Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA)

 - Class of 1951

Page 1 of 116

 

Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 116 of the 1951 volume:

WM m ii w r S ■i %Qg, 45f 3 ■KflfiMff SAXIFRAGE 1951 PUBLISHED BY THE SENIOR CLASS STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE FITCHBURG, MASSACHUSETTS I V I + ' A •= ■ ■H B sl9 B We, the class of 1951, dedicate this book to Mr. Michael Conlon whose unswerving loyalty to high ideals has been our inspiration throughout our years at T. C. The hours spent with him have been more than just another course. It was he who so well expressed our objectives in college and in life. His sincere enthusiasm and guidance have been our encouragement. We shall always remember him with gratitude as an understanding friend. DEDICATION TO THE CLASS OF 1951 Those who have had the advantage of a college education arc- keenly aware of the fact that their adult years have been well begun. Along with that pleasant sensation should come a realization that many responsibilities will be placed in the hands of those who have attained the goal of graduation. Each such young person should be impressed with the importance of his tasks, and resolve to grow with each new experience. The Faculty joins me in an expression of faith that much success will come to graduates of this college, for we have observed their in- creasing ability to meet new challenges. PRESIDENTS MESSAGE DEPARTMENT HEADS Ralph F. Weston Dean of College Josephine A. Bolger Dean of Women Roger F. Holmes Director of Training James J. Hammond Director of Industrial Arts Grace Gummo Director of Nursing Education Harry F. Percival Director of Graduate Department •v i t • P , 1 ,G ? I " tTV FACULTY I E ( First Row: Roger F. Holmes, Ed. M., Director of Training Schools; Josephine A. Bolger, A. M., Dean of Women; Ellis F. White, Ed. D., President. Second Roiv : Helen S. Ambrose, B. S. in Ed,, Supervisor, Grades 1 and 2; Catherine C. Weston, B. S. in Ed., Supervisor, Grades 1 and 2; Eliza- beth O ' Connor, B. S. in Ed., Supervisor, Grade 1 ; Anna G. E. Simmons, A. M., Asst. Prof, of Geog- raphy; Belle M. Nixon, A. M., Asst. Prof, of English. Third Row: Marion E. Clark, A. M., Instruc- tor in Physical Education; Signe Antila, Ed. M., Supervisor, Junior High School; Rachel S. Bruce, A. M., Asst. Prof, of Education; Cora M. Hassell, B. S. in Ed., Librarian. Fourth Row: Walter F. Harrod, Ed. M., Asst. Prof, of Industrial Arts; Philip A. McMurray, Ed. M., Supervisor, Junior High School; M. Martin Kostick, A. M., Asst. Prof, of Psychology ; Louise Wingate, A. M., Prin- cipal of Edgerly School; Margaret Shea, Ed. M., Principal of Dillon School. Fifth Row: William E. Farrington, A. M., Instructor in Industrial Arts; Everett E. Koehler, A. M., Asst. Prof, of Indus- trial Arts; Clifford W. Hague, Ed. M., Assoc. Prof, of Industrial Arts; William R. Tracey, Ed. M.. Supervisor, Junior High. FACULTY First Row: Ralph F. Weston, A. M., Dean of the College; James J. Hammond, Ed. M., Director of Industrial Arts; Cornelius S. Donoghue, A. M., Assoc. Prof, of Social Sciences. Second Row: Eliza- beth Quattlander, B. S. in Ed., Supervisor, Grade 3; Edwin R. Clark, A. M., Principal of Junior High School; Helen B. Ross, Ph. D., Assoc. Prof, of Biology; Kathtrine M. McCarty, Ed. M., Asst. Prof, of English. Third Row: Gertrude M. Cunningham, Ed. M., Supervisor, junior High; Elma M. Johnson, Ed. M., Supervisor, Grade 5; Florence D. Conlon, Ed. M., Assoc. Prof, of Art; Lillian Tater, Ed. M., Supervisor, junior High. Fourth Roiv: Joseph E. Underwood, Jr., Ed. M., Supervisor, junior High; Arthur C. Harrington, A. M., Assoc. Prof, of Social Sciences: Daniel L. Healy, Ed. M., Asst. Prof, of English; Rita M. Foley, A. M., Supervisor, Grade 2; Elizabeth M. Haskins, M. S., Asst. Prof, of Mathematics. Fifth Row: Eckhart A. Jacobsen, M. S. in Ed., Asst. Prof, of Industrial Arts; Richard G. Durnin, Ed. M., Supervisor, Grade 6: Arthur E. Purinton, B. S., Asst. Prof, of Industrial Arts; Richard L. Kent, M. M., Asst. Prof, of Music; Otto Hejkal, Ph. D., Asst. Prof, of Industrial Arts. FACULTY ADMINISTRATION " Administration " is more than just a word at F. T. C, for all the people who comprise the administrative group are vital to the smooth progress of the college. Besides manual work, there is paper work involved in maintaining all buildings and personnel ; there is a busy book store and post office ; there is a heating plant ; there are infirmaries ; and there are kitchens and a dining room. We wish to express our sincere apprecia- tion to a most pleasant and efficient administrative staff who make a well run college possible. First Row. Helen Bachelder, Rita Barone, Dorothy Fougere. Second Row: Mary Barn- icle, Rauha Wayrynen, Dorothy Tousignant. Third Row: Herbert Clements, Claire I.avoie, Ellis F. White. W £ MuSttfHESMSK I w SENIORS 1 1 CLASS OFFICERS IRVING DENNIS Junior High " Irv " . . . Mr. President . . . hand- some sad sack . . . pleasingly efficient . . . goes about his duties in a quiet way . . . two loves, one a jalopy . . . upholds his convictions ... a real pal . . . bow tie specialist . . . always the well-dressed professor . . . Soan- getaha. Pres. 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 4; Stick 1, 2, 4 ; Mohawks 2, 4. PRESIDENT ROBERTA O ' ROURKE Junior High " Bobbie " . . . talent galore . . . classical beauty . . . excellent taste in dress ... a whiz in thought and action ... a natural leader . . . " Need a fourth? " . . . genuine laughter . . . artistic . . . loyal Sox fan . . . Gnothi Seauton. Sec. 2; Vice-Pres. 3, 4; Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3; Glee Club 1, 2, Sec. 2 ; Sax Board 4, Editor 4 ; New- man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; ToKalon 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 1; Softball 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2. VICE-PRESIDENT 12 CLASS OFFICERS JOAN KENNEY Elementary " Joan " . . . needs no introduction . . . diversity of interests and ac- complishments . . . radiates sun- shine . . . soft spoken yet firm in convictions . . . Fidus Achates. Vice-Pres. 2; Sec. 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Co-op 3, 4, Sec. 4 ; W. A. A. Board 2, 3, 4 ; Philodemics 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 3; Field Hockey 1, 2, 3; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basket- ball 1, 2, 3, 4; New York Confer- ence 3; Swampscott Conference 4. SECRETARY RICHARD NEWELL junior High " Dick " . . . the fountain of friend- ship . . . family man . . . many philosophical viewpoints . . . seri- ous when the occasion demands . . . monetary expert . . . well rated . . . loyal and sincere . . . Amid. Treas. 4; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dra- matic Club 1, 2, 3; Sax Board 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3; Gaveleers 2, 3, 4. TREASURER 13 DOMINICK AVENI Junior High " Dom " . . . shy smile . . . appreci- ates good humor . . . knows his geography . . . one of the boys of the commuters ' room . . . will dis- cuss- anything, yet never forces his ideas on anyone . . . has fine taste ... a nice guy . . . Amici. Gaveleers 2, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 4. RICHARD ASELTINE Industrial Arts " Dick " . . . genial smiling chap . . . always ready for a laugh . . . good natured . . . conscientious ... a whiz at math . . . coffee . . . nite owl . . . rugged but gentle . . . can sing . . . home every week-end. Glee Club 2, 4. MIRIAM BARTKUS Elementary " Mickey " . . . friend of Morpheus . . . one in a million . . . taciturn in philosophy class . . . sincere . . . unaffected . . . soft-spoken . . . ap- pears to be reticent . . . Fidus Achates. Art Club 1, 2, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Ski Club 1, 2; Philodemics 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 14 GEORGE BETTINGER Industrial Arts " George " ... his " secondary " in- terest is the boy scouts . . . Sax Directory ' s guiding power ... in- formal dresser ... a wheel in the mess hall . . . also noted for cigars . . . salt of the earth . . . Soangetaha. Sax Board 4 ; Mohawks 3, 4, Medi- cine Man 4; Student Christian Ass ' n 1, 2, 3, 4. CURTIS BOYDEN, JR. Industrial Arts " Curt " . . . young man with a horn . . . he ' s a goner, too . . . regular fellow ... I. A. is his area . . . bow ties and fishing . . . seldom heard from until he ' s needed . . . Soan- getaha. Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4; Mohawks 3, 4. BARBARA BURNEY Elementary " Barby " . . . rosy cheeks . . . freckles too . . . good nature plus . . . not much taller than her second graders . . . How ' re things in Pepperell? . . . goes about her duties quietly and efficiently. 15 JEAN CADWELL Elementary " Jean " . . . " There ' ll always be an England " . . . has a unique smile that sparkles from her eyes . . . intriguing at that . . . meticulous worker and a genial hostess . . . Gnothi Seauton. Secretary 3; Art Club 1, 2, 3, Sec- Treas. 3; Ski Club 1, 2; Stick 3, 4; ToKalon 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Sec. 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 1, 2; Softball 3; Volleyball 2, 3, 4. JOHN BUROKAS, JR. Industrial Arts " Jack " . . . makes a little noise, but gets a lot done . . . active, alert mind . . . contagious grin . . . always com- posed . . . takes nothing for granted . . . nothing fazes him . . . amiable . . . generous. Epsilon Pi Tau 4, President 4. ALICE CARDINAL Nursing Education " AI " . . . Personification of dignity ... a picture of poise and depend- ability . . . quiet and graceful . . . always ready to listen ... a friend worth having . . . enduring charm . . . conscientious. Art Club 2, 5 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 5. 16 EUGENE CASASSA Junior High " Gene " ... a comprehensive speak- er and a distinctive thinker . . . perpetually active ... an emergent bass or tenor . . . intimate friend . . . emanating dramatic ability . . . has resounding laughter . . . specu- lator . . . recognized judgment . . . executive ability. Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4; Stick 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4; Stu- dent Forum 3, 4. MARION CHESNICK Elementary " Ches " . . . basketball enthusiast . . . Philo through and through . . . that worried expression . . . indus- trious . . . reliable . . . willing to help . . . staunch supporter of the W.A.A. . . . personality plus . . . Fidus Achates. Sax Board 4 ; Women ' s Dorm Coun- cil 1, 2, 3, 4; Philodemics 2, 3, 4, President 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; W.A.A. Board 2, 3, 4. CONSTANTINE CHRISTY Junior High " Chris " . . • business as usual . . . an old married man . . . musical director for Hawks ... a bulwark of the Glee Club . . . he ' s a " Porker " too . . . dependable . . , deep thinker . . . Soangetaha. Art Club 1; Glee Club 1. 2. J, I, President 3; Mohawks 4, Treas. 4. 17 FREDERICK COLE Junior High " Fred " . . . the gentleman with the bow ties . . . likable personality . . . agreeable manner . . . con- scientious worker . . . scholastic in- terests . . . enjoys good music and dancing ... a chef ... an admirer of feminine beauty . . . Amici. Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Stick 1; Student Christian Ass ' n. 2, 3; Gaveleers 3, 4, Sec. 4. RALPH CLOUGH Junior High " Ralph " . . . " Kid Zero " on the soccer field . . . math and science specialist . . . master of the terpsi- chorean art . . . he ' s a hoopster . . . a head in the clouds, feet on the ground ... a friend who can be counted on . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 2, 3,4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Basket- ball 2, 3, 4. JEAN CONATY Elementary " Jean " . . . efficiency plus . . . part- time librarian . . . journalistic incli- nation . . . wields a mean hockey stick . . . quiet charm . . . fastidious . . . variety of talents . . . Fidus Achates. Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Ski Club 1 ; Sax Board 4 ; Stick 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Editor 4; Philodemics 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 1, 2, 3; Basketball 2; Softball 1, 2, 3. 18 PAUL CONNOR Junior High " Red " ... a man ' s man . . . clear- cut ideas . . . historian par excel- lence . . . working man . . . red hair his crowning glory . . . Irish as Paddy ' s pig . . . martyr . . . acme of preparation . . . profound thinker . . . feet firmly planted on the ground ... a friend indeed . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 2, 3, 4, Keeper of Wam- pum 3. JAMES CONROY junior High " Big Jim " . . . mathematical wizard . . . great future in science . . . com- bination of Oppenheimcr and Stein- metz . . . plays a good game of ping-pong . . . interested in cosmo- logical and ontological theory of the universe . . . perspicacious . . . quiet . . . subtle humor . . . Phi Delia Pi. Esoterics 2, 3 ; Newman Club I , 2, 3. EDWARD CONVERY Junior High " Ed " . . . humorous . . . one of the quartet . . . ideal end man in min- strels, and outside right in soacr . . . easy-going disposition . . . frank of opinion . . . active in social en- deavors . . . loves to dance . . . Phi Delta Pi. Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Dramatic Club 2, 4; Sax Board 4; Esoterics 2, 3, 4, Treas. 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 4, Treas. 2, Vice-Pres. 4; Soccer 1. 2,4. AUSTIN CROSSMAN Junior High " Aussie " . . . capable basketball manager . . . quiet humor . . . looks worried but isn ' t ... a shutterbug from way back ... Jr. High choreo- grapher . . . can be counted on for a helping hand . . . autos a spec- iality. Student Christian Ass ' n. 2, 3, 4; Basketball manager 3, 4. MABEL COTTRELL Junior High " May " . . . what energy . . . fun loving . . . quick with a quip . . . keeps those Jr. High students in line ... a very understanding nature . . . believes in marriage and a career . . . aspires to the study of law. Student Forum 1, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 4. JAMES DALEY Junior High " Jim " . . . lanky lad . . . the com- muters ' cozy card player . . . deter- mined for a heart ... a gentleman by nature . . . stands firm in his convictions . . . mental acquistive- ness . . . distinctive brand of humor . . . easy going . . . Amici. Pres. 1 ; Gaveleers 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4. 20 v CHRISTOS DEMETRIOU Industrial Arts " Chris " ... he too has Dillonitis . . . enjoys his daily constitutional, but never alone . . . quiet and un- assuming . . . Palmer Hall telephone operator . . . believes in hard work . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 3, 4. GWEN DERBY Junior High " Gwen " . . . dramatist extraordi- nary ... a diamond and Bill . . . many interests, many accomplish- ments . . . struggle for punctuality . . . knows her field of English . . . constantly rushing somewhere . . . the whole world smiles . . . Fidus Achates. Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 3, Pres. 4; Sax Board 4; Philodemics 3, 4, Sec. 4. EDWIN DODGE Industrial Arts " Ed " . . . very serious . . . strictly I. A. . . . strong individualist . . . studies hard and gets results . . . lucrative counter man . . . taxi ser- vice man between Springfield and T. C . . . expedient mechanic . . . not shy, just reserved. Ski Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 2, 3, 4. 21 DAVID DONALDSON Industrial Arts " Dave " . . . red-haired, blue-eyed practical joker ... I. A. at its best . . . ex-owner of a hot-rod . . . com- muted the great distance of 50 feet every day ... is completing his thirteenth year at T. C. ; he had a hard course . . . convivial . . . gre- garious . . . indefatigable . . . per- spicacious. Sax Board 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4. LORRAINE DOMINGUE Elementary " Lorry " . . . knows everyone . . . warm-hearted friendliness ... al- ways willing to lend a helping hand . . . " Oh honestly! " . . . staunch Stonehamite . . . bundle of energy . . . added treat to any party . . . Gnothi Seauton. Art Club 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2 ; Stick 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; ToKalon 4; Field Hockey 1, ' 2; Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 2, 3, 4. FRANCIS DOWD Industrial Arts " Fran " . . . leader of the Gavs . . . big of frame — big of heart . . . efficient executive . . . congenial . . . one of the Hawaiian boys . . . good- natured . . . suave manner . . . romantic interests . . . famed muske- teer from Shaw ' s annex . . . Amici. Gaveleers 2, 4, Pres. 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 4. 22 JOHN ERICKSON Junior High " Ed " . . . the life of the party . . . has a gift of gab . . . that gorgeous Gaucho ... a convivial companion and a gracious host ... his new Chev is in the spotlight . . . flair for poetry . . . possible playboy . . . Amici. Gaveleers 2, 3, 4. LINWOOD ERICKSON Industrial Arts " Ace " ... at home on a basketball court . . . what little he does say is worth hearing . . . spontaneous humor . . . docs Lin or Jim do the cooking? . . . man of thought . . . pleasantly unsophisticated . . . Soan- getaha. Mohawks 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. RONALD FABISZEWSKI Industrial Arts " Fab " ... I. A. all the way . . . where ' s " Sandy " ? ... a grin as broad as Texas . . . good-natured . . . argumentative ability ... ac- cordionist via the polkas . . . help- ful . . . studious plus . . . epitome of conscientiousness . . . perpetually busy . . . natural informality . . . Soangetaha. Stick 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Pi Tau 5. 1; Mohawks 2, I; : cwman Club 3, 4. 23 " GRATIA FISHER Elementary " Gratia " . . . music hath charms . . . informal manner . . . has a friendly spirit . . . extremely con- scientious . . . owns an enviable store of ambition . . . always willing to do her share . . . one of the train- tired commuters. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 3, 4. f J ROBERT FARRAR Junior High " Bob " . . . equally at home on the baseball field or on the basketball court . . . keen competitor ... re- served and dignified . . . unruffled by any situation . . . carrying on family tradition . . . favorite story " Love ' s Labor Lost " . . . Town- send ' s pride, our joy . . . Amici. Commuting Men ' s Board 4, Treas. 4; Gaveleers 2, 3, 4; Student Chris- tian Ass ' n. 2, 3,4; Baseball 2, 3, 4, Captain 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. JOHN FOLEY Junior High " John " . . . musician . . . taxi ser- vice . . . generous of heart . . . indus- trious and earnest . . . always cheer- ful .. . reliable friend . . . tolerant and considerate ... a true gentle- man . . . self-sufficient . . . well poised . . . wondrous sense of humor. 24 LOUIS FORGUES Industrial Arts " Lou " . . . Dad . . . sympathetic listener for the boys . . . dependable . . . definitely studies . . . two little ones at home . . . practical convic- tions . . . clever and apt craftsman . . . patient and persistent . . . obliging and soft-spoken. Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4, Sec. 3, 4. SUZANNE FORSTER STEWART Elementary " Sue " . . . Miller Hall sentinel . . . star on the basketball court . . . practical minded . . . she can cook, too . . . candidate for a waltz con- test . . . newly-acquired name of Stewart . . . Fidus Achates. Art Club 1, 2; Glee Club 1; Wo- men ' s Dorm Council 4, Pres. i ; Stu- dent Christian Ass ' n. 3, 4; Basket- ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey 1 ; Volleyball I, 2; Softball 1; Plulodemics 3, 4. JOHN FORTSCH junior High " Jack " . . . proud owner of the best second-hand car on campus . . . always a sharp dresser . . . bids to put Hatfield on the map ... a ready smile for all ... a real student . . . perpetually moving . . . kineti( energy ... a steady friend . . . a true nephew . . . original joker . . . Amici. Glee Club 1 ; Gaveleers 3, i, Treas. 3. 25 CLIFFORD FOUNTAINE Industrial Arts " Cliff " . . . known as the man about town . . . infectious brand of humor . . . " Let ' s have a party " ... a me- chanical genius who will tackle any apparatus ... his hearty laughter rings forth . . . able man . . . Amici. Gaveleers 2, 4; Newman Club 2, 4. v m LEONARD FOUGERE Industrial Arts " Lenny " ... a stalwart of Industrial Arts and General Education . . . has three great loves, Cape Cod, Automobiles and Dot . . . congenial . . . affable . . . sociable . . . heavy construction expert . . . Amici. Gaveleers 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3; Chairman of Carnival Weekend 2. JOHN GAINEY junior High " Jack " . . . reserved . . . distin- guished looking . . . sincere in undertakings and convictions . . . confirmed bachelor . . . meticulous . . . very diplomatic in all his re- lations . . lost without the Ford . . . can hold his own scholastically with anyone . . . Phi Delta Pi. Esoterics 2, 3, 4, Pres. 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2. 26 NANCY GENTSCH Elementary " Nancy " . . . good humored . . . has a highly infectious laugh . . . sparkling eyes . . . tireless worker . . . possesses a fine character . . . Hertels ' star boarder ... a real friend to her fourth graders. Art Club 1, 2, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 3, 4; Commut- ing Women ' s Board 2, 3, 4, Vice- Pres. 3, 4; Sax Board 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 3, 4. DOLORES GIRARD Elementary " Del " . . . very businesslike . many interests . . . has an inquiring mind . . . the cards tell all . . elementary education is her field Chicopee her home . . . always dash ing about. Dramatic Ciub 3, 4; Stick 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Volley- ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 2, 3. DONALD GORANSON Industrial Arts " Don " . . . six foot four of MAN . . . enjoys philosophical discussions . . . one hundred per cent I. A. . . . one member of the Huey, Duey, Louie, and Gooey combine . . . magnanimous . . . scintillating, per- spicacious . . . extremely punctual . . . genial . . . more at home at the bridge table. Student Christian Ass ' n. 1. 2, 3, 4. 27 ERLING HANSON Industrial Arts " Erl " . . . reserved . . . has a fa- vorite place in his heart for Lun- enburg . . . takes great pride in his plans . . . individualistic . . . has an infectious brand of humor . . . firm convictions . . . quietly efficient . . . Phi Delta Pi. Esoterics 3, 4 ; Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4, Treas. 4 ; Student Christian Ass ' n. 2 ; Ski Club 2, 3, 4; Stick 2. ELSIE GUERRA Elementary " Elsie " . . . brown eyes that hide a twinkle . . . neat and sweet . . . has a philosophical streak in her nature ... a joke is always keenly enjoyed . . . given to gentle teasing . . . how ' re things in grade four? ELIZABETH HASSETT Nursing Education " Bette " . . . dependable and compe- tent . . . the Executive ... an ex- cellent scholar . . . gracious and amiable . . . always a friendly smile. Art Club 2 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 5 ; Ski Club 2. 28 SALLY HEALY Junior High " Sal " . . . intellectual pursuits . tireless worker for Co-op . . . math and science . . . efficient, industri ous . . . busy girl on campus . . young in spirit . . . pensive . . Fidus Achates. Student Co-op 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 3 Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Stick 4; Philo demies 2, 3, 4, Treas. 3, 4; New man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2, 4 MAXINE HERTEL Junior High " Maxine " . . . brown eyes . . . energetic basketball player . . . thespian . . . unpredictable . . . keen wit . . . imaginative . . . English major . . . conscientious worker . . . knitter of sweaters . . . Fidus Achates. Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-Pres. 4; Philodemics 3, 4; Student Chris- tian Ass ' n. 4; Field Hockey 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2, 4. ROBERT HESSELGREN Industrial Aits " Bob " ... 1. A. ' s even bigger than Bob ... a penny for your thoughts . . . too bad, he ' s taken too . . . Boney ' s pal . . . Intramural basket- ball enthusiast. . . a good man on a weekend . . . Soangetaha. M. A. A. Board 4; Mohawks J, i 29 GERARD HURLEY Industrial Arts " Gerry " . . . likable personality . . . winning smile and unassuming manner . . . likes Fords . . . mu- sically inclined . . . smooth dresser . . . Irish tenor . . . likes quartette harmony . . . natural poise . . . abreast of the times ... an orderly thinker ... Phi Delta Pi. Glee Club 2, 3, 4, Pres. 4; Esoterics 4; Soccer 1. NANCY HULT Eletnentary " Nan " . . . effervescent . . . artistic flair . . . always good company . . . excellent taste in clothes . . . true friend . . . grace and poise personi- fied . . . Gnothi Seauton. Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Stick 1; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 2, Vice-Pres. 3 ; ToKalons 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 1; Basketball 1, 2, 4. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, RICHARD JOHNSON Junior High " Dick " . . . " all I want for Christ- mas is my two front teeth " . . . planted his room in the green house . . . big in stature . . . huge in heart . . . salubrious . . . conspicuous friendship . . . coherent in his views . . . Soangetaha. Dramatic Club 1 ; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3, 4; Mohawks 2, 3, 4; Stu- dent Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4. 30 JOHN KIOSSES Junior High " Johnny " . . . exuberant energy . . . disarming smile . . . conscien- tious worker ... a spark plug . . . professional air . . . straightfor- ward manner . . . quick, clever bas- ketball artist ... a scrapper . . . sports mentor aspirations . . . en- joyable companion . . . bears brunt of pranks . . . Soangetaha. Student Co-op. 4, Treas. 4; Mo- hawk Club 3, 4, Scribe 3 ; Basket- ball 2, 3, 4, Captain 4. LOUISE LAGROE Elementary " Louise " . . . artistic . . . Pat ' s faithful companion . . . many inter- ests . . . independent in her gentle way . . . enjoys a joke to the utmost . . . Waltham beckons every Fri- day . . . sincere in everything she does. Art Club 4; Glee Club 1 ; Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4; Sax Board 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4. NATALIE LANE Nursing Education " Nat " . . . tall and graceful . . . charming effervescence . . . orchids and lace . . . always rushing off . . . a pert Fall Riverite . . . sophisti cated. Art Club 2; Ski Club 1, 2; Student Christian Assn. 1. 2, 5. 31 JOHN LEGERE Junior High " Jack " . . . versatile . . . has cour- age of his own convictions . . . com- posite of gravity and wit . . . nice appearance . . . tactfully frank . . . good club man . . . home radio en- thusiast ... Phi Delta Pi. Glee Club 3, 4; Dramatic Club, 3, 4, Treas. 4; Stick 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 4 ; Esoterics 2, 3, 4. i) GERALD LEBLANC Junior High " Gerry " . . . interested in pub- lic affairs , . . keen mind with a sci- entific outlook ... his good-looking smile typifies him ... is quietly as- sured of himself . . . the long arm of the law . . . quizzical laugh . . . a habitue of the commuting men ' s room. Commuting Men ' s Board 3, Treas. 3 ; Newman Club 3, 4. PATRICIA LILLY Elementary " Pat " . . . calm, cool, and col- lected . . . leader of " Tokes " . . . valued as a friend . . . charming and unaffected . . . quietly efficient . . . " Gav " tendencies . . . sterling character . . . sophisticated sweet- ness . . . Gnothi Seauton. Ski Club 1, Sec. 1; Commuting Women ' s Board 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3; Newman Club 1, 3, 4; ToKalons 3, 4, Pres. 4. 32 JAMES LOOMIS Junior High " Jim " . . . good-natured . . . can be found near any disabled auto . . . party lover . . . one of the boys . . . gets a kick out of life . . . well- known nephew . . . synonymous with Ed . . . Amici. Gaveleers 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 4. CATHERINE LORDEN Elementary " Kay " . . . idealist and optimist . . . magnanimous of heart . . . never a dull moment . . . we ' re laughing with you, Kay . . . active social life . . . boosts Dillon . . . basketball en- thusiast . . . abscntmindedness per- sonified . . . always has a problem . . . Fidus Achates. Philodemics 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. JAMES MacINNES Industrial Arts " Jim " . . . host of activities . . . al- ways a leader . . . all-round athlete . . . staunch supporter . . . recog- nized songbird ... a big car man . . . quiet until you know him . . . occasional prankster . . . sincere friend . . . enthusiastic conversation- alist . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 3. 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 4; Soccer 1, 3, 4; Baseball 1. 33 ESTELLE MAGUE Elementary " Estelle " . . . serious thoughts . . . always happy . . . has a Buddy . . . headed for the altar ... a dry sense of humor . . . never ruffled . . . immune to worry . . . Irish eyes are smiling . . . Fidus Achates. Philodemics 2, 3, 4; Basketball 4. CHARLES MADISON Junior High " Chaz " . . . can build or fix any- thing, even traffic tickets . . . tal- ented stage manager . . . knows and likes good jazz . . . fond of cats, dogs and people . . . cab and bar- racks service. Glee Club 1, 4; Dramatic Club 2, 4; Stick 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 4. FRED MAICHLE Junior High " Fred " ... a plodder of the print shop . . . the " strong man " in the bass section of the Glee Club . . . precise speech and manner . . . dignified and serious . . . even tem- pered . . . master of all situations . . . affable. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 34 4 GEORGE MAILMAN Industrial Arts " George " . . . he ' s really a family man . . . official scorer and timer for the Falcon cagers ... a rugged man on the soccer field . . . three women in his life . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4. LUCIEN MAMMONE Junior High " Loosh " . . . reserved . . . " When in Rome, do as the Romans do " . . . tends not to be loquacious . . . com- muting men ' s room regular . . . strong silent type . . . regular work- er .. . stoic . . . waiting until the Marines need expert help . . . Amici. Gaveleers 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1,2,3,4. NANCI JOHNSON MARAVELL Elementary " Nanci " . . . adds gaiety and tun to any gathering . . . note the gamin grin and the tell-tale twinkle . . . stands firm in her beliefs . . . music and art are great interests. Glee Club 3, 4; Art Club 2, 3, 4, Sec. 3, Treas. 4. 35 ■ ; | ygl GERALD McGRAIN Junior High " Gerry " . . . transfer from Wor- cester Teachers . . . Particular in all his likes . . . meticulous . . . strictly professional . . . unwaver- ing ideas . . . bachelor tendencies . . . reflective thinker . . . enlight- ened mind. ROBERT J. McCULLOUGH Industrial Arts " Bob " . . . most flexible personality . . . capable of being studious . . . sociable, hilarious all at the same time . . . very congenial, and ready to lend a helping hand . . . great car prospector . . . knows the beaten path . . . Amici. Gaveleers 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4. LEO McMANUS Junior High " Leo " . . . Co-Major Domo of the college literary journal known as the Stick . . . dapper dresser . . . outstanding scholar . . . extensive vocabulary . . . modest and unpre- tentious . . . " pat " on all subjects . . . Amici. Stick 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Editor 4; Gav- eleers 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mass. Teachers College Con- vention. 36 EDMUND MEDEIROS Industrial Arts " Ed " . . . laughing boy . . . loves dogs and people . . . coffee fiend . . . hot, cold, or black . . . married to a tea drinker . . . super car washer . . . enviable disposition . . . the minstrel man . . . infectious laugh . . . Amici. Treas. 2; Gaveleers 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 3. PATRICIA MERRILL Elementary " Pat " . . . proof that good things come in small packages . . . sweet disposition . . . performs her duties faithfully and well . . . Louise ' s partner . . . cute as a button. Art Club 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4 ; Sax Board 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4. WILLIAM MULLIN Junior High " Bill " ... an easy temper and a calm laugh, works quietly and per- sistently . . . conservative in his ways . . . progressive in his outlook . . . his manner and his record assure one ' s trust ... the rickshaw. Newman Club 2, 3- 37 I ES ROBERT NEARINE Junior High " Bob " . . . candid with the camera . . . coach ' s right-hand man . . . dorm transient . . . professional . . . Mr. Medic . . . studious . . . meticu- lous in all undertakings ... a page out of Esquire . . . Soangetaha. Sax Board 4; Stick 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 4; Mohawks 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 2, 3, 4; Soccer Manager 3, 4. JAMES MURPHY Junior High " Jim " . . . third man in the Aveni, Fitzgibbon, Murphy trio . . . startles you with his command of facts . . . genuine smile . . . ready humor . . . Watertown ' s finest . . . directs his thinking carefully . . . frank and forthright. Commuting Men ' s Board 4; New- man Club 3, 4. JOHN NEITHERCUT Junior High " Big John " . . . good natured . . . takes an active interest in his studies . . . enters conversation readily . . . strongly attracted to the opera . . . likes Shakespeare . . . reads con- stantly. Art Club 3, 4 ; Ski Club 3 ; Stick 2 ; Glee Club 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3,4. 38 JOHN NEWELL Industrial Arts " Jack " . . . worthy son of the town of Millis . . . carefree and a pro- ponent of mirth and hilarity, his company is always sought . . . likes to zoom along Fitchburg ' s thor- oughfares in his shining Ford . . . great interest in the Gaveleers . . . Amici. Gaveleer Society 2, 3, Treas. 3; Stu- dent Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3. LEO NOWACKI Industrial Arts " Leo " . . . spearhead on the soccer field . . . serious minded . . . indus- trious . . . independent . . . wide range of interests . . . dry humor . . . challenger of tradition . . . unruffled manner . . . ever-ready answers . . . Soangetaha. Stick 1, 4 ; Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4 ; Mo- hawks 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-captain 4. ELAINE OJALA Elementary " Naine " ... a twinkle in her eye . . . versatile abilities ... a look of delicacy ... a perfect lady . . . out- standing student . . . cameo blonde . . . makes every minute count. Commuting Women ' s Board 4, Sec. 4; Art Club 4; Glee Club 4; Stu- dent Christian Ass ' n. 1, 3, 4. f 39 ■ DONAL O ' SULLIVAN Junior High " Don " . . . the only man who can sleep the clock around three times . . . smooth operator . . . has seri- ous plans for the future . . . past President . . . never afraid to say what he thinks ... a man worth knowing. Pres. 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Sax Board 4 ; Mohawks 3 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. JUDITH O ' SHEA Elementary " Judy " ... a heart of gold ... a natural elementary teacher . . . our Boston sophisticate . . . flair for art . . . smooth clothes . . . energetic worker for all causes . . . interesting conversationalist . . . genial friend . . . Fidus Achates. Art Club 2, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 3 ; W. A. A. Board 3, 4, Pres. 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 2; Philodemics 2, 3, 4. JAMES O ' SULLIVAN Junior High " Jim " . . . willing worker . . . cheerful . . . gentlemanly . . . quiet . . . composed . . . amiable and versatile . . . introspective . . . well read . . . unbound interest in life . . . runs his jitney to Pepperell . . . competent . . . musician . . . week- ends aren ' t long enough. 40 m JOHN O ' SULLIVAN Junior High Old Salty . . . Cape Cod the boat . . . small but . one of the sleepers . . . . . happy-go-lucky . . . enthusiastic . . . sincere . . . friendly . . . always ready to laugh. Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. " Jack " . . expert . . dynamic . I.Q. tops v J CARL POHLMAN Junior High " Carl " . . . big, blonde and rugged . . . soccer stalwart . . . Mr. Money- bags . . . ambitious . . . always in a hurry . . . indefatigable complaints . . . knows people . . . formality a keynote . . . outdoorish to the ninth degree . . . greenhouse resident . . . transferred from University of Maine . . . Soangetaha. Treas. 3 ; Ski Club 2, 3, 4 ; Treas. 4 ; Sax Board 4; Mohawk ( lub J, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 3, 4; Soc- cer 3, 4. IRENE POITRAS Nursing Education " Irene " . . . pleasant personality . . . sincere . . . naturally artistic . . . feminine and gracious . . . self confident and poised ... a Fitch- burg resident . . . perpetually busy . . . well informed. Art Club 2, 5 ; Glee Club 5 ; New- man Club 2. 5. 41 iJf ' RICHARD PORTEUS junior High " Dick " . . . noted for his creative genius . . . dynamic . . . ever busy . . . has contributed his talent gen- erously . . . explores all artistic media with success ... an endless supply of brilliant humor. Glee Club 2 ; Ski Club 1 ; Dramatic Club 2; Stick 1, 2; Sax Board 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1. EDWARD POPOLOSKI Junior High " Ed " . . . friendly and easy-going . . . enjoys life to its fullest . . . expansive humor . . . has generous ways . . . tolerant and understand- ing . . . knows the value of good company . . . adjusts readily to peo- ple and situations. Commuting Men Ass ' n. 3. ROBERT POSKUS Industrial Arts " Posky Boy " . . . Commuter from Worcester . . . traveled 41,600 miles to attend F.T.C. . . . has been kidnapped and chased while hitch- hiking . . . perspicacious . . . mag- nanimously genial . . . always seen with his three sidekicks ... a Na- tional Guardsman of great accom- plishment. Soccer 1, 42 JOHN POWERS Industrial Arts " John " . . .an exceptional mind . . . wordly . . . impartial realist . . . unhurried habitually . . . gentle manner and voice . . . definite opin- ions . . . weaned on cokes . . . sincere . . . worth knowing . . . Conroy and Powers twosome. Art Club 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Palmer Hall Board 3. PAUL PROULX Junior High " Paul " . . . hail and hearty . . . ami- able . . . unassuming manner . . . loyal commuter . . . avid reader of historical novels . . . noted geog- rapher . . . authority on hunting and fishing . . . capability plus . . . a staunch Gav . . . Amici. Ski Club 1, 2, 3; Gavaleers 2, 3, 4. SALLY REGAN junior High " Sally " . . . multitude of friends . . . always Joe-vial . . . intriguing smile . . . cooperative and thorough worker . . . informed on matters historical and hysterical . . . Fidus Achates. Student Forum 1, 2; Ski Club 1. J. 3, 4, Sec. 3, 4; Stick 3; W. A A Board 3 ; Glee Club 2 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Philodemics 2, 3, i ; Field Hockey 1, 2; Volleyball 2. 43 RENE RHEAULT Junior High " Rene " . . . herculean hurler of F. T. C. ' s pitching staff . . . " Con- necticut is a wonderful state " . . . completely unruffled regardless of the situation . . . makes friends eas- ily .. . casual manner . . . easy smile . . . Amici. Commuting Men ' s Board 2, 3, Pres. 2; Gaveleers 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. JILL McGRAW REGE Elementary " Jill " . . . brand new wedding band . . . collegiate . . . versatile ... at- tractive . . . " Isn ' t he cute? " . . . cheerful mien . . . natural . . . sin- cere . . . Fidus Achates. Glee Club 3, 4, Vice-Pres. 4; Art Club 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 2; Dramatic Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Philodemics 3, 4. PATRICIA RYAN Elementary " Pat " ... a staunch Irish free- soiler . . . ever-ready to express an opinion ... an appreciative audi- ence for a good joke . . . wittier than Whittier . . . sincere . . . charming independence . . . Gnothi Seauton. Women ' s Dorm Council 3, 4; W. A. A. Board 2, 3, 4, Treas. 3; Ski Club 1, 2; Stick 3, 4; ToKalon 2, 3, 4, Treas. 3, Vice-Pres. 4; New- man Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 1. 44 REINO SANDBERG Industrial Arts " Boney " . . . one of the quietest men on campus . . . always around when he ' s needed . . . dependable and cooperative . . . well known in intramural basketball circles ... a free agent, as far as we know . . . Soangetaha. Commuting Men ' s Board 1 ; Mo- hawks 3, 4. EDWARD SANDOMIERSKI Industrial Arts " Sandy " ... a naturally graceful athlete . . . four year A-l hoopster . . . magnetic friendliness . . . con- stantly moving . . . enviable person- ality . . . super student . . . dorm work horse . . . radiates good humor . . . collegiate dresser . . . Soan- getaha. Student Co-op 2, 3, 4; Stick 1, 2, 3 M. A. A. i, 2, 3, 4; Mohawks 2, 3 4; Newman Club 3, 4; Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. RAYMOND SARASIN Industrial Arts " Ray " . . . neat appearance . . . sincere . . . right at home in discus- sion, political, philosophical or I. A.ical . . . gentleman with the women . . . natural ability to make- friends. Student Forum I, 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatk ( lub I. ! : Art Club 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 45 1 TffS. " ALAN SHAW Industrial Arts " Al " ... Mr. President . . . tall blond . . . individualist of few words . . . soccer sparkplug . . . clever and apt craftsman . . . sincere . . . modest grin . . . thorough and dependable in his endeavors ... a typical statesman . . . Phi Delta Pi. Student Co-op 1, 2, Pres. 4; Ski Club 1, 2; Esoterics 2, 4; Epsilon Pi Tau 2, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 4; Basket- ball 1. EDWARD SCHULZE Junior High " Lou " . . . look at the inner man . . . fullness of heart . . . enters into the spirit of things . . . has a zest for parties ... a winning smile . . . twenty-four hours a day sched- ule .. . Phi Delta Pi. Sax Board 4; Stick 1, 2; Commut- ing Men ' s Board 4, Pres. 4; Eso- terics 2, 3, 4, Sec. 4 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2; Baseball 1,2. WALTER SIMS, JR. junior High " Wally " . . . abstractionist . . . easy going, lackadaisical manner . . . " someone wake up Wally " . . . serves humor to satisfy a dry palate . . . keen mind ... a builder of bridges and houses . . . confidences plus . . . one of the dorm regulars . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 3, 4; Palmer Hall Board 4. 46 DONALD SMALLEY Industrial Arts " Don " . . . the bicycle man . . . drives a Buick . . . knows his way around . . . various interests, includ- ing women and Buicks . . . conscien- tious worker ... no bad habits . . . soft spoken . . . fearless ... en- terprising . . . discriminating in taste . HAROLD SMALLEY Junior High " Hal " . . . reserved and retiring . . . likes card games . . . orderly in thought and appearance . . . applies himself diligently to his studies . . . geniality a keynote to his personal- ity . . . tactfully frank . . . Murph ' s buddy. ELIZABETH SMITH Elementary " Betty " . . . industrious worker ... a roguish gleam in her eyes . . . shy smile with just a hint of mischief . . . keeps her knitting needles busy . . . another barracks dweller ... an understanding teach- er .. . likes to dance . . . always prompt. Art Club 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Ski Club 1, 2; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4. 47 JOHN SUGRUE Junior High " Jack " ... a prince among men . . . math and science specialist . . . extremely good-natured . . . loyal supporter to all school activities . . . keeps away from active sports . . . favors debates, acting and singing . . . the he-man type . . .Amici. Glee Club 2, 4; Dramatic Club 2, 4; Gaveleers 2, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 4, Pres. 4. SIDNEY SNEGG Indus trial Arts " Sid " ... the round faced intellec- tual . . . always ready with the last word . . . often seen sneaking through Greendale . . . good for two points in any basketball game . . . advocate of taking all one ' s cuts . . . serious in his endeavors . . . easy-going. ALAN STEWART Industrial Arts " Al " ... a man of few words but many deeds . . . loves the outdoors . . . competent camp counsellor . . . always happy and contented . . . sterling character . . . seldom solo . . . Amici. Gaveleers 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 2 ,3, 4. 48 pNv-- GILBERT SYME Industrial Arts " Gil " . . . carries himself with a friendly dignity ... a Northeastern transfer . . . booster of the Quincy school system . . . takes a broad view of life ' s problems ... a par- ticular brand of humor . . . well in- formed . . . Mr. Architecture . . . Father Confessor to the boys . . . Java. Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3- CHRISTOS TOURNAS Junior High " Chris " . . . friendly and coopera- tive ... a hard worker . . . inquires carefully into problems . . . easy to get along with . . . concerned with major issues . . . takes the scientific approach to studies . . . enjoys lively discussions ... a rabid Yank fan. JAMES TUCKER, JR. Junior High " Jim " . . . low toned . . . calm and efficient . . . commuter from the lofty heights of the Southside . . . enjoys a good game of bridge . . . great ski enthusiast ... a man of thought . . . industrious worker . . . definitely studious . . . quiet humor . . . ambition to travel. Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman ( lub 1, 2, 3, 4. 49 MR ' FRANCIS WALSH Junior High " Frank " ... a strong advocate of the scientific approach . . . has a variety of interests ... an ace geog- raphy student . . . could be found in the library ... is a talented " Sun- day artist " . . . outdoor man. Ski Club 2, 3; Art Club 3, 4; New- man Club 1. SUSAN WAGNER Elementary " Sue " . . . finds hilarity in every situation . . . permanent seat in the Spa . . . " Do I worry? " . . . long distance commuter ... if you knew Susie . . . wide circle of friends . . . serene on necessary occasions . . . Fidus Achates. Glee Club 1, 2; Stick 1, 2; Philo- demics 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Corr. Sec. 2; Basketball 1, 2; Volley ball 1, 2; Softball 1, 2. LAWRENCE WALSH Junior High " Larry " . . . proverbial tall, dark and handsome . . . fleeting but con- tagious smile . . . diamond ace . . . thinks volumes but says little . . . imperturbably complacent . . . casual manner . . . individualist . . . hidden interests . . . Soangetaha. Palmer Hall Board 2, 3, 4, Treas. 2, 3, Pres. 4; Mohawks 2, 3, 4, Vice-Pres. 3; Newman Club 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. 50 STANLEY WHEELER Junior High " Bud " . . . gets things done . . . skier par excellence . . . winning smile . . . mathematician . . . sincere friendliness . . . stout heart . . . sports enthusiast . . . hearty manner . . . worthy ambitions . . . Amici. Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Gaveleers 2, 3, 4, Alumni Sec. 3, 4; Student Chris- tian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-Pres. 2, Treas. 3; Baseball Manager 2. ALLAN WILLIAMS Junior High " Al " ... the Chief . . . influential . . . working man of many talents . . . from a card to a confidant in four seconds . . . journalist of stature ... a great pal . . . energetic . . . Soangetaha. Stick 1, 2, 3; Student Forum 1, Sec. 2 ; Mohawks 2, 3, 4, Scribe 3, Chief 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sopho- more Dance Chairman; Junior Prom Chairman ; Senior Prom ( hairman. FRED WILSON Industrial Arts " Fred " ... his summers spent in skippering " La Mouette " ... a likable person . . . surprisingly ar- tistic . . . steady and dependable . . . never worries . . . always a pleasant word for everyone . . . proud possessor of two radios in one car. Ski Club 3. 4; Stick 2. 51 MARJORIE BILLINGTON Nursing Education " Marge " . . . R. N. . . . quiet and scholarly . . . delightfully charming . . . professional dignity . . . sweet determination . . . confident man- ner . . . discriminating tastes . . . considerate . . . generous of heart . . . quietly observant. LOUIS ARMSTRONG Junior High " Lou " ... a transfer student . . . has the stuff . . . realist . . . has made many friends since his en- trance . . . neat appearance . . . friendly smile . . . always on the go . . . reserved manner . . . has the ability to please . . . our gain. ROBERT SMITH junior High " Bob " . . . would like history if he understood " predicated " ... an all-round man . . . " Wanna lift? " . . . obliging and soft-spoken . . . consistent in his firm convictions ... a wheel in the Boy Scouts . . . Soangetaha. Glee Club 1,2; Newman Club 2; Mohawks 2, 3, 4 ; Basketball 1 ; Soccer 2; Baseball 2. CURTIS PETERSON Industrial Arts " Curt " . . . noted as a V-8-mechanic . . . unassuming and soft-spoken . . . engaging smile . . . regular . . . calm, cool, and capable . . . still waters . . . gentlemanly . . . Amici. Gaveleers 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n 1, 2, 3, 4. 52 UNDERCLASSMEN CLASS OF 1952 2 -- 54 The Junior year is undoubtedly a very important year in the life of an F. T. C. student. A large part of our interest was concerned with the selection of class rings. The few minor changes which occurred went a long way in making our college ring a more attractive one. Realizing that our own graduation was not too far off, members of our class worked with the Seniors on the Sax Directory so that they would know the procedure next year. Although the class of 1952 diminished in number, due to the accelerated G. I. ' s and those members who entered the service during the course of the past year, our enthusiasm and zeal increased as each passing year found us more devoted to the principles which are a part of our college. Miss Conlon, through her own enthusiasm and capable guidance, has done much to make our activities the success they were. The highlight of the year was the Junior Prom which was held in the spring. This social affair marked a memorable occasion in our college career and will be cherished by each one of us. It is with a great deal of pride that we look back over the years .since we first entered T C. and note the many ways in which our ilass endeavored to further the good name of Fitchburg Teachers ( ollege by bringing our very best to everything which we have undertaken President Edward Regan I Louise Sobczak Sec - Patricia Kennedy 7 Robert Kiclv Having passed the first milestone in our college career, the class of 1953 looked with pride on their freshman year and with high hopes for this year and the future. With the passing of the first year, the Sophomores were thoroughly familiar with the aims and activities of the college and could utilize some of the confidence and assurance which the college has provided through its excellent curriculum and active promotion of social life. We realize the importance of maintaining high standards scholastically and socially, and intend to constantly strive to better ourselves and Fitchburg Teachers College. The Sophomore Class sponsored the annual Halloween Dance and this activity provided the class with a fine chance to work together and provide the student body with a night of fun and entertainment. The class also provided winter sports and enjoyment during the Carnival Weekend. We enjoyed working together on these school affairs and the class hopes that all its endeavors are successful. The classes before us have set high standards for us to follow and we shall attempt to keep ourselves apace with these marks and to perhaps better them. The class extends best wishes of success to the graduating seniors and also best wishes to the Freshmen Class. President Edward Flynn Vice-President Helen Lou Turner Secretary Gloria Spadaro Treasurer Charles Bird 56 .CLASS OF 1953 I 57 The class of 1954 came to F. T. C. in a year when the world was threatened with the turmoil of war. However the uneasy situation in the world did not keep the class from entering with high hopes nor from a happy anticipation of the fine education to be obtained at this college. As in previous years, the task of running the Winter Carnival Ball was given to the freshmen; the class met the challenge with several committees, thus providing a project which in turn united the class. Having a very large membership, it is hoped that the accomplishments of the class will be in proportion to its number. The officers elected to lead the class, together with the Student Council Representatives, the W. A. A. and M. A. A. Representatives and all the other members of the class wish to join with the other classes in the college and enjoy their friendship. In conclusion, we the class of 1954 look forward to the interesting and productive years at T. C. Our fondest hope is that we will be able to enjoy the advantages of the college unhindered by the chaotic affairs of the world. We hope that we may be as beneficial to the college, at least in a small way, as the college has been to us. President David Meadows Vice-President Marion Roderick Secretary Maureen Elder Treasurer James Haverty 58 ) M t Mill M »-— . umihVn ' iVirti ' il ililHilM M CLASS OF 1954 59 J n daijs ago, when lite, we dreamed, Was ideal ai it deemed, rnd hopes of untaught uouth Soared high, While oniu iou came nigh; Jwas then, with vision clear we choie, Mnd to that choice we rose, l l ith courage itrong rnd hearts of Jong, Jo carru thu ideal on! J5o, flag or Mlma fv ater, float Jn eternal wingi of praiie! ■jror thee, unnumbered hosts todau Jheir willing uoicei raise, throughout the world their tinu flame Trom thu great light still gleams, While uouth and age united claim Jhe home where fortune beams! Jhe home where fortune oeamil ■ ¥n daus to come, if life (aid bare J eemi tar more Qrau than fair, Jr if success with us climbs high, While onlu iou comes nigh; Uis then, in plight or might we ' ll rise Jhu spirit neuer dies lA ith courage strong yvnd hearts of song Jo carry thu ideal on!. (Words Lu Wotlie Will, 1927, Wusic Lu CLaUk 2). ferru) ..- -• " ■ REMEMBER 61 Do you remember the day when we arrived at T. C. ? It was then that we ventured forth into our new and exciting college life. September 12, 1947, was one of those terrific early fall days, or were you too interested and a bit frightened of all the new experiences that would soon befall you to notice? During the Orientation Weekend we still had that leftover feeling of being mighty High School Seniors. When the weekend suddenly ended and the upperclassmen began to descend upon us in droves we soon found out what it meant to be lowly Freshmen at college. In the next two weeks came a form of torture otherwise known as " Initiation " . Remember the Saturday we recited, cleaned everything from front walk to athletic field, sang songs, and polished cars? More than one student wore odd clothes to classes next week, too. We began to wonder whether we were human. It surely was difficult to determine, in some instances. Oh! Woe unto the freshman who appeared without that badge of distinction or that striking green bow. Then there was the W.A.A. Rally and with it, at last, came a real feeling of belonging. It really was fun, wasn ' t it? After we had organized our class somewhat, our first high responsibility was to elect our class officers. We scurried about among ourselves getting acquainted. After much " What ' s your name? " and " My name is " we finally picked four able candidates from our midst. They were: Presi- dent, Jim Daley; Vice-President, Kay Louka; Secretary, Betty Stokes; and Treasurer, Charlie Mague. We also asked Miss Haskins to be our class sponsor, chose crimson and white for our class colors, and wrote and adopted a class song. We got lost those first few days in the maze of tunnels that went from building to building. The poor I. A. men were the only ones who had to go outside and brave the elements. Classes seemed so hard to us then, but looking back upon them now they seem so easy, don ' t they? There were so many of them and so much homework to be done that it didn ' t seem as if it would be possible to find time to sleep. We soon found the time, though. Then there was the Freshman Reception and the hair-raising Hallowe ' en Dance. Weren ' t the Pumpkin and Mickey and Minnie Mouse costumes exceptional ! How could anyone forget the big success of the year, the Winter Carnival Ball ? That was a lot of work, but it seemed to make us grow up. Wasn ' t it wonderful? We actually had all the snow we needed that year. Of course, we couldn ' t forget our snow sculpture that won the only Booby Prize ever awarded to a class in the history of T. C. The Freshman Tea, " Male Animal " , and all the formals followed one another throughout the spring, making for an exciting schedule. Class Day. My, a whole year gone by! " Hurry and get those hoops done. Where did that roll of red crepe paper go? How many more hoops do we need? " One step of our college career was complete. Just imagine! We were upper classmen at last. Mighty Sophomores. We could help initiate those Freshmen. This was what we had been waiting for ! The first week of this year was spent in explaining the intricacies of our system to our " Little Sisters " . We were hilarious and pensive by turns watching their antics (we had so recently left the ranks). Our contribution to the school calendar this year was the Hallowe ' en Dance. We really had a lot of fun in its planning. It turned out to be quite a success, too. The officers for this year were: President, Bob Perry; Vice-President, Joan Kenny; Secretary, Bobbie O ' Rourke; and Treasurer, Bob Hutchinson. They led us through the year with no mishaps. This year the Carnival Ball and weekend were wonderful even though the snow was noticeably absent. There were the Senior and Junior Proms, Club Formals (some of us were fortunate enough to go), sports, Fun-Nite, and " Trial by Jury " to fill our spare moments. 62 ■i ■■■■■ Of course there were our classes, too. They were much more collegiate in degree it seemed, for we had such subjects as Physics, Psychology, and the like. Each day we dug a little deeper into the books and library to find the answers. By now college had become pretty much of a routine. Class day again and another year completed. This, the beginning of our Junior year was the first page of our actual preparation for teach- ing. Remember all the discussions of which group (Elementary or Junior High) we should choose. Of course, some of us didn ' t have this problem, for the I. A. men had settled their choice in their freshman year. Under the direction of Miss Bruce and Miss Cunningham we suddenly found ourselves deluged with method courses and became saturated with knowledge concerning lesson plans. With growing apprehension we saw the day draw near when we would go in " training " , and watched those poor unfortunates who were then going through the mill stagger under the weight of books, charts, calen- dars, and lesson plans. Half of us were to go in training second semester. Needless to say we found training un- surpassed as an enriching experience. Those associations made with some of our pupils will remain tucked away in our hearts for many years. This year our leaders were President, Don O ' Sullivan; Vice-President, Bobbie O ' Rourke; Secre- tary, Jean Cadwell; and Treasurer, Carl Pohlman. Remember, that was the year we got our class rings and chose the Sax board for 1951. The sooner this was settled the sooner " Operation Sax " could get under way. We chose Bobbie O ' Rourke as Editor, Don O ' Sullivan as Assistant Editor, Carl Pohlman as Business Manager, and George Bet- tinger as Directory Editor. As advisors we selected Miss Haskins and Mr. Farrington. Yes, there were the usual events but for us there was something new. This was the year that we sponsored our own prom. It was held on the swank roof of the Parker House in Boston. Re- member what a wonderful time we had? Everyone stayed until the last note of music died away. About the middle of spring our college president, Dr. William Sanders, told us that he was leaving T. C. to become Superintendent of Schools in Springfield. We were very sad to see him leave but with him went our best wishes. Class day again and another year gone by. We were saddened at this time for many of the accelerated men who had begun college with us were graduating. Ah Ha! Seniors, that ' s us! Well, well! Remember when we first came to college, we thought the day was way in the future and now it ' s finally here. Our final executive board was President, Irv Dennis; Vice-President, Bobbie O ' Rourke; Secre- tary, Joan Kenney; and Treasurer, Dick Newell. During the summer the Korean situation came to a head and exploded. Through the year all the fellows could say was, " Will we or won ' t we be called? " It was rather nerve-racking, wasn ' t it? Many of us were fortunate to take a small part in a big event during our senior year. Our new president, Dr. Ellis F. White, was inaugurated on October twentieth, in Herlihy Auditorium. It was an eventful and enriching occasion. Educators from all over the country and the Governor of the Commonwealth were present as speakers. Of course, all the school activities were heartily patronized by our class, for we realized that they would undoubtedly be our last. Formals, Proms, Fun-Nite, Assemblies, and don ' t forget the " Bartered Bride " , and all the other activities which took place throughout the year. All too soon the Commencement Season arrived. This time our feelings were a mixture of gaiety and sadness. There was the Senior Prom, rehearsals for class day, then Class Day itself, fol- lowed by Baccalaureate, and at last Graduation It made us feel sad to be leaving our college life behind, but it certainly was wonderful to look forward to the new and exciting adventures which were to befall us. ' 63 CLASS SONG i (ear the heart of old r ew (Lnaland J n the hills of home, stands jritchbura -Jeachers L olleae - ondiu called our own. efram: J ina then, all ue students loual! J)ina then, all ue older aradsl C ii e a cheer, and mahe it roual! L ive a cheer, and mahe it aladl (olest ou snows of old r ew (Lnaland, Uerdured in her clime, Mlma f ater, these our praises —Mre forever thine. Jl. -JrtL 64 Alumni Procession -- ' " v ■-i j: • Kick it! , . j tffe a coke? 66 • V Weather Prophet 67 ORGANIZATIONS 69 This year the Glee Club, under the direction of Mr. Kent, was composed of seventy members. Every Wednesday afternoon their voices echoed throughout the school as they rehearsed for their productions. One of the outstanding events of the year was President White ' s inaugura- tion. The Glee Club was accorded the privilege of contributing a few selections to this memorable occasion. On December sixth, the Club presented a concert with Mr. Donald Wilcqx, a well-known local pianist and organist, as guest artist. This concert was re- hearsed and performed with characteristic enthusiasm by all participants. In April came the biennial spring festival, this year Smetana ' s " The Bar- tered Bride " , which was the highlight of a year of hard work. The difficult solos and choruses were rendered in a highly creditable manner. The singing of the Club at some of the college assemblies rounded out a full and satisfactory year. PRESIDENT Gerard Hurley vice-president Jill McGraw Rege secretary Jane Wood treasurer John Porter sponsor Mr. Richard Kent GLEE CLUB 70 The Art Club, under the direction of Miss Conlon, is primarily a work- shop of talented art enthusiasts who wish to experiment with many different types of crafts, or who wish to learn the techniques of various types of painting. The most popular crafts this year have been copper foil modeling, leather tooling, block printing, textile painting, and oil painting. This year the Art Club assembly, November fourteenth, featured Robert Hunter, an instructor at the Vesper George School of Art in Boston. His topic was " Water Color as a Decorative Medium " , and as illustration he did a swampland in water colors and explained the painting techniques as the picture progressed. Many members joined the Fitchburg Art Museum, and attended the open- ing teas, meeting several painters of note and thus broadening their experience in the field of art. president Marjorie Swift vice-president Tom Coburn SECRETARY-TREASURER Nanci Johnson Maravell sponsor Miss Florence Conlon ART CLUB 71 " £ a qjulp The thespians in the Class of ' 51 remember two brilliant play nights in their college careers. In 1948 the Dramatic Club produced the James Thurber-Eliot Nugent hit comedy, " The Male Animal " , which established for the Club a repu- tation for excellence. Not content to rest on its laurels, the Club came up with another huge success in 1950, with the presentation of the famous Broadway vehicle, " The Man Who Came to Dinner " . Assembly audiences saw the curtains open more than once on a Dramatic Club one-act play, such as " Air-Tight Alibi " , " A Child is Born " , and " Anything Can Happen " . Over the years the Club has aimed to provide opportunity for participation to all those interested in appearing on the stage, in costuming, make-up, and backstage work. It is also hoped that the members found that the Club offered first-hand experience in the management of such a group, which may prove to be of value in their teaching careers. president Gwen Derby vice-president Maxine Hertel secretary Beverly Wiltshire treasurer Jack Legere sponsor Mr. Daniel Healy DRAMATIC CLUB 72 SAX BOARD The Saxifrage Board began its task of publishing this yearbook in May, 1950, with a staff of three officers elected by the class and eleven additional members. From September to May, Miller Hall and the Industrial Arts Building be- came a beehive of activity. Sax members could be seen dashing to meetings at seven p.m., weighted down by old yearbooks, innumerable notes, contracts, pictures, proofs, and lists. Supplementing regular meetings were five or ten minute conferences on the front walk or in the Admin lobby; the board mem- bers began to feel like " lobbyists " . Special work sessions were called frequently as deadlines seemed to appear from out of the blue. However, with the so-generously-given aid of Miss Has- kins and Mr. Farrington and with th e cheerful cooperation of so many class- mates, we have presented to you the 1951 Saxifrage. Editor-in-chief Roberta O ' Rourke Assistant Editor Donal O ' Sullivan Business Managers Carl Pohlman Louise Lagroe Directory Editor George Bettinger Advertising Manager _ David Donaldson Photography Editor Patricia Merrill Candids Editor Bob Hearine Sponsors Organization Editor Richard Newell Feature Editor Jean Conaty Art Editor Richard Porteus Write-up Editor Edward Com cry Staff Secretary Marion Chesni k Publicity Nancy Gei .Miss Elizabeth Haskins and Mr. William Farrington dtf-W k Vv THE STICK The Stick, which is published by the stu- dents of the College, is completing its fourth year of operation since its post-war reor- ganization. In these four years The Stick has grown rapidly with the college in scope and prestige. At the present time its circu- lation has reached about 900 copies, ex- changed with sixty colleges and universities, and its has won second prize in the Colum- bia Scholastic Press Association in competi- tion with other college publications through- out the nation. The Stick is the students ' voice insofar as the editorial comments are concerned. The cultivation of better school spirit, the allevia- tion of petty group differences, the exposure of school conditions, are all effected by the students ' spokesmen, the Editors. The Stick, as does every college news- paper, devotes a section to sports. In this section the paper tries to create an interest in the sports events of the school, point out the highlights of engagements with other colleges, and by an " Athletes of the Week " column, bring before the students a more de- tailed knowledge of their team through a description of the individual players. A relatively newcomer to The Stick is the Campus Chatter column. Also incorporated in the paper are several features of intellec- tual interest and challenge. The Ash Tray, one of these, gives pros and cons of current intellectual problems. The staff of The Stick has worked hard to enhance the character of the paper and is proud of its accomplishments. It has for- mulated a policy which has in the past and will in the future act in the best interests of the school and its students. EDITORIAL BOARD Co Editors M. Jean Conaty, Leo McManus News Editor Jack Legere Feature Editor Eugene Casassa Sports Editor Irving Dennis Exchange Editor Marilyn Miller Business Editor Ronald Fabiszewski Makeup Editor Allan Williams Rewrite Editor Charles Madison 74 SKI CLUB The aim of the Ski Club is to promote good sportsmanship through competition. Active participation of all ski enthusiasts of greater or lesser ability made this group a spirited one. The Club ' s aims were realized during the Winter Carnival weekend, when the Club offered an opportunity for outdoor activities. This opportunity was in the form of the annual ski meet in which inter-class competition was encouraged. The skiers par- ticipated enthusiastically in the downhill, slalom, and cross-country races. Each class attempts to gain a maximum number of points in order to secure the trophy, a cup which is awarded annually by the Ski Club. Individual awards were also presented to all who participated. Another important phase of the Ski Club activity was the invitation extended to the entire school for ski trips. During the year several short trips were made to local tows. An enthusiastic response was made, and a large body of students attended. The Club also sponsored a dance and an assembly as part of its versatile program. The members considered the possibility of a varsity ski team, and have incorporated this as one of their aims for the future. Ski Heil ! President Richard Johnson Vice-President Barbara McDermott Secretary Sally Regan Treasurer Carl Pohlman Advisor Mr. E. A. Jacobsen if WOMEN ' S COMMUTING BOARD This year we had an increase of Commut- ing Women at F. T. C. There were 164 all-told. The Board, which consists of rep- resentatives from each class, meets with Miss Bolger once a month. Problems which arise among the commuting women are solved by the Board, which also plans social functions. The annual Tea for the Fresh- men, given by the Board and the Women ' s Dorm Council, was held once again, and the Commuting Women sponsored a novelty dance which proved very successful. President Helen Mullin Vice-President Nancy Gentsch Secretary Elaine Ojala Treasurer Phyllis Morse Senior Representative Patricia Lilly junior Representative Noreen McDowell Sophomore Representatives: __Lois Hanson Joyce Laventure Freshman Representatives: Carol Lynch Betty LaFlame - - c fc J Si-. 7 «■ As a result of the increased off-campus enrollment, the Commuting Men ' s Board has become an important factor in making the commuting student ' s college life pleas- urable. This Board has endeavored to make the time spent in the Commuting Men ' s Room more enjoyable. It buys games which are used by the students. Through it the students participate in all intramural com- petitions. The biggest social activity was the Spring Clambake, which transferred the ac- tivities from a pine-panelled room to a pine forest. President Edward L. Schulze Vice-President Eugene McCarthy Secretary Donald Fitzgibbons Treasurer Robert E. Farrar Senior Representative James Murphy junior Representative Paul Rigopoulos Sophomore Representative Richard Fitzgerald Freshman Representative George Fitzgerald COMMUTING MEN ' S BOARD 76 WOMEN ' S DORM COUNCIL Activities were carried on as usual and a freshman initiation party started the social year. A Christmas party was held in Decem- ber and the girls spent much time decorating the oval room and preparing the food. In January the upperclass girls joined the com- muting girls in sponsoring a well-organized tea for the Freshman girls. During the last months of winter the women of Miller Hall ran a Canasta tournament to liven the cold nights. At the beginning of this year the Wom- en ' s Council represented both Miller Hall and the Barracks. However, a fire trans- ferred the girls residing in the temporary building to the walls of the dorm and pri- vate homes near the campus. Palmer Hall can be described as " the house of a democratic family " . Each man has a responsibility along with his free- dom — a responsibility for his own good conduct 50 that his freedom and that of others will not be curtailed. Dependability and cooperation are quali- ties striven for in Palmer, as its men are given more of the responsibility of leader- ship in its activities and government. The " family ' s " principal social activities are the Christmas party and a spring clam- bake, planned by the men under the guid- ance of Mr. Holmes, while individual mem- bers participate in the card, ping pong, and basketball games that know no season. President Lawrence Walsh Secretary Bernard Belles Treasurer Myron Eisenhaure Senior Representative Walter Sims Junior Representative Paul Healy PALMER HALL BOARD 77 Sophomore Representative Arthur Harrington Freshman Representative Carl Erickson Sponsor Mr. Roger Holmes President of Dormitories Suzanne Forster Stewart President of Miller Hall -Marion Chesnick President of Barracks Jayne Philbrick Dorm Secretary Patricia Griffin Dorm Treasurer Patricia Hartshorn Barracks Representative Patricia Ryan Freshman Representative --Constance Daley Sponsors Mrs. Anna Simmons Miss Rauh.i Wayrynen STUDENT CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION The S. C. A. is an organization which provides both a religious and a social outlet. Every meeting has a worship service and either a speaker, movie, or some other social activity. The S. C. A. again this year affiliated with the Student Christian Movement of New England. This gave members a chance to join with members of other colleges at conferences. Fitchburg led a worship service at the fall New England Confer- ence held at M. I. T. The year started with a big turnout at the first meeting which was held at Coggshall Park. The Christmas Program, caroling with the Newman Club, was a very fruitful one. The club was for- tunate indeed in having well-selected speakers and movies at other meetings. The year ' s program ended with the annual installation of officers at a very impressive service at the Cathedral of the Pines. The S. C. A. also sponsored a girls ' basket- ball team in the girls ' intramural league and en- joyed a very successful season. This has been the biggest year insofar as atten- dance and membership were concerned. All are looking forward to another promising program next year. President James Maclnnes Vice-President George Bosworth Secretary Anita Wheeler Treasurer Francis Roberts Sponsors Mr. Everett Koehler Mr. Richard Durnin Chaplain Rev. Cassius Sturdy 78 NEWMAN CLUB Under the capable direction of Miss Cunning- ham the Newman Club has again proven itself to be one of the most active clubs on campus. Among the club ' s activities for the year were a Talent Show, a Panel Discussion comprised of members of the faculty with Rev. Paul Curtin S. J. as moderator, a joint meeting with the Fitch- burg Chapter of Diocesan Catholic Nurses and a Fashion Show. The Newman Club joined the Student Chris- tian Association with a caroling program held on the Common and at Burbank Hospital. A dance sponsored jointly by the Newman Club and the S. C. A. was also held before the Lenten Season. At the monthly meetings of the club spiritual guidance was given by Rev. Charles Lynch of St. Bernard ' s Church who replaced Rev. William Welz as chaplain. The last meeting of the year was in the form of a Communion Breakfast. At this time the installa- tion of officers for the coming year took place. Once again the Newman Club succeeded in com- bining spiritual, social, and educational aims through a program of varied activities. President John Sugrue Vice-President Edward Convery Treasurer Robert Smith Rec. Secretary Patricia Foley Corr. Secretary Shirley Howe Sponsor Miss Gertrude Cunningham Chaplain Rev. Charles Lynch 79 I w k- %s( MOHAWK CLUB Out of our rich history has emanated a name full of tradition — Mohawk. The Mohawk of to- day, as the Mohawk of yesteryear, is a symbol of fearlessness, worthiness, truthfulness, and tribal fellowship. Under the able guidance of Mr. Con- Ion, the club brings to the campus an understand- ing of friendship and sociability. The Braves participate in many activities, both on and off campus. The annual Fun-Nite, staged by the Hawks and Tokes, was eagerly looked for- ward to by both the faculty and the student body. The club also sponsored a basketball team which was very active in the intramural league. Many children of Fitchburg are grateful to the Mohawk Club, and to the other clubs on campus, because of their energetic endeavors in the " Toy for Joy " campaign which was held during the Christmas holidays. Boy Scout Troop Six, also sponsored by the club, is one of the best-trained scout units in the city of Fitchburg. Held each spring, the Gav- Hawk Formal Dance was one of the most impor- tant social events of the year. The Mohawk Club fosters gentlemen of the future, serving their God, their country, their family, and their school. All are united in the symbol, Soangetaha. Chief Allan Williams Medicine Man George Bettinger Keeper of the Wampum Constantine Christy Scribe John Kiosses Alumni Scribe George Bosworth Guide Mr. Michael Conlon A ' 9 • • 9 9 y 80 GAVALEER SOCIETY The Gaveleer Society is the oldest organization on campus, having been founded in 1921 by a group of men who felt the need for improvement in social, intellectual, and athletic activities. The Fraternity ' s efforts have always been toward these endeavors. Dr. Condike is the genial sponsor of the Gavs; his able assistance has greatly strengthened the club. The annual membership of the organization is approximately thirty-five men. These members partake in numerous college activities. Each year the Gavaleers sponsor an assembly which is in keeping with the club ' s original purposes. On the lighter side, the annual Initiation Weekend headed the list. Other activities included the Gav-Hawk Soccer Game, intramural basketball, the Gav-Hawk Formal, and the annual Installation Dinner. The club also sponsored a Square Dance and, in co- operation with the Student Co-op, a Christmas Dance. The club uses the term Gaveleers interchange- ably with the Greek letters Lambda, Phi, and Sigma which denote leadership, light, and strength. The Gavs have incorporated these letters in thur pin and in their lives. Amici President Francis Dowtl Vice-President James Petto Treasurer John Newell Secretary Frederick Cole Alumni Secretary Stanley Wheeler Sponsor Dr. George E. Condike SI it. " lit ESOTERIC Founded in 1947, the Esoteric Society was es- tablished for the primary purpose of constantly improving the human relationships in the student body of the college. Improvement of human re- lationships includes the fostering of proper college spirit, the extension of social opportunity through participation in extra-curricular activities and rec- ognition of human merit as the proper criterion for esteem. The society, by the pursuit of these aims in its membership, strives to set an example for the college at large. This year saw the fraternity sponsor a gala Thanksgiving Dance, enjoyed by the entire col- 1 ) SOCIETY lege, and a hilarious Minstrel Show which is fast becoming a tradition. Additional highlights for the brothers were the Initiation Weekend, the Christmas party and the annual Dinner Dance. On the athletic front, the society was again very active in intramural basketball. Twelve new men were wel comed to the brotherhood in the fall. On this occasion Dr. Ellis White was made an hon- orary member. The fraternity uses the three Greek letters Phi Delta Pi as their symbol, denoting their motto, charity, honor, and zeal. President John Gainey Vice-President Paul Costello Treasurer Edward Convery Secretary Edward Schulze Corr. Secretary Paul Healy Sponsor Mr. Richard Kent 82 EPSILON PI TAU The Epsilon Pi Tau Fraternity is an Interna- tional Honor Society in Industrial Arts and In- dustrial-Vocational Education. It is the only professional honor fraternity on this campus. Epsilon Pi Tau was established in 1929 at Ohio State University, where the Alpha Chapter is lo- cated. There are at present thirty-two chapters in various parts of the United States. The ideals of the fraternity are to foster the ability to adapt and manipulate the tools and ma- terials of the industry, to use industrial products wisely, and to instill a disposition and ability to cooperate in the achievement of the established goals of our industrial democracy. Each chapter of the fraternity publishes an an- nual newsletter on matters of research, chapter activities and professional information of concern to all its members. 83 Membership is limited to undergraduates who have attained the upper quarter of the junior or senior class, and to those teachers who have done outstanding work in the field of Industrial Arts or Vocation Education. President John Burokas Jr. Vice-President Curtis Boyden Jr. Secretary Louis Forgues Treasurer Earl Hanson Trustee Walter Harrod TOKALON SOCIETY ToKalon, the first society for girls at this col- lege, was founded five years ago and its ideals are as strong today as they were then. " Gnothi Seauton " , the club motto, is cherished by each member and signifies the standards which Tokes strive for. The purpose of the society is to foster the high standards of the college and to stimulate all school activities. One of the highlights of being a Toke is Initia- tion Weekend. As in the past, many alumnae returned to renew old friendships and the new pledges and old members cemented a lasting bond of close friendship. Another traditional activity of the club was " Fun-Nite " , in which the Tokes joined the Mohawks in providing an evening of entertainment for the entire college. Members of the society held an assembly in March when they joined together in presenting an original program for the school, a formal dinner dance in April, and several teas. Members of ToKalon participate in all school functions as well as their club activities. Much of the organization and spirit of the society is owed to the loyalty and aid of the sponsors, Miss Shea and Miss Donovan. President Patricia Lilly Vice-President Patricia Ryan Treasurer Carol Leclair Recording Secretary Jeanne McGowan Coir. Secretary Jean Cadwell Sponsors Miss Ruth Donovan Miss Margaret Shea 84 PHILODEMIC SOCIETY The Philodemic Society endeavors at all times to live up to the standards embodied in its creed, which includes participation in the social activities of the college, cooperation with the civil authori- ties of the city, and a display of good sportsman- ship at all times. The Philo Weekend, at which the new members are received officially, introduced the round of ac- tivities which continued to the Farewell Tea when the seniors discovered that " too soon our ways must pa rt " . The highlight of the Philo social sea- son was the Rose Dinner Dance at which the Tra- ditional Rose Ceremony was performed. The old- fashioned bouquets in the club colors of red and white are treasured as mementoes of the club ' s outstanding dance of the year. Other activities undertaken with enthusiasm included a tea for the honorary members, the Christmas party for under-privileged children, and the sponsoring of a spirited basketball team in intramural games, as well as many informal get-togethers. The words " Fidus Achates " attempt to sum up how each Philodemic feels toward her sisters, her classmates, and F. T. C. President Marion Kennedy Vice-President Louise Sobczak Rec. Secretary Jill McGr.iw Corr. Secretary Gwen Derby Treasurer Sally Healy Sponsors Miss Lillian Tab i Miss Elizabeth O ' Connor 85 fl HN m jfli| AHKffVv f 3. B5 liWR53ij ADELPHIAN SOCIETY Returning to school in the fall of 1950 the members of the Adelphian Society continued their tradition of colorful activities by initiating into the club eleven new pledges and a new co- sponsor, Mrs. Anna Simmons. Early in November the Adelphians presented an assembly, " Degerwillon " , the story of a pro- gressive school. The formal installation followed soon afterward and a tea in connection with this affair took place in Miller Hall. December brought the Winter Wonderland Ball at Sterling Inn which was beautifully deco- rated with sparkling snowflakes and the happy 86 faces of the club members and their guests. St. Patrick ' s day green was formally adopted by the sisters as they joined the Co-op in staging the traditional dance. Active as always in the field of sports, the Adelphians competed in the basket- ball tournament, enthusiastic to join with the other clubs and organizations on campus in fun and good sportsmanship. The Adelphian Society, standing for sincerity and friendliness, imparts to its members those principles which they believe to be an integral part of a rich and full life. President Patricia Hartshorn ' Vice-President Joan Arthur Secretary Beverly Sherwin Treasurer Arlene Bonitz Con. Secretary Helen Robinson Sponsors Miss Signe Antila Mrs. Anna Simmons STUDENT CO ' OP All undergraduates of Fitchburg Teachers Col- lege are members of the Student Co-operative As- sociation which was instituted to co-ordinate and consolidate student extra-curricular activities. It supervises all matters pertaining to student life which do not come within the jurisdiction of the faculty. Its purpose is to further the spirit of unity, cooperation among the students, and to increase their sense of responsibility toward one another. The association also serves as a medium through which the social and cultural standards of the college may be maintained on a high plane. The legislative group of the association is the Student Co-operative Council, composed of four officers and eight representatives, a man and a woman from each of the four classes. This council is the organ through which school affairs within the jurisdiction of the students are discussed and regulations proposed. The council sponsored many of the social activi- ties of the college; among them were the Fresh- man Welcome Dance, the Christmas Dance which was sponsored cooperatively with the Gavs, and the Saint Patrick ' s Dance of which the Adelphians were co-sponsors. An all school picnic was held to close the Co-op ' s social year. 87 President Alan Shaw Vice-President Nancy Kenney Treasurer John Kiosses Secretary Joan Kenney Seniors Edward Sandomierski Sally Hcaly Juniors Richard Smith Anita Wheeler Sophomores Edmund Sullivan Helen Hammond Freshmen Richard Farris June McGary H 1km SAXIFRAGE Found 11° from the North Pole Courtesy of MacMillan Polar Expedition and the Class of 1928. " All the timorous, hesitating beauty of the early spring bloom clusters about the Saxifrage. It slips into the woods quietly, as though fearful that if it made a noise or attracted too much attention Jack Frost might send someone, or come himself, which would be worse, and punish it by retarding its growth. We find it on the top, or in the clefts of rocks, which it has been known to break asunder. In fact, to watch this little plant is a model lesson in the achievements that can be brought about by quiet will power. " 88 SPORTS 89 The primary purpose of the M. A. A. is to organize and supervise an intra- mural program which includes soccer, basketball, touch football, and softball. This board carefully planned schedules for the various sports and was con- cerned with the rules and regulations regarding them. Rule revisions and im- provements were made each time existing conditions demanded. The M. A. A. consisted of two members from each class who were elected to the board in their freshman year. Two consecutive years on the board enabled them to become eligible for office. The experience gained on the board during the first two years made them candidates for a higher position; as a result, a more efficient job was performed. An organized group representing the Hotel Raymond succeeded in winning the soccer championship by emerging victorious over a stubborn Freshman aggre- gation with a margin of 2-1. The Sophomores eked out a 6-0 win, playing against the Freshmen, to claim the championship in touch football. The intramural program offered an opportunity to the students to engage in athletic competition under the supervision and direction of the M. A. A. Board. President Robert Hesselgren Vice-President Edward Sandomierski Secretary John Rajala Treasurer Richard Smith Freshman Representatives Carl Erickson Vincent DeNovellis Sophomore Representatives Francis Wickman Loring Stevenson en ' s Athletic Association 90 l A: ry. The Women ' s Athletic Association started its activities for the year by intro- ducing the board members at the annual assembly. Under the leadership of Miss Clark the board presented a varied program of sports for the women in the college. In co-operation with the Department of Physical Education, it strove to promote the highest standards of health and good sportsmanship. Crisp fall afternoons found a group of eager girls out on the athletic field for Hockey practice. The traditional Green and White game ended the season. Archery, a new sport, was introduced this year. Its popularity was shown by the number of students who enthusiastically participated in this sport during the fall and the spring. Two badminton tournaments were held, one in the fall for upperclassmen, and one in the spring for the freshmen. The W. A. A. Board presented a delightful school assembly, Marion Rice and her Modern Dance group providing the entertainment. This year ' s round robin basketball tournament again captured the interest of the entire college. In addition to the intramural competition, the Varsity Basketball squad played two games each with American International College of Springfield, St. Mary ' s C. Y. O. of Ayer, and Clark University of Worcester. Other highlights of the season were the Freshman Rally, held at the Brook, the W. A. A. Annual Conference of State Teachers Colleges, the Swimming pro- gram and intramural volleyball and softball. President Louise Sobczak Vice-President Helen Hammond sJ t r 7 C Secretary Noreen McDowell AffeiiJ V Treasurer Nancy Kenney Captain of Green Team Joan Kenney Captain of White Team Trudy Denault r- j L- Senior Representative Marion Chcsnick V V Vv Head of Tennis Judy O ' Shca Head of Archery Nancy Hult Head of Table Tennis Marianne Kennedy W omen s Athl etic A ssociation 91 SOCCER Through the combined efforts of the 1949 and 1950 soccer teams, Fitchburg Teachers College saw a fourteen game win- ning streak. This is the largest number of successive wins to be compiled at Fitchburg. The success of the team not only served as an inspiration for the entire squad but also drew many enthusiastic students into the widening circle of soccer fans. The contemporary cry was " Your head, your head, don ' t lose it, use it! " Teams such as R.I.C.E. 2-0, Bridgewater 4-1, Keene 2-1, Lowell Textile 3-0, Boston University 1-0, and Clark Uni- versity 1-0 fell victims of the Fitchburg booters before the Green and White dropped their final game of the season at Keene 3-1. The spirit and aggressiveness displayed by the Green and White was such that each player ' s ultimate goal was the will to win through teamwork. Therefore, no one outstanding player could be singled out from the entire squad. By winning the Teachers College Conference two years in succession, Fitchburg is now being recognized both locally and nationally for its soccer prowess. Coach Bob Elliot Co-captain Ralph Clough Co-captain Leo Nowacki 92 BASKETBALL The Green and White basketball team was a little slow in hitting its stride this year. However, the boys dashed all over the court against strong opposition during the latter part of the season to come very close to a .500 average. The records showed seven wins and ten losses but failed to show the ex- citement and thrill of the game. The eighteen game schedule was cut short of the final game because of sickness in the squad. Coach Bill Provenzani and Athletic Director Bob Elliot produced a well-rounded, smooth functioning, and spirited team. Such notables as Captain Johnny Kiosses, Ralph Clough, Ed Sandomierski, Lin Erickson, Bob Duncan, Bob Farrar, and Jim Shiminski set a terriffic pace rushing up and down the court. The scores of the games were as follows; Victories: Alumni 66-30, Salem 51-48, Willimantic 63-62, North Adams 71-61, Salem 77-60, Keene 89-80, Bridgewater 90-70. Losses included Assumption 80-71, Gorham 59-58, Conn. 103-64, Worcester Polytech 59-52, Plymouth 71-60, Conn. 84-64, Clark 66-51, Keene 78-75, Worcester 59-54, and Plymouth 63-53. Coach Bill Provenzani Captain Johnny Kiosses 93 s o f i -v J m M W BASEBALL April 18 April 25 April 27 May 8 May 16 May 26 May 25 May 29 Clark University Worcester North Adams T. C North Adams Salem T. C. Salem KeeneT. C Fitchburg Salem T. C. Fitchburg Plymouth T. C. Fitchburg T. C. of Conn. New Britain Keene T. C Keene Gorham T. C. Fitchburg Boston T. C. Fitchburg Denotes Conference games The final two games were unscheduled at this time. Coach Bob Elliot Captain Bob Farrar With the baseball season two months away at the time pf this writing, it is difficult to predict what the future holds in store for the 1951 season at F. T. C. However, if the interest and chatter which has circulated around campus is any indica- tion as to what we may expect, we may be assured that the Falcons will field a very worthy team. At the present time Coach Bob Elliot has a sound team waiting to don uniforms and " play ball " . They include out- fielders Larry Walsh, Bill Martin, Alan Foresman, and Loring Stevenson; infielders Jack Rajala, Eddie Hill, Stan Bernatowicz, Bob Duncan, and Myron Eisenhaure; pitchers Ed Sandomier- ski, Minty Costello, Rene Rheault, and Captain Bob Farrar. Four players graduated last June ; however, it is expected that there will be many freshmen eager to join the squad. This year the schedule provides an even number of home and away games. FIELD HOCKEY The girls ' field hockey began with grand fashion in the month of September and continued in style during the month of October. The practices were held on Mondays and Wed- nesdays, with a little competition from the soccer players; however, no injuries were suffered. The beginners as well as the veterans were eager to learn and showed great enthusias m for the sport. Under the capable coaching of Miss Clark and a few upperclassmen, the players received individual instruction in skills and plays, and soon participated in scrimmages. A varsity team was not chosen, because it was impossible to participate in any out-of-school games. It seems as though Fitchburg is the only college in this area which plays varsity field hockey. The traditional Green and White teams were elected, the players being chosen on the basis of their skill, faithful attendance at practices, and good sportsmanship. Two of three games were played, the White team being victorious in the contest. Head of field Hockey Joyce Laventure 95 The 1950-51 basketball season opened early in October with twenty-five girls being chosen for the Varsity squad. During the season the team met St. Mary ' s C. Y. O. of Ayer, A. I. C. of Springfield, and Clark University of Worcester. Of the five games played, there were three victories, C. Y. O. being defeated twice and A. I. C. once. The sea- son ' s basketball activities were directed by co-heads Helen Mullin and Lois Lovell. The limited varsity squad, however, did not prevent other enthusiastic players from romping on the courts. General prac- tices and unofficial games were held to stimulate interest. Freshman as well as upperclass talent made itself known. There was a large turnout for the intramural games this season. Eight teams, consisting of eight 96 players and a manager, participated in these highly competitive games. At the end of the season, the three top teams were S. C. A., Adelphians, and Philodemics. Awards were given to the winning intramural team. The Green and White basketball teams vied for top positions at the close of the season. During the year, white satin jackets were pur- chased for the entire varsity squad. This new feature added a great deal to the morale of the players. Heads of Basketball .Helen Mullin Lois Lovell Basketball hJiV (Ma 4 f The volleyball season began in March at the close of the basketball tournament. Practices were held every Monday and Wednesday under the direction of Arlene Bonitz, head of volleyball. Many freshmen turned out for this popular sport, as well as many of last year ' s veterans. The game is defensive in nature and the object is to keep the ball volleying over the net without its touching the floor or the net. Consequently, the officials and scorers acquired enough experience to aspire to follow the faster but similarly neck-twist- ing game of tennis. During the season there were intramural games stressing class competition, with the strong junior team dominating the league. Green and White teams were chosen to compete for points toward the W. A. A. trophy. A varsity and junior varsity were selected to make the trip to Worcester State Teachers College for the round robin which cli- maxed the season. Head of Volleyball Arlene Bonitz Volleyball fii : A -. •( N J Softball Softball, one of the W. A. A. major sports, has always attracted many eager enthusiasts. This year was no exception as an extraordinarily large num- ber of girls turned out for this popular sport. Every Monday and Wednesday afternoon activity reigned at the athletic field as the girls practiced diligently. In addition to the upperclassmen who appeared, the usual number of hopeful freshmen were on hand to bolster the team. The traditional Green and White games were played with both teams fighting wholeheartedly for top honor. As usual, the Green and White games provided keen rivalry and top-notch play- ing. Inter-class games gave all an opportunity to display their talents. These Inter-class games pro- vided entertainment and promoted spirit for both participants and spectators. The season was highlighted by varsity games with other colleges from the surrounding area. The traditional game with Worcester climaxed the sea- son. Head of Softball Pat Ryan 98 CANDIDS 99 I IN THE AREA COLLEGE CAPERS ) J ' V ft. ' %w«» . • ».» -.. »- 1 1 ' ) «fw It seems only yesterday, but it was ' way back in September, 1947, that the class of ' 51 became a part of T. C. During that first month we felt very new. However, a new member had joined the faculty and also joined the class as sponsor. Not only did Miss Elizabeth Haskins join our ranks but she found a lasting corner in our hearts. Her sincere interest and faithful guidance were given freely and frequently during the four years. We shall remember with gratitude the faithful encouragement and understanding received from Miss Haskins who was and always will be so much a part of us. REMEM it Hi BER? V ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Sincere and very special thanks go to Mr. Farrington who did so very much to help make tins yearbook a success. His faithful guidance and assistance were extended in so main ways and proved to be untiring. On the capitalistic front, Miss Haskins ably advised us in all matters of finance. It goes without saying that Dick Porteus has always been a number one artist; how- ever, we eannot go without saying . . . our deepest thanks and praise to you, Dick, for all you ' ve done. Wesley Rowe, a junior, designed the winning cover for the 1951 Sax and also is extended well-deserved praise and appreciation. To all of the other students who generously gave their time and efforts, we again express our thanks. Advertising Miriam Bartkus George Bettinger David Donaldson Ronald Fabiszewski Nancy Gentsch Don Goranson Sally Healy John Kiosses Leo Nowacki Elaine Ojala John Powers Wally Sims Suzanne Stewart Sue Wagner Stanley Wheeler Posters Miriam Bartkus Nancy Gentsch Louise Lagroe Elaine Ojala Typists Lorraine Domingue Connie Madison Senior Write-ups Jean Cadwell Gene Casassa Irv Dennis Maxinc Hertel Dick Johnson Elaine Ojala John Powers Sally Regan Pat Ryan Louie Schulzc Hud Wheeler MWMMMHW B Wa B gWWBain—BWEBBKgBBE a gBBBBgS


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