm Emu as mn we a mn was Perkins House Smith House ome of the 66 99 Dorm ' Mather House -M ,Lis I 4'- 'U X 14.4 Southeast Corner of Math-er Dormitory Administration Building in Spring wg' 1 ' 1:f'.-'Siva-Li.. J , ,H xf-,f... ff -.-...gag-:g1.,:.'fQ5 , , A "' All.-fir' 5.-'.- ,- ' - - -za- -f-'--:--M 'l1':m1c.g '- 1t.i,:'.4f:,4 . 1- ?n',.,..-1' 'r:f,g:jm4 AT' ,-SEQ... , rm ss sms a ms S6 mme me me a E . , me me mx ms me me sms B mi H H .. a if ss mums ss-emma H x-x ss ss x-fm mi w, K:-em B ms mam B was ss ma I as an me ,am ms- was nw Qs:-m aa ma. . me The Chapel Guilford House from the West um me mx-x ms ss a ms -n me ss a m ss E . H m ss B an Q ss an ss ss me H V sy was ss a nm ms "-x n wg W 1 B RIXKJN 'Em BN ms axis REE 'unease- JRE- will -HHH :mx HSE wa was wifu " "1 ' mia -ss "mins am. ss me new am A Corner of the Administration zffn' 7 -'xxx mam' -yn HQ swfsme sf sm ss mmm E H ms? H ' ss swim new mms E H we was Em- we ma S35 HB he :HS-B Q mm. BSE as-,ms me a use i Haydn Hall Clark Hall U I CTYRQL JIU k A c o R rv E. Q21 Q 5 M W7 , ' :LN H fx . U L f Q' -' rg! 9 0 A I - QV U V . ew 3, mn U PDT!! png? We QT '-LZ! I Hffwiocf I A 3 9144 A- 4 Q IVUKSESN 1 i I S W 75 f?fs1pffv-28. Q Q 1- I Annu ,, ,- -QQ I L , 'S F 49,5991 , W hwQzL.? ' but of usy li , , Its LUZIQ an ' asp? co cerns-" 4,90 Ci-:HEEL ili- V r i I R140 j""L.. z V- UUM5 51111 + 3 X S. 'D -A Q 0 fl-J 0 'C ff Q Czfvvse l X LHICE S 1 D8 I l + , I I F f-f-fp S191 TIQQ I r N BABIES' 7 4' ' srrfm. N I i cuss ,, w fy.-,nsn-uc 51011. 5'V"""" I Li .EA BERT Zona + 1 ' f I G-pf PIERCE OCTOBER: Just about two days after summer vacation began fit seemed to usb, Reserveis Fall Term started. The ordeal of registration was completed with better-than-average speed by the upperclassmen and with perplexed looks and "What do I do now ?" repeated a thousand times a day by the uninitiated-the freshmen. We buzzed around having the first coke of the season in Haydn, and oh, how Haydn had changed! The West lounge had had a shampoo and set over Vacation and Was looking quit-e gay, with its figures and floral designs. New faces appeared on campus: some 250 freshmen, more than a few transfers, and a number of able additions to our staff- MISSGS Hockey, Lam, and Corkum made up the feminine new- comers, and Messrs. Bach and Roberts the masculine element. We congratulated Miss Thomas on her appointment as head of the ?ncgl1sh Department and welcomed Miss Schaufiier back into the o . Classes got und-er way with their usual horrifying speed . . . Queues longer than cigarette lines formed at the bookstore: 'Tm sorry that's not in yet." "What book? Oh, you mean Physics- not Physiology." The Bookstore staff was hoarse but cheerful at the end of the first day. Suddenly it was Oct. 19-a big day in freshmen history. The Flag Hunt was -on, and the frosh really went to town-combed the campus, invaded Ha.ydn, searched the gym-no place was sacred to them! The wily sophomores had done too good a job though, so when the freshmen appeared for hazing inspection it was in tl1e grotesque half-donkey, half-elephant costumes the sophs had de- creed for them. Symbolic of the coming political elections, the frosh traipsed around with donkey ears flapping and elephant trunks waving. They taught the Case men a few tricks about calisthentics on the C.S.A.S. lawn, and for their tormentors they obtained ten fmalej signatures with phone numbers attached under the candidates, names. Before school had a chance to go into that old routine, the Phi Kaps entertained with a Bingo Bum Party. Blue jeans and plaid shirts were the order of the day, and talented members had a chance to perform before the large attending crowd. The Red Cross benefited to the tune of some 358. NOVEMBER: . November, that usually inbetween month with a personality combined of both Fall and Winter, holds a lot of memories for Mather girls. Right off the bat the Presidential election was held- November 7th, Buttons flashed on lapelsg sample ballots were studied and criticized. "You're wrong-how can you say that !" No wounds were visible though. Matherites were looking forward to the annual Hill-Billy Ball! On November 10th, a big crowd turned out to see the fun. Mobs of people, millions of costumes, and marvelous food made the party complete. Square dancing was the hit of the evening. Gasp- ing, groaning girls threw ' ,E A .. themselves around with aban- E? 1 :Qian don. . 5525 SESS, The frosh and the juniors . 4 vi g: M again lost their dlgnity at the ,, H B1g-Little Sister Party on e ll :'.' E .E November 15th. "Enchant- 1.1 3, mg"-that's the word for the i '.i'i,.QiTiT 3, CVE-N clever Juniors clever adapta- 222 .,. E :': .QT zzz Q ' tion of Hansel and Gretel. I I ,--, ,.5..r v Q., W. il . . l H E , A more ser1ous but very in- i 'IZIZ terestmg note was struck 78 when the Y-Dub sponsored an "Acquaintance Tour" of the churches of various faiths. Not only Mather girls got a chance to find out about each other's re- ligions, several other northeast- ern colleges were well-repre- sented too. Many other events took a toll of energy and left a memory of fun, but all of us were counting the days till the priceless two- day Thanksgiving vacation due November 22nd. The cheering prospect of that turkey and dressing and every other edible thing in the house made us exercise-"for our appetites, y' know." We staggered back to school Monday, tired and heavier by a ton or two-and November was almost over. DECEMBER-STUNT NIGHT After Thanksgiving vacation, the pace at Mather quickened when preparation for Stunt Night went into full swing. Committee meet- ings, chorus rehearsals . . . "Okay, kids, just once more. Now try to get together this time." Scenery committee appeared be- smudged with paint and groaning about those broken fingernails. "Where can we get twenty gilded tennis balls? '?" Laments like this f'rom costume committees . . . ensemble rehearsals with Miss Miles to suggest . . . dress rehearsal at last with all four classes sure that "this is in the bag for us." Last minute worries . . . "How can we pep it up before tomorrow?" . . . "Be sure to bring your white hankies!" - And then at last . . . the big night. Proud parents and admiring dates sitting in the audience . . . one last touch of' mascara from the hard-working make-up committee . . . and then the lights are dimmed and the show is on. Freshm-en first with their Calendar Capers theme . . . well-done and amusing. Their first appearance as Mather girls was worthy of acclaim . . . made us proud .of the "youngsters" Followed by the Sophs with "How Daughter Changes at College" . . . worked out carefully and most effectively to Gilbert and Sullivan themes. Their choruses especially deserved recognition-well-rehearsed and with a subtle humor that did not, we are sure, pass the notice of the Adelbert boys, squirming in the audience. Sophs took second place with this witty presentation. The Juniors appeared next . . . in "Mid-Stunt-Night Dream", or what the writers dreamed would make a per- fect stunt . . . with choruses of angels and Sleepless Knights to complete the illusion of a dreamland fantasy. The Juniors worked hard and deserved the praise and adulation they received. The Seniors walked off with the cup. Clever satire on Stu- dent Government . . . they had the audience fincluding alums and trustees? rolling in the aisles with their sly humor on the subject of alums and trustees. 1 Q X Ki Q k U Q N Q xx xl F.- . f 'X' K . KKN4 HJ gy Y NY X 5 N g 0 Q x X, V h X, 3 fc if g M X Ky, 1 i. X3 F u After the stunts, while waiting for the 79 K P' if KH ,Q A ,431 5 K K H HBE B H K ,. H aft H W sie E-tat H is M L' EW 5-eiig w H' 4 S8 33588 H s 5555 E is BSS E M g8K'H E .W ,. 'ns mm sw lg' JANUARY 1 Q . ss x-x as a me judges' decision, fin an agony of suspensej, the Juniors led in an informal singout of pop- ular Mather songs. And then the climax-the formal dance at the University Club. Winners toasted in champagne . . . losers forget- ting their disappointment in having a wonderful time. Crowning touch to the whole affair was the breakfast at Haydn with our own Dr. and Mrs. Bacon serving the food to tired but happy Stunt- Nighters. January will long be remembered as the month of the Big Snow . . . the sub-zero temperatures accompanying the icy sidewalks, slushy streets and mountainous drifts didn't make return to school after vacation any more pleasant. For weeks we slipped and slid, sneezed and snifiied . . . for the first time in years the weather made a really interesting topic of conversation-with -- everyone joining in to tell their personal bouts with Ol' Man Winter. Of course We had other things to talk about too . . . with .X Q 51,15 f Q25 'thi N. 1 XJ LW' O X S M exams-those yearly Waterloos -sneaking up on us. Professors did us the great favor of remind- ing us of the coming trials . . . three times a week. We managed to find a few di- versions now and then ..... "What's the use of studying NOW?" . . so many of us bought tickets for the Alumnae Associa- tion-sponsored Rise Stevens con- "l cert and spent a most enjoyable I evening imagining how WE b would look on the stage. , Then, with awful suddenness, W f exams were scheduled for the 4 next week. The library was be- sieged by panic-stricken students . . . "But I must get it out . . We K! Sub were supposed, to read it last jst ,H October and it s going to be on 4 ,fe the final. Drug stores were Q1 swamped with requests for ' - . "something, ANYTHING to ,' 1 J A, , p keep me awake all night." We 1 A' ,, ll 1, I bought reams of paper, quarts 1?-,fin , f . of ink, dozeirssdog f."' Q ,-QF'-:Q A pencis . . se e 4 X ' 16.4 A A down to one last tl, J f f .' ' ' session of cram- W 5 el - , f f-- 4--. ,A , 'L ming. To add to ', - fc ,H lr the xiv?esc ofdcol- ,-- 9 ' - ege 1 e an we fr X A" V 5- X sometimes won- . -2 -,ft Y' ng, .. 1 'L r dered, do we real- l ' -Q. - ly want a de- . ., gree?D . . the in- n Mir significant task of registration flt 80 l I l only takes a few minutes, girls . . . Hall . So we sprinted all over the campus . . . to see advisers, get departmental okays . . . pay that bill before 1:O0! Pre-freshmen were also be- ing "rushed" by Mather admission experts, at teas in Haydn Hall. Seniors and faculty welcomed them, served them the traditional steaming cup of tea and saucer full of enticing cookies and candies. FEBRUARY The first, day of February, and that bane of college life- exams-was' still with us. Some profs said, "Really, I'd rather not give exams" . . . but alas, their admirable senti- ment didn't carry over to the tests they made up. But the m skies became bluer, though the snow still fell . . . and-on Feb. 2nd when our lovely, whole-week-of vacation began-the sun was shining! Some of us travelled . . . some of us stayed at home- recuperating . . . but we all agreed that it was "marvelous!" And while we'd been having fun, twenty-nine Mather girls had been practicing for the big day-Graduation. It was held on Feb- ruary 7th. . The very first day of the new term . . . sorority rushing! Eli- gibles and sorority members appeared looking sleek and smart at the rush teas-really more like banquets. Next week coke and lunch dates were the order of the day . . . it was a contest to see who could crowd more into a day, prospective pledges or indefatigable members. Rushing was welcomed, too, as a chance to get to know more people. The dorm students had the Interdorm Dance to think about . . . a Swank aiair at Haydn. The "George Washington" theme also provided for a "Betsy Ross" queen. The first Inter-dorm dance in two years . . . it was judged a great success by everyone. X s N fp V. all V l Ns Rx I N X k it X N X W x X JN A.. .Vey ef-E ,-'egg MARCH Spring ca.me a few months early . . . those wild March winds were more like balmy spring breezes and Matherites, tired of snow and cold, welcomed the heavenly weather with open arms and cotton dresses. Right around March 6th, though, the weather reverted to its us- ual Cleveland condition . . . worried sophs prayed that the snow wouldn't keep the mailman from delivering those "Special Delivery" sorority bids. But the U. S. Mail came through . . . pledge teas were held March 9th at alums' homes. The War Fund Drive took many thoughts and many dollars from Mather girls who realized the extent of their responsibility. Haydn, that mecca of bridge players, decided to do something active about it and sponsored a tournament to be held on successive Wed- nesdays. Basketball was the sport of the season and the climax was the annual Yale-Harvard game on March 26th. A dinner preceded the game . . . both were jammed with enthusiastic supporters. Week-ends at the Pink Pig were in high favor for beat-up students, of all ages and from every clan. "It's not that you get any rest there. It's just that . . . it is so relaxing." And in appreciation of this, Mather gave generously to the Pink Pig Shower held in Haydn on March 17th. APRIL I The Trib gave April a laugh when it announced an All-U Dance for April 31st. It took a little while for us to realize that April hath 30 days . . . then we howled. April seemed to be election time. Slates for all the major school oflices and the clubs were put up and voted upon. New editors, man- agers, and general flunkeys were appointed by the powers that be. Every cough was greeted with "Aha, you do have T.B.", the week of X-Ray tests sponsored by the university. Elaborate plans were made for summers in Colorado at the expense of the state health department. l 1 The sophs entertained the freshmen with a bon- fire party and the drama department entertained the public with the excellent "More Love, Brother" . . . on a slightly higher cultural level than the sophs suc- cessful and entertaining rodeo. Another effort in the rodeo line was the Gym- khana sponsored by Mather. "Every one who can stay on a horse, come out for the Gymlchana," was the plea . . . and the response was gratifying. Miss Andrews returned from Florida with a smooth tan and a collection of shells. We gasped at tales of wonderful Florida weather . . . 'cause for us the rains came. Every day the rains came. The height of the April social activities . . . the u Freshman-Sophomore Hop. Blue jeans and plaid shirts were exchanged for swish formals bedecked with corsages of all kinds, daises to orchids. The dance it was really smooth. MAY May started off with a flourish, to the tune of sweet music, soft lights, and food, at the Junior-Senior Prom. The Cleveland was the setting for this musical extravaganza. 'The upper- classinen followed the example of the Sophs and Frosh, and came "dressed to the hilt." Gaiety was the note of the eveningg as one merrymaker put it, "Are we going to be subdued? No!" 'We mixed a little work in with our social life . . . many of us were involved in term papers. Here's the best thing yet we've heard on the subject Cand we quotej, "Term papers were another time-filler Cas if we didn't have enough to dob. Somehow or other we salvaged some scraps of time, put them together and out came what is commonly regarded as several thou- sand words of nothing much." funquoteb But we couldn't dwell too long on those . . . not with the carefully planned May Day in view. The theme-the Wizard of Oz-was carried out in detail even to the raffling off of Toto, the little dog. It was complete with queen, attendants and entertainment. Following the annual sing-out . . . in which the Juniors put in a surprise appearance, Honors Chapel was held. Prizes, honors, and scholarships were awarded to the accompaniment of hearty applause by thrilled friends and families. Sigma Omego collected quite a pile of old clothes for the United Nations clothing relief drive, at its Old Clothing Tea. The last week in May began hell week for most sorority pledges. Their costumes were crazy, their attitudes very submissive. - With all thoughts turning toward June, exams and - graduation, and vacation, May ended on a half-happy, half-sorrowful note. But with the end of this, their first year at Mather, Frosh still could not quite forget the costumes they had been forced to wear those first few agonizing days of hazing . . . "and visions of elephants danced through their heads" Cwith all due apologies to Clement Moorelb 83 FORD scrzoong., u ik OF 1? N Enucfmom :X F .. RHYMOWD LN "il""" House S CLHRK HHLL Q . of w i X GUILFORD V V HOUSE Q, , fo fi S W XFV TEN we QOXMRT 'S "T e wisdom ofa learned r opportunity of leisure . . . H i iAPOCRYPHA: ECCLESIASTICUS , 84 + J MXH 7 v P 'E l L H ...L 'n-"'- YM 1 M T v, 1 n V 'r 85 f 1 ati SSE: ww Egx Tm as me W H 2 K E E Billb- TUDE T GO ERNM N "Our Council each season" . . . starts the ball rolling with Freshman Week, introduces the new crop to Mather fvice-president shines herel . . . gets the budget set up and hands the students' money to the thirteen Federated Organizations Ctreasurerlj . . . administers the Honor Code Uudiciary Chairmanj . . . handles innumerable details of student life, organizes Stunt Night, tries to keep everyone happy Cpresident and secretaryj . . . listens to pleas, thinks up new ideas at the Monday afternoon meetings, represents the student body Cthat's Student Gov.J. OFFICERS President ....,.......... ........ L ouise Barnhart Vice-President ..... ..... D ickie Shepheard Secretary .......... ...... W endy Hermberg Treasurer .... ,....... B etsy Eickhoi all 559 Stags may . Each student a member, the cabinet is the nucleus . . . its I KE? quiet activities strive for service , E Q lg- to all of Mather . . . the directory, 5 l'l stationery, the Thanksgiving baskets and Christmas dolls, and half-sponsorship with the sororities of the increasingly popular Wednesday-afternoon "cof- fees" . . . Where coffee, cookies, and conversation with friends do Wonders for a tired student. Y-Dub Works with the YWCA area . . . helped in the "Faiths Men Live By" American Acquaintance Tour, as host to students from many Northern Ohio colleges. "Y-Dub" is an important organization here at Mather-it gets out and does things . . . everyone is a member, and knows it! Advisors, Mrs. r r Franklin J. Bacon and the Rev- erend William G. Cole in meet- ings and out. OFFICERS President .,.......... Martha Morris Vice-president .... Betsy Eickhoif Secretary,.Mary Jane Llewellyn Treasurer ............ Ruth Buettner C 87 - RED CROSS IT forty-six Matherites gave the neuro-psychiatric pa- tients the first entertain- ment they'd had. Nurse's Aid-two classes of girls met twice a Week at University Hospitals for in- struction. Course graduates could volunteer as Nurse's Aides. The Motor Corps- two Mather girls drove for the Red Cross and Crile. The money-raising cam- paigns, entertaining and beneficial . . . sorority par- ties and the Intersorority Carnival donated profits to the Red Cross. And the War Fund Drive, from March 19 to 31, contacted all Matherites. 6-11 The Red Cross Unit was organized at Mathe October 1944. Despite its infancy it has b highly successful. First, at the request of British War Relief Association, the stuffing of mals for refugee children in Europe . . . contin tion of the sale of War stamps and bonds, by do and Haydn representatives. Peak sale was S one Week. Mather's Blood Bank vaunts many life inv ments. A new depository system was introdu . . . a quota for each dormitory, sorority, Haydn Hall. Donors were regularly driven do to the blood bank. Most interesting project was the success Christmas vacation party at Crile Hospital . Chairman ...,.............. Doris Alb Vice-chairman..Mary Lou Strim 1 Secretary .................... Mary Pet Treasurer ................ Anne Weism y Publicity ....... ...... M arilyn Sc l ,J-- -1 ' 0 l T HLET IC I ,,.,. First day back, A.A. sponsored a new idea- a cook-out for the dorm girls. Fall high- lighted a gay Hill-Billy Ball barn dance and a splashy swim fest . . . the Yale-Harvard basketball game, with its star teams. Yale won by the hair-raising score of 42-41- what a game. The School for Models-how to dress, walk, AND lose weight-it's simple if you know the rules. Star models had a style show at Halle's, benefits going to Crile Hospital. Big event of the spring season was the A.A. Banquet on May 14th. Campus sports finale was the baseball game with Adelbert-won by Mather. CC'est la guerrel . OFFICERS President .................... Claire Doran Secretary ............,... Barbara Curry Vice-president ........ Frances Healy Treasurer ,................. Peggy Powell SSDCI T10 They serve in a supervisory capacity . . . and it's the Pink Pig Week- ends they supervise. This group of weekend "managers" brings order out of the chaos of red and blue points, plans meals for the Weekenders at the Squire farm's "Pig", takes care of all the details . . . they take care of the Pink Pig, too-had a special shower for that little house, and gifts from students and organizations poured in. OFFICERS President ........................ Fran Mako Vice-president ................ Peg Powell Secretary ......,....... Winnie Johnson Treasurer .............. Marian Phillips i I TERDOR BO RD The dorm girls' student government . . . With a representative from each dorm- itory, and- under the guidance of Miss Dolan, the girls try to solve the problems that come up. Rules are set up, punish- ments meted out . . . from "two minutes late-campused one night," to Hcampused the rest of the semester!" If there's a major disturbance in one of the nine peaceful communities, president Mac Nevin hastens over to see what can be done. Usually something can, for the In- terdorm Board has the power of the col- lective voice of the girls themselves. President .......... ........ L ouise Nevin Vice-president ............ ....... D ickie Snyder Secretary-treasurer ...... ......... B arbi Curry N HO OR RIE Lux Society means service to the school and scholarship. Juniors chosen are tapped at May Day Honors Chapel, in the impressive ceremony in the candle-lit chapel. Biggest job of Lux is the Calendar. All meetings held on campus must be scheduled and placed on the bulletin board. President ........ Janet Young Vice-president .....,.. Pat O'Donnell Sec.-treas ......... Anne Rogers . ,x' Phi Beta Kappa elections are announced in April and June. The chosen few well deserve recognition, for their scholarship is of the highest. Those el e cte d this year: Bea Andrews, Claire Doran, Sylvia Efros, Jane Anne E11- strom, Margaret Gebert, La- Verne Green, Mary Haemmer- le, Doris Matuska, Carol May, Norma Sacks, Barrie Vendig, Jackie Young, Miriam Schwartz, Jeanne Wasilk, A1- berta Bacnik, and Marilyn Stewart. Pat O'Donnell and Lois Haase were. elected last year With eleven nationalities represented in this new all-university organization, personalities include Guita Rossbach, Belgian ice-skating champion . . . Laura Bendit, the cosmopolitan who has lived in Brazil, France and Germany . . . Wendy Hermberg, here from Jena, Germany . . . Enid Fullerton and George Johnson from England . . . Luzmela Arosemena, a Brazilian nurse . . . Venezuelan doctors. They have sociable meetings, see films of their native lands . . . and they gave a Welcoming tea for Dr. Fisher of the New York Institute of International Education. President ...... ........ A udrey Johnson Secretary ....... .............. L aura Bendit Treasurer ..... ........ H umberto Parra ITR TIGALCLB 92 Tower Theatre and Radio Club, one and the same . . . The Administration Building theatre has been buzzing since early fall with the activities of the Radio Players. Audi- tions held, the club went into full swing in October .... Script writing, directing, and acting, under the direction of Mrs. Clair Henderleder. They're proudest of three half-hour scripts recorded and presented to the Crile Hospital record library . . . of appearances at Crile and the Marine Hospital. TOWER THEATRE Social activities were also on the club calendar . . . a Christmas tea in Haydn Hall, with decorations-a can- dlelight musical and carols presented by the Tower Theatre Players for their guests from the Play House and Radio Guild . . . merrymaking in the Tower in April, when the officers gave a cake party and quiz show for the club members and guests. Guest speakers and informal meet- ings at WBOE helped acquaint the Radio Players with the opportunities of the field. President ...................... Marge Tanner Secretary-treasurer, Phyllis Hausman Home Ee Club had a busy sea- son this year . . . with one of the largest enrollments of any of Mather's organizations. And everyone of these members was more than willing to trek up to the Home Ee House on Adelbert Road for interesting meetings which ranged from cooking ex- HO EECCL B periments to the solving of the problems which the war years offered to the home ec major . . . beauty tips, too, emanated from these meetings, and hints for thrifty thriving after college days. President Arlene Hanley did right Well by her club this year . . . yessir! ANCE CLUB- Gym classes are special antipathies for most . . . but every Wednesday afternoon in the gym twelve girls voluntarily do leaps and falls and running series-extremely laborious exercise. Amazingly-they're enjoying it! A Girls in the Dance Club, under A. A. and Miss Edmondson, seriously study square, folk, and modern dancing. This year, hours of strenuous exercise brought grace and coordination . . . and highly successful performances-from the October dance for the faculty to the children's program at the Art Museum in March. This last was the high spot-their success and popularity with the youngsters astounded them. The club did French, Spanish, and American folk dances in costume . . . then invited the children onto the stage to learn some dances. The response was a mad rush. And when the audience sought autographs-the club felt downright professional! President ......... ..,........ C arol Rode 5 1 cy Q I 4-G 1 J Sf' 0 ! 'Q ,lf-4-4 CHAPEL BO RD to see what was going on in chapel for the Week, or This year the same policy of three different programs weekly was car- ried out . . . on Monday, the required convocations, planned by the student board under Miss Elizabeth P. Lamg on Wednesday the religious services by the Rev. William G. Coleg on Fri- day the musical services by Mr. Rus- sell L. Gee. Monday programs varied in interest from the Student Gov quiz show and the Stunt Night skit, to the celebration of Mrs. Mather's birthday and discussions on foreign affairs. Students have learned to look for the front page box in the Mather Record notes in their boxes from Business Manager Peg Ehrenfeld, who kept track of all attendance at the Monday chapels. Chairman ........................ ............Lois Haase Junior Representative .......................... Janet Fisher Sophomore Representative .......... Marilyn Albrecht Freshman Representative ....... ....... P Ortia DOWHS ff W Q 1 GLEE CLUB Aifectionately known as the "Gee Club", it was off to a iiying start with a luncheon meeting last September . . . first appearance at Freshman Week Sunday night vesper service . . . during the year, special music in the Wednesday chapels. The annual Candlelight Christmas Service, with old and new carols, was beautifully done . . . the SPRING CONCERT was the year's climax . . . formal dresses . . . classical, modern, popular arrangements . . . songs by guest star Marie Simmelink Kraft, refreshments in Haydn afterwards. The May Day Carol at Honors Chapel marked the end of a really successful season. The University Choir made great strides this year, and its offer of 3550 scholarships brought to it some very beautiful voices. Mather girls joined the choir in large numbers, and found in it the joy of music that they desired. Not its most highly publicized appearance, but perhaps its most significant, was the singing done by the Choir at Q the services in the Church of the Covenant on V-J day. 1, 44 The outstanding, the new, the best . . . in prose, poetry, plays . . . they are read, and reviewed and discussed and thoroughly enjoyed at the Par- nassus meetings in the Myers Room, every other Wednesday afternoon. They delve into deeper problems, too, studying other peoples and other literatures. The meetings, they have spirit-some of them get downright hilarious . . . while others remain studiously serious. Tea and cookies, fascinating literature, interesting reports, pleasant people, with the added enjoyment of the presence of Professors Eleanor W. Thomas and Katherine H. Porter. President ............................................ Lois Haase Secretary-treasurer ......., ........ D ickie Snyder PRESS BO RD A potluck supper to begin with, a Pink Pig outing in the spring . . . and real work in between. They write press releases for local papers, publicity for out-of-town . . . study the art of journalism, anything connected with the press . . . hear guest speakers-from the Reserve faculty CMiss Thomas 3 Dr. Foster on "War Cartoonsul or from the Cleveland papers Creporters Todd Simon and Wallace Katzg Sunday editor W. G. Vorpe of the P. DJ . . . reports from their own members . . . visits to radio stations and newspapers. Their specialty, releases about Mather girls to their home-town newspapers. The Press Board-Mather's own publicity bureau. Chairman, Betty Jane Carlton Program Chairman, Phyllis Scully n 4 Y 5 S. FV.-Jiri-.A f"1s?3gkfa rgjigsiis .. .R E w UNDIAL T FF Q 535 sig Q 5 Shifted, under the direction of Martha Morris, from the purely literary to general in- terest . .' . as in this spring's "career" issue-features by professional alums, stories, poetry, and essays. A bigger budget-more elaborate issues, more pictures, and membership in the National Scholastic Press Association. To quote Editor Morris: "I thought that Mather needed a publication to print timely articles that Weren't the spot news a paper requires and which a yearbook certainly couldn't handle. I don't think I've done my idea justice fPoly ed. note: We think she hash, but I'm counting on future editors to carry on." ' A regular staff handled assignments C"You're more sure you'll get enough to print."- Morrisj. Manuscripts solicited from Mather students as Well . . . and acknowledged with a note from the editor, on green and cream stationery. Editor ..................... ......... M artha Morris Business Manager. ..... -L...Jeanne McGinness 101 RECORD The Sherlocks of the Mather campus, those dellghtful ladles of the press the Mather Record The prlnter has gone to war, Powell and WISBMRH have gone grey m the servlce, but the news ha s come out 1 el1g1ously each week p ge edltor B J Carlton, gett1ng scoops fightlng lt out Wlth the prmter Feature stones Ol Annett Francls page two an ed1tor1als fast and fllI'1OLlS on every toplc guest edltors, and a furor creatmg debate over student act1v1 tles Page three a mlscellany of 1nformat1on page four a fresh man creatxon Plus advertlsmg Loew s Park has covered up A A tennls, Hlgbee s Just got out of 11ne , the Record pr1nted mlsstatements, 1t apo1og1zed , lt announced too late, 1t was pemtent And yet pu l1c1ty, and publ1c op1n1on, and ln tervlews a good Job' F1rst a Ed1to1 s Peggy Powell, Gmny Lou Wlseman BUSIHESS Manager Elleell McNamee SSW W TRIBU E Eileen Foley, Mather junior, found herself with the title of editor, and a desk of her own. She also found troubles . . . shortage of ads, rigid mailing rules, a high staff turnover dive successive business managers lost in the draftl. The paper's policy-to create more awareness of international problems, increase interest in chapel and sports. In the former line-editorials and alum news . . . and preelection straw vote on Roosevelt and Dewey CRooseve1t wonj. In the latter field-more fighting editorials, good news coverage. Plus news of all the usual and all the outstanding campus activities . . . of alums . . . of sports . . . and Throckmorton . . . and a flattering review of May Day to close its successful season. POLYCHRO ICO Sporadlc Work 1n the Haydn second floor Poly oflice the 1eal slavmg 1S done 1n 1nd1v1dual ass1gnments by a group of W1ll1ng glrls the Poly chron1con staff The1rs 15 much of the Work Wlth httle of the glory schedul1ng p1ctures accom panylng the photographer around the campus sendmg notlces searchlng out people from whom But what d1d the club do? Wr1t1ng up art1cles scr1pt1ons 1 persuad1ng solutely need a quarter page 111 the Mather yearbook And there IS the bus1ness end of thls bus1ness gettlng sub n fall sendlng out b1lls findmg advert1sers and them that they ab ad h sa Sprosty Esther Bach Jean Roecker T e1e Mary Lou Stock Isabelle Roselyn Faragher W of the staff who saw to It that collected and wr1tten u1 had a gloup to photograph when he who counted up the su Reed Shlrley Dunbar ere the hard worklng nucleus the materlal was 3 that the photographer arnved or bscnptlons as they came 1n - . . , - 3 3 to get information . . . " ' ." , . 3 7 7 H 7 I ! 1 ' , I TRGDUCI G... Miss Marion C. Siney stepped into the vacated Poly adviser place. Hers was a most diiiicult task, to take up the unfamiliar reins of a delicate job . . . delicate in that much hinged on deadlines, the Poly volunteers tended to procrastination, and many pitfalls beset the new staff. Miss Siney strove always to learn "What the story Was," even as she kept tab on the progress of the book and advised the staff as to what seemed to her the best policy. For a great deal of patience and insight in an entirely new Job, We gratefully thank Miss Siney, and Welcome her to our staif. MISS MARION C. SINEY MISS MILDRED HART RE ELL... This year's staff was started on its way, guided by the trusty ex- perience of Miss Mildred Hart, for many years the Polyclironicon adviser. Patient, gentle, she masterfully gave the student editors full sway . . their "inalienable right," she recognized, to do the book themselves, to make their own mistakes. But she masterfully knew where to insert a word of advice, to keep the mistakes from being fatal. Last fall Miss Hart resigned from the Poly . . . to her we say, Thank you, and our very' best Wishes! ME UF THE YE When we at Mather count our blessings, Mrs. Bacon is numbered among the first. If we were back in grammar school and kept opinion books, in all, after Mrs. Bacon's name would be written "marvelous," "smooth," "perfect," or any one of a dozen other trite but oh-so-expressive adjectives. But now that we're in college, other adjectives must serve. "Vivacious"-perhaps the first word that comes to mind when We think about her- her twinkly eyes and ever-present smile, her alert and interested manner. "Pleasant"-hardly a strong enough adjective to describe her gracious- ness and charm even in the little things. "Effi- cient"-it seems impossible that such la tiny and feminine person could be that-but witness the always-ready-for-inspection state of Haydn. With the very able assistance of Juliette that, too, may be chalked up to Mrs. Bacon's credit. "Thoughtful"-note well the many ideas formulated in conjunction with the Haydn House Committee for the entertainment and enjoyment of those who make Haydn theirhang-out. But these adjectives aren't enough either, what is there to do but to go back to the vernacular of our childhood, and say we think she's "swel1!" 'A' 'k ul' We might call her Mrs. Giroux . . . but no, what could she ever be to us but Juliette ? Juliette who seems to be in charge of practically everything around Haydn . . . if you're a town girl staying overnight, sign up with Juliette you must, if you want a meeting in Haydn Drawing Room, or if you have a tea in the East Lounge, Juliette is the quietly guiding spirit behind it. But that's not what makes Juliette the "Julie" whom everyone knows and loves. Its her smile when you meet her . . . her sympathy when you can't find what you need in the Candy Shop, her interest in school affairs, her patience with the inevitable question, "Julie, are there any V cigarettes this week?" Patience? No, it's more l than that, for J uliette's wonderful-she is as dis- appointed as we when there are none. Rushing from upstairs to the candy shop, rush- ing to find more milk shake glasses fbecause the girls forget to bring them backlj, rushing in an impeccably white uniform to get a faculty tea fixed up . . . Juliette, with an air of perplexity, sees the task through, and then breaks into her pleasant chuckle as she sees something pleasant in everything. Juliette herself is one of the most pleasant persons in WRU, and one of the nicest. Mather expressed its feelings toward Joe Allen at the Honors Chapel observance of his 25th anniversary at Mather. The S500 check, from students, faculty- everyone-was one expressiong but the ovation that swelled as Joe walked to the platform that evening was an even better one. It kept on and on, and meant, more than mere words can tell, how we feel toward Joe. Quiet he is, and very unassuming, but his years of experience and his increasing fame give him great stature on the Mather campus. More than that, his courtesy, his willingness Ctime and again he's asked to move the chairs at the eleventh hourj , the twinkle in his eye, his sense of humor-these win him not only respect but affection. -S It seems an impossibility to imagine a Stunt Night, a May Day, an Interdorm Dance-any campus function-that could go on without Joe. It is not only his willing help, and his in- valuable knowledge of the campus' secret haunts-it is even more. At that last moment, when everything seems blackest, J oe's smile, and his, "Yessir, I can do that for you!" fixes everything. 1k'k'k AN or THE YE Lf.,-. "ECCD"Y'l-XS F ? 1 A '- 4l Suu Y WMUHUQQHMUWUF 2 'LT x:n.. W :3 3 11' rg: it - HI E IMI E W U W KU if we Qawmq Q I if Q lc IM Q we U :ala :of 1ilZrUIlllFlZfFfQljr jf? HA Q YQQQ , QX M Fai TU IF mg S 1:1 x::: 1:1 , I-'L gli! ,H L--I---'M' J' e CH HOD 3 A 30. Ifl do vow cz frie cz' hp I I! perform i laqt czrticle. 5f5 108 l HALL. ' " wg-D-'fl MAGAIINE THKLG asf ' gmt EAS DELT PHI UP ILO "The Greeks," good fun and fellowship-at their Gay Nineties party for the benefit of the East Ohio Gas fire relief fund. Their Gold Rush party-"Wear blue jeans"-was the last of the hectic rushing season. A pledge dinner at Crosbyis--tradition with the Greeks. And at the season's end a picnic with the Phi Kaps, at Mitiwanga. They Won the '45 Singout. OFFICERS President ....,....................... Dickie Shepheard Vice-president ...... ........... C laire Doran Secretary ...,.....,. ...... K ay Cuminer Treasurer ...... ..... B arbara Beistle Seniors Louise Barnhart, Barbara Beistle, Doris Campbell, Kay Cummer, Claire Doran, Eleanor Dunham, Fran- ces Mako, Pat O'Donnell, Anne Rogers, Dickie Shep- heard, Mildred Thomas"', Arlene Wright. Juniors Doris Alburn, Betsy Eickhoif, Ruth Fetzer, Phyllis Ford, Mary Clare Harmon, Frances Healy, Wendy Hermberg, Marilyn Jordant, Jean Lafaye, B. J. Mace keyt, Marilyn Matia, Patty Lou Schoonover, Jean Smith, Dickie Snyderii, Mary Lou Strimple, Anne Weisman, Ginny Lou Wiseman. Sophomores Marilyn Albrechtt, Bette Danemanf, Shirley Dun- bart, Roselyn Faraghert, Eileen Guntherf, Barbara Howest, Mary Jane Llewellynt, Cathy McLartyi", Rowena Scottt, Jane Sutphinx. Y Pledges An Artists' Ball, at the Tudor Arms Hotel . . . bowling and skating for fun and relaxation . . . loads of food and talk at a Metropolitan Park picnic . . . goblins and pumpkins aplenty at a Halloween party at Frances Judnick's home .... a theatre party to Christmas H oliday starring their own Lois Kelly . . . pot-luck suppers with their alums . . . a S25 War Bond toward the new dormitory after the war . . . and helping home front's AWVS. OFFICERS President .............................. Emily Zwolinski Vice-president ....,. .............. L ois Kelly Secretary ......... ..... H elen Wojtowicz Treasurer ..... ..... F lorence Levstek Seniors Margaret Appleby, Elizabeth Eberle, Florence Levs- tek, Dorothy Lisy, Carol May, Evelyn Mezgec, Sally Mickey, Beverly Whitet, Helen Wojtowicz, Esma Yahya, Emily Zwolinski. 'l' Pledges DELT P Juniors Alberta Bacnik, Beatrice Diebel, Harriet Hanzowli, Frances Judnick, Lois Kelly. Sophomores Blanche Krupanskyt, Magdalean Lucht, Rosemary Nagyt, Constance Serio"'. I O EGA- MM DELT Maryann D F1 ances Poppa Garnalini's candied-apple cart at the Intersorority Carnival . . . Rushing--a ship party with stuffed sailor suits, Ugobs of fun" , . . hellweek, with original vegetable hats . . . and out to the Pink Pig for informal initiation. Good fellows stick together . . . the Gams saw Faust, Jamie at Cain Park, Rise Stevens . . . a Halloween Party, dinner at Damons in December, a Mother-Daughter luncheon at the Midday Club . . . And best of all the Week at Lois Loesch's home, to plan rushing. Seniors Henrietta Cridert, Maryann Dallow, Mary Davisi, Phyllis Evansai, Fran Glowe, Lois Loescli, Mary McAdoo, Dorothy Partridge. Juniors Betty Brownlee, Ruth Buettner, Jane Casson, Grace Cummingii, Harriet Dernmerle, Jean Fickt, Janet Fisher, Violet Gowert, Merle Kreutzt, Kay Ritz, Carol Rodei, Betty Rogerst, Vera Savchuk, Ruth Mary Schofield, Marilyn Smith, Helen Waddington, Jocelyn Ward? Sophomores Jean Lancet, Dora Jane Luikartli, Jeanne Mannt, Dorothy Rentschik, Adele Sullivanii. 'li Pledges Secretary Dorothy Par1 OFFICERS President Lois Loesch Vice-president Treasurer 112 OFFICERS Pres1deut Peg Murray V1ce presldent Nancy Render Secretary Marge Estes Treasurer Blllle Feddery View JSE sl s in gg ,Mil Xftff The Ph1 Kap star started Shlfl mg at an alum d1nner at the Col lege Club a bang up Bmgo Bum Party for the Whole Mathel gang Novembel they sponsored the first Y Dub teas, hay r1de out to 1ng a comlc Stl 1p character party Peg West s panama party Wlth no sleep dlnner at the Southern Taveln after the pledge tea 1 1 t1at1on ln June To the Ph1 Kaps W1th a flau for good publ1c1ty they bolster saggmg school sp1r1t Semors Betty Cooper B1ll1e Feddery, Martha Mo1r1s Peg Murray, Loulse ZNSVIH Betty Plpkln Nancy Rendel, Dot Roe, Frances Sm1th Peg West Jullanne At Wood Wh1taker .Tackle Young Janet Young Junlors Jane Broadbent, Marge Estes, Audrey Johnsont, Ruth Keller, Marge Kuhrtt, Patty LaRoccot Joan Pfe1fer, Peggy Powell Shlrley Putnam' Helen Urner Sophomores B J Carlton Jean Cavanaught, Barbala Curry Jean Damelsent G1lda Elllstl, Peg Fultont Mary Al Gwssl, Calol Hallockl Betty Jane Herman' Carole Johnson"', Wmlfred Johnson? Marlta Mullen Sklp Noskel E11een O Halra , Peggy Reed G1nny Shreiflerl Kay Wagnerl Y Pledges PHI KAPP ZET 113 3: Hd 'i H . . ,X x I X mx' -M E a,-gt X - H H at-,tba 0 ,,,,, , ,,,, ,, .,,.,, as: 'Hi E - ' ' :HH I - ,.,--,-- b , no 2 ., M A B X nz V -in s ss s . Y .Qs ' F Q - 3 IVQN ig, ' - - l . f .4 H , a . -- A H .L . 1' In ,wig :ral l.. 32 V - l a " ff y :KE-,' .H Ky. at ' s ,Q 'J -ffm -- sv a?f'- , Q4 Q as are ,K mga: -s fl - W , . W .I W .., . Q by 1- H ct, - 3, P . JEL - A 1 Q 5' . H H H E W QI 'V M-al eff? 3 ' . . . '- ,. 9 1 I In C . ,, , Q -E - L - ' s . ! ' , Feddery s Red Ralder camp. Rush- , it , . . ,V ,, ' a . . . 1 1- ' - 543-7 age, 1 H u . . . . H ,H - few ao, - 'Qs X , ' . . . . .C dh L-,st H ' - ' , f' K re D- - g -at W T -I W .LH 1 Y ' 1 rx: - . . . :sf . . . . v , , , , rl 9 l . .t . . C .- - A , , - . , .. , . -- . . . f- 75 ! I ' Y 7 I ! i ' 1 . s ' ! I 1 n ., H, V- Y I A SIGM O EGA as B R H as . E OFFICERS President .... .... M arilyn Ne Secretary .... ,..,,.,, J oan Crow Treasurer ..... Betty Cravv Publicity ..... .,.,,.,,, N ancy Newly back on campus this year . . . The alums' rush party-one result 5 St. Pa1:rick's Day favors for Crile. Hospital. And the alums gave a pot-luck supper too. The Old Clothing Tea-one huge success . . . one corner' of Haydn East Lounge piled high With clothing sent to the United Nations Clothing Drive. Beribboned pledges, and informal initiation . . . the Inter-Sorority Singout, and a marvelous Week at a cottage on the lake . . . a climax to the season's activities. Seniors Sophomores Jean Nowak' Nancy Bell, Betty Crawford, Joan Crowley, Helen J1mi0l'S Fogg, Barbara Hatch, Martha Immel, Marilyn Nel- Sylvia Rowihabik, Frances Zeman. son, Barbara Roscoe, Eileen Sheron, Juliet Thomas. it Pledges 114 IGMA P I OFFICERS President ...... Jeanne McGinness Secretary ........ Beatrice Harmon Treasurer .......... Arlene Franley Si? The coveted gavel-prize for money-makers at the Interso- rority Carnival-Went to the Sigs! Their booth was a minia- ture menagerie of stuffed ani- mals. A merry Christmas for crippled children at the Rose- mary Home, the next Sig pro- ject. 'Twas complete with all the trimmings. A swank Arabian affair was the height of the rushing season . . . from the Swami to the Slave Girls, no one missed a trick- especially when the "Sheik of Arabyl' appeared. l Dinners at Crosby's . . . monthly alum meetings with everything from teas to folk-danc- ing-a busy year for the Sigs. Seniors Mary Fay, Arlene Franley, Mary E. Gauger, Sally Gilbert, Beatrice Harmon, Lois Haase, Shirley Hum- mert, Lois Jo Ketcht, Jeanne McGinness, Doris Mil- ler, Margaret Tielke, Jean Young. Juniors Miriam Batesii, Rita Bieber, Shirley Clugh, Ruth Chantlert, Eileen Foley, Lennie Frum, Pat Kora- beckili, Janice Lange, Helen Portmannat, Isabelle Reedi' Ann Regan, Annabel Rickard, Betty Rinnert, Marilyn Stewart, Marian Waddington, Betsy White- house, Marjorie Wolfe. Sophomores Alice Brehmfli, Marvelle Donegant, Jeanne Dwyerii, Georgiana Gilbertt, Mary Nell Glockii, Jeannette Kiblerii, Helen Kingit, Margaret McAfeeii, Helen Redmondt, Nancy Ricet, Margan Wattst, Patricia Weetont. It Pledges 1 THET PHI 0 EG OFFICERS President SSCFGUIYY 155 Semggtgq- Marian Phillips Betty Simmermacher Treasurer 2nd semester Ruth Dornback Shie Vice-president Marilyn Hoffman Dagmar Lewis A grand and glorious year, the enthusiastic Thetas say. The Play House, alum meetings, an anniversary luncheon, in the fall. In Winter, a party with Nu Sigma Nu and Psi Omega fraternities. Spring features . . . from the United Nations party to the pledge dinner, rushing like mad . . . the enormous heart-shaped cake at Ruth Shie's Valentine party . . . a Mother- Daughter tea . . . celebration of Betty Simmermacher's recovery from infantile paralysis. Plus War aid activities . . . giving blood, rolling bandages, canteen Work. Seniors E. Denny Emanuel, Gloria Gordon, Bonnie Enid Green, Patricia Grossman, Jeanne Hruby, Dagmar Lewis, Gertrude Murell, Lois Oeberman, Lucy Riel, Ruth Dornback Shie, Betty Simmermacher. Juniors Jane Braun, Jeanne Ceryenka, Janet Marie Fisher, Marian Hacker, Marilyn Hofrnan, Eva Kenmore, Ruth Lampson, Mary Lou Nesbitt, Marian Phillips, Alicejane Smid, Pat Smith, Marge Tanner, Lois Trebing, Ruth Volzer. Sophomores Anne Fenton, Bernice Kost, Betty Sajtos, Jean Sauer. Patricia Toll. 'F Pledges 116 ALPHA THETA EPSLON War rehef work at thell meetmgs at Chustmas tune, g1ftS for shut 1ns, and then a party of the1r own They dlessed cc la, L11l1an Russell at the1r Back Numbers rush party wh1le Jane Ellstrom declalmed, The curfew shall not rmg' Golng SOC131 potluck suppers and an opela party CLe Coq CZOU and a theater party CTM Corn as Gfeenj both the same dayl The Alpha Thetas are fortunate 1n the1r new adv1ser Dr Jacob Meyer OFFICERS Presldent Malgaret Anne Jones VICE p1 esldent B1anca Zaffarano Secretary Helen W1tt1Ch Treasurer Phylhs Everhart Selnors Junlors Jane Anne Ellstrom Margaret Anne Jones Mal Joan Brown Phylhs Everhart Joy Wlthrow Helen garet Peoples Kathleen Taylol Eleanore Zullo W1ttlCh Bxanca Zaffarano Pledges NU ZETA NU Weddlng bells and part1es spelled out a busy season Pledges suffered then we1e feted Wlth a party at Wade Park Manor Alums started a newspaper Mothers and daughters had a luncheon, fathels and daughters rough It at a p1cn1c H1gh spot 1n entertalnment a grand progresslve date party from cocktalls at Ashkena s to danclng and refreshments at Druckers Memor1es cocktalls before Stunt Nlght cha1n brldge part1es for the newly Weds and that back to college party for the alums OFFICERS Presldent Florence Brofman VICE presldent Evelyn Goldfarb T1e'1surer Dor1s Goldsmlth Heller Rec Secretary Co1res Secretary SBIHOFS Gale Fldelholtz Evelyn Goldfarb Janet Koblentz rabelle Ma1lman Laura Margohs Llla R1ckel Norma Sacks Juniors Idelle Blaloskyt Flo1ence Brofman Ruthe Dragm Sylvla Drucker Dor1s Goldsmxth Heller Myrtle Hor ow1tz Esther Kapelmck Jacquehne Stone Sh1rley Thoryn 117 Gale F1delholtz Sylv1a Drucker Sophomores Arlyne Adelmanlt Ruth Brown? Harrlet Cohen? Teddy Cowen? Laura Fuerstt Sh1rley G1lbert" Bet ty Lessert Florence Lemon? Vlolet Ornsteln Elame Plckuse' Sarabel Rosel' Betty Stexnt Jean Wolfe? N aoml Wohnskyl' Pledges . . A . .. . . . n Q l - ' , ' ' , ' sc 73 . 1 . . H . ,, . . . . . . . 1' . ' I . . . . ' . . . . , . . ' - . 1 . . A . . i Y 0 A - ' ' 52 1 1 ' 1 1 1 '25 . . . 1 1 - 1 ' if 0 A l I 1 . M . . . . . . l ' 7 X . . , . I . . . , . . . . . . . . . . , , " , 1 " ' - X . N --F--------------.----- g l 1 , X c -,. ............. -- 1 . X . ..... ............... N . , V ' 1 y . 7 ' . . . 1 1 1 l Ve ' 1 1 1 , . . 1 n 7 1 : ' , . . H . . 4, 1 1 1 . ' ' . ,K . . 4 -A . . ' 1 1 1 1 1 : Q . ' 1 Q 7 ' I ' ' . . at . . 1 - 1 1 J if RHO DELTA CHI Founded in 1945, with eleven charter members . . . this spring semester, Mather's newest sorority, Rho Delta Chi, was planned, accepted, and took its place as a thriving group. They've done a lot in just getting organized . . . a dinner meeting at the Commodore for a start . . . soon a pledge ceremony . . . informal initiation, a pajama party, and a cookout. Too busy becoming acquainted to do anything spectacular, they say . . . but their accomplishment in the mere formation of a new sorority is no inconsequential thing. OFFICERS President ........... ....... P hyllis Hausman Vice-president ..... .....i.,.... G race Keller Secretary ..,..... ...... B arbara Gordon Treasurer ....,.. ....,. N aomi Garber Juniors Sophomores Miriam Cohn, Grace Keller, Alice Schultz. Joan Feldman, Naomi Garber, Barbara Gordon Phyllis Hausrnan, Anne Koppelt, Shirley Markus, Arlene Meckler, Esther Perilsteint. t Pledges A THETA LAMBDA PHI "Crazy bridge" at the Halloween party . . . the annual Christmas party . . . and never will they forget the Canadian ham at the alum president's home. Rushing started . . . barrels of coke . . . reminders of younger days, the slate-like invitations to a School Daze rush party . . . and then the pledge tea, dinner, and the theater. Entertainment by the pledges, and a pajama party, made hell Week fun. And tl1ey're all behind the War-please note 100W cooperation in all home-front War efforts. Seniors Sophomore Eleanor Safstrom, Jean Wolfordii. Elsie Vargot. Pledges Junior Kay Holman. l us TER ORORITY Made up of soro11ty DFGSI dents plus sen1or and Junlor soror1ty representatlves Perplexmg ploblems gather round the1r heads, 1n meetlngs O1 out-organ1zat1on of the soro1 1ty half of the Inter fra te1n1ty sororlty C a r n 1 V al QAde1bert gym, Saturday mght Dec 2 the S1gS Wonj settlng up the rushmg 1u1es adm1n1ster1ng them, pun1sh1n0 offender C N o rush 111g off campus No I'LlSh11'1g before Monday, February I 1 try1ng to keep both sororlty alums and sororlty act1ves happy planmng and executmg the Intersororlty Smgout and Dance Cat the Cleveland, thls year, Saturday mght May 26 Smooth IHLISIC and smoother s1ng1ng The cup Went to the 119 Greeksb But these problems are solved and as noth1ng com pared to the clash and the 1n tens1ty of opposlng op1n1on on the subgect of the quota sys tem of b1dd1ng Arguments rage 111 and out of the councll After tr1a1 and tr1bu1at1on the councll has arr1ved at a tem porary comprom1se to be trled next year, perhaps May lt succeed Pres1dent LOIS Loesch 1 . . . - , I A ,fa ' - . . . M ml! - - fm www 4 A ' . F er . M NSHHEHWS - E. -w- ' .xr - Nga? I f 11-wifes ,mm s ' ' , . 'A .1 as E wa Am, ' , , , -- ,- N H:-a-V . . Um, . H E as my . E N H mmm. 1 , was smart HE ' mils! 4 HEHEH EE REBER BEER!! B . . . . H 11 F, - H . - E 0 . '1 I' - - I . - . . 5 1. - 9 ' a m M A . . . ,S sw E E - h md 11 ,S . H ' T N as M . 4 as 7 B ' 2 H 5 P' E ' I It H HE I E . - E as C' I 2 Q: New E . . ' ,S :H .g H me M M . E , . mimi, swf-sf-l A E Kg WWE L-. . , .,..-.. A ,, . . . . - . . . - - - l n n ' ' ' ' .1 . . - 5 ' ' QQQEWBS I mhfmss BHK ' ., H A A .a , sf - - ' ,- .. H . . . . . Y 0 n V im - H M . . 1 . K I I, ' I E . E Y , S V, W., Q 3 , 45" ' f M 2 L K H f , H N - ................ MARY CLARE HARMON Business Manager MERILYN SNYDER Editor As you come to the end of the Polychronicon, now, we hope that its quality will make up to you at least in part for its lateness-this is our swan song. There is no gainsaying our tardiness, We may as well face it. In oifering an excuse, We must present a thousand little things-printer and engraver trouble and photographer's headaches-that are only too com- mon these daysg but don't blame them. They did far better than We. But this our swan song is not meant to be the Poly apology alone. It has been fun, at times-tapping the Wires of Mather life, seeing what makes it tick, and trying' to catch the electric shock and put it into Words. And yet it Was hard, too, at times . . . working against Wg wa my F Q :S BETSY EICHKOFF RITA BIEBER Lztefrcmy Eclztoo Photogmphy Edztoa t1me trymg to collect enough plctures trymg to Wrlte character sketches at the expense of Engllsh 317 Yet for the few who stayed up mghts through half the sprlng and summe1 and fall to get the book out they ask no reward only that you enJoy thls 1945 Polychromcon To have the Mather g1r1s recelve w1th pleasure Whatever of Mather hfe of humor of beauty we have been able to put 1nto the Polychronlcon th1s 1S all we ask all We hope To the aforementwned prmters engravers and photographers We can only offer ou1 most s1ncere thanks Ellls Photographers helped us out as d1d Mlss Betty Norton of the Chfford Norton Stud1os We ll never forget lt Thanks to the Cleveland Engrav1ng Company especlally Mr Ted Wahl to M1 W E Seeley plesldent of the Judson Prlntlng Company who very graclously made us thelr 4th book thls year Cthey used to do 303 and Mr Shant1 Balhadur of the Lakeslde Studlos who d1d so Well with the senlor photographs. W1thout the help so Wlll lngly g1ven by all these, the Poly could never have come out . you re not the only ones who wondered 1f lt Would! ,,.y ., awww, mama ,gems "1 gg ws? ,B We BEER ..1. B nl H42 ss - SW BW W ass 'UHUXX mama M , gig '. sums Hui Hman A-e Newegg, mmm mass W Q .M llltl M HH,,m'V,5. Z as s E M-H, News as BE Haas .E ltle X smug' mm W . M -X New -was s . ,, mms, ss' H K sn , H ml ' H mn H tl E anim 5 'E 1 sway B mas I Em ,mx-gs E E W E we grew sm E B flggagr N H H H Zim: l-:lil 'L E ., 7 gy H Q2-' mn milf! N H H R ,V wmwimmrsm :M ,F :H Him 2: H am wma, , I, .' , as M--.sms A1 glen- .raaw 4 ' n fn . fn n . 11 . , . 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ME- ,sa M gn ww M H I W W sa - N . m H ,W L. E WE B mm, 3- mam may ml -has .B gg H E E PE B L 4 E mf mass Bw-Em E m B E SS E SS B En B ,b B Q SH ,Haig H .E .Q T H was B H H an 2 fgsiiwmn H' ss, Us W.-mm -gs ms -FE .2 E ss E- 5 ss E. ss .sd T . H H gg mf S B B B ss v V E EE Y 1. 5 - , ' H H is 1 SS E E, K . . H : H B :z na na na E H 'E' Q Q ss nm gsm H ss B W. an gn mn Emgs B B 5 W E Magma E EN 'Bi a ,wa sa, :mass sf- mm ss' ss mi ss gs E an' H 25.88 ' mm ss: m fm 5, 'ss E gg- ' gs Q f K 1 Y -' - . El fs V H1 1 , ENR Ss sg' ss K' 'ml if nl as m L N N a E ' Q Q mm H B B -ss 'gs .K K B .H va N W-nj ' si H E A . E n - Q vi FTE Nix SH 5 fl n ss S W H Q Q sm H H - n V, K-1 -mv H 1-T H Eg H gag. mifgw mf' H B T-T -qw -ff H asm B .H H-5,21 Hum S2 H H W hw mm W. fafE'nHB mfw .H E B EE K W: :B- E SS E my H H W my 1 ,W H Q B 5 . as sf Q m , mm :.:.:.: gs ss E H ' - E mi E na m -:-:I-:UV E sa m ' V 'ms .E Y E ' J -Y' "':Z'f'w-. YF NL A .. .. .. E , Em., 7 .1 ... I of ,Q. ,Q1 ,QI ,Q. ,01 ,g- ,QQ ,QT Q. ,01 ,gf ,Of ,QQ ,Q. ,Of ,gl ,gf xg- ,QQ ,of 10 0 0 O O O O 0 0 O O O 0 O O 0 Do You Know The Number of Mather Alumnae? 6,4-60. The Alumnae Associa'tion's Age? Founded 1894, incorporated 1936. Where our Alumnae Live? The United States, Africa, Canada, Cuba, England, France, Germany, Hawaii, India, Italy, Poland, Porto Rico, South America, Sweden, Switzerland and Wales. Is our Membership Growing? Yes. This year we have 12 new life mem- bers, a total of 265 life members, and 811 annual members. What Does Membership Mean? It allies as with forces defending the education of women. .It ojers the comradeship of forward thinking women. It gives intelligent women experience in working together for a better world. I t expresses Faith in Mather' and a Will to keep the doors of Mather open. What is the Alumnae Principal Fund? The income is used to increase the resources and advance the interests of Mather College and the Asso- ciation and to make gifts or loans to worthy students. It totals more than 350,000 Over 351,000 was added to it last year. Who Gives to the Alumnae Principal Fund? Annual gifts may be made to the fund by alumnae at any time during the year. It makes the donor a participant in the Continuous Campaign of the University and places her name on the Honor Roll of the Voice of Reserve. What are the dues? 351.00 for the first year out of collegeg 353.00 per year thereafterg 3550 for a life membership, or S510 a year for six years. ALUMNAE OFFICE Rooivr 149-MATHER ADMINISTRATION BUILDING ' O O O O 0 0 0 ,gg-,Qc ,of ,0. -0. ,0. ,0. ,gy ,qi ,0. 1 ,gf Q1 ,gf ,ol ,Q. Anuotu Autlhleutie S ide-Laeer FRIARS "Top-Billingn for college . . . Completely stunning, chock- ful of "foot-loosen comfort, keen companions with suits, toppers, sport togs . . . ln Black or Brown Bucko. MURRAY RENDER Shoes ' 1315 EUCLID AVENUE ,0. ,of ,0. 'sgf ,gr 10. 19. ,Q. ,nl ,Q. so 1 .04 ,9. ,gl ,fy ,0. ,of . ,Q. ,gf ,gf ,Q. ,QQ ,Q1 ,gf ,Q. .gf ,0. COMMODORE VAILET SERVICE Cleaners . . . and Tailors lst Store East of Mather 11301 Euclid Ave. GA. 8223 1 ,gf ig. so. ,QQ ,gy ,Q. ,Q. .g. ,g. ,ge Come llu uucdl Browse IPTURJLIIX ROOR MART OLD AND NEW BOOKS 930 -Prospect Avenue MAin 0265 ,g. .QQ .01 ,0. ,Q. ,ol ,Q. ,Q. Q. ,0. ,Q. ,0. ,gy ,Q. Q. ,g. ,0. 10. ,Q. ,ol ,gy .01 ,Q. ,Q. ,of ,0 MARE Your Uwu CLOTHES Designing, Dressmaking. New Short Courses. Lessons Easy-Enroll Now Progressive Fashion School 4-06 EUCLID AVE. : : MA. 6572 ,of ,0. .of ,Q. , ,0. ,g. ,0. sg. Compliments of the VOCGIUE Beauty Salou 124434 CEDAR RD. - FAir1nount 4007 0. ,0. ,QL ,Q. ,Q. ,Q .01 10. ,Q. 0. .Q. ,ol ,Q- 10. -9. ,0. .of ,Q. ig. ,Q. Q ,Q. ng. .0. f so. ,Q ,Q. ,U Colnpliments of CCIHUINBS Golden Dragon Restaurant 10613 EUCLID AVENUE GArIield 0777 :ol -0- -Q. ,o. ,0. .OL-Jo. ,Q. ,0. ,0. POPCORN BALLS For Your Party 4 Fredss Popcorn Stand 2113 Ontario fNext to Richman'sJ Complete Line of Magazines and Comics - 0- ,Qi . ,Q ,gf sq. , ,gf , GA1'Held 6360 GA1'Held 6362 GArfield 6361 CArlield 6363 HENRY TAYLOR 4CoM1PANY "The Worlnfs Finest Foods" 1 4 Fish and Sea Food Caivary Riding Aeadeniry 107th CAVALRY ARMORY 2500 EAST 130th STREET CEdar 3137 Located just north of Shaker Square. Can be reached con- veniently by the Rapid Tran- sit, Shaker Square bus or the Woodland Avenue street car. Dglicacies Large in-door ring. Bridle paths around the Shaker Inlpgl-tgd Dglicagies Lakes. Private and class in- struction. i 4 I I I R. T. LAVERY, Riding Master Ellclid-105th M31'kCt Cleveland, 0. GEORQQE P, CARTER, Manager 0. ,o. .O. .0. .0. .0. ,O. .O 0 O. ,o. .0. ,.,. .0. ,0. .o, ,Q. .Or ,gf 104 .QQ -,of ,Q. .91 ,0. ,gf ,gf , 1 ,0. ,g. 0. .01 ,OL .01 ,0. KILUJEBIERQS Flowers FLORAL DESIGNS FOR ALL OCCASIONS Flowers Telegraphed Everywhere City-wide delivery 11322 EUCLID AT MAYFIELD Telephone: GA1'Iield 5500 All Types of Beauty Work CC1ECC1IL1E9S Beauty Sallo-n 11326 Euclid Ave. GA. 8666 Euclid-Ford Bldg. at Mayfield , Q ,431 ,QI , 1 ,Qc-104 ,of lp ,gl , Q. ,Q. sg- -Q. ,gf ,gc ,of ,0. ,gf ,Q- Complnments of the IVIASONIC AUDITORIUIVI home of Stunt Nnglhut Gree t nffs from THE CHURCH THE COVIENANT ILAKIESJIDIE STTUDIICGJS Shania Bahadur S tudl es 1 n Photography 0 66 " 99 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ,A A 1 1 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 1 o I - ' 11 ' 4 ' 6 Q . 0 of - ' . - 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 101 101 101 101 101 1 1 ,Q. .0. ,0. ,Q. ,Q. ig. ,Q. ,gl ,Q. ,0. .Q Shaker Academy Good Horses-Private Bridle Paths-Special Attention to Beginners Groups - Hay and Sleigh Rides. 4-210 WARRENSVILIIE CENTER RD. LOngacre 3838 - -o. ok , ,0. ,Of ,Q. Compliments of the GRACE HOYT BEAUTY SHOP 11504- EUCLID AVENUE CEdar 0676 Q. -Q. ,Q. ,g. IQ. Ig. ,gf ,Q. ,gy ,of . .0. .Q. -Q. -Q. ,Q. ,gf ,gl ,of lg. ,gl ,Q. ,gf ,Q. ,Q. ,of ,0- MURRIIES DJELICATESSJEN and GRIIILIL R 0 CO M 04 114-26 EUCLID AVENUE GA1'field 9410 We Deliver "It's Orchid Time All the Time" at the original BRUNSWICK FLOWER MART 4 4 2 locations 2002 LORAIN I0914- CARNEGIE Q. 19. ,of ,Q. ,gy ,QI ,of Q4 ,Qi ,Q. ,Q. ,Q. ,of ,oz-10. .01 ,gf ,Q WADE DRUG in the COMMODORE HOTEL WHERE COLLEGE FOLKS MEET AND EAT MAin 35444 GArlielcI 4,800 EUCLID QMAYE 1IE1LD WINE SEIUIP Your neighborhood store Complete line of DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED WINES, CHAIVIPAGNES AND BEVERAGES 11328 Euclid Avenue GArfield 1112 ,0. ,Q. .Q. ,gy ,g. ,of ,gf ,QQ . ,Q. ,gf ,gf ,g. ,g. 1 ,Q. ,Q. ,Q. ,Q. 101 1 101 101 101 1 1 101 1 1 1 101 Compliments of the 1H11u1111Do1bw1bJs House FINE FOOD 24 HOUR SERVICE GAr5eld 5445 11423 Euolld WAsh1ngton 9776 13116 Woodland Q 1 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 10' 101 S1h1a1W11l331a11l1tio 1F1lonr'is1ts COMPLETE FLORAL SERVICE Two Locations - Parking Space 9650 Carnegle Ave RAndolph 7900 12310 Superlor Ave GLenv1lle 0636 CComp111mo1n11ts of the RESERVE BOOK STCRE on the camp Dwerszfled Sports ROLLER SKATING S1ka11to1a11n1cdl EUCLID at EAST 90111 BOWLING Tlmlanoml Lanes EUCLID at EAST 100111 Wagner s Market ualzly Meats and Grocerzes 11005 ASHBURY AVENUE CEdar 18410 GArfield 8281 8282 E 1 ' 4 in 6 1111 .E , 1 . ' ' E E ' - 01 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 1 O 01 101 101 101 1 1 101 1 101 1 101 101 1 1 1 1 1 101 101 101 1 101 101 101 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 cn 66 99 U S 1 1 11.11 1.11 11 11 11 101 101 1 11 11 1.1 11 11 11 1 101- 101 101 101 1 101 101 101 101 101 101 10 H1 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 Q 0 o I 0 0 . . U U 9 E o U Q c:Q - - as C, U O U U I l n 111 O 0 U H Q , 5 E ' 1 1 1 1 . 1 . 101 101 101 101 101 101 101 16 01 1017, 101 101 101 101 10. 101 101 101 101 HOTEL CLEVELAND parties mean more fun for your guests and you Your guests will be delighted to accept your invitation to Hotel Cleveland because they like the atmosphere of a metropolitan hotel . . . they appreciate the convenience of a central location and adjoining garage. You'll find Hotel Cleveland entertaining so easy to plan and carry out because our experienced staff will relieve you of bothersome details. So hoth your guests and you will enjoy a Hotel 'Cleveland party. Let us show you rooms, and discuss plans to make that next party the success it can be at Hotel'Cleveland. wif fkyfh Keep in Step . . BUY YOUR MATHER SUNG BUOK and Mmmsnsii Dim-zcroiav


Suggestions in the Flora Stone Mather College - Polychronicon Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) collection:

Flora Stone Mather College - Polychronicon Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1922 Edition, Page 1

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Flora Stone Mather College - Polychronicon Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Page 1

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Flora Stone Mather College - Polychronicon Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

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Flora Stone Mather College - Polychronicon Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

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Flora Stone Mather College - Polychronicon Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

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Flora Stone Mather College - Polychronicon Yearbook (Cleveland, OH) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Page 1

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