Fife High School - Illahee Yearbook (Fife, WA)

 - Class of 1926

Page 1 of 112

 

Fife High School - Illahee Yearbook (Fife, WA) online yearbook collection, 1926 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 112 of the 1926 volume:

Cpropertyb of 1926 ILLAI-IEE 1926 STUDENTS OF FIFE HIGH SCHOOL VOLUME II, ILLAHEE Gbur iilllnuniain O, rarest miracle of mountain heights, Thou hast the sky for thy imperial dome, And dwell'st among the stars all days and nights, In the far heavens faniiliarly at home. Page Two William Hillis Wynn t i I 11- I- A H E E Zllnrmunrh HE name chosen by the Fife High School students for their Annual is "Illahee," meaning "the favored spot." This seems especially fitting, situated, as we are, at the base of that majestic sentinel whose waters quench the thirst of the whole valley, watering the fields that they may bring forth a bountiful harvest. An ever-present symbol of eternal strength, courage, truth and life, and which our Indian predecessors termed "Tahoma"-M-'fThe Mountain that was God." Page 'Tlwmf ILLAHEE Eriliratinn O the students of Fife High School, who have given of their best-to our teachers who have willingly rendered every service pos- sible-and to others who have in any way helped in the editing of our Annual, do we gratefully dedicate this, the second volume of the "3lllahrr" Page Four ILLAHEE Eahlv nf Qluntrntz STAFF FACULTY SENIORS JUNIORS SOPHOMORES FRESHMEN ALUMNI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION ATHLETICS YELLS MUSIC AND DRAMA EBATE AND DECLAMATION SOCIETY LITERARY FIFE LIFE INDEX TO CONTRIBUTORS AUTOGRAPHS Page Five , ILLAHEE Elllahvr Staff Lillian Ehnat, Mary Fox, Annie Ellestad, Bertha Garman, Miss Moe Page Six Ziklrulig ILLAHEE iliarulig Miss Gladys Moe, Principal Mr. Harry4Enochs Mr. J. S. Bixby Mrs. Frances McC1ane Mrs. Isabel Boaler Mr. L. E. Rynning, Superintendent Page Eight ILLAHEE Qfupvrintvnhvnta liagv Zlhraln N THIS day and age there is a great tendency toward practicality. The criterion by which a theory is usually judged is, "Is it practical?" Ideals are often called old-fashioned and out-of-date. This is, however, not the case. We have Ideals today, and they are more carefully chosen than ever before. The present day strenu- ous competition makes this necessary. Dr. Frank Crane says, "When we have a task we want to accomplish, a condition we want to attain, or any purpose at all, we form a mind-concept of the thing de- sired. That is called an Ideal." If you intend going to a distant city, you first ascer- tain what road to take. If you build a house, you first draw a plan. A ship putting out to sea lays its course on the chart. A new business house chooses a slogan, or motto, by which to advertise its principle of doing business. "We Hurry," "We Aim to Please", "Service that Satisfies", are mottoes or expressions of Ideals. If we thumb through our history we find it full of examples of struggles toward Ideals. Our Colonists thought enough of their Ideal of Freedom to offer their lives for its cause. Nathan Hale said, "My only regret is that I have but one life to give for my country." Abraham Lincoln said when he first saw the- slave market in New Orleans, "If I ever get a chance, I'll stop that." And he did. The heroes of Forty- nine had an Ideal in mind when they endured the privations of the trail to get to the Land of Gold. Dr. Marcus Whitman rode horse-back from Washington State to Wash'ngton City and back again for an Ideal. In European history the Crusades and the crusaders are outstanding examples of struggles for an Ideal. Get the habit of having an Ideal in whatever you do. The saying is that if a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing well. William James says we are a "bundle of habits". If that is the case, one habit we should acquire is the habit of planning what to do, and how to do itg what to be, and how to be it. Get an Ideal. Decide what kind of a man or woman you are going to be, then set out to live it in your everyday life. Get an Ideal and live up to it. Decide what kind of a position you want to fill in the world, and strive toward it. "What if I fall short?" you may ask. If you choose carefully, within your limitations, and try hard enough, you will not fail. If you should lose, you will still have profited by trying. Get the habit of choosing an Ideal. Select a goal and strive for it. Remember that "One ship drives East, and another West With the self-same winds that blow, 'Tis the set of the sails, and not the gales, Which tells us the way they go." Let us all try to make the world better by choosing good Ideals, and choosing them carefully. Determine which way to go, and set your sails. Mr. L. E. Rynning-Su,p't. Page Nim- ILLAHEE lgrinripalh lgagv ilngaltg 311 Srruirr HE gray-haired woman trudged wearily up the hill. Her load seemed heavier each moment but she went on and on with dizzying fatigue for she dared not stop lest her lord see her and punish her severely. The sound of horse's hoofs on the cobble-stone road caused her to step to one side to make way for the hurried rider. But no-the horseman drew in rein and stopped beside her. Was he, a knight in shining armor, speaking to her, a peasant woman and only a serf? Yes, he not only was speaking but offering her assistance in bearing her burden. A poor beggar squatted beside the city-gate with hands outstretched that some pitying passer-by might perhaps let fall a coin. Ah! A rider was approaching. God grant that he might be a charitable r.der. After our knight had passed, for it was even he who had helped the old woman, the beggar held not only 3, shining silver-piece in his hand but within him was a heart filled to overflowing with the kindly words uttered by the knight. A desert-lost man dragged his heavy body inch by inch first this way and then that, straining his eyes for any sign of water to quench his unendurable thirst. Each effort proved to be nothing more than an attempt to approach a mirage. A horse- man was coming? Perhaps even yet he would not have to die. The knight quenched the man's thirst with his last cup of water and carried him on to the next desert village and to safety. The Good Knight, for thus he came to be known thruout all the land, had ded- icated his very life to the service of mankind. Like every knight-errant the object of his travel was the reclaiming of the Holy Grail, but loyalty in service to his order of knighthood meant also the helping of those in need of help. 'Tis true our knight found not the Holy Grail but in fulfilling his obligation of service he had realized himself. In every life we find a goal Toward which the heart doth strive, But often fate doth from us all, Attainment full, deprive. But tho our life may seem in vain As far as laurels go, The thot we may have helped someone, Is a pleasant one to know. -Gladys Moe, Principal ' A Page Ten - Svvninrn ILLAHEE l Sputum V HELEN EHNAT Those true eyes, Too pure and too honest in aught to disguise The sweet soul shining thru them. Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4g Junior Rep0rter, '1llahee', 3g Editor of Fifonian, 43 Glee Club, 1, 2. A RTHUR STOLEN Had sig'h'd to many, though he loved but one. Salutntoriang Orchestra, lg Annual staff, 4. BERTHA GARMAN Charm us, orator, till the lion look no larger than the cat. Valedictoriang President of class, 1, 4, Vice President of class, 23 Debate, 2, 3, 45 Fifoniun, 1, 3, 4g President of Studcnt Body, 43 Editor of Illahee, 4g Declamation, 4, Annual Staff, 33 Glee Club, 1, 2, 4. Page Twelve ILLAH EE LILLIAN EHNAT She's all my fancy painted her, She's lovely, she's divine. Assistant Editor of Fifonian, 4, As- sistant Business Manager of Illahee, 45 Glee Club, 1, 2. MARY FOX Mary kept the heart of love, and oh, but she was gay! She danced a jig, she sang a song, that took my heart away. Treasurer of class, 2, 3, 45 Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 45 Annual play, 3, 4, Fifonian reporter, 1, 3, Illahee staff, 3, Busi- ness Manager Illahee, 45 Glee Club, 1, 2. MARGUERITE YOUNKIN But so fair, She takes the breath of men away Who gaze upon her unaware. Basketball, 3, 4, Fifonian Staff, 3, 45 Illahee Staff, 4g Annual play, 3, 43 Vice President of class, 43 Glee Club, 1, 2. VIRDE JOHNSON O', my own, my beautiful, my blue eyes! Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4g Fifonian Staff, 4, Glee Club, 1, 2. Page Thirteen ILLAHEE CLASS OFFICERS Bertha Garman ---- - President Marguerite Younkin - - Vice-President Mary Fox - - - - Secretary Miss G. Moe - - Class Advisor Class Colors - - - Silver and Coral Class Flower ---- Coral Sweet-Pea CLASS MOTTO "The quitter never winsg 4 The winner never quits." CLASS YELL Brains a-plenty Pep I guess, Senior Class of F. H. S. Qllaaa iiiatnrg HEN the school bell rang, twelve years ago, about fifty six-year-olds started on their great adventure of school life. Among these children were Mary Fox, Virde JolQon, Bertha Garman and Marguerite Younkin, who success- fully finished their grade school work and joyfully entered high school with others. As is usual in the history of freshman classes many of our school mates left us for one reason or another until these were left to finish this adventure in which they embarked so many years ago with Helen and Lillian Ehnat and Arthur Stolen, making a class of seven happy voyagers who thru all these years have learned to appreciate and love each other so thoroughly. Although we have been few in number during the last two years, our class has con- tributed much to the activities of the school, Bertha Garman being one of our most promising debaters and Helen Ehnat, Virde Johnson, Mary Fox and Marguerite Younkin members of a most successful basket-ball team, which during 1926 was fortunate enough to win all the games of the season, emerging victors. We feel we have always taken part in the social activities during the time we have been in high school, furnishing pep for all the parties and entertainments. Our stunts have always furnished a wealth of amusement to all who were present. We, the class of '26, feel we have been most fortunate in being able to begin and end our common school education in an institution where the school board and faculty have tried so zealously to maintain lofty ideals and high moral standing and we h0D9 that our class motto, "The winner never quits and the quitter never wins," will help us to carry on thru the remainder of our lives the high standards of attainment that these loyal friends have held up to us thru all our school life. Gllaaa iirnplirrg It was a perfect June day and having been invited to attend a wedding of my old friends I was hurrying to reach the church on time. It was to be a great society wedding. I had heard that even the President of the U. S. was to be there. The pastor to marry them, was the world's most noted. I arrived at the church and was given a seat. After waiting a while the great 'pipe organ began softly to play the Lohengrin march. Everyone was craning his neck to see the bride and groom so I looked too and whom should I see coming down the aisle but Marguerite Younkin, who was the most noted woman pastor in all the world. After the pastor had taken her place, Miss Virde Johnson was next in line on the arm of her father. Her stage name was Gloria Talmadge, for by now she had taken her place among the movie celebrities. A little later came the grggpm, Arthur Stolen, who was an artist, whose wonderful productions appeared in alll the Page Fourteen ILLAHEE noted art galleries of the world. The ceremony was soon over and the guests left the church for the banquet which was to follow. I was given a royal welcome at the bride's home by both my old schoolmates who were now man and wife. "I have a great surprise for you," said the artist, Mr. Arthur Stolen, "come in here." So they led me to the library where whom should I see but all my old school chums. They were:-Bertha Garman, who was formerly president of the senior class and the Fife student body, and who was now the President of the United States, Lillian Ehnat, Governor of Washington, Mary Fox, Secretary of the Treasury, she said she got her experience collecting ad money for the "Il1ahee" and handling the class finances for three years. We were chattering about old times when in comes the great pastor, Marguerite Younkin, followed by Helen Ehnat, who was the editor of the Fifonian which was now the greatest magazine of the world. The next issue of the Fifonian gave a flowery account of the wedding at which the senior class of '26 was once again united. Qllaaa will E, the Senior Cluss of 1926 of Fife High School, County of Pierce and State of Washington, being of sound and disposing mind and memory, and not acting under duress, menace, fraud or undue influence of any nature what- soever, and considering that we have honorably filled our places for the past four years do make and publish, ordain and declare this our last will and testament in the man- ner following, to wit: 1. To the Juniors we leave our places that they may be filled as successfully as before them. 2. To the Sophomores we leave our knowledge and friendship and best wishes for success. 3. To the Freshmen we leave our good example that they might follow in our footsteps and become worthy of their name when they become seniors. Also, our grave manner, that they may leave some of their foolishness to the coming freshmen. 4. To individuals: A. I, Bertha Garman, bequeath my position as president of student body to some worthy junior who feels capable of stepping into my shoes. B. I, Virde Johnson, bequeath to Lillian Jacobs my dazzling beauty and love of frogs. C. I, Mary Fox, bequeath my nymph-like form to Hilda Moi who may like to use it once in a while. D. I, Helen Ehnot, bequeath my raven locks to Harry Anderson, this so the girls won't call him "Red." E. I, Arthur Stolen, bequeath my exquisite grace and poise to Velma Cum- mings. F. I, Lillian Ehnat, bequeath my marvelous voice and line of chatter to Mit- suoyshi Asahara. G. I, Marguerite Younkin, bequeath my eloquent brown eyes to Arnold Thompson, that he may capture the hearts of all the ladies. 5. To the faculty we leave the little bit of knowledge which during our four years sojourn we have not taken from them and sincerely hope they may again have another class so charming as ours. 6. To the Fife .High School, we leave our best wishes and sincerely hope it may always have a class, such as ours, to uphold its lofty ideals and to furnish amusement. In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands and affixed the seal of our class, this first day of April, in the year of our Lord, one thousand, nine hundred and twenty-six. -Class of '26. Page Fifteen ILLAHEE Gllzum nf 'EE Altho dear Fife we're leaving, It's not without regret- For long we've worked together, And played and sung and wept- At last all that is over, And we shall never more Come into Fife's old portals' As students--as of yore. These four years have been happy, And we have tried to find A bigger, nobler 'isomethingn To bestow on all mankind. l y l Of course we ve made a few mistakes, But a1wa.ys you will find, That we were trying' daily Some truth to bring to mind, Altho, dear Fife, we leave you To take an onward stride, We hope the memory of our class Will e'er with you abide. -Bertha Garman, '26, Page SlXl6F:!l5 ILLAHEE MARY 2 ww, mu fH4?1Q MARGUERITE Seninru 3111 Zlnfanrg S THE TWINS ARTHUR Page S-eventm-n BERTHA ff VIRDE ILLAHEE Uhr Sentara For four years you've been with us, For four years daily you've strived, And now you're leaving, this world to fight, With a start of successful lives. it SGGIIIS to me that when you'll leave A space will always remain. But your work here is finished and so we know !ou'll never come back again. When you started four years ago, as freshies You thought it an awful fix But it's four years later now, And you're the class of '26. They say this is a cruel old world, No doubt that this is true, And now as you leave us, we sincerely wish- Successful lives for you. -Julius Gius, '29.. Img-c ldlgllieen' fduniurzi ILLAHEE Zluninrz W First Row-Lillian Jacobs, Agnes Moi, Clara Sicade, Namiko Yonemura, Kiyoko Sugioka, Annie Ellestad. Second Row-Mitsuyoshi Asahara, Tadao Yoshida, Daiichi Yoshioka, Forrest Norris, Howard Massey, Louise Fox, Mrs. McClane. l 3 3 3 3 3 OFFICERS Howard Massey - - - - President Forrest Norris - - Vice-President Lillian Jacobs ----- ---- S ec.-Treasurer Class Adviser-Mrs. McClane Colors-Coral and Cream Motto-Aim High and Hold Your Aim Page Twenty ILLAHEE Qllaaa igiatnrg The first meeting of the Junior Class was held the 6th day of October. At this meeting the officers of the class were elected. The second meeting was held the 7th day of October, at which plans for a Hal- lowe'en party were made. It was decided that the party should be a masqqerade. A social committee of three was appointed, they were: Annie Ellestad, chairman, La- Veta Smart and Forrest Norris, who were to take charge of all social functions during this school term. On the Friday before Hallowe'en the Junior class entertained the High School with a masquerade party. The auditorium was transformed into a very spooky and mystifying room by means of black witches and owls flying across the room, cross bones and skulls wherever one looked, and com stalks and maple leaves everywhere. The room was lit with electric light bulbs placed inside of pumpkin faces. Lillian Ja- cobs and Ruth Christy, impersonating negro sweethearts, Manda and Rastus, were awarded a comic prize for having the best costumes. Delightful refreshments were served and all in all the party was a series of laughter, fun and frolic. The Junior class numbered twelve the first few weeks of school, but later the number was increased to fourteen due to the entry of Forrest Norris and Agnes Moi. Ruth Christey leaving shortly after the second semester had begun, again decreased the number to thirteen. The Junior class is proud of the fact that they have as their members two players of the championship basketball team of Pierce County. They are Annie Ellestad and La Veta Smart. La Veta Smart was captain of the team and played forward. She had an average of twenty points each game, a fact which is both striking and unusual. A number of Junior boys were on the basketball team this year and did well in spite of their handicaps. The boys vsho are on the baseball team are: Forrest Norris, Daiichi Yoshioka, Tadao Yoshida and Mitsuyoshi Asahara. Many of the Juniors, although they did not make the team, are interested in ath- letics and they give the teams all the help and support it is in their power to render. The Juniors also took an active part in debate and dramatics. Forrest Norris and Howard Massey are our two debaters, Forrest taking the negative side of the question and Howard the affirmative. Agnes Moi represented Fife High School in the declamation contest of Pierce County by giving a humorous recitation. Although she was not among the winners she received numerous Cllmpliments on her delivery and the Juniors are especially proud of her. Howard Massey, Lillian Jacobs, Forrest Nor- ris and Annie Ellestad had parts in the High School play which they helped to make a big success. 8 8 U 8 8 Gllaaa nf '27 There is a nifty class at Fife Which is the very best, Each mind is keener than a knife- They always pass each test. From one another they'll ne'er depart, Just one more year to go. The students are all very smart, Because they're made just so. They are the live ones in the school, The students two and eleven. You ask me who are they? Pray tell, You ask me who are they pray tell? -Clara Sicade '27 Page Tw:-:ity-One ILLAI-IEE Page Twenty-Two 1 S7nphn1nnrv5 ILLAHEE Svnphnmnrw First Row-James Anderson, Ester Hill, Geraldine Whitworth, Masano Sakai Ayako Ohashi, Clyde Garman, Johnny Fujita. Second Row-Mr. Bixby, Arnold Thompson, Mitsuo Kawamoto, Kenneth Strauch Walter Erspamer, Thomas Beksinski. Clyde Garmam - Geraldine Whitworth Ester Hill - - l Mrs. MCClane M Mr. J. S. Bixby 3 it lf I 3 CLASS COLORS Black and Gold Page 'L"XVk3l'llY-1g'0RI" - President Vice-President - Secretary' - Sponsor' Class Adviser' ILLAHEE Qllaas igiatnrg In the fall of '25 seventeen Sophomores returned to grace this institution of learning. Robert Gustafson. Ralph lluscher, and Alexander Fox soon dropped out and before the middle of the term, Grace Gaines and Dorothy Booth left us. Buf- Arnold Thompson and Dorothy Vickers, members of our Freshman Class, returned and again joined the class of '28, The class is well represented in all school activities and functions. Dorothy Vickers represented the class of '28 in the girls champion basket ball team. Three Sophomore boys held positions on the boys' basket ball team. On the base ball team there are four Sophomoresg and the important position of pitcher is held by Mitsu Kawamoto and Arnold Thompson as sub-pitcher. Many officers were drawn from the Sophomore Class. Clyde Garman is the Boys' Basket Ball Reporter for the Illahee and forthe Fifonian, also being Treasurer of the Student Body. The So- ciety column of the Fifonian and the Girls' Basket Ball in the Illahee were taken care of by Geraldine Whitworth. Ester Hill reported for the Sophomore Class in the Fifonian and in the Illahee. The class was represented in debating and in dramatic declamation by Geraldine Whitworth. Three parts in the annual school play were filled by Sophomores. The sixteenth of April the Sophomores gave a stunt in the assembly. The title of our stunt was "Farmyard Musicalef' This was a very appropriate title since Mr. Bixby, our sponsor, is head of the agriculture department. The nineteenth of March, the Sophomores gave a party in honor of St. Patrick's Day. All of the students of the high School were invited. Many interesting games were played during the evening. Refreshments, consisting of cake, sandwiches, lemonade and ice cream were served at ten-thirty in the dining-room, which was cleverly decorated in green and white crepe paper. 8 3 9 3 V Ollaaa 15112111 There's a class in school that seniors will be, For they study with all their might, Their wisdom will count and soon you will see, A class exceedingly bright. There's never a time this school will score, There's never a time it will aid Without the help of the Sophomores, Who are dauntless and unafraid. Page Twl-n ty-lfive ILLAHEE Eh? Svnphnmnrr 2371. IBM Marty They came from afar, They came from east and west. For they knew the Sophomore party Would be the very best. From the top of the hill They came at a run, They rushed in the door And joined in the fun. Of course dressed in green The Freshies looked a sight, But that all Went to prove That Darwin's theory is right. They They They ran around in circles, climbed upon the wall, had a very merry time At the Sophomore St. Pat. Ball. -Forrest Norris '27 Page Twenty-Six Elkvnhmvn ILLAHEE illrvahmrn V , ., First Row-Harriet Sicade, Anna Vraves, Hazel Case, Jeanne Whitworth, Lois Garmall, Velma Cummings, Mary Bulat, Alice Seamons, Hilda Moi. Second Row-Mr. Enochs, Julius Gius, Juro Yoshioka, Millard Nase, Folke Johnson, Harold Carlson, Harry Anderson, Raiji Sugioka, Stanford Wise, Masao Kondo,,. Nicholas Eberhart, Nobuo Kondo. 0112155 Qtatnrg At the beginning of the year there were nineteen pupils enrolled as freshmen. During the first semester Evelyn Eberhardt dropped out. Hilda Moi was later added to our number and the year was completed with nineteen members. At the first class meeting we elected the following officers: President - ------- Julius Gius Vice President Jeanne Whitworth Sec. and Treas. - - - - Juro Yoshioka Sergeant-atlArms - - 5 - - Harold Carlson After a heated debate in which many fantastic hues were suggested, purple and gold were finally selected as our class colors. We chose coral sweet peas as our class flowers but left the choice of our motto till our senior year. In basketball the freshmen were very well represented this year. Two boys,. Masao Kondo and Stanford Wise were on the first team. All the freshmen girls were in the Glee Club, and most of the boys. Two boys from the group of nineteen were on the negative debate team, Masao Kondo and Julius Gius. Several freshmen., Julius Gius, who had a leading role, Jeanne Whitworth, Stanford Wise and Harold Carlson, were in the annual high school play. This shows what an important part the freshmen played in all school activities this year.. lkigv 'fwerity-liiglit ILLAHEE Obhr tn Oluming Zfllrrnhirn "Say boy, just take your book in hand, And settle down to stay, You'll be a freshie, and I won't for-get That such was I one day." "And boy, don't think you're learned yet, You've just begun the grind, You're here to make your moments pay, And to cultivate your mind." "You're not green, boy, and don't think so, Youlre as bright and good as the rest, Don't lie down on the ground like a dog, But stand up und try your best." "You'll need help in this world someday, boy, You'll want someone to lean upon, Treat others as you want to be treated, and- You won't, feel in need very long." -Julius Gius, '29 P1126 '1'uwiily-Niri.e- ILLAHEE Page 'Ph i rty Alumni ILLAHEE Sarah Garman Helen Peterson Ella Norling Agnes Peterson Bertha Seamons Charles Sicade - lora Sicade Jennie Carman Ruth Garman Sue Mitchell Clarence Peterson Josephine Fox Bertha Kaelin Anna Barth Annie Righetto Mary Fox Rose Fox Emma Norling Cyrus Richardson Annie Vizzard Miyako Yonemura Raymond Zittel Andrew Ellestad Floyd Andre Alice Harbak John Kotchko Sarah Sicade Bessie Thorson Katsuko Wananabe Roy Andre Arthur Ellestad Hilmer Teigen Edward Kaclin Marvin Jacobs Alumni 1916 Mrs. H. A. Telling Mrs. C. Payne 1918 Mrs. Spencer Mrs. P. Benthien Mrs. Wm. Woodard Bremerton.Navy Yard Mrs. J. F. Hall 1919 Mrs. L. M. Allen 1921 Teacher National Bank Andre's Store 1922 Wheeler-Osgood Stenographer' Mrs. A. Koch Teacher Mrs. Phil Meier 1923 W. S. C. Education Olympus Hotel Bookkeeper' Standard Paper Co. Farmer Knapp's Business College Mrs. Kunimatsu Carstens Packing Co. Crown Drug Co. 1924 W. S. C. Logging, Engineering'- U. S. Veterans Hospital Stenographer P. S. E. Cashier U. of W. Majoring- in Music De Sota Creamery Stenographer- Tacoma General Hospital Nurse 1925 W. S. C. Majoring in Forestry W. S. C. Veterinary Science Milwaukee Shops, Pipe Fitter Beutel Business College Golden Rule Dairy Truck Driver Page Thurtjv-'l'wc, Fife Tacoma Parkland Fife Fife Bremerton Dungenes California Fife Seattle Fife Tacoma, Tacoma Oregon Seattle Pullman Tacoma Tacoma Nebraska Tacoma Bellingham Tacoma Tacoma Pullman Tacoma Tacoma. Seattle Tacoma Tacoma Pullman Pullman Tacoma Tacoma, Fife IL li A H IC IC These are the replies the Editor received after asking for quqotntiuiis from lusi year's seniors. Roy Andre--"Girls, I'm still ax bachelor." Arthur Ellestzxd-'Al'm 21 man of brains and not words." Hilmer Teigren-M'Kl'm swamped with orders for my lust yez1r's Imziby picture." Edward Kaelin-HI still have my pe-rmunent nizircelf' Marvin .Iaeolms-'AVN'he-never I think of ilie Ted, red rose of love,' my heart aches." 3 if S 3 3 Arthur Ellestad-"When I grzxcluate I'm going to follow Yny literary bend and Write for money." His Father-"Well, son, you ought to be successful. Thats all you've done sinee you have been in school." Br lr an an an This one is told of a Fife Alumni boy who was married recently. "Are you sure that was a marriage lieenee you gave me 'V' "VVhy, certainly," replied the official, "But why do you ask?" "Because I've led ai dogr's life ever since." dlvnia' 5 nfatinn "Can you drive with one hand?" asked Mary. "You bet your life," replied the young man from Pullman. "Then have an apple," said she. l':i,gi- 'l'll.I I '- - l'lil'x-- ILLAHEE Stuhrnta' Aaanriaiinn Howard Massey, Bertha Garman. Clyde Garman, Miss Moe 8 5- 8 lr lr Uhr Stuhrnt 'Bnhg HE student body was organized early in October for the purpose of carrying forward numerous high school activities in which Fife High annually partici- pates. Last year's constitution and rules of order were adopted. Bertha Gar- man was elected President, Howard Massey, Vice-President, LaVeta Smart, Secretary, and Clyde Garman, Treasurer. Under this efficient staff, the various forms of ath- letics, debate, declamation, the Fifonian, Illahee, an.d Annual play have been sponsored and successfully taken care of. The teachers have contributed their share of work to these undertakings as well as the students. The record made this year is one of which we may well be proud. Page Thirty-Six ILLAHEE illllnnnlight Iliantnzig I will lOltEI' d0WIl 'l2l'1I'0ugh the pines tgnight By a pathway treading the dusky shade, Then the moon will climb o'er the distant height And brim the cup of Lake and glade. There I will taste the spice of the pine While the breeze from the South blows a love1"s tune, And I'll drink deep of the airy wine Which is the brew of the crescent moon. I shall feel a spell more strong than the song The night frogs sing to the drip of the dew, And over the lonely trails and long, It will bring me a lover's dream of you. -A Page Thirty-Four gnes Moi '27 ILLAHEE These are the replies the Editor received after asking for quqotations from last year's seniors. Roy Andre+"Girls, I'n1 still ai bachelor." Arthur Ellestad-'Tm a man of brains and not wordsf' Hilmer Teigen-"I'm swamped with orders for my last year's baby picture." Edward Kaelin-'il still have my permanent marcelf' Marvin Jacobs-'tWhenever I think of the 'red, red rose of love,' my heart aches." if Hr 3 if if Arthur Ellestad-"When I graduate Fm going to follow my literary bend and write for money." His FatherY"Well, son, you ought to be successful. That's all you've done since you have been in school." an lr an an rr This one is told of a Fife Alumni boy who was married recently. "Are you sure that was a marriage licence you gave me?" "Why, certainly," replied the official, "But why do you ask?" "Because I've led a dog"s life ever sincefl 3 3 3 3 Y "Can you drive with one hand?" asked Mary. t'You bet your life." replied the young man from Pullman. "Then have an apple," said she. lung-' vllllil I5 -'l'lu1'u-1' ILLAHEE Stuhrntz' Aaanriaiinn ,N Y 4 l w Howard Massey, Bertha Garman, Clyde Garman, Miss Moe 8 in 3 in V Uhr Stnhrnt Enilg HE student body was organized early in October for the purpose of carrying forward numerous high school activities in which Fife High annually partici- pates. Last year'g constitution and rules of order were adopted. Bertha Gar- man was elected President, Howard Massey, Vice-President, LaVeta Smart, Secretary, and Clyde Garman, Treasurer. Under this efficient staff, the Various forms of ath- letics, debate, declamation, the Fifonian, Illahee, and Annual play have been sponsored and successfully taken care of. The teachers have contributed their share of work to these undertakings as well as the students. The record made this year is one of which we may well be proud. Page Thirty-Six ILLAHEE These are the replies the Editor received after asking for quqotations from last year's seniors. Roy Andre-HGirls, I'm still a bachelor." Arthur Ellestad-"I'm a man of brains and not words." Hilmer Teigen-'Tm swamped with orders for my last year's baby picture." Edward Kaelin-"I still have my permanent marcelf' Marvin Jacobs--"Whenever I think of the tred, red rose of love,' my heart aches." Ut 9 2 it it Arthur Ellestad-"When I graduate Fm going to follow my literary bend and Write for money." His Father-"Well, son, you ought to be successful. That's all you've done since you have been in school." it 31 3 31 3 This one is told of a Fife Alumni boy who was married recently. "Are you sure that was a marriage licence you gave me?" "Why, certainly," replied the official, "But why do you ask?' "Because I've led a dog's life ever since." 3 3 3 3 3 "Can you drive with one hand?" asked Mary. 'tYou bet your life," replied the young man from Pullman. "Then have an apple," said she. liigw- 'Nail I5 -'l'lll'l-mi ILLAHEE fllllnnnlighi Zllantzwg I will loiter down through the pines tonight By a pathway treading the dusky shade, Then the moon will climb o'er the distant height And brim the cup of Lake and glade. There I will taste the spice of the pine While the breeze from the South blows a love And I'll drink deep of the airy wine Which is the brew of the crescent moon. I shall feel a spell more strong than the song' The night frogs sing to the drip of the dew, And over the lonely trails and long, It will bring me a lover's dream of you. -A Page '1'hirty-Pour r's tune, gnes Moi '27 - Stuhvnin' Aznuriatiun 1 ILLAHEE Stuhvntii' Aaanriatinn Howard Massey, Bertha Garman, Clyde Garman, Miss Moe 8 5 5 3 X Uhr Stuhrnt wang HE student body was organized early in October for the purpose of carrying forward numerous high school activities in which Fife High annually partici- pates. Last year'5 constitution and rules of order were adopted. Bertha Gar- man was elected President, Howard Massey, Vice-President, LaVeta Smart, Secretary, and Clyde Garman, Treasurer. Under this efficient staff, the various forms of ath- letics, debate, declamation, the Fifonian, Illahee, and Annual play have been sponsored and successfully taken care of. The teachers have contributed their share of work to these undertakings as well as the students. The record made this year is one of which We may well be proud. Page Thirty-Six: ILLAHEE Uhr 'illlahnf' This is the second volume of the "Illahee". The students have all taken active part in making it a book of which we can all be proud-one which we will keep with the rest of our most precious things. At the elections early in the year the following staff was chosen: Editor - - Bertha Garman Ass't Editor - - Annie Ellestad Business Manager - - - Mary Fox Faculty adviser ------ Miss G. Moe The various reporters appointed by the Editor were: Senior ------- Marguerite Younkin Junior - - - Louise Fox Sophomore - - Ester Hill Freshman - - - Hazel Case Boys' Athletics - - Clyde Garman Girls' Athletics - - - Geraldine Whitworth Debate and Declamation - - Julius Gius Student Body - - - - Clara Sicadei Society - - Lillian Jacobs Literary - - LaVeta Smart Staff Artist Arnold Thompson 3 8 8 I 8 ilitfnman The students of Fife High School issued a newspaper twice a month. This paper was called the Fifonian. The first issue was published the third week of October and since then it has been given to the students of the High School every other Friday. The Fifonian has been a great success and has become a school tradition. It re- lates all the student activities and the news of the teachers. The students always look forward to the day the Fifonian is due. All the students did their best to make the semi-monthly a success. The staff consisted of the following: Editor ----- Helen Ehnat Ass't Editor - - - Lillian Ehnat Class Reporters Senior Reporter - Marguerite Younkin Junior Reporter - - Lillian Jacobs Sophomore Reporter - Ester Hill Freshman Reporter - Julius Gius Girls' Athletics - - - Virde Johnson Boys' Athletics - - Clyde Garman Society - Geraldine Whitworth Prudence Ann - Bertha Garman Jokes - - ----- Lois Garman Faculty advisor ------ Miss Gladys Moe The following students designed the special coverings of the various issues of the Fifonian: Jeanne Whitworth, Arnold Thompson and Johnny Fujita. Some of the special copies were as follows: Basketball, Lincoln, State of Washing- ton, Education, Christmas, Girls' Championship, St. Patrick's Day, Spring, Memorial. Page Thirty-S x ii ILLAHEE Svprakvra Dr. Martin's address given on Armistice day, November 11, 1925, to the high school and eighth grade, dealt with the new thought that war is created by ignorant, impulsive people and peace by those who are educated. The bitterness of the last war was emphasized and a plea for world freedom, the true armistice, was made. Dr. J. S. Davies of Tacoma, gave an interesting talk, Wednesday, November 18, 1925, at 2 o'clock in the auditorium of the high school, eighth grade students and the P. T. A. The talk was on the Prevention of Tuberculosis and of many ways of helping people prevent and overcome this terrible disease. On March 1, Mrs. Sheldon of the Anti-Tuberculosis League spoke to the P. T. A. and high school on the prevention and cure of the dreaded disease. She stressed the care with which the nostrils, mouth and open sores should be guarded as entrances for these germs. Statistics concerning the help given by the League were read urging the students to help them in their work of preventing this scourge in our country. 3 3 8 8 3 Stunts Sruiur HE Seniors started the annual stunts by presenting a Christmas program. A short pantomime of the poem entitled: "'Twas the Night before Christmas" was given, the dignified Senior girls looking well in night gowns and caps. Their childish delight upon finding their stockings full of playthings and a great stick of striped candy which had been filled by Arthur Stolen fthe Santa Claus, was most touching. The next number was given by five of the Seniors, dressed as tiny girls, with hair ribbons and dresses and rolled stockings. The poem follows: -M stands for Mary, a freshman so gay, We hope that with us she always will stay. E stands for Evelyn, a brother to Nick, Altho she is bigger, on him she won't pick. R stands for Raiji who acts as he should, He has a Junior to tell him just how to be good. R stands for Ruth who helps get each ad, Come lend some support to make her heart glad. Y stands for Yoshida and Yoshioka too, And on second thot, Y may stand for you. All: We stand together to spell the word "Merry" And wish such a Christmas to Tom, Dick and Harry. . The hearty applause which followed proved the success of the stunt . The fun was not yet ended for Santa distributed his gifts to the students. Toys, candy and a useful gift comprised the list. Befoie Santa had finished his task he 'Was so man- handled that several pillows had fallen by the way-side and he was so busy he couldn't pick them up. Page 'I'lin'ly-lflighl ILLAHEE Jlunim' In February the Juniors gave their stunt. The actors and actresses 'played their various roles with great skill. The whole thing was a pantomime. Agnes Moi, the heroine is called upon by a young man who brings a box of candy. He proves to be a very ardent suitor until a knock is heard on the door then she makes him into a hat rack, the next young man is made into a chair, the third into a table and the last, who brings nothing to his lady-love is proposing to her when the fake furniture collapses on top of him. The lady, tearing her hair in anger leaves the scene as the curtain drops. Suphnmnrr On April 16, 1926, the Sophomore Class gave a splendid program, under the di- rection of Mr. John Bixby, who is their class sponsor. The name of the play was "The Home Farm Orchestra". , 1. 'Ihe Kitchen Quartette composed of Ester Hill, Geraldine Whitworth, Masano Sakai and Ayako Ohashi sang: "Sweep No More My Lady". II. Barnyard Harmony Four made up of Clyde Garman, Arnold Thompson, James Anderson and Thomas Beksinski, the four tenor wonders of the world ren- dered the three selections entitled 1. The Duck Walk, 2. Down on the Farm, 3. Be Careful of the "Bull" III. Garden Symphony Quartette, including Mitsuo Kawamoto, Johnny Fujita, Walter Erspamer and Kenneth Strauch, the high bass 'Songsters' sang 1. Hoe-Hoe-Hoe! 2. Weeds are Growing While the Fish Bite, 3. Come, Lettuce, Come! The play was a comedy throughout and the rest of the High School students as well as the teachers came near melting into tears. We had hoped that the Sophs would g.ve us another program to make us feel good again. On the sixth of April the declamation pupils made their first appearance before the High School Students. The three representing the school were: Bertha Garman, oratorical, William Taft's Lincoln Memerial Address, Geraldine Whitworth, dramatic, Tobe's Monument by Elizabeth Kilhamg Agnes Moi, humorous, Yonny's and Alema's Trip to Cooney Island by Tackla M. Weyburn. ilirrnhman April 29 the Freshmen put on their stunt made up of songs, a clever little play and a Songalogue. The Freshman Sextette sang: One Day a Freshman to Fife High Came. The second number was a play full of college humor and tragedy. Julius Gius taking the role of a love sick frosh who upon seeing a picture of Gloria Swanson in the room of Folke Johnson, a college sophomore, asks if it is Folke's sister. The su- perior sophomore kids him along, telling him it is his sister and finally agrees to in- troduce her to Julius. The day comes when the sister has to be produced. Desperate, Folke dresses up Stanford Wise, another college frosh, as a girl and introduces him as his sister. The two lovers get along famously until the "sister" accidentally loses her wig. Our hero is left only the remains of his dreams and the kidding of his com- panions. The third number was entitled: A Freshman's Dream. A Freshman looks into the future, seeing what it will bring to him. His first year he is a frolicsome youngster. As a studious sophomore he is always studying and worrying over his lessons. As a jazzy junior he cares for nothing but a good time, studies are merely impediments in his life of fun and dance. As a serious senior he carries his grand airs with him and makes life miserable for little freshmen. Page Tliirt y-Nine ILLAHEE HP Guns anh lbnhhrasral At last the "Illahee" had been taken to press! Oh, what a nightmare the last few days had been, but now all that was over and I was free to do and think as I wanted to instead of thinking, night and day of the Annual as I had done for the past month. I was aroused early the next morning by the insistant ringing of the telephone. Sensing some impending doom, I dashed to the phone-it was Mr. Andrews, the printer, he said that the office had been robbed but for some strange reason, only the copy of the "Illahee" had been taken. Nothing else had been disturbed and the doors and windows were all locked, as they had been the night before. Into my mind flashed a picture of the Greek Gods of Homer-we had been study- ing them in English, and how I had laughed at the people for worshipping them. Telling Mr. Andrews I would be there as soon as possible, I hung up. When I arrived, we could think of nothing to do but to write all the material over again. This would take a long time but as I had memorized it all I resolved to do it. In an hour I was feeling better, all the class reports were ready, once more, and I was half way through a story, when on looking up I found myself gazing at a silver pistol. Knowing that the owner of the gun was the thief of the night before, I looked up at my conquerer. By his god-like form I knew it could be none other than Apollo, bearer of the silver bow in Homer's time, but who had kept up with the times and purchased a gun in place of arrows! What could I do? Here was punishment for my scoffing. But now Apollo, the gun-wielding one, was speaking: "The gods have said that the only way you can redeem yourself and consequently make possible the publishing of this paper, is to turn cartwheels down the streets of Sumner!" I was about to protest that I knew nothing about cartwheels, but Minerva, the goddess of wisdom, and the one who loved mortals, spke words of encouragement- "Never fear, I will protect you, do as he bids--" and waving her wand over me, my clothes were changed into a ballet costume. Apollo led the way to the street, where the Salvation Army was tuning up, so I started in. Up one street and down another I went. A movie camera, worked by Mercury, the messenger of the gods, continually grinding away-the buildings of Sumner made it impossible for the gods to see what happened on the earth so Father Jove, the ruler of the gods, had sent the camera so the gods could enjoy my performance on the Olympian mount. Apollo fin- ally called a halt and said that I had angered Neptune, god of the sea, and that I must go to him and make my apologies. So I led him to a service station and stuck my head under the faucet-that fooled him! Then he started to take me to his car, a Chrysler, the wings he used to have on his feet now adorned the radiator cap-for even gods must be up to date. Leaning on the car was the only Cop Sumner possessed --poor Apollo had parked for over an hour, and beside a water hydrant! I didn't laugh-out loud-but while Apollo was offering the officer a drink of the god's own nectar, I took the copy of the "Illahee" and ran to the printers with it. Minerva prom- ised to guard it against any more experiences so I went home to bed. Miss Moe's voice was the next thing I heard- "Poor dear, what a dreadful nightmare she must be having, even water fails to wake her up. Having taken that material to Sumner she can't even wait till she gets home to go to sleep." "Ditch her into the back seat, she'll get enough bumps to wake her up," spoke up Noey. So that's that-all my exercise and work for nothing, but the gods were kind- after all! -Bertha Garman '26 Page Forty -1 Athlviim ILLAHEE' 'Bugs' Idzmkrthall 4 4 1 First Row--Masao Kondo, Clyde Garman, Johnny Fujita. Second Row-Tadao Yosh- ida, Forrest Norris, Stanford Wise, Daiichi Yoshioka, Mitsuo Kawamoto. When school started, baseball did too, the boys playing every noon with a make- shift team and not doing much but having a good time. Tennis was played by a few boys while nice weather held out, but as soon as the weather became inclement football became the favorite sport. Lack of proper uniforms seriously handicapped the game but progress in passing and kicking the ball was made. Mr. Enochs, coach and pal to the boys, came in for his share of football with consequent breakage and soiling. The writer noticed several afternoons when the coach hid his trouser legs because of recent Contact with 'dear mother earth.' A perfectly new pair of glasses was broken by the afore-mentioned coach, while playing the great national game. Practice for basket-ball started early in October. There was very little material of which to build a team and oftener than not there were not enough boys at practice to. make two teams. The team practiced with a will and great progress was made., The first game was with Gig Harbor and at that school. The score was 17 to 16 in our favor. Mitsuo, our old standby, made 9 of the points for our side, and played the best game of any member of the team. January 8 we journeyed to Roy. Fifefs inexperienced and small players could not stop the Roy five and the score stood 24 to 3 in their favor at the end. of the fourth quarter. At Buckley, January 15, things were even worse, Starr's husky veterans being too much for us. Tadao did splendid work, holding Wilson, usually their high 'point man, to three baskets. L'a2.',i- Fort y-Two ' ILLAHEE When Orting came here the first time the lights went out after the first two minutes of play with Fife leading by a score of 2 to 0. In the play-off our boys played a brand of ball which made us feel proud of them. We kept the bacon to the tune of 16 to 13. Sumner was our next conqueror, going home with a score of 14 to 6 in their favor. Vaughn came to Fife and went home with a 15 to 7 score against them-. The rest of the season was just a series of defeats for us. Eatonville, Kapowsin and Puyallup bested us on different nights and Eatonville and Orting in the tourna- ment. . Daiichi stands first as the seas'on's all-around star, playing running guard. His shooting and guarding excelled any of his team-mates. Mitsuo comes in a close second for his excellent shooting and ability to get loose from his guard. Half of Fife's points were made by this faithful member of our team. He played both forward and center. Tadao came right on Mitsuo's heels for his share of honors. Considering his inexperience he played well at both forward and running guard. Johnny, our fast little forward, did not come up to expectations, occasionally showing a flash of speed which frightened him for the rest of the game. Garman, at back guard, would have off nights but played well as a whole. His inexperience made it hard for him to stay at his basket when he longed to get into the fray thus the opposing team would get a set up shot. Stanford, center and sub did not play too well at times, but he has shown won- derful improvement over the first of the year. He is just a 'Frosh' so that we are counting on him doing big things in basket-ball before his four years are over. We are well satisfied with the boys' playing, all of them inexperienced, they have set us an example of loyalty and sportsmanship which we would all do well to imitate. Going into a game time after time, knowing that they would be beaten, did not daunt them, they played their best, proving their manhood by accepting their fate and not flinching. Altho the names of the scrubs do not appear here, they must receive their share of praise. The team we had this year owed a great deal of its success to the scrubs who turned out regularly. After basket-ball was over baseball gloves and bats came to the fore. The boys cannot be expected to do much on the field this year for the same reason that they were unable to do much in basket-ball. However, we will enter the league and the boys can be depended on to do their level best for the school. FIFE AUDITORIUM Page Forty-Tlurm-u ILLAHEE Eaarhall First Row-Tadao Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi, Masao Kondo, Johnny Fujita. Second Row-Juro Yoshioka, Mitsuo Kawamoto, Daiichi Yoshika, Folke Johnson Harold Carlson, Arnold Thompson, Forrest Norris, Mr. Enochs. Fife Fife Fife Fife Fife Buckley Eatonville Puyallup Kapowsin Sumner Y' 5' 3 3 3F Svrhehule nf Gamrn Page Forty-Four' April 9-at Buckley - April 14-at Fife - April 23-at Fife. April 28-at Kapowsin May 5-at Sumner ILLAHEE Girlz' 'igzmkrthall Birrrr Glnuntg Clllmnmirmxm Marguerite Younkin Mary Fox Mr. Harry Enochs Dorothy Vickerg Virde Johnson L21 Veta Smart Pinpga- l1'vJrty-Fivv Annie Ellestad Helen Ehnat ILLAHEE A Erram Elini flillutvrializrh Presented by the Fife High School, Girls Basket Ball Team. Time: 1925-1926 Cast: Act 1 Time January 8 Act 4 Time: January 29 Fife vs. Roy at Roy Fife vs. Sumner at Fife Act 2 Time. January 15 Act 5 Time: February 2 Fife vs. Buckley at Buckley Fife vs. Vaughn at Fife Act 3 Time' January 22 Act 6 Time: February 19 Fife vs. Orting at Fife Fife vs. Kapowsin at Kapowsln La Veta Smart Forward Dorothy Vickers - Forward Mary Fox - - - Center Marguerite Younkin Side-Center Helen Ehnat - - - Guard Virde Johnson Guard Annie Ellestad - - - Sub. The first scene of the play was laid at Roy. The' curtain rises the first time showing the girls of Fife, a strong, efficient, well organized team, fthis was mani- fested throughout the entire seasonl struggling' with the Roy team. The Fife Girls proved too much for the Roy Girls by defeating them with a score of 27-13. The Curtain rises the second time at Buckley. The Buckley team was so con- fident of victory that they lost to the Fife Girls by a score of 29-9. The Buckley Coach joined her heartbroken team in their mourning behind the scenes. The third scene was on our home floor with the Orting Girls. The Fife Sextette appears on the floor soon followed by the Orting team. The referee's whistle blows, the game is on,-the game is over! All too soon the Orting Girls say, for such a score is distasteful to them. The score is 19-S. The curtain rises for the fourth time, showing the grim visages of the Fife He- roes and the Sumner Villians basket ball teams. Now begins a battle resembling the World War in its intensity. The curtain rises showing the beginning of the second half. What a transformation! The heroes are literally walking away with the game while the villians stand, gnashing their teeth with rage. The final scene shows Fife Stars happy for the score is 27-22 in favor of Fife. The curtain again rises showing the Vaughn Girls displaying their new-born knowledge of basket ball. La Veta towers far above her guards and rolls the ball into the basket before the helpless Vaugn players are aware of the whereabouts of the ball. The Fife first team gave her understudies a chance, and even then the result- ing score, a, complete walkaway for Fife, was 40-11. The final scene opens at Kapowsin, the home of last year's champions. Fife is more than determined to win as this is the final game. After a few minutes of un- excusable lethargy, Fife opens up and a championship cannot be denied. The time- keeper's whistle blows, the score is announced, 23-16 for Fife, FIFE GIRLS are the PIERCE COUNTY BASKET BALL CHAMPIONS! Final action of the captain shows her walking through Pierce County carrying a broom purchased at Andre's store early in the season by the coach, and guaranteed to make a clean sweep. Because of the applause, the curtain is again raised, showing the girls' picture on the Sunday sport sheet and the coach going around bragging that those are 'this girls". Page Forty-Six 1 P115 ILLAHEE CDCDZ-X f'I'I'l'l-4 FORREST NORRIS 555522: Agnes: m'f'D Effigoo ,qm.-:,:5 F15 "' .-P .-m mg S ET 5 U3 ... nm W: So. YD F? sn Z3 Q- When you're up, you're up, When you're down, you're down, When you're up against Fife You're upside down. SSSsssss Boom Ahhh Fife High Rah! Rah! G-I'-r-r-r-a-a G-1'-r-r-r-a-a Fife High Boom Bah! Hit 'em in the Wishbone! Sock 'em in the jaw! Send 'em to the cemetery! Hah! Hah! Hah! Page Forty-Eight JULIUS GIUS ILLAHEE Amo, Amas, Amat, We're gonna make things hot We'll win or bust! We!!! raise the dust! Amo, Amas, Amat. Fife High yea Other team ray Both teams play Thank you! Whose gonna win-win? Whose gonna win-win? Whose gonna win-win now? We'1'e gonna win-win We're gonna win-win We're gonna win-win-How? Easy! ..l.... They haven't got the pep, They haven't got the jazz They haven't got the team That Fife School has! Hit 'em high! Hit'em low! Come on, Fife, Let's go! Kickety, Rickety, Rick-Rack, Chickety, Chickety, Chick-Chack Rick-Rack, Chick-Chack- Give 'em the horse laugh, Ee-aw! Bomalacka-Bomalacka, Bow-wow-wow, Chickalacka-Chickalacka, Chow-chow-chow- Bomalacka-Chickalacka, Who are we? Fife Hi! Fife Hi! Can't you see? Page Forty-Nine ILLAHEE Page Fifty v Munir anim Brenna ILLAHEE Erumatim i Lillian Jacobs Jeanne Whitworth Arnold Thompson Marguerite Younkin Forrest Norris 'Mary Fox Annie Ellestad Stanford Wise Julius Gius Helen Ehnat Harold Carlson Page Fifty-Two Walter Erspamer Clyde Garman Howard Massey 'ILLAHEE "Seuentvrn" The school play, Booth Tarkin,gton's "Seventeen", under the direction of Mrs. McC1ane, was presented 011 Friday evening, April 16. The play consisted of four .acts and required two and one half hours for its presentation. Those on the cast and different committees were: CAST Mrs. Baxter .- - - - Mary Fox Mr. Baxter - - - Forrest Norris William ,Sylvanus Baxter - Julius Gius Johnnie Watson - - Arnold Thompson Jane Baxter -- Annie Ellestad May Parcher - - Marguerite Younkin Lola Pratt - -- - Helen Ehnat 'Genesis -- Clyde Garman Joe Bullit .Stanford Wise Mr. Parcher ,f - Howard Massey George Crooper Walter Erspamer Ethel Boke - - Lillian Jacobs Wallie Banks - - Harold Carlson Mary Brooks - - - Jeanne Whitworth Assistant Coach-LaVeta Smart. Publicity-Clara Sicade, Louise Fox. Tickets-Bertha Garman, Geraldine Whitworth. Property-Lillian Ehnat, Virde Johnson. Scenery and Lights-Arthur Stolen, Daiichi Yoshioka, Masao Kondo, Harry Anderson. ' Ushers-Esther Hill, Masano Saki, Ayako Ohashi, Hazel Case, Mary Bulat. Wardrobe Mistress-Lois Garman. ,Synopsis of Play It is the tragedy of William Sylvanus Baxter that he has ceased to be sixteen and is not yet eighteen. Seventeen is not an age, it is a disease. In his heart William knows all the tortures and delights of love. But he is still sent by his mother on errands of the most humiliating sort, and depends on his father for every nickel, the use of which he must justify before he gets it. "Silly" Bill fell in love with Lola, the "Baby-Talk Lady," a vapid little flirt. To woo her in a manner worthy of himself fand herj he steals his father's evening clothes. When his wooings become a nuisance to the neighborhood, his mother steals them back, and has them let out to fit the middle-aged form of her husband, thereby keeping William at home. But when it comes to the "Baby-Talk Lady's" good-bye dance, not to be present was unendurable. How William again gets the dress suit, and how he wears it at the party, and Genesis discloses the fact that the proud garment is in reality his father's makes up the story of the play. Page Fifty-'l'hrve CEIPP 611111 J First Row-Harriet Sicade, Masono Sakii, Ayako Ohashi, Hazel Case, Anna Vraves, Velma Cummings, Mary Bulat, Jeanne Whitworth, Alice Seamons. Second Row-Raiji Sugioka, Masao Kondo, Nicholas Eberhardt, Louise Fox, Lillian Jacobs, Annie Ellestad, Bertha Garman, Geraldine Whitworth, Lois Garman. Third Row-Mr. Rynning, Harold Carlson, Millard Nase, Juro Yoshioka, Howard Massey, Daiichi Yoshioka, Stanford Wise, Julius Gius. C5122 Glluh HE glee club under the supervision of Mr. Rynning, was very successful. It was the largest glee club Fife has had for several years. There were enough members in the club to form a mixed chorus. The first public appearance was December 23, the night of the Christmas program. Other appearances were made, April 16, when the glee club sang' between acts of the school play, and Friday, May 28, the night of Commencement. . Those enrolled for Glee Club were: Piano-Lois Garman. Soprano--Mary Bulat, Velma Cummings, Annie Ellestad, Bertha Garman, Ayako Ohashi, Masano Sakai, Alice Seamons, Harriet Sicade, LaVeta Smart, Geraldine Whitworth, Jeanne Whitworth. Alto-'Hazel Case, Louise Fox, Lillian Jacobs, Anna Vraves. Tenor-Nicholas Eberhardt, Julius Guis, Howard Massey, Millard Nase, Elwell Ruddock, Raiji Sugioka. Bass-Harold Carlson, Masao Kondo, Nobuo Kondo, Stanford Wise, Daiichi Yoshioka, Juro Yoshioka. Page l"ifty-Four ? Bvrlamaiinn sinh Evhatv ILLAHEE Errlamatinn Geraldine Whitworth, Agnes Moi, Bertha Garman This is the first attempt in the Declamation contests for Fife, but never-the-less, we had a large turnout for the three divisions of humorist, dramatist and orator. With Mr. Bixby as coach, study and preparation began the first part of February and after much close competition, Agnes Moi was chosen as humorist, Geraldine Whit- worth as dramatist and Bertha Garman, orator. Classics from American literature were used for the speeches, the material being memorized and of ten minutes in length, The contests were held on April seventh, with the Oratorical division meeting at Buckley High School, the dramatical division at Puyallup and the humorist at Sumner. Entries came from practically all the high schools in the county. H U 3 8 I Behav The State debate question and the one which Pierce County used was: "Resolved, that the Constitution of the United States should be so amended as to empower Congress to restrain, regulate and prohibit the labor of persons under fifteen years of age." As has been our custom for two years, we entered the smaller league made up of Gig Harbor, Kapowsin, Eatonville and Fife. Mr. Bixby was chosen as debate coach when study began early in November. Reference material was secured from the State Extension Library of the Washington State College at Pullman and from the Tacoma Public Library. The teams were chosen from the persons who turned out regularly for study, the members being: Bertha Garman, Geraldine Whitworth and Howard Massey, at- firmativeg Forrest Norris, Julius Gius and Masao Kondo, negative, Bertha Garman and Forrest Norris being captains of their respective teams. The first debate of our season was held with the Stadium teams, and as it was a practice debate, no decisions were rendered. A Page Fi fty-Six ILLAHEE rw- DEBATERS Bertha Garman, Howard Massey, Geraldine Whitworth, Forrest Norris, 'Masao Kondo, Julius Gius, Mr. Bixby On December 16, the first league debate was held in the Fife high school as- sembly, the Gig Harbor team upholding the negative of the question and Fife the affirmative. Professors Robbins, Henry and Topping of the College of Puget Sound, who acted as judges, gave a 3-0 decision in favor of the affirmative. The same evening the Fife negative team met the Gig Harbor affirmative team at Gig Harbor. Unfortunately for us, the decision favored the affirmative by a '2-1 count. During the three weeks lapsing before the next league debates, much effort was given to the study of the question and to the delivery of the speeches. January 20, the Kapowsin affirmative team traveled to Fife and defeated the negative team of Fife 3-0 by the decision given by Professors Weir, Hedley and Davis of the College of Puget Sound faculty. However, the Fife affirmative who had met Eatonville at the Eatonville high school at the same time emerged victorious through a judges' decision of 2-1. As a result of eight league debates, Gig Harbor was champion of the small league with seven points to their credit. Fife and Eatonville tied for second place with six 'points each, Kapowsin third with five points. The debates were thoroughly enjoyed by the students and the feeling that the debaters have won their letters, prevails. Debate spirit in the school is continually growing and next year with more experienced debaterg we may aim for the cham- pionship. Page l"ii'ty-Seven ILLAHEE An Earning un the Zllrnnt lgnrrh I sat on the 'porch one evening, As the sun was sinking lowg And watched the shadows creeping Upon the earth below. And evening came in silence, The sky was blue and serene, The stars began to twinkle, And silence reigned supreme. The bird had flown to its nestling, The flowers had gone to sleepy The leaves began to rustle As frogs began to speak. I though of our Heavenly Father High up in the Heavens above, How dearly He loves to guide us, His theme none other than love. -Folke Johnson '28 Page Fifty-Eight - Snriritg I ILLAHEE Svnrirtg Svninr Ilnitiatinn lgartg CTOBER the 5th, a party was given by the Seniors to initiate the Freshmen. Various games were played until it was time for the initiation to take place. Then the lights were turned out and with the Freshmen sitting in a circle the various parts of a last year's Freshman who had disobeyed the orders of the school were passed around. Screams from the girls and groans from the boys told of the agony through which they were going as drops of blood from the deceased were passed around. Following this, each freshman was given a task to do-solos from the boys and recitations from the girls. Bibs and bonnets were given them to wear for the rest of the evening. Each freshy vowed to abide by all the rules set down by their elders on the punishment of death. Refreshments were served at the usual hour and then the guests were sent home as freshmen aren't allowed to stay out late. Jluninr illlaaquerahv Early On October 24 the Juniors gave a masquerade party in honor of the Seniors. The hall was beautifully decorated in Hallowe'en colors with black cats, witches, pumpkins and all sorts of Hallowe'en spooks. Nearly all the high school was present, and in their queer costumes would have made any one shudder. A prize was given to the best two-Mandy and Rastus four colored peoplej, Ruth and Lillian Jacobs. Games were played and a fishing pond was provided so we might all go fishing for our fortunes. After fishing, we formed a grand march, led by Mr. and Mrs. Rynning into the dining room. This was also decorated in the HalloWe'en motif. Cun- ning little place cards told us where to sit and oh! the good things on the table! Sand- wiches, cider, doughnuts, and apples. After we had eaten all we could, toasts were given. The rest of the evening was enjoyed in dancing and everybody left saying they had all had a wonderful time. Syurpriav lgartg A party at Annie Ellestad's home came as a surprise to LaVeta Smart on her seventeenth birthday, November 15. The Senior and Junior girls were present. The first part of the evening was enjoyed in playing cards after which the refreshments were served. The Charleston was then danced until time for the girls to go home. Those present were: LaVeta Smart, Lillian and Helen Ehnat, Virde Johnson, Mar- guerite Younkin, Mary Fox and Lillian and Alva Jacobs. Uhr Olurniuul March 5, the men of the Fife P. T. A. gave a big carnival in the gym. The nu- merous booths, decorated in bunting and liberally painted up like any professional carnival, the sawdust on the floor, banners, and bunting overhead with the three clowns and the home band playing made it seem like a "regular" carnival. An act put on by five professional comedians added the last touch to the affair and made it truly worthwhile. Fife and the surrounding communities turned out "enmasse" to witness this big affair. Innumerable bags of candy, cones of cie-cream, and packages of gum were eaten. Hot dogs, coffee and lemonade were in great demand. It was an evening brim- full of goodies and fun. Page Sixty ILLAHEE Eh? Svnphumnrr liarig The Sophomores gave a party March 19 in honor of St. Patrick's Day, The hall and dining room were beautifully decorated in green and white, lovely trilliums carry- ing out this motif on the tables. The first part of the evening was spent in playing games. A prize was given to the chicken who could lay the biggest egg. At the usual hour delicious refreshments were served. The toastmaster added his share to the evening by calling on several teachers and students for short speeches. After lunch dancing took up the time until midnight when the guests returned to their homes. Happy faces told all too well the good time that all had had. Ezuakrthall Binnn' A dinner was given March 30 honoring the girls' and boys' basketball teams, by the student body. The dining room was decorated in delicate shades of blue and gold, the school colors. Vases of gorgeous daffodils were placed on the long white tables, which were airanged in the shape of a letter H, the honor guests having the middle table. The place-cards were little basket-balls. Blue and gold caps added to the ap- pearance of the honor table, each member of the girls' team had a balloon attached. Dinner was eaten by the light of yellow candles. After a delicious dinner, the feature of which was the presenting of a large white cake decorated with a basketball in brown, to La Veta Smart, captain of the girls' team, toasts were given by: Mr. Enochs, La Veta Smart, Clyde Garman and Mr. Rynning on t'Why I like Basketball." Dinner was served in an efficient manner by four maids, Lillian Jacobs, Lillian Ehnat, Clara Sicade and Louise Fox, who were suitably attired in black dresses and frilly white aprons and caps. Dinner over, the guests adjourned to the next room where the game "cootie" and dancing were enjoyed. Mrs. Rynning and Nicholas Eberhardt were awarded the prizes for being the best "cootie catchers." As far as could be ascertained, everybody en- joyed themselves and all too soon was it time to go home, the teams feeling certain that the students of Fife were loyal and appreciated their efforts to put Fife on the map in athletics. illrrahmau lgarig Good looking shieks in big bottomed trousers and the latest style in hats and shirts, heralded the approach and invited the high school to attend the Freshman paI'tY, May 7. 'Ihe party, in honor of the Seniors was a gay affair. With the hall decorated in the senior colors everybody seemed in their best holiday mood. Unique games Were played, a delicious luncheon served and the customary dancing enjoyed. Although this was the only party given by the Freshies it was a pronounced suc- cess and they are to be congratulated on the entire success of the evening. 3 3 8 It 3 Srhnnl Glalrnhar 1925- 1 HBE Sept. T School begins with lots of pep. 8 Oh! of all the handsome teachers! 9 Looks like lessons are go.ng to be easy this year. 10 Nevcr judge by looks-these teachers assign terrible lessons. 13 'linic to settle down, one week gone. Pzigr- Sixty-Oiiv - ILLAHEE Oct. Nov. Mary gets a kick out of school. Some of green is already wearing Off of F1-eshie-5, 'Mary Bulat tries to vamp Julius. LaVeta says she has never met Whiz Bang but he must be a keen guy. Mr. Rynning insists that the Physics class is gonna flunk! Talk about shieks--have you seen Stan's and Clyde's trousers? Mrs. McClane finds girls in Domestic Science sewing without a thimble.. Now you're going to get it. You know the saying-"Laugh and the world laughs with you, weep and you Weep alone"-go ahead and weep-itis raining todayl Biology class goes grasshopper hunting-ugh! Seniors give party-Frosh initiated. Now, girls, be careful-he's only a Frosh. Ready for vacation again. Thank goodness, only eight more months of school! Mr. Enochs gets glasses. Lois gets her hair bobbed-Rah for our side. If Folke doesn't stop asking questions he'll get in trouble. Bertha is the only one who knows her Civics today-per usual. Forrest says he reads Mutt and Jeff every night! I wonder if Mr. Enochs is writing a book-he always is asking for themes. Dot Vickers returns to school. Big marble tournament-Mr. Enochs vs. first grader. Lillian Ehnat sent to dentist because she has a tooth-ache--at least that is what she says. Girls defeated in a talking match with the boys. Organize the Glee Club. First issue of the Fifonian. Who is Prudence Ann? Now, girls, who took Mr. Enochs' cap? Helen tries to vamp Mitsuyoshi but without success. Louise Fox says that soup should be seen and not heard. Julius, what are you looking at Geraldine for? Namiko was the hostess at a Japanese party given at her home. Another new dress for Alice! Juniors give masquerade ball--Oh, Rastus, where's Mandy? Teachers' Institute. Whatta life! Teachers' Institute again-our time for vacation. Mr. Enochs comes to school with new Lizzie. Howard wishes for Forrest's good looks. Please notice Raiji's new bow tie. Velma found telling her mostprecious secret-shhhh! Now, Nicholas-who is that girl? Were you blinded by the Anderson Brothers' blazers? Girls exceptionally quiet in sewing today-LaVeta and Bertha absent. Thomas starts a riot over girls short skirts. Bixby overheard singing: 'tOh, I Wish I Had Someone to Love Me." Esther found in gym doing daily dozen. Sleepy Monday, again. Oh, Bertha, scandal! Marguerite gets fired from Glee Club. Tadao sworn off eating until Thanksgiving. The great mystery-who took Kiyoko home from that party? .4 -f, Mary does her daily giggling in English. FA Pu ge Sixty-Two ILLAHEE Dec. an. Q'26l Feb. 24 25 30 31 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 19 20 21 22 23 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 18 19 20 21 22 '25 26 27 28 29 1 2 3 4 5 All Frosh girls have black eyes today, what's the matter. Oh, Boy! Thanksgiving tomorrow! and two days' vacation. Agnes Moi and her kid sister, Hilda, enter school. Helen says that if you want to see a good joke, look at Helen. Report cards-OH, what grades! Frosh show speed in bringing back cards. Mother -Moe delighted. Now, Annie, you mustn't tell such naughty stories. Oh, look at Howard, the Shiek. Don't lose your heads, girls. Junior boys play marbles-how childish. Elwell says he is like Cal-hasn't much to say and minds his own business. Clara tells us Fife has no shieks-they're all freaks. Girls, don't make so much noise in the dressing room. Velma says she doesn't like to run-it ruins her complexion. LaVeta's birthday-spank her for me. Mrs. McClane informs LaVeta that she can hang Bertha in sewing today- does your neck hurt? Now, Freshie, don't cry. Santa won't forget you. Marguerite has her English lesson today. Miss Moe says that if we go down the steps quietly Santa may bring us Christmas presents. Secret! It is known that our shiek has quite a case on Dona Russell. Hilda found crying. Mr. Enochs told her there was no Santa! Christmas Vacation. Vacation over. All come back with happy faces and good resolutions. Louise and Evelyn have a fight over wineballs. Mary runs off with loot. Marguerite Younkin finds out that dancing the Charleston and curling hair at the same time d0esn't work. We have given up hopes for Arthur to ever grow up. Girls win first basketball game of season-boys lose. Everybody feeling blue-semester exams today! Sophomore class meeting. What's it all about, anyway? Evelyn Eberhardt leaves school. Good-bye. old dear. Exams worse than expected-Freshies weep when grades fall lower than A. Where were Julius and Geraldine last night? Can't fool us, we know! Listen, kid-did you hear about Virde? Daiichi thinks the world is all wrong this morning-what happened to him yesterday? Harold is so bashful, you'd never have expected it of him. O'h, now we know what keeps Nicholas out so late nights. Just look at our shiek's new sweater. He has promised to let me wear it some day! Mary B says if she gets any fatter she's going to shoot herself! Dorothy Vickers announces her engagement by singing, "Yes sir, he is ser- ious." Agnes can't yell today because she is taking vocal lessons and is afraid of straining her voice. Lily Ehnat is absent today. She went out Sunday without her hat on, so says Helen. Girls and boys both defeat Vaughn. Too bad, English III students get a zero because they can't think of any jokes to tell. Mr. Rynning decides to run over "The Chapel Steps" in Glee Club. For a nice quiet lunch, go to the hot lunch room. I Page Sixty-'l'll rm: ILLAHEE t look at the A's. ig kindergarten stories. "Los 'Tres Osos." went to a dance last night. Who are the shieks, girls? a friend fwm "the Old country." Ve laf and laf, ve haf .esson in World History as usual. class! All the time they work. mg a May basket on Alice Seamons' door tonite. 1 castle you have," said Arthur so sweetly. never thought that of you," said shy little Marguerite. like the Geometry class-he kept them in after school l01'ty, "Why ar0I1'1S you a bean pole like me?" Oh! what a glorious night. arriet S. would look charming with her ringlets cut short. s, 2700 minutes, 162,000 seconds left of school. A ime I've told you," scolded Mr. Rynning in Physics class. MCCl3I1e if she should start house-keeping now. ting in the sun absorbing a few more of those charming vhich had as its base the killing of a cat! ting last night? Oh boy, water's fine, ere among the 'missing' yesterday. I don't blame you, I sick too, on a day like this. i for commencement. Friday fish. Seniors get out--Lucky dogs! of exams-one more day of school, leven good boneheads gone. Good-bye, Old dear-s! 8 8 8 8 8 illig Zliirat Evan tonight as can be, is calling on me. nd asked if he might call, and young, handsome and tall, me door bell, maybe it's he! e door in great haste not a moment to waste. the d00I' I grow fussed and red, B' occurs to me to be said, ngue is glued as if covered with paste: i00r with a noisy bang. though the whole house rang. ew that my brother troubled, y troubles were all doubled, B week of them he sang. ' -Ester Hill '28 Page Sixty-Five ILLAHEE ILLAHEE ,.-. ., ,. . . ?,- 1-,--W..-,-.ff.V,.. f.r.....,...a.r.f,.-.,,.........1 - eps Namiko, she gave him a comb for Christmas. ,ld me not to t1'y to be funny-I already was. ' says he will take the Biology class to Steilacoom if he doesn't 2 responsible for their return. appened today. -nds Velma a sweet valentine. at Kapowsin and win the championship. Who says Fife can't atball? iave their pictures taken. Now the camera's broken. s late to school this morning. We'll excuse him. He forgot that rted at nine o'clock. s are still absent. Some wedding! nes to school with a parking blister-now, kid- .unt-Agnes shows how she entertains her sweeties. :ides to take up house-keeping. 1 life! I'in so sleepy. s fails to says "Have you heard this one?" in English today. in tournament and lose to Eatonville, but show good playing. GBM Elini il Mah wings! of play chosen- Oh that I had wings ime to make up-Ain't we got fun? That I might fly away, id Ruth leave school. Into a different land sd fine at tournament. Forever there to stay. ld Stayed home, girls! Off to the tournament. 's he chews gum to keep his mouth closed once in a while. e the team's picture in the paper yesterday? 2tting quite heavy, he broke his desk today. olke juggle that pencil. This land has sorrows grieving, This land has deaths untold- I wish I were in Heaven To pace the streets of gold. This land where hearts are aching, 's she eats chicken eggs but she isn't a chicken. This land which pains our breast, Illahee reporters-stay away from Bertha or you will be bawled This land shall be forsaken, phat late report of yours. When we've entered into rest. out invitations for St. Pat's party. 's Day. Everybody that's Irish looks groin. got herself while sweeping. 's party. Such fun! has spring fever this morning. till has spring fever. imming at noo11. Water's fine. C'mon in. ken for annual. Gee! ain't we pretty. running wild in his baseball uniform. ut for play practice. ls girl out last night, He came to school today with a black eye. No school today. ' bunny visited me. How did he treat you? n speeches. Ve haf so much foon! d. Play postponed until April 16. rs are sick today. Have fishing fever. Dick falls in. mme at Buckley. took Biology class to Steilacoom. returns safely. Lrsal. lrades get big kick out of Genesis. given. Thank goodness, no more play practice. ly. No excitement. My heart is drawn up Yonder Where death shall have no sting, And so I often wander, To the Palace of the King. . -Folke Johnson '29. .PO-EC giXfY'SiX Page Sixty-Four ILLAHEE Dec. Jan. V263 Feb. 24 25 30 31 1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 19 20 21 22 23 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 18 19 20 21 22 '25 26 27 28 29 1 2 3 4 5 All Frosh girls have black eyes today, what's the matter. Oh, Boy! Thanksgiving tomorrow! and two days' vacation. Agnes Moi and her kid sister, Hilda, enter school. Helen says that if you want to see a good joke, look at Helen. Report cards-OH, what grades! Frosh show speed in bringing back cards. Mother 'Moe delighted. Now, Annie, you mustn't tell such naughty stories. Oh, look at Howard, the Shiek. Don't lose your heads, girls. Junior boys play marbles-how childish. Elwell says he is like Cal-hasn't much to say and minds his own business. Clara tells us Fife has no shieks-they're all freaks. Girls, don't make so much noise in the dressing room. Velma says she doesn't like to run-it ruins her complexion. LaVeta's birthday-spank her for me. Mrs. McClane informs LaVeta that she can hang Bertha in sewing today- does your neck hurt? Now, Freshie, don't cry. Santa won't forget you. Marguerite has her English lesson today. Miss Moe says that if we go down the steps quietly Santa may bring us Christmas presents. Secret! It is known that our shiek has quite a case on Dona Russell. Hilda found crying. Mr. Enochs told her there was no Santa! Christmas Vacation. Vacation over. All come back with happy faces and good resolutions. Louise and Evelyn have a fight over wineballs. Mary runs off with loot. Marguerite Younkin finds out that dancing the Charleston and curling hair at the same time doesn't work. We have given up hopes for Arthur to ever grow up. Girls win first basketball game of season-boys lose. Everybody feeling blue-semester exams today! Sophomore class meeting. What's it all about, anyway? g, Evelyn Eberhardt leaves school. Good-bye, old dear. Exams worse than expected-Freshies weep when grades fall lower than A. Where were Julius and Geraldine last night? Can't fool us, we know! Listen, kid-did you hear about Virde? Daiichi thinks the world is all wrong this morning-what happened to him yesterday? Harold is so bashful, you'd never have expected it of him. O'h, now we know what keeps Nicholas out so late nights. Just look at our shiek's new sweater. He has promised to let me wear it some day! Mary B says if she gets any fatter she's going to shoot herself! Dorothy Vickers announces her engagement by singing, "Yes sir, he is ser- ious." Agnes can't yell today because she is taking vocal lessons and is afraid of straining her voice. Lily Ehnat is absent today. She went out Sunday without her hat on, so says Helen. Girls and boys both defeat Vaughn. Too bad, English III students get a zero because they can't think of any jokes to tell. Mr. Rynning decides to run over "The Chapel Steps" in Glee Club. For a nice quiet lunch, go to the hot lunch room. Page Sixty-'Flirt-e ILLAHEE L Mar. April Forrest steps Namiko, she gave him a comb for Christmas. Howard told me not to try to be funny-I already was. Mr. Bixby says he will take the Biology class to Steilacoom if he doesn't have to be responsible for their return. Nothing happened today. Forrest sends Velma a sweet valentine. Girls defeat Kapowsin and win the championship. Who says Fife can't play basketball? Teachers have their pictures taken. Now the camera's broken. Mr. Enochs late to school this morning. We'll excuse him. He forgot that school started at nine o'clock. Ehnat girls are still absent. Some wedding! Bertha comes to school with a parking blister-now, kid- Juniors' stunt-Agnes shows how she entertains her sweeties. LaVeta decides to take up house-keeping. Oh, what a life! I'm so sleepy. Mr. Enochs fails to says "Have you heard this one?" in English today. Characters of play chosen. Boys play in tournament and lose to Eatonville, but show good playing. No more time to make up-Ain't we got fun? Dorothy and Ruth leave school. Boys played fine at tournament. I wish I had stayed home. Let's go, girls! Off to the tournament. Arnold says he chews gum to keep his mouth closed once in a while. Did you see the team's picture in the paper yesterday? Folke is getting quite heavy, he broke his desk today. Just see Folke juggle that pencil. Lily E. says she eats chicken eggs but she isn't a chicken. Advice to Illahee reporters-stay away from Bertha or you will be bawled out about that late report of yours. Sophs give out invitations for St. Pat's party. St. Pat.rick's Day. Everybody that's Irish looks groin. Velma forgot herself while sweeping. Sophomore's party. Such fun! Everybody has spring fever this morning. Everyone still has spring fever. Boys go swimming at noon. Water's fine. C'mon in. Pictures taken for annual. Gee! ain't we pretty. Mitsuyoshi running wild in his baseball uniform. Everyone out for play practice. Art took his girl out last night. He came to school today with a black eye. April fool. No school today. The Easter bunny visited me. How did he treat you? Declamation speeches. Ve haf so much foonl Julius' hand. Play postponed until April 16. Several boys are sick today. Have fishing fever, Baseball game at Buckley. Mr. Bixby took Biology class to Steilacoom. Everybody returns safely. Dress rehearsal. Matinee. Grades get big kick out of Genesis. The play is given. Thank goodness, no more play practice. Blue Monday. N0 excitement. Dick falls in.. Page Sixty-Four ILLAHEE May Report cards. Just look at the A's. Spanish class telling kindergarten stories. "Los Tres Osos." Sophomore stunt. Annie and LaVeta went to a dance last night. Who are the shieks, girls? Howard entertains a friend from "the old country." Ve laf and laf, ve haf so much foon. Mitsuo knows his lesson in World History as usual. That trigonometry class! All the time they work. James Anderson hung a May basket on Alice Seamons' door tonite. "Oh! Louise what a castle you have," said Arthur so sweetly. "Arnold, Arnold, I never thought that of you," said shy little Marguerite. Mr. Rynning must like the Geometry class-he kept them in after school again today. Said Thomas to Shorty, "Why aren't you a bean pole like me?" Freshman party. Oh! what a glorious night. Harry A. thinks Harriet S. would look charming with her ringlets cut short. Nine days, 45 hours, 2700 minutes, 162,000 seconds left of school. ' "That's the third time I've told youj' scolded Mr. Rynning in Physics class. Namiko asks Mrs. McClane if she should start house-keeping now. Geraldine found sitting in the sun absorbing a few more of those charming freckles. A plot unearthed which had as its base the killing of a cat! Did you go swimming last night? Oh boy, water's fine. Several students were among the 'missing' yesterday. I don't blame you, I feel like I could be sick too, on a day like this. Glee Club practices for commencement. Today is Friday-Friday fish. Exams this week. Seniors get out-Lucky dogs! Exams! Exams! More exams! Whew! Last day of exams-one more day of school. Commencement. Seven good boneheads gone. Good-bye, old dears! 8 32 5 8 8 illlg Zliirai Emu I'm excited tonight as can be, A real beau is calling on me. He wrote and asked if he might call, He's kind and young, handsome and tall, There is the door bell, maybe it's he! I run to the door in great haste For I have not a moment to waste. As I open the door I grow fussed and red. For nothing occurs to me to be said, And my tongue is glued as if covered with paste: I shut the door with a noisy bang. The echo though the whole house rang. I never knew that my brother troubled, But now my troubles were all doubled, For a whole week of them he sang. -Ester Hill '28 Page Sixty-Five wr- I L L A H E E 0911! Elhat Ill 15:61 wings! Oh that I had wings That I might fly away, Into a different land Forever there to stay. This land has sorrows grieving, This land has deaths untold- I wish I were in Heaven To pace the streets of gold. This land where hearts are aching, This land which pains Olll' breast, This land shall be forsaken, When welve entered into rest. My heart is drawn up Yonder Where death shall have no sting, And so I often wander, To the Palace of the King. -Folke Johnson '29 Page Sixty-Six Eitvrarg ILLAHEE Utne nf 7!.iifr's Eittle Glnnuehirs The new pastor had recently arrived in Mayville, a small village. As he thought it his duty, he decided to Pay 03011 and every family of this community a visit. The next morning with his book under his arm, he began his visits. The first house he came to was that of Mrs. Jones, who had a reputation of being slightly cranky, but as the pastor was a new-comer, he knew nothing of this. Re-buttoning his coat and straightening his hat the pastor approached the door and rang the bell. Soon a tall, stout woman with an expression on her face that almost caused the pastor to lose his breath, opened the door. "What do you want?" she asked curtly. "Good morning, madam, I am the-" "Yes, I know, you're the bookseller who was here last week or I am mistaken." "No indeed, madam, I am-" "You just wait here for a moment," said the terrible Mrs. Jones, and disappear- ing into the house she speedily returned with a bulky object which to the astonished minister's eyes, took the shape of a rolling pin. "I reckon you see this," she said sharply, "and if you don't start moving I reckon I'll use it," continued Mrs. Jones. Thus ended his first visit. But the pastor would not let himself be discouraged although never, in all his experience, had he met with such a reception. The next house he came to was an adorable little bungalow set in the midst of delightful flowers of all colors and description. Surely, thought the pastor, the mis- tress of such a home would be pleasant and amiable. Little did the unfortunate man know what was in store for him. As the pastor started toward the door his heart thumped so rapidly and loudly, that he became frightened. He tried to calm himself but a queer feeling crept over him. In response to his knock a young girl with large expressive eyes and bobbed brown hair, dressed in a most attractive fashion, opened the door, and exclaimed, "Why Larry, when did you get home?" The astonished pastor found speech im- possible and when he came to earth again he found himself sitting on a davenport with this wistful creature asking him to tell her about his trip. Swallowing the lump that arose in his throat the pastor said: "There must be some mistake, I am-" "Oh, to be sure, Tom, how stupid of me, but really you do resemble Larry a great deal," continued the girl. The pastor having overcome his feeling, was by this time most indignant and exclaimed: "See here, I am neither Larry nor Tom, I-" "Well who in the world are you, anyway?" asked the girl. "Pm the new pastor," replied the now belligerent man. "You are what!!! The new pastor!" With this the girl had sunk into a chair and sat very still staring hard when suddenly she laughed hysterically, then cried and then laughed again. The poor minister had never felt so helpless in all his thirty- eight years, he ran from one door to the other, rubbing his hands and talking to himself. In despair, he bowed his head and prayed. When he lifted up his head his eyes fell on a pan of Water. "Ah! God is indeed good," he exclaimed, and taking the pan of ice water he threw it at the girl. She became still and motionless in an instant, her large eyes searching the room as if looking for some one. Just then she perceived the pastor. "Oh you," she cried, "Why didn't you tell me you were the pastor," picking up The Book, she thrust it at him saying, "here, take this and leave the house instantly." Page Sixty-Eight ILLAHEE Luckless man! What else could he do or say? He turned and walked out of the house, down the street toward home. To his mind came the proverb: The third time is the charm: but the pastor did not feel equal to brave another episode similar to his first visits in the little village of Mayville. -Annie Ellestad '27 I 8 8 U 3 Tlhafn the iaranrn nf Eli I remember distinctly that I died. I had a funeral and beautiful flowers. The next I remember I was walking the streets of the underworld with a guide and it was very hot. We came to a house and stopped and rang the bell. While waiting for an answer the guide told me that this was where the dunces of Pierce County were kept. We were admitted by a small negro boy, who led us up some stairs and into a large room where about fifty "would be High School students" were studying. I looked around but recognized no one for of course Fife wasn't represented. I was soon tired of this so we again went out in the street. We had walked but a short distance when we came to a river. The guide told me that this was the River Sticks, and to visit the rest of the underworld we must cross it. The guide summoned the ferry man and we were soon across the river. We came to a large building, and this, the guide told me was where the teachers went when they died. We went into thc room and if any of them knew me and gave a bad re- port about me, then I'd have to stay in the underworld always, if not I would be taken to heaven. I gave a sigh of relief when I saw that no one knew me. I was then taken to the officers of the underworld, who asked me a lot of questions. After conferring private- ly for some time, they told me that I could go so I was taken to heaven. As we were entering the golden gates I could hear in the distance the melodious voices of the Fife Glee Club. The guide left me at the gate and as I Came nearer I saw that the Glee Club had no instructor. I was glad to see someone that I knew and I asked them where the teacher was. I was told "That's the heaven of it, no teachers are admitted." -Geraldine Whitworth '28 3 U I 8 3 Early Spring They say, this year we've an early, spring As flowers bloom long before their time. But we could expect just such a thing. In such a wonderful, glorious clime. The trout are swimming in the brook Cared for by an Unknown Power, The beautiful birds are making their nests Upon some lofty fir tree bower- -Daiichi Yoshioka '27 Page Sixty-Nine ILLAHEE Zfm Cftlah Zfm Nut A Illreahir I'm glad I'm not a Freshie For Freshies are so green, They can't get it in their head Not to be heard but seen. Next year perhaps they'll see this As now do you and I, And if they wish to change themselves, They will surely have to try. I sit and gaze across the aisle And watch their foolish faces, As they turn their minds and thots To study verbs and cases. The only reason now I sit With head hung down so low- Is to think that when a Freshman I might have acted so. --James Anderson '28 31 lf if 3 if Ilmft illifr Ctranh? Our Editor asked a love-sick student to write a report on the Orting basketball game and you know that saying about Spring and a "young man's fancy". Well, this was Spring. And here's the write-up: The boys played a wonderful brand of ball with Olrting, and HE wore the most becoming blue suit I'd ever seen. Did you know HE was growing a mustache? Just the tiniest thing. Orting was outclassed at every part of the game, including the making of baskets at which Johnny and Mitsuo eiccelled. The game was the most exciting in the third quarter, when with the ball held poised for a basket HE leaned over and asked if I'd marry Him. Wonders will never cease. You can imagine how thrilled I was. That isn't all, HE promised to give me a ring. I told Him I loved Him no matter if Tadoa did make a personal foul in the fourth quarter which put him out of the game for that evening. The team played bravely on, altho they missed the little guard's assurance and deliberation. As the game progressed it was known that we would win unless some unforseen tragedy should occur. The rooters jumped up and down in their delight and even the coach vouchsafod a little smile of encouragement upon the lucky BOY who was holding my hand and looking into my eyes. Have you ever seen HIS eyes? Of course I'd be terribly jealous if you knew that they were the most expressive brown eyes this side of heaven. And His nose, darling, it's absolutely the most perfect and classical thing since Apollo. Oh, I could just die for Him. When the game was over the boys dutifully gave a yell for our team but you could see envy in their eyes as they looked upon us, as victors. Isn't life grand and glorious and funny? Would you ever believe such thoughts were in the minds of the little innocents at Fife School? And yet the Editor had to accept this as a report on the Orting game, but such is LIFE! -Lois Garman '29 Pagv Sew-n x ILLAHEE Uhr Eamh nf Nnmhrrr HILE you are sitting here doing nothing you might go on a trip wtih me to Nowhere. Nowhere is noted for its emptiness and its lack of space. I was very fortunate one day to be able to make the trip and when I was on my way back I was still thanking myself for going. Our mode of travel was quite ancient but it served the purpose and that was all that was necessary. It was a vehicle that has long past gone out of date, but our grandfathers were well acquainted with them. They were Alumni-planes. Those days they were propelled by a gas jet, the gas being manufactured in the air and the ship was self sustaining. The sides were made of aluminum, contributing to its name. The seats were of plush and inlaid with mother of pearl. They also had a father of pearl on the Presidential seat. We left the metropolis, Tacoma, one fine day, the hottest in summer, although the sun was averaging one hundred and twenty degrees, the snow had just started to freeze, and I was later told that the sun cooled off and the snow eventually melted. The Land of Nowhere is situated near the land once called the North Pole, of course we moderns may not be acquainted with such names now but nevertheless people were that foolish. The land is now cultivated and the cities are prospering enormously. A story goes that a man who once was a school teacher in a little high school, became interested in this strip of Polar Cake and bought it all from Mother Earth and is now mayor of the city. He became interested in the land through his boyhood fishing trips near it and little did anyone realize that such a place was of great value. From our Alumniship one might see, if he looked over, a small one hundred story building. It is used to sell golf balls, the demand being so heavy. That one thousand story building over yonder is a high school named after, they tell me, a school that once won a championship in basketball. Fife was the name if I remember correctly. "Oh my! What has happened?" 'fLook, everything is falling." And when I looked they were right, everything had fallen, so we turned around and went home. -Arnold Thompson '28. A Iiriuilrgrh Glhararirr He was a colored gentleman The boss of nigger town, And all the other colored folks Obeyed, his plan laid down. He stood nigh unto six feet high And built just like an ox. When this young giant came down the street With fear, youths dropped their rocks. When he was with a group of folks, And started in with grace They could stand all unalarmed With his fist clinched in their face. Perhaps you wonder who this man Of so much power could be, He was not just a common man But a preacher-man was he! -Forrest Norris '27. Page Nr vvnly-One ' ILLAHEE "lBnmez" English isn't easy, As you will soon agree, For often the assignment Is writing poetry. Poems sound romantic, But this, I swear, is true, They are far too difficult For folks like me and you. The proper rhyme and rythm, Words slipped in just so, It's simple just to say it, But to do it '? Oh, my no! No more is English easy, A's are hard to get If once more he says "Poetry", I'll drag a "D" I'll bet. -Bertha Garman '26 5 31 3 if 3 "T T 9 11 mm 5 Lwfi, Saga 152111 t'Lem has left the cows, And he's left the pigs, Now for hard cash His old man digs. Lem's gone to college, He's studying now, Writes home and says he's learnin' The essential parts of a cow. Lem hopes to be a farmer, I know he is a fool. But hope the studying does him good, Now that he's in school. Lem's a freak of nature, He's a half-done job. Boys in college smoke cigarettes- Lem smokes a corn cob. Lem's pursuing his studies, I mean: He is always behind, When he gets back I know he'll have, About college, a different mind." -Julius Gius '29 I zi ge SLSVl'1ltY-VFXVO 3Fifv Hlifv ILLAHEE Dear Reader: You are now come to the section of this periodical entitled "Fife Life". Because this section is supposed to be the funny department, I begged the editor to allow me to insert a picture of the faculty. To this the editor would not consent, so there I was. What was I to do? It then dawned on me that I had my back against a stone barrier. Fighting down all thought of anger I began to write what you are now about to undergo. To enjoy this section the following prescription is offeredg 1. Small amount of intellect. 2. An "Illahee". 3. Sense of humor. To get the best results these should be applied thus: Have a small enough' amount of intellect to purchase an Illahee, then apply your sense of humor. If you do not come out feeling better than you did when beginning, then my efforts and your for- tune are wasted. It has not been intentional to defame or criticize any person mentioned. If that person should become infuriated and speak in a foreign tongue, here is one hint. Let him go. P Speaking of foreign tongue: Stanford-"You sure throw a terrible lingo. You ought to go to London and learn the King's English." Masao-"Oh, I know his English all right." Mr. Rynning-"Why don't you answer me ?" Arnold-"I did shake my head." Mr. Rynning-"Well, I couldn't hear it rattle clear over here!" Johnny-"Where did you get that bump on your head?" Folke-"Oh, that's where a thought struck me." Now folks, please don't get angry-wait till you see that joke on the other fellow! Because of the raw material turned out for basketball, there were many rules laid down for the players. Those of the least serious nature were: 1. No player shall stage a boxing match with an opponent for more than ten min- utes. 2. Where two or more players are killed intentionally by an opponent, said op- ponent shall be taken from the floor. 3. No spectator shall be allowed to throw bouquets of bricks, bananas or rotten eggs at any player during the game. 4. At the end of each quarter, the opposing team shall be allowed to come on the floor and 'pick up any of their wounded or sick which they can identify. Frosh-"What should we eat to develop the cr'anium?" Witty Soph-"Noodle soup, head cheese and cocoanut pie." Julius-And what did you think of my last joke? Joke Editor-D-glad to know that it was your last. Folke-Annie just gave me a mean look. A. 'T. T.-Go on, you always looked that way. Mrs. McClanff"Stanford, tell us all you know about nitrates." Stan Wise-"Well-they're cheaper than day rates." Page Seventy-Four ILLAHEE "ANIMALOGUE" 'Alf I were but a little frog, Said Lillian one day, l'd hop on top of toadstools high And with the froggies play." 'AI wish I were a monkey Asittin' on a limb, And everytime a Sophomore passed. I'd make an apish grin." -A Frosh. "If Mary were an oyster Asittin' in a shell, She'd string the pearls and make he A decorated belle." 4'If Forrest were a kitty So fluffy and so fat, The girls would call him pussy And give his head a pat." Ulf Bertha were an eagle With claws so sharp and long, She'd gather all the Annual news That she could light uponf' "I'd like to be a birdie," Said Marguerite to me, "Just singing songs the whole day And sitting in a tree? 3 5 8 ll 3 FAMOU S SAYINGS Miss Moe-'4Pass to your first period class." Mr. Enochsf"Maybe I've told this one before." Mr. Rynning-"What say?" Mrs. McClane-"Too much talking, girls." Mrs. Boaler-"Get your paper ready." Mr. Bixby-"Get to work down there." Howard-"Get out of here." Julius-K'See you in church." Lillian E.-"Gee, I feel funny today." Mary F.-'tHas anybody got a ,pencil Mitsuyoshi-"Try and do it." Bertha-"Oh gosh, kid." Virde-"I don't know." Lois-'fThat's swell." Stanford-"Well, I'm surrounded." Clyde-"So's your Aunt Henry? Helen-"Precious Floppity". Forrest-A'Now let me tell one." I can borrow'?' l'ug'e Severity-lf'iVv rself long ILLAHEE DEDICATED T0 FORREST NORRIS I woke to look upon a face, Silent, white and cold. Oh friend, the agony I felt Can never be half told! We'd lived together but a year, Too soon, it seemed, to see Those gentle han-Ts out-stretched and s.ill That toiled so hard for me. My waking hours had been of one Who now to sleep had dropped, 'Twas hard to realize, oh friend, My Ingersoll had stopped! THIS IS CORRECT At a conference of the Fife Jurnalistik Klub, this section of the "Illahee" wuz addudged too be absiluteli fre frum gramatical and iypografical errers. The editer was elicted grande Cheef of the 34 255 organization. It is hoped that the reeders of this journal will appreciat the eferts spent in pub- lishingg sutch a a ?"f"'k6 excelunt wurrk. The lineitypur must bee congratulated for his exceluntte compozition. Sew far hee has knot maideny erers in vpunktuation speling or gramer. A freshman was wrecked on an African Coast, Where the Cannibal king held swayg And they served that freshman on slices of toast, On the eve of that very same day. FOOLED YA I stole so many kisses My lips began to sag And then the dog-gone woman She hid the candy bag. Viv-Say, you got a cigarette? Die-Sure, wanna see it? , 'Twas the night before Christmas And all through the house Not a creature was stirring Except Pa and his Spouse. He: "Why didn't you answer the letter l sent you?" She: "I didn,t get it and besides l didn't like some of the things you said." Annie: "Father has awfully funny feet, hasn't he?" Forrest: 'fYes, I got quite a kick out of them the other night." Page Seven! y-Six ILLAHEE Millard FRESHIES IN THE SPRINGTIME Freshies are gay for spring time is here, They feel awfully happy. they act awfully queer. The birdies are humming- Springtime is here. For the roses so red, and the daisies so bright, 'lflake them love-sick and blue in the pale moonlight. And the stars all twinkle- 'Tis a wondrous sight. The buds are all bursting, the flowers are nodding, But the freshies to school, are still patiently plodding, They're so sleepy and slow With all of their prodding. Before spring was here they seemed kind of dead, But DOW that SpriI1g's here, with light foot they tread. For the bright glorious sunshine Has gone to their head. By Freshman poets, Anna Vraves, Lois Garman, Mary Bulat N.-"She told me I sang like her pet bird." Harold-"Hard luck, her pet bird is a parrot." Bertha-"You say you want this spring poem to appear in the Annual? Frosh-"Yes." Bertha-"Then I can't publish it." Frosh-"Why?" Bertha-"Because I do not wish any unjust suspicion to fall on some innocent person." The other day Mr. Bixby was doing a little turning on the lathe in the shop when Shorty came along and exclaimed: "My, just like a man would do it." CAN YOU IMAGINE ? Bertha Garman with a turned up nose? Geraldine Whitworth without those eyelashes? Ester Hill with a negro's hai1'? Agnes Moi not talking? Stanford in overalls? Namiko flunking? Miss Moe an old crab? Mr. Bixby a minister? La Veta Smart as a blonde? Julius Guis with lockjaw? Mary Fox not smiling? Mitsuyoshi a brick layer? Art Stolen minding his own business? Vic Smith an aviator? Hazel Case with a double chin? Page Se-vvii I y-Sex ii ILLAIIEE A KISS A kiss is a peculiar proposition, Of no use to one, yet absolute bliss to two. The The The The The The small boy gets it for nothing. young man has to steal it. old man has to buy it. lover's privilege. hypocriteis mask. To a young girl-Faith. To a married Woman-Hope. To an old maid-Charity. -Exchange Breezes, breezes, through the treefes Pa drowns Ma each time he sneezes We have: Black but no white. Snow but no ice. Noah but no ark. Fox but no dog. Stolen but no thief. Smart but no Alec, Forrest but no trees. Whitehead but no grey hairs. Carter but no wagon. Burrows but no holes. Case but no bottles. Wise but no sage. Enochs but no Arden. Hill but no valley. Verde but no island. Arthur but no round table. Massey but no master. Seamon but no sailor. Bowler but no alley. When its wet and sloppy Weather Then they all take to the leather. They encase their calves and ankles. In big huge topped winter boots. Some protect their little toesie With a wool sock warm and cosie, While some others, still wear silk ones In their high topped winter boots. Will some silk clad maid please tell me Lest my curiosity kill me. The question is important So I beseech you-Please. Mayhap my quest is silly But sure it must get chilly In that six or eight inch distance From boot tops to the knees. i':u.:e Sevciity-lfligghi ILLAHEE what Elm, Qlnulh 31 Bn? His lips were so near, That-what else could I do? You'll be angry I fearg When I tell this to you- I can't make it clear- Or explain it to youg But his lips were so near That-what else could I do? His arms were so strong, That-what else could I do? For them did I long So-why should I rue? I knew I should fear 'Twas disgraceful, untrueg But his lips were so near That-what else could I do? -Louise Fox '27 Abbreviations H. S.+How silly C. S.-Capable Sue A. E.-Awfully energetic B. G.-By Gum J. G.-Just girliswh L. El-Likely enough H. E.-Hard earned H. M.-Hand Made H. C.-Holy catfish F. J.-Fulla jokes G. W.-Gee' Whiz S. W.-Slick Wizzard R. S.-Royal Sap N. E.-Naughty Enough M. N.-Mighty New L. F.-Lotsa Fun M. A.-Massive Apollo V. J.-Very just Mr. Enochs ion patrolejz "Who gave you that black eye, little boy? Small boy: "Nobody, I had to fight for it." He said to me-"Want a kiss?" I said-"Who?" He said--"You." I said-"Me?" He said-"Yes" I said-"Wh0?" He said-"Me." I said-"You?" He said-"Yes," I said-"No." but he didn't hear me! Page Seventy-Niue ILLAHEE Mother: "Well, Johnny, let's go home," Johnny: "No, mother, wait until they let the animals out." Mother: t'Why, they'll never let them out, my dear." Johnny: "Yes they will, I heard father and another man say 'Let's hang around and we'll pick up a couple of chickens'l" When trouble comes to where I live, And says she's come to stay I shut the door and turn the key And say "I've gone away." Them's just the words I say, I hollers through the key hole 'Ts done took a holiday." -Exchange Nic-'KI wanna thank you for the wool socks." Father-"Rather pleased, eh?" Nic-"Tickled to death." Here's to the man who is the wisest and best, Here's to the man who with judgment is blest, Here's to the man who's as smart as can be- I mean the man that agrees with me! Miss -Moe-"What are you doing, Folke, learning something?" Folke J.-"No, I'm just listening to you." Little Nicholas came home from school with tear stained eyes. When asked by his father what the matter was, he said that he had received a 'licken', and it was all his father's fault. But I don't see why it could be my fault," said his bewildered father. "Well, you remember yesterday I asked you what a Russian rubble was worth?" "Yes."' "Well, 'not worth a damn' ain't the right answer," By Gosh Stan: "Mamma, when can I shave like papa does?" Mrs. Wise: "Not for a long time yet, darling." Stanford: 'AWhy not, I know a lot of words alreadylu A gallon of gas A gallon of oil A piece of wire You call a coil A piece of tin, And a piece of board Put them together, And you have a Ford, -Exchange Miss Moe fin economicsjz "What is the difference between a want, utility, price and value ?" M. Y.: "Aw gee, I didn't know we were going to have a 'EQASV' Page Eighty PUGET ILLAHEE Zlnhrx tn Glnntrihuiurz COLLEGE OF PUGET SOUND C. S. BARLOW K1 SONS H. O. HANSEN NEW WORLD LIFE INSURANCE GEORGE HOERTRICH H. BENTHIEN AND SONS MQCORMACK BROS. CO. PUGET SOUND POWER AND LIGHT BEUTEL BUSINESS COLLEGE GARDENVILLE DAIRY H. MIETHKE A. G. SEAMONS AL IVERSON WASHINGTON HARDWARE COMPANY SOUND VEGETABLE GROWERS ASSOCIATION RELIANCE LUMBER CO. M. R. MARTIN K COMPANY KNAPP'S BUSINESS COLLEGE WASHINGTON ENGRAVING CO. SUMNER NEWS-INDEX BEN ANDRE VALLEY FO'RGE GARAGE MEZZO STUDIO KIMBALL GUN STORE I':U.5w lCi:'hty-Un ILLAHEE Y rr :1nu-n..unQ.nu-nn1imtw-im-M-...D...W....,...uv-tm-.m...i'...u.,...m...i,N.-ni.-ii.-M.-..m.-.p,....,..........m1 -iv l "THE COLLEGE WITH A PROGRAM"' A Cfillege Offering Courses in Liberal Arts T as Wel! as Pre-Technical Courses and Industrial Chemistry i ...- i I sf I i . DEPARTMENTS OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AND MUSIC 1 1 Summer Session Begins June 14, 1926 Q Autumn Semester Begins September 8, 1926 i - g . A Bulletin of Information Will Be Sent on Request i COLLEGE OF PUGET SOUND 1 A Tacoma, Washington ,l -,,-.,,.....u-..,..u-,.,..-.,.. ........,..-.l-..-.,..-..-u-...-.... -.l....,....-.,.- - - -,. , ri Words of Wisdom The part of a car that causes the most wrecks is the nut that holds the steering' Wheel. Why not be like the old English sun dial which says: "Let others tell of rain and showersg I record only the sunny hours." Heard in Domestic Science: Mrs. McClane: "What's the hardest thing in the world?" A. E.: "Ester's biscuitsfl .1,,,,1pg-.p......l..l.i.,-.,,11nu11nn1....-.gg-Hn...M-.M1 .4 ... ,g -. 1. qi .1 E- :Y ,gre q -ggi ...lu-. I , E l GEORGE SAYb--- 1 I Get all your swamp land working for you. Our l D R A I N T I L E . 3 makes it as good as the rest, i C. S. BARLow Sz SONS Q 1 1715-21 Dock St. Main 21 I.. E 1 I l I l I l I r r i l I l l 1 r n u I I l 1 L 1 I l I.- Page Eighty-Two ILLAHEE f-...- - -...-..-...-..-...-...-......i.....-....,..-...-...-..i..........n.-...-i..-..-..-u..-......- - -..-E : I Q SEE HAN SON, THE JEWELER 3 g at For Dependable Elgin, Waltham, M9 -' "" . ,, ,, , H 'lt H d R l' bl S 1 5 A A. N, jr .A E ami 0 , an e ia e w I L vLf?5?2f5jfv Slzfif' QT 'DE Watches. - r1fm"Q'l1Y E... wil l fEi..f5M:a2w?z . - l 3,-ig, 5531 ,gm'f5gl1h iZ'w i l Have you ever used a Conklm Pen or i '-f' gf m ' 'f alisw t ' Pencil? We carry a full stock of this : i Qflgi durable make. : KKJVFCEI I 1 I4 A N 5 C J N 3 l Dependable Watch Repairing-27 Years Experience i 257 So. llth Street Fidelity Bldg. : L . 1u..uu....n-11.11.11lu11I11I1lu11nl1ulL.-........,.i,,.......,....,......1..1..1..1..1..1...1,.i..1..-.......,.i, Mr. Bixby-"Did you open the windows wide, as I told you to?" Arnold T.-"You bet I did. I pulled the top one all the way down and pushed the bottom one all the way up." Our idea of a snap job-Feeding the horses on a merry-go-round. Arthur was going along the ,pavement when he came upon a person having trouble with a car. "Perhaps I can help you, there are a few things I know about that kind of a car " "Sh-There are ladies present," was the fitting reply. 2...-..-..-..- - -..-..- -.,-..-,.- .. -.....-..-..........-......-......-..- - - -..-l - K li, .3 1, W' ,, ,g.!.dff9Egf, 2 , Em W Inj, If I ' X Q ll' E i ' l fl nt 2 I , W iw Will' ga , ,Xl ! 3 fifllllwllslfg' or L L L ll 3 I Q' wil I succnss ! QM X IN DEPENDENCE 1 ' . i I P NL VISION .NewWorld I,1fe i Q W THRIFT POLICY I EQXINGS wins for you the res- Q T 3g:1s1oN pect ofyour loved ones EXTRAVAGENCE and gives you the confldenoe i 1 and courage to winhfes battle i ' INDEPENDENCE . 'Buy lbesli Special Agent i CARI-ESSNESS w.-xsrumcmw BLDG. i 'mcoma 3 , I I I Protect those that love you. Q NEW WORLD LIFE Main 804 512 Washington Bldg., Tacoma '1ll1llillill1lll 1i71171 :li 1- linlilu1nilvlllqivlui--31311.-1pg1p11pp1pp1 11, Pzigzgv liiglily-Tlirq-o T 1 -A ILLAHEE 2' ll -H.-..-t.-..-......-..........-..-..-......-..-..-..- - -..-...,,-,,............. -1 GEORGE HOERTRICH JR.-Electrician Anything Electrical Repaired and Installed Agent for Fairbanks Morse i Home Water Systems Phone R. F. D. No. 2 Box 48 Main 7840J4 Tacoma, ashington I W TRY THIS ON YOUR PIANO CSung to the tune of "Casey Jones", Old Stanford Wise sold his hogs the other day, The foolish young trash threw his money right awayg Rode into town, sitting on a board, Came home ridin' in a brand new Ford. When he got to the house and turned toward the gate, He shut down the throttle and he put on the brake, He grabbed for the reins, got the throttle instead, But the gosh-dinged Ford kept a pluggin' right ahead. Stanford jerked at the levers, and he turned off the gas, He kicked at the pedals, and he broke out the glass, He cut all the wires and he pulled off the top, But the gosh-dinged Ford, it just wouldn't stop. So he pulled out his knife, and he smiled all serene, Cut a hole in the tank, drained out the gasoline, He pulled out his gun, shot the tires full of lead, But the gosh-dinged Ford kept a pluggin' right ahead. Stanford went right through the fence, and up through t he lane, His mother saw him coming, and she was almost insaneg She ran out ahead, then she stopped to see- And the Ford struck her squarely flat against a tree. She struck out her arms as she went into the air, Just as Stanford went by she grabbed him by the hair, She bounded on the seat, landed on the pad, And the gosh-dinged Ford kept a pluggin' right ahead. Stanford steered for the shed, but just missed the hole, Struck an old hog, and you should have seen her roll, Then out through the yard they landed in a heap, In the big muddy pool, 'bout six feet deep. Stanford grabbed his mother, and struck for the shore, He was glad it had stopped, and would go no more, He pricked up his ears, then he looked back and said, 'tWhy the gosh-dinged thing is pluggin' right ahead." -Exchange Page Eighty-Four 1ul1n.1q.1..1,.1..1 1,p1,h1 1.,1.,1l 1 1 1-1I.141.41p.1..1,.1.'-q.1g1..1.,1g 1,,,......l.1.,,1..1.,.1..1..1..1 1.1..-1,..1,..1..1,..1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1..1.a1..1..1..1,.1..1n.-,,,1,.1.,,..-Q..--1.1.1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1.1. ILLAHEE GERA IUIVIS LET US PLANT UP YOUR WINDOW BOXES AND BASKETS QU Our stock of bedding plants has never been better, all fine healthy plants in all the varieties A fine line of Snapdragons, Asters, Zinnias, Marigolds, Stocks, etc., at moderate prices , 284 fl. BENTHIEN AND SONS NURsER1Es Fife's Wise man says: Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow. A penny saved is a penny closer to that new dress. A stitch in time saves embarrassment. The lack of money is the root of all kinds of worry. A rolling stone gathers no money. An empty wagon makes the most noise-but I'm not mentioning names! A smack on the lips is worth two on the jaw. Fain heart never won fair lady-advice to Fife's sheiks. It is more blessed to give than receive-says the blind man as he passes his cup If at first you don't succeed propose, propose again. I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1.1..1..1..1..1M1.1..1,.1,,.1.,,1,,1,,.1,.,1.,.1 1 1 1 1 1.11.11 McCORMACK BROS. TACOMA 251 A complete department store, handling everything to wear, and to furnish the home. Page Eighty-Five 1. .intui- ILLAHEE lt... ... ..-..--in-.I.-nl.-nu...n.-n...u-.H-n1..1u.......u.miu-.u.-.In-.u1uu-un-nn----I-11-10 E l l 2 REAL ERVICE l l ' THE PURPOSE OF THE 2 Puget Sound Power and Light Co. 2 is TO GIVE Best Electric Service at the A Lowest Possible Rate M ruff SOUND i i oFF1CEs 3 l Tacama ----- 1306 A Street l Puyallup - - - 306 Meridian Street T Sumner - ,P ---- 1012 Main Street 5 i .l-...-.....i......-.n- -..-.u....I-...-...-.,.-...-.. ....- - - .. - ... ,.-.,.-....-......m.-...-....-.,.,..,.... A. S.-"Your shirt is out guy." "Where '?" "Out, where the vest begins." History Teacher: "How old would a person be who was born in 1900?" Agnes: "Man or woman?" They were driving down the street on the straight of way when this occurred. A truck came backing out of a drive way and Stanford just had time to grab the steering wheel and stop the car. John: "I could die dancing with you." Helen: "It's about to kill me, too." l - -..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-....t.- -,,-.3 1 BEUTEL BUSINESS coLLEGE S l TRAINING ASSURES SUCCESS l l After High School l l When you have finished your general education, prepare l yourself to enter the business world by specializing in commercial 1 1 subjects at 2 BEUTEL BUSINESS CULLEGE i 9375 Broadway T Main 802 Tacoma, Wash. : ,im- ..-..-..-..-..- - .. - -.-..-..-..-..-..-..-..- - -..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-..-! I Q., I hty S ILLAHEE V" - ' """"" 'M' ' ' """"- ' 'M' 'M ' ' ' ' -'Wi Gardenville Dairy l L .. i See Us For i Pure Milk and Cream l Lat ,.r,.r,.1..i,r ..,,..xr.-.-.,r.::.,1..-.,r..-..-.::..-..-..,..-....r: ,:..l Mother-"Aren't you getting pretty big to play with the boys, Alice?" Alice-"Oh, no, the bigger I get the better I like them." James A.: "The moon has a great effect on the tide." Ester: "Yes, but it has a greater effect on the mind." Miss Moe-"I wish you wouldn't chew gum. Don't you know it's made out of horses' hoofs'?" Arthur S.-"I know it. That's why I get a kick out of it." Butcher-"Did you want some brains, madam?" Mrs. Wise-"Yes, my son hasn't had any for a long time." .1 1...-.H1..-...1..1..1..1..1..1...-,.1..1..1.,i,.1my1.-.Qu......-.ui..1,g1,.,1q.1..1ug.-nu.-ul. I 1 Q l R. F. D. No. 2, Box 56 Phone MAIN 7838 J5 I l 1 MIETHKE'S NURSERY 1 ! I ! .,.,. l 1 Q Growers of High Grade Ornamental Evergreens, Rockery 5 and Edging Plants, Rose Bushes and Flowering i Shrubs, Perennials, Bulbs and Vines, Pot and Bedding Plants, also Fresh Cut Flowers and Everlastings 1 I l I 1 I 2 Mall Orders Promptly Delivered E Nursery at Milton Tacoma, Washington I 1 ,..................-..-..-......-..... - - - - - - - - .. .....-........-...-.........-....-...-.- -. Page lfliglily-Seven 1,...ulH1ll....1I..-..1.,.-..,1,......1......,,,....lu......1,.-..,....Il..1,,......1...1..1.......-.., ILLAHEE lv' 1ll-u--nn-.M1nn..541m1pl..-.uqqlN-..pq-..-.1-liu1,,1M...gl,..M-w.1,,q--M1.m..m....,......u.-im EVERYONE LOVES FLOWERS We Have Them For All Occasions if A Plants, cut flowers and baskets for the sick room, ' birthday or your best girl Bouquets for the bride and bridesmaid ' Funeral designs from the simple, dainty spray to the most elaborate design. Also bedding plants for your garden and porch boxes. if A. G. S E A M O N S Gardenville Route No. 2 Box 16 SERVICE -- QUALITY -- COURTESY AL IVERSEN SHOE REPAIRING We will call for your work at Andre's Store 1133 Commerce St. Tacoma, Washington I..-.I...,..-,......1........,-......,.1..- 1...-W.-...1......1 .......1..1,.......-,..1..-....1..1........1 :-: Spalding Athletic Goods :-: WASHINGTON HARDWARE COMPANY GUNS FISHING TACKLE BUILDERS HARDWARE ,,,....,,,..M..-,.....,,.-W.......,.1,,-,,,..m...,.q..W.....1.,.-,,....,......-.i.-.,,-,..1,........1..-..,-....1.., F ff Ivghty P ght ILLAHEE ""' -""" ' " '"""""'""""""""""' " " " ' " " " "' """3 l PUGET soUNn 1 VEGETABLE GROWERS ASSOCIATION I T Sumner, Washington Growers and Shippers of "RITEGRADE" 5 Brand Vegetables i We Specialize in Mixed or Straight Cars of Lettuce, Cauliflower, Rhubarb, Celery, Cabbage, Carrots, Beets, Etc. T ? ..........-..u.-n-ua.-..1u1l--up-.ul-unin-....un-nn1n1.......uu.-u-f1uu1n-in---.1..1.l-.1 1 ... 1...,...,, Mr. R. Younkin-"How is it that I find you kissing my daughter?" A. H.-"I don't know, sir, unless it's that you wear rubber heels." Namiko tin domestic science!-"When do we start house keeping?" About the only way to insult a girl nowadays is to tell her that she needs a hair-cut. After Mr. Enochs had related the landing of the Pilgrims he asked them to draw the picture of Plymouth Rock from imagination. After some time Little Louise asked, "What do you want us to draw, a hen or a rooster ?" RELIANCE LUMBER COMPANY Lumber, Sash and Doors I Interior Finish Q See Us for Poultry House Material I ' 2 Yard and Office East D and Puyallup Ave. Tacoma, Washington Phone Main 72 - i .1H1H1H1H1..1...1..1.....,..........-I.-.H1..1..-.f-...1..1....- 1 ...-n..--..un1.11--1.ui'-4...nn...nu.. , E-.......-..-...-..-..-.......-..-..-......-..-..-......-..-..-..-.... -.-.....-..-..-..-.............! Q When You Need Anything In I l OFFICE OR SCHOOL SUPPLIES i . -We Can Serve You- I T QUALITY MERCHANDISE-REASONABLY PRICED i - i 7 M. R. Martin Sz Company 3 T 926 Pacific Ave. Tacoma L....-..-......-..-......- .. ... .. ...n- ... - - - ... - - .....-.-...........-t..-...-...-..-,. Page l gl I N ILLAHEE -n:1nn-un-uu- - 1 -nn..nn..m.-1--uu-m,-..-,.,,......-,...-.N-u.-,,1u....m,.. 1 1 1 1 1 -.ml-W - - l W A N T E D I Q Young Men and Young Women i L To prepare for the Higher Class Office Positions- Ig Where Advancement is Rapid and I T, Salaries Large " I Write for Details on Our '1 . SUPERIOR TRAINING F IN s 5 I BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ' AND if 5 THE PRIVATE SECRETARY i S Or Call At g I Q MODERN - i I NAPP i BUSINESS COLLEGE I 5 Tacoma, Washington l "BEST IN THE NORTHWEST" I .. .... - - ...-..-...-.n- .,.. -..-..-..-.i-.,.-..-W-..... - - - - - - -,,,-5 WHAT'S THE USE??? of learning an ancient history date, When you can have a modern one with her at half past eight? She?-Gee, that's a wonderful moon. Arthur S-Well, if you don't like this Overland you can get out and walk. They Deserved lt, Anyway They say that a terrible tempered student in a fit of anger, broke the back of xaesar, tore the appendix of Cicero, and pulled the Tale of Two Cities! Enochs-"Name one date in ancient history." Art S.-"A--aaa---Anthony's date with Cleopatra." f Mr. Bixby-"So you admit that you wrote on the board that I am an old fool, Well at least I'm glad that you are truthful." What's the easiest thing in the world for the Joke editor to find? Ans. Some wise guy that has heard that joke before and is always cracking a new one himself. If one doesn't eat for seven days it makes one weak. Walter: "I noticed you got up and gave your seat to that lady in the street car yesterday." - Clyde: "Yes, since childhood I have respected a woman with a strap in her hand." Page Ninety ILLAHEE I i,m.,,v,,,.,,. ,..,.-...V, ,.,. , .,.,. N.- w.f,.., If f, x. , ' ,ff ' Y' 1" .. W4 lllclk 'Q f f Gyn! I UC 4,,. C 4 fx K I 0 Q ,J P, I , I. K I, f 1 'ff X' ,fl 'Sf f ,K1 7 lf V 1 va Washington Egraving Co. IOIOVQA .ffreef Main 2620 Cjacoma. P N 3 ...lm-.uu1m,-.11.-...........11...-...11..11.1...-...-. 1 51-911 f ki 15 -vi' f 3 1 1 x IILAHFF : f 1 I xfofwff if vi MMJM ,QW A4 jfyxf gif, 1 J K wi ,cffxf 49 ' ff gg I lj' 4-VU jj Complimenfs ofgwf M3 The Sumner News-Index Printers of This Book Sumner, Wash. ygp-lu.-pu-..-,..-g-...1u.1un..nu1.... -. 1 1 ... .Q .. ... ... ... .. -p-.- -mln.. .1 P N T ILLAHEE liala 09' illiinr L ' ? , 1 v, Vx ,,- ' X A ' 2 f,f,,.V 4' ' k , '1, If -K 7 7 1 y ,., X f Y X ' V ,' f A I f ff--L.-M f7l'f.1-1'-'fwfr ' If ",,EA,,, ' 1 ' . X 'VI ' 1 7 L wwfyx 'f -17 4 V. ' 1 , ' f - X ,evzgf 1 K fyffig X .A 9 Y fra., x ,f .1 -f 4 .,, ,i'1,,. ij., 5' .bl '2 yu! K, ILLAHEE 132115 GS' iilinr 1 A , , 'iz' -4 ' .-A--j f L A L m f 1' -L Q L. ,. .FX X 1 ' , , ! 5 f"N K 4 Q fb! ,!"'a,-pu., I x X!! Lf , 4 L 1. Q, f . I . I 1 3 ,f 7 X 14 fri fi Affffkg 'ff X flfl 0 f "1f"A J' A, x . , , A,,,,,4 J,k-f.-. 17,9 Y PW , 7' pf r 9 ,gf J H 1' ILLAHEE f f Faln GB' illinr 1 Q7' f"-fffvqfx J 'f'f!-44:-D-1. I x R X' X X I f , ,','fi 1 !V'x""g'! ff Kf4f,4ffMi4- Q- V, 22 , 7,-vfyq-71' I jffjlff, I mwmxa. GOV! W n ILLAHEE Ollrurr memarkz X A . , 1 Q .lse I 1 L C " "-gk '-1 Lfif f' J zif1,+ 53. --ff - I N sd I , ff! I C f ,wifi ,vdkfj ,afycf -VZQA5' xii'-' f - ' , 54 4., L, Q, L h f f I ,, - - ,, . . , J zf54"'f7f,AQ,..A.' fu.. L ,- f u KJ , f B .1 is I 3 Qu ' ", GJ 4 4 ix x. L,,J A 'if -ff . 1,0-fA'.f 7 L, Lf- ' f ' - X0 fl V , f 1 fdfgf ,144 I fgcnivj Lf fin J X S f L, r 1 ,Avi fx I k ,A MY W I V A I ' 4 JIX7 if . uk ffflhiimvwk-W' ff . , , , .A I, J ' '-0-f. x 1 ILLAHEE D Gllenvr illrmarkzi A J Cfnwwfdleqf-.. '17 f, , V. ' It' 'f 1 . 1 r' r 1 ,-X, gC1l,k, f'r7!, 1 XA - fit . f ' A v,,Q,f7. . 2 'Aff V X I f I ping ' ffm WVLMW WMM M 1 ' i . , 1 1. . 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Suggestions in the Fife High School - Illahee Yearbook (Fife, WA) collection:

Fife High School - Illahee Yearbook (Fife, WA) online yearbook collection, 1927 Edition, Page 1

1927

Fife High School - Illahee Yearbook (Fife, WA) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

1932

Fife High School - Illahee Yearbook (Fife, WA) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

1938

Fife High School - Illahee Yearbook (Fife, WA) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

1947

Fife High School - Illahee Yearbook (Fife, WA) online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

1951

Fife High School - Illahee Yearbook (Fife, WA) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

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