Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA)

 - Class of 1948

Page 1 of 102

 

Fitchburg State University - Saxifrage Yearbook (Fitchburg, MA) online yearbook collection, 1948 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 102 of the 1948 volume:

lg N if iv J A 1 o p J 1 ' 4 . H nn., , awww- ge fi iii 4""frs 41-1 - X axifr ge Etclaburg State Teachers College V ,TKNNQ w., 'V ' '- I I ,' Il . 'T 'I 5 ..,. s T F 'V 11 -.s X , 1f,s.4,, 0.4: j" .A NN. . . -uf" , S ' , , 1 21 5' ' ' 1, 0l"8 lfU0lf' ln this, the l948 Volume ot the Sdxitroge, the Editoricrl hoard presents to you or record ot your college lite, its study dnd hdrd work, its fun ornd friendships, its hopes ond dchievements. Moy it in the future help to bring book delightful memories ot the yedrs spent dt ETC. THE SAXIFRAGE BOARD AoKNowLEDoMENrs Cweorqe F. Condike lvlichoel l, Conlon Clifford W, Haque Rolph F. Weston Robert Proulx STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE FITCHBURG, MASSACHUSETTS voLuME XXVI JAMES P. GRAY Editor V.. - U 0... N 1- ' X Q 2 'X-.4,,,,?l N w 5- .- 2,5 F :N ' U ' s. F,-P - .5 . 4 ' X wx! X 1 1 'x x ' - K NTT?- if 'qv Q X ii , X - ' " . X xxx 1 . f., fy, 5 - N l ' . Q ' 1 1 . , . N 55 'X ,, A 7' 1' 1 .17 my v X Q X wx, N' wg. 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LQ s 1-A I- K S kg 1-E-4 4--4 6 Efizl 3 I fi li -'-H ,W -, , if "1-if" .- f- sff,,-:t-r- I I I tho'ts of un-taught youth soared high,While on-ly joy came nigh.'Twas then with vi-sion clear we if suc-cess with us climbs high While on-ly joy comes nigh, 'Tis then, in plightor might,we'll , 1-ann 'ta as etfai' fi"1"fr'2'i-. -Q2 H1141 it-'FI if ,Q--big? 'E i' is V K P E 'Iii Vniiiie i2 a T15 I Y N - N I fi eieeeeei-2-1-eeesqeaferf A f ' szisff gli -D5-r-0--P -yn 2-0-Eilkelllg g '-0--y-I-jj, "lf: l' I I V V Vi' V' chose,And to that choice rise- Thy spir-it nev - LQ.1- 41-1-,Q we rose, W 61' ith cour-age strong and hearts of song To car - ry thy ideal on, dies-With courage strong and hearts of song To car - ry thy ideal on. . ' 'N Q 1 5-iii 55569 111"".".1 , -A - - -. - - -., .- - - - - -5225111-C-riitibiiiiiga-K-7H2-Pwiip-ili!I,'L":'5g 113: our nerr r F n: 1:4 ' I -ey-P4 +L v V I J CHORUS 9 I Estee si-J ERP fn f-fi' 4-Eleigpfgrijiiit Liv: itgglgijg Q2:!j1SE1'S-i -iii " ,F ' 2: l-v-gg So Flag of Al -ma Ma- ter Boat, One-ter-nal wings of praise, For thee un-numbered hosts to-day ,-A Hn'1-1 Q-Q-14-L 1-1-1-e- 'S'-'S'-P-A R-1-1+ i-iii jigijhii-lI?L1jEI1 I: 1: 5-922 P7 Vigiiiifgtiiiiiiz lr' 'rrr1:1e::::f:f- : L ' p i z - s : :+,::g.:t:: l V v 1 v v v V v . J - .. --- - - A .L bidntfiifijmeag- fgji. lsZL?,f:L,i,-fg1iligijffgii ..S':giS- sggfiigleii I I Their will -ing voic-es raiseg'1'hru-out theworldtheir ti-ny flame From thyquicklightstillgleams, 1 p 1 12' E. Q-,amo-,a-1- ,Q-Q4-Q- 4,1-1-Q- an -gbjgi gitigig- 1I'SmPAiiiiii-,EiE.El:,l-Lxggfggiggijiil ' ig 1glV'WZ' -hfil?-fi'-,2 ,Ji I:-C L i ,f V ,Q F-I-- FSM N tz 1 .i -J 1 J- ie 715 -L be Li J11,-.n el'- Elrgi 13: if Q gjfgffijjjfsfg-:f2.lijiEFPQZg.'iE:,-ji'1arFg'I 7 7 e le--,e4V,5af H -0-Q 9 0 QF V LV -- While youth and ago u - nit- ed claim The home where for-tune beams, The home where fortune beams. 0- 41- 'lea apes M s"'.l' '51 ,Me ., - .Q - ph-- gif Q5 ig! ig rs: i -FEW 9 i 5? For i lg? '11 9 ' :Mmm Vo,g7r's'Tii 9-Iii iI451ig!wLU1i 5 V V V V v V V V l l lb IOSEPHINE A. BGLGER To Miss Boiqer, Whose ever wiiiinq quiddnce dnd understdndinq ds d Cidss Sponsor hdve been of imrnedsurdbie dssistdnce, we qrdte- fully dedicdte this book. GEORGE F. CGNDIKE IOSEPHINE A. BOLGER Yearbook Co-Advisor M 505 Yearbook Co-Advisor ' 7 151535 bil' M Yi. m' fix a Q ff! f .i A lrir fx Qs DR. WILLIAM l. SANDERS Your class is distinguished in several ways. You are the largest postwar class to graduate, you number among your membership the first graduates of the tive year nursing course, and you are entering your respec- tive protessions ot teaching and nursing at the most opportune time in the history ot either profession. The leadership you are trained to otier is sorely needed by your state and nation, and it is my wish lor you that you discharge your responsibilities as leaders with the same alacrity that you accept the privilege ot leader- ship. Heartiest congratulations to you! 3, .,, 5 .ww 2 1 fy QA GERTRUDE E. BRADT Deon of Women GRACE GUMMO Director Nursing Education g IAMES i. HAMMOND A yy, Director of Industrial Arts + 'f th'-f' I - t Sn ROGER F. HOLMES '43 Director of Trczininq 'Q W ' f in?" ,, L- we 'U aw, , ,Y.':.a' ,...ug:..f:5g.. H , 'iii f " X 'K V. -.' 1:. "5 '1"7":' 5 'A'-' Q jf HARRY F. PERCIVAL Director of Groduote Study RALPH E. WESTON Deon of Men 4-- Gs M. .la ix ' - lazy ,lg 'luv' xx O f"' DR. WILLIAM I. SANDERS MICHAEL I. CONLON Philosophy F Philosophy .T I GERTRUDE E, BRADT .df EClLlCClilOIl ,.n---. HARRY F. PERCIVAL ROGER E. HOLMES Measurement and Psychology Education ff '.'Q l f"1 ,Av N '-Y? 'L 4-1. ,4x V ' 5 S, - , .,s 2' h ,Of '." . 1' 'A ffafu ' " Ql A , wx V T .' Q I l A s I. , r. if I D I 5 4. sg-QN MMG INDUSTRIAL ARTS WALTER E. HARROD ECKHART A. IACOBSEN CLIFFORD w. HAGUE EVERETT E. KOEHLER LAWRENCE E. LANDALL JAMES I. HAMMOND ARTHUR E. PURINTON ENGLISH BELLE M. NIXON DANIEL L. HEALY Com LL HASSELL ARTS HELEN M. WEYMOUTH. RICHARD L:- KENT, FLORENCE D. CONLON. i SCIENCE AND MATH. DEPT. YWHI5 H.f'+.I'1Tffxl.I., 'ZllfDI'R'f5E P' f..'UINJIWlKIf, ELIEAUETII M. HASKINS, HMPH VVEST4' N ' Ig, ...P .e- ,X .N . I z I"""A"" I 4 3? ,- X' fo f 5 N9' -02 I , 3, V. , 'ai 1 fa ffigff, H E 'aff ,ga - 40"- . "':II" "' J X x4.,,g f "" .,+ 1 - 4 ' V' ' , vii, A -- .1 . 6 SOCIAL SCIENCE ANNA G. E. sI:I.I:I.1oNs CQRNELIUS 5. DQNQGHUE ARTHUR C, HARRINGTCN, I.1i:H.aEL I. CCNLQ jg' 'Q 1 'N HL' -,gl PHYSICAL EDUCATIGN IOSEPHINE A. ECLGEF 3055? 5. ELLZCT X Q if Vy UQ ' Vi E """"ir EDGERLY SCHOQL ELMA M. IOHNSON, NRITA FOLEY, ELIZABETH QUATTLANDER, LOUISE WINGATE, IRENE L. SMITH "."xTIIIIRIII'II' I' DILLON SCNHOCL 1 WESTQN, MARION E, ANTHONY IUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PHILIP A. MQMURRAY, FREDERICK W, I .IN' IQKOIEE, ISEEPH E. I,IIIffER.WC GERTRUDE CUNNINGHAIV1, EDWIN CLARK, LILLIAN TATER 3, I JJ , Xxx-Q. ADMINISTRATICDN CLAIRE 1. EOECKH, HELEN BACHELDEH rwmm' T, CCURTNEY RAUHA v. WAYRYNEN. pg-4 - ' S., ,, mu. ' 1 V , f ,X 're 1 5 ."i- 1 v H ' -I Q1 1 J tv ,La Q K' I x 1,1 ,fl "I . n 1 Q ' I 1 ' 1 . 2 s ur f Ni vw '. it Lia ,,1 1 , , 'ft' 'Ki .9 Q ' xp., K , , gl. lx 4 1 - fa i x' - , gf 8 ' I vis V A u - fl 1 v 1 I . K H ' .P p ' E r I . 5 Q if if 'QW' n Q 's I 2 I ,., I V - i M J , v Ut' I I III I niors KENNETH E. BOCKUS lUNlOR HIGH Research historian prodiay . . . leader par excellence . . . rnaster of any situation . . . "do or die' '... pipe fanatic . . . talented tease . . . desirable dancinq partner . . . serious purpose . . . ardent defender of cer- fafl tain upcountrv locales . . . multitude of yas' friends . . . Arnici. Class President 2, 7, 45 Student Council 2: Vice- President Comniuters Council Eg Board Director 3, 4g Gaveleer 3, 4. F5 f if rf' pf' PRESIDENT MARILYN M. KILLELEA ELEMENTARY - Demure . . . expressive eves . . . elusive charrn . . . innate finesse . . . irnaainative . . . arnlaitious . . . intellectual reservoir . , . a staunch Spa supporter . . . natural funster with Davroom specialties . . . wears a reserved sian on her personality . . . still waters run deep . . . Gnothi Seauton. Cl' 'mltll' l 2, 1' "l: Art 'Eluh Al: lllfwnifiri Club l, 7 '7' flq Rtiflt Tri lffil n Emi' fxlass Secretary 47 llffltfw' lg Rmvliiia l, fi, -lp l-liltina R, E SECRETARY lULlE A. CLOUGHERTY ELEf'.lEN7.l.RY Qutstandina executive abilitv . . . pop- ular . . . epitome ot versatility . . . stylist . . . spontaneous sense of humor . . . ounaent wit . . . tlashinq dimples . . . admirable aualities . . . Rockport enthusiast . . . T.C.'s Eleanor Roosevelt via Clinton . . . Cfnothi Seauton. Class Tice-President P 44 Coziiniuiters Board 2 F 4, Rresiden' 4- TC Kaitlin F 4 Prespjient -2' E".7.,5.i.R. Board 2 3 -2: ,lj Club ' 2 P it Sfifk 2, P 4- Nei.-:man Club l 2 F 4' Frirnfztii Club 44 Sax Bind 4- Co- Rei 2 7' Cliairtiiiri l.'."rtifris Parquet -1: Cf'-Chiin mvirri 'uriiir PYRITT' A" CNlTI'f!f'L"1f. Fetiitr .5,ssemElv1 C:- Chairnian Hafi'-'een Pwrife T Hiikejf l Q 3 43 Vo'levbf1lll 7- Eff-'liral ' R -1 VICE-PRESIDENT Bi Q C ., -- Q - rig ,- If iv i!,'g.Q.: " 3 ::'- pm Yi t l 1 'Q' my ... faq, v 1 ft AUX 4" RICHARD C. WHlTE Tall lanky athlete . . . modest and per severing . . . outdoor sportsman . . . re sponsible and reliable . . . subtle humor . . sharp dresser . . . shes and slciis ot X eaual interest . . . spontaneous ioviality . . boyish charm . . . loeanpole bustler . . definitely popular . . . Carnival Kina . . Spanqetaha. li. ..w.A. -bard C Judi.. C -z ,C.4-b.-. ,C bS.-o...,.1 Fume as ,au 1'- fl: 'Q iii i TREASURER KENDALL F. ADA MS TIfW?I"T"'?-'A' L-df' SNICMOLIS Ha-if kV'CIT+L.'T of the Pm F ' " State . . . frie1'1CHiziess pers iJ:1fied ami alile , - - 1Cv1aT C"fTT1If1f'II'lfCI'1 . . . A ure Hated efilciemcy , . . ccmseieuti, Calm, umuffled disgifinsitifm . . , qm mecimfir . . . degvermifdnle . . . cvixrf 111 1 is perienced ieacher . . . LA. tw the P in I" 4-E 3 ' H ...Z , " , x . , N .', I Q Q. . En xv U . " f- 7' . ..., g P 'K-V' gif ' ' "ff, r ' . I 9 - I P 1. .P ' ' IOHN A. APONE INDUSTRIAL ARTS Unafflmal Mohawk ambassador . . . hav- 1sh, nawe . . . Colorful sense af humor . . hah spmted . . . excess af f,l1,1b spmt . . . dynamo af enerqy . . . nanchalam . . . araumeutative . . . dispenser af qeneral aaad W111 . . . athlete and spartsmau. 9 6 s 1, 1 WN 'qfrsff MARY E. BICKFORD ELEMENTARY Deliahttul laugh . . . outstanding athletic ' if ability . . . whiz on the basketball cour . . . positive assertions . . . unique sense of humor . . . casually colleaiate . . . re mains PAT on all subjects . . . wide circle ot friends . . . distinctive penman . . . aal axy ot cultural talents. Basketball l, 2, 3, 4, Hockey l, 2, '35 Volleyball l 2, 3, Badminton 2, 3, 4, Softball 45 W.A.A. Board 3 4, Class Secretary 3, Glee Club 1, 2, 45 Choral En semble 4, To Kalon 45 W.A.A. Conference 35 Coelctec 3, Campus Fellowship 3, Co-Chairman Senior Prom. t . A., 1 :sf ' t . . ' Y' Q, ,, . 'Tia K 'Q A If S I 'li ? T E235 L , "' ,., - ..g . F54 . ' N " ,,., -,fi U e U ,fbi n O f EVELYN R. BOUBGAULT NUBSlNG EDUCATION That qirl we always hear and see bub- blinq over with vitality . . . present in every activity . . . always a friendly smile tor everyone . . . hCIDDY addition to any party . . . most sincere . . . dependable in every way . . . pioneer in Nursina Education. W,A,.A. Board 2, Vicefpresident 2, Hockey l, 25 Dramatic Club 2, Glen Club l, 2, Ensemble 2, New- man Club l, 2, Volleyball l, 2, Basketball l, 2, 4, Bowling l, 2, Art Club 25 Badminton 4. ii 5 ' c ' s , . J- ev-n-Q.. w -sq 'V THERESA R. CARCHIDI ELErl.mti.aR'i' lAMES P. BRUEN INDUSTRIAL ARTS New Hampshire wit in a Massachusetts settina . . . dry humor timely expressed . . attributes of modesty and friendliness . . easyqoina . . . "Calm is he who knows is ways" . . . exponent of philosophy. Palmer Hall Board, Secretary 3, President 4: Mo- hawk 2, 3, 4g Secretary 3: Glee Club l, 2, EH 45 Co- hairman Gay-Hawk Dance 3. F Q I 1 , o fel X lx Pun to he with . . . friendly . . . easy laugh jitterhua addict athletic in- terests . . . eneraetic in all she does . . . informal manner theatre authority . . loyal . . . ready for anythina. H rkriv 1, Q! -1, -lg E".','.iI1f'l 1,2 1 45 WA. A. Blind C :Bt IEANETTE A. CARLSON NURSING EDUCATION ' Came down the "rud apiece" from the hills ot Vermont to captivate the hearts with her giggle H Smile M 10119 WUVY blonde tresses . . . versatility personified , . . petite heartbreaker . . . pioneer in the Nursing Education course. Glee Club l, 2: Tennis 2: l-locket' lf 2- ,,.... JW' IRENE I. CARROLL ELEMENTARY Sunny unrutlled disposition . . . hearty catching laugh . . . keen sense ot hurnor . . . fun loving . . . reliable friend . . . loyal rooter . . . well liked . . . carefree . . . always co-operative . . irrepressible . . . pretty little song bird. Cflee Club l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, Ensemble 2, 3, 47 Art Club 47 Ski Club l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4, To Kalon 45 Newman Club l, 2, 3, 4, Hockey l, 2, 3, 4: Bad- :ninton 2, 3, 4, Softball l, 25 Volleyball l, 2, Miller Hall Board l. 4 . ali 3 l.. s' QQ Y ri 3 ti' fi- n' r ,1 1' . . 3" I , 5' 'JU I . ' ,,'.. , . 5 .1 7-ff 1 ' wmgwx--f-.1 fr.. ,n "sm", fl if IQHN F. CASEY lNFUSThl.iil. ARTS Colorful expressions . . . rugged indi- viducrlist . . . nictster of the ditty "The fun is just beginning" . . . steomrnroller tullbgck on the soccer tecrrn . . . ever-recrdy gn- swers . . . originator of delcryed dction. l.Iohd',-.rlzs 3, 45 Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4g Soccer l, 3, 4. l 0 Pi LS s, x I. i THERESA G. CASEY EL ri it E N i' Colm unruitled disposition . . . short in stcrture, but tcrll in stondcrrds . . . generous gs dciylight . . . hcrhitucrlly unhurried . . . chief pilot lor Floncrggns hecxps . . . on crnihition to ccipture sleep . , . interested tourist in Philosophy clcrss . . . lVlc1niie's wcrrden. If,-1-fvp -yi "lub 1' Civ!-1 Club lg l-liking l. 1 .,. W srffs O- ' 'CP' l ANTHONY V. CIPRIANO INDUSTRIAL ARTS Excellent teacher material . . . voice of rare quality . . . business-like in scholastic search . . . flair tor enjoyina life . . . cheer- ful disposition . . . qenerous nature . . . a practical rnind . . . enerqetic . . . de- pendable and co-operative. Epsilon Pi Tau 2, 3, 45 Gziveleer l, 2, 3. -lf Newman Club l, 2, -1, Treasurer 2: Chairman 'Winter Carnie val Ball 2. 523 , P l ez:-'f-' 2:23-7 Pl-IYLLIS E. CGNNERS VJNICF HIGH Practical minded . . . conservative tastes brisk as loreeze . . . rnost tirne-minded of clock watchers . . . ltfiller Hall angel . . . ueoqraphy gem . . . athletic specialist rnurder with a hockey stick . . . a ccn- stant corrector of Ccnners handle. ...ft.fi. scart. 4, .l...er l-tall ooara -lg Qgxizrm -ard 47 Slee Club l, 2 S 4: Hijkex' I Q 3 5 lx? X lftsx X 'iq X t XQHJ sl- '. 5 ' A 'I . . Q- U d v ,1- IAMES P. CCDONEY iumion Hiott Easy arin . . . handsome . . . diqnitied . . . diplomatic . . . desirahly attable a qood sport . . . suhtle humor . . . well poised . . . strona will . . . deep under- standing . . . soap Carver ot note "Classy Corn" beneath a veil ot Calm "Hits The Spot." Gmvelnf'rs 2, 3, 4g Newinan Club 3. RUSSELL R. COOK lNDUSTRlAL ARTS Sunny disposition . . . easy qoinq . . speedball athlete . . . lively, hearty man ner . . . Scotty's constant worry . . . im partial . . . kinq ot the pinqponq crew . . l.A. prodiqy . . . master of all situations. Epsilon Pi Tau 3, President 45 Gave-leer 2, 3, 4 Chairman Cwav-Htrwk Dance 35 Campus Fellowship 3 Cfwinniuters Board 4, v N '- . im 4-u.,A4 mx ' X 9 HAROLD S. COREY INDUSTRIAL ARTS Mon ot mony hobbies . . . versotile oth- lete . . . oriqinol thinker . . . Colm, deep, unrutfied motnner . . . enerqetic Worker . . . unpretentious . . . subtle humor . . . corri- dor customer . . . toctful opinionist . . orqumentotive copobility . . . sincere in C111 undertokinqs . . . mosculinity personi- fied. F?" ': in it i ith WH, +V' . 'ima M ' ig --1 I A- P1 '21 if fx' ' A , 1 n' 4 ' ' u ' ' - . -V . . Q , ,...-at , . 4.1- RALPH A. CURRAN IUNIOR HIGH Neot otppeoronce . , . cosmopoliton . . executive monner . . . credtive drtist . . . "Dali" dbihties . . . individuolist . . . de- termined . . . qorruious conversotionohst . . . stimuidtinq personolity. Dromoitic Club 1, 'Zz Goveieers 2, 3, 45 Stick 3, 4. ' U - X ff . ' 1 Ax A . . 1 5 S . ,' --f nt- 4 ,mx AS r ik .i - -X 5 N . , N' , I i i - 'Y 1 , . ' ' 49' -1 ' t A- xvv?tt ftgb, Y . FA f1:'.! 'Q :- V i' , 5 .. 3 5.',kX -, , ' i , rf'0'RlQ,, ' ,ut , 1 ' -71, - . Mt, V x. t- K' DAVID M. DANTQNIC lNDUSTlilAL ARTS Quiescent, modest, reserved . . . im mune to perturbation . . . draftsman par ex Cellenoe . . . "lack-of-all-trades" . . . out door enthusiast. Mi hawks il, 4, 4 f' WI! 1 it r- A ' ' : '5 -4 ,. ,,5 M 3: 'uf ,5-. tad ' , " 7' ew : l lj! , 5. 5 M -n f x y Q l . 1 t 1 ,Y K, e A K ANNE G. DRISCOLL El,ElxlEltlTAH'1' Able defender ot own convictions . . . informal manner . . . dynamite on a team . . . bustlinq bundle ot business . . . ready partner in any undertaking . . . staunch supporter ot Clinton . . . aets around as easily as a cold. Ulf" 'fltitv l 7 3g V.f,.A.A.. '1r,l 2, il, Secretary 33 'D' 2 lffg Hf'.fTl1+,",1 l, 2, fl, 4: Easlzfitball l, 2, 3, -lf V llleyl' ill l, fi, 45 Bfitwliria l, QV, -15 Swftbzll l, 2, 45 B l'l!Ti1l'.l'I'. 7 H -lg N'D".'t'IIl'iI1 Club l, Fl, 4: Dra- m 111.5 flirty 1 QT, 'g Art tfluln l gf Stiidfnt Forurn l. 2-. EVERETT l. EASTMAN lUNlCR HIGH Driving executive . . . cogent deloater . . . alert mind with discriminating sense of values . . . courage of his own convictions . . . excellent scholar with a flair for math and science . . . accomplished thespian . . . challenger of tradition anytime . . . extremely well poised. Gyreleer -lp .lisscczate Ejitcr Saxifrzge 4- Dramatic Club E, -1, President 4. K - , U. ?""".. 22 xf.: A I ft' v X- I X J' Q ,x I Ki-K r I 3 'Q '-Q , 1- , g 8 '25 5 lk ' I CLIVE CONSTANCE EMERY Sports enthusiast . . , accomplished eauestrienne . . . artistic talent . . . charm ing smile . . . argumentative powers sup porting definite ideas . . . keen mind dependable worker . . . calm and sin: ?"""' loyal friend . . . enduring charm 1" enthusiastic smasher of tradition . . . good sport. H L it - 5- 'c tzszn ."ssf:'at": E -1- 3 iw LAWRENCE A. ENOS INDUSTRIAL ARTS A aood worker, a better sport, and yet a better friend . . . "Woo-Woo, watch that stutt, Shorty, I recoanize ya!" . . . man ot notebooks . . . "What people need is peo- ple . . . sincere club man . needed gg. , everywhere. 9 Chairman Winter Carnival 25 Co-Chairman Gavf Hawk Dance 35 Palmer Hall Ecard 27 Newman Club l, 2. 3, 4: New England Teachers Conference NY. A ' l947p Chairman Snow Sculpturinq 4. n hr 2 t lahfrf- I 5 - WZ, ,. ' , V , QQ. , .ks-,v-.Al lf, .ffccuf 'ff A3 -', L w gflxx' 1 'Q tif??2f' V' 1:31, ilsxists , - A t 'T "' 4, . xr-f . ' ' .ff L., if X V . , N, fill' will .-?ig5'sfj,1'5Qi3'? ,1 . 'I 5 I till 4? 'IZ -r .x A. ff ,. .Q - A 'I ' -iq is Q 2 as fill 5 1 .vs , GLS . I V A VX g , .4 4' I ' ,ze J t ANN C. FAGAN ELEMENTARY lnventor ot tun . . . enaaqinq smile . . . ready to laugh at all times . . . worries but does nothina about it . . . slow to take ottense . . . campus irnpersonator . . . qood dancer . . , colleqiate . . . Rockport mem- ories . . . exponent ot monotone solos. Newman Club l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4, To Kalon 4, Secretary 4, Commuting VVomen's Board l, 2: Dra- mtgitic Club 4, Saxitraae Board 43 Volleyball l, 2, Bowling 2, 3, 4. CAROL FABBAB ELEIVIENTABY Outstanding in the field of athletics . . . quick sense of humor . . . fascinatina dirn- ples . . . unaffected . . . frank opinionist . . . straightforward . . . loyal . . . scores of friends . . . welcomes Bill tsl . . . variety of interests, T.C. and otherwise. VER Glee Club l, 25 Commuting Board l, 2, 3, 4, Secre- tary-Treasurer 45 W'.A.A. Board 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 2, President 45 Campus Fellowship 35 Student Council 25 'W.A.A. Conference 45 Basketball l, 2, 3, 45 Hockey l, 2, 3, 45 Volleyball l, 2, 45 Bowling l, 2, 3 45 Soft- ball 2, 3, 4, lAlVlES B. FIOBELLO INDUSTRIAL ARTS Photoqraphic rnind . . . a little short of Qenius by hard work . . . qood "head" man on the soccer team . . . the lauahs are yet to corne . . . the illustrious villain of "Curse You, lack Dalton" . . . Casey's partner in crirne. I U Soccer l, 2, 3, 45 Mohawks 3, 45 Epsilon Pi Tqu 3, 4: Basketball l. R T ' -ogg Hur N w 1' K J .A FRANCIS A. GARIEPY lUNlOR HIGH Loyal commuter . . . easy to know . . . business-like in academic pursuits . . . per- somticatioii ot purictuality . . . methodi- cally mmded . . . advocate oi science . . . takes lite in his stride . . . exemplary host . . . checker champion. Gavaleers 4. as , I! YA Ji ROBERT l. GAUDET lt,lNlOl9I llltlli x 4 wr Spectator oi lite . . . self-sufficient decisive m opiriioris . . . shiries OH the dance floor . . . Cleahoms answer to the thrifty Scotchmah tales . . . loria hair . always verhalizma . . . camera tart . Koussevitskys future threat. .'ittirlf'i1ttr,1ir:v1l 'tg ffivftliti-rs: Alg Nt' t A - 5 t 1 ' , ,-, 1 I V- 'VJ YUUI iii - mor ' ferr 'rrvitmrr llt rw ll fttfl wwrf't1rt,'fTr'-'iirsi . ,M 1 ., 1' ,- i Clul -lg .-rr:-11.1 wtf- lv' 'irfl 'lg lItlIVlII1llI1Il ,Mr trry lrfifis lI'f"T 1f""Y' . r-'LF -it ' if -' ".-9 1. , U' v'5.I1,.-.x.A A, A- . . '?",142"gfg-x r-' ' ,iff ,147 X ., ,rf IANET L. GQLDMAN ELEDJIENTARY Striking appearance . . . poised to per fection . . . intellectual . . . air ot profession- ality . . . eloauent conversationalist . . mature rnind . . . reliable . . . sincere . . thouqhttul ot others . . . qood natured . . hurnorist ot renown . . . smoothness and polish personified on carnpus. To Kalon 4. K JV' LEC E. GCDUIN iimisrmixi ARTS Personification ot co-operation . . . tear- less expresser in philosophical realnis . . . lj-X, pioneer . . . clever with brush and tinqers on canvas . . . dependable . . . un- auenchable zest for lite . . . reservoir ot humor . . . born realist . . . "l-liah Fore! head" . . . natural friend, sportsrnan, ath- lete and orqanizer. Soccer l, 2, 3: Glee Club l, F5 Art Club Chair- man Wiiiter Carnival Ball: Chairman lunicr Prone. '35 Mohawlcs 2, 3, 45 Cc'-Chairman Gav-Hawk Dance 25 President lVl.A.A. Board f X. . lt WILLIAM GRAHAM iiltriusrazar .ants Qne man soccer team . . . weight litter ot note . . . popular Spa lecturer . . . sound mind, sound body . . . discussions a must for a well-rounded education . . . admir- able independence . . . "To swim is to live" . . . dancinq partner deluxe. Glee Club l, 2 E '15 Pulrner Hall Biarcl l 2 Q' 4: ,iient Christian Association fl, 47 lxl.A.A. Board I 4, President -2: Sniffer P, 4- lnframural Eisketball TQ -1, v 'fn' 'YQ ., 'M :rr q nnmv . .isp l. . , , Q ' s tl 1.4,-. IAMES F. GRAY lUi.lLPL HlGH Forcetul personality . . . serious . . . per- severina ambition . . . knows his qoal in lite . . . no task too larqe . . . conscientious teacher seelcina a secure future . . . ever ready with suaqestions and willing to do his share . . . a qood man to have on a committee. Prvzi-lf nt "'l"'rs:: 519: Stuilf-nt Fvrutn l, 4, Treas- iif-: 1 fr 17"':tI ' Vfil' 7 1 4 T1-'-iisiirer 4: G1-Jelfers 1' lj Fil-ci 'flmib Q, 4, 45 lYlI1'IllI"l'f1"' Bfard -lg Class Mar' gal. xi. Q, -' ll ill A " rifzfizie 4 ,nvfv 'vw .1 f HM .-U.XI..,'y - -LVM . .-...- ..4 'x"x"Q-':'l' L:-x 7..- W.- -,-.- 'A,-,-.f-yv-. f.-xv-v-vfxfvw ' A-0.33: U-. . . . C.C,4bx1--. ,x.,---5x4-A'i' .., -.-,. A, -v-'3v-3--- rf-vfv 'Ar --A y'YNf3'- ?u.:5f3,kv -- --..--vb.C . . . --u.-. -,,- --- -y.-. ,,,,,, -,x,.,,...,.: -YAAA ..-Av 31- 'vv-' .--v .-.':-XA....-x. -jx..N.,.4 V.Kx.. -Ay- ,.,.,.,.,, ,,-,.,,,- ,-U-Y: ,-fy X Qrwf-QQ-fwq' 'yiv' v-,:. --.x.A-- . Nu- 1.x.4.. ...--.-A-...-,x-. - A --- IAY -N v-f-..-NYS f-f-fxrv,3,'- Q'-"fr .:""f""'Q" M.- :X.,':.-:-.- --N.,..,.,-,:. . k,-,,-.- .., . -.--,.-,.. r , ' ' aff-1 , l. .., J Auf 'ad . S I , . 1 Q5 4 - A ...- " HI I -- x 4 , F Q. i O i . f X T31 X 4 I. v . 'r iv, , A .,,. -. Y, Y Y, Y,-, , W LA. 'N fm-NMN .JL --4, J. Jkx.-- k.1LzJ. 3-,C-fv -.,- A' -W-Y-f3QQ..-3 NANA -,. .A..--.V V- ---.N.,-vs.g,-ux, vxvv WQWQ vwwwvw :MW gr- .- lf,-'A-, .--,--... -,k--5--.-5 --,--- -..-. , --.--.':.. ..fA,-.A,,A-.H.... -.fv-..- -IL-.Y-.-,-xv AW. bx.,--.M--C,..: :CNET X.- ---.---,- -.,.. x,.-- ,.3,-3,.,-,. .Y --:'. ,.. .-V-Y W- :L .-3 ,.-..,,..-- .4 ,M V- -M .A,. . . . , ,, . . . . 3'-YY ,- H- ,NSA :nf .Y .-N f-Q3 Y-:QU N.-L-.: .v :.-M ..-4--j ,V ---V ---,A-. ,.,..3-.-..., ,-..,- ,--,.-,, ,.,-,,.-..- p4---,.,.A . .yk.42A-,1...A-- g-,..-EC , ,-,UQ -V N-3 LM.. -5.,g4--,,. -X X, W. w .:,- N -. lx C y.-N. .,f-N-- V4 . -:tv 4 .A ff -xv .4A,, 1. -anna an , . -:N ji, '--. M 1 Ji 3 X ikll.-- - . llliuin 4,V GEORGE A. ICHNSGN INDUSTRTAI. ARTS Analytical mind . . . keen mathemati cian . . . expert craftsman . excellent designs - e on Eranta . . . man of tirni con victions and ready wit . . . tall and lithe . enthusiastic skier and yachtsrnan riqht at home with the world Gaveleers 2, IT, 4, Vice-President -l lfi P u 7.77 ice-President 35 Epsilon Pi Tau 1 lRENE P. KELUHER NURSING EDUCATION Our lrish colleen ofthe contaqious, sponf taneous laughter and fun . . . known lar and near for her even temperament, ibut were warned not to torqet she's lrish through and throuqh lll . . . her some- times serious countenance only masks a lot ol oleviltry . . . pioneer in the tive year course for nurses. Glef- Clulo l, Q5 Tennis 25 l-lockff-y l, P"f' 'I LS. 'halve V.: Q VY' A- -Ib 'Q ., , -V f. N.-. , 5' if 'E fr !'7.f:,' I ' ,. J A -5-,..t':. 2. sir'-.En f RQDGER F. MARTIN INDUSTRIAL ARTS Magnetic friendliness . . . professional appearance . . . smoothness of a collegian . , . envied physique . . . ambitious . . . out- standing ball player . . . pronounced in- dependence . . . jovial companion . . . nonchalant . . . everything "Ch Kay." Mohawk Club l, 2, 3, 45 Baseball l, 2, 3, 4: Sticl-I l, 2: Glee Club lr Newman Club l, 2, 3, 45 Soccer 1, Intramural Basketball l, 2, 3, 4. "K ml aim' M Apr' nr- , . s , ALEXANDER C. MCAUSLAN INDUSTRIAL ARTS Perfection in leadership . . . contagious sincerity . . . operatic capabilities . . . well informed . . . unpretentious confidence . , . flying enthusiast . . . nucleus of the Mikado . . . dabbles in hearty laughs . . . right at home with Prince or Pauper. Glee Club l, 2, Y. BA -I MARY C. MCNAMARA ELEMENTARY' Adventuresome . . . vivacious . . . lite ot the party . . . interesting personality . . . caustic wit . . . sophisticated . . . ready tor anything . . . coauettish . . . capable leader . . . baseball enthusiast . . . athletic ability especially as a LEETY . . . designer ot unique bracelets . . . sure cure for the blues. sl 4, Art Cliilv l, 2, T, Al: Stifk 2, 3, 45 Softball l, 2, 4g V 11:l'f'l'wl' l 'A 3' -lt llc 'kfy l- Vcllevbrll lt Cf-Rec ELIZABETH A. MCGUIRK lUNlCfR HIGH Buoyant . . . entertaining . . . Rockport memories . . . infectious giggle . . . laud- able talent for music . . . fluent eloquence . . cheering and captivating twinkling eye . . . always occupied-with Ralph . . as predictable as New England weather. Cwlee Club l, 2, 3, 45 Ensemble l, 2, 3, Llp Dramatic ub 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 4: Newman Club F -lp Saxifrage Board -lg Volleyball 25 Bowling Mcdern Dwnce l, 25 Hiking l, 2. ' -H ea -me - A I 51 ,ix 3 .'.-.r., ,o r. if 4 .?' -s -fx FREDERICK R. MILLER TNDUSTRIAL ARTS By different methods different men excel, but here is one who can do all things well . , . a topnotch sport . . . loyal friend . . . always smiling . . . contagious enthusiasm . , . continually on the qo . . . diplornat par excellence. Basketball l, 2, 3, 4: Soccer l, 3, Co-Captain 4: Mo' hawks 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3, Vice-President 4: Student Council Vice-President 4: Saxifraqe Board: Epsilon Pi Tau 3, 4: Campus Fellowship 3: Ski Club l, 2, Q' ".E',,"" 4:-. ,, -- 3 x 4 , i afr,,.' . Y iv W Q Q V - , 9. ,, , .hi X , X Q ' :Ls . 5 fe f t -. Y I' K 'Rx' 'v Y Q Jw. ' 4:4 1 N 'iixyj -Q " ' JL: imik 1 x .245 gf-. -Y A M, :....., E ",id3f'2 ' liilf- .V 1 L , ft 1 'n ' - 5 v A 'K I 1 2 2 5' ,Vw xxx ' K 'g '25, T. W 14 X s " v w 1 1. ,, 'Q 0 ,, k X 4 4 A :si 'AT T 5 is T ' 3 'x ' ,L W: ' s ,AIX lt Ut K' 4 A GERALD MOTTA INDUSTRIAL ARTS Man of distinction . . . handsome well dressed . . . capable and conscien tious . . . industrious . . . speaks little but says volumes . . . unappreciated until really known. Mohawks 3, 4: Student Council 4, J I T El , if ' 1 f 1 , f 5,,?,. If - M J ' f 4 .- V J S K' f . T ian' ' Q ': K 3' . 2- - 1 H at 10124:--, ve,,33-'gl-Avg, 5. If f 1 5 in 1 lOl-IN F. NOLAN INDUSTHIAL ARTS Accomplished Spa lecturer on religion . and morals . . . frank . . . tactful . . . spe- cial genius with a' camera . . . thorough organizer . . . dependable worker . . . re- liable friend . . . suave manners. Gaveleer Society 2, 3, 4, President Sq l947 Saxi- lrage Board: Newman Club 2, fi, 45 Palmer Hall Board Sq Rervresentative Eastern States Teachers Ccn- ' vention 3. I 1 H9 , f , A r sv Y ANDREW I. OTDONNELL IH. PT INDUSTFUAL ARTS Gav's favorite dynamo . . . irrepressible , . . dabbles in living gaily . . . contagious grin . . . dashing wit . . . easy going . . . master of lesson plans . . . born organizer . . . always on the move . . . accepts and finishes responsibilities easily . . . reliable friend. Gavelec-rs 3, 4, President -lg Coinrnut-5-rs 4, Secretary-'l'1easurer 45 Stick 45 Saxitraqe Board 4g Co-Chrrirni-in College Picnic 35 Cliairnian lunivr Prorn 1 3 CARL H. PETERSGN iuttiori Hiott Pleasant personality . wide range of interests . . . . creative writer . . . door man. Sl-Qi Club lf Dramatic Club l, C1 'Treasurer 2, 3, 41 Stick l, .,. . diplomatic . scholastic aims enthusiastic out- , . O f I Athletic Board Llp College lvlcirshiill Ml: ll.E.T.P A. terence 4. a."H' 'bn-ark ' yi: A R i y L , N Y ! 'Pi 1 A 4, lee Club l: Class Ji, oi. 3 4 i 0'-H-T T X, , y-sy fi Ai 4 P K , . I. l 'sp I I 'T ff, I 1 it ANTHONY I. PGLTTO lllDUSTRl.iil. ARTS Laughter and philosophy hand in hand . , . a congenial exuberance . . . The Ultima Thule ot friendship, tolerance and consideration . . . extremely eloquent . . . idealist seasoned with practicality. Class President ly Epsilon Pi Tau 2, 3, -lg Girveleer Sccfty 2, -'ly Newman Club l, 2, 2, -QA Glee Club l, 2, 37 Soccer Team 25 Chairman Seniir Prcm 45 Chair- man Gav-Hawk Dance 4. nf' FFA ' x F 1 , Y lUl.IA PHANKUNAS lUNlCH HIGH Amherst admirer . . . logical mind . . well informed . . . dogmatic . . . freedom from worry . . . emotional firecracker deep purple moods . . . tathomless . . attends all classes held at the Spa . . bridge expert . . . famous long talks unbounded interest in people. i Glee Club 1, 2, ff, -lg Ski Club 2, 3, 45 Dramatic Club 5, 45 Newman Club l, 2, 3, 47 Student Forum 4. ., I 1 rv f r u 1 ' 'QL , , 1 I , ,la-PF ROBERT W. PRQULX lNDUS'l'RlAL ARTS Astairean potentialities . . . unlimited perseverance . . . industrious . . . disc jockey . . . lover of classical and popular e cellent stage manager . . . burns the can- dor at both ends . . , independent . . . sys- music . . . ready with the words . . . ternatic organizer. Frlitftr ft SlX1fl'1"jF' Dirt 't ,ry 45 N+1'.-Jriiriri Clu - -, bf-,fri ft ,"f. -ig ltrriiiifmxv I jul, Ai, .ortriqo Marifiqfir, Lgle- Lluli -, -2, 4, .stage l".'fClIMIQ'f'fj Toctinicat A4'lVlS"I .air-zitia 4. . f , N. .X. X ' 1 I I FORREST A. PYLE ,,,-K,vN,-,-- .v .-.--5 X .., H -A-. x x.u--Lg........ ,....c, Invetercfte pipe smoker . . . life cf C1 rgcxrz . pcssessor of cz fine sense cf hum Y rwv' i- A . . . tcxctful Opiriicnist . . . '.'OCCIl'QL1iC1f'y' ci cr coiieqiczie dicticricrry ...i vkI1C'.'.'S these clouds" . . . mcrieybciqs cf the WfQCILl:c that refreshes" . . . ferziiriizie appeal. fs . A f . w xr P - ,vis Sir- . -1, -.wee .,.i ,-,, LY Q .. -... A ..vX,.,,. .. , . X., ...... ......4 .-.-.... ..-...-. . -A ,.,:-...L,.. M, -- .-,,.r.-.-,.- - Lf-.L ,,--..-. . X----V ., ....,... . N.- c..,.......... -k...-.,., . .,. .... . -.c.-:'. ' 'X Q..-' ', Q.,...-ve.,-v- 2--.Y- ' . .. V--. -: ,,..'....,..ff ..,-.., - 4 Q flg 51 . I QF '-'E' 'WALTER RICHARDS -..,.. ,.., -,.,.,: , -'w-v.. -..J.- Excepiiczicrliy talented dancer CI . . . dry hunter . . . every requis cess . . . Qzitelecipczlly iziciinecl N iriq perssnaiiy . . . the delight c :I rczphy .ecicher . . . ccziricisseur C IDUSIC. - -.VV W - w- -v - - fx -. ....,4,., Y M X...,, . g'7, :.,....3. GEORGE G. ROBERTIE lNDUSTRlAL ARTS 5 Remarkahly pleasant temperament . . . unhurriecl . . . tacttully frank . . . logical mincl . . . exponent of the Epicurean phi- losophy ot lite . . . a true gentleman . . . clocked co-operation. . ww Gaveleers 4. 2 ' .fe ' P I' X, . t . Y 1 v- i A X3 I . MARGARET H. RYAN ELEMENTARY lnexhaustihle patience . . . perpetually busy . . . musical . . . artistic . . . Wide circle oi triencls . . . professional enthusiasm . . . alootness hiding a great charm . . . las- cinating storyteller . . . rhythmic . . . la- conic . . . excellent companion in fun or work. Student Council Secretary 45 Class Treasurer 35 Glee Club l, 2, 3, 45 Ensemble l, 2, 3, 45 Newman Club fl, 3, 4, Secretary 2, 3, Vice-President 45 Saxil Iraqi? Ecard 45 To Kalon 3, 4, Vicerpresident 45 Ski Club fig Class Song Leader 4. ERIC P. SCOTT INDUSTRIAL ARTS A ready hand and a helpful hand . . . completely congenial . . . a valuable club man . . . diversified activities . . . enthusi- astic sportsman . . . super-pressure sales- man . . . unforgettable performance in the Basketball Ballet of Funite . . . Wor- cester's ping pong specialist. Saxifrage Board 45 Campus Fellowship 2, 3, 4, President 35 Mohawks 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 35 Basketball 1, 2, 35 Soccer 1, 2, 35 Commuting Me-n's Board 3. M i J FRANCES STAPLETON ,ELEMENTARY Vivacious . . . photogenic . . . corny humor . . . Georges peach . . . warm- hearied friendliness . . . neat . . . generous . . . original expressions . . . never serious for long . . . bewildered nonchalance . . . tall and slender . . . PUNgent repartee . . . congenial . . . carefree . . . loves novelties and surprises. Glee Club 2, 3, 45 Ski Club 2, 3, 45 Newman Club 2, 3, 45 Dramatic Club l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 35 En- semble 45 Ari Club 45 To Kalon 4. CHARLES C. STURDY - SPECIAL Sturdy' as his name . . . kind Words that hit the spot . . . sincere friendliness . . . stirring voice . . . man of the briefcase brigade . . . master of words . . . perfect p preacher . . . contagious sincerity . . . X, X sparkling spirit. x wx -., v N '-1 an MARILCU SULLIVAN ELEMENTARY Songbird of '48 . . . charming sophisti- cated attractiveness . . . ardent individual- ist . . . unpredictable . . . exceptionally skilled in handling money . . . "Mikes timekeepern . . . interesting personality . . . "Fifteen Miles on the Erie Canal," Ctlee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Ensemble l, 2, 3, 4g Mixed Quartet 4, Newman Club l, 2, 3, 4, Ski Club 2, 3g To Kalon 3, 4, Treasurer 4, Art Club 45 Class Treasurer 45 Miller Hall Board 4, President 45 Basketball 2, 45 Hockey l. 0 0 lOSEPl-l C. SYLVESTRC lNDUS'l'RlAl. ARTS Capable, dependable leader . . . keeps things running smoothly at all tirnes . . . interesting personality . . . sincere scholar and inventor . . . busy nian with plenty ct time to spare. Student Ccuncil 1, 2, E 4, President 4: Gavele 2, 3, 4: Alurnni Secretary 2: New-rrzan Club Q, 2, ,J 3 x 5 n if '1 MAMIE TEITTINEN ELEF.fENf'ARY Pun to he with . . . ready te laugh . . . frequently "Bob"-lying . . . keeper of Case . , Y . . influential ever . . . intriguing per- sonality . . . never a dull rnement . . . aithtul fcllower ct "never hurry" fcrmulg - - GSCQFCIIDHYIS Miss Lightning. Glee Club I 2- Campus Fells:-:ship if Hiring PASQUALE G. TRAMONTOZZI INDUSTRIAL ARTS "By honor and labor always aiming higher" . . . Mr. Anthonys shining ex- ample of "Would Work" . . . once you know hirn you cannot torqet hirn . . . stout ,M heart is better than all the heads in the . world . . . sports enthusiast. -mp- M.A.A. Board 35 Baseball 2, 3, 45 Mohawks 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 45 Newman Club 3, 4. n pn-- l . ,: Fife. K .4392 xi , if ,- l Y v V Q4 .- , f I f, ,ir ROGER I. TREMBLAY ' INDUSTRIAL Anrs Hearty manner . . . tuneiul crooner . . . Gav's leader of sinqouts . . . pianist of note . . . equally adept at creatinq an l.A. proj- . ect or writing an English thesis. ocveieefs 2, 3, 4, Baseball 2, stick 4, Glee Ciub 1. S J . I I' X A 5 'CM' 'if ' I!! --lg A 3 1 1 ' fl ' I fl 5 q 1' E, -- g 4 CLAIRE L. VCRSE IUNIOR HIGH Brilliant mind . . , thorough orqanizer . . . willing to work . . . enjoys life . . . aura of friendliness . . . musical mind . . . artistic aptitude and athletic ability make her the acme of versatility . . . efficiency plus . . . genius with initiative . . . on the road to success. Glee Club l, 2, 3, 4, Newman Club 2, 3, 4, Hockey l, 2, 3, 4, Volleyball l, 2, 3 4, Softball l, 2, Basket- ball 1, 2, Bowling l, 2, 3, 4, CofChairman Halloween Dance 2, Stick 4, Chairman Christmas Dance 3, Saxi- fraqe 4. X C C Ii MARGARET I.. WHEATLEY ELEMENTARY Conscientious . . . staunch debater of own convictions . . . able executive . . . active school spirit . . . charming dignity . . . Harvard rooter . . . conservative . . . professional attitude . . . Carnival Queen. Student Council 3, 4, Secretary 3, Class Vice-Presb dent l, 2, W.A.A. Board 2, 3, 4, Glee Club l, 2, 3, 4, Ensemble 2, 3, 4, Dramatic Club 2, Student Christian Association 3, 4, Hockey l, 2, 3, 4, Basketball I, 2, 3, 4, Volleyball l, 2, 3, 4, Softball I, 2, 4, Badminton 4, N.E.'I.P.A. Conference 4, Saxifraqe Board, Eastern States Conference 4. 7-.1-v""' TJ-' 3,'IlI'I'l ' '.'n', , 1 Il '.' - CATHERINE T. WoNa Q ELEMENTARY . Dependable . . . artistic to the core . . . quietly' observant . . . idol of the Art Centre . . . continually best dressed . . . private ' financier . . . constantly charming . . . epi- tome of courtesy, kindness, charm and - P.. culture. Newman Club 2, 3, 4, Glee Club l, 2, 3, 45 Art Club l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4g Saxifrage Board 4: To Kalon 4. t 1 :rl -3-Elf, '1 - :' . T-"'s"' 5 was -5" N . ' " ' . - fl: ' ' ' sl ,, it 3 g?'2Q,.'. X -eu. ag' v. , . , M V Vit Milf! X I , . 'A t . ,Q H vm" ,,- ' 1 X gl ll 4 1 ELIZABETH S. WRIGHT ELEMENTARY Friendly as an April breeze . . . likeable personality . . . enjoys square dancing . . . gentle manner and Voice . . . romanticist . . . interest in refrigerators . . . steadfast friend . . . fearless expresser of ideas . . . especially in Mr. Conlon's class. 5-J rv" Q'Is Student Council 35 Class Secretary 25 Glee Club l, 2, 3, 4, Ensemble 2, 3, 4, Student Christian Associa- tion 3, 4, Hockey l, 2, Basketball l, 2, Volleyball l, 2, Softball l, 25 Badminton 4, Miller Hall Board 2. r Qass ,Song b gebejf-IJIJ VVVIUJJ IJIJQIMII MIM A w4JVff'ImIJJ1fIIIJfJI jusf an-Ofhef fff-ne wana? fzagffafp me famffy Tree my Ia be I I I6I"9HJ"IJ-IIJJJ IJJJI JSI maxv Ura! free of F1766-buyfafh branches year by year Ana' O Iiibifiie If I, I If B eaiffii,I If I I, I iff III bb 4 I I DJ I I wfiffe No fearbave we whaf-eer our fafe Him bag? 13 our gum'-fzd fflgfrf I 944 o U.S.S. FZTQ f Sixty-four seamen, all novices, boarded the good ship '48 for an adventurous four-year cruise. Vllhewl The crew hadn't minded the first knot of the trip to the ship, but those last three or four knots had ended Just in time, as our home port and Myrtle appeared on the horizon. With T.C. as a home base, we saw a new life open to seamen ff Frosh in other words. Maybe we shouldn't have said that so loud, We were as proud as punch, but those ensigns and lieutenants were husky brutes. The boatswain ordered,"all hands on deck." VVe stepped lively and rowed to shore. To our surprise there weren't any 5 petty officers to keep us in hand with their blackjacks. Heavens! We had arrived. Bangl! Every sailor of us experienced that mal- de-mer of initiation when all our new found sophisti- cation, maturity, confidence, and poise were swept away by the brighter lights of the school. The gi- gantic baggage tags and green bows naturally helped us to stand out among the vast throngs Oi of the student body. We resembled a modern artist's concepticn of chaos. We were the unwept, un- honored, unsung heroes of the 20th century. But our voices were wonderful, and our frosh as- sembly was the best in T.C. annals. Of course there was a slight disagreement as to its merits. The pennies, vegetables, old shoes, etc. that greeted each act were stored for future frosh. The ship doctor prescribed a freshman reception and thanks to the upperclassmen we had a snazzy time and made many new acquaintances which were to become lasting friendships. AND the upperclassmen were human and quite likeable. Soon the sailors were scurrying from fo'cas'le to engine room in search of their nautical equip- ment fr- books! POINTS OF INTEREST: The Freshman-sponsored Carnival had little time to get underway for Carnival time brought sadness into hundreds of hearts when Dr. Charles l-lerlihy was taken from us. There was a wrench in every heart for the warm, simple, kindly man who had steered many a bewildered student ship safely home. His spirit still is a bond of friendship stretched out to each and every troubled soul to help one over the hurdles. Men -flet us repeat -f men hit the gangplank in the second semester and a basketball team sprang up which carried the F.T.C. banner proudly. Tn fact the spirits of young and old fno re- flection, alumnil soared. The green and white was on the march. Class day hit us with all the awe and wonder it possesses. Maybe our hoops wiggled, but our thoughts were firm as we pictured the scene three years hence. Remember those gorgeous Rus- sians and Brazilians, the whole United Nations theme? Our first shore leave fAlleluial and all the child prodigies went home to brighten our local spheres of action. The crew returned to duty, tired but willing - with a few less men. We weren't worried for we were big shots now, spelled Sophs. Experienced as we were, turn and turn about brought new galley slaves as we initiated a younger group, under the watchful eyes of those ranking admirals, the faculty. l-lad we really been as gullible as those youngsters fwe seriously doubt it. POINTS OF INTEREST: The ship was really jumping as we prepared for the inaugural of our personable Dr. Saunders. We had gained a very admirable Admiral. The Halloween party we put on was acclaimed the most shocking in history. Could be because of the shocking apparatus in the tunnel of horror. And believe it or not we will never forget that magnificent, stupendous, colossal snow sculpture we fashioned at the carnival. lt was rumored to be a skier. Now what prize did it take? As we were saying, time moves on. The junior-Senior prom off campus, the Gav-Hawk formal, and the Sax dance certainly made the liberty minded gobs sit up and take notice. T.C. was kicking up its heels. And class day! Was it terrific in practice as the gobs really dished out those American folk dances. Then came the rains and our class day went up in rain. THE l:'LEET'S IN! Our second shore leave! Promoted from the ranks the luniors came thundering back for a year of business - no adolescent stuff. After a few hours at dear Old Alma Mater we decided business is business, but who's got time for that? POINTS OF INTEREST: T.C. got a real stab in the arm with the return of veterans and juveniles clamoring to get within our pearly gates. We were so glad to receive such "fine minds" into our fold. Stories of the good old days at T.C. began to be outshone by the jumping social and educational calendar. And believe us the juniors really helped make the "Mikado" the success it was. Why sure, many of the charming, swaying, young lasses were experienced tars of '48. And who do you think those handsome men were - none other than '48ers. We scrubbed the decks for our Iunior prom. As full fledged petty officers we had our own prom off campus. Henry Ford may never have known the wonderful time his Wayside lnn gave us, but we left our stamp on the lnn just in case. Half of our staunch crew bravely weathered that shake-down cruise talked of in whispered tones as "training." Broken in body and sometimes in spirit, they time and time again faced the innocent- faced bedeviled builders of tomorrow, lt all resulted in gray hairs and hearty laughs. FUNlTEfa new feature -- made even the trainers hilarious. LIBERTY! Our third shore leave! Under command of the Sec. of the Navy the good ship '48 set out on the last part of its voyage. A relatively calm sea set the ship on its way. lt was wonderful to be officers. The poor seamen were lucky to have such kind officers and philosophical ones at that tho huml. Our ranks were swelled by swabbies-our ship was popular this year. POINTS OF INTEREST: The other half of our class was subject to the de- lights of training as witnessed by the casualty list. Every activity A scholastic or otherwise - was in full swing. We snatched at every chance to get to- getherffthe Halloween costume ball, the Christmas dance, the Gav-Hawk formal, the funior prom, the A Senior prom, Funiteeeverything, because our col- lege delights, anticipations, challenges, and friend- ships were numbered now. We did the things and a little more that the tradi- e z V tional Senior does feven the hilarious ordeal involved 9 in picture posingl. We know the Senior Assembly will go down in history - our last prom go down in L memory-our signatures go down in Saxes-our o friendships go down into hearts-our feet go down under the freshmen arches with firm steps. 0 Honorable discharge in sight! As the grand ship U of '48 pulls into port its crew knows there's much a . e a ' ' awaiting her and hope someway by some power she has grown enough to meet these tasks. Great or small, the crew will never forget that ship of ships, the U.S.S. '48 -God Speed Her! Qghtn QCITUS 01170114 frail' X-' --1' "" wr- ,v CAM MA Aware of the ileetness of time and the treacherous ' .-.' hirris of fafe -,-.' e, the Class ot l9-15, bezna of sound mind and excellent spirits, do hereby begueath the following giffs of remembrance f posterity: To Dr. Sanders: We leave a year's supply at bo:-J ties to brighten 6:lC Philcsophy classes To the Faculty: We leave all the cuts we didnt use and an autographed book on individual differences entitled "These Seniors." fun To the Underclassmen: Vife leave our warnings on what not 71 da as we had, and our thanks for being so nice. Iohn Apone leaves his expertness on skiis to lchn Olvlalley. Mary Bickford leaves her beautiful legs in plas'er molds for Varga. Ken Backus leaves as perpetual class president. Evelyn Bourgault leaves as 48's All American girl. lames Bruen leaves for New Hampshire. Tess Carchidi leaves her agility to Bill Rogers. Ieanette Carlson leaves as a charming Angel of Mercy. lrene Carroll leaves her charge account at Baylins to loan Theresa Casey leaves with Miss Lightning on Flannagan's Express. Iohn Casey leaves his line to Tom Convery. Tony Cipriano leaves his professional attitude tc Skin Mulligan. lulie Clougherty leaves the Dean without an assistant. Phyl Conners leaves her pet hockey stick to lvlaiien Chesnick. Russ Cook leaves his closet space under the stairs ti Lewis Schultz. lim Cooney leaves Miss Conlon his ha:i'ilef':r'.'e1i Eskimo- tir fin exhibit. Hal Corey leaves here with Kathy :if-31:1 s' p Q -"Jens Cfle-ge. Dave D'Antonio leaves for Longnie-:.d:v.', Ralph Curran leaves his skill with pen and iirusii ti Eiiik P3r'eus. Connie Emery leaves her versatility tc- lxlary leriziisin. Everett Eastman leaves his executive ability to loe Germ it Larry Enos leaves his marvelous personality to Red Allen. Ann Fagan leaves her nervous tremors to Ruth Vckey. Carol Farrar leaves Bcb to carry an the family name in lim Fiorello leaves his dramatic ability to Don lalkert, Fran Gariepy leaves with Bol: ,ind Kenny, reading 'Cttarae ii the l.ia:i Bob Gaudet leaves to conduct the Boston Symphony. lim Gray leaves the best Saxifrage ever printed CURE. Leo Gouin leaves his galaxy of talents ta Ray Forrest. lan Goldman leaves her lien-1 Lcik ta lxliss Hasselt. Bill Graham leaves the coach minus a soccer team. Paul Henry leaves Miss lilixons class in an uproir. Bertha lohnson leaves her artistic and athletic ability to Bev Cousins. George lohnson leaves for Guam via the lluseum cf Mara Killelea leaves her dernure manner lu Bette Erickson. lrene Kelliher leaves tor Burbank Hospital. Rodger Martin leaves his baseball cap to Bib Hut-hir'.scn, Alex McAuslan leaves the iflikadds throne to Ralph Gicnet, pasketpail. , t Natural History. Mary McNamara leaves her place in the Diamond Set tc Roberta Saul. Betty McGuirk leaves her thespian talents to Carcl Fred Miller leaves as a potential threat to Gil Dodds. Smith. . cur nop es for as muc 'Rriaadef' ,-N , , lerry Motta leaves his impeccable appearance rind formal manner to Dori clark. c sptg nt eineius nicknames Andy O'Donnell leaves us a quick impression :if dimples, dry '.-:it ani Dick Pavesi leaves Miller lcliill a v.'ti.rrieri's paradise :gain Tony Polito leaves with a smile far tj-'.'eryor'ie. Carl Peterson leaves the Stick in Frank l-larrigan's capable hands, ludy Prankunas leaves :ir :ne ct her timous lang fiilks. Robert Proulx leaves us an excellent directory tar Jur fa:-:itragf-. Forrest Pyle leaves his pipe and a lcllipop tg t:ciiira,ie Bert Steeves, Walt Richards leaves his inimitable choreography to aryane who Peg Ryan leaves still saying Ryan is a one-syllalile :gi Eric Scott leaves for Worcester in his new c ir. Franta Stapleton leaves voicing her basketball cry "Oh ler-e-ee' Charles Sturdy leaves us slightly awed ani img 'es-Wd. Marilou Sullivan leaves her lovely scpifin r 'xiitf l.l1l'y'Sll"'llCl1Zl, loe Sylvestro leaves ar. enviable recorgl as Clit pr' :riaent Mamie Teittinen leavtis us like a streak ct liahtriiria 6 t i 'tt Sterling. Pat Tramontczzi leivfs the girls sighing Qin-l hit' izga, Roger Tremblay leaves his army unitornis t v T,tii iftiiiivfy Claire Verse leaves her intell--tgtual ability t if :raft ','.'l1i'i.-e Margaret Vfheatley lflavf'-s to ivipt lar llvtrv iid. Dick 'White le :vos his lik yish ai p-- il tf Eidif txizi. Kay l-Nong le '.vi'h ,i tixiat' llfcti it t i lflll tr iii tlif- tying. Betty 'v'v'right f t lit Qi a '.'f'i:i:t'tf':it b ak. lr. '.'.fitiie-ss, li li-'Z-iliiit' set! iii htiii.l:: in l :sf 1.1 this tl i,. ,., uld like t a try. IESSES .yn . : mfg- -:f Q 13,1 1 1 mv- --11"'lw " r X, ll l.r X g f' . ,,,6p-Q . x fi rl: sh I , Y ., . I ....,-----..P,-Y ,. ull Q, ..z- I DL 'Z' lv' "" -,- v--i..,.w,.v- u .. I 5 .W N --pqkg ww., Ji," I ! il K 7 fl ,,, " - rm:fZ52S?- tw ' I x. ,N ' . X, Nw 'K ,Q.-.Ql..- :"'-' ' . N .f l' I 5: Ia . 1 ' my R ,Q .-.1 n wr Q , - J.:-n -,..,. :fer nr vb x X. 4-T I. l , :xml .. ,Luv fu 40 . P3 I-' ' X. N - mn. K 1--P+.. k C., 'I in-. O -"Is . .1 NIORS IU VAN DONO HERINE L. -President, CAT ice- V ERN EAH RG ent GED Pre-sid SEPH GORMAN IO Treasurer ONITZ B Secretory, ELLEN lk!-' -K-AA. 'r' ,I 144. ,d"""""S-f. SOPHOMORES LORING CANEY Vice-President President, RAYMOND FOREST Treasurer, DONALD YORK Q' ru Z O z 1 Q bl L. E CD F3 CD UD g. c lfT! as 1 -, - 4 1 n , V 'Ln all 1 -Q .1 u- ' 1 Us , L J, f 'T 2 C..l 5rL,f. 1-. '-AJ in GJ : I., .-gp. -N gc, . I ... Q 'T :Q1 it .4 .: ol., P ' -I. M - I 'ME' CJ 5 ac? SIJN-IH. Y NONPC US ,. pg . L . ' r K7 ' .Q i -, . , . . - .I , it Y u o - f -fir' i 1. , - S - 9 . W - , L t ' -i , i 1 Mi. ' ' ' 1 ' If . " 5 1 , ,rr 1 s 5 6 .glmafenlf C2-oloelralfizfe olfmci loe Sylvestro President Fred Miller Vice-President Peggy Ryan Secretary Constance Emery Treasurer ii1iYLS5lg Freshman Representatives Gerald lvlillane 2 Shirley Rice S lames Theodores 2 Peggy Gibbons S Gerry Motta 2 Margaret Wheatley S Sophomore Representatives lunior Representatives Senior Representatives All undergraduate students of F. T. C. are members of the Student Co- operative Association, which was instituted to couordinate and consolidate students' extra-curricula activities. lt supervises all matters pertaining to student life which do not come within the jurisdiction of the facultyg to further in every way the spirit of unity, co-operation and loyalty among the students of our collegeg to increase their sense of responsibility toward one another, and to be a medium through which the social and cultural standards of our college may be maintained on a high plane. The legislative body of the association is the Student Coeoperative Council composed of four officers and aight representatives a man and a woman from each of the four classes. This council is the organ through which school affairs within the jurisdiction of the students are discussed and regulations proposed. ,jim ,gaxizfage Mar Iames F. Gray Everett Eastman Eric Scott Robert Proulx Margaret Wheatley Andrew O'Donnell Ann C. Fagan lulie Clougherty Catherine Wong Elizabeth A. McGuirk Fred Miller Phyllis E. Conners Margaret Ryan Robert I. Gaudet Forrest Pyle Editor Associate Editor Business Manager Directory Editor Advertising Manager Photography Editor Organization Editor Feature Editor Art Editor Write-Ups Men's Sports Women's Sports Staff Secretary Candids Editor Circulation Manager i X jim 31:64 Carl Peterson Editor Louis Scanlon Associate Editor Ellen Bonitz Feature Editor Andrew O'Donnell Business Manager Sponsors Mr. Conlon Mr. Hague The l948 "Stick", the most progressive newspaper ever published at E T. C., captured third place, National l-lonors in the Teachers College Division ot the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. This year the "Stick" has played an important and leading role in the shaping ot student policy and in the controlling oi student activity. lt has continued to publish an unbiased account oi school news-happen- ings, and serves as a record oi school achievement, thereby perpetuating incidents ot the unforgettable past which would otherwise have fallen into undeserved oblivion. The editorial page, by offering timely articles ot both educational and critical value, has done much toward enhancing school prestige and toward cultivating a healthy school spirit. The "Sticks" policy is as tollows: l. That "The Stick" shall at all times act in the interest ot the school, and shall in no way publish material or advertisements which in any manner shall prove detrimental to the school standing. 2. That "The Stick" shall serve as an inter-school public relations organi- zation, and in this way act to turther school recognition and to enhance school prestige. 3. That "The Stick" shall publish an unpreiudiced account ot school news events, and shall strive to include in each issue articles which will prove ot educational value and benefit. 4. That "The Stick" shall act as a record ot school achievement and prCiqreSS. 5. That "The Stick" shall encourage student opinion and aid in the de- velortmerit ot an integrated school spirit. l 1 i , Il 7 V "" ' T 5, ' A 'lti:1..1fsugj, . T ffl," , r..,ff M ' . u fl .. ' i , . ? ' Ngilftjgllf ELIAMVIQT Mary Truland President Christus Nikitas VicefPresident Ellen Bonitz Secretary Philip Breault Treasurer Miss Gertrude Cunningham Club Sponsor During the l947-48 season the Student Fcrurn engaged in formal debates, forums and radio discussions. The club varsity teams debated both sides of the national forensic gues- tion, "Resolved that a Federal World Government Should Be Established." They met the debating societies of Worcester Tech, Springfield, the Elms and Amherst on this question. lack Pitinger, president of the 'World Federalist Club at Harvard, under the sponsorship of the Forum spoke at T.C. urging the adcpticn cf a Federal World Government. Mr. Pitingers talk brought forth a lively discussion and question period. Geoffrey Harwood, news analyist, described broadcasting techniques at the April assembly. Club members participated in a guest forum on ccllege scholarships at Fitchburg High School. Everett Eastman spoke against offering scholarships and Mary Truland against clubs offering them and lames Gray in favor of federal aid and Floy Sarasin for athletic scholarships. The radio series called "College Student Gpinionf' given cver the radio station W.E.l.M., was begun in the fall and resumed in the spring. ln these radio programs, which were transcribed, two students from the visiting college and two from Fitchburg defended their opinions on a current tcpic. They cross-questioned one another and then an expert on the particular subiect under discussion closed the program with a criticism and evaluation of the students ideas. The first of these programs was a discussion on the "Clcsed Shop" with Massachusetts State College at Devens. The "Marshall Plan" was the topic discussed with Holy Cross, "Youth Recreation" with Clark Uni- versity, "Socialized Medicine" with Worcester Polytechnic lnstitute, "Universal Military Training" with Tufts, "General Education' with Bcston College. and 'Housing' with Massachusetts State. .M ll , w,,,3,?,yI,mq A 0 ' ' ' , . ,5'l, ' , ' v ,txlllt , ' '- ' . r 2. W. a Q j -. 5 y. 1 I , 1 , ,QA - I ' ' ' ' ' " Vi P' K7 - . .A -9. ,1 I . X . N Tye, t . hr WA 31.5 fl Join Simi lulie Clouqherty President Margaret Ryan Vice-President Ann Faqan Secretary Marilou Sullivan Treasurer losephine A. Bolqer Sponsor To Kalon the iirst W'oman's Society on the campus was founded in l946. The name "To Kalon" was derived from the study ot Greek philosophy, which has also served the club as a continuous source of inspiration. The purpose of the society is to foster the high standards ot the college and to stimulate all school activities. The aims and ideals ot the qroup are embodied in their motto, "C-fnothi Seautonf' rczmczfic Everett Eastman President Elizabeth McCruirk Vice-President lames F. Gray Treasurer Carol Smith Secretary Daniel L. Healy Faculty Sponsor The war curtailed Dramatic Club activities somewhat, as it did most of the other campus activities, because of the absence of male members. How- ever, the club continued to function during this time with the holding of meet- ings and the presentation of plays, under the expert direction of Miss Belle Nixon. With the return of the men, and the increased enrollment, once more there is potentially a good Dramatic Club on the campus. Plans for the enlarging of activities of the club have been laid along two lines: the developing of the talents of students who wish to act, the organization and development of a group whose interests are solely backstage. The Dramatic Club has functioned along these lines under the sponsorship of Mr. Daniel L. Healy and the able directorship of president Everett Eastman. Robert Proulx has been in charge of the group interested in backstage work, and everything from scenery design and painting to specialized lighting effects has come under his direction. lt was the Dramatic Club's turn this year to present the major production of the year for the public. "The Male Animal," the play chosen by the club, is the story of a college professor who is suspected of communistic inclinations, and the various difficulties that arise in his mode of life, both acadamic and marital. After practicing diligently for several months, the cast presented "The Male Animal" in a manner which received admiration and praise from all who were fortunate enough to see it. IV' -'. Q. , 5 W - -. 1 H' 1 -I 4 ,, ' inc" I 1, 1, W Fw , --.rm i I , .. 8, -' l!1l'!F',jggf13'v'q-3!!t -V,-I-n.a-f ct rd.,- , w sa-.,. fa Q ,5- jAe Wewnflan Michael Russo President Miss PGPCJQY Ryan Vice-President Miss Ann Fagan Secretary Miss Mary Truland Corresponding Secretary William Rogers Treasurer Miss Gertrude Cunningham Sponsor Rev. William B. Welz Chaplain More than eighty-tive students on campus this year took advantage ot the spiritual, intellectual and social activities ot the Newman Club. Several attended functions at the Newman Federation Center in Boston where most ot the New England colleges hold parties and dances. The best-remembered events ot the year were the November lecture by the Rt. Rev. lohn l. Wright ot Boston e "Europe Revisited," and the joint meet- ings with the Student Christian Association. Cne joint meeting at Christmas- time was a gilt party and the other a movie and tuntest in April. Besides the monthly socials, committees are planning tor a civil rights tall: by the Rev. Alfred Rosset on "Education in the South" and the annual Cornrnunion Breaktast. i sS?lflfC!8lfLi 6A.l"L5flf6lflfL ff50CL6'LtL0lfL George Krikorian President Mary lennison Vice-President loan Lyell Secretary Bichard White Treasurer Edwin B. Clark Faculty Advisor The Student Christian Association, formerly the Campus Fellowship, is an organization devoted to the fostering of religious and social activities on the campus. It is affiliated with the New England Student Christian Movement which is a fellowship of Protestant student and faculty groups committed to the will of God. A comparatively new organization at Fitchburg, the S.C.A. has made great progress since its organization two years ago. This year for the first time a local minister was appointed chaplain of the group. Beverend George E. Lang, of the Beth Eden Baptist Church in Fitchburg, served as Chaplain this year. The S.C.A. has participated in many of the activities of the New England Student Christian Movement-including the summer conference at C-AT-Ka, the Boston Area Conference and a number of other conferences. Several of our Fitchburg members are participating in the policy forming process of the New England Movement. The monthly meetings of the S.C.A. this year have included: noted speak- ersg films: and, discussions. Two joint meetings were held with the Newman Club. An auxiliary Bible study group is in formation, limited to twelve mem- bers. The final spring meeting will be held at the Cathedral of the Pines in Binge. K. . V , J I . V 0 ,. T 1 9 lf r .x x A D , , 3.5 ' FF 4 . - 4 2 . L if N: 4- Q JI . ' ' 4 ,- I Malawi cm Michael Russo Chief Frederick Miller Medicine Man Pat Tramontozzi Keeper of the Wampum loseph Bloom Scribe Raymond Forrest Alumni Secretary Michael Conlon Sponsor As the golden sun sinks beneath the rugged hills of Fitchburg another Mohawk pow-wow comes to a close and many of our graduates are taking the lonely trail back. ln the future, we shall return and sit around the camp- fire with the younger braves, whom we know will uphold the envied tradition of our club and will carry on as successfully as ever. The interest of the Mohawks entered into the field of dramatics this past year. Fun-Nite, sponsored by the Mohawks and the To Kalons, proved highly successful. The cast succeeded in creating a jovial feeling and kept the audi- ence in roars of laughter throughout the entire performance. The annual Cav-Hawk dance held on March l3 at the Wachusett Country Club proved to be one of the most successful and colorful dances held by the two clubs. The deeds of the mitrhty tribe of the Bear this year have been glorious. Now, as tho warriors sit around the campfire and "pass the pipe of peace around," these many worthwhile accomplishments are recalled to mind, and bring much happiness to the heart of every true Mohawk . . . Soangetaha. owe Aer cghciefy Andrew 1. O'Donnell President George lohnson Vice-President loseph Gorman Secretary Carl Peterson Treasurer Francis Gariepy Alumni Secretary ln 1921 the faculty and students of this college founded a society for the purpose of furthering social and fraternal relationships and for fostering the appreciation of English. The name given to this group was the Gaveleer So- ciety. Colors were chosen for the society, black symbolizing strength, and gold representing character. Later the three Greek letters Lamba, Phi, Sigma, which mean Leadership, Knowledge, and Strength were adapted, as well as the motto, "Amici usaue ad anas." Through the years the Gaveleer Society has been prominent on the campus as a group devoted to the best social and academic interests of the college. During the war, the club was inactive, but after reorganizing the year before last, the members determined to renew the high standards set by their founders and fellow members. This year's club designed and built a compact crystal ball. lt was first used at a dance given by the Gaveleers for the school on February 19th, and was met with the approval of everyone. lt is available for all school functions. On April Sth, the Gaveleers held their assembly. Mr. Leo Gittzus, class of '41 and a fellow Gaveleer, spoke on lndustrial Arts Education in the Massa- chusetts school for the blind at Perkins lnstitute, Watertown. On the same program his wife, Mrs. Gittzus, the director of the deaf-blind department in the same school, gave a demonstration, with the aid of one of her pupils, on teaching the deaf-blind. Some of the plans for the future are: the redesigning of the fraternity pin, decals with the three Greek letters, and a larger program of activity for the entire student body. "Carpe diem!" i 'vs t 4 4 . .J , .. I' 5 4. V 6 vs . f ' ri " Q .P Y i it .L l , X 4,-A ' J ,BA , ,A . Q i Q is ! 1 f 6055414 cm, Mr. Arthur E. Purinton Trustee Russell H. Cook President David H. Vennburq Treasurer George I. Ahern Secretary Epsilon Pi Tau is a national honorary professional fraternity Whose ac- tivities function in the fields of Industrial Arts and Vocational Industrial Edu- cation. The ideals to which this fraternity is pledqed are: to recognize the place of skill in our democratic societyg to promote social proficiency: to foster, counsel, and publish the results of research in the fields of lndustrial Arts and Vocational Education. ,Af CM Roberta Saul President Iarnes Gibbons Vice-President Catherine 'Wana Secretary-Treasurer Ralph Gionei PeC3QY Ryan Edward Ahern Peter Savoy Eileen Sheehan Lou Scanlon Peggy Ryan 2 Shirley Burne X Le CM 1 President Secretary Treasurer Librarians Accarnpanisis V 1. 1 f ,. . 9 ll , 4 4 , s , f I ,X L N a s , Q ' ' A ' 1 ' ' . I 5, ' ' .V . - r ' . A 3 . 1 I A xx . ,-' gn 1, 5 4 ' 5 "' 'xx' ' ' ., Qoferic agjyciefg Frank Harrigan President Bill Burke Vice-President Bob Bonitz Secretary lerry Millane Treasurer 525 CM lahn Apone President Dick White Vice-President Pat Lilly Secretary Bob Anderson Treasurer rt Y7 ommzfafing Omen 3 ovmczf lulie Clouqherty Carol Farrar Anna Doyle 2 Marv Truland Iulie Kelley 2 Marqaret Grant S Martha May 2 Beverly Richards S iplifiii President Secretary-Treasurer lunior Representatives Sophomore Representatives Freshman Representatives 5. so l Q 5-at-I ommulfing Wen 3 Mociafiolfi A. Forrest Pyle Bert Steeves A. I. O'Donnell Russell Cook Walter Kotomski Robert Erickson Robert Hutchinson President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer Senior Representative lunior Representative Sophomore Representative Freshman Representative '1 WWW flu! EW 4 .tk I . ,, Marilou Sullivan President Ellen Bonitz Secretary-Treasurer 1 v fjafmer Auf Marc! Mr. Randall lanies Bruen Mike Russo Norman Frye Bill Graham Lou Scanlon Bill Locke Larry Walsh Sponsor President Treasurer Secretary Senior Representative lunior Representative Sophomore Representative Freshman Representative 1' or'CS X , in 47 v, of XM: if X , . I Q F t . A X if D , 4 ' l I A Q 2 -. . . Z Z ' . - .. 7 0 s xi ' r ,X I . x f' ' T -mr , omenlf ,fglffigfic A50ciafL0n Carol Farrar President Marguerite lohnson Vice-President Beverly Cousins Secretary Mary Iennison Treasurer The Womens Athletic Board under the able leadership ot Miss Bolger pre- sents an active and varied program ot sports tor the women of the college. ln co-operation with the Department ot Physical Education, it strives to promote the highest standards ot health and sportsmanship. Girls who show special interest and ability in athletics are awarded Wo- men's Athletic emblems, pins, and blazers through a point system. Some oi the sports enjoyed this year were: basketball, tield hockey, bowl- ing, badminton, tennis, volleyball, softball, and hiking. Among the special events were two varsity basketball games with Clark University Women's College and a trip to Smith College in Northampton to see the English Touring Team play hockey. Two delegates were sent to the annual meeting ot the Massachusetts State Teachers Colleges Athletic Conference held this year at North Adams State Teachers College, on October l7 and l8. Mary Bicktord Captain of the White Team Peqqy Gibbons Captain ot the Green Team Margaret Wheatley Senior Bepresenfative Phyllis Conners Head ot Hockey Theresa Carchidi Head oi Bowling Mary McNamara Head ot Basketball lulie Clougherty Head ot Hiking lfanne Berndtscn Head ci Volleyball loan Lyell Head ot Badminton Ellen Bonitz Head of Tennis Buth Vokey Head cf Softball ls Q8 gs , JB WHITE BASKETBALL lb- ,N 2-L GREEN BASKETBALL QF 35- A '90 Q ' LY L I ' f Ya, 'T ,Y ' , , . 9 " Ig J' ki X fi, , . 'xg 1 WHITE VOLLEYBALL V I V -. Jie is '69 Q I Y GREEN VOLLEYBALL kfbi'JQ':1", f ,M '2f."vxf' 4w42.K.g.f-Ax. ng Wiki ' " Y' N39-'ff 'Ak' 'N ,F . W we Q v ,- .ay I I 5 4 A I, 4- , X ,...-as 'A . 4 X Iv nm? ' . I . ,NNW 'jf 5 gg . "" elf mv- 'Mx MTV ' ik. - , n I I IQ v--1--f. ,,,. if ' I Y Q ' . w v-5 T, " ' K . I : 1 Q , I. . I We , .I- E , v wg Y 'Qi' ""' 'r-' Mhz. - X' x. W A- MA v um-. ...W ' , I If BADMINTON ' , '1 .-4' , 1 YS" iP'! 1 ' as ff 95" awk '-I fig! ' 'I' av -,,,.-.,.1 I- JI ' I of-f+--f A E gw I I , 1w:i f iggf z..-5 i T117 It I ' ' 'miss QQ.. INDIVIDUAL SPORTS eng .Aflaific Adociafion Bill Graham Carl Peterson Mike Russo Walter Sullivan Ed Sandomierski Dick Rege Bill Kennedy Loring Cgnev A very successful intramural basketball league was carried on with keen rivalry prevailing among the six teams participating. The teams entered Were: Mohawks, Gaveleers, Esoterics, Comrnuters, Freshman, and the Club Haymon. Much color was added to the play as many of the teams appeared sporting new uniforms. This year the varsity did not carry a lay Vee team with them. Some of the League games were played as preliminary attractions to the varsity games. When the visiting teams were accompanied by their TV. squads the intramural teams took turns playing them. Each team in turn also accompanied the varsity on their road trips. This proved an added stimulant to the individual par- ticipants. With a successful basketball league registered on the records, the board now will turn its attention to the softball diamond. Keen competition and much fun is in store for the student body as this year's play promises to be as thrilling and entertaining as last season's. The following teams are entered in the Softball League: Gaveleers, Mo- hawks, Esoterics, Ramblers, and Peasants. Good Luck and lots of fun to all. K1 . it -i, H , . i . ' I 1 ' - !X f ' . v if A b Q .mx 1 in 9 ' ' f 1- X . , 9 'wi . - " if ft ' ' A . wtf ,.g'..'.,M'- - v E, Q .. ' . xi h - -Q -Vt II' Q K ' ,252 4 tgirl., . V- Q V k MQ.T?,f...i . :A ix. , .' r . I V ' 7 A , ' V55 H". I ' .I 'u . . .. . 1.5 r, , 'F T -W -Q3I- "' .Li-'15, OCCQI' Bob Elliot Coach lim Theodores K Fred Miner 5 CO'CQplUmS Coach Bob Elliot's Green and White soccer aggregation enjoyed a suc- cessful season with 3 wins and 2 defeats against strong opposition. Wins included: Suffolk U. l-Og U. of Mass. tDevensl 2-lg and Bridgewater 9-2. Losses: M.l.T. 4-U: Clark l-O. Co-Captains lim Theodores and Fred Miller paced the team throughout the season. Returning lettermen included: "Max" Moczulewski, lim Theodores, Fred Miller, Bill Graham, lim Fiorello, lerry Snow, Bill Sullivan, Walter Sulli- van, George Krikorian, Dave Vennberg, Leo Gouin, Lou Scanlon, and "Swede" Marshall. The newcomers included: "Gus" Amaral, "Mike" Busso, Leo No- wacki, lack King, Dick Bowland, Bd Ahearn, George Mailman, Balph Cluff, Lyn Erickson, Iohn Apone, lim Mclnnes, George Morris, and Bob Poscas. Hard Work and the experienced guidance of Coach Elliot produced a smooth functioning unit. "Max" Moczulewski was unquestionably the out- standing player on the TC. squad. He is perhaps one of the greatest goal- tenders ever to perform for the Green and White. Co-Captain Miller paced the teams scoring surge. This is the third year of varsity competition that Fred has held the scoring honors. lim Fiorello, George Krikorian, and Gus Amaral turned in excellent performances in the front line. Bill Graham and lerry Snow led the hard-driving, ever-alert halfback line that continually kept the opponents on edge. Co-Captain Theodorcs and Bill Sullivan held down the fullback slots. Bemomber Sullivan soloing down a clear field at Devensg and Theodores 75-yard tally at Bridgewater? Prospects for l948 are bright as only Miller, Fiorello, and Graham will be lost through graduation. Z?m4ef4a! William Provenzani Coach R. Elliot Athletic Director lim Theodores Captain 1. Eisenhaure Manager The Green and White basketball team enjoyed their most successful sea- son in many years, winning 14 and losing 5 games against strong opposition. This included 10 wins of their 14 N.E.T.C.A. Conference games, good for second place in the Northern Section Conference standings. Newly appointed Coach William "Bill" Provenzani and Athletic Director Bob Elliot produced a well-rounded, smooth functioning squad of thirteen men. Veterans from last year's club included Captain lim T'heodores, lerry Millane, Fred Miller, Dick White, loe Degulis, Max Moczulewski, and Paul Harrington. Capable and promising frosh included Ed Sandomierski, Bobby Farrar, Lyn Erickson, Bud Erickson, Dick Bege, and "Zeke" Schulze. The Falcon's started off their season at a terrific pace, winning six straight. Many of the games were nip and tuck throughout, and the season provided many thrills for the spectators. The team held the distinction of not losing to a Bay State club, or of losing a game on their home court. Previous road losses to Keene and Plymouth were later avenged on home grounds. Scoring honors went again to Ierry Millane as the high-flying Falcon s passed the 1000 point mark for the second straight year. The victories of the Falcon's follow: Salem 58-38, Willimantic 58-55, U. of Mass. CDevensl 71-68, Farmington 64-44, Gorham 46-41, Lowell Textile 36-34, Suffolk U. 51-39, Keene 47-43, Gordon College 53-43, Salem 73-56, Worcester 72-47, Plymouth 60-48, B.l.C.E. 87-49, and Bridgewater 57-40. Losses included: Keene 41-37, New 1-laven 54-44, Plymouth 65-51, New Britain 80-52, and Albany, N.Y. 70-58. Prospects for next season are bright indeed. Only Fred Miller and Dick White will be lost through graduation. tl-I j- " ' ' ' W' ' .3 -1 '.,'J: nc it in - lun. se 0 , l 6 Qi' Q Q ' 0 . 'vt '.' 7 4 .L Q -.J , ' t ' A 1' 4 na' . taut- Q gf' L .L 5 ' Q - - 1- ,1 1' , " .. .P ! S ,U f 1 Viv 4 uf , .V . If I gdjezdf With the baseball season two months away at the time of this writing, it is difficult to predict what the future holds in store for the l948 season at P.T.C. However, if the interest and chatter which has circulated around the campus is any indication as to what we may expect, we may be assured that the Falcons will field a team well representative of our old "alma mammyf' Coach Bob Elliot has eighteen veterans to use as a nucleus for his squad. They include: Ed Rice, Tom Mullins, George Krikorian, Ken Stone, Dick Rutka, Ralph Gionet, Bob Calkin, Rudy Alisch, Dick York, Max Moczulewski, Pat Tramontozzi, lerry Millane, Ioe Degulis, Rodger Martin, Fran Pelosi, loe Bloom, and lack Connell. A large number of frosh are expected to report for early season practice. The Green and White will attempt to squeeze in a full schedule of fifteen games in the comparatively short season which will open April lst against Clark University. League games will be played with other teams in the NE. 'l'.C.A. Conference. Games have been scheduled with Keene, New Britain, Salem, Gorham, U. of Mass. tDevensl, Arnold, Clark, and others are to be contracted later. Soccer and basketball have not only regained their pre-war eminence as important parts of life on the F.T.C. campus but have surpassed all expec- tations. We all sincerely hope that baseball will once again attain its place on the extra curricular activities list here at F.T.C. A ,J . Y-- is ancli 5.5! 1 WF' uf v s 1 2 H fkif. 9, 4.435 Q E -.wif u ' 7 fx-W N' my Q, 1 3,-if 1 w---- 1 x pa, if - "-4 -.. .,A -f uf. 1 .. M ' ,. 1. Ui .-g','1,' v ev rn .F s 4' M rr' , MJ-R if 3 1 , .u uswvff- Jw yi uv'--'V' ,3....K "Q"'Q ir .,V.. al! as ji! 'bb bl . we-61 . ww 6. Seq Q I I 1 - ,-13 1 Mu ,T , . Qs xp: ll ,I -.4 -mv- -1 ' .r"-Jil-'. af., ,. .F Milf! Sn 'wi 1 .2-f f Av , Q 'Wa 3,3 ,ak I Va I 2 .1 N. Q-s.f ' . :faq yy u . A vw- e J' A . NFS Vg , uid-Q 5711 if J . ' , n L47 , X 1 .- K 4 - u X Xe xi! w. gif A- '- 9 F3 uv ' . v -n-.1 - s ,-..,,,,,, - ui N . '- Q34 f 74 ,v ' f f kk , H f ,-. . 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