Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA)

 - Class of 1949

Page 1 of 100

 

Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) online yearbook collection, 1949 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 100 of the 1949 volume:

l cf EE ,Lori 1- 9 U I QQQ Q S X5 x ,, f Q gbfvw -may 123.31 , , ' A AF , TQ WQ Tl 04 DEVO W v M 3 xg I we Q5 Q 4 XS f - "' Erzc s W ,r A A A' ' Q! M 1-,I Q auf L 'YQ sy 63" ASSEMB L X, ' PElc"l0.D CFN 1-291-A ,NMK AY ASS 3' iff 1 l 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 I I 1 I 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 gaxiffadge femme, 57275 zfzwfefs my 1 Q P .if lf' 355.4 f' :xl .- -gf A ' t w ig Fm . Q Il, 9 v . 41' 4'?ff9if1'l?l 2 if .. . f 'iz vin """ ' M, ' ' rdliw ,ag 4 .UW . R,- s 'mv -,- 1 mfewom' The graduating class does not fully realize that this is their last year until the Saxifrage appears. It bears their signature-the class of 1949. This yearbook serves as a faithful recorder of life at Fitchburg Teachers College. Fun, friendships, frolics, classes, and careers are all pictured here. As the forty-niners go "to untaught youth" may they forever remember their full and happy years spent at this col- lege. We hope that in future years the Saxifmge of 1949 will help to bring them back in spirit to their beloved Alma Mater. THE SAXIFRAGE BoARD ACKNOWLEDGMENTS DANIEL HEALY CLIFFORD W. HAGUE RALPH GIONET STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE FITCHBURG, MASSACHUSETTS VOLUME Xxvll ROBERTA SAUL BLACK Editor I , 7 , I ,I .II .ff ro, I I 'S ' K , Iv 3-. ' ' no 'QU fi 90 A X n 105.0 .W , S. s IM, 3 Q 1 . i . 'Pt I -0 ll' p 2 . i . 'H Q Q In I Q Q1 l 01 ALMA MATER-SCI-IOCL SUNG qu WOI'dS by MOLLIE VVILD, 19-4 Music by ELIZABETH D. PERRY N R P as -53kil-l"!L"5 1 2 'Q e gi- J if J -1 1 L l J 1 4-4 l 0. 0 0 E gg? .J ' V: 4 I 1 -2 g, j 1. In days a - go, when life, we dreamed, Was i - deal as it seemed, And 2. In days to come, if life laid bare Seems far more gray than fair, Or n ne' il 1 A 'Q' P' Q n -n A Q if QQ n Emi:-twz-Qw w 1 3 an Q sr Lrg pr E 5 iQ m 'l24f-l'i2-5'F'2x4'2'l'v2Vi'ViVV N IN . e 11-gif! 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'N l-1..,'Q'. 4.11- ,-Q-1- 1-1-in-Q - - -A - - - F- - -Bitzi! liipjji'-, mii-EigiK:2:iQi2iEilhEE!:,!j'1"4 it: 12:1 all ' ljllji - M I .Z'VV-V -'L V V-V VV CHORUS Q T - l -P :PQ 5g2TiCEiPi1W1l'-EQEQKZPQTJ-jigpg?-S,-qgggiiiigg-::JijiViV5,:iliI lliQ figgigit Aiigiif QS- -Q1 -"'-7"-2: Mvrgf So Flag of Al - ma Ma- ter iloat,One-ter-nal wings of praise, For thee un-numbered hosts to-day ...fl mp sg-Q - l4,Q- 1,111-.l- Q71 ""-"'.p-p 1-1-14 -i'igih eeiiigpgqtrgsp-i:wg,,Ezmp. Bjgiiiifpjjgiiz ,+l2i'.o7:'2gl:4:jegQgi!i?1!- ,Q ,Q ' p l. l - ' I: li-e,!:g:y:: V V V l V V V V V d2 Q -Ziyi iilliil' ' - iid- IN X J' -ll J- gQdl2i,j,VL,, I ul 1 5?21:i2Ti?i,:2:Egif:g- --0- 7o-o-c-5T- 0--1 5-0 - 4 , -QM Q0 e - Their will -ing voic - es raiseg Thru- out the world their ti- ny flame From thy quick light still gleams, F-in ,Q-12'-",2'. ,.Q- Quo-:-1- A -Q-Q.L-Q- Q-1-1-Q- 5, 5l2iii1cg!1iE,-u'Eiiiigri-itll: .iliiljiiligtfihiihifgg Eg? 321 firm 1 oii'9'pm g2gg21l:Zl:1jQ-'-l'--7-rV",i-'-l'- G-' V V V l V l Al2e-l jsgmjgile ,1NW:f'..i-ia. 15 Vwj- Q Il. -ji 'iElgfi'cT" 6512-iii 'TS 2 Agf!egi'4jj,r gv:T,i:liVE1g!,:E:Q.3iE1iVg-ll P ' - f --'YO-5 H0 f- ff' fl'-I 5 I 0 'V--- A While youth and age u - nit -ed claim The home where for-tune beams, The home where fortune beams. -0- ---4 Q Q 0 e A ,ALJ'1r'B1e"'Q'l' '51 -V-T -s f . EDTV? I 1 'Q i -fini? i2 '-,.l--Ies1mg1 ' f 9 gi i!-gg7"'T-i iii: imil 9-' tlijg V V V V V V V V V lv 'Q o I l iggx J- A. xx K JAMES J. HAMMOND We, the class of 1949, respectfully dedicate our Saxifmge to Mr. james J. Hammond. His interest in the students, and outstanding work in the field of Industrial Arts, have been a guiding inspiration to us all. fdvuqyf. gn , DR. WILLIAM J. SANDERS The non-accelerated members of the class of 1949 may re- member that when they entered Fitchburg in the fall of 1945, I, also a newcomer, claimed membership in the class. I still wish to claim membership in the class of 1949 and do so with a good deal of pride. During your four years in college the teaching profes- sion has taken immense strides forward and you are as- sured of positions that carry high prestige and adequate financial compensation. You have a splendid opportunity to further the prosperity and welfare of the communities in which you will teach and you have been well prepared to seize that opportunity. Be assured that you have my best wishes for success in your profession and happiness in your private lives. -ASN A ,Y A9 , G 5. BY' Oven, RAC5 W! OTHER Op- A30-I GE Dgdll 0 1,25 64716 41,60 A N -6:1 . ,J 1? Q , 4 A5-. 'W If X .K ig? Sir JAMES J- HAMMOND ROGER F. HOLMES Director of Industrial Arts Difedo, of T,,,i,,g,,g L Y ' dimes 0.9 R W5 Q32 G,-a Q, S YV' toroi 'offff TON Dirac 9" Qgit E1 ' f iii 5 ' . Ii 3 P if Q , x N 2 L xv r P I r .ii P J I Q I 9 ' A 4 , . U 1 , ' V ' ' U-if o 5 0 CXQSS Sony 'Z194-9 Words -Beffe Eflbk5Oh Musik -Dick Garolner Carf Def-ersorz J b 1' - f-fereg foffwe cfass of for-Ly mme w,'!A,'!5 6017-hef' Prado! and hue J J f lJ ' x ' 6 G ive o sdf Uff' lo five pur-pf? Ondwfnfe andcz ,ofeqe fo br-my I! Mrut -- J jj L J. 7 J? J. J J Ji l JP J J ,J J J For we are proudafour Aojls wfyo .ref-yea' WIHU7 Cour- aye, lik and wiff To J x.. jeff- er we 7194-ILQJAJ-0176-ou! Me wofldour ,nur--pose fo, fuf- vqff -- - S J-EJ VlV"BJUlJDVU1J.7 Fl c ome 15 effow cfasf moles jeff? -er found 76,-ee ckeers for fffe pursple andwlhlef J J ' ' 'gb f'JJfJl QVJH VUJJ O mem- Aer our days .rfomfaf afearfff 7f C wlaici we kujhl kr wifi: aff our mfyfff qlux, H: L 'Q' Q u 4-5' Q Q' I I . -'L ,.,'s, N. G .. go Y I ' '-.:.,,' 'B Q 1 4-5,-,..,1 QF' I 1 "'M, f-, ' Q O' ' A 0 - , a 1 ' 1 , , in ' .,,, Ufbx., 9 J. , . , . .dwg U x., A '14, Q -U IAQAJ- - . ' ,' , ' 1 O 1 I .44 i I ' n I .. . 2 A, f 1 ' . ., 2 , vw '- yfg.-,, ' Q - 1 ' A x .HW WWW 'O Q -A J 'K ' - , , -f I . ,- '-Q. . s X ii :JL 1 U lag.. Q, . ,, 1,5 -n V' I - . - , . ' Q' T Q gy 0 ' ' , ,Q ' Ala ' a ' ' .,., ,, . u ' . Q I . I 6 -4. -' 4 -' . ' ' I hr 11141. f i In U A. . . y ww... Q-sf. " A - , ,-'JS ,,,.,o.w. Q , Ulf' mr-f Ai' ', x A ,',' X Q ' 0 v 'W Q ' 573' ll . Q I nl- f 5 ' vs .. t . x PRESIDENT 4 , Q fav ,f I X l f f ff , 4 X - I I j Xa fX-F1 I , I . 1' X IV X ,fl an -gi' i xQf' fa, at , " ,' GEORGE AHERN Our little pres . . . a leader and worker of renowned fame . . . serious sometimes, witty always . . . versatile in athletics . . . has a billion friends . . . dwelt amongst the roses and petunias in the greenhouse. Gaveleer l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Glee Club 1, 2, 4, Treasurer 21 Epsilon Pi Tau 3, -1, Secretary 33 Class President 3, -in Soccer 4g Newman Club 2, 3, -i, ELLEN BONITZ "Bonnie,' . . . "I'm only a bird-" . . . un- limited vim and vigor . . . tends to be ath- letic . . . has a finger or two in everything . . . pleasantly unsophisticated . . . favorite pastime - slaving on committees . . . Delta Phi Delta. Stick 2, 3, 43 Student Forum 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, 3: Dramatic Club 25 Commuting Council 13 Miller Hall Board 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, 45 W.A.A. Board 3, 4g W.A.A. Conference 3, Newman Club l, 2, 3, 43 Class Secretary 2, 3, 45 Saxifrage Boardg Hockey l, 2, 3, 43 Basketball 2, 3, 4g Volleyball l, 2, 3, -ig Softball l, Z, 3, 43 Badminton 3, -ig Modern Dance 25 Hiking lg Tennis 3, 43 Bowling lg To Kalon 2, 33 Philodemic 4, Vice-President 4. a . ig .1 efxgitgt- V iq,:..1J at 6 ' r ' gr ' tif tri 4 r:,.v"f' +1 , ' s C ,,,, gtg , gf: fi ,V 5' Arif tgirl ,Q 4 in A -. . i1i"'."' , 3 ,-.112 Ia' SECRETARY Q 3 n.. '- . Sin , Ev gi 5 J X A II" gd 37 an l aim, I 54 1 . JOSEPH GORMAN "joe,' . . . "just because your hair is curly" . . classroom "Morrison and Commingeru . . . his club's professional worrier . . . won wife and B.S. at T.C .... sharp, snappy re- torts always good for a laugh . . . why have an alarm clock? Glee Club 1, 23 Newman Club 2. 51 Class Treas- urer 5, -ig Prom Committee 2, SQ Gaveleer, 2, 5, 4. Secretary 5. VICE-PRESIDENT - s 1 1 MARY JENNISON "Jennsy" . . . a regular girl . . . quick wit . . . "those mouldy books" . . . Ingrid Berg- man hair . . . "W'!1o's a typical school teacher?" . . . potentially athletic, definitely artistic . . . "W'hen I was at the univer- sity-" . . . Delta Phi Delta. W'.A.A. Board 3, -i, Treasurer 3, -ig Bridgewater XY'.A.A. Conference 43 Hockey 2, 51 Volleyball 5, 4: Softball 23 Badminton 2, 3, 4: Class Vice-Presb dent 45 Art Club Z, 5, -ig Dramatic Club 2: Glee Club 2, 3, -ig XY'omen's Ensemble 5, -ig Philodemics -ig Student Christian Assn 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3: Saxifrage Board 4. If J C1-74? ax apogp TREASURER 303 I 5 A I .2-gk In it gi' 1, ,N f Eg X si 5 X XX. 5. . iq Q9 le RUDOLPH E. ALISCH "Rudy" . . . belongs to the progressive school of thought . . . noted for unveiled sarcasm . . . proud ovs ner of a new Buick conxertible . . . covers Worcester and outlying areas . . . "good husband material." Gaveleers 2, 5, 4g Installation Banquet Chairman 5g Baseball 1, 25 Intramural Basketball and Softball 1, 2, HORACE ALLEN "Red" . . . "feed these men" . . . the trusting sort, always good for a lift . . . Kipling is his Bible . . . born comedian . . . thespian of the highest order . . . heart belongs to . . . a 5-to-7 odds profiteer. Dramatic Club lg Glee Club lg Newman Club lg Stick lg Esoteric Society 1, 2, 5, President 1, 5. AUGUST AMARAL "Augie, . . . "got a cigarette?" . . . possessor of that rarity, bedroom eyes . . . only man who can sleep eight times around the clock . . . state of Maine Chamber of Commerce . . . campus Valentino. Newman Club 1, 24 Soccer 2, 53 Esoteric Society 1, 2, 3. HELEN ANTILA Carries secret ofiicial business in a knitting bag . . . conscientious . . . truly a hard worker . . . quiet dignity personified . . . "I love training." Stick lg Field Hockey 11 Basketball 2: Halloween Dance Committee 21 Art Club 5, Ai: Student Christian Assn 1, 2, 5, 43 Freshman Reception -ig Lincoln N.C.M. Conference 1. AJ lf fh I if O Bw ,ss vt ' ,J 'Q 'N U01 f Q Q 2' 4 03 .. sr 'I' ' I X N . 'N ' J ,,.. SS 2 fi jug 'lib if 56 Qi in . X., ki, ' .fp , ,y I f,,, 2 .x X Q xl ,sb 1 ' 1 x C H l X . J 1 XX ,f-" Oi- pngzlr ,C NMHQS A 1 ' -fi mt LL Q fag CX xx N Q SP1 , U fxfi Y f f C6 S xx!! t 5 371 JOSEPH ATCHUE "Joe" . . . "Give you a game of tennis, one hand tied behind my back" . . . worldly . . . "You speak well, child" . . . he's growing younger by the day . . . an exceptional mind which works in an exceptional way. Newman Club 1, 2, 5, 4, Mohawk Club 2, 3, -4. PAULINE BOLDINI "Stretch" . . . small in stature, but good things come in small packages . . . very adaptable . . . full of fun . . . vivacious . . . always agreeable . . . musical and athletic . . . scurries enthusias- tically from place to place, and always willing to help . . . loyal and true . . . a favorite among all. Glee Club 1, 25 Ensemble 1, 2, Newman Club 1, 2, XX'.A.A. 1, 2, Basketball' lg Class Secretary lg Swim- ming 2. MADELYN BOVENZI Quiet . . . to the point . . . conservative tastes . . . refined . . . placid and composed . . . easy- going . . . always Joe-vial . . . Gnothi Seauton. To Kalon 2, 5, 4, Corresponding Sec'y 4, Commuters' Board 4, Vice-President 4: Art Club 2, SL Stick lg Newman Club 1, 2, 5, 43 Saxifrage Board -tg Bowling 1, 2, 5g Softball lg Freshman Reception Committee 4. JOSEPH BLooM "Joe" . . . "What ya say, man?" . . . no com- petitors in tennis any more . . . regular com- muter to the Cape . . . did a fine job in W'ood 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and will do well . . . co-operation is SO important. Mohawks 2 3 4 Secretary 5 Basketball 7 Baseball 7 Intramurals 4 Saxlfrage Board Advertising Nfan ager Senior Prom Committee . .-., 47 5 T"'y A 'fs' J 41.39 av .JIU ff' ,--an , X 42 N A-' M pil '1 X '--fp ORREN BRADSTREET "Brad" . . . "I'm moving again" . . . believes in hard work . . . has inexhaustible supply of energy . . . gridiron powerhouse . . . life am- bition to glue table-top . . . only man to hold a zillion jobs at one time. WILLIAM BURKE "Bill" . . . Why, Sam?" . . . only man to trans- port voluminous notebooks with ease . . . knows the beaten path . . . easily stimulated . . . possessor of faculty appeal plus . . . prac- tical joker . . . a real porker. Class President lg Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Esoteric Society 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 35 Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4g Stick 2, 3, 43 Make-up Editor 4, Saxifrage Board. THOMAS CAIRN EY "Tom" . . . has a beautiful Irish bass . . . goes hog-wild at a basketball game . . . keeper of his cousin . . . pleasantly sarcastic . . . ever faithful to the Black and Gold. Class President 1, Basketball 1, 2, 4, Baseball 2, 3, 43 Newman Club, Vice-President 1, 23 Soccer 45 Student Council 4, Gaveleer 1, 2, 5, 4, Glee Club 1, 2. UMBERTO CATALINI "Bert,' . . . conscientious . . . loves a philo- sophical discussion . . . critical of new innova- tions . . . a trusting friend . . . sterling character . . . an asset to society. X a 'S ff 4--' 5, IJ' ' N , is L' is tc? t ,V ff 4 + gt Kp x t, I nigga R-'if ,L- fn. 57 M S 1 I di:-"S ANTHONY CATANZARO "T" . . . "What's up, Doc?" . . . somebody else hits his car always . . . he can sing . . . shops only where discounts are in force . . . operates the "Worcester-to-T.C. Streamlinerf' Mohawks 2, 4, Art Club 2, Glee Club 25 Newman Club 1, 2, 4g Soccer 2. HENRY CEMBALISTY "Hankus" . . . "Who wants fat hair?" . . . orator . . . fiery editor of Stick . . . instigator for reform . . . impartial realist . . . accom- plished writer . . . packer supreme of notebooks . . . perennial pipe-smoker. Epsilon Pi Tau 2, 43 Stick Editor 1, 2, 4g Saxifrage Board, Freshman Reception 2, 4g Winter Carnival lg Art Club 2, New England Teacher's Conference 4, Esoterics 4. VICTOR CIESLA "Doc" . . . "Cup of joe" . . . smooth operator . . . can't be fooled . . . hunter and trapper . . . would wither away without gallons of coffee per day . . . first sergeants make good teachers. Mohawks 4, Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4, President, 4: New- man Club 1, 2, 3, 4. ROSEMARY COFFEY "Rosey" . . . temper, temper . . . beats 05 superintendents . . . stunning red mop . . . specs to match each of her trillion outfits . . . artistic . . . and temperamental . . . Delta Phi Delta. Art Club 1, 2, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Stick 1, 5: Saxifrage Board 4g To Kalon 2, 33 Philodemics 45 Field Hockey 3, 4, Winter Carnival Committee, Mod- ern Dance lg Women's Banquet Committee 4: Hallow- e'en Dance Committee 23 Senior Tea 3g Freshman Reception Committee 3, 4. ri Ll Tai gg 145 G Q ao? EDWARD CONNOLLY "Trigger" . . . his nature never varies . . . never stopped smiling, or bringing cheer to moments of despair . . . connoisseur of bridge and its intricacies . . . a sure success in the teaching field. EDWARD CUNNINGHAN "Glen" . . . "Got a butt?" . . . at T.C., a mother to Millane . . . a staunch one-girl man . . . the tallest fellow at the college . . . sack happy. Esoteric Society: Newman Clubg Intramural Basket- ball 2, 3g Softball l, 2, 4g Junior Varsity Basketballg Saxifrage. PAULINE D'ARCANGE LO Affectionately called "Darky," petite in stature, but strong in convictions . . . willing to fight for her beliefs . . . self-sulicient . . . enthusiastic . . . has an unquenchable curiosity . . . humble, gracious, calm in every situation . . . sense of humor that conquers all . . . a reliable, confi- dent friend. Newman Club 1, 2g Glee Club 1, 25 W.A.A. 1, 25 Swimming 2. EDWARD DAVIS "Ed" . . . "Brrrrrrr" . . . staunch advocate of Buick automobiles . . . in fact, should be listed as standard Buick accessory . . . holds record on Fitchburg-to-Springfield run. wi g-' lvfislt, 7. . .gi Ego V. 0 14 o E. . f ,HH Z. fn' 5' pf 3'oo"aqgd 'fieazg Y. . 5,-,gov-,.r,g A., ia: vi vsgrdgxi M U' ' , 'fi' I 0 1 fo' M M., il f v fjtggjg biig D33 - N ,X EE , C .f- . , 9 1 1: QAM , JOSEPH DEGULIS ' H gl! J to " oe" . . . "Let's get the heat up" . . . a number one man on the Hill . . . student representative at faculty meetings . . . born mathematician . . . has a mind for figures . . . the pompadour Q NU , -..,,,,...?., wows em. I fnfthbvfj I ,j 2a M-th: Basketball 1, 2, 43 Soccer 43 Baseball 1, 43 Esoteric I Society 1, 2, 43 Saxifrage Board3 Business Manager3 - 11 an Stick 2. m f'f .- V1 L-L K -Y-.f ee , VINCENT DiSESSA "Dese" . . . "My car is no good" . . . profound believer that used hacks make good cars . . . one of the Everett boys . . . reason why auto- mobile taxes are high . . . rarely drives own car during week, someone else burns the gas. 5 xx' I -' "'1tXl'N 'y Q' QU GCE ,nay t ,, q l , cl J .7 bc 'kj C aw - X X',.f , gf!! "Zi . - 4 -U CATHERINE DONOVAN Nl Card shark . . . does justice to the King's Eng- lish with a Boston accent . . . sophisticate . . . "So- we can't all be artistic!" . . . varied cul- tural interests include modern "dawnce" . . . Queen of the Ball . . . Gnothi Seauton. Class Vice-President 33 Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 43 Ensemble 2, 3, 43 To Kalon 2, 3, 43 Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 43 Dramatic Club 43 Ski Club l, 23 Field Hockey 2, 33 4 "0 CP gl 7? 4 f:,",' Q., A ' ylgiyffgifif. ' Modern Dance 1, 2, 43 Basketball 3. - JOHN DONOVAN eff "Jack" . . . "Bubble gum?" . . . potential movie producer and actor . . . likes big cars . . . knows j the beaten path . . . a definite asset to a com- fortable dorm . . . heart of gold . . . welds anything at all better than new. Q l Mohawks 2, 5, 43 Palmer Hall Board3 Senior Repre- X sentative 43 Cap and Gown Committee 43 Newman X X Club 1, 2, 3, 43 Freshman Dance. of .t 1 I NJ iv 40- X .4 '4' i' sas'- 'iv F--4 6 ANN DOYLE Straight from the old sod . . . longest line in these parts . . . outstanding member of the profession . . . did she ever bring you a donkey from Tralee? . . . Irish eyes effective ammuni- tion with male species . . . Gnothi Seauton. Glee Club lg Arr Club 2, 5, To Kalon 2, 5, 43 Com- muting W'omen's Board 2, 3, 4, President 4, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4. RICHARD DRURY "Dick" . . . "What, another notebook?" . . . worry wart . . . detests notebooks . . . life- guard . . . operates best under the influence of J. Millane . . . reminds one of "Willie" in the popular Mauldin cartoons. Gaveleers 2, 4, Art Club 23 Stick Staff 1, 2, 43 Sopho- more Dance Committee, Intramural Sports 2, 4. ALICE ELIZABETH ERICKSON "Bette" . . . talented individualist . . . anything for the profession . . . dual personality . . . the joker in the card game ad infinitum . . . dis- tinctive gait . . . sailed uncharted seas . . . carefree . . . Gnothi Seauton. Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4, Glee Club 1, 2, 35 Ensemble 1, 2, 3, 43 Modern Dance 1, 23 Basketball 1, 2, 4: Volleyball 1, 2, 4: Hockey 1, 2, 33 Senior Prom Committee 43 To Kalon 2, 5, 4, Secretary 5, President 4. WILLIAM FITZGIBBON Beau Brummel . . . looks more like a college boy than anyone we know . . . member in good standing of L.S.A. ilong-suffering archesb Club . . . believes that a complete education includes a term of duty at one of the local grocery stores. Student Forum lg Esoteric Society 4. A 9 lx -Q - , f- lv' Engl' --Eng" ,FUVI lg-'-',' i i :ful 5 fri' 1- 'LEW' s -, If , '. if J.--gg LV" 1. l NS Z2 '15 fr I-. I eff, flag, ,.flf-1--- if I fl j - X X RAYMOND FOREST "joe College" . . . plinks the piano like Hoagy . . . a little guy with a big heart . . . well versed in matters serious . . . well versed in matters unserious . . . a noble character of T. C. Class President 23 Mohawks 1, 2, 5, 4g Alumni Secre- tary 25 Stick 1, 31 Saxifrage, Art Board 4. 3 1-ff, Ifu: ' 1 P 99:3 Q g rf' X f. f ' was if if 1 aj - Q22 ai Q Q wharf X NORMAN F RYE "Red" . . . "How can you tell?" . . . Palmer Hall ofhcial chaplain . . . earliest morning riser in Palmer Hall . . . constantly repairing anything on wheels . . . as predictable as a blizzard. Baseball 25 Basketball 23 Ski Club 1, 2, 5, 43 Student Christian Association 2, 3, 45 Palmer Hall Board 5. JAMES GIBBONS "jim" . . . "If it isn't that irascible old gent" . . . Central Park and campus brake mechanic . . . sandpaper expert . . . knows well the beaten path . . . accomplished mimic and master of wit . . . operator of Clinton-T.C. Express for co-eds. Newman Club 1, 2, 4g Gaveleers 2, 43 Epsilon Pi Tau 2, 4g Vice-President 45 Art Club, Vice-President 2g Glee Club 25 Stick 1, 2, 45 Freshman Dance Commit- tee. MARGARET GIBBONS "Gibby" . . . buoyant spirits . . . captivating . . . big wheel . . . keeper of the queens . . . conversational ease . . . flexible accomplish- ments in the athletic world . . . Delta Phi Delta. Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 41 W.A.A. Board 3, 45 Student Council 2, 3, 45 N. Y. Conference 5: N. E. Con- ference 33 Glee Club 1, 21 Stick 5, 4g Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4g Volleyball 1, 2, 43 Softball 1, 2, 4g Field Hockey 1, 2, 3, 43 Saxifrage Board 4g Philodemics 4g Tennis 3. fi 4- 'N ALFRED N GIFFORD GiH . . . ever-present sense of humor . r h 0 s u ,gn used to sport a multi-colored automobile in l - the old days . . . took effective philosophy notes S on a wire recorder . . . pleasant and friendly. - I . , ..i-.-- ,ur G if I Q K . x + 1' , L a , x 'Skis RALPH GIONET y "Huh" . . . how's the baseball bat? . . . a ' good voice, his best role in the campus pro- duction, "The Mikado" . . . tireless and steady worker . . . will co-operate with anybody to- ward anything. , I 'E 1 ll '35 llx, e an 'il t Giee club 1, 2, 5, 4, President 3, Mohawks 2, 3, 4, L Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Soccer 43 Newman Club 2, 3, 4, 1 Commuting Men's Association, President, 2, junior Prom Chairman, Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 49 Student Council, Secretary, 4g Saxifrage, Directory Editor. I af, X1 COPELAND HAGUE 6 ix W "Copey" . . . very much of a family man . . . ' 1 always late for most classes sometimes . . . if ff M xflrlifkx your new Studebaker is ailing, see Copey. My ll! V9 Wx, GRACE HANLEY "Gra-Gra" . . . fastidiously neat . . . cheerful outlook . . . found a home in the profession . . . "The Miller Hall Sentinel" . . . fascinating story-teller . . . generous of heart . . . Delta Phi Delta. Glee Club 1, Z1 Newman Club l, 2, 5, 43 Art Club I, 2, 3, Miller Hall Board, President, 4g Philodemics -ig Snxifrage Board 43 Class Marshal 23 Field Hockey 2, 3. i 'Ml ll' lllcu X l,l1ll1 X X X X XS I WL , x x ,xi J X X. s x V i I 59' N, J! C- fi 5 W NLM- C-rt J,-"'.Z X N , Hep. V. , K x W af. '.x. 'Ll X pl Yo? 'U ' .0 's Q I C 0 PC SHIRLEY HANLEY "Teddy" . . . our artist at the piano . . . Digby's girl . . . staunch friend . . . heart of gold . . . calm exterior conceals inner gaiety . . . guiding spirit to the dead end kids of D.M. Student Co-op Ig To Kalon 4g Glee Club 1, 2, 3: Hockey 3g Basketball 33 Newman Club 1, 2. BERNARD HARCOURT "Barney" . . . "There I was" . . . likes the little things in life . . . ingenious . . . creative mind . . . best friends are Chipper and tea . . . prac- tical joker . . . professional doodler . . . 14- 15-16-Buzz. Newman Club 1, 2, 5, 49 Art Club 24 Stick 2, 3, 4g Associate Editor 4g Saxifrage Boardg Esoteric Society 2, 3, 4g Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4. FRANCIS HARRIGAN "Frank" . "I'm beat" . . . Stick editor . . bundle of nerves . . . sports authority . . . jack-of-all-trades, master of none . . . will talk freely on any subject . . . "Shiner" . . . poten- tial coach. Newman Club 2, 3, 45 Stick 2, 3, 45 Editor 43 Esoteric Society 2, 3, 4g President 53 Baseball Manager 29 Ski Club 2, 33 Columbis Scholastic Press Association Con- vention 3, 4g Saxifrage Board. WILLIAM HOWAT "Bill" . . . "I'm looking for bottles" . . . heart belongs to Bates, head belongs to jets . . . the guy what puts bottles around ships . . . winter trips to Maine are rough . . . a better way to do things . . . wanting always for a new gimmick. Epsilon Pi Tau 2, 4j Gaveleers 43 Art Club lg Student Christian Association 2, 4. ,, . :QI ' ' ff. .fn W I ,, 1 'ZR it 11 ' W mtl f ,, . ff 3 I S ig:-54 'I' jEAN JARVIS "Jinx" . . . coquettish . . . a petite fashion plate . . . sultry voice . . . delightful giggle . . . fluctuating date list . . . one of the queens . . . Delta Phi Delta. Dramatic Club 1, 2, 3, 43 Glee Club 1, 23 Philodemics 43 Art Club lg Stick Stal? 4g Ski Club 2, 5, 4g Modern Dance lg Newman Club l, 2, 5, 4, Field Hockey 1, 2, 5, 4, Basketball 1, 2, Women's Banquet Committee, Saxifrage Committeeg Bowling 1, 29 Halloween Dance Committee 2g Senior Tea 33 Freshman Reception 4. .. I5 N WILLIAM KENNEDY "Bill" . . . used to be I-A . . . used to room ,Tl ' ll with Sully . . . one of the married vets , . . A recently acquired a new and shiny car . . dabbles about in plastics. Esoteric Society 2, Secretary 33 Glee Club lg Newman Club 1, 2, 3g M.A.A. 2. EULA KING "Tiny" . . . hard to distinguish from her second ,.. graders . . . steady, calm disposition . . . -1 always ready to enjoy a good laugh veteran bus girl from Ashburnham Art Club 3, 4, Freshman Reception Committee 4. JACKSON KING "Jack" . . . "How coy can one be?" . . . , competes with horses . . . makes snap decisions . . . a real live beachcomber from Ogunquit . . . enjoys Finishing shop most . . . authority on sandpaper methods. Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 41 Treasurer 2g Intramural Basket- ball l, 2, 3, 43 Intramural Softball l, 2, 3, 45 Varsity Baseball lg Varsity Soccer 5, 4, Mohawks 2, 3, 4. C f f lf I to 'O PHQY3 Phelib xl k 4 Q5 WEA XQSE4 "Q ,-fllff G? X1 f ,K VKKESTH ' !5-1. J 'ij T g I 1..- .4 l LJ 1 ,jc I X - Qian'-F Il! f -4 'L 7 ii ' Sis , ff -... 1 . 1 WALTER KOTOMSKI "Walt" . . . "Abie, what's that?" . . . political operator . . . smokes long cigars . . . curious as all get-out . . . always cooking up a good deal . . . knows all, sees all, hears all . . . born to argue. Gaveleers 2, 3, 43 Dance Committee Gav-Hawk 35 Stick, Business Manager, 3g Commuting Men's Board 3, Newman Club 2, 3. CHARLOTTE KRAEMER "What time is it?" . . . calm, unrufiled dis- position . . . ever cheerful . . . extremely gra- clous . . . gentle manner and voice . . . when you need a helping hand, call on Kraemer . . . Gnothi Seauton. Art Club 2, 3, Commuting Women's Board 1, 2, 33 To Kalon 3, 43 Winter Carnival Committee 15 Stick 23 Saxifrage Board, Secretary. GEORGE O. KRIKORIAN Often seen on the Sunday evening covered wagon from Worcester . . . friendly to every- one . . . a photography bug caught him . . . one of the coach's most faithful athletes. Mohawks 2, 3, 43 Soccer 1, 2, 3, 43 Baseball 1, 2, 3, Basketball 2, Intramural Basketball 3, 45 Student Christian Ass'n 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, President 4, Stick, Saxifrage Photographer. ,f f Q -- , - Chic has a passion for long trips with of women shining light in the field of I.A. ii Lv! gr 2 ll fm DONALD LAMBERT X 'fig X it as L Nast 3 f trailers . . . varied interests include millions Z , S! g0, i . . . ' ' ' ' ff f , fi E - I 1 fv f Q I f I5 , ff 6 ff? 'K N 5'6- x a X l l HENRY LA SHOTA sf . Already an experienced teacher . . . infectious S rm, WN chuckle . . . the outdoor type . . camp direc- ' . tor from down Maine . . . a serious rival of 5 Arthur Murray. 2 - 'f--" SCHOOL " flea I l A Lesson ,l i X x F 3 j 4 1 ' gg. -X 'Y I ALFRED R. LeBLANC Distinctively known as A. Robert . . . speed is a modern invention and he's not old-fash- ioned . . . befriends everyone . . . short of temper behind the wheel of his silver chariot, he says . . . another conscientious bridge enthusiast. Newman Club 1, 2g Student Forum 2g Gaveleers 43 Senior Representativeg Commuting Men's Board 4. WILLIAM LOCKE "Bill" . . . "What do you mean?" . . . one of the Everett boys . . . a smooth politician . . . stickler for facts . . . constantly seeking a better way to do things . . . the pin that punctures the balloon of the idealists. Mohawks 33 Newman Club 2, 3g Palmer Hall Board l, 25 Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. JOSEPH LOVETT Came to T.C. as a transfer student . . . one of Baileys imported goods. C5 673 . Q V fr., gk-vt :ful liz, f0CKE ' Q? E7 W ' "N f"2wi2f " Qfjy I '.'1f7, lie 6 Q QQ? 1 , Q 5 uf? 5 Q52 :QD L 3 ffx 1 I 4 0 eacfwe V ly f I ,ifsqsrlfll g:.fi1g',1ff.- , if I 'l Alla' if la' R8 A 18. fi p 4, Qt EX 'fv 4" 4 5 9 f ,f .li I. ll f, O JOAN LYELL "Pidge" . . . charming dignity . . . whiz at math . . . a natural at the Ladies' Aid meet- ings . . . Sweetheart of Sigma Chi . . . con- genial personality . . . sincere . . . Delta Phi Delta. XY'.A.A. Board 3, 43 Senior Representative -ig Bad- minton 5, 45 Hockey 2, 3: Softball 2: Stick 3. -1: Philodernics -ig Student Christian Ass'n 2, 3, 4, Secre- tary 3, President 4: Saxifrage Board 4. HORACE MANGUE "Ace" to '1'.C .... a champion on skis . . . ever with a pipe clenched in his teeth . . . football coach of "my boys" . . . delights in a friendly, little argument. MARY MAYNARD "Maureen" has twinkling Irish eyes. but speaks French fluently . . . believes in leprechauns lpossesses four herself- her guiding lights throughout trainingl . . . amiable, generous . . . an accomplished dancer . . . has many aes- thetic interests . . . fervent respect for humanity . . . conscientious . . . wishes to know all things . . . has a great heart and a great faith. Newman Club: NY'.A.A. l, 2: Swimming 2. ELIZABETH MCBREEN "Libby" . . . "The train must be late" . . . always neat as a pin . . . nothing fazes her . . . charming smile with personality to match . . . keeps Doyle in line . . . quiet and shy, but oh so lovely! . . . practically owns B. and M. . . . Delta Phi Delta. Newman Club 4g Philodemics. X 1-an THOMAS MCDONOUGH ff -f-Q "Mac" . . . most certainly the quietest lad on the campus . . . when he speaks they all listen . . . noted for dry humor . . . horses are his l favorite hobby . . . swears by the new Nash. EARL H. McDOWELL "Mac" . . . also lives in style-in the flats . . . even turns to athletics for "my Gavs" . . . has been known to make his wife play tennis with him. Gaveleer Society 2, 3, 4. Secretary 4g Sports Editor, Saxifrageg Intramural Basketball 2, 3, 43 Senior Prom Committee. BARON V. MCDUFFEE Second only to Culbertson on matters pertain- ing to bridge . . . noted for neat dress, versatile abilities, and gentlemanly habits . . . definite opinions on marriage, philosophy, and politics . . . "A wise head hath a close mouth." Dramatic Club 2, 4, Treasurer 4, Student Forum 4. JOHN MCNANEY Studious now and then, never now and seldom then . . . authority on bridge . . . raconteur of sea stories that are hard to beat . . . possesses all assets insuring success in any Held. Gaveleer Society 3, 4. A 4 Etkruu Lf? .- akcfsrfk ?-A353 Gy' gs Q. F. I ZR 'E X Ax ,Y . , 1 LQ f X f f ig -: e i uI':lI ll llll l ll N yy JEAN METZLER Artist . . . true friend . . . efficient nurse . . . master of all handicrafts . . . an all-around wonderful person . . . believes that silence is golden in its place . . . witty . . . short in stature but great in her abilities to give . . . that's our Jean. Art Club 1, 2g Swimming 23 Basketball 25 Hockey 1, 23 Bowling 1, 23 Ping-Pong 25 Badminton 1, 2g Soft- ball 1, 25 Volleyball 2g W.A.A. 1, 2. JERRY MILLANE Always blushes when he misses a basket . . . an original Esso . . . guides the whole bunch of us . . . says Jerry, "I owe it all to Ned." Basketball 1, 2, 3g Baseball 1, 2, 3: Esoteric Society, Treasurerg Student Council 3, 4, President 4. ERNEST F. MILLER Te has the honor of living in the flats covers wood area has positive views on teaching which are expounded at great length was Mr Rogers assistant in Lunenburg Epsilon Pi Tau 3 4 CHRISTUS N IKITAS "Chris" . . . resonant of voice . . . big influence at T.C. on matters political, philosophical, and humorous . . . many interests, many accomplish- ments . . . the senatorial type. Student Forum 1, 2, 3, Vice-President 2, President 3: Dramatic Club 2, 35 Gaveleer Society 3. '28 v Q ,I g .1--. if-PN QQ is I x 1 k X r ANTHONY NOON Tony Im broke only worthwhile campus carpenter wishes he could dey ote all spare time to building boats eager to swap anything for anything swears by Ford cars. M 4 fa ff EDWARD NOWAK V l x "Cap" . . . "This weekend? In Webster!" fff' . . . will never forget visual-aids demonstration f x . . . weaned on cokes . . . a research artist . . . XF! authority on yet-propulsion . . . only man to new bottom of NX'ebster Lake if Newman Club 1 2 44 Mohawk Club 4 f'5 5l?5f' MALCOLM OLIVER llfffiff N "Mal" . . . "What do you think of this?" . . . If ,. , , X1 ' source of dry wit and humor . . . air-corps ' ff yi ' 7 collar man . . . a stickler for exactness . . . , X burner of the midnight oil . . . never forget T www Epsilon banquet. 1 psi on i au E '1 P' T . f f X x Z N f '4 f , f 1 Q I Us ' GEORGE E. OLSON "A wand'ring minstrel, I" . . . left the boys for 6,4 K :A ' A a more sheltered life . . . tenor in "the quar- 7 A , ret" . . . a staunch defender of his own prin- I y A ciples. J ' once Club 1, 2, 5, -4, President 41 Mens Ensemble 4g I , ay, x - 1? "'-' Esoteric Society' 5, -tg Saxifrage Advertising Staff 43 If Nj 7' NX 1 XY'intcr Carnival Committee lg Men's Quartctte 5, 4. , Mi' K, V mf l 1" 'il my f ' 5311? R ,,A,f-ff-"X ff F ,I , I. I 5 --F-M A. v 4 -' ' .tl Q if ff 3 'Aj fl ,if tx-K sa I- ..f ' " -. gf E H I 'ln' i Llf' H lf af ' 1 f l'G'l1lIFE ,. 7 If 7' if Sf ml X F if Qftlafiie 52757 V45 Qin!- N X I fig .fl ff JOHN o'MALL1sY "-Iackn . . . "Quit your crying" . . . thinks he can sing . . . custodian of the coke machines . . . houseboy for Palmer and Miller Halls . . . swings a mean broom . . . Denny's partner in crime. Mohawks 2, 5, 4, Chief 43 Newman Club 1, 2, 5, 4, Chairman, Entertainment Committee 39 Palmer Hall Board, President, 41 Senior Dance, Chairman, 4g Intra- mural l, 2, 5, 4g Houseboy 3, 4. FRANCIS O'MEARA "Digby" . . . "When in doubt, see Uncle Roy" . . . a veteran boilermaker . . . spends all spare time keeping jack D. out of trouble . . should be a private eye . . . satirist par excel- lence . . . he made the beaten path . . . "I'm no squealerf' Mohawks 2, 5, 43 Scribe 4g Palmer Hall Board, Sec- retary, 45 Senior Dance. JOHN O'NEIL Should pose for collar ads . . . member of "the quartet" . . . has pipe appeal . . . having trouble with physics? See John . . . put all his faith on "the Hill." Class Secretary 2g Glee Club 2, 5, 4g Men's Ensemble 43 Esoteric Society 1, 2, 3, 4g Quartet 5, 4. FRANCIS PELOSI "Fran" . . . "Heaven is in Everettl' . . . ac- celerated from the class of the Blue and Gold -with regrets . . . has a calming influence over Locke . . . quietly efficient. Mohawks 2, 3, Vice-President 3: Soccer 55 Baseball 1, 33 Basketball lg M.A.A., Vice-President, 3, Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3g Senior Promg Newman Club 2, 5, Saxifrage 4. - " ':5,"'-, I girls?-'. xxx? bb , 'Y t, ,J W'-f auf' A I' gym-'wr I 5 vii 5' ' l 'Zi " it , i I -.Q,,ywf,,!,?fj V if Y .agua l Q mxkp . Ai .att A N S., JOSEPH B. PORTER lx J i, 'w G? T Take john Dewey for instance- t e ill . . .4 carries a briefcase . . . found success and hap- Y piness "on the hill.' 55 Art Club 2- Glee Club 2 4' Newman club 5 4- sm- "Y f 1 dent Forum 2 3 4. -'-'7 . Z , 1 11 ' i executive type . . . a professional voice . . . E If , I s . if , l' i i 1 y y Lg ' I sy I , it 4' ' r q WILLIAM ROGERS Better known as "Buck" . . . "Now 1et's look 'T at this thing from an I. A. man's point of view" . . . the "Esquire" type of dresser . . . adored by the football squad of D. M. Dillon . . . please don't tell him his jokes are junky . . . blessed with a heart of gold. Freshman Class Marshalg Glee Club 1, 2, 3g Newman Club 1, Treasurer 2, 3, President 43 Saxifrageg Eso- teric Society 4. RICHARD RUTKA ,T 5 5 3 , l C, . "Dick" . . . buddy of the "Everett gang" . . . lc, neat and fashionable . . . sports the "profes- X A sonal attitude" at the proper times . . . one gy 1 of the Indian boys . . . not often heard, but can I ' he sing! R ix ,7 i Mohawks 2, 3, 4g Baseball 2, 5, 4. ALBERT ROUPS Furniture fancier . . . owns more tables than a cafeteria . . . a bug for masquerades . . . expert on doling out fatherly advice . . . as soft-spoken as a librarian . . . quiet as the proverbial church -ix f7"f 'D , 7 , f . . W 0 H ffl I 1 l pw NIM gg ,Q ' I H Y! x l l 1 i mouse. ,ff . l, f f I L ein? gt pr . X ,bf 1 -U Cx N U X I "I-. fv- UF EDWARD SARRASIN "Ed" . . . "Have you seen my album of wed- ding pictures?" . . . expert in metal areas . an ex-Marine and don't forget it . . . in be- tween quiet and noisy . . . had many headaches caused by proceeds of the barracks coke ma- chine. Mohawks 43 Stick 1, 2, 43 Glee Club l, 23 Art Club 1, 23 Ski Club 13 Student Forum l, Z1 Newman Club 1, 2. ROBERTA SAUL "Bobbie, . . . convention goer . . . unruffled by any situation . . . a friend to bank on . . , exceptional use of words . . . always calm and cool . . . noted for dry humor and puns . . . mainstay of the Sax . . . "XVhen will I ei er find time to be married?'l . . . Delta Phi Delta. Art Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 53 Bowling 1. Stick 1, 2, 53 Dramatic Club 1, 23 Student Forum l, 23 Fresh- man Reception 43 N. E. T.P.A. Conference 43 Saxi- frage Editor 43 Philodemics 43 Eastern States Con- ference 4. E. PETER SAVOY "Yummy" i . . self-styled music critic . . original wit that brings many spontaneous out- bursts of mirth . . . varied interests include women, golf, and train travel . . . believer of "A fool and his money are soon parted." Glee Club 1, 2, 5, 4. LOUIS SCAN LON "Lou" . . . "I have a question" . . . worries too much over "Meaning of Meaning" . . , pushed around by the lasses at the Tuesday night dances . . . no bad habits . . . theory ex- pounder . . . excellent chaperone . . . con- scientious worker. Newman Club 1, 2, 5, 43 Regional Representative 1. 2, 5, 43 Associate Editor 53 Representative of Co- Vu- , ,f I ul. X S ,J -X Q. ii gm: 1410 mln ' A M N lumbia Scholastic Press Association 33 Corresponding Secretary of Teachers' College Press Association 3. Soccer 2, 33 Letterman 23 Glee Club l. 23 Ensemble l EILEEN SHEEHAN ' Staunch supporter of the class of '49 . . . where there's a debate there's Izie . . . good- natured . . . took off for Dighton . . . enthu- siasm plus. 73 , Glee Club 2, 5, 43 Ensemble 5, 45 Student Forum 2, 5, -ig Stick 43 Saxifrage 45 Art Club 2, 4. RUTH SIMMONS Endowed with personal magnetism . . . possess- ing Winsome ways with original qualities . . . practical and conscientious worker . . . careful and exact . . . continually searches for the truth . . . cultured, witty humor, fun-loving, sincere to all . . . a true and loyal friend. 2-6 Glee Club 1, 23 Art Club 1, 23 Swimming 25 W.A.A. 1, 2. l JEANNETTE SMITH Tall, blond, erect in stature, gay in tempera- ment, witty, dramatic . . . connoisseur of fashion . . . insatiable thirst for culture . . . profes- sional . . . eager to help . . . unlimited power ' of concentration . . . realistic in her beliefs 'F ' . . . enterprising . . . discriminating in taste 3' . . . fearless . . . magnanimous of heart. Glee Club 1, 25 Ensemble 1, 25 Debating Club I, 25 , Dramatic Club l, 2g W.A.A. 1, 2. 'I' WILLIAM SORTON Willie A day just dont have enough hours campus night watchman JUS campus day student he newer sleeps general all round repairman Q I .2 V OO -f ,Q- 1 " 0 I P u Y rf? ,,,J ggi!! 2 X, Vp x r IL 2 a Q 1 IE!!! -M--..: ul 255 '-f': ,,:4...-:" an 4 I l ,',',,,. ,,,'f'7!5k,-rnIf0"H Cfrfs 0 V V 1 l "L 6' f' BERTRAND H. STEEVES A k' X "Bert" . . . owns cars, pipes, and many things . . . has aspirations to the ministry . . . he and Mr. Conlon taught us all we know about his- H f ii tory . . . at times, extremely pessimistic. :slr ' Student Christian Ass'n 2, Commuting Men's Ass'n -I I Board, Vice-President, 33 Gaveleers 2, 3, 4, Vice-Presi- ' 2" Q dent 4. 27 4 N J If L.-- J 4 ARTHUR STICKLER --1 ' , 9 "Stick" . . . "I'1l give him a ticket" . . . what , 1 2 an operator . . . controls entire town of Groton ' 'A ' . . . a sherif . . . best glass-driller at T.C. . . . ' , in charge of model shop . . .Epsilon banquet a t' M happy milestone. ' k , L Gaveleer 4, Stick 3g Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4. 'ue WALTER SULLIVAN Has a penthouse out in the flats . . . took his training at Devens . . . could be a softball player . . . a staunch "Gav." Sophomore Dance Chairman, Gav-Hawk Chairman 3, Gaveleer 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Vice-President 3: Stick 5, Soccer 2, 3. MARY TRULAND Dependable . . . considers others before her- self . . . "Twelve dollars, please. This book is two days late!" . . . always the optimist . . . active in all school activities . . . Delta Phi Delta. .7 arvpk g A 7 L .ni ,JR LIUHHRIAI L -Q --fs Ls - A Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Corresponding Secretary 3. Vice-President 4, Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Ensemble 2, 3, 4, Student Forum 1, 2, 3, Secretary 2, President 3, Philodemics 3, 4. I DAVID H. VENNBERG Aspiring to the ministry . . . the quiet type . . . a rugged soccer star . . . a great I. A. guy. Mohawks 2, 3, 43 Soccer 2, 3, 43 Epsilon Pi Tau 2, ivy- 3. 4, President 2, 3. THEODORE WE IN ER "Ted" . . . a master of veiled sarcasm . . and as they say, "still waters run deep" . . . delights in notebooks . . . makes magic up in the lab . . . totes a tray in a sophisticated man- ner. Saxifrage Circulation Managerg Intramural Basketball and Softball. CALVIN WHITE "Cal" . . . "I got a problem" . . . made a for- tune while in training . . . the best barracks orderly on campus . . . speaks to anyone, any- time, anywhere . . . spends hours tracing down hack rattles. Gaveleer Society 2, 3. 43 Treasurer 3, 43 Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 43 Secretary 43 Art Club 23 Stick 23 Newman Club 2, 3, 4. ABBIE WHITNEY "Whit" . . . our class chauHeur for trips to Willard Brook . . . displays considerable ability in sports, music, and studies . . . strong per- sonality . . . always composed . . . displomatic . . . realistic and practical . . . takes nothing for granted . . . humorist and friend . . . sports a diamond, too! NY'.A.A. I, 23 Basketball I, Z3 Bowling l, 23 Softball l, 23 Class Marshal 23 Student Council 13 Swim- ming 2. 4, f 'JS +0 '40 'ft f L v Vw P- fr 0 I 1 'v K 1 ff 1, I 4 I' Z 'Q f X, ff 1 1, I C ' --T x fa, Xi sg ilk.- Qin: ? 'ffbe 0 3 I . -. X jf .-an M. 5343 ,, ' " llll .77 anim! A 1 'P li 'f t H l K , .tax .f H f X vis K 1 X' xx gli xi f I I Q ap N24 WI' -lt tl L "" MARJORIE WHITNEY Good old "Whit" . . . where there's a bridge game, there's Marge . . . tries not to let her scholastic activities interfere with her social life . . . a fiend with a badminton racket . . . one of our best . . . Gnothi Seauton. Dramatic Club l, 2, 5, 43 Glee Club I, 2. 3: W.AA. Board 23 Basketball lg Modern Dance 2, Volleyball 1, 25 Hockey 1, 23 Softball 1, 2, Badminton 2, 3: To Kalon 49 Class Song Committee 13 Hallowe'en Dance Committee 2. THOMAS WHOLLEY "Tom" . . . "Where's the job sheet?" . . . to argue is to live . . . one of the Everett boys . . . operator par excellence . . . home every week-end. Mohawks 2, 51 Newman Club 2, 55 Vice-President, Freshman Class: Chairman Winter Carnival Ball: In- tramural Sports 1, 2, 5: Advertising Manager, Stick, 2. ALBERT J. WRIGHT "Al" . . . owns a steamship line from Worces- ter . . . takes linotype lessons . . . has printer's ink in his veins . . . has been seen and heard playing the drums . . . builds houses for first graders. Newman Club 1, 2, 33 Stick 1, 2, 3, Orchestra 13 Saxi- frage Directory 2. DONALD YORK "Don" . . . "I mean" . . . perpetual and con- tagious grin . . . no hard beverages . . . full of questions . . . knows the beaten path . . . only man who can slide under a door . . . smokes matches . . . Einstein of jet-propulsion. Esoterics 1, 2, 4, Vice-President 4, Class Treasurer 23 Newman Club 1, 2, 43 Glee Club lg Hallowe'en Dance Committee 2. N .ll I l ggi GSA lass ill We, the members of the Class of 1949 of Fitchburg Teachers' College, being of sound mind, superb memory and extraordinary intelligence and considering the uncertainty of this frail and transitory life, do herefore make, ordain, publish and declare this to be our last Will and Testament. Any claims of the monetary type can be filed against the "Sinking Fund." Chick Lambert leaves his automotive gadgets to Jim Peters. Bill Burke leaves his air of quiet dignity, and flashy neckties to Skin Mulligan. Bill Howatt leaves his car to T.C., may it rust in peaces. Joe Gorman leaves his historic background to Mr. Conlon's sleeping history majors. Kay Donovan leaves her excellent soprano voice to Helen Dery and her third grade kiddies. joe Porter leaves his blustering attacks on any and all theories to jim Cummings. Bert Steeves leaves his endless supply of cigars to George Boettinger. Mary Truland leaves her place on the Dean's List to Tom Mullins. Dick Rutka leaves his air of formality to Bachelor Bob Bonitz. Teddy Hanley leaves her third grade laellions with great sorrow and despair 1? J. Marge Whitney leaves her professional attitude to Jean Alletson. Maddie Bovenzi leaves her noisy mannerisms to Marilyn Scott. Lou Scanlon leaves his relentless search for opposition and a trail of broken hearts for Bob Stevens to mend. -. Charlotte Kraemer leaves her athletic ability on the tennis courts to Ken Allan Stone. Red Allen leaves his choice of fluttering feminine hearts to Tom Convery. Frank Harrigan leaves his bedroom slippers and supply of dog biscuits to "Ugh." Baron McDuffee leaves his oratorical powers to Lou D'Nunzio. Chris Nikitas leaves his strong political convictions to Vic Valeri. Bette Erickson leaves her eccentricity to Ruth Mann. Bula King leaves her tiny stature to Connie Dow. Libby McBreen leaves her habit of blushing a quiet fire-red to Joan Kenney. Leo Gouin leaves but we can't believe it!!! Rosemary CoHee leaves her artistic talent to Dick Porteus. Eileen Sheehan leaves her "Friendliness" to all the underclassmen. Peggy Gibbons leaves her stilts to joan Wilson. jackson King leaves his love of horses, recently developed, to the ring of "bookies" on campus. Jane Savard leaves her love of music to Ethel Cotter. Rudy Alisch leaves his generosity with his car without an imitator. George Krikorian leaves his sparky aggressiveness to Paul Harrington. Horace Mangue leaves his role of "helpful advisor" to Don Clark. Walt Sullivan leaves his vet's apartment to one of the 20 G.I.'s who are fighting for it. Tom Cairney leaves his martial carriage to Leo Patrochi. Pauline Boldini leaves her great stature to Nan Barney. Roberta Saul leaves the Saxifrage as evidence of her capabilities. George Ahearn leaves a Fine record as Class President. Jeannette Smith leaves her fastidious tastes to Barbara Shovelton. Abbie Whitney leaves her composure to Neysa Nelson. Red Frye leaves Harry Bassett his job as chaplain. Al Gifford leaves his pass to Roy's to jack Stahl. Ralph Gionet leaves his bass voice to Loring Caney. Copey Hague leaves his I.A. letterhead. Tony Noon leaves his art metal ability to jerry Millane. Bill Sorton leaves in his new car. Dave Vennburg leaves Mr. Landall without an assistant. Barney Harcourt leaves with "Peggy." Walt Kotomski leaves to pioneer I.A. in Worcester. Tom McDonough leaves his formal manner to Al Williams. Bill Locke leaves his dope sheet to "Moz." Ted Miller leaves his I.A. ability to his brother. Mal Oliver leaves his tree stump as a visual aid. Fran Pelosi leaves his spot on the bench to any aspiring soccer player. Ed Sarrasin leaves I.A. in Holyoke. Art Stickler leaves anything that is nailed down. Don York leaves his "technique" to Skippy. Cal White leaves with his Ford still running. Al Wright leaves the cylinder press in one piece. Orin Bradstreet leaves the movers without a customer. Dick Drury leaves with his nose in a book. Tony Catanzarro leaves as a master of spring joints. Hank Cembalisty leaves his old sandpaper to Louis Hart. Vic Ciesla leaves his bottle of "Groze" to Dick Rowland. Jack Donovan leaves the Mohawks without a cook. Joan Lyell leaves the billing and cooing of the pigeons on the roof to the dorm girls. Pauline D'Arcangelo, Mary Maynard, Jean Metzler and Ruth Simmons leave their four leprechauns to Mary Mulkeen and Polly Reagan. Jinx Jarvis leaves that sanctified spot "underneath the maples" to any ambitious romancer who loves privacy! Grace Hanley leaves her beautiful clothes to Marian Kennedy. Mary Jennison leaves her "undercover" methods of obtaining votes in school elections to Pat Kennedy. John O'Malley leaves both Dean Bradt and the Miller Hall Board in need of a new right- hand man. Dick O'Meara leaves his booth in "Uncle's" to Bob Perry. John O'Neil doesn't leave Ann for a minute. Peter Savoy leaves what's left of his commuter's ticket to his little brother. Teddy Weiner leaves Miss Courtney in a quandary. Ellen Bonitz leaves just about every organization on campus. Joe Bloom leaves - with a sigh of relief. Ed Davis leaves his Buick to the W.A.A. Albert Ruops leaves his Philosophy book to whoever wants it. Bill Fitzgibbons leaves his scholastic headaches to his kid brother. Ed Connelly leaves his chair in the Commuters' Room to Connie Sharron. Ray Forest leaves the school sadly lacking an accomplished man of the world. Bill Kennedy leaves "Sully" looking for another place to eat. Al LeBlanc leaves to start "The League of Temperate Templeton Teachers." Earl McDowell leaves his cozy nook in Passion Flats to go out into the cold, cruel world. John MacNaney leaves Mr. Donoghue with a quiet classroom for a change. Jim Gibbon leaves a book of instructions on "How to Play Buzz." Hank LaShota leaves with a winning smile that should carry him far. joseph Lovett leaves with regret. Ed Nowack leaves his car keys to the Philos and the Gavs. Bill Rogers leaves the Newman Club quite a job to find another equally active member. Frank Giddings leaves Dr. Percival wondering where all those questions came from. Gus Amaral leaves Coach Elliot hunting for an outside left. Ed Cunningham leaves for New Hampshire, where, we hear, the ceilings are higher. Joe Degulis leaves Dean Weston looking for a new assistant. George Olson leaves the quartet in dire straits. 3 N -5 . pre55CJ G L n U 8 nqgtx ry QQZY f 49' l 'Li.kf1f Q2 :eg .57 Y Q ? og! 521 :-7 :25, nl. X ui U I ,C 1 kg Q? I 4' 'o,, f 1 is 4. f 4 ll 'Sm- " ?Y?' 5' 'SESNSE' pfffaizl 9 Q A XM T gggggm iff? 6,CA,,,,, A ' if ggggaia 'Eiga 5 557,111 1 S 45,04 4 Q 3,674 C : 5421.51 ' E ' 6? Qooe LQQQQQX 'Q Ak! 0 Ska, 5 :GE .a 'S 5. P- A832 . E, , 6 6 A18 ' va 4 0 Q- 'L EQ m ., if of Bf2"5W?fZZff5 xx ,I wfsafe ' D 6 ,f.'., Sly -E Wi s 0 qv, ,gif 'ii ff M222 pw -r'.E'i Agbzef A, uccgey '-E2 76402 6 uf 553352 ea 6 I 44,73 f 2,3232 .avi 601- awe 4,646 Q9 Q 55540 415 22691264 xx I I Oki' Q' f Gy ef - C ,T Class Wjgnnlson rN"1 .. 19 V'-' V X, Nm f, J XA' N fgfff f N0f,T"e 0 N lv f. vy l 2 Xbxyx 4, Z K Q Q T ,JW ey ,Q I 'A x K um! N N W 6' 0 'iff ff f X f " I u 1 Q ' N X f W -x I 'IEW w. Mo-sf M-'29 fo ' f V jucceeol Ma H2 aff .Burke IN LY 5 A WI fic Z x I , , , j " fl' I, lv MN Gif? , bgu 44 ND KK ' N .E gilzgafa ,Q 3 Ki' j cfvfn B " r 1 If X i f x, . D , K .Q fA?7?g?5XX TZ Mop. riff :- ,, 4 , , II 1 W h -'issf 12.9725 M Sf GFS' A ll. 'fcffgzg Q G , 9341.-zffc :Ili I Joe Deegmnj X0 L'-rn f f N ff Q, 2 york Be IFE af 0 x so jp: glmh flfnlw x2 X qfvfivx. Q Y ' Q X f' V- X ' A -f xv Q AX X XX J " X. K-Aj 'U chff WCW Ewen! R,-104 ya o A ugh W MV vb I Fug K :fb - x 28? .mb R-r 0 -4 f, ls W frjm SS Ii CLA OPHOMOR S A 4 J,,.- - , .-'v ' 1 - x FT' QT'-"vs I' Q gi y Q mr ll 'N tkvg. -px . lvx 33 x , .- ..- 'ff NWT, - gr- -W --- 4 Y-- I"l -...A vi! -w-4 ca-4' :Ffa ,re 3 ,nr- izzdefzi 0-opemlz ve 01111011 james Theodores President Jeremiah Millane Vice-President y Ralph Gionet Secretary Maxwell Moczulewski Treasurer IA?-5212ia?VOr1an Freshman Representatives 1 Edward Sandomierski I , 9 Sally Healy K Sophomore Representatives l Kenneth Stone 1 . . l Jean Alletson junior Representatives 1 Margaret Gibbons I . . l Thomas Caimey S' Senior Representatives 1 l All undergraduate students of F.T.C. are members of the Student Co-operative 5 Association which was instituted to co-ordinate and consolidate students' extra- i curricular activities. lt supervises all matters pertaining to student life which do i not come within the jurisdiction of the facultyg to further in every way the spirit i of unity, co-operation, and loyalty among the students of our collegeg to increase their sense of responsibility toward one another, and to be a medium through l which the social and cultural standards of our college may be maintained on a T high plane. The legislative body of the association is the Student Co-operative Council l composed of four officers and eight representatives - a man and woman from each T of the four classes. This council is the organ through which the school affairs ' within the jurisdiction of the students are discussed and regulations proposed. Ll The Stick BOARD OF EDITORS Frank Harrigan Co-Editor Barney Harcourt Co-Editor Hank Cembalisty News Editor Ellen Bonitz Feature Editor Bob Curran Sports Editor Bill Burke Make-up Editor Ken Stone Business Manager Mr. Conlon, Mr. Hague Faculty Sponsors The 1948-49 Stick, in its second year of operation since its post-war reorgani- zation, once again endeavored to bring to the student body as complete a coverage of student activities as it is possible to record. It attempted, by its unbiased publi- cation of school news, to record for posterity those important events which are to become part of the history and tradition of the school. Through the medium of the editorial page it has attempted to bring to light, in a constructive manner, the petty group differences within the student body and to aid in the cultivation of a healthy school spirit. Into the sports and feature sections have been incorporated those items of extra-curricular interest that are so important to the college student. The policy of the Stick is as follows: 1. The Stick shall at all times act in the interest of the school and shall in no instance publish material which will in any way prove detrimental to the school's standing. 2. The Stick shall serve as an inter-school public relations organization, and in this way act to further school prestige. 3. The Stick shall publish an unbiased account of school news happenings. 4. The Stick shall encourage student opinion and aid in the development of an integrated school spirit. i 1 ' Q Y' -an gf ' EY' . 5 .V 1 X . .. N Student .. owne The Student Forum, under the guidance of versatile Miss Gertrude Cunning- ham, is always the organization that intrigues and somehow fascinates many per- sons. By this we mean that the various radio talks at the local radio station, WEIM, the round table discussions, and the debating teams seem to arouse the "soap box" instincts in the student. This past year the question for debate was the national college question of the year, namely, "Resolved, that the Federal Government Should Adopt a Policy of Equalizing Educational Opportunity in Tax-Supported Schools by Means of An- nual Grants." The Student Forum's list of many opposing debating societies include Holy Cross, Worcester Poly-Tech, University of Vermont, and the other State Teachers' Colleges in Massachusetts. The officers for the 1948-49 season are Chris Nikitas, President, Dolores Gi- rard, Vice-President, Allan Williams, Secretary, Mary Truland, Treasurer. "' -- l 2 To Kczlmz Society Bette Erickson President Carol Smith Vice-President Katherine Donovan Recording Secretary Madelyn Bovenzi Corresponding Secretary Patricia Garneau Treasurer Ruth Donovan 2 S Margaret A. Shea 5 Ponsors To Kalon Society, the first women's club on campus, was founded in 1946 for the purpose of fostering the high standards of the college and stimulating all school activities. The club's motto, "Gnothi Seauton," is cherished by the members and the aims and ideals of the group are embodied in this motto. "Toke Weekend" was the frolicking-rollicking weekend, set aside to initiate new members. The ghosts and goblins of I-Ia1lowe'en had nothing on the charter members when it comes to frightening wary pledges. "Fun-Nite," as the name implies, is a night of fun. The Mohawks and Tokes put away their books and took up their boots and saddles. Vi' it, humor and laughs permeated the atmosphere. We now travel from the ridiculous to the sublime, the sublime being the Toke assembly, at which time the Tokes gave Dr. Sanders a two-volume work en- titled "City of God." 3' lailocieflzic Society Ruth Vokey President Ellen Bonitz Vice-President Florence Donnelly Secretary Joan Carroll Treasurer Miss Lillian Tater Co-Sponsor Miss Elizabeth O'Connor Co-Sponsor In the year 1948-49, the Philodemics have successfully entered the social scene here at T.C. Their club assembly, an expertly staged reproduction of the old-time vaudeville type show, was appreciated as an excellent student presentation. An original Valentine Dance was run by the Philos, a dance at which the men were kings and the girls did a turnabout. This was planned to increase fun and spirit here at school, and Cupid and the committee certainly hit the bulls-eye. The Philodemics also took an active part in the girls' sports program by enter- ing the round-robin basketball tournament and finishing second, only bowing to the Gremlins. We hope that the word Philodemic will, to the student body, stand for fun, good sportsmanship and loyalty, not apart from, but with,a1l activities. I '--.Xl f 3 I F""- mnzcziic lub This year the Dramatic Club had the largest enrollment since pre-war days. With its many members and talent, old and new, the club is again up to its pre- war level of excellence. Under the expert guidance of Mr. Daniel Healy and the directorship of Thomas Convery, president, activities in all fields have been increased. The two major aims of the Dramatic Club are the developing of the talents of students who wish to act, and the organization of a good active working group whose interests are in back-stage work, scenery, costumes, make-up and the other things which go to make up a good thespian group. XVith its new equipment the club has been able to function even more smoothly than before. During the class of 19-i9's stay at T.C., both Miss Belle Nixon, who directed us our first year, and Mr. Healy, our present sponsor and director, have been of un- limited help. The hit play, "The Male Animal," presented in our junior year, will be long remembered for its success which we judge by the praise from all who attended. This year we presented "A Child is Born" at the Christmas assembly and as usual it was up to if not exceeding the usual standards of the club. We hope that after we have been long departed the club will continue on and reach unlimited bounds. We go wishing the members that we leave behind the best of luck for future years and our support for continued success. t A Xxhzti I5 :FI iB',!lllllllf' l Vlllhiln T I fxezwmzzz Club During the past year many students have taken advantage of the varied pro- gram provided for them by the Newman Club. The monthly meetings included the formal Ritual initiating new membersg prominent speakers such as Leonard Feeney, S.j.g carol singing at faculty homesg a Day of Recollection with a Paulist Fatherg and a Question Box conducted by Father XY'elz. The officers of the Newman Club for the years 1948 and 1949 were as follows: President, XY'illiam Rogersg Vice-President. Mary Trulandg Secretary, Judith O'Sheag Corresponding Secretary. Susan Vfagnerg Treasurer, Loring Caney. The Newman Club sponsor was Miss Gertrude Cummingham and their Chap- lain Rev. Wlilliam Vfelz. 1 A -P . 1, ,.N,:-,ff Stzzdefzt l97'Z'Sl'i6l7l Associczlimz Joan Lyell President Stanley Wheeler Vice-President Nancy Prouty Secretary Kenneth Skinner Treasurer Everett E. Koehler Faculty Sponsor Rev. C. Cassius Sturdy Chaplain The Student Christian Association is an organization affiliated with the New England Student Christian Association which is a fellowship of Protestant students and faculty groups devoted to the fostering of religious and social activities on the campus. The monthly meetings of the S.C.A. include programs devoted to speakers, movies, and discussions. An effort is made to incorporate a balance of religious and social activity at each one of our meetings. Meetings are held on the campus and in the various churches and at such places as Coggshall Park and The Cathedral of The Pines. Members of the organization may attend conferences, sponsored by the New England Student Christian Movement throughout the year, as well as the S.C.M, annual summer conference held at O-AT-KA, in Maine. R f nl Q WV? iw 1 Y C ,, fzveleeij Society The Gaveleer Society of the State Teachers' College, Fitchburg, is an organiza- tion native to the college and dates back to December, 1921, when it was formally chartered. The Fraternity's program centers around sports, intellectual and social pur- suits. These said areas of endeavor are set up with the idea of interest in general to the college and of value to the frat members personally. Dr. George E. Condike of the Science Department is the new Gaveleer Spon- sor. He is replacing Mr. Daniel Healy of the English Department, who, because of increased teaching and extra-curricular demands, had to resign. Mr. Hea1y's absence will be keenly felt and we should like to take this opportunity to thank him again for all the advice, assistance, and encouragement he has so freely and sincerely rendered us in the past. . The annual membership quota is set at thirty-live men. Present officers include: Edward Ahern, President, Walter Stanton, Vice- President and Acting President, Earl McDowell, Secretary, Calvin White, Treas- urerg and Thomas McDonough, Alumni Secretary. The Gavs interchangeably use the three Greek letters, Lambda, Phi, Sigma, which denote Leadership, Light, Strength. The Fraternity has incorporated these letters into its pin. The annual Gaveleer Assembly was one of an educational theme and was well received by the student body and faculty alike. The Gavs would like to take this last opportunity to wish its departing mem- bers and the graduates in general a sincere and heartfelt wish that the happy moments of our college days and the opportunities for knowledge and truth return to them manifold in their chosen profession. AMICI! .4 N olmwk lub John J. O'Malley Chief Francis N. Pelosi Medicine Man Francis O'Meara, jr. Scribe Maxwell Moczulewski Keeper of the Wampum Kenneth Skinner Alumni Secretary Michael Conlon, jr. Guide In the valleys of the Adirondacks in the upper part of New York State dwelt the great and noble Mohawk tribe of yesteryear. just as the Mohicans are extinct, so, too, have the Mohawks vanished into a bygone era. Clan and tribe, totem and medicine, peace pipe and tomahawk, the dances, the ceremonies, have gradually given way to the methods and manners of the white man. Twenty-five years ago, in a small section of a thriving metropolis in the upper reaches of Massachusetts, to be more specific, on or about the campus of the State Teachers' College at Fitchburg, there has sprung into existence the white man's modern counterpart of the long-gone Mohawk. This Mohawk of today, however, is far removed from the Mohawk of the past. Clad in the garb of ordinary citizens and students, these chosen few carry on proudly those attributes which had made their red brothers the magnificent race they were. This organization is essentially of social character, for in place of the peace pipe there is the traditional Initiation Week-end, when old members return to the campfire to greet the new "Hawks", in lieu of a ceremonial dance is the annual Gav-Hawk formal, a substitute for the warpath could be nothing less than Fun- Nite, the annual presentation of the Mohawk Club and the To Kalon Society. All is not frivolity with this club, for it has its serious side also, culminating in the promotion of all things beneficial to the college student, specifically, in- creased social welfare for the students, professional advancement, proficiency in athletics and co-operation with the alumni. The qualities that mark a true Mohawk of today are represented by the letters in the club by-word, SOANGETAHA. 5 , l ,M l 1 Y , I L K 1 sl Pi' 3 fig? gg.yE .54 H ' T-4 'T all I l . xg . ' , Y 'I ol. .2 ' y L ,X ' " ' QL y 4 l l l , '..,. ' rib.: if if 1 2 'xi I 'tr- Ur 3 O ,fa ,Jf"'-1-wi "AJ W M fri? soteric Society The Esoteric Society of Fitchburg State Teachers' College is established for the primary purpose of constantly improving the human relationships in the stu- dent body of this college. Improvement of human relationships includes the fostering of proper college spirit, the extension of social opportunity through participation in extra-curricular activities and recognition of human merit as the proper basis for esteem. This society, by the pursuit of these aims in its member- ship. strives to set an example for the college at large. In regard to its activities, there are few among the upper-classmen who will forget the revival of the old minstrel days as demonstrated by "That Black Gang." The society's consistently high standing in athletics is another example of their ability to set the pace in the Intramural League. This year the club is sponsoring the Tennis Trophy to enliven individual competition and to foster friendly rela- tionship. The annual formal dinner dance brings to a close the participation of the society in campus activities. The officers of the Esoteric Society for this year are: Horace Allen President Don York Vice-President Bill Kennedy Secretary Dick York Treasurer psilmz Pi Tau Professor Arthur E. Purinton Trustee Victor J. Ciesla President Thomas McDonough Treasurer Calvin j. White Secretary Epsilon Pi Tau is an international honorary professional fraternity whose activities function in the fields of Industrial Arts and Vocational Industrial Educa- tion. The ideals to which this fraternity is pledged are: to recognize the place of skill in our democratic societyg to promote social proficiencyg to foster, counsel, and publish the results of research in the fields of Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. bb 0 Glee lub George Olson President Catherine Donovan Vice-President Robert Calkin Treasurer Roberta O'Rourke Secretary Activities presented by the Glee Club were an Autumn Assembly and an April Concert and Operetta Program. J A v wav it I ri Club The Art Club this year holds meetings every Tuesday afternoon, presided over by Florence Donnelly, President, and assisted by Jeannette Roberge, Vice-Presi- dent, and Florence Rowe, Secretary-Treasurer. During the year there are always several exhibits in the lobby downstairs. either of childrens work or the work of a well-known contemporary, or a current exhibit. The success of the Art Club is due to Miss Conlon, who so ably and helpfully assists us in all our undertakings, and we herewith wish to express our thanks to her. X 1 Arthur Keller Robert Anderson Nancy Hult Carl Sector Miss Haskins he ki lub President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Advisor The F.T.C. Ski Club offers opportunity for outdoor activities by holding an annual ski meet in which interclass competition is encouraged. It presents a trophy to the winning class. Also, this club sponsors ski trips for the benefit of all stu dents. The aim of the Ski Club is to foster good sportsmanship in competition ak, Luv -, S Commzzfizzg omezzfs mm' Ann Doyle President IQ S . R t t. es Madelyn Bovenzi Vice-President S emor epresen a lv lagilsiglgiant 5 junior Representatives Patricia Lilly Sophomore Representatives Nancy Gent sc h Emily Bunker I He1enMuHinS X s. FreshmanRepresentatives Commuting Women's Board meets with Miss Bradt and works with her for the welfare of its members. They help to make the hours of recreation more pleasant. The locker rooms, smoking room, and lunch room are taken care of by this group. ommzztifzg e1z's ssocizzfimz Rene Rheault President Richard Porter Vice-President Edward W. Connolly Secretary-Treasurer A. Robert Le Blanc Senior Representative Cornelius Sharron Junior Representative Robert Hutchinson Sophomore Representative Reino Sandberg Freshman Representative Dean Weston Faculty Advisor The Commuting Men's Association is made up of men who live off the campus. This Association was founded by Dr. Harry S. Percival in 1931. At that time a group of students furnished a room on the lower floor of the school. There elec- tions were held, activities planned and discussed. It now also serves as a lounge where students find relaxation through conversation, good music, and extra- curricular games of chess and bridge. Last year found the members of the Commuting Men's Association participat- ing in the intramural baseball competition, while in the 19-i7-48 basketball season the C.M.A. hve was successful in winning the intramural championship. ff" ,hx . E7 6' f iller all Grace Hanley President Ellen Bonitz Senior Representative Helen Dery junior Representative Marion Chesnick Sophomore Representative Arlene Bonitz Freshman Representative This year Miller Hall, the happy home of seventy potential school teachers, has had a number of good times which will be cherished memories in the years to come. The first week of college the Freshman initiation party informally introduced the newcomers to Miss Bradt and the upper classmen. The deepest gratitude of the resident girls is extended to Miss Gertrude E. Bradt for her untiring interest and co-operation in the activities of Miller Hall throughout the entire school year. dimer Hal! Board john j. O'Malley President Francis O'Meara, jr. Secretary Lawrence Walsh Treasurer john Donovan Senior Representative Zolton Csicsek junior Representative Edward Sandomierski Sophomore Representative Paul Healy Freshman Representative Palmer Hall has long been recognized as a sanctuary for men. Under the leadership of our proctor, Mr. Holmes, who is preserving the democratic rule of our former sponsor, Mr. Randall, the Palmer Hall Board acts as the duly elected governing body. The right of the individual to have peace and quiet is stressed by the Board. Monthly meetings are held to give any resident an opportunity to make construc- tive suggestions that will help us all. Restrictions are few, opportunities to mature are many, co-operation and harmony are stressed. The Palmer Hall Club sponsors athletic games, card games and the annual House Party at Christmas time. Small, inexpensive presents are exchanged at the Christmas Party and entertainment by members of the House is presented for the enjoyment of all. K omezfs tlaletic ssocirzliozz Marguerite johnson President Catherine Lorden Vice-President joan Carroll Secretary Mary jennison Treasurer The Women's Athletic Association started its activities for the year by intro- ducing the board members at the annual assembly. Under the leadership of Miss Bolger the Board presents a varied program of sports for the women of the college. In co-operation with the Department of Physical Education, it strives to promote the highest standards of health and sportsmanship. Awards for the 1948 Badminton Tournament were presented to the winners at the first meeting of the W.A.A. Board in September. Winners of the coveted trophies for the mixed doubles were Betty Hassett and Phil Breault, and for the women's doubles, Ellen Bonitz and Beverly King. The popularity of tennis playing on the campus has been shown by the num- ber of students who enthusiastically participated in this sport during the fall and spring. Crisp fall afternoons found a group of eager girls out on the junior High School athletic field for hockey practice. In competition with a skilled team from Lowell Teachers' College, the F.T.C. girls met defeat after a fast-moving, well- played game. The traditional Green and White game ended with a tie score, which showed how well matched the players were. The underclassmen are looking forward to playing on the new athletic field when it is ready for use next fall. The round robin basketball tournament played this season held the interest of the entire college. The finalists in the tournament were the Gremlins and the Philodemics, with the Gremlins as victors. Other highlights of the W.A.A. sports season were the Freshman Rally, held at the Brook, the Sports Day, held at Bridgewater Teachers' College, and the bas- ketball games with Clark University. lV.A.A. Board Captain of White Team. Ellen Bonitz Head of Hockey, Eunice Delay Captain of Green Team, Marion Chesnick Head of Tennis, Ruth Vokey Heads of Basketball, Suzanne Forster, jo-anne Head of Badminton, Shirlie Rice Berndtson Head of Hiking, Florence Donnelly Head of Volle 'ball Maril 'n Zins Senior Representatives. joan Lyell, Margaret 3' Q 5 Head of Softball, joan Kenney Gibbons K? si-f WDQVH- ,, 'T vp--, M! GREMLINS - INTRAMURAL CHAMPIONS BASKETBALL Navi' I f X 'G' A M., , . ' 1 ff, X 2 A s 4 '-Q J- 1. 57 'L -P-. Q, v gi - Q5 .. - I f x 1 I f VOLLEYBALL - XVHITE TEAM VOLLEYBALL - GREEN TEAM T7 . ' ' . ' x 2 1 v 1 X 3, XZS-g1 ljX!, L E ..,4 14 5 E 1 0 'X -'C P3 6 -'N ,- 0 W I 1 F7 ,, ,. , "I R2 I I I I I 5 I l ,:" . I, 1, 1 1 5. ' II f Ji 7 1 I r VF' X 15" 5' X491 : ,W ' ,z f I ff ' i gf I V 5- R ,I J.. ...:" Hiking. J 1 u. 'mv' ' " F-fr-1' BADMINTON I .11- I U I 5 5 . I v I '1 Hi xx v IN- 5 I I 9 1 I I Head of Badminton Green and Ilnbite Team Captains SHIRLEY RICE MARION CHESNICK-ELLEN BONITZ P 5 ,f .ig sf' J, 'I -f 1 Q V! , '25-f i dv-... X sr xiii, fllefz '5 tfaleiic ssocizztiozz A very successful intramural basketball league was carried on with keen rivalry prevailing among the eight teams participating. The teams entered were: the Epicureans, Eager Beavers, Mohawks. Commuters, Gaveleers, Raymond, Slow Seven, and Freshmen. The varsity basketball team carried a J. V. team with them this year. W'hen a visiting team did not carry J. V.'s, the preliminary game was played between the J. V.'s of T. C., and one of the intramural teams. This added color to the intra- mural teams and often proved a good contest for the J. V.'s. After a successful basketball season for the Intramural League, the board is looking forward to a successful Intramural Softball League. Last year's teams pro- vided much excitement and good fun for both participants and spectators. The way things are now taking shape, the game ought to be more exciting than last year. - N.. 0 12:-sf' OCCEI' Bob Elliot Coach Maxwell Moczulewski Captain Playing an eight-game schedule against strong opposition, Bob Elliot's Green and White soccer team enjoyed a highly successful season with five wins and three losses. Wins included: Bridgewater, 5-2, Clark, l-0, Keene, 2-l, Suffolk U., l-Og Rhode Island C. E., 5-2. Losses: M.l.T., 5-2, University of Mass. iDevensl, 3-2, Keene, 3-2. It would be impossible to pick out any one man and claim that he was the star, but it is possible to mention a few that were outstanding members of a smooth- running club. Max Moczulewski, again an outstanding goalie, atomic-toed Bill Sullivan, the iron man, playing eight full games, Snow, Kirkorian, Degulis, Marshall, Vennberg, the Ahearn brothers, Nowaki, and King, equally versatile with head and feet. Dick York and jack Rajala, high scorer and runner-up. Coach Elliot, though losing jack King, Ed and George Ahearn, Vennberg, Gus Amaral, George Kirkorian, joe Degulis, Fran Pelosi, Ralph Gionet, and Tom Cairney, is well supplied with replacements for next year and is looking forward to an even better season. The coach will have Moczulewski, York, Snow, Sullivan, Rajala, Shaw, Stone, Cluff, Nowaki, Erickson, Rowland, Mailman, the Convery brothers, and Curran. jerry Snow and Bill Sullivan are the co-captains-elect for the 1949 season. I 5 3,9-nj fzsketbfzll W'illiarn Provenzani Coach Robert Elliot Athletic Director jerry Millne Captain The Green and XX'hite Falcons played an eighteen-game schedule. The games were all close and. from the spectator's point of view, very thrilling, but close doesn't count and only the final score enters the record book. The team just couldn't click at the right times and consequently was not as effective a group as was possible. Standouts included Millane. Farrar. Sandomierski. Erickson, Keosis. Rege. Degulis, and Harrington. These boys should be admired for their "never say die" spirit. Millane and Degulis will be the only ones lost through graduation and Coach Provenzani is already grooming their replacements in order to haye an all-yeteran Squad next year. GAVELEERS - XVinners of the Intramural Competition S-le w, ' - ,..,, 'Q ' P i 3' t' A amy - . -xx v. , -'57-,I 'im fm ' - -2 'J f EN Q ' Q .1 u-. ' X .V 'A . g N' , X M " ff,-at , 311, ii- I . ,ku 5.1-sgf,':f ' f Q - g,1! 3 " 155.5 P"?if f ' 1 -L., 'AE Lvl? 'W '- O -np: C -. . px 'Wi . K ' .L ' fx 1 bv M5043 fl rv- , as I f nl x A ri y . I5 . ' Alf: 1 ..4 -fn , Fri, 'u 1 ' 1 A N N 5 i 'AR 2 In? 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