Ferndale High School - Reflector Yearbook (Johnstown, PA)

 - Class of 1947

Page 1 of 88

 

Ferndale High School - Reflector Yearbook (Johnstown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 88 of the 1947 volume:

K 1 A 1 1 L L T A J 1 E '1 + i '4 X ii ,H 3 .1 u ,Q 1, I I 5 l 'J 5. 54 1 'AS W EDITOR if IOANNE KELLY SISTANT EDIT RUTH MANGUS ff ADVISER ff ETHEL Bosmtv OR T' ,, gl 'R 4 I' K A l .1 ,, Ak,,,V ,K V Q if E A - 'A 4. ' l I ' K 1 gf V V ' ,lf 5 I vf ,JI I 6 Nh . M ' ix W V , WV, , A -.,.,.N 0m Mbna Wfalm The l941l REFLECTQR 51.2 kj Published hy the Seninr lflass nf Ferndale High Sellnnl, Ferndale Bnrnnqh, Jnhnslnwn, Pennsylvania Once again we have the privilege of presenting to the students a thorough yet simple account of student life and school activities. In this issue of the Ferndale Reflector is depicted a complete and con- cise record of the year 1943-44. Desiring to portray school life in the spirit of the present time and realizing that, even while we endeavor to perform our duties in a great national emergency, the purpose of our education is to prepare us for life after the war, we have chosen as our theme "Education for Peacef' It is our modest hope that wherever and whenever you look at this book you will find in it the full flavor of happy and active days spent at Ferndale High. 'KIIUNTENTS ir 'k Ilur Leaders i llur Students if Uur Athletes 'A' Uur Enterprises To the students and teachers of Ferndale High School now defending and serving their country with the same loyal spirit with which they once served their school, we dedicate this book. They have calmly laid aside their own desires and ambitions to protect the freedoms and personal liberties which are the bases of all democracy. To them, the symbol of the indomitable American spirit, we make a hum- ble salute in which all those who read the pages that follow will join us. IJIII TIU ,- , ,qt XR Winn vw. KW X aw' cuff? N 2 f? Muna S f, I X um ' XNE X115 0 5 T MQW T 9vm?5RL3 L K S ORDERS W mm, LEVJK S B C, ER C, RMNER F F NNE ' PLE xr-M6 E 'Nfl , X xg X K .ISL ,L 1 X ,MJ ,Q X 1 72 g X, M Af Z, g 3 2, ,Z 2 ,1'y it ,Z Z Q X- g ,, W Um .feaafefza ilu Pmnriam k..:L, 5' wr FREDERICK L. SHARPE With the untimely passing of Mr. Frederick L. Sharpe, Ferndale Schools lost an active and faithful member of the Board ot Education. Pupils, teachers, and fellow board mem- bers knew him as one who desired always the best for our educational system. Multiplied evidences of his whole-hearted interest in their personal and individual success endeared him to the student body. Remembering him, they cannot help but be inspired by his faithfulness to his civic responsibilities, his loyalty to his church, and his devotion to his home and family. His death is our great loss. - J., ---.-11' srrsztirgssfwrg 3 Q w 25? W T fr uililagiff F9 5a2Ega2 5i.EssE gag QW g+O eg Recess Vmggswvn iiisgg Sasser dssigiiim 9 ggwiguua me ,WM -5 50.85 .--I0-' Wg"-big' UNO Urban! gw W FQSH 353- -'gtsb 'U 3 m H- m.s .Fm s C E . in U1 .just Ulu-4 Es? .Cl-79,1 Q. 0 d' 3P5'srErmrS0s egiggggggggggh Zlnflwlrmnriam CD E 52 mga? C170 Ch '1 V WUI 55355 - 3' iff:-IS" 'ptgmpd-Qs, m naive Nm '1 CPM 0 ss? K sEEEEms 5152523 E E5R5'Es W we 'IDNZE LH' 3lG.'3D" as fi 5 3? 1'-'Q HERBERT W. ENGLISH During the past term the Ferndale schools have sullered an inestimable loss. The death of Mr. Herbert English on November l5, 1943, ended a long and memorable career of teaching. The sterling quality of his character is Written in- delibly in the hearts of his students. His greetings to everyone were always warm and wholesome. Through his sincerity, humor, and unfailing determination, he helped to develop the skill and ability of every pupil with whom he had contact. Both students and teachers ot Ferndale High School deeply mourn the passing of this outstanding friend and adviser. FRANK KELLER Supervising Principal Attended the University ot Pittsburgh . . . secured B. S. and M. A. degrees . . . member of Phi Delta Kappa. Mr. Keller, as supervising principal, has intro- duced many new plans and interesting projects. A firm protector of school property and a strong advo- cate of a friendly school spirit, he has brought Fern- dale much recognition through his ability and fore- sight. Always concerned With student problems, he is ever ready to give understanding counsel and advice. ORIN C. NAUGLR HARRY B. SCHROCK WILSON S. GnIsLI1R HARRY C. MILLER WILLIAM G. ASHMAN Vive President SP4'1'6'fK11'Y Preszdent Treasurer Member BUAHIJ UF EIIUEZXTIU The men pictured here determine the policies of our school. Not only are they responsible for solving school problems, but they must also see that each pupil receives the proper education so that We of the future generation will be prepared to meet the challenge of securing and keeping a lasting World peace. These civic-minded men are alert to the fact that the pupils of today are the citizens of the future. It is their desire and determination to educate us so that We will be able to carry on the duties that will be set before us. To see that We obtain this education, the board holds regular monthly meetings. At these meetings they elect teachers, buy text books, and perform other tasks essential to the opera- tion of the school. To these leaders, who have been so helpful and considerate in starting us toward our goal of obtaining happiness and future security, we give our genuine and sincere thanks. THEY lVIUI.lJ THE FUUNBATIU if -k uimswft ly, wi MARY SPANGLER . . . attended Calitornia State Teachers College, Pennsylvania State College, Un.- versity of Pittsburgh, and University oi West Virginia . . . teaches English, history, and geography. BYRON KUHS . . . received A. Ii. degree from Gettysburg College, M. Ed. from Pennsylvania State College, and attended University of Pittsburgh . . . teacher of Eng- lish and civics . . . director of senior play . . . adviser of Hi-'t' Club. IESSIE HILL . . . has A. B. degree . . . attended Albright College and University of Pittsburgh . . . in- structor in English and problems of democracy. GRACE HETRICK . . . attended Al- bright College, New York Univer- sity, and Columbia University . . . has A.B. degree . . . teaches Eng- lish and Spanish . , . adviser ct senior class. RUTH HETRICK . . . attended Al- bright College, Pennsylvania State College, Columbia University, and Bucknell University . . . has A.E. degree . . . teaches Latin, Ameri- can history, health, and physical education. BRUCE FISHER . . . received B.S. degree . . . attended Iuniata Col- lege, University ot Pennsylvania, and University ot Pittsburgh . . . teaches physical education, health and biology . . . coach . . . ad- viser of "F" Club. degree from Iuniata College . . . teaches ancient history and plane RY WILLIAM SCOTT . . . obtained B.S. f, 1 14 geometry . . . assistant coach. J J -pf if rim TnMu1iHuw'5 1112, cu EY ETHEL BOSLEY . . . obtained A.B, degree Irom University ot Pitts- burgh, did graduate work at Duke University . . . teaches mathema- tics 7 and 8, algebra I and II, solid geometry, and trigonometry . . . adviser ot Rellector and senior class. SARA LOUISE MARKLE . . . attend- ed University of Pittsburgh, where she received A. B. and Master ol Letters degrees . . . librarian . . . English instructor. LOULA BLOUGH I . . attended In- diana State Teachers College and University ot Pittsburgh . . . re- ceived B. S. degree . . . teaches music and is director of band, or- chestra, glee club . . . sponsors annual spring' concert. - moms WILSON . . . iijfffx degree from Iuniata ege . . .' home economics teac er -I ' viser of Girl Reserves. FLORENCE HORNICK . . . attended Indiana State Teachers College and Pennsylvania State College . . . has B. S. degree . . . teaches art and spelling . , . adviser of Girl Reserves. GRANT CUSTER . . . attended Cali- tornia State Teachers College, where he received B. S. degree . . . teaches chemistry, physics, biology, and pre-flight aeronautics , . . photographer for Reflector. LAURENCE WOLF . . . obtained B. S. degree from Buffalo State Teachers College . . . instructor in mechani- cal drawing and industrial arts, GEORGE TOWNSEND , . . possesses AB. and M. A. degrees . . . at- tended Susquehanna University and University of Pittsburgh . . . in- structs classes in algebra, American history, and general science. 15 -A' f IIN RE TUB Y'5 E IDES 6 HERBERT ENGLISH . . . attended Millersville and Bowling Green Bus- iness College and University ol Pittsburgh . . . obtained B. S. de- gree . . . instructor in bookkeeping, typing, and home and job mathe- matics. KATHRYN LONG . . . received B. S. degree from Indiana State Teachers College and M. Ed. degree from University of Pittsburgh . . . teaches shorthand and typing . . adviser of the Press Club. WILMI-X MOONEY . . . our pleasant dependable school secretary and "information please" . . . always busy answering phone calls, writ- ing admits, typing, and -oh yes- Iilling out those report cards. ELIZABETH MOORE . . . graduate of Memorial Hospital . . . teaches home nursing . . . truant otlicer . . . school nurse . , . our friend in time ol need. LUKE SNOWBALL . . . our depend- able head custodian . . . always on the job for our comfort . , . . . . checks thermostats, lights, and ventilators . . . keeps the school tires blazing on winter days . . . supervises his assistants and does numerous odd jobs. 1 ELIZABETH REESE . . . graduate of Susquehanna University . . . re- ceived B. S. degree . . . also at- tended University of Wisconsin . . . teaches bookkeeping I and II, commercial law and geography, and home cmd job mathematics. . . K FIRST' RUVV llvfr In iight! Bm-isrlci, l.ni-son Mtarl-, Il. Schweitzer, Churrhvv. SECOND ROW' Vvl. lanws, Cesloxnilr. Nlcllngh. l.. Snlv. lam-I Moms, Swirls. THIRD RUXV B. Snnler. Cameron Rose, Mitthell, leannc Bocltel, liieuinq FUlll?'lllf l?llXY D Pose, H. Fisher F. Salntr. Nrnigle, N, llodhuntcr. FlF'l'l"l Row Mr, Keller Mgr., i1.,..lmsn, The Student Council has added another year of success to its history. Organized for the purpose of student self-government, this group serves as a mediator between the administration and student body, and helps to solve problems within the school. Regardless of its size or nature, each matter is given thought- ful study and consideration. The organization, of which Mr. Keller is adviser, is composed of two representatives, a boy and a girl, from each home room. These students take part in the discussion of problems which come before them from time to timeg if a decision is reached, they report the matter to their classmates. Through their efforts many new suggestions and clever ideas were introduced. To provide recreation for the students, noon dancing was begun and proved successful. Movies and several novelty shows were also arranged by the group. Pupils were urged to participate in assemblies, and in this way new talent and leadership were discovered. if OFFICERS 'A' WILLIAM IAMES President Gsoacz Swicx Vice President NANCY TODHUNTHR Secretary Yll TH SIILVES ITS PHIIBLEMS -A' -A' 17 .,-,V J fu .fy oLfgf!,. ' .,. V f f1.v - , , :,"'g4,:? ' ,,. k V. .ff L A, ,- J, f +- v ' fr. f I' XX- JG: I 5.5, . yfi' 1. ...xy 11, x, ,. , , A f qw mg, H, - . ,J Q . . . r. -,,.,, fl EF vfif' . 1 ' If ay-Q .- ,,,., 1 . , , ..' lv, ffxif'-," 5. ,mg-4, 1- f' F. X wg., ' ,,. ,P . W ,wwf A fax-- pfxjw, fx.-" .'. 1" 11.4. J HJ., .'m df, .,'. n K lllgf.. va.. Jo'-'Lx in Gm Siuclenh 'A' SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS if ROBERT Escrr President ROBERT ESCH"- every- one likes our genial, skillful, alert f?l presi- dent . . . the topnotch humorist in chemistry . . . "Professor Sven- gali's" ambition, aero- nautical engineer . . . left mid-term for Iunior Pitt . . . seems to prefer titian blondes. IAMES KTAGJ SIMLER Vice President IAMES CTAGJ SIMLER- sincere, changeable per- sonality . . . well liked by his fellow classmates . . . airminded-wants to be a pilot . . . favorite dish is one with food on it . . . makes smooth appearance . . . can boast athletic prowess. DOROTHY ZIM M1-:RMAN Secretary-Treasurer DOROTHY ZIMMERMAN -active and likeable . . . future stenographer . . . reads away her leisure hours . . . "Maggie Mae" likes Iohn Payne and chili con came but hates ice cream . . . collects rings . . . cuts capers on ice. THE EL SS UF 1944 5, wily." . LOIS ATKINSON - effi- cient typist . . . noodles, her special dish . . . goes to movies when Tim Holt plays . . . wants to leave Iohns- town for a defense job . . . her mind wanders to Italy frequently, so do her letters. DORA BERKEBILE-quiet and composed . . . finds satisfaction in dancing and singing , . . future private secretary and graduate of Cambria Rowe . . . special inter- est in chocolate sundaes, but deluxe special is certain soldier from Lo- rain Borough. VIRGINIA BEFIKEBILE - quiet, obliging, but lots of fun . . , includes milk shakes and movies in her diet . . . that "Navy man" is uppermost in her thoughts . , . "Ginny" had to leave school first semester because of ill- ness. IOANNE BOCKEL-strik- ing, pleasant personality . . . always knows the "latest" . . . finds blonde males attractive . . . col- lege bound . . . future in social or personnel work . . . spends sum- mers at their farm . . . enjoys horseback riding . . . speediest typist. BETTY BRENDLINGER- brisk, lively, and talent- ed . . . sketches portraits at every opportunity . . . might become a secre- tary . . . enjoys ice cream and dancing . . . what is this we hear concerning her interest in the Air Corps? ARAWAN1-I CARNEY - silent, capable, and will- ing . . . eager to please others . . . ambition lies in Cadet Nursing . . . "Carney" collects stamps as hobby . . . shows dexterity as typist . . . fine worker in the church at Middle Taylor. LILLIAN CESLOVNIK - lively, popular, "Cesy" wants to see the world . . . sews-makes own cute clothes . . . which will it be: the soldier, sailor, or marine? . . . "regular" on honor roll . . . one of finest cheer- leaders. DORIS CLAWSON-con dial, pleasing, generous . . . very proud of broth- ers . . . finds most sat- isfaction in packing boxes for Bill . . . also likes reading, good mo- vies, and turkey . . . has distaste for scrub- bing and cooking. E IUH5 s N21 X ill if luv PAUL CLAWSON-live' ly, pleasant, changeable personality - finds dark eyes appealing . . . active in sports . . . booked up every Satur- day night from now till? . . . rarely seen Without "Mac" . . . ambition, member of infantry. ROBERT DAUGHERTY- bashful, quiet, a man of few words . . . 9Ill0YS sleep, ice cream, and New Year's Eve . . . dropped out of school in October . . . "Doc" thinks farm Work is "tops." LILLIAN DAVIS-known by ever-pleasant smile and lively manner . . . "Lums" likes to walk in rain . . . loafs in spare time . . . probably Will attend college - home economics . . . favorite dish, spaghetti with meat balls . . . enjoys ice skating. WILLIAM DIBERT-"only half human," he says . . . merry, mirthful, and Witty . . . would rather eat than dance . . . pet saying, "You tell 'em cabbage, you got the head" . . . ambition, commercial photograph- er . . . adores "Stinky," his pet rabbit. 22 E LIIJHS ROMA DICKEY - neat- ness and order are her virtues . . . favorite pas' times are reading and movies . . . good typist, wants to become secre- tary . . . appreciates Ios- eph Cotton and ham- burgers . . . pet saying, "Go bat yourself around awhile." LOIS EASTON-unpro dictable, versatile, and daring , . . future air ca- det . . . never misses Fred Waring . . . Lulu-ed in senior play . . . likes sports and class officers . . . when will she learn to sing? . . . interest in chemistry. LOLA MAY ELLIOTT - sportive and willing . . . may attend college . . . likes graham cracker pie and Alan Ladd in- tensely . . . pastimes are sports, reading, and movies . . . have you ever heard "LM" giggle? . . . collects wishbones. IOSEPHINE FALSONE -- jolly, happy, and lively . . . she likes to roller skate fevery Sunday night at leastl . . . en- joys "chili" and typing . . . "Io" wants to travel everywhere when she gets out of school. ALTA FISHER-pleasant and ever friendly . . . do we note a little more sparkle in these dark eyes when "he" is near? . . . active as cheerlead- er . . . appreciates good swing music. RICHARD FRAMBACH- winning personality . . . good looking, blonde . . . fast, fearless flash in football . . . friend to most females, but has his own idea of what's nice . . . passed air ca- det test last fall . . . neat dancer . . . adept at everything. ROBERT GEISLER - tall, lanky, and intelligent . . . "the" P. D. student . . . left Ianuary to at- tend Gettysburg College . . . Mac supplies classes with information on gro- cery stores . . . fine man on our squad. TED GILBERT - brisk, joyous . . . "Gibby" likes to run gas out of Dad's car . . . wants to join Uncle Sam's boys . . . hates delivering papers . . . fights with "Maggie Mae" in spare time . . . st if l 11 A RICHARD HASSENPLUG -"problem chi1d" . . . hobby-sleeping . . . ma- rines his destination . . . next to visiting on Sum- mit Avenue, eating oys- ters and French fries are most enjoyable . . . "Doc Ferris" . . . smooth dancer. SHIRLEY HENNEY - a petite blonde, composed, dainty . . . "Cherry" . . . keeps her hair to a "T" . . . likes dancing and milk shakes . . . has ap- titude for sewing and singing . . . daily hiker from Riverside. ROBERT HEASALTINE- carefree, entertaining, capable . . . "Bob" hopes to sail the seven seas and have a girl in every port . . . favorite dishes are Betty Grable and spinach . . . P. D. whiz f???l . . . Sonja Henie on skates. LOUISE HOOVER-gen- tle, placid, and cordial . . . finds Ty Power dash- ing and romantic, but likes lilled pork chops almost f?l as well . . . studies secretarial work and may attend business school . . . hobbies- l'10bbY - "little black radio, reading, and book." movies. Z I J Z S E IU H 5 ' f V23 i lik fff LGIUHS nav EDWARD HOWARD - tall and straight, hand- some and silent . . . we hear he makes good whatever he tackles . . . ambition - railroad en- gineer . . . if in armed service - paratrooper . . . dish -- everything . . . favorite female - Gloria lean. IEAN HUSTER - smil- ing and collected . .. . . . . roller skating, swim- ming, and 'watching en- ergetic Peggy RYCII1 Ure her favorite pastimes . . . taking commercial course to become secretary . . . one of first high school blood donors. WILLIAM IAMES-light hearted, athletic, de- pendable, friendly . . . wears horse-blanket coat . . . "Romeo" to all the girls , . . future as pilot or bombardier . . . could "lessen do without that Hupmobile and certain "blonde?" BETTE IOHNS-an indi- vidual personality this little blackhaired beauty transferred from Philipsburg . . . wants to teach physical ed . . . local swooner for croon- er Sinatra . . . adores Gene Kelly and Wrest- ling matches. Z4 DONALD IONES-quiet, mild, and tolerant . . . "Doc" wants to be a mechanic . . . he has shown his knowledge in this line to the pre-flight class by perfect recita- tion on aircraft engine principles. IOANNE KELLY -good- natured, neat, and de- termined . . . infectious smile . . . was consist- ent honor student . . . blushes at ease, espe- cially when those cute but embarrassing acci- dents occur . . . "Butch" likes boogie-Woogie. IACK KIMMEL-a pleas- ant, proficient, but prob- lematical pupil . . . "Ga- briel" of "Duke Andrews and his Orchestra" . . . ambition to be a bum t?l or a musician . . . always present where Club Diner hamburgers or Olivia De Haviland movies are. DOROTHY KINDZERA- precise, neat, nice . , . very much like Helen . . . shorthand is her fa- vorite subject . . , very good seamstress, makes lovely clothes . . . Hum- phrey Bogart's acting pleases her . . . ham- burgers with onions is her dish. HELEN KINDZERA-cap able, efficient, commer- cially inclined . . . thinks she needs a good vaca- tion after school is out . . . dancing and movies are favorite pastimes . . . another Alan Ladd fan . . . hates soup, EVELYN KLAHRE -- do- mure, sweet, till you know her, then lively and fun-loving too . . . likes piano but doesn't care for practicing . . . will go to Iunior Pitt to study for laboratory technician . , . "writes" . . . interested in pho- tography. IAMES KROPE--talent ed, friendly , . . "lim" fascinates classmates and others with delightful ar- rangements on the pi- ano . . . takes to "T- bones" but dislikes cas- tor oil . . . has fine time in his maroon Ford . . . in "Duke Andrews" also. ELIZABETH LAZER-io- vial, practical "Betty" , . . honor roll artist . . . has trouble keeping awake in school . . . speeds around on motor- bicycle . . . has fun be- ing waitress at Bards . . . favorite food, toast- ed cheese sandwiches . . , dislikes oysters. ELINOR MCCONNELL - impetuous, agile, viva- cious . . . "El's" hobby is driving "Tapioca" . . . favorite pastime, enter- taining our left half- back . . . intensely dis- likes appendectomies "hep to the jive" . . . ex- pects to attend college . . . one of three-year cheerleaders. RUTH MANGUS --- frank, sincere, one of our brightest classmates . . . shy, but warms up quickly . . . perfect ste- nog . . . wants to be a successful business Wom- an . . . thinks spaghetti suppers are "super," MARIAN MIXRKEL -- at- tractive, impulsive, and gay . . . interested in new swing steps . . . one of few who like own name . . . also likes Bar B-Q's, prefers Rip- ples . . . an all-around sports fan . . , probable future with WAVES. MARY METZGAR- ready, willing, and able . . . studious . . . enthusias- tic 4-H'er . . . left mid- term for Penn State . . . studying agriculture and home economics . . . plays piano . . . favorite pastime is driving trac- tor . . . Canadian friends hold much interest. SENIUHS N "N 25 X it qt naw CATHERINE MOONE - agreeable, quiet, always has a smile . . . 'lKay" thinks steak with mush- rooms and dancing are "swell," but that Air Corps interest in Hawaii tops the list by tar . . . in movies its Glenn Ford. LUCILLE NAUGLE-live- ly, jocose, and happy- go-lucky . . . one gallant trips over benches for this young damsel . . . one of our outstanding musicians . . . future in specialized nursing . . . ivory complexion and curly black hair. DONALD PETZ - our red - headed, typical American boy . . . hopes to become a flying ca- det tMr. Custer says, "lt he works"l . . . ia- vorite dish is blondes, especially that West- mont cheerleader . . . member ot the "Shower Chorus." IAMES PINELLI-pleas- ing personality, regular tellow . . . "Piny" was on "All Star" team as leit guard . . . we won- der it Lucille had any- thing to do with chang- ing his theories on stags in that English talk. 26 E EIUHS ESTHER RHODES - etti- cient, friendly, and pru- dent . . . likes music, plays piano, sings . , . future beauty culturist . . , when "Babe" comes home, "Essie" lives on top of the world . . . tinds fun at "Young People's" in church. LEONA RHODES - com- posed and undisturbed attitude . . . wants to become a nurse . . . "Nonie" is always around when scalloped potatoes are served . . . likes to cook . . . sings in girl's church chorus . . . interest in army camp. LURANE RHODES-pro- ficient, pertinent . . . "Fudgie" is interested in cadet nursing, candied sweet potatoes, and people, especially that certain someone in the air corps . . . tine par- ticipant in sports and horseback riding . . . pastimes, church work and singing. GEORGE ROBERTS-ah ways wisecracking, en- tertains everyone around . . . "Cookie" resolved to join Navy alter seeing Betty Hutton in "The Fleet's ln" . . , outstand- ing in basketball . . . the "Reverend" thinks WAVES the best branch of service. DOROTHY RUBRECHT- doesn't know where she's going most of time, but gets there . . . loves to laugh, dance, cmd date . . . ice cream and Walter Pidgeon are fa- vorite dishes . . . wants to be a cadet nurse . . . writes seventy-two let- ters per month. MARGUERITE SAINTZ- non-talkative . . . neat- ness and order are her virtues . . . may attend Cambria Rowe . . . Rod- dy McDoWelI, pies, and two canary birds are fa- vorites, but getting up in the morning is awful in these eyes. VIRGINIA SANKER-con dial and jovial . . . here's another cadet nurse . . . finds fried ham, Hum- phrey Bogart, and Tom- mie Dorsey's swing mu- sic just too, too divine . . . hates concert mu- sic . . . that purple sweater is nice! LOIS SAYLOR-delight fully dear, docile, and droll . . . finally going on five feet . . . faith- ful football follower . . . "Lo" loves to fill her scrapbook with anything she finds interesting . . . feasting on French fries comes next. IUH5 IACK SCHUSTER - ta- lented, capable and composed . . . Satch's ambition, structural engi- neering . . . concen- trates on lovely fresh- man . . , whizzes around in blue Ford . . . inter- ested in sports . . . pine- apple, Alice Faye, and Iohn Garfield are ta- vorites. DORIS Sl'IAl'FER-pre- fers to sit and listen . . . favorite food is hot dogs . . . another ardent fan of Alan Ladd . . . "Dotty" hates to get up in the morning . . . her hobby is writing to a "leather- neck." MARY LOU SHAFFER- jovial, likeable, willing . . . "Lou" works at "Cookie lar" on Satur- days . . , before ration- ing, steaks her favorite meal . . . no special am- bition, but wants to earn some money . . . finds Ronald Reagan fascinat- ing. ELIZABETH A. SHARPE -unsettled and lively . . . has much musical ability . . . sings, plays piano, glockenspiel, vio- lin, and records . . . one of those cute "nuts" . . . always around when pancakes are served. 'N 27 1 fff new BETTY SHULL-striking ly becoming, gentle, pleasant, and agreeable . . . male friends are plentiful, but it is be- lieved that she has de- cided who is first on her list . . . likes good mu- sic and roast chicken. GEORGE SWICK -- slow but dependable . . . fa- vorite school activity is lunch . . . 'lYutz" pushes black Ford around . . . wants to join Navy . . . favorite dish, "big one" . . . where you see Swick you see Roberts also . . . hefty gridiron Candidate. MARIORIE TODHUNTER -gratifying, friendly , . . plans for future are col- lege and teaching ele- mentary work . . . hopes to travel . . , unusual dish, fried frog legs , . . careful not to spill acid because it makes holes . . . drives Chrysler. NANCY TODHUNTER - characteristically com- posed and capable . . . "Toddy" expects to at- tend Allegheny College and major in languages . . . appreciates music . . . sings . . . stuffed pork chops and actress Bette Davis are her fa- vorites. 28 E IUHS HELEN VERHOVSEK - willing to help others . . . wants to be a gov- ernment girl in Wash- ington . . . has passion for hot pork sandwiches and swing music . . . "hobby" is counting food stamps. LOUISE WING!-XRD-fum loving . . . she aims to please . . . listening to radio takes up leisure hours . . . Donald Duck's chatter fascinates her "Wink" has appetite for sauerkraut and weiners . . . intends to be P. T. clerk. BEATRICE WRIGHT--lib tle, but oh, so sweet! . . . domestic type . . . "Beatty" hates public speaking . . . evenings reserved for the one and only . . . lively, peppy, full of fun . . . craves good jokes and dancing at Ripples. ROBERT WRIGHT-most talented artist deluxe . . . works on this line for all school activities . . . ambition is to be a commercial artist . . . hobby, photography . . . likes French fries . . . "Ellsie" Wishes Betty Grable lived in Iohns- town. R Af,-Tim g , f 5""' 4 -.. f 'i' 'lx Q4-if 1"RANifLIN Mlsmra STEVE ADAMS hw-iff FIRST ROW Ileft to rightl: Fred Miller, Everett Michaels, Ierry Helder, Pccul Shurbcxugh. SECOND ROW: Iohn Homolci, Iohn Shutter, Richard Hem- minger. THIRD ROW: Ioseph Soho, Mcxrlin Croyle, Peter Drosjcrck. FOURTH ROW: Iohn Muchesko, Arnold Benford, Iohn Ncrhtigul, William Lint, Missinq from picture: Iohn Soho. 20 eta zlmywmwtatawh'-irilznftivt' 2' 'Sf 1 f, FIRST ROW tlrft tn riglttl' Xvnr ren, Stahl. llaire. VVicl4nit'lx, Parle vechio, Rankin, Orris. SECOND ROW: Mr. Townsend Pollock, Hamer, Rigo, Tahek, lln fecker, Zahoran. lohnstnn, Miss Long THIRD ROW: Sharhaugh, Mlinar chik, Nlayer, Saly, Michalides, Felton FOURTH ROW: Eichler, Brown Ripple, Moors, Livingston, Hill james. FIFTH ROW- Kesslak. Koreltz. Ko koruda, Maystrovnlt, Grvxn, U Sainlz. SIXTH ROW: Cnughennur, Pclulvv Sherhine, Marinr, Grrning. Kvim W0:nin'k. SEVENTH ROVV: Lrhnian. Snsrersic Hunt, While. Lees. l.aBrie. Stutzman EIGHTH ROVV: liatnnler. Hamilton Svrnell, Koehler, Doran, Palay. King NINTH ROVV: Helsel, Saintz, VV1ng ard, Knyat, 'l'mnuskn, Virus. TENTH ROW: Shnll:, Pritts. Za kuciya, Blasko, Cushman, Piclmrnll ELEVENFIIH ROW: Hopkins, Koontz Vtfoodward, Konchan. Stlinevk, tfalule Ryrhak. 'l'WEl.l7'l'll ROVV' Nine, Waller Wnlks'l', llinslman, llernrninger, I THRU III H THE .IUNIIJH5 This year the class of '45 took their places as the "sophisticated" juniors . . . were heard cheering lustily at all games . . . and were present at all school activities. The boys advanced to important positions on the football and basketball teams, While the girls struggled at interclass sports. Worthy material was contributed by the juniors to the band and orchestra as well as to Girl Reserves and Hi-Y. They really went "over the top" with their magazine sales . . . broke all records . . . then planned furiously for the prom. Class rings were some- thing special, and how they did flash them around. Although they had a hec- tic time tackling physics, shorthand. and other trying subjects, they kept the honor roll well supplied. Now, after struggling through an exciting junior year, they are looking forward to taking their places as seniors. RU if OFFICERS ir President-IRVIN WICKNICK Vice P1'9Sid9IIf--ROBERT Hiims Sew -Trans,-Mtcnnm. Pzmrrivrcmo t OFFICERS ir President-DONALD Ross Vice President-EDWARD MISH Spv.'Ti'ens.-ROBERT RIPPLH SOPIIOMORE GIRLS FIRST ROW fin-Il to rightl: Rosrn lmerger, VVi'imer, Slaxik, Smith, Say lor, Hamer, Shikalla. SECOND ROW: Vs-rliovsel., Iiodos Weaver, Price, Saly, Crislip. Baker Mrs. Hill. THIRD ROW- Dalia Je Virus, Davis, . 5 . Hody, H9-alop, Thomas, FOURTH ROW: Walters, Brucv. Grexa. Chrrney, Bram, Polippn Ondreicalf, FIFTH ROW: Swarny, Mitchell Mack, Wirknick, Moore, llomola SIXTH ROW: Martin, Sanl-ter, llom- yak, Ilouseholder, Iarrelt, Holko, Dottbt. SEVENTH ROW: Wolford, Nine, Raymond, llornr. Iarohs, Snyder. IZIGHTII ROW: Maldet, Otto, Da- vis, l.f-vergood, Cameron, llarrisnn, NINTII RONV' 'l't'Pter. I,arnPIw. Melia. Sutlonirk, Bard, Mirhaels. SOPHOMORE BOYS FIRST ROW: Schuster, Layton, Buck, Blough, H. Boerstlrr. Plantan, Bachik. SECOND ROW: Mr. English, Fisher, Churchey. Bremer, Zahoran. F. Clawson, Wehn, Miller, Mr. Kuhs, THIRD ROW: Kodrowsky, Orris Rager, Gawlas, Walkoski. R. Boerf sller. FOURTH ROW: H. Clawson, Wit- prachtiger, Obert, Bonner, Dnhinsky Blaschak, Ripple. FIFTH ROW: llouser, Ashman Yesh, Butler, Wallvo, Rose. SIXTH ROW: I.eb:Plter, Krieger, Kesslak, Mish, Lees. LaBrie, SEVENIIIII RCJWI Cieszynslci, Stnlufr, Dezelon, Ream, Kimmel, Cfvrlcel. IiIGH'l'II ROW: Keenan, MaurPr, hlztrcinlxo, Berlelmile, Rolucils, Tressler. ,,., ,.., , 4 S l Illllll SIIPHU UHE5 The shy, frightened, inexperienced "greenies" of last year have completely for- gotten they Were labeled as such . . . as sophomores, they now look down on this year's "freshies." After getting acquainted in their freshman year, they were ready to start this year with a "bang," They ac- cepted their school Work as whole-heart- edly as their extracurricular activities-tak- ing part in all sports, majorettes, Courier, Reflector, Student Council, and assembly programs. Many things were accomplished under the leadership of their capable class officers and sponsors. The school expects to hear much more from this enthusiastic group in the next two years. IJBSEHVINE -A' -k Bringing new vigor and enthusiasm into the school. this year's freshmen class was different. Not the bash- ful, timid newcomers of former years, but rather a lively, interested group eager to enter into all activi- ties. Many of the girls became majorettes, Girl Re- serves, glee clubers, and local sports fans. The boys FRESHMAN CLASS if OFFICERS if President-BRUCE FISHER Vice President-HENRY REINDFLEISH Sec.-Treas.-BARBARA CARLMARK likewise accepted opportunities to take part in football, basketball, and wrestling. An unusually large number of freshmen achieved places on the honor roll throughout the year. Much musical ability was displayed by their participation in both band and ora chestra, and a very definite interest was shown in "jitterbugging." l'7RESllMAN GIRLS-l7lRST ROW tlvft to rightl: Knkenherger. Bantlrowsliy, Witllilyer, Rlnrlli, Dylan, Congllenonr, O. Rhodes SECOND ROW: Miss Wilson, Minler, Monrs, Orner, Maystrovirh, Kolar. Gastley, Strozar, Koehler. 'l'HlRD ROW: Busliwatlt Frarikosky, Walkti, Barron. Placliy, Shaffer, Fletcher. FOURTH ROW: Walsli, Parker, Larnela, Shnll. Hopkins, Cushman lilF'l'li ROW: McHugh, Pupovivili, Pecscnye, Mnrdorlc, Bee, Frnmhnfh, Pollock, SIXTH ROW: Sober, Grantham. Simler. Boring Schweitzer, Kokornda. SEVENTH ROW: Bockel, Speck, Henderson, Oyler, Kantner, Mclntyrc. EIGHTH ROW: Carlmark, Brasher Kist, Ashman. S, Miller, Zexna. FRESHMAN BOYSMIIIRST ROW: Gaspar, Chrislrtcr, Stine, llassenplug, lames, Gnwlas. Wright. SECOND ROW: Nlrs. Nlarlale Witprat'htiger, Brencllinger, Annian, Larson, Levergood, Yr-arts, Uktnar, Miss llornick. THIRD ROW: Mnfflcy, Satko. Runintel, Rtek Shook, Brandon. l:OUR'l'lf ROW: Mnrl-wi, Lishka, Rees, Stephenson, llnnt. Repp, Garland. Fll7'l'll ROW: Mlmarrliils, lietzer Knepper, Slagle, Pfeil. Ripple. SIXTH ROW: Riga, Beltz, Balng, Carney, lollnson, lllsher. SEVENTH ROW: lnlinston, Mislt Levenlry, D. Miller, Berg, Cable, lilGl'l'l'H ROW: Rucosky, Martin, Barnhart, Frietlline, Moose. Snyder. NINTH RUXV: Kelil R. Poehner, D, Pnehner, Peters. Nanglc, Stntzman, TENTH ROW: Zeiler, Baunlhaugh, Gelilnian, Reindfleish, F. Miller, Conslnlwlt' ELEVENTH ROW: Knzmn, Hartnett. lk, ,ff SEVENTH GRADE-FIRST ROW tleft to righll: Altemus, Boersllvr, Price, Polippo, Dallape, Yealts, Reap, Allison, Sides, Markel, SECOND ROW: Bracken, Schultz, E. Davis, Long. Brant, Crislip. ll. Davis, Fisher, Wagoner, Freidline. THIRD ROW: Sober, War'ing, Koontz. McNally. Enlcle, Goldberg, Bnninlmnglt, M.:n'l-4, Beck, Miss lletrifla. ElGllTll GRADE-FIRST ROW lleft to rightl: Massimo, R. lohns, I. Iohns, Doran, Orris, llislop, Odili, Hamer, Buterbaugh, Bee, Schweitzer, Yeatts. SECOND ROW: Kennedy, Rilrhey. Cousins, Horne, Grviner, P. Iohns, Nlansfield, Reynolds, Peterson, Brown. llill, Robson, Allison. TIIIRD ROW: Mr. Scott, Bowers, Humphreys, Mack, Easton, Mostoller, Walker, Sedei, Miss Spangler, Monne, Sivi, Fluck, Rose, Frzimharh. Calderwnoil, llarhaugh. if i ll H PHD ISINE UNDEHEL1-XSSMEN Although the seventh grade had a rather small class, they had no trouble in making their presence known. After getting acquainted with the halls and classrooms of their new building, they became really quite prominent in school social functions . . . games, dances, assemblies, and other school activities. Besides adding home economics and shop to their regular studies, a few also added a special 3:30 to 4:30 session. Exhibiting great possibilities sOCiCIlly and as scholars, they show pros- pects for future school years. Last year-'S "youngsters" grqduqlly Settled dOWl'1 to beCOII19 CI Sncippy, wide awake group. Learning to saunter leisurely instead of "tearing" to the next class was quite a problem for them, but it was solved. Although they weren't as yet permitted to take part in all activities, they loyally supported the team with their hearty cheering. Some of them have already become "jitterbugs." They are looking forward to next year's promising programs, even though they will be merely "freshies." 33 7+-J-,Lf 0144 ,aww iii THE SQUAD--FIRST ROW lleft to rightl: Iames, P. Clawson, Simler, Swick, I. Schuster, Pinelli, Ripple, Mr. Lngisinger. SECOND ' ' ' ' ' 'lc ' . C . : Chu Z uslu ROW. Mr. Fisher, Petz, Hemmmger, Frambach, Geisler, Halre, Cable, Wlc nick. Mr S ott THIRD ROW lt , C nan, Hindman. Tressler, Nine, Rose. Parlevechio. FOURTH ROW: Walko, C. Roberts, Constable. Hartnett, Keenan, Marcinko, Blaschak. Ream. FIFTH ROW: Rucosky, Gehlman, Nauqle. Fisher, Repp, F. Clawson, Yesh. SIXTH ROW: R. Boerstler, Hill, Wehn. Houser, Miller, Yeatts, Martin. SEVENTH ROW: Iohnstnn, Iohnson, Berg, Carney. EIGHTH ROW: Markel, Blunglx, R. Srhuster, Lebzelter, Buck, Hamer, Buterbaugh. Wright. DEFE DEH5 UF THE BL Eli lllllll BULB FERNDALE BUMPS RICHDAND SEPTEMBER 10-Putting on ct scintillating display of power and speed which had Rich- land Township running around in circles most of the time, the Yellow Iackets opened their grid campaign with a resounding bang by scoring a 21-U triumph at the Point Stadium. Details of the game can best be told in a few figures, which give the Stingers credit for 289 yards gained from scrimmage against 73 for Richland, while the first downs read 18-6 in favor of the winners. Backed on their heels when the Iackets scored in each of the first three quarters, the Townshippers showed their only signs of life early in the final frame, when the game was already beyond redemption. Their attack was shackled by an alert Ferndale defense. Halfback Frambach and Fullback Ripple ac- counted for most of their team's yardage. 36 EBENSBURG PULLS SURPRISE SEPTEMBER 17-Ebensburg High School's underrated Red Devils pulled a major sur- prise when they knocked off Fernda1e's vet- eran outfit, 18-6, on the Ebensburg field. Long runs accounted for two of the Countyseaters' touchdowns and a 56-yard march produced the third, while the Yellow Iackets were limited to a single touchdown late in the game. Running up a 14-11 margin in first downs, the Red Devils piled up 323 yards against 234 for the Stingers, whose passes and razzle-dazzle were broken up by the fast-charging Ebensburg line. It was only after the Counter by their foe that the Stingers were able to get going. Two laterals yielded a first down, and two runs by Frambach brought the ball to the six-yard line, from where Ripple went over. JACKETS DEFEAT INDIANS SEPTEMBER 24-Striking back with a resounding bang after seeing their first-period lead wiped out, Fern- dale High counted twice in the sec- ond half to batter Conemaugh Town- ship into defeat, 19-7, at the Point Stadium. The Stringers started out by car- rying the opening kickoff 83 yards on just eleven plays, but the Indians forged ahead in the third session on an 80 yard march and successful conversion. Coach Fisher's boys were quickly back in the van, need- ing only three plays to scoreg then they followed up with a cake-icing touch- down in the final session on a 47-yard ad- vance. PUNXSUTAWNEY BOWS TO F. H. S. SEPTEMBER 30-Cashing in on the scor- ing opportunity which came their Way in the final frame, the Yellow Iackets rammed over the game-winning touchdown to trip an inexperienced but stubborn Punxsu- tawney combination, l2-7, at the Point Stadium. Ferndale outplayed the visitors as the 10-4 margin in first downs indicates, and took the lead by scoring in the second quar- ter. Aside from their lone touchdown jour- ney in the third stanza, the Iefferson County lads were never able to pass the rnid- stripe. lfflf. MANAGERS-tlcfl lo rightl' Markcl, Wright, Bunk. Buterbaugh PORTAGE TGPS STINGERS OCTOBER 8-Portage High School's foot- ball team pinned a 12-7 setback on the Yel- low Iackets in a close. hard-fought engage- ment on the Portage field. After a scoreless first half, Portage tallied a touchdown in the third period and another in the fourth session before Coach Fisher's proteges rallied for seven points near the end of the game. Portage held an ll-8 edge in first downs. The rivals were virtually even in the first half. Ferndale scored in the last few minutes of the game when Ripple passed from his own forty to Clawson on the ten. On the next play Frambach passed to Claw- son in the end zone for the score. i Contact 'A' i' Flash if if Scramble 4' if First Line of Defense ff FERNDALE WINS THRILLER OCTOBER l5-Ferndale High staged a brilliant game to shackle the previously un- defeated DuBois High machine on their home field by a surprisingly big 13-7 margin. Trailing by a 7-6 score at half-time, the Iackets came surging back to score twice in each of the last two frames and turn what once was a close game into a landslide. Ronald Nine made the most spectacular play ot the evening when he took the sec- ond half kickoff on his own goal line and tore straight up the field for 89 yards. Ripple accounted for three touchdowns, while Geisler and Frambach each crossed the line once. if O11 Parade if if At Ease 'k CONEMAUGH MAKES CONQUEST OCTOBER 21-Conemaugh High's Iron Horses lived up to their name with a 25-7 conquest of Ferndale High at the Point Sta- dium to break the long jinx held over them by the Iackets. The Conemaugh boys made 245 net yards by rushing and picked up 84 more by completing two passes. They collected ll first downs. Ferndale also covered plenty of ground, gaining 131 yards by rushing and another 122 by completing nine of Z1 passes. Aside from their third period touch- down, the Stingers were stopped cold once in scoring position. Hemminger recovered a fumble to pave the way for his team's score, which was carried over by Ripple. if "Hit 'Em High" af 38 'A' Caught in the Act if SOUTH FORK GETS DUNKING OCTOBER 28-The Yellow Iackets got a final tuneup for the Westmont battle in actual combat maneuvers by dunking South Fork in the Point Stadium mud, 26-U. Despite the heavy goo, the Stingers man- aged to toss the ball around a little, but in the main relied on straight football to score twice in the second stanza and once each in the last two. Aside from the first few minutes of play, the South Fork Falcons were never in the game offensively. But the visitors spent a busy evening defensively chasing the Iac- kets all over the premises, as Coach Fisher's lads scored on drives of 81, 89, 62, and 36 yards to rack up their fifth triumph. 'ff With a Twist of the Wrist 'A' i' The Voice of Authority 'A' WESTMONT SWATS STINGERS NOVEMBER 4-With fire in their eyes, Westmont's high-geared Hilltoppers swatted the Yellow Iackets, 13-7, at the Point Sta- dium in their twentieth annual battle. Going into the fray with the incentive of breaking the eight-year jinx hanging over their heads, the Red and Gray combination had to wait until late in the third quarter to get its offensive going. Scoring twice in the beginning of the final stanza, Westmont held the count to 13-U until the final minute to play. Then Frarnbach tossed a perfect strike to Nine, who made the catch on his own 45, cleverly outwitted two defenders, and romped down the field. i' Playing Catch i 39 J 1 ? 1 ,fn , elf ,,,,..,M X A,,,1 , 5 my , wpvwf A , fi we x If Y 2, Ail I x A Xu' My 4 ,Rh ' m Af, 'll , M 3 5 , .ni an 4 'D M fi ga L i' Benchwarmer Blues i' 'A' First Aid if LEHT lVII DS f ir STHUNE MUSIILES -k -k i' The Home Front 'ff 42 IACKETS MEET DEFEAT NOVEMBER ll-In a wide open game played at Lewistown, Fern- dale's Yellow Iackets were defeat- ed, Z6-l3. The winners made lti first downs and the visitors l3. The locals scored twin touch-- downs in the first and thircl frames, while the invaders count-r ed single six-pointers in the two other chapters. Geisler carried the ball over irt the second quarter, and Nine- grabbed a pass for the extrc: point. Frambach chalked up the Iackets' other touchdown when he went across in the last quarter after a sustained march. BARNESBORO NIPS FERNDALE NOVEMBER 19-In a listless game played in the Barnesborc- Stadium, the locals set back Fern- dale, 7-U. Lack of action can be blamed on the field, which was all mud and prevented either team from getting any lasting of-N fensive under way. Considering the condition of the ball and the evident eager- ness of both tearns, there were surprisingly few penalties. Bar- nesboro had a 7-5 edge in first downs, with most of them coming in the last few minutes when the Red Dragons pushed over the lone tally of the game. PIGSKIN REVIEW Ferndale Opponent 21 Richland 0 6 Ebensburg 18 19 Conemaugh Twp. 7 12 Punxsutcxwney 7 7 Portage 12 31 DuBois 7 7 Conemciugh 25 26 South Fork 0 7 Westmont 13 13 Lewistown 26 O Bcxrnesboro 7 149 122 w i' Aces In Action i' if -k HIGH IDEAL5 if if THHUUEH SPUHTS if To the Victors Belong the Spoils i' ,misfit S1MLr:R FRAMBACH Roasnrs CLAWSON Gr:1s1.r:R THHIII EH THE SE SUN -A' f The Yellow Iackets opened their basket- ball season by dropping a one-sided 34-19 verdict to the undefeated South Fork High tossers on the home court. Ferndale was in the lead soon after the game started, but had trouble getting the ball into scoring position for the remainder of the contest. The inexperienced Stingers were defeat- ed 37-l6 by the strong Catholic cohorts. if Referee in Command 'A' While their ballhandling was still a little sluggish, the borough men showed much more aggressiveness and skill. The opening two quarters of the Fern- dale vs. Conemaugh Township game were packed with practically all of the scoring action. Although they handled the ball well in the early going, Coach Fisher's passers really did best at the foul line, making ten point-adding shots. The game ended 33-ll, Having a big height advantage, Alle- gany's rangy and fast cage representatives enjoyed two big point-getting quarters tc double the final score 32-16. Although the Iackets Worked the ball consistently in the action-packed last round, not enough points were gathered to change the ultimate de- cision. Opening the Tri-County League season, the Stingers climaxed a great uphill fight against Indiana with a winning drive in the last frame. With less than a minute tc play, Clawson hit the basket to set the stage for a game-deciding bucket, which Fisher made to eke out the 28-27 count in our favor. PHNDMAN CABLE Pzrz Sci-xus'rr:R NINE i if WITH ll H lf EERE Neither Ebensburg nor the home team could get its offensive maneuvers clicking in the first half, but the second half was en- tirely different. The County-seaters took the lead, but held only a 22-21 edge until they sank the game-clinching basket with the second hand on the clock making its final spin. Ferndale's cagers came up with one of their best games of the season to go on ct scoring spree against Conemaugh Town- ship and cart off a 52-15 victory. Dominat- ing the play from start to finish, all but one of the Stingers stuck a finger in the scoring pie. Boasting one of the best teams in their school's history, Iohnstown played before the largest crowd of the year and carted home the long end of a 32-l8 score largely through the stellar play of their center, Rey- nolds, and the sharp-shooting of Slobozien. Our team failed to take advantage of the Trojans' defense, which permitted plenty of opportunities to score. Westmont and Ferndale put on their customary ding-dong battle, until our oppo- nents began to take a decisive lead in the third stanza. From this point, the Red and Grey moved on to final triumph. Limited to a slim two-point lead during the first eight minutes of action, Conemaugh grew stronger as the game proceeded and hit their peak in the last frame by handcuff- ing the Iackets without a point in that quarter. 'A' Time Out for a Pick-up 'A' FISHER Pom-INER HARTNETT CUSHMAN RUCOSKY NAuc.1.i: THEY STHI E TU The Fishermen shaded Windber by a close 34-33 count in a game that saw the home team hold the lead throughout the first half. The Miners took the lead in the third quarter, but hard playing in the final period brought Ferndale out on top. Exhibiting a strong passing attack, Al- toona dominated play and took the game, 46-16. Although able to break through the Maroons' defensive setup with consistency, if Sideline Critics if IIUNUUEH if the Ferndale quintet were stumped when it came to shooting, since the height of their opponents enabled Altoona to control the ball off both boards. Stymied without a point in the entire period, Coach Fisher's men still managed to nose out Ebensburg, 16-15. Neither team could make any headway in the first frame, but margins in the second and third periocls gave Ferndale a lead big enough to with- stand the County-seaters' last-ditch efforts. The Iackets traveled to Indiana and played the best ball of the year to win 48-37. Both teams had "hot fingers," but our boys made few mistakes and worked together with clock-like precision. It would be im- possible to name an outstanding player, since both the varsity and junior varsity performed like veterans. Windber High defeated Ferndale for the first time since early in the 1938 season when they Won a 29-22 decision. The Coal- miners could muster only five points in the opening quarter, but they were enough to provide a comfortable lead for the remain- der of the game. 'I'lll2 SQUAD-FIRST ROW: Schuster. Frambach, Clawson, Simler, Gcislvr, Roberts. SECOND RUXV: Cushman, Nine, Cable, Petz, Hindman. THIRD ROW: Rucosky, Fishcr, llzxrlnf-tl, Pmflum-r, Nnnglv. l7OlIR'l'll ROXV: Knyat, Gvlilman, l'lamilton. Fll7Tl'l ROW: Scott, Mr. l'7islms'r. Given trouble only in the third period. Ferndale's cagers breezed through a 27-16 triumph over Southmont's Tigers. Our lads got the jump at the opening Whistle and re- mained on top. The visitors came to life after the halftime, however, the Stingers came back with a rush for seven points in the final round. In our second meeting with the Trojans, we showed a decided improvement over many of our earlier games. Our defense had the Iohnnies' high gear attack well- bottled. While our lads played an excellent passing and floor game, their shooting was decidedly off and we emerged on the short end of an l8-27 score. The Yellow Iackets rose to great heights when they knocked off the smooth-sailing Westmonters, 25-2l, in the year's most stun- ning upset. Starting off like a ball of fire, Ferndale clicked for eleven consecutive points before the Hilltoppers converted a foul to start their scoring. In a game which saw every player on the squad in action, we could garner but four points during the entire thirty-two min- utes. The whole team played as though in a trance, failing to make even "peep shots," while the Catholic offense and defense worked almost to perfection. Fisher's boys threw another big surprise party when they trounced the unsuspecting Conemaugh Iron Horses by a 33-20 deci- sion. Sparked by Simler, who ruffled the em- broidery work for five field goals, Ferndale's ballhandling and defense worked to per- fection. Tllli MANAGERS-l7lRST ROXV: lVlnrlwl, l:lutf'rlm1ql SVFOND ROVV: Allman, Hlough, R. Sc'l1usIc1', Hinrk. Taking each of the last three periods by two-point margins, the Stingers downed Southmont, 23-18. The Iackets dropped the first round and were trailing early in the second when they suddenly pulled out front With nine consecutive points, In the final stanza the Tigers reduced the gap, but Fern- dale quickly retaliated. Altoona came to Ferndale expecting lit- tle trouble, as they had scored almost at will in a previous game. The Iacket defense Worked Well and held the visitors in check: but again their poor eye for the bucket caused the Stingers' downfall, as they made but five of 63 shots. Ferndale traveled to South Fork for a re- turn game. For the first two quarters it looked as if the Black and Gold were going places, but with the second half the attack bogged down. The sharp shooting of Mor- gan and Rowe proved too much, and the Iackets came out on the short end of a 31-25 score. In a fast moving game, Allegany emerged a 40-31 winner from a return en- gagement on our floor. After the senior five got off to a poor start, giving the Mary-V landers a nine-point lead, the junior five- entered the fray and for the next eighteer minutes held their more experienced visitors: on even terms. if Lamplighter's Serenade if 'K' Bucket Bound if INDIVIDUAL RECORD Games Quarters Field Free-Throws Per Cent Total Name Year Played Played Goals Made - Missed of Fouls Points Clawson Sr. 24 83 36 18 14 44 90 Schuster Sr. 24 82 28 l5 18 45 71 Frambach Sr. 10 30 10 9 ll 44 29 Geisler Sr. 10 32 16 4 4 50 36 Petz Sr. 23 62 12 4 6 40 28 Roberts Sr. 24 84 27 15 29 34 69 Simler Sr. 24 90 45 13 21 39 103 Cable Ir. 16 55 30 18 6 75 78 Cushman Ir. 13 26 2 1 2 33 5 Hindman Ir. 19 46 3 9 5 58 15 Nine Ir. 21 47 12 8 8 50 32 Fisher Fr. 19 - 52 12 18 5 78 42 Rucosky Fr. 7 7 0 l 1 50 1 Poehner Fr. 6 6 0 1 1 50 1 Total Points ......... ...... . 600 SEASON VARSITY IUNIOR VARSITY Ferndale Opponent Ferndale Opponent 19 34 South Fork 25 26 16 37 Catholic High 14 16 28 24 Conemaugh Twp. 33 ll 16 32 Allegany High 28 27 Indiana 38 15 21 24 Ebensburg 18 19 52 15 Conemaugh Twp. 32 7 18 32 Iohnstown 28 13 36 56 Westmont 15 17 12 30 Conemaugh 34 33 Windber 26 12 16 46 Altoona Westmont Soph. 36 22 16 15 Ebensburg 25 8 IUNIOR VARSITY MAKES IMPRESSIVE SHOWING The Baby Iackets were one of the strong- est junior quintets in the county. They play- ed a twenty-three game schedule, winning sixteen and losing seven. The squad was made up of seven freshmen and six juniors. The freshmen played the first tive games on the schedule, losing close games to South Fork, Catholic High, and Ebensburg and de- feating Conemaugh Township and Indiana. In order to strengthen their team for Tri- county competition, Cable, Cushman, Hind- man, and Nine were added. This combin- ation with Bruce Fisher from the freshman squad finished second to Westmont's junior- senior outfit. The highlights of the junior varsity season were two games won from Iohnstown High juniors and two games won from Catholic High I V's in a three-game series. The team scored a total of 540 points, an average of 24 per game, While the best their opponents could do was to score 374 points, an average of 17 points per game Bruce Fisher had the highest individual score, totaling 224 points on 88 field goals and 48 fouls for an average of 10 points per game. SUMMARY VARSITY IUNIOR VARSITY Ferndale Opponent Ferndale Opponent 48 317 Indiana 30 14 22 29 Windber 24 23 27 16 Southmont 16 13 18 27 Iohnstown 19 18 25 21 Westmont 20 25 4 33 Catholic High 15 14 33 20 Conemaugh 26 28 23 18 Southmont 28 14 23 32 Altoona Cochran 25 17 25 31 South Fork 18 21 31 40 Allegany Catholic High 29 l7 600 700 540 370 if Last Minute Orders i' i' Toss-up 'k 49 BH!-HN!-XIJBHW if With emphasis being put on the PhYSi' cal fitness training a boy receives in high school before entering the service, Fern- dale High School has met the challenge by opening a new field of athletics. This new- est sport at the school is wrestling, coached by Mr. Luchsinger. Although the program was first organized two years ago, it was not until this year that wrestling was given a place on the interscholastic sports calendar. The team's record of one victory and ten defeats is by no means an indication of the wrestlers' spirit, nor is it an index of how hard they worked. The boys exerted every effort to overcome the handicap of inexperience, and in the meets each boy really put up a fight. Even though our op- ponents were frequently victorious, each one knew he had been in a battle. Another fact about the team's record should be made clear: of the meets lost, about one-half were by one or two point margins. One of the most encouraging things about the wrestling squad was the improvement shown by the boys as the season pro- gressed. 5U WRESTLING RECORD Conemaugh Twp. 25 Ferndale .... 21 Bedford .V...,..,c,,.,,, 33 Ferndale .. . 5 Bedford ,c.,tcVt,c,,c,Y 32 Ferndale ,,c, 3 Conemaugh Twp. 27 Ferndale lO Boswell Vt,wwt,.,,,Y,,,c 30 Ferndale .... ll Somerset ..,.... .... l 5 Ferndale . ,, 21 Blairsville ........,,,. 22 Ferndale ,,,, 17 Boswell ...... ....... 2 3 Ferndale ,t,, 9 Blairsville ..,.. .... l 8 Ferndale ,,,, 17 Two wrestlers closed the season with almost perfect records. These boys, lim Pin- elli and Iessie Iames, each won all but one of his bouts, both losses being close de- cisions. They were the only senior members of the team, and they certainly set a good example for the others to follow. A brief summary of their records follows. lim Pinelli, captain of the team and a senior. wrestled in the one hundred and sixty-five pound class. He won nine bouts and lost one. Two of his victories were by pins, six by decision, and one by forfeit. His most notable victory was over Keblisk of Somer- set High School, who outweighed him by twenty-six pounds. Iessie Iames, senior and now an air cadet, wrestled in the one hun- dred and fifty-four pound class, winning ten out of eleven matches. Of his wins, nine were by decision and one by pin. His most important victory was a decision over Ep- pley, which gave the Boswell star his first defeat. Now that wrestling season is over, the boys are looking forward to the next year and hoping for a more successful outcome. With all but two of the boys returning, it is our guess that they'll have it. -A' if IJISPI. Lu 2 nf Z I. Iames H. Bremer H. Hamer T. Churchey I. Lees I. Iohnston W. Stutzman M. Parlevechio R. Rose E. Schultz I. Wicknick W. Iames I. Pinelli B. Constable at e ti ti E1 E1 E 2 .. 22, QE., ME, NE. fi. FQ., 535. 55, .52 .fag we iii Q22 Q55 +355 :ZS 10.2 1551 1254 iam man: uma: u.mI1: Em: L-D L-D L-D W-D L-D L-D L-D L-D L-P W-D W-D L-F L-D L-D L-D L-D L-D W-D L-D W-D L-P ....,,., .,....., L -D L-D L-D L-D L-D 'L-P L-P ........ L-D ........ L-D L-D LVD L-P ........ L-D L-P L-D L-D L-D L-D 'L-D L-D ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ ........ W-D L-D ........ Draw L-D Draw ........ ........ 'L-D ........ L-D 'L-D ........ ........ L -F ........ W-P L-D L-D Draw L-D W-P ........ L-D W-D W-D L-D W-D W-D W-D W-D W-D W-P L-D W-D W-D W-P W-D W-F W-D Draw L-D L-D L-D L-D L-P ........ L-D Key: '-Exhibition Match L-D-Lost-Decision W-D-Won-Decision L-P-Lost-By Pin W'P-Won-By Pin L-F-Lost-By Forteit W-F-Won-By Forfeit YEIJ BY MATTERS az 'XE A,- EE' 'UM 2 5 E 1.-D W-D W-D L-D L-D L-D L-D IB RMB W-P W-D THE SQUAD-FIRST ROW Qleft to right! Lees, Pinelli, W. Iames, Wicknick. Schult Ha p q SECOND ROW: Iohnston, Stntzmzm. Ripple, Constable. Churrhey. THIRD ROW: Martin, 9 Rose. Parlevechio. FOURTH ROW: Mr. Lnchsinger. FIRST ROW fleft to rightl: Frambarh, Swick. Geisler, Roberts, Scliuster, Clawson. SECUNIU ROW. Pinelli, Sfliultx. Hemminger. Nine, Cuhlv, Ripple. Ross. THIRD ROVV: lanws, llnssenplug. flOllslLllwll', L lUllRlll RUVV M l"l Pailt-xruttm. llindmiiu, Nviuknicx I. H ' "I promise to be loyal at all times to the F Club and to the school for which it stands. I Will not cheat. I will obey training rules and play the game hard for the fun of the game, trying to Win by strength and skill. I Will treat my opponents with courtesy. If I play in a group game, I will play not for my own glory, but for the success of my team. I will be a good loser and a gener- ous Winner . . . " This is a portion of the pledge that each "F" Club member must make. The purpose of fair play, cooperation, and clean sportsmanship is practiced by the boys, not only on the field and court, but also in their everyday living. I. 'Aztek To become a member of the organiza- tion, athletes must meet the requirements for a letter in one or more of the varsity teams. Letters are also earned by obtaining a total of five hundred points, fifty of which must be earned in interscholastic games. Besides gaining honor for the school, they have achieved personal victories. They have found that teamwork, imaginative leadership, and plain hard Work are the safest foundations on Which to build for the future which they, as Ferndale lettermen, face with eagerness and with confidence. if if FUR EHITIJHIII S SEB IEE 52 IIHE TIVE HEIIHE The chief interclass sport for Ferndale girls is volleyball. From the four high school classes approximately ninety girls partici- pated in the games this year. During the contest the girls displayed sportsmanship, friendly rivalry, and good playing ability. Their rewards were clean fun and whole- some exercise. Each group and each girl entering into the competition served to make the games more interesting to spectators and to play- ers. The less experienced teams learned by playing and by watching the more exper- ienced teams, and so the rivalry became keener as the contests progressed. Two 5liNlOR5-FIRSI' ROVV: tlcft tt: riqhtl: Sanlscr, Rlmclcw M 'mtt.t...1C,, mtl., wmgm, sms,-. SECOND ROW: Nittgtff .aston, lltshcr, D. Slmffcty Ccsloxntlx. Kclly. 'l'lllRD ROW: N. 'udluuutcix lilltutt, llotkcl, Zimmerman. M. L. Shaffer. Wirigrurrl. SilllllOMORlf5-fl7lRS'l' ROVV' 'l'. Daxls. llocly. H. D.avli-, Mitchell. llnntcr, Saylnr, VVQMQV. SECOND ROVV: Nlnss llctrulx. llhomas. Martin. llcslup, Bodnar, Otto. 'l'tlIRD ROW. l,cx'ct'- oocl, llurnc, Stttlonirlx, l3.1rrl. Tllfl -ki' teams, the sophomores and the seniors, were almost even, but the seniors edged out in front to claim the pennant for the year. The girls remember with fond memories the good times had by all, the spirited yells at the end of each game, and the friendly associations which shall endure in the years to follow high school days. Com: or SPORTSMANSHIP Keep a stout heart in defeat. Keep your pride under in victory. Keep a sound soul, a clean mind, and a healthy body. IUNIORS-l7lR.S'l' RCWV: Riga, Orris, lohnston, Pollovlc. Stahl VVarrcn. SECOND ROVV: Shcrbinc, Ripple, Brown, Sharhaugh Urcning, Moors. THIRD ROW: Koehler, Lacs, Keim, Stutzmau Marmc, Scrncl, White. l7Rl'iSllNlEN-FIRST ROW: lllctthcr, Moors. Polloflt, Wldmvcr l'landrowsky, Kochler. SECOND ROVV: Miss Herrick, Bc-c Kantncr, Minter. Borlccl, Hopkins. 'l'lllRD ROW: Oylcr, Sober llrdnthani, Simlcr, Ashmdu, l'lcnclcrson. FOURTH ROW Kist Brasher, Sprrk, Carlmark. 53 HEE IIIJMPETITI To many boys who do not take part in varsity competition, interclass basketball is a major feature of the winter season. lt is here that future varsity stars first learn the rudiments of the game. With 86 boys taking part this year, teams were organized into major and minor leagues. A total of ll2 games were played, each team playing twice a week under student officials. The first half ended February 22 with two teams undefeated: the juniors in the IJ 'ki major league and the seventh grades in the minor league. The second half closed March lUg in the major league the seniors emerged undefeated. In the play-off the seniors, Pinelli, Hassenplug, Gilbert, Krope, Iames, Howard, and Kimmel, defeated the juniors, 23-20. In the minor league the seventh grade repeated their first half performance and did not lose a game in nine starts, in the play-off with the major league winners, they were completely outclassed and fell by a score of 54-19. """w5E?fki'5F' ' 5ENlOR5--f7lR5'l' RUXX' llcfi lu Hgh!! fluxx.arnl llrwaltlylc, lllNlf5ll5"l7ll25'l' Rflvk' ll,nrf, llgn'lcxr'1hm. brhullg. bunk, ll8bSf'HFlllQ- IUHICS. Pmcllu. SECUND ROW' Krups. Iisrh. Gulf VVuku11slr. bQl'ILjUND ROXV. Blasko. 'llolnaska hm- K'm"'cl lfRli5IlNltiNfl:lR5'l' Row vv,.g1.f, shim. l0h..,.,,,. lohuston SOPHOMORE5,-lflR5'I' RUVV lmxxlas. Urns. llouscr. Krlrqvr, Stutzumn. Nlanmu, Yi-falls. SECOND ROVV Amman, VV1rprdnh'1qer Ktrndn. Lets. Fisher. fllnlrxlwv SECOND WORN' Sshustcr, Nllllcr, llrurcllluv. Kuinm. Rnpplc, Rccsr. Larson. 'l'lllRD POVV. Kia'-par Plantan. Bonner. Robcrts lrrs-lrr. Yr-h. Lchzcltrr. VVclvn Prdlog. Bamhnrl. Riga. lluul. Markcl, l7OllR'l'll PUVV Mnfflry THIRD ROXV Rust. Rcavvv, Klmmcl, R1ppIc.fIl.msun. l7fJl,lR'l'll Slaglr, Bclu. f'fr.1ndnn, Brvmlllugcr, fillrfllff ROVV: hillnavshllx RUVV. Buflrr. Built. Stul-wr. NVllpl1nhtlgcl'. Bofrsllcr. Blnugli. l'faun1b.4ugh. Kclil. Liuxisfalwlr. luoosc. SIXTH llQW: N112 lwshcr X.. 54 . ,,,g-1 5IiNlOR5fIfIRSl' ROVN' llttfl to xighfl. Sanltcr, Rhodes. Nl. 'flutt- hunlcr. Dans ifcslmnilt, Kcllv SECOND ROVV Nauglc l:,:x-Jovi. lrtsllvl. D Shaffer. lnlms. 'l'lllRD ROW' N. lncllvulltcr, lflllotl. Bmlxcl, Zliiiiiicrimiit, Sharpe. M. l.. Slvnffcr, Vtfxngnrtl. 5OPllOlN'IORl'l5f--FIRST ROVV: 'l'. Dans, Ifamcr, B. Davis. Mit- ihcll. Savior. W't-Axe-i'. SECOND ROW' Miss Il:-trunk. Thomas, Martin. Prine. liotfnar, Otto. Sfilv. THIRD ROVV: Baker. lfornc. Crisllp. lfc-lop Snilniiitlx. Brirrl. l7OUR'l'll ROVU: Lcxergontl. Nino. Biurc. VVolfo1tl, Interclass basketball was one of the out- standing activities in the girls' program of athletics this year. Each class entered one team, with a total of about sixty girls tak- ing active part in the contests. The friendly rivalry between the class teams made most of the games interesting and hard-fought. The sophomore and senior teams were close competitors, with the sophomores, who lost only one game out of fifteen, taking the pennant. The "freshies," a little slow in get- ting started, were just beginning to display IUNIORS-f7lRS'l' ROW: Riga, Orris. Moors, Stahl. Iohnslon VVar1cn, SECOND ROW. Koehler. Ripplc. Brown, Sharhaugh llnllonk. Iamcs. THIRD ROW: Eichlcr, Mayer. Kr.-im. Stntzmdn Pehlcy. FOURTH ROVV: lfunt, Kesslak. Lees, Doran Lehman Whitt. IIRESHMEN-FIRST ROW: Moors, Banclrowsky, Kantner. Bnclwt Kukcnhcrger. Koehler. SECOND ROW: Miss Hetrirk, Bee Pollork. Vvlictmycr. Sirnlcr, Minter, Hopkins. 'l'l'llRD ROW: Bar ron. Sober. Grantham, Ashmun, Hciidcrson, FOURTH ROW' Kist Brasher. Speck. Cdrlnmrl-t. their ability when the season closed. The juniors, who were sometimes very good and sometimes not so good, entered into the contests with as great enthusiasm as any other class team. Their spirit more than compensated for their poor showing in the number of games won. Having closed the basketball season for another year, the girls will remember those special nights, Monday and Friday, which furnished for all of them loads of fun and priceless recollections. -A' -A' E GER P HTIIIIP TIU 55 Z' W 0614 gnimpzubiwi 4 ITRIESHIVIEN AND SOPHOIVIORES-FIRST ROW tlvll to rightl: Slavik, Iyloors, Strozar. Wcirncr, Koehler, Dylm, Kukcnhcrgcr, SECOND ROW: Bandrowslxv, Puiclli. T. Davis, Wcavrr, Baylor, XViLIniyer. D. Hamer. THIRD ROW: llnruick, Ma struvich, Virus. Ondrulalt, Crlslip. Baller, Doulvt, Ivlirntcr. Otto. FOURTH ROW Rlauhy, use y Fletcher. Kolar, M, Grcxa, I.. Sally, Prirc, Mvllugli. FIFTH ROW: Wallin. Sankcr, Martin, Kokorunla, Ilopluux, Tlmmas. SIXTH ROW: Boring. Ashman, Bac. Kautiicr, Mark. Ilousehnltlrr. Ilornc. SEVENTH ROVV' Bush- wark, Gastlry. Parkcr, Walsh, Shull. Pnllutla. liIGll'I'l'I ROVV: Larnelt, Melia, Mitrhcll. Simlcr, Hcslop, Sxxarury, Cushman. NINTH ROW: Sober, Grfuuhani. Pctwciivc. Pupoxith, Scliwcitzcr. Michaels. 'l'EN'I'Il ROW: Ilciiclrrstm. Brute. Wolford. Barron. Nine. Raymond. IiI,l'fVIiN'I'lI ROW: Spcrk, Botkcl, Qarlmark. Brasher, lxist, Dans. 'I'Wlfl,FTIl ROW: Zuma, Nlclnryre, Ovlcr, Miller. Bfirtl, I.6xcrgoorl. IIINIORS AND SENIORS-FIRST ROVV: Rhodes. Ilolcrlt cr, VVai'rcu. Fislicr. Pullork, Inlmslou. M. Ilamcr. SECOND ROW: Wright. Saylor, Orris. Stahl. Rankin, Ilcltuu. lamrs. THIRD ROW: Mangus. Sharpe. lfcsluxuilx, D. Shalfcr. Wingard. Lazer, V. Bcrkchilc, Miss Wilstwli, FOURTH ROW: Nauglc. Easton. IVlt'Cunnall, Nlarkcl. Saly, Kcim. Grcning, FIFTII ROW: Falsonv. Mutuir, Moors. Broun, Ripple. Sharhaugh. SIXTH ROW: Kolvrwumla, ' I ' : " " 'J ' 'l - 1 l' ssl. Ilunl Nl. I.. bhaflcr. banker. D. Berkrhilc, Klahrt. Ilooxri, Ilustu. SLVHNIII ROW, Clnxson, bicxa, Kc. Ia , liichlcr, Mayer. EIGIITII ROVV: Hcrincy. Kcllv. Burkul, Dans. Pchley. Slxcrhmc. NINTH ROW: Livingston. Ixcs. Stutzman. I,aBric, Lehman, Sustcrsir. 'I'EN'l'tl ROVV Ilill, Nlariuc, II. Kinrlzcril, Wltite, Ruhrcrht, N, 'I'txdl1ui1tt'r. ELEVENTH ROVV: M. Illualhuntcr, Elliott, Scrncll, Zimnicrnian, Kuchlcr. Doran. D. Kuidzcra. With the largest club since Girl Reserves were organized at Ferndale, this group has completed an outstanding year. The year's program began with a lively initiation. Assisting the Red Cross, the girls made utility bags, bedroom slippers, and enter- taining scrapbooks tor the soldiers. Many also volunteered their services for hospital duty. Highlighting their social events Was the annual sport hop, this year known as the Snow Ball. Every second Wednesday at their meetings, interesting and instructive programs were presented. HE DY FUR SER IEE -k 'A' ir GIRL RESERVES t President ALTA FISHER Vice President ROBERTA POLLOCK Secretary MARY IoHNs'roN Treasurer VERA WARREN Advisers Miss HORNICK Miss WILSON HE IIHI li TIQIW H11 THE BEST if -k t HI-Y wk a very busy and successful year. From a membership greatly President increased over that of previous years the club elected its officers. ROBERT ESCH who were chosen, incidentally, to offices on the greater Iohns- Vice president town Hi-Y council. RICHARD Hnssrupruc secretary Under the direction of Mr. Kuhs the club carried out many Img SCHUSTER activities, held a victory dance after the Westmont game, par- Treasutet ticipated in the mixed dance held by the Girl Reserves and Hi-Y, Invm Wxcxmcx and completed their social calendar with the annual Iamboree. Advise, In addition to their social functions, the boys also operated a con- MR- KUHS cession at all the basketball games, maintained a flower fund for the school, and gave gifts to all boys leaving for the service. y A FIRST ROW fleft to rightl: Layton, Plantan, Wicknick, Esch, I. Schuster, Hassenplug, H. Bcerstler. SECOND ROW: Blough, Buck, Fisher, Orris, B, Schuster, Wehn, F, Clawson, Miller, THIRD ROW: Mr. Kuhs, Wits prachtiger. Saintz, Kodrowsky. Lees, F. Gawlas, Walkcski, Churchey. FOURTH ROW: Bonner, Kuyat, Wright, Hesaltine, Hamilton, B. Boerstlcr, H. Cfawson. FIFTH ROW: R. Ripple. Pinelli. lames, I.aBrie, Nfish. Hammer. SIXTH ROW: Clawson. Petz. Rose. Iames Kimmel, Haire, Cushman. SEVENTH ROW: Lebzeller, Pickerill. Blasko. Tomasko, Wingard. Zakuciya. EIGHTH ROW: Ashman, Pritts, Virus, Ream, Butler, Yesh. NINTH ROW: Frambach, Cable, Woodward. Hopkins, Cieszynski, Stoker. TENTH ROW: Berkebile, Walker, Wacker, Sfhneck. Swick, Hindman, ELEVENTH ROW: Simler, Geisler, Tresslzr, Roberts. 59 FIRST ROW llclt to rightj: Wright, Saylor, Ceslovnik, Felton, Hamer, Mctzgar, Hunt, Mayer, Shaffer. SECOND ROW: Eichler, Kesslak, Hill, Kelly, Brencllingcr. Bcrkchilc, McConnell. Davis, Miss Long. RD ROW N I I B Ie I Sh K' tl Rib th S Ik l I l'OUR'l'lI ROW M n is Still an THI : aug Q, or c, arpc, In zcrzt, I rcs l, aI'cI', .r:cr. ' : a gn., . :nr . Elliott, D. Coughcnour. Lehman, Pcbley. I.,aBric. FIFTH ROW: Hopkins, Ziinmcrman. Kuchlcr, Doran. Lccs. Gilbcrt. 'I'oInas.ko. COURIER STAFI' Editor .. Assistant Editor Sports Edtiors . . Girls' Sports Editor Exchange Editor Art Editors .. Circulation Managers Proof Headers Sponsor . . BETTY SIIULL .. . PAUL CLAWSON .. ,,,. . ANDY TOMASKO WALTER HOPKINS DOROTHY ZIMMERMAN . , BEATRICI: WRIGHT ELIZABETH LAZER DOROTHY LI:I-IMAN ,IoAN STUTZMAN PATRICIA MAYER BETTY PEBLEY LUCILLE LABRIE ISABELLE DORAN BETTY BRENDLINGER Miss LONG The last Wednesday of each month brings a snappy, interesting, news-sheet to Ferndale. Yes. it's the Courierp and what a line it has, the best slant on everything! Certain Ferndale mortals known as editor. feature editor, sports editor, and typists go around tearing their hair and complaining about the inefficiency of the reporters, of themselves, and of life in general. Nevertheless, after much ranting, piecing, and composing, the Courier gets underway. The nightmare of publishing a high school newspaper rolls merrily on, with last min- ute scoops to add to the complications. Spicy editorials, clever comments, assembly reviews, hints to the wise and otherwise, sport disappointments or successes, and school activi- ties in general form the major part of the Courier. Miss Long, who has taken charge of the publi- cation this year, has proved herself to be very efficient and resourceful. She has contributed many new and delightfully different ideas. The paper has given to everyone a complete review of all events, both classroom and extra- curricular. Each reporter is constantly on the job to prevent anything from passing unnoticed. One of the new features is the Victory Puzzle, which gives industrious study hall workers something on which to exert their energy. UTHI EB TTHE TH TH-ki' 60 IIISTIIHY I THE Mfllil li 1' i Another year. Another yearbook. Yes, the l944 Reflector has now become a cherished pos- session of every student, enfolding between its covers the complete story of the year 1943-44. After many Weeks of planning, Writing, and working, the editors and staff with the able as- sistance of Mrs. Bosley and Mr. Custer present their finished product, hoping it Will meet with your approval. We have attempted to portray an accurate record of your classes, activities, and interesting experiences. To each phase of high school life, we have striven to give its proper place. In choosing our theme, we have selected a subject both timely and practical. We realize that today our chief task is to attain victory, and once it is gained, our job, as future citizens, is to protect and maintain that hard-won peace. Therefore, our selection has been "Education for Peace." We have tried to make this publication as at- tractive and original as War-time conditions per- mit. The informality of the book is an outstanding feature. Interesting, witty articles, true-to-life snapshots, clever layouts all have been com- bined to make a pleasing annual for you. We of the staff trust our efforts were not in vain. It is our Wish that this Reflector will be a source of real pleasure to all its readers. Senior Editor .... ...,. I OANNE TAFF IOANNE KELLY RUTH MANGUS BOCKEL .. ROBERT WRIGHT . EVELYN KLAHRE LoLA MAY ELLIOTT Mas Bosr.r:Y SENIURS-Brrkvliile, Carney, Crfzlnvnik, P, Davis, Dickey, lfnston, Fisher, F1'an1hnL'li, Clnwsnn, Civisler, Gilbert, Ilussenplug. Henuey, Ianws, Lazer, NIt'Cunne'll, Mclzgnr, Naugle, lmrum- Rhodes, Rulurerht, Snnkvr, Szlylor, D. Sliuffvr, Sharpe, Shnll, Zinmwrnmn. ILINIORS-eldrown, Cahlr, Doran, liirlllvr, Frlton, llrrxft. llumvr, llill, llimlmnu, Hopkins, Hunt, Ioliuston, Kess- Iuk, Koehler, l.:tBrir. Lehman, Nlnrine, Nlayer. Michal- litlvs, Prlilvv, llnlloflfr, Rankin, Sally. Sernvll, Sharlmuglt, Shvrhimx Stahl, Slutzman, Sustersir, Warren, White. SUPIIOMURES-Hard, Brufe, B. Davis, T. Davis, Grvxa, Homola, Horne. larch-1, Larnek, Mack, Mdrtiii. Mriia, Nlitliuels, Mish, Milcliell, Nine, Otto. Price, Raymond, Ripplv, Saly, Snnkt'1', Sztylur, Shilmlla, Slavilc, Swztrnv, 'l'hunms. WP:tvPr', YVPin1ur, Wolford. gsm. -Q-lj? 1 61 STHIHE P THE The band is one of the snappiest, pep- piest organizations of the school. When Mrs. Blough took charge last fall the member- ship totaled forty, of whom twenty-four were old members and sixteen were new. These officers were elected by the group: lack Kimmel, president, Ted Gilbert, vice presi- dentg Elizabeth Anne Sharpe, secretary, and Iames Krope, Treasurer. Rehearsals were held daily throughout football season and on Mondays and Wed- nesdays thereafter. The band added quite a number of new selections to its repertoire during the year in addition to learning the popular service marches. Another important achievement was the purchase by the mu- sic department of two new drums, which were added to the percussion section of the band. FIRST ROW: timmy Ream. SECOND RONV llefl l l'. Mcconvmll, Davis, Cvslovnik, Otto. Savlor. Left to right: Wal'rel1, Stahl, lohnston, Pollock, Ftslir Numerous public appearances were made by the musicians. Their performances between halves at the football games adcl- ed much to the color and spirit of the events and were greatly enjoyed by all who at- tended. The band also played for basket- ball games, participated in the Red Cross parade, and played for the Spring Concert. No article on the band would be coni- plete without a Word about the drum ma- jors: George Roberts, Harry Hamilton, and second-grader Iimmy Ream. Their twirling and high-stepping were a feature of every appearance. Majorettes Sandra Mitchell and Ioan Moors, and the twelve graceful twirl- ers trained by "Cookie" and "Hap" were an "extra special" attraction. At athletic contests the peppy cheer leaders appeared with the band, getting a fine response from Ferndale rooters. glut: llamilton. lfnmrr, Reynolds. Felton. Moors. Bork:-l. Rolwrls. THIRD RUVV: Nlaltlcl, l.cvUrgooxl. llrmlcrson, Sunlcr, Nlilrlwll. Klal'lnmrk. 62 S-Xl - FIRST ROW: Ream. SECOND ROW Ileft to righlj: I. WL-nx'cr, Gawlas I. Hasscnplug, Reap, E. Friedline. Layton, Stine M I ark, H. Bucrstcr, Garland. THIRD ROW: Hiwlop, I. Mark, Kukenlwe-rger, A. Orris, P. Weaver, Metzgar, Sharpe, Sharbauqh 7 Mrs. HIm1gh. FOIIRTH ROVV: Petvrmn, Iiarron. I. Knknmldn, M. Sninlz, Lcvcntry, N. Mack, L, Nauglc. FIFTH RCJW:Ali exlop, I. IVIonrx. I. Ripple. Mntchvll. I. IVI:mr-., Slnqlr, A-.I1mnn.II.Sninlr.SIX'l'HROXV:Ilnmilmn,WnmIwarLI,Iack Kimmel I . Rolvcrl-., Kmpv. flillwrl, Inmv-. Kinmlrl. I71Iwrl. FIRST ROW lleft to rightl Felton, Baker, Hoover, Merzgar, Klahre, Heslop, Mack. SECOND ROW: Lurane Rhodes, M, Hamer, Warren, Rankin, D. Hamer, Saly, Weaver, B. Saylor, L. Saylor. Mrs. Blough. THIRD ROW: Sharbaugh, Levergood, B. Davis. Keim, Grening. Grexa, Mitchell. FOURTH ROW: Brown, Moors, Leona Rhodes. Kelly, Mangus. Sharpe, Bockel. FIFTH ROW: L. Davis, Markel, McConnell, Easton, Nziugle, Fisher, SIXTH ROW: V. Berkehile, Henney, D. Berkehile, Bruce. Wnlfnril, Maltlet, Brencllinger, SEVENTH ROW: Rnhreulir, 'llnllmnls-r, Doran, Bard, I.aBrie, Lehman. Each Wednesday morning brought a stimulating session of song to the glee club members. After dismissing classroom for- mality and exercising their vocal cords a little, the girls really "got in the groove." Many long, pleasant hours of practice were spent, especially during the weeks preced- ing the Spring Concert. 'Although at first the pitches tended to be a shade off-key, under Mrs. Blough's patient direction perfect har- mony was attained. All types of music were included-classic, sacred, folk tunes, and occasionally a little jazz. 'A' ir -..'k il .it With the wave of her baton and a nod of her head, Mrs. Blough, the new music di- rector, begins rehearsing With the orchestra. These rehearsals take place several morn- ings each week during activity period. Here the musicians repeat again and again the difficult passages until every note is exact and every beat in perfect time. The value of these practices was shown at the Spring Concert, between acts at the senior play. by additions to our assemblies, in the at- mosphere at Open House. This year the organization has gained many new members. The majority of these SH HPS FI. TS The glee club was open to all girls in high school, many of whom eagerly joined its ranks. The chorus was prominent at all musical functions, particularly when it en- tertained in assemblies and participated in the Spring Concert. It not only improved its members' musical ability as a whole, but also developed several outstanding indiv- idual accomplishments. Among these were some talented soloists, as well as a vocal trio. In addition to gaining new musical knowledge, each member received much pleasure and enjoyment. ir, Mir tl. 'k if E are underclassmen, who will provide a val- uable reserve for future years. For the first time in many years all the musical instru- ments owned by the school are in the pos- session of students eager to master them. Mrs. Blough gives much encouragement and help to these individualsg consequently the interest in music is widening. New music was purchased for the or- chestra, and on it the pupils worked dili- gently. A decided improvement was noted at the finale of the season's work-the Spring Concert. Altogether we think the or- chestra has done a fine job. HIHP5 HIIHMIJN Y SPHI E EU IIEHT PHUEH Orchestra- Commencement March ..A. Roberta Hudson, Arr. by I. S. Zamecnik A Twilight Romance ,,,,,,,..,,,............,.....,.....,,....,.....,,..... C. W. Bennet Moment Musical .. . ,,.,,,,.,.,,..,....,..,.,........,.,..,.,.....,..,......,,..,,. .. Franz Schubert March Fantastique ,...,.............,,,....,.,,, Georges Bizet, Arr. by I. S. Zamecnik Song ot India .,,,., ,,,,, ,,,. ....., R i m sky-Korsakott, Orchestrated by N. Clifford Page That Old Bass Viol ....,,.. ............ ......,,,....,.,..,.............................................. P a ul Yoder Vienna Forever ....................................,......... Iohann Schrammel, Arr. by Seredy-Tocaberl String Quintet-To a Wild Rose .......................,,,,....,.... Edward McDowell, Trans. by C. Simon Stanley Mish, Ioan Mack, Lois Saly, Ioyce Bockel, Verne Thomas Accompanist-Shirley Pecsenye Vocal Solo- Fairy Tales . ..,... ...,...., . ..... . .. ..,......,.......,....,,..... ........ ......,........,...,........ E r ich Wolff I Am Thy Harp ,....,........... .... ...,...,,......................... ...... R . H untingdon Woodman Shirley Pecsenye Accompanist-Richard Davies Boys' Chorus-Czecho-Slovakian Dance Song ...............,.,,,.... Popular Melody by C. F. Manney Clarinet Quartet-Two Guitars ..............,..,..........................,...,........................... Russian Folk Tune Lucille Naugle, Nine Mae Mack, Herbert Boerstler, Ronald Fisher Mixed Chorus-All ln An April Evening .........,..,....,..,,.............................,........ Hugh S. Robertson Girls' Chorus- Chinese Lullaby from "East ls West" ........ R. H. Bowers, Arr. by Wallington Riegger Mexican Serenade-Folk Song from Mexico ......,,..,.,........................... Morten I. Luvass Only the Lonely Heart .........,,,...,..,,..,.....................,.. ..... P eter Ibyitch Tschaikowsky Cornet Solo-New Friendship .. .......... ..,..............................,..,.,,.., ,,....., . . . .....,.,..... C. W. Storm William Ashman Vocal Trio- Accompanist-Iames Krope Three Little Maids ..... ,, .... ................. .....,...... ...... . . .............. ......, . . Marjorie Elliott An English Ccmlen tCountry Gardensl ........,..,....,........... .......,............. E nalish Folk Song Lucille Naugle, Dorothy Lehman, Lois Easton Accompanist, E. A, Sharpe Ukranian Dance- Mary Ynchak, Dorothy Bandrowsky, Michael Wasilko, Paul Holubz B INTERMISSION and- American Patrol ............,.................,........................... ....... F . W. Meacham Pan American Selection ..,. .... ......, E . DeLamater There's Something About a Soldier .... .... ....................,,.....,.. N o el-Gay Salute to the Armed Forces- Marines-Marine's Hymn ..,.............. .................... A rr. by Mayhew Lake Army-U, S. Field Artillery .... .... B rig. Gen. Edmund L. Gruber Air Corps-Army Air Corps ......... ,,,...............................,..,,........,.,... R obert Crawford Coast Guard-Semper Paratus ....................,......,................................., Boskerck, U. S, C. G. Navy-Anchors Aweigh .,........... ...,....,, Charles Zimmerman, Arr. by Paul Yoder With Ten Lovely Twirlers National Emblem ......,..................,,...,....,..... ..............,...,.,,..................., ,.,..,.,. . . . E, E. Bagley With Drum Major-Harry Hamilton Majorettes-Sandra Mitchell, Ioan Moors Star Spangled Banner ............ Harmonized by Walter Damrosch, Arr. by Iohn P. Sousa FIRST RUNV tlvfl to riglutl: Slim-, loycv lim-Lt-l, ll. llislwi. ll. llmrrsllcr. I. Mui'k. E. Frit-tlliue. SECOND RUVV: ltirliler, 'l'lmnia n Sl N M l M l ji 'I'Illl'll l'flXV N "VI " M l It In Ah an K l' dll ' erm . :i V. .it , 1- .'i.i . t t . ,um 5 ,u isa. is: 1. s in . . 'ire 'nu Sharpe. Nungls, 65 Left to right: Hassenplug, Easton, Flsch, Todhunter, Mangus, McConnell, Markel, Krope, Roberts, Gilbert, Dihert, Sharpe, Kimmel. ll HTMN ll!-lI.I. FUR SE IIJH5 -A' i' 'k Dramatic Eyefuls 'A' HCUCKOOS ON THE HEARTHH A Mystery Comedy By PARKER Wi F1-:NNr:I.I.Y Director-Byron A. Kuhs Student Director-Ruth Mangus THE CAST Abby Rodick ,.,.,e,,,e,. Elinor McConnell Lulu Pung Y... ,,e,,, V7,......,, L o is Easton Charlotte Carlton o7,, Marian Markel Sheriff Preble e,.... ...Y.oo I ack Kimmel Don Carlton o,,o ..... I ames Krope Zadoc Grimes .,...., ,Y,.,,.. W illiam Dibert "Doc" Ferris ,oo, ,7,. R ichard Hassenplug The Professor ,.....,.o..,....... Robert Esch Rev. Clarence Underhill George Roberts Beulah Peck .. Elizabeth Anne Sharpe Dr. Gordon . ,. ,, . .. , Nancy Todhunter State Trooper ,E,, ,, ,, Ted Gilbert THEY LE IJ HELPI E Hllltl if -A' Outstanding among the groups of the school are the ushers. To be chosen to this group is a high honor, as usherships are through the Girl Reserve merit system. Throughout the year points are award- ed on the basis of participation in the various club projects. Each spring the merits are tabulated, and the senior girls who stand highest are given Girl Reserve pins. The underclass girls with the largest totals are made ushers for the coming year. student earned Before each assembly a "double buzz" calls the ushers, whose responsi- bility is to seat four hundred eager stu- dents quickly and without confusion. Not only at student functions but also at every program to which our patrons are invited, the ushers give evidence of their efficiency and capability. Find- ing a seat in the Ferndale auditorium is not difficult, since these girls are right there, ready and willing. lk t l- 'i t 'A' - FlRS'l' ROW ltop to bottoml: Otto, Martin, Saly, Wright. SECO D F t Nldht lllpPy dKIl3Sk The senior class gave a magnificent per- formance this year in presenting "Cuckoos On the Hearth" by Parker Fennelly. Under the efficient and capable coaching of Mr. Kuhs, the cast was always "kept on the job." At practices between 3:30 and 5:30 one could see all the members devouring candy, pretzels, or whatever seemed to be available at the expense of some unlucky person. Of course practice was not all fun: learning to talk loud enough, memorizing lines, repeating scenes, and practicing stage business filled tedious hours. An at- tractive stage setting was designed and constructed by Mr. Wolf with the help of elective shop students. The cast gave a uni- ROW: M. Todhun er. . "o uner, eso . a mon . 2 '. THIRD ROW: Buckel, Shull. que performance. Marian Markel and Iames Krope were outstanding in the leading roles . . . Bob Esch, Dick Hassenplug, and George Roberts were unforgetable as the "villains" . . . Lois Easton and Bill Dibert provided hearty humor . . . lack Kimmel gave a con- vincing performance as the lunatic and elu- sive murderer . . . Elinor McConnell, Nancy Todhunter, Elizabeth Anne Sharpe, and Ted Gilbert did well in the supporting roles. Ruth Mangus, the student director, deserves much credit for her work behind the scenes. These are now all pleasant memories to the cast. At both performances each member did his best to make the play go down as one of the best Ferndale has ever presented. G7 G if Our Serious Side i' -k ll Y AT The days of the Ferndale student are lively, happy hours, each one treasured as an unforgetable experience. Study and re- laxation, triumph and defeat, disappoint- ment and pleasure, all are combined in a typical school day. "By the dawn's early light" those who live in the out-lying districts crawl out of bed, and after a hasty departure from home, finally catch the bus. By the time they ar- rive at school, the students living in Fern- dale are doing their first yawning and stretching. After a mad scramble getting dressed and dashing down the street, these individuals experience a narrow escape try- ing to get in home room just as the last bell rings. This is done in much the same man- ner as the early risers catch their bus. When everyone is at last settled at his own desk, IF. .5. sighs of relief are heaved. Oh man, what a way to start the day! After discussing everything during pre- paration period from Mary and Bill to a future Hi-Y dance, students finally get down to serious work. The school offers courses to suit the interests of almost everyone- college preparatory, commercial, home eco- nomics, manual training, or special art. For those who make a "special effort" detention is readily given. Time flies when one takes part in these activities, and before anyone expects it the dismissal bell has rung. With the feeling of having accomplished something, each one leaves this "Edifice of Learning" and goes on his own way. Nothing special, and yet each moment a lifetime in itself-that's an average day at F. H. S. E TEHTAINMENT PL 5 "Friday's fourth" was a high spot in the weekly schedule of every student at Fern- dale High School, for then came the as- sembly. The program this year was ar- ranged and directed by Mrs. Markle, assist- ed by Mrs. Blough and Mr. Kuhs. Student talent provided entertainment at most of the assemblies. During football season there were a series of pep meetings with the cheer leaders in charge. The band contributed greatly to the spirit and snap of these occasions. Outstanding among the other fine student programs were the pa- triotic plays by the seventh and eighth grades, the musical quiz when Iack Kimmel quipped and joked in true "emcee" fashion, and the senior assembly. Most impressive of all the student programs was the beauti- ful nativity play presented just before Christmas. Guest speakers at assemblies were granted eager attention. Rev. I. A. Robinson of the Walnut Grove Church of the Brethern brought an inspiring and practical message at the Thanksgiving program. The sound advice regarding health given by Mr. Rob- ert McKinley of the Philadelphia Dairy Asso- ciation was sugar-coated with delightful humor. Dr. David Cornelius was a most en- lightening speaker on the subject of chirop- ody. It was an honor to have Mrs. Faye Burchfield read poems form her latest book, "Dear Iohnny," and everyone was pleased with her character-revealing sketches. Paid assemblies for the benefit of the Reflector fund were varied and unusual. Chief Red Feather, a full blooded Cherokee Indian, explained the customs of his peo- ple and performed several of their tribal dances in a program that was both educa- tional and entertaining. Mr. William Neff, a magician from Indiana, Pa., and his two at- tractive assistants kept the students amused and mystified throughout his performance. Movies were not satisfactory, and in their place was arranged a program that was the hit of the year. Mr. D. K. Ernst, known as a practical psychologist and hynotist, amazed everyone with his demonstrations. Bill Dibert, Elizabeth Ann Sharpe, Mary Ann Marine, Bobbie Koehler, and Don Bowers were his subjects, and their sub-conscious responses will never be forgotten by any- one who was present. 69 i' All in cr Dcxy's Work 'k MARCH 13-Basketball Banquet. Basketball squad enjoys hearty feed at completion oi season. MARCH 31-Spring Concert. Theme "Around the World In Music." Orchestra, band, choruses, and twirlers participate. APRIL 22-Girl Reserves-Hi-Y Dance. Clubs combine to hold a really super semi-formal dance. Music by Duke Andrews. APRIL 28-Senior Assembly. Rollicking afternoon in which Seniors dismiss their dignity and provide plenty of lun and entertainment. MAY Zl-Baccalaureate Services. Seniors hear inspiring service and real- ize their days are numbered. MAY 23-Commencement. The eagerly awaited day is here and the diplomas are finally in the hands of their respective owners. Quite a climb, but we made it! MAY 26-School closes. The doors close behind us, and we leave a little hesitantly to face a chal- lenging World. We know We shall miss The School, The Teachers, The Activi- tiesp but most of all, We'll miss YOU. SE IUH DIARY SEPTEMBER 1-School Opens. Leisure summer vacation days are over, ye old school house beckons us, and we get down to a regular routine. OCTOBER 29-HalloWe'en Dance. First dance of the season sponsored by Girl Reserves, anxiously awaited by all "Spooks" and "Goblins" ot Ferndale Hi. NOVEMBER 5-Hi-Y Victory Dance. We entertain the Hilltop victors after the Ferndale-Westmont football game. NOVEMBER 18-19-Senior Play. "Cuckoos On the Hearth"-mystery com- edy by senior class. Chillingly funny! DECEMBER 9-Football Banquet. Gridiron "he-men" reap their rewards. Tums were popular remedy next day. DECEMBER 23-Snowball. Girl Reserves' dream fulfilled-juke box, Christmas tree, greens, and MISTLETOE! IANUARY 22-Iunior-Senior Party. Iuniors play host to Seniors. Free re- freshments. large crowd lget it?l Fl -qw Sgt-:DU 525.2 ole 5232 Q Swlgw 'Z-5.QN emi s5QS DCD3.-H ui-gb-'Q UI D-Era. ,.,,0 gE1rg7"' .'50m'LU CI-U' 0 22-53 32623 or 9,0 gif' 2-'J' 9-'gm MPIQZF 00 IN , .1 I V ,,.. -.wmv 9 ., 5 - xr-N " A M. 5 A ,Y Q , A If 1-,,, .5 4 if ' 'lr All Aboard if i' Faculty Add1t1u11 'ir 41 Fczvontc Puzstirue 'Il' i' Night Shot if Siiting One Out i' if Ash Co., Inc. if i' Hcp to the Iivc i' I l I...-.......V - WE TAKE I VE TIJHY if if LOIS ATKINSON . . . Interclass Volleyball-l . . . ROMA DICKEY . . . Spring Concert-3 . . . Girls' Spring Concert-I . . . Girls' Chorus-l . . . Per- Chorus-Z, 3 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Girls' sonality Club-1. Athletic Club-2, 3. DORA BERKEBILE . - - Reflector 3, 4 - Courier Lois EASTON , . . Reflector-2, 3, 4 . . . Courier- -4 . - . SpringICqnCert-2, 3. 4 - - - Glrl Reseflfes 2, 3 . . . Interclass Basketball-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Irr- ..2, 3, 4 . , . G1rlsICl1orus-2, 3, 4 , . . Secretarial terclass Volleyball-II ZI 3I 4 I I I Spring Concert C1ub-4---Drt1mC1t1CC1Ub-1.3- -2, 4 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Girl Reserves- l, 2, 3, 4 , . . Girls' Chorus-2, 4 . . . Dramatic Club-3 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-l. VIRGINIA BERKEBILE . . . Rellector-Z . . . Spring Concert-2, 3 . . . Girl Reserves-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' SIIOIIQUTZ' 3' 4 - - - SeC'e'G"i'1l Club-4 - ' ' Cm" LoLA MAY ELLIOTT-Reflector-2, 3, 4 . . . Courier u -' -4 . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Inter- class Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girl Reserves- 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3 . . . Secretarial ISIQSIQEZBQICKEL -IIIIIIIIc?If!leiQIIi2EfiIIIfiff Z '3' 4 SIUE-5 . . . Girls' Athletic club-1 . . . Photography , . . . , , , II -I . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-2, 3, 4 . . . Girl Reserves-2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3, 4 . . . Ushers-3, 4 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-2 . . . Dramatic Club-3. ROBERT ESCH . . . Hi-Y-3, 4, President-4 . . . Interclass Basketball-2, 4 . . . Spring Concert-3 . . . President of Senior Class . . . Boys' Chorus BETTY BRENDLINER . . . Interclass Basketball-2, 3 -3 , , . Senior Play-4 , . . Airplane Club-3, . . . Interclass Volleyball-1, 2, 3 . . . Spring Con- Secretary Treasurer , . . Aviation Science-l. cert-4 , . . Girls' Chorus-3, 4 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-l, 2 . . . Secretarial Club-4. IOSEPHINE FALSONE . . . Spring Concert-3 . . ARAWANA CARNEY . . . Reflector-4 . . . Spring Gul Reserves-2' 3' 4 - - - Gtfls Chorus-3 Concert-3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3 . . . Drama- ' - . . . ' ' h ' h-1. "C Cm" 3 G""s A' 'em Ch' ALTA FISHER . . . Reflector-2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3 . . . LILLIAN CESLOVNIK . . . Rellector-3, 4 . . . Courier Interclass V0lleYbfIll-1, 2, 3, 4 - - - Spring COP' -4 I I I Interclass Basketball-1I 2I 3I 4 I I I In- cert-3, 4 . . . SecretaryI of Class-3 . . . Girl terclass Volleyball-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert- Reserves-11 2' 31 4' Pfesldenl-'4 - - -I Ushers-2 3 . . . Girl Reserves-3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-3 . . . - ' - Cheefleqdeffgf 3- 4 I- - - Dfamullc Club-3, Cheerleader-2, 3, 4 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . SeC1'9lCU'Y - - - Girls Athletw Club-'L Personality Club-l. RICHARD FRAMBACH . . . Hi-Y-4 , . . Reflector DORIS CLAWSON-Interclass Volleyball-l . . . ln- -4 . , . Varsity "F"-4 . . . Spring Concert-2, 3 terclass Basketball-l . . . Spring Concert-l, Z, 3 . . . Football-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball-3, 4 . . . . . . Girl Reserves-Z, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-l, 2, 3 Boys' Chorus-2, 3 . . . Orchestra-2 . . . Athletic . . . Personality Club-l. Club-l, 2, 3, 4. PAUL CLAWSON - - r Reflector-3' 4 - - - Ht-Y- ROBERT GEISLER , , . Reflector-3, 4 . . . Interclass 4 - - - Courier-4. Assistant Editor-4 - - - Student Basketball-1 . . . student council-1, 2 . . . Varsity Council-l, 2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer-2 . . . Var- "F"-3I 4 I I I Spring Concert-1I 2I 3 I I I Foog- Sill' "F"-3, 4 - A - SPTUIQ Concert-1, 21 3 - - - ball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball-2, 3, 4 , . . Iunior Football-lf 2' 3' 4 - - - Basketball-lf 2' 3' 4 - - ' Class Vice President . . . Boys' Chorus-I, Z, 3. Secretary ol Class-l, 2 . . . Boys' Athletic Club- 1' 2' 3' 4' TED GILBERT . . . Courier-2, 3, 4 . . . Reflector- 3, 4 , . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Inter- RQBERT DAUGHERTY I I I Football-1I ZI class Volleyball-2, 3 . . , Band-l, 2, 3, 4 . . Spring Concert-3, 4 . . . Boys' Chorus-3 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Photography Club-3 , . . Dra- LILLIAN DAVIS-Courier-2 . . . Interclass Basket- matic Club-1 - - - Vice Pfesidenl Of BCtY1d-4- ball-1, Z, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-l, 3, 4 . . . Girl Reserves- 1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-l, 3, 4. RICHARD HASSENPLUG . . . Hi-Y-2, 3, 4, Vice President-4 . . . Reflector-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Courier -l, 2, 3 . . . Interclass Basketball-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . WILLIAM DIBERT . . . Interclass Volleyball-2 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3 . . . Band-2, 3 . . . Band-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Boys' Chorus-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Wrestling-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Avia- Orchestra-1, 2 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Photography tion Science-I . . . Dramatic Club-3, Vice Presi- Club-3. dent . . . Boys' Athletic Club-l, Z. 75 WHlI'5 WHI1 if if SHIRLEY HENNEY . . . Reflector-3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-l, 2, 3 . . . Girl Reserves-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Dramatic Club-l, 3. ROBERT HESALTINE . . . Hi-Y-2, 3 . . . Art Club-l. LOUISE HOOVER . . . Reflector-3 . . . Spring Concert-2, 3, 4 . . . Girl Reserves-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-Z, 3, 4 . . . Clothing 'Club-l . . . Dramatic Club-3. EDWARD HOWARD . . . Hi-Y--3 . . . Interclass Basketball-2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball- Z, 3 . . . Boys' Chorus-3. IEAN HUSTER . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2 . . . Girl Reserves-l, 3, 4 . . . Secretarial Club-4. WILLIAM IAMES . . . Hi-Y--3, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball- l, 2, 3 . . . Student Council-4, President-4 . . . Varsity "F"-2, 3, 4 . . . Football-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball-l, 2, 3 . . . Wrestling-2, 4 . . . Boys' Athletic Club-l, 2, 3, 4. BETTE IOHNS . . . Interclass Basketball-4 . . . Girl Reserves-4 . . . Reflector-4 , . . Secretarial Club-4. DONALD IONES . . . Aviation Science-l . . . Air- plane Club-3. IOANNE KELLY . . . Reflector-l, 2, 3, 4, Editor-4 . . . Courier-2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball-2, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-1, 3, 4 . . . Student Council-Z . . . Spring Concert-3, 4 . . . Girl Reserves-2, 3, 4, Treasurer-3 . . . Girls' Chorus- 2, 3, 4 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-l. IACK KIMMEL . . . Hi-Y-Y3, 4 . . . Rellector-l . . . Interclass Basketball-4 . . . Interclass Volley- ball-l, 2, 3 . . . Band-2, 3, 4, President-4 . . . Spring Concert-2, 3, 4 . . . Boys' Chorus-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Orchestra-2, 3, 4 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Photography Club-2. DOROTHY KINDZERA . . . Girl Reserves-Z, 3, 4 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Clothing Club-l. HELEN KINDZERA . . . Courier-4 . , . Girl Re- serves-Z, 3, 4 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Clothing Club-1. EVELYN KLAHRE . . . Reflector-2, 3, 4 . . . Courier -Z, 3, 4 . . . Band-3 . . . Spring Concert-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Orchestra-l, 2 . . . Girl Reserves-I, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-l, 2, 3, 4, Accompanist-Z, 3 . . . Dramatic Club-l, 3. 76 IAMES KROPE . . . Interclass Basketball-3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-3 . . . Band-2, 3, 4, Treasurer-4 . . . Spring Concert-2, 3, 4 . . . Boys' Chorus-3, 4 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Photography Club-3. ELIZABETH LAZER . . . Reflector-4 . . . Courier-4 . . . Interclass Basketball-3, 4 . . . Interclass Vol- leyball-3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-2, 3 . . . Girl Reserves-4 . . . Girls' Chorus-3 . . . Secretarial Club-4, ELINOR MCCONNELL . . . Reflector--2, 3, 4 . . . Courier-3, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball I, 2, 3 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3 . . . Spring Concert- 3, 4 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Girl Reserves-l, Z, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-3, 4 . . . Ushers-2 . . . Cheer- leader-Z, 3, 4 . . . Dramatic Club-3 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-1. RUTH MANGUS . . . Reflector-2, 3, 4 . . . Courier- l, 2, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball-4 . . . Band- l, 2, 3, 4 . . , Spring Concert-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Girl Reserves-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Dramatic Club-l, 3. MARIAN MARKEL . . . Reflector l, Z, 3 . . . Courier -1, 2 . . . Interclass Basketball-1, 2 . . . Inter- class Volleyball-l, 2 . . . Spring Concert-Z, 3, 4 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Girl Reserves-2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3, 4 . . . Cheerleader-2, 3 . . Dramatic Club-3 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-l. MARY METZGAR . . . Reflector-3, 4 . . . Courier -3 . . . Band-3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-2, 3 . . Orchestra-Z, 3, 4 . . . Girls' 'Chorus-2, 3, 4 . . Crafts Club-3 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-l. CATHERINE MOONE . . . Interclass Basketball-3 . . . Girl Reserves-2, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3 . . . Spring Concert-3 . . . Dramatic Club-l, 3. LUCILLE NAUGLE . . . Reflector-Z, 3, 4 . . . Courier -l, 2, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Band-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Orchestra- l, 2, 3, 4 , . . Girl Reserves-2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3, 4 , . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Drama- tic Club-3 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-l. DONALD PETZ . . . Hi-Y-2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Bas- ketball-l, 2 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2 . . . Varsity "F"-4 . . . Spring Concert-3 . . . Foot- ball-2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball-2, 3, 4 . . . Boys' Chorus-3. WH 'l"S WHAT if -k IAMES PINELLI . . . Hi-Y-4 . . . Interclass Basket- ball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Varsity "F"-2, 3, 4, President-4 . . . Football -l, 2, 4 . . . Orchestra-l, 2 . . Wrestling- l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Athletic Club-l, 2, 3, 4. ESTHER RHODES . . . Spring Concert-3 . . . Girls' Chorus-3 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-l, Secretary Treasurer-l. LEONA RHODES . . . Spring Concert-3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-3, 4 . . . Clothing Club-l. LURANE RHODES . . . Reflector-2, 4 . . . Courier- 2, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball-3, 4 . . Interclass Volleyball-3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girl Reserves-2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Dramatic Club-l, 3. GEORGE ROBERTS . . . Hi-Y-4 . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2 . . . Band-l, 2, 3, 4, Drum Major -l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Varsity "F"-3, 4 . . . Spring Con- cert-l, 2, 3 . . . Basketball-3, 4 . . . Class Officer, Vice President-3 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Wrestling-2 . . . Photography Club-l, 2 . . Twirlers' Club-3 . . . Athletic Club-4. DOROTHY RUBRECHT . . . Reflector-2, 3, 4 . . . Courier-2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball-4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Con- cert-3, 4 . . . Girl Reserves-2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-3, 4 . . . Personality Club-l . . . Drama- tic Club-3 MARGUERITE SAINTZ . . . Band-2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Orchestra-1, 2, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Athletic Club-l. VIRGINIA SANKER . . . Reflector-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Courier-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball- I, 2, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-2, 3 . , . Girl Reserves-2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3 . . . Usher-3, 4 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Clothing Club-l, LOIS IEAN SAYLOR . . . Reflector-2, 3, 4 . . . Courier-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-2, 3, 4 . . . Girl Reserves-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3, 4 . . . Ushers-2, 3, 4 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Clothing Club-l . . . Photography Club-3. IACK SCHUSTER . . . Hi-Y-2, 3, 4, Secretary-4 . . . Band-l . . . Varsity "F"-3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-l, 3 . . . Football-2, 3, 4 . . . Basketball -l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Class Officer, President-l . . . Boys' Chorus-3 . . . Orchestra-l . . . Athletic Club-2, 3, 4. DORIS SHAFEER . . . Reflector-4 . . . Courier-4 . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-2, 3 . . . Girl Reserves-2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3 . , . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Girls' Athletic Club -l, 3, Secretary-Treasurer-3. MARY LOU SHAFFER . . . Interclass Basketball- l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-l, 3 . . . Girl Reserves-2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-l, 3 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Athletic Club-l . . . Dramatic Club-3. ELIZABETH ANNE Sl-IARPE-Reflector-2, 3, 4 . , . Courier-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2, 3 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Band- l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-4 . . . Spring Concert-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Boys' Chorus-4, Accompanist-4 . . . Orchestra -l, 2, 4 . . . Senior Play-4 . . . Girl Reserves- 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-l . . . Dramatic Club-3. BETTY Sl-IULI. . . . Reflector-3, 4 . . . Courier -2, 4, Secretary-2, Editor 4 . . . Interclass Basket- ball-l, 2, 3 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Student Council-2, 3 , . . Spring Concert-2, 3, 4 . . . Girl Reserves-1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President-3 . . . Girls' Chorus-2, 3, 4 . . . Usher-4, Head Usher--4 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Dramatic Club-3 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-l. IAMES ITAGl SIMLER . . . Hi-Y-4 . . . Student Council-3 . . . Varsity "F"-3, 4 . . . Spring Con- cert-3 . . , Football-l, 2, 3, 4 . . Basketball- l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Senior Class Vice President . . . Boys' Chorus-2, 3. GEORGE SWICK . . . Hi-Y-4 . . . Student Coun- cil-4, Vice President-4 . . . Varsity "F"-3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-3 . . . Football-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Boys' Chorus-3 . . . Wrestling-l, 2, 3. MARIORIE TODHUNTER ...' Courier-l . . . Inter- class Basketball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball -l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-2, 4 . , . Girl Reserves-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-4 . . . Ushers -3, 4 . . . Clothing Club-l. NANCY TODHUNTER . . . Courier-l . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball- l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Student Council-4, Secretary-4 . . . Spring Concert-3 . , . Senior Play-4 . . . Girl Reserves-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-3 . . . Usher-2, 3, 4 . . . Clothing Club-l . . . Dramatic Club-3. HELEN VERHOVSEK . . . Interclass Basketball-2, 3 . . . Interclass Volleyball-1, 2, 3 . . . Spring Concert-3 . . . Girls' Chorus-3 . . . Girls' Ath- letic Club-l. LOUISE WINGARD . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-1, 2, 3, 4 . . . Spring 'Concert-l, 3 . . . Girl Reserves-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-l, 3 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Clothing Club-l. BEATRICE WRIGHT . . . Courier-4 . . . Interclass Basketball-l . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Girl Reserves-l, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer-l . . . Girls' Chorus-3 . . , Usher-3, 4 . . . Secretarial Club -4 . . . Girls' Athletic Club-l. ROBERT WRIGHT . . . Hi-Y-4 . . . Reflector-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Courier-l, 2, 3, 4 . . . Band-2, 3, 4 . . . Spring Concert-3 . . . Boys' Chorus-3, DOROTHY ZIMMERMAN . . . Reflector-4 . . . Courier-4 . . . Interclass Basketball-l, 2, 3, 4, Manager-4 . . . Interclass Volleyball-l, 2, 3, 4, Manager-4 . . . Spring Concert-3 . . . Senior Class Secretary . . . Girl Reserves-2, 3, 4 . . . Girls' Chorus-l, 2, 3 . . . Secretarial Club-4 . . . Cloth- ing Club-1. 77 THANK YIIU The Staff of the 1944 REFLECTOR gratefully acknowledges the faithful assistance and willing cooperation of the student body and faculty. We are particularly indebted to MR. FRANK KELLER MR. GRANT CUSTER MR. BYRON KUHS MR. BRUCE FISHER MISS WILMA MOONEY MR. THOMAS WALKO MR. LESLIE M. WEIGEL MR. R. A. HADDOCK PHOTOGRAPHY Eucm-xvmc PRINTING Andrews Studio Iahn 6. Ollier Engraving Co. 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Ferndale High School - Reflector Yearbook (Johnstown, PA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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