Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA)

 - Class of 1950

Page 1 of 112

 

Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 112 of the 1950 volume:

mM 1 : ' :■• ■:.- " • ■• .:- : -- n Ot D III sn n yt 1 j z i n D, The Class of 1950 dedicates this edition of the Saxifrage to Mr. Ralph Weston and Mr. William Farrington in sincere appreciation for the excellent advice and invaluable assistance rendered to our class over the years. II To the Class of 1950 There never was a better year to graduate from college. Your professional skill and knowledge are in great demand and the opportunities for moving ahead in your chosen career are rapidly expanding. But you must continue to strive for the first class in your work and in your associations, as you have done while in college. The responsibilities of leadership that you have undertaken are great, and the temptation to relinquish them is strong. I am confident, however, that you will not tolerate mediocrity in your work nor in your lives, and you have my very best wishes for your success and happiness in both. Ralph F. Weston Dean of College Josephine A. Bolger Dean of Women Roger F. Holmes Director of Training On leave of absence September to January Harry F. Percival Director, Graduate Department Grace Gummo Director, Nursing Education James J. Hammond Director, Industrial Arts 1 J III! Row One: Anna G. Simmons, Florence D. Conlon, Helen Ross, Harry F. Percival, William J. Sanders, Josephine A. Bolger, Ralph F. Weston, William V ■ MacKaye. Row Two: Barbara Smith, Rita Foley, Katherine M. McCarty, Lillian later, Elizabeth Quatllander, Louise Wingate, Gertrude M. Cunningham, Rachel S. Bruce. u wiWii i m riftmw ii» Roiv Three: Cora M. Hassell, Elizabeth O ' Connor, Belle M. Nixon, Elma M. Johnson, Walter F. Harrod, Cornelius S. Donoghue, Row Four: Daniel L. Healy, Marion Clarke, Signe Antila, Margaret A. Shea, Lawrence E. Landall, Elizabeth M. Haskins, George F. Condike, Arthur E. Purinton. Row Five: Robert G. Elliot, Philip McMurray, William Tracey, Richard G. Durnin, Arthur C. Harrington, Richard L. Kent, Clifford W. Hague, Eckhart A. Jacobsen, William Farrington, Joseph E. Underwood, Michael Conlon. MIIIS " Administration " covers a lot around F.T.C., for the business of running a college involves more than meets the eye. There is all the paper work connected with ordering materials, equipment and services for the personnel and buildings ; there is a book store and post office ; there is a heating plant ; there are infirmaries ; and to feed the two hundred dormitory students there are kitchens and a dining room. Our administrative group functions admirably, making the campus a smoothly-run community. Row One: Elizabeth Keller, Rita Livi, Claire Lavoie, Mary Bamicle. Row Two: Helen Bacbelder, Herbert Clements, Edna Lantbier, William J. Sanders, Ran ha Wayrynen. 10 fiSS 1 JL Gerald Richardson — Gerry . . . constantly smiling . . . sincere and earnest in his work . . . threatens to make I. A. big . . . favorite saying: " It ' s big! " . . . happy family man . . . Soangetaha. President 4 ; Art Club 2 ; Stick 2, 3, 4; Mohawks 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4; Soccer 4 ; Junior Prom ; Freshman Reception 4. Veronica DiFederico — Gorgeous red locks . . . voice, oh so melodic . . . naturally artistic . . . smart dresser . . . pride of Edgerly children . . . Gnothi Seauton. Secretary 4, Vice-President 3 ; Dramatic Club 2, 3 ; Glee Club 2, 3, Ensemble 2, 3; Stick 4; Newman Club 2, 3, 4; ToKalon 3, 4, Recording Secretary 4; Softball 2 ; Junior Prom. Julia Kelley — Julie ... as Irish as . . . blend of sweet- ness and sophistication ... at ease no matter where . . . effervescent . . . capable leader . . . genuine sin- cerity at all times ... a friend worth having . . . Gnothi Seauton. Vice-President 4; Art Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Commuting Women ' s Board 1, 2, 3; Intra-fraternity Council 4; ToKalon 3, 4; W.A.A. Board 4. 12 William Sullivan — Sully and smile synonymous . . " Head her, big boy " ... a true friend . . . happily married . . . Specialized Education is his goal . . . Phi Delta Pi. Treasurer 3, 4; Sax Board; Glee Cl ub 1 Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Esoterics 1, 2, 3, 4, Corres Sec. 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Capt 4; Junior Prom. 13 Reginald Alexander 5 Jean All et son Robert Anderson Richard Bailey Joseph Aveni Bettina Asselta lrma Anlonangeli 14 Regi nald Alexander- — Al . . . quiet . . . very happily married . . . shares Jim Cummings with the Caneys . . . Vermont ' s contribution to Massachusetts . . . has a large library of unread books from past courses . . . eager beaver in the Hawks . . . " Sure " . . . always helpful . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 2, 3, 4. ] ean Alletson — Scoops . . . loves new Fords . . . shines in geography . . . talks equally well with both hands . . . usually seen with Rice . . . unique sense of humor . . . late follower of Socrates . . . can ' t be found on her nights out . . . Delta Phi Delta. Student Council 3 ; Assembly Committee 3, 4 ; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1 ; Philodemics 3, 4; Basketball 2 ; Volleyball 2, 4; Softball 2. Robert Anderson — Bob . . . industrious and persistent " Svenska " idealist . . . strives for exactness . . . neat and methodical ... a master with rule or pen . . . very friendly . . . conscientious . . . trustworthy ... a loyal worker . . . pensive . . . revels when snow flies. Glee Club 2, 4; Ski Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, -Vice-President 3; Winter Carnival 2. Irma Antonan geU — Easy to know . . . contagious giggles . . . Having a party? Call on Irma . . . first-rate hostess . . . expressive outbursts . . . ingenious devisor of arithmetical devices . . . has a weakness for red roses and accordions . . . provocative dark eyes . . . thoughtful . . . genuine. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Art Club 3; Newman Club 3, 4. Btltina Asselta — Betty . . . sunshine in her smile ... a helping hand ... a magnanimous heart . . . always on the go . . . ingenious talent for any line of business . . . loves convertible coupes . . . bubbling 5 ' of enthusiasm . . . Like to talk? Meet Betty . . . tops in any line of cooking. Art Club 3 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Commuting Women ' s Board 4, Treasurer 4; Halloween Dance 2. Joseph Apeni — Joe . . . endowed with personality plus . . . once a friend always a friend . . . spends weekends in the A P . . . well-read . . . ex-gunner on B-24 . . . outdoor sports enthusiast . . . partial to history . . . Amici. Ski Club 3; Newman Club 3; Gaveleers 3- Richard Baile y — Dick . . . hails from Weymouth, transplanted to New Hampshire . . . early morning commuter ... a leather handbag a week . . . quiet but capable transfer . . . a real craftsman. i Harry Bassett- — Smiley . . . reserved . . . distinguished looking even in a shop coat . . . three year member of the Tribe . . . hails from the Nutmeg State . . . likes to be shaken . . . devoted to his duties . . . bridegroom of last August . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4, President 4. Jose ph Baublis — Good Joe . . . proud papa . . . intelligent . . . conscientious . . . commuter . . . .Athol ' s fair-haired boy . . . tall and good looking but married . . . geography major . . . Harlow ' s nemesis. Glee Club 1 ; Newman Club 1, 2; Winter Carnival 1. Theresa Beauvais — Destined to bask in the sunlight of success . . . capable and ever-willing leader and worker . . . sterling character . . . epitome of grace, poise . . . unbound interest in life . . . accomplished pianist-dancer . . . Gnothi Seauton. Sax Editor; Glee Club 1, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Girls Ensemble 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 3, 4; ToKalon 4. Joaiwe Berndtson — Individualist . . . willing to lend a helping hand . . . has the makings of a physical education teacher . . . honor student . . . believes debate is best . . . always active . . . creative talent . . . Delta Phi Delta. Saxifrage Board ; Dramatic Club 3 ; Art Club 1 ; Student Christian Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Miller Hall Board 1; Philodemics 3, 4; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; W.A.A. Board 2, 3, 4. Leonello Bertoccbi — " Leo " . . . great in stature and nature . . . spontaneous sense of humor . . . adaptable to situations . . . observant . . . possesses choice tidbits of knowledge . . . amusing . . . owner of " the miraculous Ford " . . . expedient mechanic . . . variety of interests . . . gets things done. Frances Bolger — Sue . . . destined for big things in a big world . . . wears confidence like a halo . . . fun- loving, carefree disposition . . . sincere . . . dependable . . . Gnothi Seauton. Stick 1, 3, 4, i; Dramatic Club 1, 3, 4; Art Club 1, 3; Glee Club 1, 3; Ensemble 3; Ski Club 1, 3; Newman Club 1, 3, 4; ToKalon 4; Softball 1; W.A.A. Conference 3; Freshmen bert Bonilz — Bob . . . spectator sport . . . easy to get along with . . . T.C a family affair . . . handicapper . . . adaptable . . . straight-forward . . . has courage of his convictions ... Phi Delta Pi. Stick 1, 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2; Esoterics 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Carnival. Joanne Bemdtson Theresa Beauvats Joseph Baublis Harry Bassett Leonello Bertocchi Frances Bo I Robert Bon ' itz Q 5 fe " V I 17 I V Curtis Bum pus Francis Burke Robert Cahill Robert Calkin Eunice Brown Elizabeth Brown Robert Brogan Q 5 18 Robert Bro gan — Mr. President . . . will help you anytime . . . runs his car (?) from Gardner . . . possible wedding: vinning smile and unassuming manner . . . one of I.A. ' s best . . . favorite saying " I ' ll try " . . . loves parties . . . Amici. Newman Club 1, 2; Gaveleers 3, 4, President 4. Elizabeth Brown — Betty . . . always thought of as " Betty and Bob " ... an added treat to any party . . . has the most amusing collection of rousing songs . . . creative talent . . . will cheer you up in a split second . . . Want to know about Egypt? . . . Delta Phi Delta. Art Club 1, 2 ; Glee Club 2, 3, 4 ; Student Christian Ass ' n. 4; Commuting Women ' s Board 4 ; Philodemics 4 ; Field Hockey 1 . Eunice Brown — Fiend for red ink . . . pleasant drawl . . . soft curls cover a brilliant mind ... at home with the classics ' . . . loquacious at times . . . New Yorker at heart. Stick Staff 4 ; Dramatic Club 4. Curtis Bumpus — Curt . . . former warrant officer . . . gentlemanly . . . student par excellence in spite of full-time work . . . composite of gravity and wit . . .starred in poetry class . . . Phi Delta Pi. Esoterics 3, 4. E ranees Burke, Jr. —Fran . . . good- looking and easy going . . . likeable personality . . . " H ' m, babe ' . . . mighty mite of the diamond . . . blushes easily . . . prizes his collection of Dorchester ties . . . has the ability to get what he wants in life . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2. Robert Cabill — Worcester ' s gift to the " White Cap Art Club " . . . a winning personality . . . firm of conviction . . . science and sports authority . . . defender of " Cousy ' s " good name . . . staunch advocate of the " Flat-top " . . . ambition to eliminate Plan E and become Worcester ' s next Irish mayor. Intramural Sports 1, 3- Robert Calkin — Bob ... a man of thought . . . industrious worker . . . loves to dance . . . has an infectious brand of humor . . . member of the quartet ... a traveler . . . Phi Delta Pi. President 3 ; Sax Board i ; Glee Club 1, 2, 3 Treas. 3; Esoterics 1, 2, 3, 4, Pres. 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Christmas Dance, ( 0- hairman i 19 Loring Cviey — Ggar smoking . . . genial . . . confident . . . earnest . . . I. A. is everything . . . devoted husband and father ... a chef of no mean ability . . . " They are all good kids " . . . influential and helpful to anything he believes in . . . Phi Delta Pi. Vice-President J. Sax Board 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, -4, Treasurer 3; Esoterics 1, 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Pi Tau 3. -l. Treasurer i ; M.A.A. 2. Joan Carroll — Joanie . . . the terror of the training school . . . adept hoopster . . . can be lOunted on to stir up fun . . . has writer ' s cramp from taking notes . . . parboiled by so much hot water ; . . Delta Phi Delta. Secretary 3; Glee Club 1. 2; Ski Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Philodemics 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 1. 2. 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; W.A.A. Board 3- William Chase — Bill . . . always a cheery " Hi " for everyone . . . left here for a short stay at a photography school . . . the one responsible for our handsome profiles in the year book . . . lost without his camera . . . Amid. Gaveleers 4. Charles Chiasson — Joe ... a natural leader . . . possessor of the professional voice qualities . . . argumentive powers . . . challenger of tradition . . . born narrator . . . informal manner . . . friendly . . . witty ... to know him is to like him. Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4 ; Newman Club 3 ; Vice- President 4. Donald Clark- — T.C. ' s lion hunter . . . understudy for Danny Kaye . . . baritone in the quartet . . . fast on his feet ... a smooth salesman . . . sociable . . . ever hear of his trip to Miami? Saxifrage Board 4; Dramatic Club 1 ; Art Club 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball Manager 4. John Connell — Easy going . . . overgenerous ... a winning way . . . always doing favors unrewarded . . . Fanny Farmer ' s sweetest . . . party lover . . . knows everyone . . . vice-versa . . . week- end course at Jackson . . . lost without a car. Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Ski Club 1; Inter- fraternity Council 3; Esoterics 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 1. Thomas Conver y — Go-getter extraordinary . . . extrovert . . . soccer casualty . . . A-l poster maker . . . original in thought and action . . . outspoken exponent of what he believes . . . many irons in the fire . . . best dancer at T.C. Saxifrage Board; Stick 2, 3; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, President 2, Treasurer 3 ; Glee Club 1,2,3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, President 3 ; Soccer 2, 3 ; Baseball 1,2,3; Freshman Winter Carnival 1 ; Sophomore Hop 2 ; Freshman Reception 3 ; Dance Instructor 1, 2. Q 5 Loving Caney Joan Carroll William Chase Thomas Convery John Connell Donald Clark Charles Chiasson t ; 21 r7« James Craft ey i] 5 4TC Zolton Csicsek James Cumm ' ings Eunice Delay Aquilino De Carolis Lois Day Robert Oman fni fames Cra ffey — " Uncle Jim " to all the youngsters . . . loves all God ' s little ones . . . knows the value of a smile . . . combines his many talents perfectly . . . energetic . . . courteous . . . kind . . . favorite thought — " Let ' s be happy " ... a man for anybody ' s team . . . Phi Delta Pi. Student Council 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Esoterics 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Junior Prom; Senior Prom; N.E. Teachers Conference 4. Zolton Csics : ek— Zip . . . one of the boys from Everett . . . infantryman . . . likes to discuss philosophy . . . pioneer in I. A. . . . big in every way . . . sentimental . . . football enthusiast . . . many friends ... " I got mine " . . . vigorous worker . . . perplexed about mysteries of life . . . girls flock to him . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 2, 3, 4. James Cummings — Jim . . . quietly efficient . . . confirmed I. A. man . . . Zip ' s weekend guest . . . pampers a ' 34 Ford . . . from boy to man at T.C. . . . analytical mind . . . dry humorist . . . generous nature. Robert Citrran — Firm in all decisions . . . Salem ' s loss is our gain . . . nice appearance . . . intelligent speaker . . . good worker on any committee . . . Superman in the Stick Assembly . . . good-natured and honest . . . Phi Delta Pi. Stick 3, 4, Sports Editor 3, Co-Editor 4; Dramatic Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Esoterics 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2 ; Soccer 3 ; National Scholastic Press Conference 3. Lois Da y — Stately and poised . . . excellent taste in clothes . . . reserved and determined . . . possesses an original and gifted mind ... on occasions a rare mimic ... a sure success in teaching ... a boon to Grade 4. Art Club 1, 2, 3; Halloween Dance. Aq uilino De Carol is — Archie to all who know him . . . has courage of his convictions . . . will listen intently to your tales of woe ... a modest, quiet and unassuming " Leominsterite " . . . masterful bridge player. Commuting Men ' s Board 4. Eunice Dela y — " Debbie " . . . Gibson Blouse Girl . . . Larry Parks ' rival in show business . . . the Ail-American Girl in sports . . . assiduous student . . . the attractive blonde librarian . . . mania for jazz bow ties ... an Ipana smile . . . able champion of the Irish . . . Delta Phi Delta. Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 1 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Philodemics 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, Captain 3; Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Softball 1, 2, 4; W.A.A. Board 3, 4; W.A.A. Conferences 2, 3; Halloween Dance. Helen Der y — " Keeper of the girls " . . . most loquacious after dark . . . sparkling eyed, dark haired Orange-ite . . . valued as a friend . . . Margie ' s room-mate . . . never tired of . . . Delta Phi Delta. Stick 2; Art Club 3, 4; Ski Club 1; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Philodemics 2, 3, 4; Miller Hall Board 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4; Field Hockey 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2; Volleyball 1, 2; Softball 1, 2, 3; W.A.A. Conference 3. Florence Donnell y — Flo . . . friendly to all . . . gracious . . . essence of patience and fortitude . . . there when needed . . . " Oh! how we danced! " . . . talented athletically and artistically . . . rumor says she can cook too ! . . . a favorite personality at F. T. C. . . . Delta Phi Delta. Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 1, President 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Philodemics 3, 4, Secretary 3; Volleyball 2, 3; Badminton 2, 3; Hockey 1, 2; W.A.A. Board 3, 4, Secretary 4; Halloween Dance 2. Walter Dunn — Drum corps addict . . . summers at Hampton . . . dependable . . . cooperative . . . " Let ' s have a party " . . . droll humor . . . homeloving type . . . Fun-nite orchestra bulwark . . . asset to any group . . . " Want to go up for a plane ride, Joe? " . . . Soangetaha. Glee Club 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Mohawks 2, 3- Hubert Dialin g — Ray ... his home is his workshop and vice versa ... a real craftsman ... if you don ' t know how to do it see Ray . . . delights in his Chevy ' s camouflage paint job . . . distinguished voice . . . not afraid to give voice to his sentiments. J ames Eisenhaure —Ike . . . pleasant personality . . . easy-going alarmist . . . tactfully frank . . . good club man . . . idol of Miller Hall . . . once a friend always a friend . . . graduating with a car the same age . . . Phi Delta Pi. Stick 3, 4; Esoterics 3, 4 ; Palmer Hall Board 4 ; Basketball Manager 4. Mar ) l : arrisse y — Originality in dress . . . gets along with everyone . . . Fall River urbanite . . . debby in her ways . . . dungaree fan . . . hot dogs . . . Bulldog rooter . . . Mary and Pat . . . Gnothi Scauton. Stick 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; ToKalon 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Student Co-op 4; Intra-fraternity Council 3; Basketball 3; Junior Prom; Winter Carnival. Norman Vorest — One of our most conscientious veterans . . . active iome radio enthusiast . . . cjuietly efficient . . . favors experience over money . . . loyal as a friend to classmates ... car a necessity . . . Sax ad man. Ski Club 3 ; Newman Club 3. Florence Donnelly Helen Dery Q 5 Mary Farrissey Nor man forest 25 Margaret Grant Vito Gerard: Patricia Garneau 5 26 Patricia Garnean — Patty . . . vivacious . . . expressive eyes . . . staunch patroness . . . " Get rid of that coat! " . . . favorite of the kiddies . . . sweetness personified . . . gets things done . . . style all her own . . . New Haven-bound 76-0 . . . Gnothi Seauton. Stick 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; ToKalon 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Secretary 4; Winter Carnival 1 ; Junior Prom 3- Vito Gerardi — Master of all situations . . . efficient and systematic . . . the F. T. C. capitalist . . . owns two fishing yachts and a new Olds . . . the human alarm clock . . . scouting enthusiast . . . expert projector " pilot " . . . thinks he can play tennis . . . authority on domestic life . . . good-natured . . . Amici. Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Gaveleers 2, 3, 4. Mar g aret Gran — It ' s nice to be natural when you ' re naturally nice . . . essence of nonchalance . . . admired by all who know her . . . always smiling . . . portrait of a lady . . . Gnothi Seauton. Newman Club I, 2, 3, 4; Commuting Women ' s Board 1, 2, 3; ToKalon 3, 4. Francis Guastalli — Gus ... a transfer student from Boston Teachers College . . . has the stuff ... an experienced man in the field of I. A. . . . has made many friends since his advent to T. C. . . . our gain. Lc- aij Harlow — Lefty . . . studious to the nth degree . . . realist . . . basketball coach of Gardner V. F. W. . . . cigar fiend . . . sports fanatic . . . likes to travel . . . President ' s list . . . geography major . . . can hold his own scholastically with anyone . . . Yankee wisdom. Commuting Men ' -. Board, President 3; Winter Carnival I. how Harrin gtoi — Embodiment of quietness, intelligence . . . joy to a math teacher . . . neat appearance . . . sincere . . . conscientious . . . friendly smile . . . commuter from the barracks ... at home with brush and palette. Sax Board; Art Club 1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club I ; Student Christian Association i ' -Continually playing gunman on lookout for " DeFed ' s " Harrington- . right at home finds his freshman suits haven ' t in an argument, political, philosophical or I. A.-ical expanded with his midriff . . . delights in telling of his experiences as steeplejack . Phi Delta Pi. Newman Club l. 2, b, i: Esoterics l. 2, J, i; Basketball l. 2, 3. 27 . .-. .-. .;■ Always searching lor competition in chess or pinochle . . . usually found hiding behind .1 pipe . . . insists on .1 sandwich between every class and sometimes during . . . exercises his thumb on the Worcester road. Paul He ] em an — Eighty-eight keys, all sharp . . . cheerful willingness to aid every undertaking . . nonchalant . . . gifted master of ceremonies . . . averse to Morpheus . . . always on the go . . . Phi Delta Pi. Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Intra-fraternity Council 4; Esoterics 3, 4; Director Philodemic Show 3, 4, Adelphian Show 4, Newman Club Charity Show 4; Junior Prom; Senior Prom. Carl — Quiet . . . reserved manner . . . friends call him Cozy . . . quite a gentleman with the women . . . salesman extraordinary . . . has ability to please . . . dependable to the nth degree . . . movie connoisseur . . . expert in the social science field. Student Christian Ass ' n. 2, 3, 4. James Hills — Jim . . . rugged commuter from N. H. . . . outdoor sports and farming are pastime interests . . . natural ability to make friends . . . easy-going manner . . . optimist . . . humorist . . . lover of people and life . . . soccer team ' s loudest rooter . . . proud popper. Glee Club 1 ; Winter Carnival. Lucy Hirsch — Lou . . . Helen of Troy ' s competition . . . sweet and lovely . . . demure Miss from Lunenburg . . . talented soprano ... an outdoor girl through and through . . . cupid ' s favorite target ... a truly congenial friend ... a third grader ' s wish come true. Saxifrage Board; Glee Club 2, 3, 4 ; Girls Ensemble 3, 4 ; Student Christian Ass ' n. 4. Louise Hutchinson — A sym- pathetic listener . . . one of those people who says little but thinks much . . . has a serious purpose in mind . . . dependable . . . conscientious worker . . . looks forward earnestly to teaching. Robert Hutchinson- — Bob . . . tall, good-looking Clinton commuter . . . definitely studious . . . lover of baseball . . . has romantic commitments in Clinton . . . would like to take Robert Frost ' s place at Harvard. Treasurer 2 ; Commuting Men ' s Board 1, 2; Winter Carnival 1. 5 WpP TF ' Pi Paul Heffernan Robert Hutchinson Louise Hutchinson Lucy Hirsch James Hills 29 Q 5 Robert Irving Lois Jennings Marguerite Johnson Arthur Lindsey Dorothy Leighton Eugene Laperriere Arthur Keller 30 Robert Irvin g — Bob . . . tall blond individualist of few words . . . automechanics his pastime . . . capable and dependable worker . . . sincere in undertakings . . . practical convictions . . . determined to attain the professional attitude . . . Amici. Student Christian Ass ' n. 2; Gaveleers 3. Lois J ennin gs — State o ' Mainer . . . smooth disposition . . . barracks sentinel . . . pizza fan . . . always dependable . . . model elementary teacher . . . Delta Phi Delta . . . Art Club 1, 2; Barracks House President 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 4; Philodemics 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Field Hockey 1, 2, 3; Halloween Dance; Junior Red Cross 3 . Mar g uerite J ohnson — Marge . . . sax master ... A- 1 in athletics . . . sharp dresser . . . personality plus . . . keeps one guessing . . . talents galore . . . kind you want to know better . . . Gnothi Seauton. Student Council 1 ; Stick 2 ; Ski Club 1 ; Art Club 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4; To Kalon 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; W.A.A. Board, Vice-Pres. 2. President 3; Field Hockey 1, 2; Volleyball 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2; Softball 1, 2, 3; W.A.A. Conference 2, 4, Banquet Committee 3 ; N. Y. Teachers Conference 4. Arthur Keller — Art . . . has ideas of his own . . . never dis- plays emotion . . . ping pong devotee . . . prodigious appetite . . . executive capabilities . . individualist . . . ardent outdoor sportsman . . . family man of Palmer Hall . . . Soangetaha. Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mohawks 4. Eugene Lap evriere — Gene . . . half of the team of Laperriere and Mague . . . wants to teach near Rockingham or Narragansett . . . quietly studious . . . commuter. Intramural Softball 1, 4; Intramural Basketball 2, 4. Dorothy Leigh ton — Lover of poetry . . . intellectually alert ... at home in the class- room . . . eyes that speak volumes . . . always rushing off . . . never wastes time in the dining hall . . . bound to succeed. Arthur Lindse y — Art . . . lost without a car . . . takes great pride in all his painstaking plans . . . good organizer . . . the Dick Tracy of J.H.S. Crime Club. Arthur Little — Art . . . scholastic aims . . . perpetual thinker . . . lover of Western music . . . once a friend always a friend . . . clever and apt craftsman . . . sincere in undertakings and convictions . . . neat . . . generous of heart . . . affable. Epsilon Pi Tau 3, Secretary 3. Phyl lis Lyonnais- — Typifies " good things come in small packages " . . . bundle of energy . . . inspired with ever-ready answers . . . reliable friend . . . preview of Vogue . . . poise plus assurance . . . Gnothi Seauton. Art Club 2, 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 To Kalon 3, 4. Charles Ma gue- — Charlie . . . serious student . . . equine interests . . advocate of progressive education . . . passion for English . . . commuter via thumb . . has an ally in Gene. Treasurer 3; Stick 2, 4; Winter Carnival. J ames Mahone y — Jim . . . cjuiet . . . studious . . . transfer from Boston Teachers College . . . sincere . . . meticul ous . . . made many friends and has proven his worthiness . . . thorough in his studies . . a sure bet to succeed. Ruth Maun — Dry sense of humor . . . keeps her life a deep dark secret . . . can be counted on for a scholarly answer . . . Scotty ' s boon companion . . . intense likes and dislikes . . . artistic ability. Art Club 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 3; Softball 1; Basketball 1. Arthur Marshall — Swede . . . smoothest dresser on campus . . . always neat and sharp . . . loves to ski . . . one of the boys from Everett . . . another threat to make I. A bigger . . . confirmed bachelor . . . devoting life to edu- cation . . . Soangetaha. Ski Club 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4; Palmer Hall Board, President 4; Mohawks 2, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3; Junior Prom. Norman Ma y — Shifty ... a local product . . . master of sports analysis . . . football his specialty . . . can tickle the ivories . . . famous checker player ... to be found in Commuting Men ' s Room. Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2; Senior Prom. 32 James Mahoney Charles Mague Phyllis Lyonnais Arthur Little Ruth Mann L 5 Arthur Marshall Norman May ■P " " - . 33 ft t 11 j Mar) Clare Mulkeen Richard Mulligan Thomas Mullins Dolores Muh iey ]avu ' S Morris Maxwell Moczulewski ]eremiah Millane s 34 J eremiah Millane — Big boy . . . boon to T. C. basketball . . . boyish grin . . . crimson modesty . . . enviable manner . . . studious . . . has been known to be partyish . . . will give I. A. a push . . Phi Delta Pi. Student Council 2, 3, Treasurer 2 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Esoterics 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3; Baseball 1, 2; N. Y. Conference of Professional Schools. Maxwell Moczulewski- — Max ... or the Chief . . . hails from North Hadley ... a sports stalwart and the Coach ' s guiding light . . . Nestor of the campus . . . humorous . . . perfectionist . . . flew the big ones in Italy . . . our prize to any school system . . . Soangetaha. Student Council, Treasurer; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Mohawks 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, Captain 3; Basketball 1, 2; Baseball 1, 3, 4. James Morris — Jim . . . " Now you take a General Motors product " ... a pipe in every pocket . . . connoisseur of Halloween costumes . . . dabbles in photography . . . put his millions into a diamond for " the Girl " . . . Amici. Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Gaveleers 4. Mar y Clare Mulkeen — Twinkling Irish eyes . . . spontaneous smile . . . vivacious and carefree . . . sure ol merriment . . . quick on the comeback . . . Fitchburg resident. Dramatic Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 5; Hockey 2; Basketball 2. Rnh.nd Mull igan — Dick . . . popular . . . jovial . . . personality . . . staunch defender of Lunenburg . . . commuter in name only . . . the Dali of Dillon . . . big gun of Slow Seven ... a frolicsome freshman but a serious senior . . . sold on edu- cation . . . Phi Delta Pi. Ski Club 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Corres. Sec. i . hsotcn S 2, 3, 4. Thomas Mullins— -Tom . . . conversationalist . . . quietly persuasive . . . sports lover . . . devilish . . . thorough and dependable in his endeavors . . . should go a long way in education . . . has " distraction " in Medford . . . Phi Delta Pi. I 4; Intra-fraternity Council 5 I Baseball 1. 2, s, 4; Junior Prom; Senior Prom. Dot- Mitlve y — Dee . . . keen mind and caustic wit . . . likes to take Voke riding in the little- blue car . . . seldom seen without " the Mohawk " . . . vivid vocabulary . . . has a passion for N. H. . . . loves those held trips . . Delta Phi Delta. Intra-fraternity Conner Philodemics 3, 4; Junior Prom. tor Mnsheuski — Artist extraordinary . . . quiet mannered . . . dependable . . . needless worrier before exams . . . " I ' ve got to get on the ball " . . . Jack-of-all-trades . . . dabbles in horticulture . . . gentleman farmer on the side . . . never short of cash . . . good listener . . . ambition to travel. Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Ne y sa Nelson — Independent and strong-willed . . . fluctuates between gaiety and gravity . . . sports enthusiast . . . spirit free and infectious . . . remedy for all ailments. Student Christian Ass ' n. 5. Peter Niknla — Pete ... " I can get them wholesale " . . . has an angle for everything . . . offers a convincing argument . . . has a young heir to his palace in West- minster . . . claims more power for his Chewy than his bulldozer. Stick 3 ; Ski Club 2 ; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3. Robert Perr y — Bob alias " Dean " ... a resident of the flats . . . versatility personified . . . brilliant student . . . croons like Sinatra . . . stickler for accuracy ... at home in a discussion . . . Soangetaha. Class President 2 ; Stu- dent Coop., Treasurer 3; Newman Club 2; Intra-fraternity Council 2; Mohawks 2, 3. Charles Pieterse — Fertile mind under tranquility of manner . . . studious . . . methodical and thorough . . . home workshop as a pastime . . . patient and persistent ... a trust- worthy and faithful friend always . . . summertime Good Humor man . . . excellent teacher potentialities. Richard Porter — Cap ... a loyal Gav . . . will do anything for anybody ... an able ball player . . . runs daily cab service to Burbank hill . . . always on the go ... a firm believer in the dignity of man . . . Amici. Gaveleers 2, 3, 4; Com- muting Men ' s Board, Vice-Pres. 3 ; Basketball 1 ; Junior Prom Chairman ; Senior Prom. Pauline Rea gan — Personification of poise and charm . . . cute manner of getting her own way . . . intense desire for beauty, truth and perfection . . . our paragon of sophistication. Newman Club 1, 2, 5. Q Victor Mushenski Neysa Nelson Peter Nlkida | Pauline Reagan rr» Richard Porter - Charles Pieterse Robert Perry 37 i Q 5 Richard Regie Edward Rice Shirlie Rice Rigas Rigopoulos Denzil Rickarby Elsie Richardson Janet Richards Richard Re ge — Basketball playmaker and captain . . . rugged masculinity . . . one of the best minds on campus . . . " Chicopee ' s Cary Grant " . . . writes poetry ... at home in all social strata . . . expert in debate . . . thinks he can play tennis . . . Soangetaha. Newman Club 2, 3; Intra-fraternity Council 3; Mohawks 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3, Captain 3 ; M. A. A. Board 1, 2, 3, Pres. 3- Edward Rice — Ed ... a mighty mite . . . understudy for Alan Ladd . . . pleasant grin . . . clever athlete . . . " Body and Soul " . . . sincere . . . never a dull moment . . . quiet . . . reflects superior intellect . . . Phi Delta Pi. New- man Club 1, 2,3;Esoterics 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1. Sb ' niie Rice- Miss Efficiency . . . top-notch trainee . . . Miss Haskins ' helper . . . keeper of the watch . . . co-operative . . . appreciative humor . . . Delta Phi Delta. Saxifrage Board ; Student Council 2; Art Club 2, 3; Student Forum 1 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Miller Hall, Pres. 4; Philodemics 3, 4; Intra-fraternity Council 3 ; W. A. A. Board 3: Field Hockey 1; Volleyball 1, 2, 4; Softball 1. Janet Richards — Jan . . . bridge shark . . . party lover . . . demon behind the wheel . . . proven ability as a poet . . . refined, staunch friend . . . good student . . . entertaining companion . . . Delta Phi Delta. Stick 4; Philodemics 3, 4, Alumnae Secretary 4. Elsie Richardson — Mask of meekness cloaks her inner spirit . . . alumna of Brooks . . . between-meal-snack lover . . . goes about her business quietly . . . never without Dottie. Denzil Rickarb y — Denny . . . constantly smiling . . . the ladies ' man . . . Mrs. Keller ' s right-hand man . . . the Walter Pidgeon of the campus . . . loves to keep that Chewy in shape . . . O ' Malley ' s buddy . . . many friends . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 2, 3, 4. Rigas Rigo poulos — Reggie . . . handsome Greek profile . . . dark, wavy hair . . . cardshark . . . checker champ . . . Gav bulwark on basketball court . . . excellent dancer . . . serious . . . contemplative moments . . . " The Coffee Shop " . . . knows the Rinehart system cold ... a crooner of quality . . . " Can ' t get started with you " . . . Amici. Gaveleers 2, 3 ; Halloween Dance. ■ ] sannette Rober ge — Jenny . . . excitable as a kitten . . . ready, willing and able . . . chic taste in clothes . . . conscientious worker . . . warm-hearted friendliness . . . repertoire of quaint metaphors . . . Delta Phi Delta. Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Treas. 4; Girls ' Ensemble 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Philodemics 4. Stanl ey Rochford — Rocky . . . pleasant personality . . . good student . . . authority on television . . . realistic attitude on life . . . philosopher ... " I can ' t feed my wife on experi- ence " . . . likes skating and Chicago . . . would like to teach on an Indian reservation . . . will debate on any subject — any time . . . Phi Delta Phi. Esoteric Society 2, 3- Florence Rous — Flo . . . dependable . . . good-hearted . . . gifted with responsive and sympathetic nature . . . clever with scissors, paint and paper . . . has more talent in her little finger than . . . " The quality of mercy is not strained " where ' er she goes. Sax Board 4; Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec.-Treas. 3 ; Halloween Dance. Ri chard Rowland — Dick . . . one of the Worcester commuters . . . easy going and capable . . . husky and rugged . . . man of many moods . . . independent and serious . . . definite ideas strongly expressed . . . soccer enthusiast . . . Soangetaha. Mohawks 2, 3; Soccer 1, 2, 3. Robert Sasseville — Bob . . . dark . . . handsome . . . quiet, unassuming manner combined with a good brain . . . math and science specialist . . . pleasant . . . meticulous dresser. Edivard Schube — Ed . . . ambitious . . . will experiment with anything once . . . realist . . . exacting and thorough ... an industrious and able craftsman . . . ever-ready to assist the cause . . . capable model making enthusiast . . . sociable . . . Jack-of-all-trades . . . converted to pipe smoking . . . I. A. problem solver . . . Amici. Gaveleers 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4. Mari ly n Scott — Has her own art gallery of snapshots, mostly male . . . pin point neat . . . quiet, unassum- ing manner . . . can be found riding in a maroon sedan . . . often seen with a " Mann " . Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4. 40 Florence Rowe Stanley Rochford ]eannette Roberge f Richard Rowland Robert Sasseville Ediuard Scbube 1 Ik Marilyn Scott Q S 41 I §■■■ Carl Sector Q 5 42 Carl Sector — Still looking for the perfect mate, preferably one who skis . . . studies hard . . . swears he is going to exercise next year — before the skiing season . . . infectious laugh . . . admirable wardrobe ... a good word for everyone. Sax Board; Ski Club 1, 2, 3, Treas. 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 3- Eleanor Severance — El . . . complicated love life . . . subtle wit . . . Mrs. Keller ' s right-hand girl . . . square dance artist ... at ease in sports . . . defends her beliefs in a quiet way . . . watches over Chesnick and Alletson . . . Delta Phi Delta. Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4; Philodemics 3, 4; Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4. Cornelius Sharron — Connie . . . our genius from Gardner . . . good company . . faithful and energetic worker . . . young but mature . . . serious yet cheerful . . . " Who ' s got the cards? " Barbara Shovelton — Petite and trim . . . sweet, charming and unaffected . . . faith in life and her fellow man . . . talented in collecting information . . . always ready to lend a helping hand in moments of distress. Campus Fellowship 1, 2; Student Christian Ass ' n. 5. Kenneth Skinner — Ken . . . unsurpassed in work . . . " prop " man . . . excellent scholar . . wonderful spirit . . . came in a boy and goes out a man . . . has time for everyone . . . likeable . . . success assured . . . Soangetaha. Glee Club 1, 3, 4, Stage Manager 3; Dramatic Club 1 ; Stick 3; Palmer Hall Board 4; Campus Fellowship 1; Student Christian Ass ' n 2, 3, 4, Treas. 3, Pres. 4; Mohawks 2, 3, 4, Alumni Sec. 3 ; Soccer 4 ; N. E. Student Christian Movement Conference. Ray mond Slnsarz — Ray . . . the inventor . . . has a yen to tinker with machines . . . factory in his dorm room . . . confident that he can show his potentialities — we ' re sure he will ... a veteran of Palmer Hall. Glee Club 1; Student Christian Ass ' n. 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4. Carol Smith — Needs no introduction . . . one of the most popular students on campus . . . lively conversationalist . . . energetic and capable worker . . . intelligent . . . witty . . . charming . . . our great actress . . . Gnothi Seauton. Sax Board; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. 2, Vice Pres. 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Intra-fraternity Council 3; To Kalon 2, 3, 4, Vice Pres. 3, Pres. 4; Boston Teachers Conference 3 ; N. Y. Teachers Conference 3, 4; Senior Prom. R ' - ' . ' ' ■ ' . —Bob . . . would like history if he understood " predicated " ... an all- round man . . . " Wanna lift? " . . . obliging and soft-spoken . . . consistent in his firm principles ... a wheel in the Boy Scouts.. . . Soangetaha. Glee Club 1, 2; Newman Club 2 : Mohawks 2, 3, i ; Basketball 1 ; Soccer 2 ; Baseball 2. J eremiah Snow — Jerry . . . one-man soccer team . . . virile . . . witty . . . popular with both sexes . . . always happy . . . staunch defender of his beliefs . . . sincere . . . eager beaver . . . famous for his laugh ... Phi Delta Pi. Esoterics 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 4; M. A. A. Board 3, Treas. 3; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Capt. 4; Winter Carnival. J ohn Stahl — Jack . . . the crew cut . . . still waters . . . chief collector of Gav revenue . . . always ready to lend a hand . . . loves an argument on the potentials of I. A. . . . Amici. Glee Club 3; Art Club 3; Stick 3; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3; Gaveleers 2, 3, Treas. 3. Walter Stanton — Wally . . . " You ought to get married " . . . always cooking up something for his Gavs . . . expert whistle blower on basketball court . . . student during the day, chemist at night . . . fashionable penthouse in the flats . . . gentlemanly . . . shines in psych, class . . . professional attitude . . . Amici. Newman Club 2, 3, 4; Gaveleers 2, 3, 4, Pres. 3- Robert Steiens — Bob . . . demon in the dining hall ... to ski is to live ... an appreciation for humor . . . studious . . . math, wizard . . . desires to emulate his father. Ski Club 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 2, 3; Student Christian Ass ' n. 2, 3, 4; Teachers College Confer- ence 3 ; Student Christian Movement Conference 4. Kenneth Stone — Ken . . . producer of weird sounds . . . happily married . . . grins from ear to ear . . . heckler ' s voice . . . credit to Scituate . . . rare sense of humor . . . sentimental . . . caused revolutions in I. A. at Lunenburg ... Phi Delta Pi. Student Coop. 3, 4, Pres. 4; Stick 2, 3; Esoterics 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice Pres. 4; Baseball 1, 2; Soccer 3- Stanle y Suchodolski — Suche . . . " Who, me? " . . . denies vigorously having been seen at Whalom with a woman ... an expert electrician from way back . . . willing worker . . . cheerful. Glee Club 1 ; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4. 5 Stanley Sucbodolski Kenneth Stone Robert Smith Jeremiah Snoiv John Stahl Robert Stevens Walter Stanton f " «»« B 45 John Taugher Walter Torno Donald Tripp Richard York Ruth Vokey Victor Valeri J ohn Tou gher — Jack . . . quiet . . . composed . . . confident . . . jovial laugh . , , dramatically inclined . . . keen sports critic . . . appreciates a good joke . . . dynamic tenor . . . " Nothing to it— it ' s easy! " Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Stick 2 ; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 2, 3, 4. Walter Torno — Walt . . . calm, cool and capable . . . frank of opinion . . . easy to know . . . creative ability in training problems . . . good club man . . . generosity itself ... a credit to the profession . . . Phi Delta Pi. Esoterics 2, 3, 4. Donald Tri pp — Don . . . alias the Sea Dog . . . loves automobiles . . . one of the greenhouse boys . . . ever present to offer a helping hand . . . transfer from Wentworth . . . loves pipes . . . dining-hall mainstay ... I. A. man . . , a good Brave . . . Soangetaha. Sax Board; Mohawks 3, 4; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1, 3, 4; Maine Area Conference 3; N. E. Teachers College Conference. Victor Valeri — Vic . . . easy- going disposition will assure success . . . amiable and versatile . . . introspective . . . strong sports advocate . . . wants to make a career of training . . . commutes from Leominster . . . Phi Delta Pi. Newman Club 1, 2 ; Esoterics 3, 4, Sec. 4. Ruth Voke y— Voke . . . agile athlete . . . loves to laugh and often does . . . Mulvey ' s partner in crime . . . optimistic bridge fiend . . . learning the Spa business from the soda up . . . goes home often but won ' t say why . . . Delta Phi Delta. Glee Club 1, 2; Ski Club 1, 2; Student Christian Ass ' n. 1 ; Philodemics 2, 3, 4, Pres. 4; W. A. A. Board 2, 3; Softball 1, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 1, 2, 3. Richard York — Dick ... a cultured mind . . . capable of sober thought . . . infectious grin . . . student of philosophy . . . one of our star soccer players . . . future bright . . . Phi Delta Pi. Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Esoterics 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas. 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 3; Soccer 3, 4; M. A. A. Board 3, 4, Sec. 3, Vice-Pres. 4. SAXIFRAGE It is quite appropriate that for many years the Fitchburg State Teachers College yearbook should be called Saxifrage. The title was taken from the beautiful white- petaled, gold-centered flowers of the high mountain ranges. It, in turn, was named Saxifrage, or rock breaker, because of its unique ability to overcome impossible obstacles to its growth. With quiet and steady effort, the alpine plant sends its roots deep into the rock crevices. The flower itself is only the culmination of this inner strength. We who aspire to teach can find in the Saxifrage a true analogy. To be a credit to the profession we need to continue the experience of quiet and steady growth which we as students have acquired here. It is only from such inner strength that our success as teachers will come. Saxifrage is more than the name of our yearbook ... it is an ideal. 48 _ In September, 1947, approximately one hundred and fifty green but lively students gathered at the College, representing the selected groups from various high schools in the Commonwealth. Our members dwindled because many of the G.I. ' s took the accelerated courses and thus sped on ahead of the regular group. We had excellent officers during the first two years, and our present officers have led us in the past year with great zest and devotion and with the best interests of the class in mind. Miss Haskins, through her quiet but sym- pathetic guidance, has been our inspirational sponsor. During our entire college career the class of 1951 has been active and prominent in the scholastic, athletic and cultural life of the College. However, it has been in the past year that the true worth of the members has come to light. While we have been active in the various phases of our college life, our main purpose has been, and is, to seek further educational enlightenment and thus better ourselves so that we may be both a help and an inspiration to the children and the communities in which we will soon practice our profession. Our prom was the highlight of our social program. This unique springtime ball was one which every member of the class will cherish in his memory as one of the most successful formals of his college life. It is with true pride that we the class of ' 51 look back on our record, and also look forward to completing our college career with even greater success than has been experienced these past three years. 50 " ■■■■■miMMHIHBI IJ II BS President — Donal 0 ' Sullivan Vice-President — Roberta O ' Rourke Secretary — jean CaJwell Treasurer — Carl Pohhnan D President — Robert O ' Keefe Vice-President — Nancy Kenney Secretary — Patricia Kennedy Treasurer — Edward Medeiros 52 To the class of 1952 the name Fitchburg Teachers College means more than an institution preparing us for our life ' s work. It is a name which we bear proudly upon our lips, a name which evokes precious memories of the many happy hours it has been our privilege to enjoy here. Fitchburg Teachers College is a college where social and cultural knowledge has been combined to produce an individual capable of dealing with the many difficulties which will present themselves in the future. It was our good fortune to secure Miss Conlon as our class sponsor and her wisely-chosen words of advice have enabled us to meet and overcome the obstacles which confront every Freshman Class. During the past two years Bob O ' Keefe has capably guided the activities of the class of ' 52 in the all-important role of Class President. This year ' s repre- sentatives to the Student Co-op are Noreen McDowell and Alan Shaw. The Halloween Dance sponsored by the Sophomore Class proved to be one of the most outstanding social events of the year. The ghosts and goblins of T.C. turned out in full array to view the colorful decorations and enjoy a varied program of entertainment. Winter Carnival weekend has always been looked upon as the biggest and best event of our school year. The success of last year ' s Carnival weekend stands out as one of the many achievements of the class of ' 52. 53 President — Edward Flynn Vice-President — Elaine Weiner Secretary — Gloria Spadaro Treasurer — Francis Roberts Time rolls on swiftly and surely, and as it rolls our views of education change. Before coming to F.T.C. education seemed to many of us a necessary but uninteresting duty to be disposed of with as little effort as possible. Now that we are members of this fine educational institution, each one of us values his education, realizing it is the key to happiness and fulfillment in life. The Freshman Class of Fitchburg Teachers College thus makes known its primary objective at the outset of its college career — to keep allied with the high standards of the school, to make use of its invaluable resources, and to strive to equal the lustre of the preceding classes. One of the largest groups to enter the college, with more than two hundred members, it is hoped that each one will be an asset to the institution and that the accomplishments of the class will be in proportion to its membership. The officers elected to lead the class, together with the Student Council Representatives, Helen Hammond and Denis Sullivan, the M.A.A. and W.A.A. Representatives, and all the other members of the class desire to unite with the other classes in the college and enjoy their friendship. The Winter Carnival Ball provides the Freshman Class with its first and most memorable project and makes Carnival weekend a highlight. Various com- mittees are appointed to function in planning this ball. As each new phase of college life presents itself, we the Freshman Class, aim to move forward with more confidence each time and imprint a vivid and impressive mark in the annals of our college. 55 J!L Water (Music by Elizabeth D. Perry) (Words by Mollie Wild, 1927) Jrn days ago, when life, we dreamed, Was ideal as it deemed, -Mna tko ' li of untaught youth ioared high, While only joy came nigh. -Jwas then with vision clear we chose, rnd to that choice we roie, With courage itrong ana hearti of dong Jo carry thy ideal on. Ichorous: J$o Zziag of svlma ill later float, Jn eternal wings of praide, Lror thee un-numbered hosts today Jheir willing voiced raise; Uhru-out the wond t heir tiny flame jrrom thu quick light still gleams, While uouth and age united claim Jhe home where fortune beams, Jhe home where fortune beams. -2- Jrn days to come, if life laid bare -5eomi far more gray than fair, Jr if sucess with us climbs high While only joy comes nigh; Jis then, in plight or might, we ll rise— Jhy spirit never dies — With courage strong and hearts of song Jo carru thu ideal on 56 57 President Constantine G. Christy Vice-President Theresa Beauvais Secretary Judy O ' Shea Treasurer Jeannette Roberge but $£fc This year the Glee Club is made up of seventy-six voices under the direction of Mr. Kent. Meetings take place every Wednesday after- noon at one o ' clock with an additional one Monday evenings. This year the club produced the Christmas program and in addition to this the spring program. Interest in choral singing has been growing in the American col- eges for a period of several years. The Fitchburg Teachers College Glee Club feels itself a part of this expansion and we are singing music that is increasingly more challenging. We feel that this year under the able guidance of Mr. Kent our musical activities have served to enrich those who participated in both appreciation and enjoyment. 58 President Roberta O ' Rourke Vice-President Wesley Rowe Secretary-Treasurer Jean Cadwell ART CL The Art Club was again filled to capacity this year with enthusi- astic students. Thursday afternoons found the members busily at work with numerous crafts which ranged from stenciling, metal crafts, and leather tooling to working with water colors and oils. A spirited interest in finger painting was noted and most of the members tried their hand at this popular expressive art. The results proved to be very gratifying. Our able and tireless sponsor, Miss Conlon, could be found giving helpful guidance to many perplexed craftsmen. Several of these meetings were supplemented with lectures and demonstrations by guest speakers who gave inspiration and showed methods of applying the correct techniques in craft work. Many members joined the Fitchburg Art Center and enjoyed the social and cultural advantages which were offered. AFT CJLOS 59 The Saxifrage Board began its task of publishing this yearbook in May, 1949, with a staff of three officers elected by the class of 1950, to which were added ten other members. Sax Board members who attended summer school carried on work through July and August, printing the Directory Cover. Then in September, with all members back at college, our first regular Thursday evening meeting was held and work was begun in full swing. From September to May, Palmer Hall residents became accustomed to the heavy traffic due to Thursday evening meet- ings. Frequently these seemed to assume the importance of a U.N. conference, for Sax members could be seen dashing through the lobby at 6:30 P.M., arms laden with old year- books, contract forms, proofs, lists and notes innumerable, followed promptly at 7:00 P.M. by a dignified-looking repre- sentative of our publishing company. Special meetings were called frequently as the work to be done seemed insurmountable. But with the advice of Mr. Farrington, who was present at all meetings and who helped in everything we did, the assistance of Mr. Weston in financial matters, and with the cheerful cooperation of so many class- mates, we have presented to you the 1950 Saxifrage. Editor-in-chief Theresa Beauvais Assistant Editor Robert Calkin Business Managers Joanne Berndtson Carl Sector Directory Editor Donald Tripp Advertising Manager Donald Clark Photography Editor Shirlie Rice Organization Editor Loring Caney Feature Editor William Sullivan Art Editors Florence Rowe Irene Harrington Write-ups Editor Carol Smith Staff Secretary Lucy Hirsch Candids Thomas Convery 60 STICK The Stick in 1949-50 has tried to bring to the student body and faculty news, features and editorials on items of general interest. Through the medium of this student publication happenings on campus and off, of importance and all-over interest, are recorded for present enjoyment and future reminiscences. A variety of articles have been presented to stimulate the entire student body intellectually, socially and seasonally. Its attempts to bring about greater school spirit and to dispel petty grievances have been and will be seen in the general campus attitudes. As the current college year comes to an end, the Stick staff wishes to thank all individuals who have assisted them in any way, to make their paper the success that it has been. The senior members who will be graduated in June reluctantly depart from the ranks, but offer the incoming group the heartiest wishes for another year of achievement in their newspaper work, and the wish that they fulfill to the best of their abilities the traditions and precedents that are character- istic of The Stick. Co-Editor Frances Bolger Co-Editor Robert Curran News Editor Leo McManus Feature Editor M. Jean Conaty Sports Editor George Mailman Make-Up Editor Ronald Fabiszewski Business Manager James Eisenhaure Faculty Advisors Mr. Conlon, Mr. Hague 61 President Richard Newell Vice-President Carol Smith Secretary Gwen Derby Treasurer Tom Convery Faculty Sponsor Daniel L. Healy uL The class of 1950 proudly recalls its sophomore year when the Dramatic Club brought new fame to itself and the college by presenting a near professional production of the James Thurber-Elliott Nugent hit play, " The Male Animal " . Since then the club has had to work hard to maintain its established reputation. The membership of the club is greater than it has been for many a year. The enthusiasm shown does much to foster the aims of the club which are primarily to allow those who have acting ability to appear on the stage and to provide opportuni- ties for those gifted in costuming, make-up, and back-stage work to give vent to their talents in active groups within the club. Not the least of the accomplishments is the acquainting of its members with the functioning of such a club which may prove to be of valuable use to them in their teaching careers. This was the big year for the Thespians once more. After much searching to find the proper play they finally chose to direct their endeavors to the production of the Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman comedy, " The Man Who Came To Din- ner " . A large cast and extensive set provided plenty of hard work for all members. One thing is sure, the audience which saw the finished product didn ' t have half as much fun as the gang on stage and back-stage had in producing it. President Richard Johnson Vice-President Nancy Hult Secretary Sally Regan Treasurer Alan Shaw Advisor Mr. Jacobsen 51 UL This year interest in skiing and in the Ski Club is at a peak! The Fitchburg Teachers College Ski Club has a record enrollment of fifty members. The aim of the Ski Club is to promote good sportsmanship through competition. The realiza- tion of this aim takes place during the Winter Carnival Weekend when the club offers an oppor- tunity for outdoor activities. This opportunity is in the form of the annual ski meet in which inter- class competition is encouraged. In the past the skiers have enthusiastically participated in the downhill, slalom, and cross country races. Each class attempts to gain a maximum number of points in order to secure the trophy awarded annually by the Ski Club. At present this cup is in the proud possession of the class of ' 51. Trips to neighboring ski-tows, an annual dance and assembly, and other activities are all part of our ski club year. Ski Heil ! 63 President Leonard Harlow Vice-President Curtis Peterson Secretary Anthony Sambito Treasurer Gerald Leblanc Senior Representative Aqualino DeCarolis Junior Representative Edmund Popoloski Sophomore Representative Joseph Kotomski Freshman Representative Richard McNamara n n The Commuting Men ' s Board has become a more im- portant group with the increase in the off-campus enrollment. Its duties include the management of the rooms used by the commuting men and the providing of activities for the male off-campus students, who are unaffiliated with a fraternal group. This year the board entered two teams in the Intra- mural Basketball League and fielded a softball team in the spring. The board planned a " smoker " and a spring social, the latter a joint venture by the men ' s and women ' s boards. This year there are one-hundred twenty-nine commuting women at F.T.C. Two representatives from each class make up the Commuting Women ' s Board. This board meets with Miss Bolger on the average of once every two weeks and tries to solve the problems that arise among the women commuters. This year we have managed to get our day room painted, thanks to our men commuters who donated much of their time for this purpose. We also held a Freshmen Tea with dormitory girls — some- thing new which appeared to be a great success. President Patricia Lilly Vice-President Nancy Gentsch Secretary Elizabeth Brown Treasurer Betty Asselta . President Arthur Marshall Secretary Kenneth Skinner Treasurer Lawrence Walsh Senior Representative - James Eisenhaure junior Representative John Powers Sophomore Representative Bernard Belles Freshman Representative Richard Jefferson Proctors Mr. William Farrington Mr. Roger F. Holmes Palmer Hall is " home away from home " for the men on campus. Peace and quiet are two factors that are stressed by the Board. They also see that each man has his say. That is, at the monthly meetings, the residents are given an opportunity to offer suggestions which would be helpful to all. The Palmer Hall Board sponsors many social affairs in the form of athletic games, parties and outings. All in all, the Board consists of hard-working men ener- getically trying to make our stay here in Fitchburg a pleasant and a memorable one. This year ' s Women ' s Dormitory Board represents both Miller Hall and the Girls ' Barracks. The Board is responsible for all dormitory activities which take place during the year. During the current year it spon- sored a Freshman Welcome Party and a Christmas Party which were both attended by residents of Miller Hall and the Bar- racks. In addition to these two parties, the Board was respon- sible for a Welcome Tea which was presented through the combined efforts of both the Commuting Women ' s Board and the Dormitory Women ' s Board. With the able and co-operative assistance of Miss Bolger, our new Dean of Women, the Dormitory Board has succeeded in adding many happy memories of F.T.C. M S r Women ' s Dormitories President Helen Dery Miller Hall President Shirlie Rice Miller Hall Secretary _. Marion Chesnick Miller Hall Treasurer . Lydia Duryee Barracks President Lois Jennings Barracks Secretary Patricia Ryan - The Student Christian Association brings to the student an ex- pression of religion and a chance to use it through soical activities run by the club. Being affiliated with the larger organization, the Student Christian Movement of New England, the S.C.A. gives a chance to all interested members to join with other college students in conferences held throughout the year. The Boston Area and State Teachers College conferences are the two main aggregate meetings held during the college year, with a conference for all New England colleges held at O-At-Ka for a week. This is one of the most impressive experiences a college student can enjoy. The program included a hot dog roast at Coggshall Park, a visit to the Jewish Community Center, a Christmas program, speakers, and an installation of officers at the Cathedral of the Pines. Many more active members have made it the biggest year in the four years of its existence. President Kenneth Skinner Vice-President Lydia Duryee Secretary Louise Sobczak Treasurer Stanley Wheeler Faculty Sponsor Everett Koehler Chaplain Rev. C. Cassius Sturdy UL Miss Gertrude Cunningham was the Newman Club sponsor and the Rev. William Welz of St. Bernard ' s Church served as chaplain. " More than ever " has characterized everything in Newman circles this year. That is, more members, more activities, and more spirit. Evidences of this are clearly seen in the various activities sponsored by the Newman Club. First of all, there was the Communion Breakfast held in October. Next came the interesting series of lectures by Rev. Paul Curtin. This proved a huge success among the students and faculty. In November the Newman Club Talent Show was favorably received by all. And during the winter months, for the first time, the Newman Club organized a girls ' basketball and a men ' s basketball team. They both enjoyed a successful season in the intramural league. Other activities included caroling at Christmas, a W ashington ' s Birthday Dance, and an April Card Party. At the monthly meeting, the spiritual and social aims of the Club were manifested in discussion and activity. The last meeting included the installation of officers and a Com- munion Breakfast. President Thomas Convery Vice-President Robert Curran Secretary „ Patricia Kennedy Corrresponding Secretary Joan Kenney Treasurer Edward Convery Chief Maxwell Moczulewski Medicine Man Lawrence Walsh Keeper of the Wampum Paul Connors Scribe Allan Williams Alumni Secretary Kenneth Skinner Sponsor Mr. Michael Conlon Throughout the twenty-five years the Mohawk Club has been in existence, it has endeavored to foster in its members a co-operative spirit and feeling of camaraderie, which will symbolize for others on campus the unification of purpose and accomplish- ment which man can achieve in society. In the firm belief that it is the individual of well- rounded personality as well as one with specific talents which will make the superior teacher, the Mohawk Club views with pride the versatility of its individual members who give willingly of themselves in what- ever field they possess capability, be it athletic, crea- tive, or scholastic. E Pluribus Unum . . . One out of many . . . Out of the combined efforts and individual talents of the many, has merged the one . . . the Mohawk Club . . . united in thought, action, and purpose. Chapter of Lambda Phi Sigma The Gaveleer Society was founded in 1921 by a group of students and interested faculty members of the Fitchburg State Teachers College. It was founded to foster the appreciation of English, and to promote social and fraternal relationships. Throughout the years the society has successfully attained its basic purpose. The Gaveleer ' s. colors are black, symbolizing strength ; and gold, symbolizing character. The Greek letter Lambda, Phi, Sigma, symbolize leadership, knowledge, and moral strength. The Gaveleer Assembly was presented to the stu- dent body on January 10th. This year the society presented Albert Siska, a young virtuoso of the piano, organ, and accordion. Mr. Siska studied extensively at the Estonian Conservatory of Music. During the war he was a prisoner in a slave labor camp. He came to this country a little more than a year ago and in a short time has received much acclaim throughout the New England area. The program was well received by all. This year the annual Gav-Hawk Soccer game was played on our new athletic held in a record eight inches of snow — cold but exciting. How the snow did fly! The Gav-Hawk Formal, acclaimed as one of the most colorful and successful ever, was held on May 6th of this year. It was heartening to see the large turnout of Alumni members. The Gaveleer Society has sponsored a number of group activities during the year, shared by students, friends, and guests. " Anna us quay ad aras. " President Robert Brogan Vice-President Curtis Peterson Secretary Richard Newell Treasurer John Stahl Alumni Secretary Stanley Wheeler 1 I 69 President Robert Calkin Vice-President Kenneth Stone Treasurer James Craffey Secretary Victor Valeri Corresponding Secretary Richard Mulligan Faculty Sponsor Mr. Richard Kent I The Esoteric Society is now in its fourth year of existence at Fitchburg State Teachers College. Its primary aim, is to foster that spirit which will improve the human relationship among the student body. It also endeavors to extend social opportunity through participation in extracurricular activities, and above all, to recognize human merit as the proper basis for esteem. The highlights of the year for the " brothers " are, of course, the Initiation Weekend, and the Annual Dinner Dance. This year at the " weekend " twenty- one new Esoterics were welcomed into the brother- hood. The Society sponsored a very successful Soccer Dance in the fall for the entire student body, a fra- ternal Christmas Party, and a rollicking Minstrel Assembly. The fraternity uses the three Greek letters, Phi Delta Pi, as their symbols, denoting their motto, Charity, Honor, and Zeal. mmJtmm President Harry Bassett Vice-President Charles Chiasson Secretary Arthur Little Treasurer Loring Caney Trustee Arthur Purinton psium pi in The Epsilon Pi Tau Fraternity is a National Hon- orary-Professional organization operating in the fields of Industrial Arts Education and Vocational-Industrial Education. Epsilon Pi Tau was established in 1929 at Ohio State University, where the Alpha Chapter is located. There are at present thirty chapters in various parts of the United States. Its purposes are to recognize the place of skill, to promote social efficiency, and particularly to foster, reward, publish and circulate the results of research efforts as far as possible in the fields of its interest. Membership is limited to the upper fourth of junior and senior undergraduates majoring in Indus- trial Arts or Vocational-Industrial Education, and to outstanding graduates in these subjects who are in the teaching profession. IIIN yinr 1 m " D .§. ' ■ r g B " ' X m ml KnA IRu IlB ■ ' ' ! B r f i; --:? ▼ I ■ it rfi mJ k I ■ I IP; j H ru r nrlwr J V ■ " ? V; ' J , - jtMWM ... HMM - -Jr . - --- :- — - ' . ' : . ,.:, , ' ' • WttittHUt : »i President Carol Smith Vice-President Mary Farrissey Recording Secretary Veronica DiFederico Corresponding Secretary Patricia Garneau Treasurer Patricia Ryan Sponsors Ruth Donovan, Margaret Shea The To Kalon Society, the first women ' s club on campus, was formed in order to further the high standards of the college and to stimulate all school activities. " Gnothi Seauton " , the club motto, is cher- ished by the members and embodies all the aims and ideals of the group. Among the various activities of the club is " Toke Weekend " , which has become a tradition in the club. At this time the Alumnae unite with the regular mem- bers in welcoming the pledges into the club. Another traditional activity of the club is Fun- Nite, in which the Tokes join with the Mohawks to provide an evening of entertainment for all. 72 President _ _ Marion Chesnick Vice-President Eunice Delay Secretary Lois Jennings Treasurer Sally Healy In recent years Fitchburg Teachers College has undergone many changes and developments. Enroll- ment has increased and the need for new organiza- tions presented itself to provide greater school spirit and activities. Thus, the society of the Philodemics was founded in 1948 with the purpose of cooperation and participation in the social functions of F.T.G The first major activity of the Philodemics in the ' 49- ' 50 season was the formal dinner dance held at the Sterling Inn, establishing a precedent for an annual affair. Another major activity of the Philodemics is the participation in the sports program at T.C., including basketball, softball and badminton. When our senior girls leave Delta Phi Delta and " our ways do part " , the word Philodemic, meaning " friends to all " , will remain deep in their fondest memories. II pp o " m r 73 In the spring of 1949 the Adelphian Society was formed. It was felt that a third society was needed to complete the triad. The Adelphians began their 1949-50 activities with an initiation which became the talk of the fashion world. The Harvest Moon Dance just before Thanks- giving was one dance that will hold memories for all students. The trimmings seemed to turn the gym into a hall of festivity. The year 1950 held these activities for the So- ciety: A victorious basketball team, an assembly which brought entertainment to the student body, and a formal dance in April for the Sisters of the Society. Under the able sponsorship of Miss Signe Antila, the Adephian Society hopes to prove to the student body that companionship and friendliness plus hard work and fun are necessary for a well- balanced college career. President Jo- Ann Zwiesele Vice-President Noreen McDowell Secretary Beverly Sherwin Treasurer Norma Pendergast Sponsor Miss Signe Antila DH Student Members Joan Kenney Alan Shaw Jean Alletson Faculty Members Miss Nixon Mr. Kent The Assembly Committee, consisting of students appointed by the president of the Co-operative Association and two faculty members, is responsi- ble for planning the Assembly programs. Dr. Sanders cooperates with the Committee and has proved most helpful with his good judgment and wise counsel. On more than one occasion he has been responsible for presenting a Goldovsky and a Dean Keppel, and has found the money to finance such programs. The Intra-fraternity Council is relatively new on this campus, being only in its second year. Each club elects two members to this council for repre- sentation in all discussions. Chairman of the group is George Mailman for the year 1949-50. The purpose of this council is the discussion of all intra-fraternity problems. All recommendations are submitted to all clubs in written form. It is through this medium that a spirit of unity, co-operation and loyalty among the clubs will be increased. To Kalon Jean Cadwell, Julia Kelley Adelphians Jo- Ann Zwiesele Arlene Bonitz Philodemics Sally Regan, Dolores Mulvey Mohawks Richard Rege, George Mailman Gaveleers James Daley, Robert Farrar Esoterics Paul Heffernan, Thomas Mullins s - ill I U L 1 uU U uuu lu All undergraduate students of Fitchburg Teach- ers College are members of the Student Co-op- erative which was instituted to co-ordinate and consolidate student extra-curricular activities. It supervises all matters pertaining to student life which do not come within the jurisdiction of the faculty. Its purpose is to further the spirit of unity, co-operation and loyalty among our students and to increase their sense of responsibility toward one another. The association also serves as a medium through which the social and cultural standards of the college may be maintained on a high plane. The legislative group of the association is the Student Co-operative Council, composed of four officers and eight representatives, a man and woman from each of the four classes. This council is the organ through which school affairs within the jurisdiction of the students are discussed and regulations proposed. This year, as in the past, the Student Co-opera- tive Association sponsored such social activities as the Freshman Reception, Christmas Dance, Saint Patrick ' s Dance, Rollerskating Party and the All- School Picnic. In order to add a more congenial note to the Freshman Reception, the Council changed the affair to a more informal dance. From the stand- point of student interest the result was more satis- factory, and the success of the dance was due to the interest and efforts of the entire student body. President Kenneth Stone Vice-President Marguerite Johnson Treasurer Robert Perry Secretary Sally Healy 76 1 J " 1 1 IIS 77 Dick York Jerry Snow- Dick Rege Ed Sandomierski Jack Rajala Murray Smith Francis Wickman Loring Stevenson The M.A.A. is made up of two members of each class who are elected in their freshman year. After serving as board members for two years they are then eligible for office. The experience gained while on this board for the first two years helps them do a more efficient job in an official position. This board was very active in the organizing and supervising of intramural programs in soccer, basketball and softball. The class championship in soccer was won by the Sophomores who edged out the Seniors in a close, hard-fought battle. The Sophomores had previously beaten the Freshmen and the Seniors had defeated the Juniors. Sports offered by the intramural program provide an opportunity for stu- dents who do not play on a varsity team to engage in athletic competition under school supervision. ■ 78 President Judith O ' Shea Vice-President Louise Sobczak Secretary Florence Donnelly Green Team Captain Joan Kenney White Team Captain Eunice Delay Senior Representative Marguerite Johnson Heads of Sports Suzanne Forster Marion Chesnick Lorraine Doiron Nancy Hult Joanne Berndtson Julie Kelley Nancy Kenney Marion Kennedy Noreen McDowell Stick Representative Sally Regan The Women ' s Athletic Association started the year by introducing the board members at the annual assembly. Under the able leadership of Miss Clark, our Director of Physical Education, the board presents a varied program of sports in order to promote high standards of health and sportsmanship. This year, thanks to Marge Johnson ' s diligent work, the W.A.A. was able to present at the assembly a much simpler system for gaining awards. A W.A.A. key has been added to the other three coveted awards. We hope that the popularity of the newest sports, roller skating and swim- ming will continue to grow at a rapid rate. The turnout for practices in all sports this year has been wonderful. This made the Green and White games very interesting and found the Green Team emerging the winner of the field hockey games. The Round Robin basketball games again stimulated the interest of the entire college. Other highlights of the W.A.A. sports season were the Freshman Rally, held at the brook, and the sports weekend held at Framingham Teachers College. WOMEN ' S 1 i 79 p Coach Bob Elliot ' s 1949 soccer team came up with the greatest year in the school ' s history when it gath- ered 8 wins against 1 loss. After outplaying yet losing the opener to Worces- ter Tech 2-1, the Falcon hooters drove through eight opponents in succession. The victories were over Clark 2-1; M.I.T. 4-2; Keene 2-0; R.I.C.E. 3-0; Boston University 2-1; Keene 3-0; Suffolk 6-0; Bridgewater 4-1. Our hooters scored a total of 27 points as against 7 for the opposition. To pick the outstanding player on the squad would be unjust. Each player contributed his share of play. It was a season that was successful through team play by all of its members. Co-Captains Bill Sullivan and Jerry Snow once again proved to be the .stalwarts of the team. Their work and fight were an inspiration to all. Coach Bob Elliot Co-Ca plain Bill Sullivan Co-Captain J crr y Snow sftiii The Green and White of Fitchburg got off to a good start on the basketball court this year when it captured its first three games. Then came an about face and they dropped their following three. How- ever, they showed a good offense in losing to the New Britain Teachers, a leading New England team. Coach Bill Provenzani had a well rounded squad of twelve men. Captain for this year ' s team was Dick Rege. Lin Erickson, Bob F arrar, Jerry Millane, John Kiosses, Ed Sandomierski, and Joe Paton made up the leftovers from last season. Newcomers included Ed Balcom, Ziggy McNamara, Bob Duncan, Paul Shiminski, Lorry Stevenson and Ralph Clough. These are the scores of games played before the Sax went to press: Victories: Keene 53-52, Worces- ter 57-46 and Assumption 55-54. Losses included North Adams 57-41, Assumption 62-47 and New Britain 81-53. The following games were played too late to have scores included: Bridgewater T. C, W.S.T.C, Clark University, Salem T.C., North Adams T.C., Gorham T.C., Salem T.C., Plymouth T.C., R.I.C.E. First row: Jerry Millane, Johnny Kiosses, Lin Erickson, Capt. Dick Rege, Bob Far- rar, Bob Duncan. Back row: Manager Don Clark, Art Axon, Paul Shiminski, Ralph Clough, Mac McNamara, Joe Paton, Chet Burwick, Dick Poirier, Stan Bematoivitz, Austin Crossman. % o r mm a KrtHHBf ftSfl r v This year ' s baseball schedule is by far the largest undertaken by our school in recent years. Of the .fourteen games scheduled, eleven are with mem- bers of the New England Teachers College Ath- letic Conference. All home games are being played on our one-year-old athletic field. The Falcons of last season turned in one of the best records in a good many years. The record was 6 wins and 5 losses. This year ' s aggregation, from all appearances, should have an even better per- centage. Lost through graduation is Hank La Shoto, the greatest catcher the college has ever seen. Also missing will be last year ' s captain, Dick Rutka. In the outfield Fran Pelosi will be the only other miss- ing member. BN 82 First row: Coach Bob Elliot, Bob Calkin, Tom Mitllins, Bo b Farrar, Larry Walsh, Fran Burke, Bud Wheeler, Manager. Second row: Font Comer], George Mailman, Ed Sandomierski, Rene Rheault, jack Rajala, Bill Martin. Back from last season ' s team are Eddie Rice, Bob Calkin, Rene Rheault, Tommy Mullins, Jack Ra- jala, Fran Burke, Tom Convery, Ed Sandomierski, Larry Walsh, Bob Kiely, George Mailman, Bill Martin, Minty Costello, Bob Farrar, Dick York, and Ken Stone. Added to these men is a large group of freshmen out for the first time. This year ' s team is a traveling club. At least six games are being played on the home field of the opponents. The schedule follows: North Adams Away Clark University Away Salem S.T.C. Home North Adams Home T.C. of Conn. Home Keene S.T.C. Away Gorham S.T.C. Away Salem S.T.C. Away Plymouth S.T.C. Away Keene S.T.C. Home T.C. of Conn. Away Gorham S.T.C. Home Denotes New England Teachers College Athletic Conference Games. The dates of the T.C of Boston and Worcester S.T.C. games were unsettled as the Sax went to press. April 15 April 19 April 20 April 25 April 27 May 11 May 13 May 17 May 19 May 23 May 24 May 26 Softball is a W.A.A. major sport. This year, all through the softball season, interest was very high, and every Monday and Wednesday after- noon, a swarm of gaily-uniformed girls were to be found practicing diligently down at the athletic field in a corner opposite the hard-hitting men ' s baseball teams. An extraordinarily large number of upperclassmen appeared and thus fortified the team. In addition to these veterans, the usual crowd of freshmen came forth to prove their mettle. Green and White games were earnestly played. Both teams vied whole-heartedly for top honor. Inter-class competitions stimulated spirit galore, and provided opportunities to see all sorts of high comedy. At season ' s end, a varsity squad met Worcester T.C. in the traditional softball contest. Head of Softball Joanne Berndtson n o n a Heads of Basketball Marion Chesnick Suzanne Forster ffl The 1949-50 basketball season was directed by the co-heads Marion Chesnick and Suzanne Forster. The season started early in November with general practice for girls interested in this popular sport. About seventy-five girls came to practice, and the freshmen proved they had a great deal of talent. A freshmen team went to Clark in December to play Worcester Teachers College in a demonstra- tion of the new rules. During the latter part of December both upperclassmen and freshmen joined to compete in intramural games. There were eight teams of ten girls each. These games were very popular because they gave every girl interested in basketball a chance to participate. Toward the end of January and during the first part of February the Green and White teams rivaled for top positions. The rest of the season was dedicated to varsity practice, which prepared the girls for competition against Clark University. 84 ■• The volleyball season began in March at the close of the basketball tournament. An enthusiastic group met in the gym for practice of this popular sport on Monday and Wednesday afternoons. While the game is purely a defensive and batting one, the object is to keep the ball volleying over the net without its touching the ground or the net. During the season there were intramural games which offered opportunities for everyone to par- ticipate in this sport. Green and White teams were chosen to compete for points toward the trophy which is presented annually by the W.A.A. to the captain of the winning team. The trip to Worcester Teachers College for a Round Robin climaxed the season. This year marked the beginning of a new tradi- tion which sprang up when the faculty challenged the senior members of the team to a game. Since such great enthusiasm was shown, it is hoped that this event will prove to be an annual one. Head of Volleyball Nancy Hult HE The girls ' field hockey season began with grand fashion in the month of September, and continued in style during the month of October. The practices were held on Mondays and Wednesdays, well attended by all the classes. The beginners as well as the veterans were eager to learn and showed great enthusiasm for the sport. Note: Some girls even acquired the skill of Soccer playing — Soccer team ' s doings! Under the capable coaching of Miss Clark and with the help of Lorraine Doiron, head of hockey, the players received individual instructions in skills and plays, and soon participated in scrimmages. Although a varsity team was chosen, because of weather and other factors involved, it was unable to participate in any out-of-school games. The traditional Green and White teams were elected, the players being chosen on the basis of their skill, faithful attendance at practices, and good sportsmanship. Two of three games were played, Green team being vic- torious in the contest. Head of Field Hockey Lorraine Doiron 87 " m r One might well call the Dillon School a work- shop in democracy. Here each child participates in real and vicarious learning experiences which not only have a real meaning for him but foster his maximum physical, mental, social and emotional growth. The purposeful activity programs result in a curriculum which serves each child in his growth toward competent democratic citizenship, the type which demands not only academic literacy but social, civic, and economic literacy as well. These purposeful activities provide for individu- al growth, the development of special aptitudes, interests, and creative abilities, and foster the all- important attitude — a desire to go on learning. New student teachers coming to Edgerly School often remark how busy they rind the building. Bein the campus elementary training school, it consequently receives a great many of the visitors who come to see the college. Frequent periods of observation and demonstration teaching for college classes in addition to the practice teaching of the assigned students make it a laboratory school in the broadest sense of the word. The seven supervisors in Edgerly feel very close to the on-going life of the college. I I. I J A The outstanding achievement of the Junior High School is its ability to recognize and give play to the active life of its youth. Here is the unit of school organization that sets the example for student activities through student councils, varied clubs, assemblies and other features of extra-curricular life which allows for the finest development in every- day living. This popular form of school plan- ning allows youngsters of adolescent years to have full opportunity to learn not merely in terms of books, credits, diplomas and degrees, but in terms of preparation for living and earning. Thus, this school conforms to sound and practical principles of education which are based on the premise that all youngsters will have an education based upon their abili- ties and understandings; that edu- cation will be suited to personal and social needs of the children and the community; that education will be continuous so that youngsters will find joy and growth in learning at all times. I] II L 511 X r « « " »• d 90 J.vJtLM -8 L « «k— Jk tX 1% ir N JSrr B JTf t m - ... j. 1 S ' iB ] fe :f 5«:5= - 1 ' Ml ■ The staff of the Industrial Arts Depart- ment extends sincere personal wishes for the success and happiness of each and every mem- ber of the Class of 1950. Saxifrage time is a sentimental but happy season when seniors begin to feel the spirit of the college and identify themselves with its traditions. It is a time when projects, units, job sheets, lesson plans, training and the popular " bull " sessions become part of the campus lore of I. A. Each senior is about to become one of those legendary characters whose doings and sayings will be related to the newer crop of undergraduates. Yes, something of each of you will remain at Fitchburg. But that is not all. Your future deeds will also be recorded here, for wher- ever you go and whatever you do, you remain an alumnus of J ; . T. C. Our success is yours and your success is ours. So look well to your responsibilities and God speed you in your mission. We hope you really appreciate the importance of your errand, and are con- fident in your ability to meet your tasks. We trust you will not stay away too long. You must return to make new entries in the record and to reminisce with us about the old ones. 92 93 • fm flBK Ipgy 94 ? ■ " 30 QrtevmfMsr W fii €zf£j o?o n a toe e. 3 : 14) CLAS5 96 oZaAAl fi dd? Jk teUz Ufa. qaA. C ??z n M -gas 2A y J cvejZ -, C on Mure i 97 rm me (put? ' c£ c ocaM ' lOCd ' cm. Y 01 98 Zi iWw . towel y 1 - TZftstdJL U sd oa. £l L KZx{ 6nA sM - o M. Ac U 7 Id J €d yO u i cuj r c a d p(r{tL UA 99 103 We ve mad« it! Page L04, which you are view- ing, marks both the end of our energy and the com- pletion of the 1950 Saxifrage. With eyes strained from proofreading, fingertips flattened from typewrit- ing, we breathe a sigh of relief together with a silent wish that you may rind as much pleasure in your year- book .is e. in all sincerity, have had in working on it. To all of you who helped us in any way — our greatest thanks Your 1930 Sax could not have been published were it not for the men behind the men behind the book — viz., the various committees who solicited ads. designed posters, collected pledge money and proofread. Many thanks. 1111S ADVERTISING Betty Asselta Joanne Berndtson Sue Bolger Bob Calkin Tom Convery Austin Crossman Lois Day Debbie Delay Norman Forest Therese Goguen Lucy Hirsch Noreen McDowell Bob Pandiscio Jeannette Roberge Flo Rowe Don Tripp POSTERS Joanne Berndtson Betty Brown Florence Donnelly Irene Harrington Flo Rowe Solange Sullivan TYPISTS Irma Antonangeli Frances Caney Irene Harrington Lucy Hirsch Flo Rowe WRITE-UPS Sue Bolger Bob Brogan Curt Bumpus Zolton Csiczek Bob Curran Paul Heffernan Julie Kelley Max Moczulewski Bob Perry Janet Richards Jeannette Roberge Jack Stahl Walter Stanton For the modern designs which run throughout the book, we acknowledge special thanks to a Junior, Dick Porteus. Dick sub- mitted the winning cover idea in our October con- test. He designed all di- vision pages, cartoons, and sketches in addition to writing our feature, My Daze " , based on ideas sub- mitted by Eunice Brown. Special thanks, Dick. V JB • ' .. • ;


Suggestions in the Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) collection:

Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

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Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Page 1

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Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Page 1

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Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

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Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

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Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

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