Farragut (DDG 37) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1979

Page 1 of 108

 

Farragut (DDG 37) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1979 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 108 of the 1979 volume:

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Underway replenish- ment as well as personnel transfers are carried out via helicopter. l C ll.. l Y' bf E ta ll za I . g , f 5 70450: 0 A long wandering or voyage usually marked by many changes in fortune. While FARRAGUT drops anchor along side her task group in Souda Bay, Crete, one might easily reflect upon those giant wooden armadas of long ago, ancient ships which for centuries sailed these very waters. Throughout the ages, in time of war as well as peace, both vessels of oar and sail have sought out Souda Bay's large and open watersy Today, the U.S. Navy utilizes this centrally located bay as a rendezvous sight for anchorage and replenishment. Perhaps King Ulysses himself explored the rocky shores of Crete or passed by here on a Trojan Man- O'-War, searching for that ever elusive Blue Water Odyssey. ANCHORAGE: Souda Bay, Crete Iforegroundj Fast Frigate USS McCANDLESS FF-1084, Destroyer USS CARON DD-970 Ueftj, Guided Missile Destroyer USS FARRAGUT DDG-37 Icenter foregoundj, Oiler USS DE- TROIT AOE-4 fright foregroundj, Aircraft Carrier USS INDEPENDENCE CV-62 ftopj, Guided Missile Destroyer USS MAHAN DDG-42 Ibaclfgroundj. Brannan . . , . , ., Y . -.. ,,.. . ,. . . ,...,.,...- .c,..u....--L ,.:g-..-.,-..,.-a 1.,4.,.g,..:,4,,.,u...'- .,,,.,y -..G-e.,...s .'a...1.. .,..i3 ,.s:.1i..E ,:.-i,.,,.c-,kan ,uf Yr , bs P, -V A Q R A W. M A HV, ,.,,, - PM S, -A W 1 U Vifwxa' 5. s'-veg' ,F 5 :-1 yin-x Valdes Sundt Time Passages or CONTENTS OF AN ODYSSEY Life at Sea .............. Ship's History ............ Command Histories .... .. Port Visits ..... ....... .. ..... . ..... Parting Glances ....................... Memoriam for a Shipmate ...... Portrait of a Sailor ................ Damn the Torpedoes ................ A Myriad of Things To Do ....... Division Features ........ .............. . Homecoming ...... .. .... Portraits .............. . - -.,,.,,, , - - ...- .---..,,,.,, 01.14-.. . 4-5 6-15 16-17 18-23 24-35 36 37 38-39 40-41 42-43 44-85 86 87-99 Ward June 28, 1979 Farewell To Friends and Loved Ones . . . As the sun moved eastward across the sky dissolving the darkness into a bright orange light, one knew this day would be different. Ordinary movements, seen but unseen, take on a meaning far beyond their actual significance. The conversation light, the surroundings seemed much quieter than yesterday. This day had finally come. It had been discussed, preparations made, the reasons are known. I'm proud. Yes I'm proud that my husband will be the guardian instead of one whose talents are unknown and untested. We are determined to be strong, but V'-do those tiny moments of doubt seem to pull hard at the foundation of our resolve. The traffic on the highway seems light this morning, and the miles rush by much too fast. ' .- 5 I will remain here and Whisper my prayer to her . . . "Bear him Kas the breeze above bears the bird un to his nestj. Bear him unto his home of love, and there bid him rest." l Grey Lady, Blue Lady . He said she always demanded too much and gave too little in return. I don't believe him though. He is secretive about her. Stepping onto the metal deck one feels a faint but powerful vibration that must come from deep inside her. The whir of fans, the hum of motors, the bustle of those at the beginning of an adventure, all give strength to the purpose of this grey lady's design. I know I must share him with her. She will rock him gently through the night, protect him from the storm and bring him back to my arms. gwzm..--W-L-f..1..,f-,-:R-., .fr w--1' X532 Sund ,Ulf HAP: X ,W lMp,MgqQAqj.e, 1: ., -W,nNxgn..,.... . , x Kreider ri T, 1 f Green Deckg Incoming Underway life often depends on helicopter replenish- ments, and during our 1979 Blue Water Odyssey Farragut received nearly 200 helos over her fantail with zero flight problems. Boatswain's Mates comprise the flight deck crew and Hull Technicians man the helo crash team. BM3 Tony Blascovich did an outstanding job as Leading Enlisted Safety Observer during the entire deployment. I Damage Control Contest Annually FARRAGUT holds a Damage Control Contest on the fantail while deployed. Teams of pa tchers and plugers worked feverish- ly to stop the insistent flow of water, which was provided by the Hull Technicians and two P-250 Water pumps which the H T's rigged for the occasion. Petersen JW' Mann- ,H ,, x I E ff 1 fc ff f M! ' 40' . , gf 8 Naples, Italy: Scene of Mike Boat Rescue It was a quiet Monday afternoon in Naples, Italy, when the word that sends chills down everyone's spine was passed on FARRAGUTg "This is not a drill. I repeat, not a drill. Muster the duty inport Rescue and Assistance Detail on the fantail!" A U.S. Navy LSM-8 "Mike Boat" flarge landing craftb located 200 yards from FARRAGUT'S berth, had begun taking on water in the engineering spaces. Unless immediate action was taken, the Mike Boat would be in serious danger of sinking. FARRAGUT'S Rescue and Assis- tance team, led by LTJG Sean Corrigan, Damage Control Assistant, and HT2 James Shelly, departed the ship in three minutes and had begun dewatering the Mike Boat within ten minutes. When pumping was com- plete, HT2 Shelly, MM3 Roger Sharpe and HT3 Donny Shull checked the engine spaces for damage. They discovered several large cracks in the hull, which were caused when the boat smashed into a pier during a storm. After consulting with the Port Services Officer, LTJG Corrigan and a pump team manned by HT3 Shull, MM3 Sharpe, HTFN "Ralph" Brush, and SA Mario Camana rode the damaged craft as it was towed seven miles into port. On September 16, 1979 FARRAGUT proved she was ready. Next time it may be a tanker or destroyer that needs assistance. Quenehing e Grey Lady S Th1TSt i gives the order to heave around 7 After Rig Capt. BM2 Neal BT2 Ford monitors fuel Soundings fabovej After rig phone talker OSSN Yerk frightj. 10 Refueling probe from the USS DETROIT AOE-4, slides down span Wire on FAR- RAGUT'S after fuel rig Ueftj. After rig team Hheaves around" on line attached to probe fbelowj. Photos by: JO3 Sundt f be 11 ?'G'!'l'i1'C'VF1ffv'7-"ASK-1'-1?N '-'-stu . lofi. TTCS . TT17' 5T4"gY:!?"l V L "' Just Takmg lt Easy n Independence Day The crew s flrst open air cookout unfolded on the fantail for our underway 4th of July celebration The Mess Specialists of Supply and hot dogs All the trimmings for a regular Independence Day picnic were on hand including live muslc performed by FARRAGUT Sf own Blue Water Bayou A number of fantall cookouts were held durlng this 6 month cruise and 1f faces can tell a story then take a look at a few of these Civilian clothes were authorized by the command in order to make the event as comfortable as possible. O Division did an outstanding job of charcoaling chicken, hamburgers l ,IL ,. m.ufv11gL,gf T 1' m.,v-qgig-wg, J.:-V 7 2.-,-H-1 -1- .ws Lefwzfglrng Z-::if-ev? ' '- ' v .- ,. -4- 1 -av: -1--01'-v DKC Purganan and SK2 Marayag BBQ chicken on grills prepared by the Hull Technicians of R Division fleftl. All the trimmings Iabove right! were provided by the Mess Specialists of Supply Division. Shorts and T-shirts added a small touch of home to the afternoon outing. fabove leftj. Photos: J O3 Sundt 543: ,ff us' ' Q .yuh--.:'1"ir'-'W 234525532 -fl 13 P N Rv Photos by: JO3 Sundt 1 1 4 T Freddle Dlaz LIVE muslc on the h1gh seas'7 It s a pleasure cru1se Tlghtq Wrong but whenever Blue Water Bayou strlkes up a tune FARRAGUT sa1lors f1nd pleasure 1n the muslc they play FARRAGUT crewmembers weren t the only sa1lors to enjoy Blue Water Jams As we pulled alongs1de our replenlshrnent o1ler the USS DETROIT AOE 4 D9tTO1t s crew was greeted by some good old country rock1n muslc You haven t llved unt1l you ve seen a 250 pound fuel o1l rrgger dolng the tw1st to a Roy Rogers yodel sung by Blue Water s own GMM2 Robert Moore Rolando Valdes Fred Draz John Romero MM ., . X l Y -. -x-, ,ssh -ms E i , -vm-m,wm.-wM..,.M.i 'H l George Dillah un ty According to the band members and the people who attended the concerts from the ship, the most memorable dances for which the band performed were the two which took place over the Labor Day weekend in Alexandria, Egypt. More than 1,000 Egyptians showed up to listen and dance to the American band. Once again as Egyptian and American shared this musical experience, the mutual understanding which seems to come from music's own special language, drew people together who probably would never have come into contact otherwise. 4 Bob Moore uf 1 4 an ""-- , f , 1, ff 1511 , , LQ, x :cgi 111 X , fi?M54ff7fg'2-ff'?fiWWz',f?-1 , X - 2.1 1 iw", -V f ' f' , ' v4?f?W fi ,, V 8, , . .f ,f M' .Q k . 1' xy , , , ,V .1 f I , - 4 K ,., ma:-f 'f ' X4 . by -, , K, ,ff X, -, ' , .,,.f,, ., V V 5 f Fjl . 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X xf gf, Q Z I V ,no 2, V V V f f f f fy , ,f X In bg N 'Z' 7 f f ' J' if f ,, , , , ,,,, ,,,,,, , f ff f fafgf if 4- Q , 5 II,, ,-I, ---' L '-', -V-V ,, .VVV x m A ' " ' ' f' x ' ' 'A -' X X x V--V . V M ' h b .II. . V X 1 . 5 , , , , , X X X V , 7 K Jaxx , Y M f f , , f f f f f 1 Aff 10 ff!! f X ff f f 'ff V f W 'X .,,,, . . f V-IV ---VV, f V,,, , 1 A .I V J :II -II ' J J WMX- QINII V QANMA- I A It W H I , A 1 , V VV .7 VI,II , VI,.. I.I., V? ,VI,I IVI. VI 1: .--k kiffcg fAA " "f" W ' f 7 ' f f Wfffw f f ff f , f X X 7 D V x , X . f l,A. . A,Q f A l , ' Q -' l1 ,,AA 3,11 V."AA V - The Third USS FARRAGUT QDD-3481, Commissioned in 1934 The Fourth U.S. Navy vessel to be named in honor of Admiral D. Glasgow Farragut. STEM TO STERN The first in a class of modernized missile ships, FARRAGUT is one of the world's largest and most versatile destroyer-type ships. FARRAGUT was constructed by the Bethlehem Steel Company in Quincy, Massachusetts and was commissioned on December 10, 1960. She was the first ship on the scene of American Astronaut Scott Carpenter's splash down. FARRAGUT commenced her first major moder- nization in the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in May of 1968, and completed sea trials and Post Availability Shakedown in the Boston Naval Shipyard in March 1971. As the first modernized DLG, FARRAGUT possessed the most up-to-date anti-air warfare capability in the Navy's arsenal. Her main armament is a Terrier surface-to-air missile twin mount located aft. She is also equipped with anti-submarine rockets, triple torpedo tubes located port and starboard and a 5"f54 caliber rapid fire gun mount forward. These systems can be controlled individually or in coordination by means of the Navy Tactical Data System CNTDSJ, a computerized installation for direction of the ship's weapons systems. FARRAGUT was nominated as the Atlantic Fleet pilot ship for the 1200 pound boiler improvement program and entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in January 1975. On July 1, 1975, the ship's hull number was changed to DDG-37, when the Navy dropped the classification of Destroyer Leader. STATISTICS Length ........... ................................ ...... 5 1 3 Feet Beam ................. ...-.-.----- 5 3 Feet Displacement ....... ...... 5 ,800 Tons Draft .............. ............................. 1 8 Feet Speed ......................................................... Over 30 Knots Crew .......................................... 22 Officers, 360 enlisted FARRAGUT completed a base line overhaul from October 17, 1978 through October 2, 1979 as part of a 5 year maintenance cycle where her engineering plant was overhauled and the new over the horizon cruise missile system, Harpoon, was installed port and starboard. V ....i"' 'ff ' ' f ' f Commanding Officer ,,,,,,,A,,,,,, CDR Sanford N. Mock Sanford N. Mock was born in Brunswick, Georgia on January 14, 1939. He graduated from the United States Naval Academy in June 1961 and received his commission as Ensign the same day. CDR Mock served aboard the USS COURTNEY KDE-10211 as Communications' Officer followed by a four year tour aboard the USS WEATHERFORD QEPC-6185 as Executive Officer. From July 1965 until July 1968, Cdr Mock was a student at the U.S. Naval Post Graduate School in Monteray, California, where he received a Master of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering. His next assignment was the U.S. Naval Destroyer School, Newport, Rhode Island, in the Department Head Course, followed by a tour aboard the USS WILLIAM V. PRATT QDLG-135 as Weapon's Officer. Cdr Mock was then assigned to the Bureau of Naval Personnel as the Training Program Manager for Advanced Missile Systems which included AEGIS, NATO Seasparrow and Harpoon. This assignment was followed by a tour in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for surface warfare. In this capacity, he developed training requirements for all missile and gun systems. From June 1975 until December 1976, Cdr Mock served as the Executive Officer of the WILLIAM V. PRATT QDDG-441. Commander Mock's decorations in- clude the Navy Achievement Medal and Navy Commendation Medal. His service awards include the National Defense Medal and the Meritorious' Unit Com- mendation Star. Commander Mock and his wife, the former Armande Mary Cornier of Bath, Maine were married on August 10, 1965 and they have three children, Deborah, Sanford Jr., and David. August 28, 197 9 Agusta Bay, Sicily '14, Q Change of Command On August 28, 1979, CDR William L. Wunderly Jr. relieved CDR Sanford N. Mock of duty as Commanding Officer of USS FARRAGUT. The ceremony was held on FARRAGUT'S fantail while anchored in Agusta Bay, Sicily. Commander Destroyer Squadron Twenty Two, Capt. Allan B. Higginbotham was guest speaker at the hour long ceremony. ..41.....,...:x,s:,sg.Nf L-4+ an-L1 1"1"5-5'-3 -1- Photos by: EM3 Petersen Commanding Officer CDR William L. Wunderly Jr Commander William L. Wunderly Jr., was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on April 27, 1939. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in June 1962. . He has served on the following ships: USS JOHN KING QDDG-35, USS HOOPER KDE-10265, USS WILKINSON QDLG-55, USS ENTERPRISE QCVAN-655 and as Executive Officer for the commissioning crew of the USS VIRGINIA QCGN-385. Cdr Wunderly graduated from the Surface Warfare Department Head School in Newport, Rhode Island in June 1966. Prior to reporting aboard FARRAGUT, he was a staff instructor at the CNO's fChief Of Naval Operationsl Senior Officer's Ship Material Readiness Course in Idaho Falls, Idaho. From 1968-1970, Commander Wunderly attended the Naval Postgraduate School at Monterey, California, receiving a Masters Degree in Oceanography, graduating with distinction. In 1971, he completed Naval Nuclear Propulsion Training and is currently qualified to operate a naval nuclear propulsion plant. J" l COMDESRON 22 CAPT. A. B. Higginbotham Captain Higginbotham was born in Portsmouth, Ohio on 9 December 1929. He is the son of Mrs. Chloe Addair Higginbotham and the late Mr. John Crockett Higginbotham of Iaeger, West Virginia. After graduating from Welch High School he attended Duke University until he entered the Naval Academy in 1949. , Upon graduation from Annapolis in 1953, Captain Higginbotham commenced a predominately sea-going career in Navy combatant ships. He served in the cruiser DES MOINES QCA-1345, destroyer WILLARD KEITH QDD-5725, submarines SEA LEOPARD QSS-4835, SAILFISH QSS-5725, REDFIN QSS-2725, REQUIN QSS-4815, cruiser JOSEPHUS DANIELS QCG-275 and frigate TRIPPE QFF-10755. He commanded the submarine REQUIN from 1966 until 1968. In 1970 he commissioned the frigate TRIPP which he commanded until 1972. Captain Higginbotham's other assignments include tours as Director of the Engineering Department at the Submarine School in New London, Connecticut, Assistant Operations Officer for Polaris Submarine Matters on the staff of Commander Submarine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, Assistant for Surface ASW Sensors in the office of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations fAnti-submarine Warefarelg and Assistant for Chief of Staff for ASW on the Staff of Commander, Sixth Fleet, embarked on the USS LITTLE ROCK QCG-41. His most recent assignment was in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations fSurface Warfarel where he served as Head of Plans and Program Branch. He assumed command of Destroyer Squadron Twenty-Two on 26 July 1978. vs---.1Af.1i,,.s...q-zi. --'h.-1sY--'-.- Sundt 21 Executive Officer LCDR Edward J. Kaufman e June '78 - a Jan '80 Department .. , .. 1. , I ,,., .1 ,.w,,,,, . ,W .4 , .,. ., Y V ,,,,H V V, ,, A Qs- Heads OPERATIONS WEAPONS LCDR R. Schrope LT. D. Dietz 4 ' -nigg- SUPPLY NAVIGATION ENGINEERING LT. J. Nielsen LTJG W. LTJG C. Bensten Edmondson uno- :SezL'N":!:9':!HQltf!G1S7Hv'-rf?""7f'iff?5"?'?'?'?"5'if'??'???5YT?':'''TT' , f7""'x'z.-,fg-'5H jw"'- if ' , , Zim! .4 ,,. -7 J g ,, f,.'..t,,Qi 1. . Sundt Brannan Kabovej First Division crew, led by BMC John Ward and BMI Bill Cecil, pay out 11-inch towing hawser to the Fast Frigate USS GARCIA KFF-10401 during an emergency towing exercise in the Mediterr- anean. Kleftj Harbor tug in Genoa, Italy manipulates FARRAG U T into position as FARRAG U T prepares to go pierside. fbelowj Lookout' keeps watch as FARRAG U T begins her approach on the Oiler USS DETROIT IAOE-42. USS MAHAN in foreground. Brannan Wlf ff f ",' 2 ff 7 W f J gWyWzc6 ' R fffff I ,I f ffgf X, f 42 45 2 f' 05,3 ,V f -sv' ww f www -mm S SS, OS2 Thelle and OS2 Vancel enjoy Sousse's Hne White sandy beaches. Many modern hotels line the beaches here making Sousse a favorite vacation spot UNISIA As our liberty party scrambled out of the liberty launch, the shrill wail of Moslem prayers met our ears. Our eyes beheld a city choked by the traffic of tiny cars and throngs of native pedestrians and tourists on holiday. Brown skinned children swam beneath the pier while ships from various Mediterranean countries filled their holds with cargo. Dock workers laughed and waived as the liberty boats made their way into the harbor. UAHHH, the Americans have come to Sousse, Tunisia!" Only five or six warships pull into Sousse each year and the local people were glad to see us. Sousse is a North African resort city of 86,000 inhabitants whose numbers swell during the summer when Europeans, mostly German and Swedish, flock to the hotels which line Soussels white sandy beaches. The city is a contradiction of old and new, a contradiction developed by the income derived from tourism. The main attraction of Sousse is the casbah or "medina". Its stone parapets and mosques act as vigilant sentinalsg a tribute to the ages. Within these walls, one finds the "Old Cityi' of Sousse, a city which has seen a thousand years and has defended itself against as many adversaries. 26 Brannan x 4 F- - 1 K'-1-if-.v-A4-ff'f2+S+-bifwwf-xif'f'11f'if"'T-Y-Q-miie-sf-'1f1'92:a'e4-:asses-isa'-G'-cfrenfg-rw--frfwvrrwgerf-wa-fi+"-ue?-If-ffwvwzwf-P2+'s'1ii:':'14rf:'c221526-'iw'-' v ,--vf "-ff:1'ff'Q1r'1 1 '- V - .Q -.., V 'gg 3z,5,....,.,-,,.g.,,...' ,iq..,.r,,,.r.-W Valdes Valdes I I i. L n n Valdes 27 , ' '- . , .4 Y - ,, ,W . -g Y- - - .'.-:-.f , Y -. . -xf - ' -, , - - ,1 Y. ,...f..g-,,,,.-..-.-Y---41"-"'--1-f-A-.1-,. QW.,-:e.-n.-Y,X,,, x-Y.----- ,M-Q . 1 wf 1 - '-,g....,---- ,,a.g - -,,,a,-.- .QI-nam.LN....,.N-.,,1,...1..Aqyfxsif..-Y-L.w--:-m1g.-,-f--H-- u--,f-- A , t f Sousse, Tunisia Entrance to Medina Irightj. Hand Woven wool blan- kets and other garments are prepared by artisans of Sousse fbelowj. Liberty boat at Fleet Landing fcenterj. Looking through a glass onion Ibottom Ieftj. View of FARRAGUT anchored off Tunisian coast Ibottom rightj. 'i':'i'!Rb Q--5FS1l?'?-5' "Ri If-.K?f?5QkTfl"??l!3N?E'.E53Q'F1Yf2K'q5 21' 1 ' I V Q4 Sundt 33,1-Y :A . 1, J.7,,,,,m1,,w1P.,5,,E 4,,3.f54-i,s2f,e?,-..-Ns, --f-vw-iv. Leather and brass goods are Well made and inexpensive when bartered for Kleftj. Kbelow l to rj, Minaret stands as vigilant reminder of Moslem faith. fcenterj Just fell in love. Krightj Street merchant looking for a sale. fbottom l to rj Beautiful tourist from Scandanavia. fcenterj He just wrapped up an episode of I Spy. frightj Tunisian coffee and grain merchant in Medina. A VV., k-hf, I Sundt l l Alexandria, Egypt North African ports have always proved intriguing for the FARRAGUT crew, perhaps due to the drastic differences found in North African lifestyles, climate and natural as well as man made wonders. FARRAGUT Med-moored in Alexandria, Egypt on 31 August for a four day visit of this enchanting land. We found Alexandria to be a bustling city with sharp contrasts between its inhabitants and the ever changing lifestyles found in this large port city. The picturesque horse drawn carriage is always popular and the carriages of Alexandria moved in and out of traffic easily, with the driver half asleep at the reins or constantly turning around trying to sell his customers something. There is one consolation however, the all too obliging carriageman seemed to know all the best places in town. Right? , Alexandria was fascinating, but Cairo is just around the sand dune and the Great Pyramid of Geza beckoned us on Tours were available and bus loads of sailors were on the road to Cairo Saturday morning FARRAGUT S Blue Water Bayou stayed behind to play at the local Sport Club and the Alexandria Yacht Club while one thousand Egyptians turned out to see what was happening with those w1ld and crazy Americans Meanwhile on the road to Ca1ro the tour buses lumbered on through the burnlng Sahara Of course words can t really descr1be the wonder of the Great Pyramld or 1ts guardlan the Sphynx and ln the back of everyone s mind we all knew thls opportunity might only come once in a lifetime and our cameras have captured those distant memories for all time FARRAGUT departed Alexandr1a on Sep- tember 4 bound 'for Naples Italy. There was something special about Egypt its overwhelming sense of cultural and architectual development To think that we stood on the same ground as King Tut and rode down the fertile Nile River where Moses was cast a drift All the mysterious and exotic pictures we conjure up in our minds as we dream of ancient Egypt will 'be with the crew of the FARRAGUT for a long long time to come 30 Brannan w r V Brannan BTBHHBH . 1 . l 9 l l l l , l 1 , 0 I l . 3 ' a . 9 l . l 1 ' l . . . . , I , 0 . a - ' l l , , ' . 7 v l l - ' , w I l . . , . . . X t l , . i , Y V I Q l J' 'LTV' Y T ' I 'T T'-A'A" 'T' V :T ' '5 ' " ' ' A ' 1-' '-"-' f ' --7'- - P 'ii-' -'ff ff f'-'15 1'- -4 +--1-1--r-f -'f ,az wi-ns ' -1 -- -. -rs - 1 - - :-. 1 1 I wr. ' 'V ' ' -aw11e6:M',f fu ww-:fm -,,-.M X-5+--nw..-. -A, . --. . , .., - .. Pyramids and Sphynx frightl. foenter - r to ll Grant and Bauhan, thrill seekers. Gibson just horsing around beneath the second largest pyramid. Tour guide. fbottomj Egyptian family entering Moslem Mosque. Egyptian children flash the camera an impish grin. Valdes ,,,.,... a.,:..,., V ,,:...5,.,s,.T.,.-.,,, ...,.,:.l- wr,-.-,.... Panorama of Naples Bay aples, Italy: Crossroads to the Mediterranean From the very start, when you first step foot into Naples, you know that you are in the heart of Italy. From the crack of dawn until the last light twinkles and is gone from Naples Bay, life goes on at a furious pace. There is the brightly colored laundry flapping in the breeze, resembling so many Italian pen- nants. There is the traffic that seems to threaten your life. There are the worlds most cosmopolitan waiters, street vendors and shop- owners. There is the taxi cab driver with a photograph of his mother on the dashboard who would seem equally at home in Brooklyn, New York. He will take you to Pompei or Sorento if you wish, but he will charge you the price of a train ticket from Naples to Milano. There are street wise children strattling mopeds in the city's piazzas. There is the Galleria Umberto, a shopping mall with a lovely stained glass ceiling, the gathering spot for all walks of Neopolitan life. There are the ferry boats and hydofoils crammed with matronly women and their infant children, giggling school girls and baret clad men with solemn ageless eyes, all bound for the nearby islands of Ischia and Capri. Except for the U. S. Naval presence in Naples, this is the Italy you have seen in the movies, an Italy you may never encounter again if you wonder the length and bredth of the "boot". There is more emotion, more theaters and more hustle bustle per square kilometer in Naples than travelers will see in all of Italy. Excerpts from Mediterranean Mosaic 1977-'78, USS INDEPENDENCE CV-62. -f HQWKZQQ I x OS3 Brannen and OS3 Travis I la I l . .13 :Vu ,.-,Q11'v-. --2' v ul, .J-1: ..-.f.,.11 i 1-. .4101 -1.1, -., ou- 1. 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Q QM'-x,11z2iv'i12sA1,wf:"-Q1::?:f:-:ws,1f1f-M' 113511 ' V1 .. 1f 1'1' -I 111f11141:"'11ef1 W2 1 -irlifih Amphitheater at Pompeu .mtg--V .115a-..,.3q,-.,,.g4,i,.a-2-.,.i'f -J--1....:--' -4 1- 1.-l-V .Ln 1- -' --' ' ' ' ' ' "' " -H" """ ' Rome OSSN Whartenby Views St. Pauls Basilica from the Piazza Pia K top rightj. Jesus of Nazareth Kcenterj. The Roman Forum Where Ceasar Was assassinated Krightj. Ceiling fresco of Christ Kabovej. 34 f.. ..u..,--a-w-.- a 1.-.---f,,a.., ,.,,,.aN,, ,M ,,,,,Q,q-Q-:::,'i.-V-.qmfqrrw .Q oooi -.i:1.,v.u--. Genoa, Istanbul, and the Leamng Tower Ktop leftj. The Blue Mosque in Istanbul Turkey. One of the seven Ancient Wonders of the World fcenterj. Modern swimming pool and patio in Istanbul Kbottom leftj. Leaning Tower of Pizza Kbelowj. O Genoans in front of ice cream vendor. 1 v 1 Photos by: OS3 Brannan ,, 3 . -0, g.'fN,"-,1- 13-i1QL.':i : -:Ye- ff - ,., .,- Lg., -'a5.5.-ia.-Zgif -f'fs,i:e.r '+ 'i:,lgl Q' f-::ia.sf52-fi'-4-:-1551-1-XFQEIH H1 '- 1'-jC'fj'71i'-ff'fAj"i'i"'L-' " 3' '4f'T",,"' ' Y Q , I Y f ' A f' r of a Sailor "It takes all kinds." We've all heard that line before, but on a Navy warship nothing could be closer to the truth. With the many and diversified tasks to accomplish, it takes all kinds of talent to bring everything together. Sure, we're all different, but we are all here to carry out the same mission. These are just a few of the faces of the men who make FARRAGUT happen. l' Photos by: JO3 Sundt l Parting Glances Port visits come to an end all too soon, and it's back to Blue Water and that familiar routine of life at sea. The Work never ends underway, yet this life we lead still gives us a chance to reflect upon ourselves and our deeds. For some it is a chance to realize their goals. However, for others the Odyssey is final, never to return to the sea. . ?7'i'1?4'9lf"E'fi"' V f'1Y-2-is- Qlf?f5fQi?1'i'S af- L- 1 Lu a - ' v i , fdr -6- - G 1-: ff -2 ' f-'12- : f ff " " - -H+ :rf-f ' f'2:' gif1:'51i-Sir? LEil1f"?+-is-.lirf TT f " " ' .. . . f....-.11- .1-,..1-,'--,A.,-..1.4.-A.A -.. ,,,v,:x,. ., ,. -UM ,Al I . Q , ,L ,- ' Hwiwiela 1' , .Q ' v ' A -- - -- , -4::.1,.L.,...Q,.-.L.+...1...f.....::..,-......,L,. .... .W-.,,.'-vm fW ,k'-' f -, . , ' ' . - ff.,,i! WW M riad Things To Do . . . Underway means hard work and long hours. Training is a constant evolution as men work together with machines and equipment to accomplish FARRAGUT'S mission. A ship is a community which lives, works, and plays on Blue Water and because of the elements around us, we are geared for performance, anytime, anywhere, no matter what the evolution might be. 'Wai Brannan 40 ga H5 Xiamen Photos left to right: FTMC Barry Bidweell sits at tracking console in the Combat Information Center during a missile firing run. OS3 Jody Watkins during refueling detail. BM3 Tony Blascovich and BM2 Wando Neal wrestle with after fuel rig. Ccenterj USS CARON QDD-9705 in Black Sea operation. Russian vessel in background. USS MAHAN QDDG-425 in formation with FARRAGUT. fbelowb U.S. Navy helicopter over FARRAGUT'S fantail. Turkish destroyer alongside FARRAGUT during memorabilia exchange. GMG2 Phil Miles talks with shipmates during unrep. 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K, , f ,' 'Yi' ,ef ' I -'ff f . iQ1iz,ZZ','19fZ K -' ' Lfxzfffzf W,-f,f,,,,,,f ,.., , 1, ,rw 5, , ,3',5g1ffQ':4s:f4 ,mfg :15-,,g ,fin ' ,, f ,,.-f ,:4,,.af,,5v,,M':::fz w 2 ,una4,"Tf',ZL7!z?,1.X fa"':E',v2 221, OX :I , . ,f k "ff ,GQ :xg ggcibg' H532-,i6,g .1fg: -zr.y',,f' g ' 'ff' :Jie 1'zffv5Lf'n2fwsf'Lf! 1' 1 ' z,,f.,'f,f - , 5 ,f,4,,ff2.,2,-f1- ,Wf-ff ff , 'rx 1 -f xy-f1ff'Q,,iXz1w,fqQ4T4,1:,',,'.1yf,f-,ff5,,, ,. ,x ,',,.-'fi Z 71Qf'j.iQfgj!j!,.17vLffgQQ,f4jv,L!','f.l.'j-j3g,f-,Qjfj ff: 1 , ff-4,25 .f pi ,g fig k f 'fv,:'f?f-'1,!,f,' ,Y ' " 'hw V , ix i ,, W' ' 'nk ' .qi ,K I 'WM 4, ,W k V 12 G22 A az, , . mf '- 'W"f'nffv7 ,W A ' ,Q ENGINEERING: M DIVI ION One of the most basic yet very important jobs of a Navy ship is the act of moving that ship through the water. Everyone knows that it takes power to push a 6,000 ton ship through the water but, how many people understand all the implications? FARRAGUT'S engineering plant is a 1200 pound per square inch steam plant with two Delaval 42,500 shaft horse power main engines. It's the job of the Machinist Mate's of M Division to keep those work horses working. The main engines aren't M Division's only responsibility however. The "holes" also distill water for all of the ship's services. And what about electrical power? They do that too. It is services like these that makes FARRAGUT more than just a hunk of cold iron. Working in the holes calls for a special breed of man and FARRAGUT'S Machinist Mates know what it takes to keep FARRAGUT cutting through the water. The working conditions below decks are anything but comfortable, with the sweltering heat and constant high pitch screaming of the engines. But whenever a speed change is ordered from the bridge, you can be sure that the men of M Division will be ready to "answer all bells!" ,.. 'sf qw 1' ,fl M K , ae: ,U M I KU N4 :mx LQ ,M f I In Even pierside with the engines down, the Machinist Mate maintains FARRAGUT'S services, such as electrical power, and fresh and feed water. The hustle and bustle of underway activity continues as the engineers of M Division keep alert to ensure there are no wrenches in the smooth operation of the power plant. Tl" Now each of us from time to time, has gazed out to sea, And watched the warships pulling out to keep our country free. And most of us have read a book or heard a lusty tale, About the men who sail these ships, through lightning, wind and hai . But there's a place within each ship that legend fails to teach . . . It's down below the waterline, it takes a living toll. ,-1:-ye- S9912-Xse'.!. Fez., 1.1 ,A n 5 , . ,, 1 3 .4 ,, ,W MM fa A hot metal living hell, that sailors call the "HOLE". It houses engines run by steam, that makes the shaft go round, A place of fire and noise and heat, that beats your spirits down. Where boilers like a hellish heart with blood of steam, Are of molded gods without remorse, are nightmares in a dream. Whose threat that from the fires roar, is like living doubt, That any minute would with scorn, escape and crush you out, Where turbines scream like tortured souls, alone and lost in hell, As ordered from above some- where, they answer every bell. The men who keep the fires lit and the engines roaring, they keep the watch in hell, For if the engines ever fail, their ship's a useless shell . . .l M DIV iii J 'Qu s "fb-www Jw f fx ,f ,fm f ,f X f fx ,f -.K 'M A QM nu "MLA , F ,U . . I .,,?,5s,.,R-, -,1.:,. 7,155.5-W -. Y 1.rsf"v1: a .rvws-egy1rg,.,'E,g:mq-J, 1s.mreweg:eh-qaxpw.,--,nv-1-iowa-xx-gm--v-4-m.-7-w-ne:---wg-3' . W , .3-we-I W -. , . .L . . DIV Petersen From The Firey Pits Come The "Keepers of The Flames" Boiler, what's a boiler? If you are in or ever have been in the Navy, you know that the boiler on a ship supplies the engines with steam. We take for granted the electricity the engineers in M Division make for us, but without steam from the boilers we would be shaving with a safety razor and taking cold showers. In fact we wouldn't have any services because the engines wouldn't light-off. The men in B Division work in the hottest place on the ship and under the most physically taxing conditions. Steam pressure must be kept at 1200 pounds per square inch as it comes out of the boilers, which means water pressure in excess of 1400 PSI is forced into the boilers by the forced draft blowers. Any leaks, even pin holes can burn and damage whatever comes into contact with it. That something could be a Boiler Technician if he happens to be standing in the wrong place at the wrong time. Regardless of these condi- tions the Boiler Techs of B Division work together as a team in order to keep the cycle going that is so important in keeping the equipment "on the line". Watch standards keep things running smoothly down below, and the Top Watch is man with all the answers. He -.es 5 -"II: ' - ' ' ' ' ' must have a theoretical and practical knowledge of the fireroom and how to best put that experience to use. The Upper Levelman gets the first word on any situation which occurs within the two boiler rooms. He also ensures the boiler has a constant supply of water. Lower Levelman ensures the boiler can get fuel and the Upper Levelman gets water. The Burnerman is truly the "Keeper of the Flames", as he starts the fire and keeps it going. The Messenger is the eyes of fireroom. He must ensure all the machinery is receiving the proper attention. .x..,.n.n -. ...ae s . f.:L.,,... W.: f x , M., .x Y 3 . I r 'f f 5 ,--,ff-f, fy, XV , - N. .f ,f' ft! ACCESS V same ozzzssme 91 WGN " "The men below are its Very soulv . . . So if you ever write their sons, or try to tell their tale, The very words would make you hear, a firey furnaces wail. And people as a general rule, don't hear of men of steel, So little is heard about that place, which sailors call the "HOLE". But I can sing about this place, and try to make you see, The hardened life of men down there, cause one of them is me. I've seen these sweat soaked heros fight, in superheated air, To keep their ship alive and right, though no one knows they're there. ' And thus they'll fight for ages on, till warships sail no more, And the boilers mighty heat, and the engines hellish roar. So when you see a ship pull out to meet a warlike foe, Remember faintly if you can, "THE MEN WHO WORK BE- LOW." R DIVISIO : "If we can't fix it, it isn't One of the most diversified jobs on FARRAGUT is that of a Hull Technician. An HT's job includes firefighting, all phases of damage control and nuclear-biologi-cal- chemical warfare monitoring and clean up, in addition the HT must be proficient enough to instruct all shipboard personnel in these areas. An HT,s daily routine consists of arc welding, pipe fitting, oxyce- telene cutting and welding, silver brazing, braze welding, plumbing and soldering. Almost all emergency repairs aboard FARRAGUT require the talents of an HT. When FARRAGUT receives a helicopter over her fantail for personnel or logistics transfer, the HT's respond f Z . f : 55181. broken." by manning the helo crash detail. Should a mishap occur during this period, it would be the responsibili- ty of the HTS to rescue the helo crew and save the ship from possible damage. 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The engineers down in the holes concentrate on making the ship steam through the water. All of the refrigeration units on the mess decks are maintained by A Gang as well as all of the other pieces of equipment in the gallies and sculleries throughout the ship. Any time a small boat goes into the water, there is a member of A Gang along, usually an Engineman, just in case the engine fails. FARRAGUT'S operations people rely on A Gang to repair the cooling systems on the radars and computers. When the ship loses power, it's A Gang's 426 horse power emergency diesels that go on the line to supply the ship with electricity. The hydraulic systems aboard FARRAGUT are also maintained by A Gang. All heat and water pumps outside of the main engineering spaces are also the responsibility of the guys in A Gang. Everyone knows Somebody that can fix just about anything. Well, if you're ever looking for a "Jack of All Trades", just call for A Gang. 52 Qa N, N 'ff' H DIVISIC E Division is divided into two ratesg Electrician Mates CEMJ and Internal Communications Tech- nicians CICJ. The EM's maintain all electric motors, electric tools the lighting systems onboard FARRAGUT. The huge electrical switchboards found in the Engine spaces are also the EM's respon- sibility. EM's stand watch at these switchboards monitoring input and output. The IC techs maintain the ship's telephone switchboard, tele- phones and sound powered phones, ship's entertainment system and the lmc Cpaging systeml. Beyond internal communications, the IC techs repair the ship's gyro com- passes and the engine order tele- graph. 5 , EEN f 54, , -nm, , 5 4, g ff, ' f f f . 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F Wi fi, ,gli X Lf X 7 X Q if ' wwf f rr r 2 Z fff X I , ff J X 6,24 ,.-' ,X -,hh, ,.., , ., f j, kk-- 1 I1 , ffifff ff r , .. , . a t "'i2 7.179 -,'-" H fi U , , f ' ' M, 727,:,W,4 r ,,.,,,, ,U . fi? w3fil1f.if Vg .3 ,Z my www-W ffgyzfrzf ,g,,.,ig -,'fg fL ' F can FOX DIVISIO The Terrier Guided Mis- sile Fire Control System, MK 76 MOD 6, is comprised of two major entities. The first is the two 55-B radars, which au- tomatically track assigned tar- gets and actually guide the terrier missile to the target. The second is the multi- purpose Univac digital com- puters, and their peripheral equipment Whose primary functions are to aid radar tracking by processing posi- tional error signals, calculating fire control solutions and missile launcher directional commands. This is all inter- faced with the Navy Tactical Data System QNTDSJ in the Combat Information Center. It is the responsibility of the Fire Control Technicians CFTM'sD of Fox Division to maintain, repair and operate all of this equipment. , A, . 01.0 . ..,. , - ... ,., . ...F , , -':...,u..,.. -M .- --J. ,.Q.,w.-',-1 - A.-. -1,1--My ,.1..4.u.,. --.' Q -' --4- .-lv-, .. .,,, f-Nfl. , . 1 1 1 ' 3 , ff 1 ,4 my W.f.fW.g,Q:f-wzfg ti, W ,.f1-tfffmf,-fw We-ff,f f 1 1 ,f . V fuf4?fffWyffffyyygfW.gf11qf-. ,,, ,W y ff ,' 1 cm, 5 'W W ff, f, ffzfiffffffzfffyfizwf-4 1 f 1 f-if xg-ffwyyf' if ff-wf'f.Mf f f ., ow af M .4 f fy , . my-ya-42fwygwfffff.f741-W,-ffgw,fn ff!! ,. ' 1, milfmf-fox-w5f1zf,fMy Q ,f 1 5 f-'Mfg mf ,' , W2 f 5 WW f f f t 4- ff f' ffww fc ff ffffffwmff fffwffffffwfifffffff, fiffffff W 1 pffwif fr f of .f X .K ff X IW, -1-f frfsf. ., I ff 1 1 fix .f .1 f- .f . - .7-5-M Wfwff fwg, ff fff if 44 JAAAQM . f- 41 .ff .f.-f f,. ff,ff..fff. ff .af f f.f f .f f ' fgyffffyf fy, fff,5.f,Wf4,fy,f47,77.f ,, f,,,,fgffW55,.,,4 05. UWM, J, ifZWfflffffffff,f?f ff ff Zfffffff fffff ffwfwff ,sf f ,iff f f ww ff f 1 f ny ff WW? ,ww 1 1 -it-1,14 2 .ffwwwf fffzwwwwf ff , f fffff f f fff! f , f , ff, wif oft., 1 1 f fff fwfffffOfwf f k - 1 fi ' 7 tiff! 7-WMM eff .f:f1!f4ffy17f- -VZMQ1-fyf-127 4:4141 1-if -NM! f - -, M1 -wif ,gf 4 f,ff,y:g,ff-ff J 1 ,ff ,fgfjfyf : ,W ,,fff?i9y get Z fff 4 f 1 WW-zfffffffwf.-v,Wf1ff fwfr ffffffffffff f 2!ffffO,ff ky? fZfWff,Q fffgpyffwffcjj fi .ff fn, f ,wh X, ffffffffffffffff ffff ffff W ffffffam fffff f 1 f ff K. . 7 .Q - fyfyff 4 7. WJ!! f . , ff-fk,,f.ff,,.f, ya? 1- 1 1 1. f f fffyc ffl 5141- f ff f f WL- . '14 yfffy ff 13 1.11.17 11 ' f ' , ,sf 1 QMWQ of mzfffgwffwyz 11191.15 -vf A 1 fi .. ny ff f -.exam Wagga . - 211 .f . K fffjf 1.1: wffffffww :'f -4 , ' ff ,y:1f..tw-1 -' fffffff4Wywf - 1 Qs? f , ,, ' W fgyf ,Myra '- .-,fsf f A' f 1 ., , ,ff ' , 1ff11f1f,414'f-fffffffvjf Zffifffff 133111 121 .11 f f 1 ff - f fwfr 1 jig, wf a aa 1 11' . ,. ,,,,- I :ina ' ' vff. .f ' A 76. f 2 121-gf 236.5 f . ,yn W!! I ' ! , f.f - , 111 K I N355 650: ,ig .f f 1 1 . 1 ' 2-f1"ew'wseefiff2i:W 1' 2- 11 1 Wy f . mf 1 1 Mr ,111 .. 1 ,.. .11 '. iff: 145' 1:1'1,.11g'1 Y 111111 ff1: "3:' 1 1 1 1 1 '111.1,f , fi 1 11 '111f111.11 1 i 1 1 V A , b 6, ,ag at RA M 14 15111 '111'1 1 1 111 4. 1 1 1 1 ' ' 1 s X XX 7 1 1 During Med Cruise '79, FARRAGUT'S FTM 's scored an impressive 9 hits for 11 Hrings, with two direct hits and no system failures. This excellent record only exempliHes F RRAGUT'S title of Tidewatefs Top Gun. Fox Division is divided in to four separate Work cen tersg 55-B radar, 48 radar, missile plotting, and the surface- to-surface Harpoon cruise missile launcher system. .. ft- -qi5-1av.1-.,-,ww-xvrs-1-ze.--.wMT:-refrfitzy CG DIVISIO : GL' The well publicized slogan, "Tidewaters Top Gun", refers to the FARRAGUT sailors who man the surface gunnery system. Their extra effort and dedication first earned CG Division that distinction, and they have maintained their reputation throughout the Mediterranean up to the present. The FARRAGUT gunnery system is the 5"f54 MK 42 model which can hurl projectiles weighing 70 pounds at ranges of thirteen miles against air and surface targets at a rate of 30 rounds a minute. This provides FARRAGUT with the ability to defend itself against high speed aircraft and surface vessels as well as gun fire support for shore bombardment. The gunnery system is comprised of several elements, 5" gun mount, director, gun fradari plot, and the carrierfmagazine. Each element interacts with the others. The director and gun plot locate the target and the gun mount knocks them down. While in the Med, CG Division scored a grade of 10023 more than once, by knocking down high speed targets being towed behind jet aircraft. 4-lf" ,..qf"" 1 . 4, , , I""""'i 5""f"""" 2 S V' ,..V if ,ig Sundt GMG2 Phil Miles fleftj. Kbelowj L-R: GMG2 Fran Grant, GMGSN Carlos Anaya, GMGSN Joe Kyttle. Kbelow leftj GMGSN Mike Habjan. GMG3 Mark Kennedy and GMGSN Pat Bauhan fbelow centerj. FTGSN Hank Owczerek fbottomj GMG3 Charlie Tayor fbottem rightj. Sundt My 1 ' ' , ,W 2? Mason .,,,',,-?:,M,,g,,:57r,,:,.,N.:1...5, R-f,..-.1-..-J--, i.5i-4-Nr-f---n -9-,---H V -. P X . E J 1 ,M , MM fff 'ww Nj IQ L ,0,,,, 4 l 5 3 I x V V w xl 11, w ' x 3 X ? W f 5 Y 3 K 1 Y Y ' , 1 I Y ' 1 w 1 1 1' 5 3 w 5 IN I 1? .. -. , J , H I i 1 I 4 P i s 5 l .V J , 1 Q C DIVISION ASW . . . Anti-Submarine-War- fare. That's what CS Division is all about. The men in Sonar CSTG'sD man the ANXSQQ-23-A Pair Sonar system, always alert for any unusual contacts. Below Sonar Control is the Underwater Battery where Sonar Techs operate the Mark-111 computer system which displays the optimum presentation for FARRAGUT'S ASW weapons. Sonar is the heart of the ship's ASW group. From here everything is tied together for a weapon's delivery which could come from either the MK-16 Launcher Group fAnti-Submarine-Rocketsl, or the MK-32 over the side torpedoes. X ' .f'-. ' f il, Sundt fri-4-" .-:ff iv rvfsv'--1 z' ng'-ww ,,,...-,.,-,,...., MW V, ,,,, a., Berryman If ff X - if i Torpedoes are Hred from the six torpedo tubes located port and star- board on the ship's 0-1 level Ueftj. Anti-Submarine-Rockets CASROCJ are Hred from a group of eight launcher cells located forward on FAR- RAGUT'S 0-1 level Kbottomj. Sonar Technicians STG1 David Bishop and STG3 Rick Morningstar work with Torpedomen TM3 George Cobb and TMSN Brian Hutton fbelowj. ,ea al nfl' 'T f . ff ,hh Ericsson 11- VA., .Ms J... p- f L1-5.159-f::1.:v..fr4,-.,:,-:Zigi-,-7-55 ., f, Q g, 2 . . l 1 - V- .-vw --. :cs-'sua .. 5:wwnL4..r. .s,u1ma,,. ..g,,.,z1a.fnLevssxvf--wafp-rnJ.a.r.1.:..r,ww.wzn-f,p'.nz.iu3-s-xusrv -wav:-,,, ,,,,,,mN H... 9 rl FARRAGUT conducted many submarine tracking exercises while in the Mediterranean, firing practice torpedoes at the elusive sub-surface target. The MK-32 torpedo is presently the U.S. Navy's most sophisticated surface launched torpedo. The ASROC is a rocket thrown torpedo. The rocket projects the torpedo to a predesignated spot and the torpedo is released into the water where it begins its search. - I top right! STGC Bruce Fitzsimmons conducts preventative maintenance on MK -32 tubes. STG1 Mike McFarland assembles torpedo handler frightl. CSXCG ganig just hanging around. K below leftj. S TG2 Allen Bell an GMT3 Tony Lanzara I below right-foregroundj. 'Q 1' f-'fx e-if i'f':fi1':+1 :rr ,K ,qsv!:jrfa:1j4--fa-'Q-. ,Y .ww-:vig-f-,fwsrrrn-r-.-:1's1ew:-"ff-rwMziv'-vf"'ff,'-fi:-:.f . FIR T DIVISIO The title of Boatswain's Mate is truly synonymous with the term "salty". "Old saltv of course originally applied to sailors of long ago who worked the decks and riggings of fhe tall ships which relied on wind for power. Those were hard men, braving the elements of the sea both day and night. Today these salty sailors still face stiff winds, salt spray and extreme temperatures, even on a modern ship like FARRAGUT. A normal working day for the men of First Division is anywhere from 8-12 hours long. When not on watch, Deck Force is carrying out the other aspects of their job, ranging from deck seamanship to life guard detail during underway replenishment. Watch stations include the bridge detail which consists of: Boatswain's Mate of the Watch, Helmsman and Lee Helmsman, Port and Star- board Lookouts and After Lookout or Fantail Watch. Each of the three watch sections stands eight hours of Watch duties daily. The men of Deck also man helo stations for helo transfers as well as the small boats. Deck personnel keep the boats in tip top condition and operate them whenever the situation dictates that a boat must be lowered over the side. The work First Division performs is very visable and everyone onboard has benefit- ed from their efforts one time or another. May the Deck Force be with you. Q. .F in ,rn 1 M w. . . . Qt 1. nine f ' N ,,f,, , ,,., .- A V YT: " ' ""g15.l. 4 4, Exe. 4,-0, ' 1 f, M, fy. 0 fy f '41 Mfmxf V AQ X XX Combat Information Center The Combat Information Center QCICJ is where all the action is when it comes right down to firing FARRAGUT'S weapons systems. Operations Specialists COS'sJ work in CIC and operate the tactical scopes and display boards. Every weapons system including the radars and the NTDS com- puters are tied into CIC. OS's keep track of air and surface craft, take :9vO1'tS on their speed, distance and e lg! i location, recommending .A in WH: e and speed changes. for " A ' RAGUT in order to avoid or intercept. The electronic Warfare equipment is also located in CIC. OS's identify friendly aircraft and assist them in figuring a fire control problem or actually take control of a distressed aircraft and land it on the deck of an aircraft carrier if necessary. This is useful when a S unable to control his craft. P f V L pilot is hit by enemy fire and is E ' 'si V3 OSSN Bill Whartenby behind the VP board in CIC Kabovej. DS2 James Mason in NTDS computer central Kleftj. Air and surface tactical display scope in CIC fbelowj. s j M, ,,,,.,,.,q Mem W A f f 46 7fnpsZ?W f , if wwf WW, M Q 'W X "Q X fifflw W , "NX fi ,f 'ff f WW 0 2 M X., KM, 1, n' V, . W4 fig? 4' ff, ' X! f , ', fwi W 4' 'f my Zz M, Q ' W v 7 X ff, ,,,,., f nf " ff' ff f ,W yy JA f fiwwif I .,, 1 4 yi if CC DIVISICN: Radiomen Communications onboard FARRAGUT is critical to the ship's mission as a combat Warship. Without the radio networks, teletypes, satellite feeds and links, FARRAGUT would be cut-off not only from the rest of the fleet, but from the world as well. It is the job of the Radioman to ensure that all message traffic moves on and off FARRA- GUT smoothly and in a timely manner. Radio Central is the communications "nerve center" of the ship with a total of 30 circuits, 10 HF receivers, 10 UHF tranceivers, 6 HF transmitters, 2 satellite circuits Cone transmit, one receivel, and 2 NTDS link circuits. As flagship for Commander Destroyer Squadron Twenty-Two, FARRAGUT'S message traffic triples. Ccont'dJ. Radio . . . Due to the importance of radio traffic, Radiomen are constantly on duty, usually standing 12 hours on and 12 hours off. While FARRAGUT'S Radio Central is used main- ly for official business, there are times when cir- cuits are open for receiving national and international news, including sports, which is passed to the crew via a closed circuit televi- sion report. Radiomen can also set up telephone calls from overseas under certain circumstances for the crew. Class "E" messages are another way to commun- icate to family and friends stateside and the Radiomen are responsible for that also. The job of a Radioman is a busy and diverse one, and if it wasn't for the radio circuits and the men who man them, we would cer- tainly be uninformed and unable to do our job as effectively as possible. '71 OC DIVI IO : Signalmen The Signalmen fSM'sJ of OC Division provide FARRAGUT'S visual communications. Through the use of flashing lights GZ" incondecent search lightsb, flag hoist, and sema- phore Chand signalsl, Signalmen can communicate with other surface ships within line of sight. With the help of the "big-eyes" line of sight can extend over the horizon. FARRAGUT has two big-eyes, giant binoculars, located on the port and starboard sides of the signal bridge. These are essential in identifying visual communications from other ships. On a clear day big-eyes can see up to about 16 miles. Flags are used both underway and inport to notify other ships of an evolution or maneuver FARRAGUT is or is about to be engaged in. For example, if FARRAGUT is involved in a turning maneuver while steaming in formation, a flag goes up the halyard which identifies their inten- tions and subsequent actions. Inport flags are used to identify such shipboard evolutions as men working aloft, divers over the side, re-fueling, explosives handling, etc. Even though Radio has a much wider range of capabilities and is used for most of the ship's major commun- ications, visual communications can always be counted on by the Signal- men even when the radio equipment is out-of-commission. 555- 9 """-Q-.m. M 5 X Q Q ii. :,, EN 1 xwfvw ix S :QQ ii if i 5, 5 3 W, we '9 3 5 if ii fr wi IV? I :ii 51 52-S 15-1. xs Q' Wk S wi 5: " fi E ii X I S 5 3 . Q j SN 1 SX 5 S1 2 S as K AP 1 Sundt Sundt ,Zz -fa 2 '-..- -' f, 5- Q-ff. .-gm .gvgag :L-Q V ,-. ...fs 1.-We OD DIVISION: NTD OD Division is home for the Navy Tactical Data System fNTDSj and Data System Technicians CDSJ maintain and operate thig complicated and multi-faceted system. NTDS makes it possible for FARRAGUT to engage with at least three hostile targets simultaneously- all three of FARRAGUT'S main weapons systems can be controlled and fired with the help of NTDS. With a link to another ship, FARRAGUT'S capabilities are expanded considerably and the DS's must keep their system ready to go on the line in a minutes notice. The DS's also repair the Operations Specialist's scopes and consoles in CIO, which are linked to the NTDS computers. Recently OD Division has taken on the responsibility of maintaining FARRAGUT'S television system, and the D1S's have proved that they can handle just about anything that comes t eir way. 'sn Xssw Mason w4,,a-1 7 if if 'mf' XXX XX If WW!-194' jf' X """"'--..---E.: ,E ff :am f fy WW ooo! ,Z ,gag W7 ' f Wigvfwuawf ff f f ' f f WW TE SITE stands for Shlpboard Instructlon Tralnlng and Entertalnment SITE IS a telev1s1on statlon deslgned for use underway as a tralnlng tool and an entertaxnment medlum The system IS operated by the sh1p s Journallst and a handful of lnterested volunteers W TTG operates 61f2 hours, SIX days a week and 10 hours on Sunday Programmlng IS supplled by the Amerlcan Forces Radlo and Telev1s1on SGTVICG, Los Angeles, Callfornla Speclal bulletlns such as Captaln s Call and Port Brleflngs are also broadcast over the closed c1rcu1t cables SITE has two channels and they can transmlt slmultaneously News from home and around the world IS gathered by Rad10 Central and the SITE operators report the news tWlC6 each evenlng The remote televlslon camera IS used for recordlng mlsslle flrlngs gun shoots and other evolutlons for later revlew lI Ami! Ye , y , V I . M- I 2 if ' k'QA'7", .. , - .. . , 23 f W fi, S .,... .,,,.,. , ..., ,. M I f W 5 ' :: ,3?"Llfv,, gff",wwf'X,"fa X? A -aff-:Zz -, E y 4 'Y ,,,,,, 1 t -1 :, " me ,f gr' ' f , ' ' ,W 1122912 ' ' , 5 ,,., , ..W,,,M,,N, M, ,,,. , ,,., , ,,,..,,, .0 ,xg , Q Q , . A 5 I f 42 ,Q ,cf ff ' "-f,. . , , ,,,,.,,,.,,.0,z0 I ,129 1, 45.52, .ft 1. ,ay .,,,,,.,,,,,l V 1, A p ' I 'f is f 'ff ii, 2 ' ,aw , s - 'pl ,. . ,, .,v fp, ' ml-Mn,-f V' ' KZ - ,. Wm, :Ma QM, Q I , ,V l 1 K at X wx y . HX. V 4 .XZ .XZ ll N. x X xx R 2 Za . iw., ffglf . . - . . . . . . . I - ' . . . , . . ,, ' , . ' Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . if - ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . I l I 515 ET3 W Alonso ftop leftj, ET3 D. DuVall ftop rightj, and ET3 R. Valdes with a new friend in Sousse, Tunisia fbelowj. One group of OE Division are the Electronic Warfare Technicians fEW'sl. The EW's Wage their War electronically by utilizing highly sophisticated electronic equipment to seek out, identify and some- times fool incoming air craft. EW2 L. Foged and EW2 M WinHeld Kright centerl. fbelowg l to rj ET2 M Cullen, ET3 T Hayden, ET2 D. Balfour-Grice and ET2 G. Nall Kforegroundl. 76 ,nz ,..,,...A.o-ua. 4 ,ffyffh 4 6, Q , When it comes to shipboard electronic equipment, and the men who operate it, we must look at two categories. Those who actually operate the equipment and those who maintain and repair it. Unlike engineers, who repair their machin- ery as well as operate it, electronic equipment which is used in the ship's operations and weapon's systems must be maintained by the OE DIVI IO Electronic Technicians fET'sJ of OE Division. These men repair and maintain all of the electronic navigation equipment, communica- tions systems QUHF, HF, data-link, and satellite communicationsl, and the ship's radars fair and surface searchl. The Electronics Technicians also calibrate their repair and test equipment such as scopes and meters. The ET's are the unsung heros of FARRAGUT'S Operations Department as they are on call for any casualty 24 hours a day underway, and afterall, what good is all of FARRAGUT'S sophis- ticated electronic equipment if it doesn't function properly? SK-Storekeeper SH-Ship's Serviceman MS-Mess Specialist DK-Disbursing Clerk SUPPLY DEPARTMENT Supply Department consists of four individual rates, Ship's Serviceman CSHJ, Storekeeper CSKJ, Disbursing Clerk CDKJ, and Mess Specialist CMSJ. These people provide such services for the crew as, record keeping, laundry, barber facilities, ship's store, and meal preparation. All business which involves the purchasing of materials for FARRAGUT or contracting outside labor IS handled by the 78 Supply Department. Special activities such as birthday dinners underway, fan- tail barbeques, and parties are co-ordinated by the men in Supply Department. A Navy ship is a small community afloat and without the services provided by the Supply Department we could not call FARRAGUT our home away from home C6 ' 79 7 ' f -M We - M DI 1 ' riff? ff! f We MV A W X The preparation of three meals daily, four underway, begins every day at 5:00 a.m. for FARRAGUT'S Mess Spe- cialists. From the moment when the first egg hits the grill in the morning until the dinner pans are put away at night, FARRAGUT'S Mess Spe- cialists are cooking up a storm in the ship's three galleys. The preparation of food doesn't begin in the galley however, as the menu must be prepared well in advance, and accurate records of all food consumed must be kept at all times. Cleanliness in FARRA- GUT'S galleys is of prime importance to food service and each galley is inspected daily by the senior Hospital Corpsman for sanitation. Special events such as birthday dinners. and fantail cookouts, give the Mess Specialists a chance' to really shine. Standard fare for the birthday dinner is Surf and Turf, all the steak and lobster you can eat, served by the XO and the Supply Department Officer. And we mustn't forget the night baker and his brigand of helpers who bake fresh bread and breakfast pastries while underway. So, just where would the crew be without MS Divi- sion? Mighty hungry! ,l-,,5,,,,.,,- ,, , ,, g,,.5,t., - ,. 1 -.ty 4,-v V ,,, W: Z.-,wiA..:3-:,,-Q.v,,,,x.:fg- s-::7'fa1:1.jf, gg Y 1 'I S' : r.4,m1:1Q5 32 3351!-vsp nfjxffvvpkgt Q52qggvgvgyx'3y,lxgg5'fYef5f,1:'g4'-3awQso.y5-yn-eg15gf3fwg'Q'-551g?gj'?:f!j"f!v:v-nf-irlnwy-fy'f'7'-'k:v1fJg""?"""f""""f"I" "' Mui 'T'-412971 -1 "- ,.,-' yfw 41 4- 31' J Maw-,,,,, ,W f ' f 0 2 , 'fa YW! if ,,,,m?7" 5 ,,h,,, I 'Qui'-M' 'W h r Egg F, 37' , a 35255 f . L 9 . 1-.YA V ,W ? n 4 ?1i?f'? 1 k Qs X N- ig ' fy -'- 'V-alfizwsif-'32 izlbgfsis-'fif' J'.,.:?L.-.:. -.Q.. ' .'-'.f-:TF-fifzffig..:Lsggi-if-.i-.-1-'-2:51ii 'L' -Y " ' 1 - . -f--. . " - ' ' . :V . , fn f'- Y V ' V " " "-- f Y "f-W 4-0'-1 ' 'ML 1 pt - -- - f x---nm-11J.-,..v..g-'-+n,4.,..,,-fu-.s:.n-A...-fanufumwn11115151-.rm4:,.w,n:fai:::3muw.nsu. 'fs ' QQ.,-.a5 'A u,3.,, A ' .:. ,, yn , - guqgm ' .vrrfg-4x1-xAL.z,,x.1,.:..x.f ' ' Q ,q.x.:,..M,,, .Qu .,1,.N.. . v.,.. :,- . SUPPLY DIVISION SKI W1 Frazier talks with MSI Wolford ftop leftj. SK3 Seldon, SKSA Hadley, SK3 Craw- ford pose for the camera with FARRAGUT sh1p's store op- era tor, SH 3 M cGra th I top rightj. Icenterg l to rj SH3 Priolo, ship'S laundry, SK2 Marayag, supply support, SK2 Lacsamana, supply support, and SHSN Harris, Ship's laundry. Kbelowg l to rj SH3 Bell, SH3 Pack, and SH3 Black, shipis laundry. NAVIGATIO DEP RTME' T: NX Where are we navigator? One might hear that question on the bridge, but you can bet that FARRAGUT'S Quartermasters of NX Division will always be quick to respond. The Quartermasters maintain all of the ship's charts and navigation equipment. At dusk a Quartermaster slips out onto one of the bridge wings to shoot the first star of the evening for a chart fix. Quartermasters are familiar with all of the rules of the road and they stand watches as Helmsman, and Lee Helmsman as well as Navigator. 82 Y-'F '-mf: Q.. .fli:If' ---. i ' 6:3-i.-1 1.-Qs' 1? 'i Sundt 83 2 xv f -... -, Qpux ff- f-,.-, mff ., 5 Agni IX DIVISIC IX Division onboard FARRAGUT consists of the following rates: Yeoman, Personnelman, Master-at-Arms, Career Councilor, and a Navy Journalist. The scope of IX Division's responsibilities is diverse, and except for the Master-at-Arms and Journalist, is strictly an administrative function. The Personnelmen handle all Service Jacket entrees, cut orders and issue I.D. cards. Personnelmen work together with the Career Councilor and the ship's Journalist by supplying them with necessary personnel information. The Yeomen of the Ship's Office handle all of the Captain's correspondence, legal files and any official documents etc. IX is a division of the Navigation Department. 7 f - sa. i 7101 va M l W f ,,,. , , 71,7 71 . . , ,, , . HO ECOMI G As we have followed the crew of the USS FARRAGUT throughout their 1979 Blue Water Odyssey, we have seen that each individual and every division is essential in putting everything together to carry out FARRAGUT'S mission. While we the crew reflect upon our experiences in the Mediterranean we hope that you too, our family and friends, will someday pick up this book and visit these distant lands and maybe better understand what your FARRAGUT sailor did on his 1979 Blue Water Odyssey. 86 . , , ' I, .' .., .f .,a.-.Ls A,:,-nm.,..w5.,u.-.-...e.e.,a.,a..s1:---' -Q,-'.-u.r.44.,x.'-A.. wa. v......,,,,,,' fi. 1 - ----. .1 V. . A N- ia xml 1 lil? S Nf "" 'i JW X 1 N S I R x frfl Xff if W .XXX , X f f ff ' f' "f: .,Uza""4'7 .-5 1 f ff mfg' wal . 37" I 'fzfy ' . .' 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Suggestions in the Farragut (DDG 37) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Farragut (DDG 37) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1977 Edition, Page 1

1977

Farragut (DDG 37) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1986 Edition, Page 1

1986

Farragut (DDG 37) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1979 Edition, Page 7

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Farragut (DDG 37) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1979 Edition, Page 89

1979, pg 89

Farragut (DDG 37) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1979 Edition, Page 43

1979, pg 43

Farragut (DDG 37) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1979 Edition, Page 42

1979, pg 42

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