Eureka High School - Sequoia Yearbook (Eureka, CA)

 - Class of 1933

Page 1 of 150

 

Eureka High School - Sequoia Yearbook (Eureka, CA) online yearbook collection, 1933 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1933 Edition, Eureka High School - Sequoia Yearbook (Eureka, CA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1933 Edition, Eureka High School - Sequoia Yearbook (Eureka, CA) online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 150 of the 1933 volume:

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QQW yawn L,5zwzm .i SNAPS OF GRAD- UATES A FEW YEARS BACK Page One Hundned Twenty Three ggi V1 v. ,X 4' Q.: 1, ,, - 'j"'f1" 1211+-':f11vefe,,:P'if"H'f'-ff-' -- 1 . . - piggy. T., . 5' SchoolDay Happenings '- Feb. 17. Glee Club Concert-Good singing and playing by the Glee clubs and the Orchestra. 1 . Feb. 18. Eureka at Crescent City-Lightweights drop one to hard-fighting northerners-Heavies win with little difficulty. Feb. 20. South Fork at Eureka-Two more wins for the local boys. Feb. 28. Alumni Mardi Gras--Good crowd-Good music-Ha-cha. Mar. 1. Student body meeting-Professor Howe of.Humboldt State-An interesting talk on the Hawaiian Islands. ' 4 Mar. 3. Eureka at Arcata-Eureka douses Arcata's hopes rfor C. I. F.- Heavies win their twentieth straight game. I Mar. 10. Excalibur Noon-iDance. Q - Mar. 11. Fortuna at Eureka+Eureka takes the encounter easily to be ac- ' .claimed 1933 champions in the lightweight division. u Mar. 17. 41. Irish Jig-Another Senior Dance-Music by the Sequoians. Mar.q31. Moving picture on the Hoover Dam-Very, very interesting. Apr. 1. 'Baseball-Fortuna at Eureka-First game of the season--Score 12-6 in favor of Eureka. Apr. 5. Student body meeting. ' Apr. 11. Ferndale at Eureka-Ferndale provedthemselves too much for the Eureka boys. Apr. 22. Eureka at Ferndale-A plenty sweet Eureka team opens up to take Ferndale into camp. , 1 -' Apr. 22. lnter-school track meet-Lots of enthusiasm shown-Now for track!+Wow! Apr. 26. Basketball Dinnerf-Servedito the loyal members of our Basketball f teams-Prepared by Senorita Mathews. F l Apr. 26. Bunny Hop-A perfectly wonderful dance--Given by 2H class. Apr. zs. School Night. ' May 1. May day-No school-Many huge trout' weighing from 20 to 30 lbs. ' were caught by many of the students. Q May 3. Student body meeting. May S. Music Festival-All the glee clubs in the county assembled at Arcata. May 101. Jolly Junior Jamboree-It was indeed a jolly time every body had. Page One Hundred Twenty-two ' ' Jwif v JKKZ '. hx , -S .t .x 1 .NW-.P . ' - ' , ,p'..1."'4'.y - ,Q UI'V:311 " ".7tf:T's?F A I' 3-" Jw ' Q11 . . nw ,ff W rf- . ,gf-,i,, , ,. A m ffi - A , 1 '- Lf' "ur :Q '3-5 5 ff"3.2giff5:56'1?i?,gk '19 Bi-, N A if2.v'g:f"' --'Hari ' Q" '3..Qn,v.3gN .1 : 1' A f x s. - .a', ::- - . 44.-9-,-,., ,x ,. 14.2 ,SMX Q: -NXQ3 .,iv2g3X?i'-g, '+f1'ffavQ'f'g. 3' . .iZIt3,igui:.x ,wr x, .. --'1' 4."'3 '7, , "Y .E L' ny.. . - K M .. .1 . - . "' x!Q4S,."E A' -fr: :XM ' - - ' .ac pta H, ,".f " .- - 254-ggf f'.?v 'iaicjj 513' Sys? lwzfii 2 5, .5 QQ' ,339 - gufg-. J I f-5 1 Q' if i ,, VZ. b S ' . -sf , gy my . . ,X-,Z if .- ' " ' -' 'gf ggfsfv i f A . n w Mznfw . 'H ai, fi . J if -f?X',f,'gv1+ QL, vw, 3 Lf. dz sd , ,A .NS I, .,,.,A, ,I Mfr. fy-'vw 2 qwszfu ex if. 'film 'A 2 fiifif W j.ti.4gj-fjs5,.sfi' n 1551: 1 -ff S?,5' i i 'L f on nk:-iQ,,,1 A wr : 1' -1-. - A 2, Lu' 1: .-QV 5,135.45 1 . W ww' " Y 5,131 , w , 2 f .. .Sma. "W1,., " - mf- k5?S?1'f3+? : V Sm! 2 il ' '7'::"' A .,:.,i wfAx,A 4' TQ V 2 , Eye' ,fr - L 1-'-' 1 pf r -'Z ,, -wr' 7 it . K ' A f , R, f' if L , STRANGE AS IT gl , i .. V, ,V MAY SEEM g n q 1, E, ,Q ,X ,Ulf-Qvw-fr 1 ai' fa F M3.5g..,.,,, ..,. ,...:3 5- I -vtzm,:,:wv1 , ,H Q if gi . , , ' ' ' 1 ,y-.,.,,w.-1,1 - . x.,,. --,.. . Page Ons Hundred Twenty One ' 5 X 51 'N 1 , +A, gg-F A - V ' Q7 9. 5, Q., x.,Q J ' A "ZA-2 ' ff nh, vvwfjlz X . vi. ,wi i, ly. if 5 ' V N a J X5'n.g:,1w v, SQ 5,5 A - 5 Mgfvyf 1 225' 1 ' 'frm' ,lx - ,, , M., ,...1.M.x,.M, X' . . ii: . .9 . ' -sfsgiviff .fffl 5 ,gf H. "' 1 f' ' 3 ' -' ,..,,--' ' efiliybu if I -2. School Day Happenings ,:, Nov. 18. Basketball-Alumni vs. Eureka-High school teams look very prcmising. Nov. 22. "Oh Doctor"--A Glee club production-Featured by distinctive songs. Nov. 23. Big E Dance-Well attended, well managed, - --- ---- ---- was had by all. . Dec Dec. Dec Dec Dec Dec. Dec Dec Jan. jan. J an. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. 7. Speech Arts Contest-Herbert Saffel, 2L and Evelyn Bagley, SH were the winners-Football feed-Greatly enjoyed by about forty-five football players-Prepared by Miss Mathews and the hospitality com- mittee. 9. Basketball-Eureka at Ferndale-Opening game of the season- Lightweight lose but heavies win. 14. 1 5. 1 6. 2 1 2 3 . 23-Jan. 4. Xmas vacation-Sandy Claus-Vacation was a godsend. 4. Alumni Dance-Oh these Alumni-What would we do without them? i Girls' League-Wliile the athletes attend the big E meeting. Leap Year Dance-Smiling girls escort blushing boys. Basketball-Fortuna at Eureka-Eureka takes both games. . Former principal, Mr. Jensen, speaks to the school on teehnoeracy. Senior Ball-Presented by the Hon. Senior--A very gay affair. 11. Student Body meeting. 13. Hi-Y Dance-Black Cats n'spooks n'ghosts n'everythin'. 14. Basketball-Eureka vs. Del Norte-Two more for Eureka. 20. 23. Mid-year-Everybody moves up a notch in their classes. What a batch e-f new scrubs, looking kind of scared--They had heard of the E. H. S. initiations probably. Talk by Dr. Sweet of Oak- land on dental hygiene. 27. Basketball-Eureka at South Fork-Eureka wins again. 28. Arcata at Eureka-Arcata hopes drown under basket-shooting of the Eureka squads-A great deal of spirit was evidenced on both sides. 1. Student Body meeting-Initiation of scrubs-Interesting antics by the scrubs-Greatly enjoyed by the assembled students. 3. Ferndale at Eureka-Eureka's lighties avenge defeat suffered earlier in the season-Heavies take listless tilt. 4. Girls' Hi-Jinx-Scrub girls performed for upper class girls. 8. Girls' League. . 10. Eureka at Fortuna--Two closely fought games-Gym packed to capacity-Eureka comes out on top in both games. X 4H Valentine Dance--Many students dancing-Good music. Page One Hundred Twenty Aug Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. l ' Q ' I . School Day Happenings . 22. Opening of school-Everybody glad to be back-renewing of old friendships and the making of new-and of course the taking up of the burdens. 7. Student body meeting-The new president, Rodney Walch, pre- siding along with all of the other new student body officers. 16. Noon dance-And Eureka-Alumni football game-Old and new stars in action--Alumni too good for the Loggers. 22 Football-Eureka vs. Arcata-Large crowds, plenty of noise--Eu- reka wins first C. I. F. encounter. 28. 3H dance-Red hot thythm-The Crystal Boys--a gay crowd. 1. Football-Eureka at Ferndale-described as tight game-thrills, spills, and a victory for the Eurekans. S. Student Body Meeting. 12. Girls' League Meeting-An hour of study for the boys--Wfhile the gals go parliamentary. 13. 4H dance-Bring back Prosperity-heh, heh-Guess they weren't expecting Roosevelt to turn the trick. 15. Football-Eureka at Grants Pass-Eureka put up a swell tussle but-Oh dear, Grants Pass 7, Eureka 0. 22. Football-Del Norte at Eureka-Plenty of suspense-But the Eu- reka boys showed their wares and came through with a 7 to 0 victory. 23-28. Institute week-No school--Students bewailing the fact that it wasn't a month-Hooray, no calendar for a week. 29. Football-Del Norte at Eureka-Night game-Eureka wins 6 to0. Nov. S. Football-Humboldt State at Eureka-The college had to struggle for it but they got it-Score: Eureka 0, Humboldt State 7. Nov. 8. Call for basketeers-Hopes high for championship teams-fans anxiously await first game. Nov. 9. Girls' League-Funny they don't have a boys' league, some say. Nov. 10. Girls' League Noon Dance--Short but sweet. Nov. 11. Armistice Day-Another brief respite-The final football con- test--Contestants: Fort Bragg vs. Eureka-Score: Eureka 0, Fort Bragg 13. Nov. 14. l'Wappin' Wharf',-Blood-thirsty pirates and their escapades thrilled the audience. Nov. 16. 3L Rat Race-Mickey Mouse became the pal of every high school boy and gal. . Page One Hundred Nineteen A 5 5 Y 1 bb Q 905 .af Q ' ,I x Q., 'QR Y' ' ' 1-is Q Y X I-3 ,ww ,W 'Y , . J' 5 f 'L '55 if . f , .557 'Z -9 '+ 1 r Q ' 5. sis ' 2 53133 " ' ,gli ' -1:35-,' mf f . -265 f' I-gsm? - ,A fn , X wig, 4. -"'-V. . ' , v rx? Q. 4 P K ,X 5:3 ew w , 1 ,W .s A t I , v ' , .. x, 5 -1 '-eg UF, 1 'I x v. ZX vii? Y 1 ' QE, lf., Q v' if iw :D is--' 1 I ', I - n 5 2' H fjfi . -I ' Lxwl V1.1 f 'f ' "Fe 5 F?" -' . ' f .x - 43,1 , i , 'Q I f , .K Q., f-f.Lv w 'R vb' ' 5, .4 .4 " 'V',1?Agg3 Q 7' k Q W, ek' . six Lf? 21- ' -J'-"ii -. , , :Ny .5354 . iff XJ' aj fin" 714 . V ,f,i,:, A--2 , P - K fi 15. 62,5 .J 1. :G lm, ' 2,3-:g:ff'2 V-w fi! v 1, 1 A'3"K?.f,f ' ' f 2:-fa.,-., -1 rj Q- gf . xg . H V A 7 f' ff f?"- 'Ev' 3, 1 .q ' ,fs ', 3 ' 6 giiglk-f X rt: Li I 5:,'3f5:LgJxa5.f , 1 -: ff' . ' F at ,gA,.f 2,34 glviggri I ,X-up ,tfy , . Ixj K .-mv 1' V Ng- Q J ga ' Yfj'5Qg, 3-fra' 53,-Qi 1 .N L' . . . 5-, - f'SfJ' 3353!- - 'H , I 4 -.. ,::.. ull.. . - ,Ns .:. 11 5 'I . .. 1 1. :- c. Q 4.,,1,: -,vw 1 n 'Q W' Page One Hunfred Eighteen 5 .. 4 , 115, , Eggs -44 . ,5 '2g.q3.:, 1. V gb '5f2i'S V45 Xl' , , M., vi' L K- Zt,tn , , -K -T- w 3 P - if X f ' + IUST AS THE CAMERA , s ' '4 - - -s. s f ""N.., , A J vAUGHT THEM. ..,xk.fE'4' ' kiykfk-i1?, : ' 4 .-- - ,M I , ' - ML 3 it ,'117K,. Q 1 . . , -, s L' f ,.,L K -'xx aff,-,Q -. 15'-J , My .,3- Y-f -' sq -fy V it-. am ix' ' W 43 4 ','x.2PE3g 1 J, , P A-JS' x 1 25,5 1 4 ' zittf X k I 't4J"'.9 ' WI 1 y 4 V ..-Vs' ,hr ' rl. X' it F3 21 ,ft-Q4 . ., NZ X- f K ' fx . f 'f'1Q4f-1'aei- K. -yy ffl.,-, ' - '-fl-7' -A27 ' . Tnfjff'-5 fe 5' - . ' -YK .- X fikiig Q91 In gfyifp 1 'i"5?WT"'1f""" V' X' ' -5 if Y A .Q Z 215-543 '-fs :L fi' 1' , H W Y . .ig-ggi.. . 5 l I 1 ,,..,- .A,. L. V in . M , N ' M5 T4 1' ,wf - ' " 5.474 -. 7 E m , 1: ,fQ'1:g.ig:g,,, 134 ,X : V is- .,. .K-'sw M , 1.. iff' - .viffifgv N , . 3- HM' ' f 'was , 1 O 101 Typing Department Everyone who has the opportunity should study typing, because it en- hances a person's chances of success. Typing will never prove a detriment no matter what vocation one may choose to follow. Aside from being a tool with which to do one's work, typing is character building. Perhaps you think this is a little far-fetched, but let me elucidate. Powers of concen- tration, which are necessary in all types of work, are developedg coordination of hand and eyes and the subjugation of the body to the mind is achievedg obedience, a characteristic of successful men and women in every walk off life, is stressed in the typing department. Another accomplishment that proves to be useful in other types of work is the dexterity of hand and mind that is gained in practicing typing. Typing also enlarges and enriches one's vocabulary because the material which is used for practice and tests is highly educational. The subject matter of the test material is well chosen and is written in an entertaining manner that helps to develop a good Writing style. Typing is an essential to anyone who is intending to enter the business world, not merely because of the ability to type but also because he gains the re- quirements of a good Worker: concentration, coordination, cooperation, and cheerfulness. Thus you Will agree that the mastery of typing is more than merely the acquiring of ability to use the typewriter. 4 Page One Hundred Seventeen -sswgi ' ??fKif5t fag-if .iffnffff t Ai, :fart X, E f . Q. ... ,.. s.-, -ru x.f.'f2.4f::f in A i 16 'fi"." f 1.612 Jsliwlifif 4 fl-Snr .u Jag , JA," L 1 . THQ F' 1, ,v . , Ja c ' 4 ' f'iei::i i"i'4 Y , 'J in I 4 ' 1 ,1f.. 4. z . .3 I 0 ft- 'lv 1 if I Jilin ..,x. .gh .N , . i 1 1 X we 4 -,, .i ra 2 5, ml iliifi, 1 gg a kg . 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'L Mal? 5: . ,,, , . .Ls -5, 5 1 WI. , , -,I 121. 1 iff: A ' lrfliff' ' -7' Q. av a .2 ig, 6 S . inf. ff' ' af 'sri if H5 ul, .V 3, N,-Q Q 3 W, ,,. gas - N 9 Mechanical Drawing 0 Drawing is the most universal of all means of expression. Engineers, architects, builders, and artisans of all nations use drawings to express their ideas and to solve their problems. Without drawing all progress in the in- dustrial world would be at a standstill. Mechanical drawing is recognized and taught in practically every high school and college in the United States, both for its cultural and for its tech- nical values. Its character building qualities cannot be overemphasized, es- pecially in developing constructive imagination and visualization. Mechanical drawing has always been an expensive subject for the stu- dents, even when they were able to buy their equipment through the school at wholesale prices. Now the depression has changed this condition materially to the student. From now on the school will furnish the mechanical drawing equipment the same as tools for work are furnished in the other departments of the school. One year ago the Lincoln Primary School Building was planned and the contract let through the high school drawing department with a saving of about S5,000. It is expected that the department will be called upon to build a similar building for the Marshall School in the near future. There is no doubt that the mechanical drawing department of the Eureka High School more than pays for itself in money saved and in service rendered. .v I V Ml? i Page One Hundred Sixteen fy. a Q .A I 4 ' l ' i i glth ffl A , .QQ : is ,. fsftigwg, ,. 1,84 . .5 ...S , J. 3, FA i,-4. za , t e QT za., - ' ,1 't fei. ,Q u Q it - , if .g:M'bQf5t+'g ,. g.:fff1i',-11, 35' -K am:-iw-f ftiiirf ' fr . .y ,511 ,..' . , ..,,.,,Q-..-.r,.- ft , .jgypysi 'I' W ,g A f. . i it it at l ,L f - " em : adams x - - lm "AM" "' -1f'ffT?if"f515-M., .1 Q . 'A' Home Making Department 2- The home making department is made up of the cooking and nutrition classes and the plain and second year sewing classes. The student may take either of the two, or both if she so desires. In the plain sewing class the objectives are the following: To help the student acquire a knowledge of fab- rics which should enable her to spend wisely her clothing allowance, to teach her to select with intelligence materials and styles suitable for underwear and dresses for the school girl for different occasions, to help her to become skilled enough to make all her own clothing as well as to make up with ease anything that requires sewing in the home, to develop the spirit of cooperation, and in the future to become a happier and more efficient home-maker. The knowledge of cooking and nutrition is an invaluable aid to the home-maker, and the course as taught in the Eureka High School tries to train the student in the following: an appreciation of the functions and im- portance of the home, the home as a business, a realizaion of the dignity in- volved in being a partner in the business of home-making whether as a wife or as one of the family, the importance of the home-makerys possession of a knowledge of the various departments of the home in order that the business may be a success, and knowledge of the cost and the value of foods. These are but a few of the most important objectives of the courses. Knowledge of what is expected of the home-maker and the ability to meet the requirements are two things which will help make happy homes. 1 s a -: 4 f - V, mfg . ' fab ' fyzfev vfgwi' ,L .f if ,-is at , 1: fi sf :lsr ap .asa . nf S-,jj 5. K 1' i1S'ilw" 4. , .5 si .' v. . J . ,EY . r.f5+?:'?'4, ' . 'J-,615 2,5 '52,-' ,'.' f A: -. 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K lf F it agiIs..x...a...'la-Xybkfi ' ' 'Q . i 2Tlf'Jiif1x'f'f - Q .4 5 r Ig hogs 'i',, hug ,sv . i a gf -'af . ,f t. ff i H..- V , 2 , ,vga-,x.gs,3a - 1 " , 'P 'UK Page One Hundret Fifteen , w Y ' . 1 f ' in 'Q Q , gasp rw ,Y LA Q s we 1 i -gl by-15. tg i ,U -Sfilg,-fa. fx X- V, segiggifr -wfffwiii' ' is Fifi? 1 :. .. iw, ' ,., , J . -if-YQ" " '- "',?ggfP','f1 is. Safes or - , 'f"'Qggf,'f . ,Iv , gm , , . A V,,,, . .str S , 5. Q qv gs Q Q 5 .4 r ii:- -.I 1 ' ' .ffm f F iff 'S 1: .i ' ' K ff -.s.,.3",1, X' T :f5,",'l.- -ff' 'Q..f..' is KN. ,T Talk' J .4 K 32,4 . . ,V . 1 e . fi, t . , 'ii X M A 1- . K-,,,5p?s' - - ff, a .1373 gn? Q as .gifs ..sf.siw.emwwmvmxsa-m4f sx 'Qi- . jj, gi., , i"1T'?.3f". f 3 f Y .- .1 . iff,-'Q -71 'iff' "- .i . , ,x , s 'A T' W 111' .., ' ,tj . f. ' i' .'J'V'?Vl4' . li 'ii 17' ,Kang w':i'i'.f3zQ5f4-:' tj: J 4' -' jg :',ivf'w,fL V. -15,551 5". A 11 f.,1,, ,.S- A- ,v-, Hjxltw' ,g,.gl--3.1.4-' X war JQJFY' '5,i?f-lima' ,iifjf Jflff 5- i 3555.241 5,4 -.Jaap . - 3, . .f 'g-qt. 1 fr. , I ,A ' awp .H , J , ' 'gif fl ix 4. ri ' 13? . Ak-2 Q ' . .-g - M 44. , . . Q V-, -,, , .. . -1'-1' - . - 1 .. x, ' Auto and Machine Shop 0 The social objectives of the course in automobile and machine shop work are to dignify productive labor, and to help students adapt themselves socially to a productive environment. The industrial objectives are to develop in the students their talent and power of analysis and initiative, to train them to be efficient and to have an appreciation of work done well, to develop self-confidence so that they may use their native ability when confronted with difficult problems, and to train them to a level whereby they may secure positions in the trades in which they are endeavoring to make a success. The projects which the students work on in the Eureka High School shops are the best available. They are practical and not practice operations. With the best equipped shop in Northern California, and the many worthy projects available, a student entering these fields has much better opportunities than are afforded in most other communities. Some concrete examples of the type of work being done in the shops are as follows: An incinerator that is used to burn all the rubbish from the high school and junior high plants, a complete concealed lawn sprinkler system for the senior and the junior high schools and for the Albee Stadium laid out and installed by the shop boys, and maintenance of the busses and bus equipment. Many other projects of like nature are being and have been carried on by A. A j the shop boys with a great saving to the taxpayers. 'f'ii!?1'2?' 5131's for 3 'wp ' Page One Hundred Fourteen QI ft V 4 Sill' - at ffl? ,"'xi,j,, ' gif' V513 FJ "' . - ,rw ff f. sf , ,Q-f. . at f-in iafvssfs r -' 4 ' ,' ,swan t . .. .tt QR ,t , . 'T if Qi'1fImqs.. ., ffi-'fi-'A-fi. -i 2125 .:. The Art Department -g - The Art Department of the Eureka High under the direction of Miss Borg offers such diversities as enameling, basketry, and art. Enameling is taught in a room entirely apart from the main Art room. There, such things as old cans, coat hangers, and plain pieces of wood are transformed into attractive containers, holders, hat stands, book stands, and many other useful and ornamental objects. This part of the department teaches the young girl to make helpful things for future use. This depart-- ment is also carried on in night school in order that the house wives may come to learn to make things which catch their feminine eye and taste. In the basketry department such things as trays, baskets, and hot dish plates are made. A student who Wishes to take enameling must take either basketry or plain art before she can do so. Such thin s as drawin ictures, which is the rimar lesson, makin g g P P Y 3 block cuts, painting posters, both for school and outside use, and making Christmas cards are accomplished in this main department of Art. Any art work that is to be done for the classes, clubs, or Girls' Lea ue is done b this g Y department. Many students who have taken art have been fortunate in receiving positions without any further training. This is a fine example of the voca- tional qualities that the Art Department has given to the students of our school. , is .K 2 .Q , 'v , ,gl . Af? 'V 1' , i. A 4 J b ,igwifff ' . N 5-,ck-kg 4. : S 'li' if " fl YZ 'SWT'-4 ,x -'wi' V- ' fe: t . , ,I 4 .ia -,fd ,ai W 3' 1 x A Af . , 5' - Q f:,,', ' TEM. - .r S K 'el ' , W5-.Q 4 in A aw' il L MT wr 1' 522 ,',,+r43'rfsQ gg wt 1,55 X af.. g, f'Y,f'1'?f"4 ' 'Si'A'x': L' s 2 + Y'-,T w 1 4, ,f ' w, 1,.-'vi'-1 M. 5, g vii 15' i Rig' 7 em 6, 'I H - AN . ,v yn! Xa will! if ,QR f x s X 1 il S v .s.t ,s , NSW' gfsiez-g'.','k 1 gig, K, 'na I it N im- si 1 5 fa?-if S-il gf, V f .sn . Y. lg, Nu. f 5 K . h1,faL,:,,fl' 'sary if ,,, 'f K Q3 -pa ,f-1 W . -4.,,Q f is 1 +,.f,-4: X , fx 4 ' ,,,,.,- J rl t , W. wx! ' F, E Q 5" . , . 5 . hbtbii ' Q I asia., umewvk-M! ,ik T'.-U-'YQ Q H: 2123. .'.7r sf" l f gif m 5 2 3??.lQ'Ei'L . gg f - . V. Page One Hundred Thirteen , i if 't A 3 Q ' N is ' '- 5. Z, in ' gag 'Z 'K I 3,1 Q ff 99 X' Nm S N df' fe 2 t- fazfv M QA: A ..r,, 5 ,Q 5, K it A n, 'iff if Nik Q Q -a..wass,, . ..ui.1A-,f'fii.i - i iii- xi ft?- 1 Sli .1 J 3 f t M 1 9 5 A I. Q Q fdifi .1. sf ft! lv .,, Y Q , fi- S 1 f it i., . A-N' , if . ,,-.He .,.,. .5 'EL .'-N43 . ' if i -Why A Printing Departmen . Modern times require modern education. Pupils need more than readin', writin', and 'rithmetic, and in the high school they Want more than ancient history, algebra, geometry, and foreign language. They want practical things and nearly everyone today realizes that there is really more educational value in practical things than in the old time cram and jam memory subjects. We really learn by doing, and doing something useful has the greatest educa- tional value and also offers vocational opportunties the schools must provide since the apprentice system of old is too onesided for a modern boy or girl. Printing in our high schools has become popular because is is a combin- ation of an educational and vocational subject. It deals with words, sentences, paragraphs articles-practical English- spelling, punctuation, division, paragraphing, and the like. It deals with art in the proper grouping, arranging, displaying, empha- sizing of words and sentences in the advertisement, article, sales letter, dod- gers, letter heads, cards, etc. and gives one the principles of design such as balancz, proportion, shape and color harmony, and fitness. It deals with mechanics, drawing, lettering, science and mathematics in the art of the presses and linotypes. It builds character, carefulness, accuracy, initiative, industry, speed, orderliness, co-operation, thoroughness, and tolerance. It is essential not only to the printer, the pressman, the linotype operator, but to the editor, publisher, ad writer and solicitor, and the printing salesman. Page One Hundred Twelve ' . .gg-A K. L ,. YB' 'T' j ' S: - ' .-.wa at .fag-,,,.. n , va. , .4 ...gh . , ff in , ,ses 'Z.'.'f P' -. . . lp ,ve to -f.' igggrftg D. .- ws- , " fit- if saw 1--.. V, -4c.iJ'z'- ' S , '-:mf a..1?wft,!'fz1-r- ng- N 'oodworking Department -3- Two phases of woodworking are emphasized in the course as it is taught in the senior high schoolg namely, the cultural or avocational phase, and the vocational phase. The cultural phase is emphasized for those students who are interested in the work for the pure joy they experience in developing their artistic talents through the medium of woodworking, while the voca- tional phase is emphasized for those who are interested in the possibilities of woodworking as a life occupation, and who are also interested in the com- mercial possibilities of the occupation. Students who are artistic by nature find in woodworking an excellent opportunity to express their temperament in beautiful and artistic designs executed in Wood, recognizing the beauty of the color and the figure in the woods, pleasing proportion, sound construction, and utility of the finished product. Students who are practical minded find in Woodworking an opportunity to express their ideas through the design and construction of practical pieces of work of acknowledged commercial value, such as cupboards, cases, chests, and all manner of mill cabinet Work. In making up these pieces, the same procedure is followed as is practiced in up-to-date commercial shops. Thorough instruction is given in scientific methods together with practice in the efficient use of the hand and machine tools using standardized methods Wherever possible. Page One Hundred Eleven ,. . :.w-si-Tuff.. L. v ,, , . ,nw kfgfls, , .xg y Iwi, aj 'lit 4 .Vi Y , , sg, ' v, . Z .Ii 1 ,. 1. ' Y P 34 - an vis! g ' 9, w 1113 .i .1 'Ps s..+i1'., 1 M 1' 15221 Lf. ,xi fi- . "Q: ' f'51iiil-it A fa - --'. K..-1, wr: . , . N ,. fi in i.'E'I'i 5134. if ws? , r r.: 1 'wr' f. ' 1 Q, lr", ,hiv Fw ',, M, - L? W QS: s, 5, '1 F G Q ' ' 1 ,li an .43 .gifs ".f-ring ,arf vga xxx, as XM., i .. sag +112 T aft!-j Jail' , ' 'Fifa' 1,4 A or , iv". y i ff'L?Li3.w i.:522s,f-iaftglii-iw. L, 1' 1 .imnut ti ,Q-X13 -an 3 I: 1 ,-L Y , fi K t A 3 5 4 1 Ei ' ! 3 r 'H i,,. X ' . if .ia , , 1,14 Lx Preview, Vocational Arts HE modern day school provides for not only the courses which are essentially preparatory for higher education but also courses which through actual experience furnished to the students will enable them to decide just what sort of work in which he prefers to become skilled. For the student who is not interested in purely scholastic pur- suits while in high school, is provided the vocational courses such as printing, typing, mechanical drawing, machine shop, commercial work, home making, and the like, which require skill in creative work and in manual labor. These courses are of unlimited value to the individual even if he or she does not wish to make that his life work. Such courses as home making, typing, machine shop, printing, woodworking, art, and mechanical drawing will always be of use at some time or other regardless of what the vocation is. No two students desire exactly the same course of study. Some wish courses which contain the elements of the vocational and the literary, while others turn to the vocational courses as much as possible. In any case the student must take the required subjects of the school whether he likes them or not. Thus the vocational depart- ments are becoming an increasingly vital part of the mod- ern high school, helping to round out the curriculum which has been evolved through the demands of the parents and students themselves. " A 'W . . '- e Eureka Hlgh-Eureka Hlgh a Eureka High, you are the only school for me, Q And that is why to. you we all will loyal be. Our red and green, victorious always can be seen. We come and go so all will know, , A ' How true to you we are, Eureha'High., I Eureka High, you are the only school And that is why to you we all will loyal he.i Our red and green, victorious always can he seen. We come and go so all will know, How true to you we are, Eureka High. Page One Hundred, Ten gs was host to the members of the graduating class of January 1933. The affair was formal but informal attire was permissible. 'The members of the faculty and their husbands and wives were the guests of the evening. An entertaining and lively dance sponsored by the Hi-Y club was pre- sented Friday the thirteenth of january. The decorating theme centered around black cats and other recognized symbols of ill luck. Several prizes were awarded during the course of the dance. An unusually large crowd was in attendance. Music was furnished by the Sequoians. Many clever costumes featured the Girls' Hi-Jinx held February 4 in the girls' gymnasium. Everyone came dressed to represent an advertisement and the result was that the scene took on the appearance of, a burlesque rather than a dance. The fete was a combination Jinx and Big and Little Sister party. The low sophomore girls were guests of the upper class girls. "Cupid's Cut Up" was the clever name for a well attended dance given by the 4I'I class, February 15. Many surprises were given the dancers, the special feature of the program was a tap dance by Miss Claire Anderson. The dance hall was decorated in accord with the Valentine's Day season, and the Sequoians under the direction of Rew Melendy furnished the music. Amid streamers of red, yellow and green, couples swayed to the rhythm of 'the Sequoians' music at the Mardi Gras held after school in the girls' gymnasium, February 29, and sponsored by the alumni group under the direction of Mr. Morgan. Although owing to a heavy downpour of rain, there was a marked scarcity of fancy costumes, the spirit of the occasion was not dampened a whit and the dance proved to be a merry affair. The semi-annual Big E dance was held as usual in the Masonic Auditorium April 28. A very large crowd enjoyed the affair, and the scene was certainly a picturesque one as the gay throng of students and alumni danced beneath profuse streamers of red and green. The large E on the stage added much to the beauty and attraction of the picture. Many new sport outfits were in evidence among the fair sexg that alone would have made the scene an at- tractive one without the decorative streamers. Musical accompaniment to the dancing was furnished by the Collegians Orchestra. The ZH class expended all of its latent energy in the presentation of the Bunny Hop in the girls' gym April 26. The dance hall was decorated in keeping with the Easter season, mainly the bunny or rabbit theme was in evidence. One of the prizes which were given out to the lucky ticket-holder was a darling little white bunny. And was the lucky person tickled pink. Another of the attractions was the punch. The music was furnished by the Sequoians. Page One Hundred Nine Highlights Of The .I Social Season To the strains of the music played by the Crystal Boys, a guest orchestra which was visiting the school at the time, one of the largest dance crowds in the history of the Eureka High, glided and swayed, at the High Junior Barn Dance on September 28. More than two hundred and tweny students danced to the music of the Sequoians at the noon dance, September 30. This party was the second of a series which was sponsored by the Excalibur Club for the benefit of the 1933 Sequoia. "Bring Back Prosperity", was the password at the High Senior Dance held October 6. The dance was unique in that the tickets were in the form of money and the candy which was given out during the dance represented gold dollars. Rew Melendy's Sequoians played the tunes to which the happy the 31. class dance presented in the girls' gym, November 15. Pictures of Mickey Mouse scattered around the hall formed the main 'decoration while streamers of yellow and green added to the colorful effect of the scene. Elaborately decorated with red and green streamers and a large red E, the Masonic Auditorium made an attractive setting for the semi-annual Big dance presented by the Varsity E club, November 23. Aside from the throng danced. Mickey Mouse became very much in evidence at the "Rat Race", which many students from the high school, a number of graduates of the school and students home for the holidays enjoyed the affair. The music was furnished by Guy Libera's orchestra A novel entertainment in the form of a Leap Year Dance was presented by the Girls' League, December IS. The usual form was reversed, the boys waiting to be asked for the dances and the girls doing the asking. The hall was decorated with streamers representing the colors of the various schools of the county. The focal center of the scene was a Christmas tree gaily be- decked with streamers of red and green. The semi-annual Senior Ball was held December 23 in the Masonic Auditorium. A large crowd of students and many alumni attended the gay affair dancing to the tunes of the Collegians until midnight. Taking the place of the Junior-Senior Banquet, the Junior Senior Dance was held at the Women's Club house on J street, January 12. The SH class Page One Hundred Eight lug- lhe Sequoians -g- The Sequoians as pictured are the main standbys of the school in the matter of music at school dances. Rew Melendy is the leader and manager of the group as well as being the accordionist. This group plays for many dances outside of the regular school dances, and they play for nearly every school dance. Considering the fact that those in the orchestra are going to school and must find time to work on their music outside of school, they present excellent music. The drummer, Raymond Poscic, is a veritable fountain of jazzy thuds and other syncopated noises. The Sequoians made possible the presentation of the Excalibur noon dances by donating their services so that the entire proceeds of the dance could be used to help finance the Sequoia. The orchestra usually adds to the ornamental effect of the dance hall since they usually dress in keeping with the theme of decorations which is being emphasized at the dance. . The members of the Sequoians range from scrubs to seniors in their classes and the sad part of it is that Rew Melendy, the old maestro, is on the outgoing freight with the rest of the members of the June class. It is hoped that the Sequoians will continue to function as a unit, and the school will not be deprived of their services. The Sequoians are June Melendy, pianog Howard Lewis, trumpetg Leo Paulus, saxaphoneg Rew Melendy, accordian, and Raymond Poscic, drums. . 5 sz, , Page One Hundred Seven - if .'?."e i f? fi? Fifi? avg .f..',L 1 . tiqwxvtt FY' fi 2 , , , ,avi-!f+?3.w,s.f ,iJJi?I'akr.i .. .Q .vhs 5.31. ,s i ,li Q .Rf .'. l. -Lg.. so . .QW , 255397-' "if A 'T 5 . .s i W . . .ii . N, 1 1-., 1. Q iam Y . .gy L ifiis ,t , Eureka Hi Orchestra q, The Eureka High School Orchestra is usually called upon to render the musical part of the majority of the speaking and dramatic programs given in the junior and senior high schools. Thus it adds much to the enjoyment of these events. This service which it renders the school is of great value to the school and also to the individuals in the orchestra as they receive oppor- tunity to play in public, thereby increasing their accomplishments in their work. The orchestra took part in the annual music festival at Arcata and also the combined glee clubs and orchestra concert given in the junior high auditorium. Both of these events were held in the spring semester. Professor Flower's prodigies are Barbara Early, Aieli Eggert, Jeanette Dougherty, Doris Gunderson, Dorothy Gottchalk, Gladys Hinman, Curtis Kness, Howard Lewis, George Leese, Ino Laakso, Veronica Quinn, Evelyn Quarnheim, Grace Robinson, jean Ross, Wfalter Schocker, lirnest Reed, Malcolm Sears, Ensie Wirtgi, Ora XVilson, Sandy Wfilson, and Mabel Nellist. Page One Hundred Six . ff: 'i3?f.f f ' 'I ,ei , , -x,.5,f- ' Q -25 ,Q J 4 g yn. . ' fgcf 7' .' 'ggvggw V , a-. ,Jai ,,. A-A of Rf sei , s, .u,.a.- , .K ,A-. , j ,r,,Mgf.:v ,V r 1,1 - -4, ' -' ' , ,f..,,.7r M1 I ie Eureka High SchoolBand L The band is an organization which is in constant demand. At the games everyone looks forward to hearing the band play, for nothing adds to the color of a scene more than the band and its music. Both Junior High PS F.. School and Senior High School pupils take part in the activities of the band ,.. under the able direction of Professor "Pop" Flowers. This year the band took an active part in the annual music festival held at the Teachers' College in Arcata playing two pieces as an individual group and two pieces in cooperation with the other participating bands. The members of the band are as follows: Barbara Early, Aieli Eggert, Jeanette Dougherty, Doris Gunderson, Dorothy Gonrchalk, Gladys Hinman, Howard Lewis, Curtis Kness, George Leese, Ino Laakso, Irving Manson, Dorothy Nelson, Virginia Nelson, Julian Obara, Raymond Poscic, Veronica Quinn, Evelyn Quarnheim, Grace Robinson, Jean Ross, Walter Schocker, Ernest Reed, Malcolm Sears, Lyn Stewart, Vieno Taskinen, Merle Thomas, Martha Sunnari, jack Wallace, Ensie Wirta, Ora Wilson, and Sandy Wilsypn. , Page One Hundred PIVG E3?5A:g,:f25,f ,W if S 1 f:f,5vf?f5' ' a 'Y .A A ,If V, X , 1. Q' ,f , .ahh .Li V. -, f , ,qu , , ,L ,gf .Sr M 'lg .1 .f if- E 'T T F? f'i.i ai' , .. 71' , 4, 4 .',.'i-X! lil" .- ip' 1 x ia ,L , ms, 31, A , . is . ,V 1. '.. "' - ?,',"' ! ,, . .t 9 ,Wirral , J'kr, .A , ' i:fi'?i3,' " s 19 4 vii' -Nag 4' ,. , Tsai "Ti ii H? 5 . gi lf , .3 E ,X 1 if i . ' Affli- . g E14 1 ia f ,T 1' 'iff fr ,inf img, ' . - 11:5 'Cf s ,aw . u, . . rEy"?H we " - 7 1 ', Girls' Glee Club 9' 5 Pu 1:0 U Q Girls' Glee Club 9 The Girls' Glee Club is one of the most popular of the girls' organizatiions in the school.. Enrolling some 170 girls, it is larger than it ever has been before and is steadily increasing. Its contributions to the social and musical life of the school are numerous. There is no depression when one is singing and possibly that is one of the reasons for the great number of girls enrolled in the club during these times when everyone is taking the depressionistic viewpoint. At the glee club and orchestra concert last Febraury, the numbers pre- sented by the Girls' Glee Club constituted about half of the program. The girls' octette has accepted several invitations to entertain at outside functions and has everywhere met with the highest praise. Much practice- and patience is required of these girls who devote extra time to the perfecting of the octette. The members of the group are Olive Crothers, Marjorie Bull, Lois Wing, Melba Corsetti, Elaine Haley, Jean Davis, Mary Samons, and Virginia Stuart. ' The annual music festival at the Arcata Teacher's College is the big aifair of the season for the glee clubs. All of the schools in the neighboring vicinity send their glee clubs to represent them in the music meet. The musicfestival is presented with the idea of furthering interest in music and glee club Work, and competent judges pass criticism on the technical points as they see them in connection with the performance of each glee club. This year the Girls' Glee Club took part as usual, singing two beautiful selections. Once yearly the boys and girls of both glee clubs combine to give an entertainment for the mutual enjoyment of both. This year the entertain- ment was in the'form of a dance held in the gym, May 2. One of the interesting features of the glee clubs is the regular monthly presentation of a program consisting of talent discovered among the mem- bers of the club. Occasionally guest entertainers are enjoyed, but the majority of the entertainers are members of the club. The outstanding project of the year was the operetta, "Oh Doctor", participated in by both glee clubs. The majority of those in the Girls' Glee were in the choruses, and the following members took leading parts: Melba Corsetti, Mary Samons, Emma Cox, June Melendy, Lillian Carter, Frances Metcalf, Lois Wing, and Beverly Scott. The officers during the fall semester were president, Melba Corsetti, vice- president, Laura Haugan, secretary, Estella Flaherty, treasurer, Jean Mc- Donald, sergeants-at-arms, Helen Hurbutt, Lucille Canepa, and Helen Domaz. The officers for the spring term were president, Olive Crothers, vice- president, Nedra Bowman, secretary, Helen Ruzic, treasurer, Jean Davis, sergeants-at-arms, Virginia Stuart, Merle Tausch, Lillian Carter, and June Melendy. Page One Hundred Three is is ,. az' 'Za Us vt . Slit?- Pvk . 1, ,M , . q i' 4, ' g 1 Am Y'f'f 4 . 'M 'Fig 9 . J, ibfffil z , 1 . WM fi xp , J, X "4 . . 1 r .is,.a , in 0 'l Q -5-H 3,5 .m Q er , ...I 3 I , , icagxlai H. xi? ffifai, fi.. I U' -fit 1 ' efsif 1-I -'x- :J ga- -. , 4.4, "Hi: 1 -4 . . ,. Je' 'CJ 015351 'G 43. mf? . . A1 f, if-51 W? -' . ,, ip! ,-. P01 vista '7 i' . Boys' Glee Club . This year, as usual, the Boys' Glee Club took an important part in school music and dramatics. A new feature of the organization is a male quartet, which has sung for various musical programs. Together with the Girls' Glee, the club presented the clever two-act musical comedy, "Oh Doctorn, in November. Miss Pearl Jacobson directed both the music and the dialogue for this production, as well as the various choruses. The following members of the Boys' Glee took leading parts: Elmo Sarvis, Harold Charters, George Burwell, Raymond Poscic, Harry Massagli, Paul Blend, Rodney Walch, Wilbur Kammerzell, Ervin Hadley, Terry Karas. Darrell Connick, and Ray Qglesby. The Boys' Glee also was largely responsible for the success of the com- bined Glee Clubs and Orchestra concert given in February. The officers for the group for the autumn term were president, Terry Karas, vice-president, jack Mackey, secretary, joe Malloy: treasurer, Cor- rado Pinochi: sergeants-at-arms, Kearney, Bauer, Crisp, and Sievert. During the spring semester the officers were president, Blaine Boice, vice- president, Corrado Pinochig secretary, Joe Malloy: treasurer, Joe Hinch: sergeants-at-arms, Fanucchi, Malin, Karas, and Sandberg. Page One Hunilrecl Two 16'-V 3 fi, X ,, , 1151. W iff, ,, 4-wr' 'r,?"1, . riff .' f. 4, ' i...g5' K ' "' . in 4 - .M 1:,Y ,.L A in Yuafs, easy, as ...-,,.,a .F , -- ' MH" Tue 'Y 37, i-?f5s.sa-, ,- O Those who take part in the contest must be speakers of no little talent because of the way in which they are selected. Speeches on the subject which has been chosen for each class are delivered in every English class, the winner from each English class competing in turn with the winners of the other English classes in his division. The winner of this elimination contest is en- titled to speak in the finals against two other speakers in whichever division of the contest he happens to be. The contest is divided into two divisions. The ZL, ZH, and SL classes are in the lower division while the SH, 4L, and 4H classes make up the upper division. A winner of each division is chosen and the two winners arc honored by having their names engraved on the Speech Arts cup. The victors in the contest for this year were Herbert Saffel of the 2L class and Evelyn Bagley of the SH class. The contestants and the subjects upon which they spoke were as follows: Herbert Saffel of the QL class, Centenary of Sir Walter Scottg Sulo Paaso of the 2H class, Washington Bi-Centennialg June Solee of the SL class, Mahatma Gandhi, the patriot and the mang Evelyn Bagley of' the SH class, Whither Germanyg Louise Carter of the 4L class, affirmative of the question, Should the Philippines have their independencc?g Ora Wilson of the 4H class, neg- ative on the same question. Page One Hundred One ' ig I affirms, ,qsfixl z Speech-Arts Contest O Y' Ng, - K 5. fsgd fi X. i 3 ini-flaw . lift W '35z", ,Jr 5 A vi 4, . - , , . . f' f , ,fi-5 '.i ,Y in .S .. , A W ,M .E ,rim 4 ,Q- gf Z if xx, A sg ,. , , Af Q 5 ,' WK A? ,i" B .N Iii ' T ,a .K ., . f I Q ff ,g 1wwQ S' w ., 'flfdli Y PM . Q ,, .V ,y 4 '24 ., :six-5, 'ydigggg 'L r Kamxiil J, X 5- , . . T tl ,if . gui v. , Q mi: - ML At... 4, ..'?5?f 1431'- 3 'Y in .1 X. 1 ... .wx-we - ,, .cl ...N S gag lia3::r.f 4 ,,,,,,. 'E Llk'!.!1'n,.L1 Q S G 3 .',,V,.. c 1 fu. 'S Sams L- 2 W .. , 'wifi it .',,. 1i,"1',:'f'1i- ia. if A E452 kv . ' Operetta, "Oh Doctor" , One of the outstandinig productions of the year was the operetta, "Oh Doctor!" presented on November 21 and 22 in the Junior High auditorium, and directed by Miss Pearl Jacobson. A large chorus was one of the features of the production. The leading role of Dr. Drinkwater was well interpreted by Harold Charters. Melba Corsetti, as Honor, pleased the audience with her charming voice. The cast, in order of appearance was: Ur. Drinkwater ,,,,,, Harold Charters Bessie ,,,, ,, Helen llomaz Mrs. Weakly ,,,,,, ,,,,., J une Melendy Philip ,,.. ..,. G eoi-ge Burwell Mrs. Lrossly ..... Emma Cox Jim .,,,.,...i.,. .. Raymond Oglesby Dr Slaughter ..,,. ,,,,. E lmo Sarvis Old Timer ,r,. ,,,, D arrell Conniek Dr. Cutteni ,,,,, ....,, H arry Massagli Hob ,,,,,,,r,, ,,,, I iodney VValch Dr. Coffin . , .,,..., Raymond Poscie Cynthia .,., ,,,.. l ,illian Carte:- Rainbow ,..., .,r. W ilbu" Kammerzell Manuel .,,,,,, ,r..,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, P aul Blend Honor ,.,.,,..,,,,, ,,..,.,,,, M elba Corsetti Characters in the ballet: - QQ Madame Chere .,,,r,,, Frances Metcalf The Pilgrim ,,r,.,,,,...,,,, Ervin Hadley ,i i""7 Glory Drinkwater .,,rr. Mary Samons The Goddess ,,,, ,....... L ois Wim.: Pancho , ,,,,,,,,,,,,, , ...,,, Terry Karas The Nymph , ,.,,,,,,,,,,,,, Beverly Scott 5315-.."5tl 'R " ' ' ?.,,s1t,'2f.q.,Q - Q 'ji T 5- if 'X' 'ig ' fill i A Page One Hundred .43 a'1't'1f2?' no if 11- - 1 M.: . "rx Aff, f' . JMR? :jf ji. 1 - ,ik-..:f " . a'-.. ,S - A 4 . L. I ' - W' :gg5f2Ygl?q33.wi'71f1:-- . -. ,. 'Q X .vfnL"v"4.ru' fire"-' , . . - 1 P A ,-.., . 9 " Wappin Wharf" O "Wappin Wharf" by Charles Brook was presented for the public last autumn by the drama department under the direction of Miss Ruby Powell. The play is termed by its author, a "frightful comedy of pirates" which the audience found to be true, not long after the curtain had gone up. The plot centered about a girl and a boy in the clutches of a band of "bloodthirsty pirates", who are finally brought to justice. Ervin Hadley as the pirate captain, and Blaine Boice and Leslie Kelly as Duke and Patcheye, respectively, were exceptionally well cast. Mary Burns did a remarkable piece of characterization. The complete cast was as follows: Duke V..,., ...t,v,,, Blaine Boice Patcheye ,,t,t,t ,t,t,t , Leslie Kelly Captain of the pirates ..,t Ervin Hadley Red Joe ,,,,,,,,tt,.......,., ,,,, R obert Turner Darlin' tt,, , t,t, Mary Burns Betsy Yeett tttr May Holm Old Meg ,,,,, ,,t,t,t,t , t,,,.,..,,,,,,i,o,...,,t,t.oi.., ,t,t,,,,,, Y , 7, Frances Hinds Sailors r Y Corado Pinochi, Howard McGowan, Jack Pidgeon ,Q Page Ninety-nine f 1 :cf-. L r i w- LSQQV9 , w I 3 ,'5'i1Q L 5..f.x ' ' Sri gif if 5 ' tb r . El Y' 1- is ,Q K vi. .,-y, :A t f 332:51 Sf 1 f l at ' .Jw .- . ' K - - rf we W . at it 55, 3: J ., ,gf 2 i w?i2'f-P I Q K sn, xl 3-H, ' ' . ,l t, 1 , Q f Y f f- 2 f iw. .. ,wx 1 r 1' ,1f'2w rr in 3 463. is zu: aa K . X 7 3 5- '- . QT? , 3' xi is . Y- A-3.5! X f K -xi! 15: ' T' H' L 'v Q. . . A 'wi . . lg Q, f 5' iffy . M -s .Q , ,Mg . ,V Q Q, Q: Y. -'sg 1.zH2gf",1ii'g,f , . , fi K,-J. ,-,js-3, ' ' Qgfsifl tffifgfffss iAa4,L:'Qiai -f , .Ei ygiepfgf ffm it a If : ir A1 it --wg Ng ips time ' 31555 2 - .r wi? i'ii'.'fEss1iff4ff r.w.i,,: ., get 31 in s ' Tsai? tum-3941, F f .k A .qffi laws - i'?ti??? 'i ifir if i F5 i i figf f i 7 i ai ., . TFY f' ' Q ,g5,,, V",,.i3.! . 313' " .r,.- N f 7'.f,-Q,-gfiiflg ., ,wi-,,fLi'1 f-r - U-tj. f ' 4 - ar,.ly r , pnwirii Elbrffwa WJ A Za. r -tnyrv gtg .Mr ,. it , . M ku K 1 . l V ,, ,- .M -if . 4 ,ag,..i,, rl, 9 'vi It ,wggi :kgI.Lu..a , www a- 5 3 r ia: un-'VQQAQ M, 0 -is UL -i, f.. "axe -'9 t 4 --.iii Q if .yin-iaiwxxff-555 ' v.',,V, -aim . , 7 il .L i , . a 4 p f-'.' ' at - is e " 'js 4-.frwyfh - s5a4i'x!ffi fmag f my waxy-4, A , ' z-,t fi' v?'r+5f'Y , it M 1 a+,-fiiwfidf-A'least Y s -,Gaia 1,,gi,,f5g Q, ge, .L are is is as - it r 1 'V f L, ' 'Apr ?QfQT1e Q e r ,grae f at 9 -Qf fg A NJN f iff 5, 'Xin Q, 1? f gdicii X ' - t wi . it 4 .1 ' f3"'f -' - iiiflfliiiriigi A r . X. G' H Wm,,,,iff his ,A K L . .pi5g3ii,..,gi.,,gL,, M......af.W..,.sa,t,mam:mwimf1'ai zz.vL -i.,m:- '7"tf"'.zf - --f ix' T fL"Tf.4 .. ,,7',.f Wt -,,rw..q yy- .qi , ,LA' fu .H o Q. Eureka High- Eureka High . - -- ......iT Eureka High, are the only school for me, And that is why to you we all will loyal be. Our redaml green, victorious always can be seen. We come and go so all will know, - How true to you we are, Eureka High. Eureka High, you are the only Sfhool for me, And thai is why to you we an waz zoyu be. Our red and green, victorious always can be seen. We come and go so all will know, How trueto you we are, Eureka High. Page One Hundred Ten l was host to the members of the graduating class of January 1933. The affair was formal but informal attire was permissible. The members of the faculty and their husbands and wives were the guests of the evening. An entertaining and lively dance sponsored by the Hi-Y club was pre- sented Friday the thirteenth of january. The decorating theme centered around black cats and other recognized symbols of ill luck. Several prizes were awarded during the course of the dance. An unusually large crowd was in attendance. Music was furnished by the Sequoians. Many clever costumes featured the Girls' Hi-Jinx held February 4 in the girls' gymnasium. Everyone came dressed to represent an advertisement and the result was that the scene took on the appearance of a burlesque rather than a dance. The fete was a combination Jinx and Big and Little Sister party. The low sophomore girls were guests of the upper class girls. "Cupid's Cut Up" was the clever name for a well attiended dance given by the 4H class, February 15. Many surprises were given the dancersg the special feature of the program was a tap dance by Miss Claire Anderson. The dance hall was decorated in accord with the Valentine's Day season, and the Sequoians under the direction of Rew Melendy furnished the music. Amid streamers of red, yellow and green, couples swayed to the rhythm of the Sequoians' music at the Mardi Gras held after school in the girls' gymnasium, February 29, and sponsored by the alumni group under the direction of Mr. Morgan. Although owing to a heavy downpour of rain, there was a marked scarcity of fancy costumes, the spirit of the occasion was not dampened a whit and the dance proved to be a merry affair. The semi-annual Big E dance was held as usual in the Masonic Auditorium April 28. A very large crowd enjoyed the affair, and the scene was certainly a picturesque one as the gay throng of students and alumni danced beneath profuse streamers of red and green. The large F. on the stage added much to the beauty and attraction of the picture. Many new sport outfits were in evidence among the fair sexg that alone would have made the scene an at- tractive one without the decorative streamers. Musical accompaniment to the dancing was furnished by the Collegians Orchestra. The 2H class expended all of its latent energy in the presentation of the Bunny Hop in the girls' gym April 26. The dance hall was decorated in keeping with the Easter season, mainly the bunny or rabbit theme was in evidence. One of the prizes which were given out to the lucky ticket-holder was a darling little white bunny. And was the lucky person tickled pink. Another of the attractions was the punch. The music was furnished by the Sequoians. Page One Hundred Nine Highlights Of The .I Social Season To the strains of the music played by the Crystal Boys, a guest orchestra which was visiting the school at the time, one of the largest dance crowds in the history of the Eureka High, glided and swayed, at the High Junior Barn Dance on September 28. . More than two hundred and tweny students danced to the music of the Sequoians at the noon dance, September 30. This party was the second of a series which was sponsored by the Excalibur Club for the benefit of the 1933 Sequoia. "Bring Back Prosperity", was the password at the High Senior Dance held October 6. The dance was unique in that the tickets were in the form of money and the candy which was given out during the dance represented gold dollars. Rew Melendy's Sequoians played the tunes to which the happy the 3L class dance presented in 'the girls' gym, November 15. Pictures of Mickey Mouse scattered around the hall formed the main decoration while streamers of yellow and green added to the colorful eifect of the scene. Elaborately decorated with red and green streamers and a large red E, the Masonic Auditorium made anattractive setting for the semi-annual Big dance presented by the Varsity E club, November 23. Aside from the throng danced. I Mickey Mouse became very much in evidence at the "Rat Race", which many students from the high school, a number of graduates of the school and students home for the holidays enjoyed the affair. The music was furnished by Guy Libera's orchestra A novel entertainment in the form of a Leap Year Dance was presented by the Girls' League, December 15. The usual form was reversed, the boys waiting to be asked for the dances and the girls doing the asking. The hall was decorated with streamers representing the colors of the various schools of the county. The focal center of the scene was a Christmas tree gaily be- decked with streamers of red and green. The semi-annual Senior Ball was held December 23 in the Masonic Auditorium. A large crowd of students and many alumni attended the gay affair dancing to the tunes of the Collegians until midnight. Taking the place of the Junior-Senior Banquet, the Junior Senior Dance was held at the Women's Club house on J street, January 12. The 3H class Page One Hundred Eight ng- lhe Sequolans ng- The Sequoians as pictured are the main standbys of the school in the matter of music at school dances. Rew Melendy is the leader and manager of the group as Well as being the accordionist. This group plays for many dances outside of the regular school dances, and they play for nearly every school dance. Considering the fact that those in the orchestra are going to school and must find time to Work on their music outside of school, they present excellent music. The drummer, Raymond Poscic, is a veritable fountain of jazzy thuds and other syncopated noises. The Sequoians made possible the presentation of the Excalibur noon dances by donating their services so that the entire proceeds of the dance could be used to help finance the Sequoia. The orchestra usually adds to the ornamental effect of the dance hall since they usually dress in keeping with the theme of decorations which is being emphasized at the dance. The members of the Sequoians range from scrubs to seniors in their classes and the sad part of it is that Rew Melendy, the old maestro, is on the outgoing freight with the rest of the members of the June class. It is hoped that the Sequoians will continue to function as a unit, and the school will not be deprived of their services. The Sequoians are June Melendy, piano, Howard Lewis, trumpet, Leo Paulus, saxaphoneg Rew Melendy, accordian, and Raymond Poscic, drums. Page One Hundred Seven of-ai :Qf.'4VI - f' ff " ' .ve f:5xEl?'fl'?5A5-x:.g a J'4'iLli':5'zii-, . rs :i,s.i"f7Z" -gr T5 'H .ff .52 ,, sg, K. r i :gk-r.',P-ikufsj , . ,A ,-. . -- .s , , 5. iii? l X ,-QU., ' 1 C' ' ' 5 s."' . S ,A-V V Pe... Y.,,1 , , Eureka H1 Orchestra , The Eureka High School Urchestra is usually called upon to render the musical part of the majority of the speaking and dramatic programs given in the junior and senior high schools. Thus it adds much to the enjoyment of these events. This service which it renders the school is of great value to the school and also to the individuals in the orchestra as they receive oppor- tunity to play in public, thereby increasing their accomplishments in their work. The orchestra took part in the annual music festival at Arcata and also the combined glee clubs and orchestra concert given in the junior high auditorium. Both of these events were held in the spring semester. Professor FloWer's prodigies are Barbara Early, Aieli Eggert, Jeanette Dougherty. Doris Gunderson, Dorothy Gottchalk, Gladys Hinman, Curtis Kness, Howard Lewis, George Leese, Ino Laakso, Veronica Quinn, Evelyn Quarnheim, Grace Robinson, jean Ross, Wfalter Schocker, Ernest Reed. Malcolm Sears, Ensie Wirtgi, Ora Wfilson, Sandy Xvilson, and Mabel Nellist. Page One Hundred Six ., gif. 4:-7 f X. .fg'5- ,Al X "W if-. P . H Liv,-' i-in A 'M c , :Y-fc .,,. X ive. . A ,4,A1 YA 'b ' 3 ' ' 4- ,-t,g'f1f,Q...,- ssArn,,,- :Ji ggi' 2 , .x f .-,. The Eureka High -:I Q, ',,A' Q School Band 'T ,ty 2 1' 'Sm' gli? ' 3 -'2 tl 1 , ,xr -1. ,i fr-4' K VM.. xl ao- : f i Yi Q '-it ut .. , , 9Q!.'f,--915355 am ! .,.- , 4 ,u ,ns ., f I .H by ftyuqs .,. W ,sr 045 ,Mil fl 324 ,XE . .vig , a The band is an organization which is in constant demand. At the games everyone looks forward to hearing the band play, for nothing adds v to the color of a scene more than the band and its music. Both Junior High School and Senior High School pupils take part in the activities of the band 1 ' under the able direction of Professor "Pop" Flowers. This year the band took an active part in the annual music festival held at the Teachers' College in Arcata playing two pieces as an individual group and two pieces in cooperation with the other participating bands. The members of the band are as follows: Barbara Early, Aieli Eggert, I-653 Jeanette Dougherty, Doris Gunderson, Dorothy Gottchalk, Gladys Hinman, ' ' Howard Lewis, Curtis Kness, George Leese, lno Laakso, Irving Manson, Dorothy Nelson, Virginia Nelson, Julian Obara, Raymond Poscic, Veronica 4 Quinn, Evelyn Quarnheim, Grace Robinson, Jean Ross, Walter Schocker, Ernest Reed, Malcolm Sears, Lyn Stewart, Vieno Taskinen, Merle Thomas, 'I ,I Martha Sunnari, Jack Wallace, Ensie Wirta, Ora Wilson, and Sandy Wilipn, H Page One H1 ndred Five ' ,T Q' ' fir? f - aff? Pl at f 2 .efiffi ' Q ' f fbi- ,KAV il Ska' W X v , Y , , 412612 , , - -' ffiJa:Qffa'e-is 7-Fha We-ff,-c:i3'f"'51:l', Ju. .3 , Jlaay' ,4g'fqf'1- - vi Ts., -N ' 5873 ,.a. " Girls' Glee Club 0' 'S' Pug l"f'3'3Y,"i15 .. E . 32.1 '13.'..:i9 .. .. ., Qfwgg . i' .M ' . , .' - A tl-'1' ' .- -'M . 0 Ollv Humlzud F1 ' Girls' Glee, Club 0 The Girls' Glee Club is one 'of the most popular of the girls' organizatiions in the school. Enrolling some 170 girls, it 'is larger than it ever has been before and is steadily increasing. Its contributions to the social and musical life of the school are numerous. There is no depression when one is singing and possibly that is one of the reasons for the great number of girls enrolled in the club during these times when everyone is taking the depressionistic viewpoint. ' At the glee club and orchestra concert last Febraury, the numbers pre- sented by the Girls' Glee Club constituted about half of the program. The girls' octette has accepted several invitations to entertaingat outside functions and has everywhere met with the highest praise. Much practice and patience is required of these girls who devote extra time to the perfecting of the octette. The members of the group are Olive Crothers, Marjorie Bull, Lois Wing, Melba Corsetti, Elaine Haley, Jean Davis, Mary Samons, and Virginia Stuart. A The annual music festival at the Arcata Teacher's College is the big affair of the season for the glee clubs. All of the schools in the neighboring vicinity send their glee clubs to represent them in the music meet. The music festival is presented with the idea of furthering interest in music and glee club work, and competent judges pass criticism on the technical points as they see them in connection with the performance of each glee club. This year the Girls' Glee Club took part as usual, singing two beautiful selections. Once yearly the boys and girls of both glee clubs combine to give an entertainment for the mutual enjoymefit of both. This year the entertain- ment was in the'form of a dance held in the gym, May 2. One of the interesting features of the glee clubs is the regular monthly presentation of a program consisting of talent discovered among the mem- bers of the club. Occasionally guest entertainers are enjoyed, but the majority of the entertainers are members of the club. The outstanding project of the year was the operetta, "Oh Doctor", participated in by both glee clubs. The majority of those in the Girls' Glee were in the choruses, and the following members took leading parts: Melba Corsetti, Mary Samons, Emma Cox, June Melendy, Lillian Carter, Frances Metcalf, Lois Wing, and Beverly Scott. The officers during the fall semester were president, Melba Corsetti, vice- president, Laura Haugang secretary, Estella Flaherty, treasurer, Jean Mc- Donaldg sergeants-at-arms, Helen Hurbutt, Lucille Canepa, and Helen Domaz. The officers for the spring term were president, Olive Crothersg vice- president, Nedra Bowman, secretary, Helen Ruzicg treasurer, Jean Davis, sergeants-at-arms, Virginia Stuart, Merle Tausch, Lillian Carter, and June Melendy. , Page One Hundred Three sf' ,Q , K .-.,, IQL ll g. r f , jljg.-3. L- E r-ig, , ,,.,v,,, -A , . a J 4 1 ,s 4' ' ,,. 1 , . T rw. ,- :ix Q45 X gi'S?f fi: . ' .- , 1, mfr? , .fgfrfei ffwfi.. , ', un ' ' 54. .-v, 4. " if-I ,, war: xx' ' E 1 ' 1 1 5 nw " . wp ' ' 4 Ui 5' X., 5,7 Q :iii . L ' . ' .?,, ,. ,. .,., l l 'Q 2"1't"r 4 ,' QT' T .a i e .sf weep ' A . Boys' Glee Club ,M This year, as usual, the Boys' Glee Club took an important part in school -t music and dramatics. A new feature of the organization is a male quartet, 'T . which has sung for various musical programs. Together with the Girls' Glee, the club presented the clever two-act musical comedy, "Oh Doctor", in November. Miss Pearl Jacobson directed both the music and the dialogue for this production, as well as the various choruses. The following members of the Boys' Glee took leading parts: Elmo Sarvis, Harold Charters, George Burwell, Raymond Poscic, Harry Massagli, Paul Blend, Rodney Wtilch, Wilbur Kammerzell, Ervin Hadley, Terry Karas, Darrell Connick, and Ray Oglesby. The Boys' Glee also was largely responsible for the success of the com- bined Glee Clubs and Orchestra concert given in February. The officers for the group for the autumn term were president, Terry Karas, vice-president, Jack Mackey: secretary, joe Malloy: treasurer, Cor- ' , rado Pinochig sergeants-at-arms, Kearney, Bauer, Crisp, and Sievert. 5.3, .A . During the spring semester the officers were president, Blaine Boice: vice- ' P wg' resident, Corrado Pinochig secretar , oe Mallovg treasurer, oe Hinch: " S" Yfsz-iTfl'f- sk.. if ' 5 y ' ' lf' -""f'- T sergeants-at-arms, Fanucchi, Malin, Karas, and Sandberg. A Page One Hundred Two P vt'- , ri . 'Q , 1 "ff .fgs , iff- as. - we .1 ' - ,,.,f-" r'-jf-'se . fa' ' - f M ' fQa?'a g,f? ga t , s fiixl ,fi ' fjf-' 'ff-vm-ff' Q- ,z Qlgfiilgf H N' ,.,ffi.,' 112,12 , :.1"1w A fig' - , 'H 'Q si- s k-41.4 ,.49rAg3.,..:, O Those who take part in the contest must be speakers of no little talent because of the way in which they are selected. Speeches on the subject which has been chosen for each class are delivered in every English class, the winner from each English class competing in turn with the winners of the other English classes in his division. The winner of this elimination contest is en- titled to speak in the finals against two other speakers in whichever division of the contest he happens to be. The contest is divided into two divisions. The ZL, ZH, and 3L classes are in the lower division while the SH, 4L, and 4H classes make up the upper division. A winner of each division is chosen and the two winners are honored by having their names engraved on the Speech Arts cup. The victors in the contest for this year were Herbert Saffel of the ZL class and Evelyn Bagley of the SH class. The contestants and the subjects upcn which they spoke were as follows: Herbert Saffel of the ZL class, Centenary of Sir Walter Scott, Sulo Paaso of the ZH class, Wfashington Bi-Centennial, June Solee of the 31. Class, Mahatma Gandhi, the patriot and the mang Evelyn Bagley of' the 3H class, Whither Germany: Louise Carter of the 4L class, affirmative of the question, Should the Philippines have their independence?g Ora W'ilson of the 4H class, neg- ative on the same question. Page One Hundred One ii"-fig? Q Ls. s Fifi Q ,.:.:,'1'f .sl , K J r ,. ...,.,,..1.f,,,4,i....,5tcm-' as. e 'Y ' , 6 A, ta . 5, .. Speech-Arts Contest O . 4' ' 'L Q is , , . zfg Q i 11 41 , . 1 sf.,l,g.3:g.i1. ,Wi 'mg . . ,xv- .. as 4,1 ' .gk , 1 YI 'i F- rf, ., .' X I 12732 XV? 1. .v f Q ' 11,1123 f .4 11 K f.. .' ,T If Lg is ' 1 i. f. I? F Y 2 V? 55, 4: ' Sie' ,. , ,,..f,i:fke . . ,L . ff i.ff'f'ig"5i " 1. - '- it , I Qiilgfafg .V .ryhl f AI was iaeiifnwgkl V W Tia . A gi! ' 5 i '.i n 3 ,,A . K- A . ' '-5 wh fin '- fini gf? 54? 32? F' ww-f ' ,QV9 -4 :E-. 3-sg ' Q-, . ' ni w ffffqxfi? , ,.,.i..,wJ3s-. ,,. X .. .1 ,I B f ' ,,, . 3 W' .CWD 'L .. fa-v:ii?5 .A 2 ,mfr r , ' ' C H 7 O . Operetta, Uh Doctor' , One of the outstandinig productions of the year was the operetta, "Oh Doctorln presented on November 21 and Z2 in the Junior High auditorium, and directed by Miss Pearl Jacobson. A large chorus was one of the features of the production. The leading role of Dr. Drinkwater waS well interpreted by Harold Charters. Melba Corsetti, as Honor, pleased the audience with her charming voice. The cast, in order of appearance was: Dr. Drinkwater ...,,, Harold Charters Bessie , ,.,, Helen Domaz Mrs. Weakly ..,... ..,,, J une Melendy Philip ..,, . ..., George Burwell Mrs. Cirossly ,,,, .....,,. E mma Cox Jim ,,,,...,,,.,, Raymond Oglesby Dr Slaughter ,,,,, . r,..,. Elmo Sarvis Old Timer ,,,. ,,,, D arrell Conniek Dr. Cuttem ,...,. ..,,,, H arry Massagli Bob ,,,....... ,,,, l Rodney Walch Dr. Coffin ,,,, ,.,,,,, R aymoml Poscie Cynthia .,,,,, ,,,,. L illian Carte" Rainbow ...., ,,,, W ilbur Kammerzell Manuel .,,,,,,,,.,,,.,,.,.,,, ,,,,, P aul Blend Honor ,r,,,..,,..., ,...,,,,, M elba Corsetti Characters in the ballet: A .. Q Madame Chere ,,,,,,,, Frances Metcalf The Pilgrim ,..... ,..,,,. , ,, Ervin Hadley Mal, Glory Drinkwater ,,,,,, Mary Samons The Goddess ,,,, ,,,,..,..,. I ,ois Wim! sf' Pancho H ,,,, r.,,, 'l 'erry Karas The Nymph ,,,,,,,,,..., Beverly Scott -' .1-F55 "1 ' , 'i l mi'-eaifg-g ' . 9, . . ,L 'ffl XJ Aa. if 1 QI 131 +7 'xg 35 A Page One Hundred "W ,Av .QM I .. I - 72: fL?:7"3fi'5 M. '-1, -A. ,VY4 ,,, .. .'.1 . Nr ,,'i"4., .M ve "EJ f-j f' -'Mfkf " . 1' i A'-5"fH e sf- :V at - P--4--'. ' ' -:-I-I 'i5'Q3"ie:fsi"L "fl 1, . ,. "'i...ff.fl.f13'f4:g -Aff' ' 1' "' . -1' ' Aw...-:mTf9.'-..1- 9 "Wappin N harf" O "Wappin Wharf" by Charles Brook Was presented for the public last autumn by the drama department under the direction of Miss Ruby Powell. The play is termed by its author, a "frightful comedy of piratesv which the audience found to be true, not long after the curtain had gone up. The plot centered about a girl and a boy in the clutches of a band of "bloodthirsty pirates", who are finally brought to justice. Ervin Hadley as V A ing A i tw A ' o fre? ii . 'ks -aafs , -, -.4-Q ffQ1,,,Q' i M . aw fig, " Zjegf' , 'igugg ggi a H :H N 4, fl. if X K y Ewan. . aims -W A .. ..-. ' ' '1'ffJu- " avw""'f . Sa-f his L Qfha. ia A 1. -,pj.gng.-,f.g5i5f b. W -v, 'paw --Q1 Wikni.. X.. gp Q kg rs, as . ,Zi isis: Y gf " Aft K y in 'i-325, ' it . b . It ,gf 4 ig in ,1-. W, ,Zim ,.jf,if'j' ' . wif' L , ' Z wsf.1.xff get STS? .egg Q. a X :En iii 1 ik. lx Q,--S . -X T R 9 fk l ,Egg sgsggy . 3. .2 - -X S3 :tk rg v a , .kf4x,. , gal 5 Z- ' Y s - t 3 f A ,jk 35,1 32,3 ,, - in 2 My as s is .pf - was ?l? , 3 Q 5.3 . 1 gf? Tig sg' if . gf, .vi . AQ, yi 3 in ' -3,4 'ff g. AF k i sa L X -:kg wvwgsg 2, - ,tg C- i-jfiw as-'. . ig-g w. 5, ,J . if 554: 2" fv2i+'5 .r 45 . 'K xi W . ' " if gi it a is is ,,'-'Sk ,. S.,if- .5 , if 1 e ,Wi ,t fwjjf ,LJ-'rw ' "fLi2s.L2A . .At fl' Q.- : Igg::.rfs the pirate captain, and Blaine Boice and Leslie Kelly as Duke and Patcheye, .3 respectively, were exceptionally well cast. Mary Burns did a remarkable I Q , . . Nfjaty. piece of characterization. W - T 1 ., x, , The complete cast was as follows: 5 Duke r,e,,,,i..,,r,,,,i,r,,..,,,i,i,,i.,...,i,,r,r. Blaine Boice i Patcheye r,,,,r,r,, .r,r,,,,r. Leslie Kelly R Captain of the pirates ,,.. . r.., Ervin Hadley 1 Red Joe ,,,r,,,,r,r, . ,.ie...r,, r,,, R obert Turner f , .i iQg,g."hi,',.-j Darlin' trti, Mary Burns .QM-W-M'-W Betsy r,r,e . . r,r,,r,r ,. May Holm Yk., Old Meg ,,r,, i,,,,r,r,, . . ,..r,r,,,,r,,.,,,,r,r,,.,,,,r,r, ., ,,,,r,, .. Frances Hinds Sailors . Corado Pmochi, Howard McGowan, Jack Pidgeon fs Q '. .. r ,Jazz s K E5 'f '4"""?fAI Page Ninety-nlne ' , ggi i f ,Tj i L rj .X - Ng, Q K ' iii, 'Kg .I f . .- Q . X A .L z 31 is t 5 - if' e fnnr:.sewai'vg e.Q .1.r v.lt 's?xwwV,x 33 ' r b'??Q 'f1igi5'5?-Q f s Tgg R -mggfv. LQ Af . -- is jg 3, 'Qs-ffhjf an r ,W , .. -w w . . . W," 1, iz, L. .., hi X 93 J 'bf 5' .fi.s.g ff . rim 'gf C4 'al . 54- .". f nys 'QQ ' . N .A W K- i f - ' .. . fx mi - :'?-iffS4 " r"f' . ff ky A 3 453 y?,X.g,2:,5 in K gal ,L :gpg V 5, 5337, 'ui' -it . .h L: - at ls -ffsfgggai a . as -.??1f gnq.5q:',1:"3g .iff ' 1qe'ieefivf .A K 4, I kv U V 2 51384 I., ,.,k A kk gi L M K. . ..E-J Xjtx1.l?,,u . X A UV, A ,V wi Q : ., .,, , in A ,DJ . iA,M !i,x3 .' .5Tx ,.ri,,5a, J. "0" 'ft Cv X- f -,Rs-T01 -f r L' -1 swf, - Preview Of Fine Arts N this day of the rapidly increasing use of machinery, the working day and the working Week are being materially shortened, thus leaving the average person with a consider- able amount of leisure time. This is true of the lowliest worker. The way in which the spare time is spent is of the utmost importance in the lives of the individual. Since the high school is the final step toward acquiring an edu- cation for the majority of the people, they should grasp every opportunity to train themselves to make good use of leisure time. Worthwhile avocations are nearly always of an educational nature, because the student's knowledge is increased and his character developed while he is enjoying himself. This is the reason, then, that the high schools of today make provisions that the student may have oppor- tunities to study some of the subjects which may help to make his leisure time of more use to him after leaving high school, whether he intends to go on to higher education or not. .A-. Q00 Q5 n!g Ll 4,,!,!,x. . 4 ,gp- ,m,a,.,, M...,,W,.,,.,,,, A,-, ,..--,.-qvwwbv ZR-M m,:f'f1'-vt .. -H '11 .V 1 U -..:.,:,. L my vsp,-I x .1 1 3 , pts, 'fBig Qskyn osgnf Wow! Wow! 12 WISKY TVEE! WEE! OLEY.MACK - E - I O EUREKA HIGH WOW! E osxy Wow! Wow: WISKY WEE! WEE! OLEYAMACK - E - I O EUREKA HIGH WOW! C H' I Page Ninety-six ' , Girls' Sports O Girls' athletics opened this year under the supervision of Miss Alta Huber, who was substituting for Mrs. Layton at that time. Some fine material for basketball was found in the scrub class, and three of the pros- pects made the picked team which took the championship. The first game was played on November 21. The low scrubs emerged triumphant over the high scrub team. The score was 13 to 14. The game was hard fought and closely contested throughout. On November 22, the low juniors Won from the high juniors with a score of 14 to 1. The low juniors had the game in their grasp almost from the starting Whistle. A The high seniors took a beating from the low seniors on November 23, the score being ll to 12. This defeat Was a beating in name only, howeverg that is indicated by the closeness of the score. November 29 marked a Win by the low juniors over the low seniors by a score of 7 to 9. The championship game Was played on December 22. The picked team Won from the low juniors by a score of 8 to 9. The game was a hard fought one and both teams deserve praise for their skill in the art of basketball and for their excellent sportsmanship. The members of the championship team are Edith Finley, Elvira Champi, Ida Ivancich, Merle Thomas, Stella Thomas, and Leah Thomas. . . .- yLf,,1.' 1' . 5, Q Page Ninety-five .ig ,A V3 X N MMM . yg.,3R-gag. fr -is . . .Ss-zz-'es ' 2 . . . M.. . Qi" , 'T 1.5 ggi- - -13,3 ff 5:5 'l1ffQ?zff5f.f, 1. ig Egg' fry .5 ' ,ff A ' X PM ji- j gg vwyij. if 1 f -5 ' Tw, f 7. , ev:-fsn f was 11 ' Qi-ar? Ifliki' . . - Wg 1 . s I ' ' fi, , . A .ff ' I if 31 1 'X 1 A . w " ici Y Q gif H ri ,Q .Q ,aa in . . if' X. .,vi. ,,fx.,,,..-. 5 . gsfigfl ,, I , , 13.515 H ' 1963- .. 1 .5 ,534 P : , -a. - gif f psp, -Lf,. ,M 3 f""N ',. wr' PQ- ' , . 1,1 . r.. g Q s. '-Q7 K: -is A - . 1 N.-grew , .. j ,Y Rs, .55g's, -. . . ,wg mst. . 1. 1,1 ,. 1.5515--, Q5 Y -g 2 if 1 Tffs.-V fl'-ilfixk? ...,f5?l?'.wi .- M 1. R .ii 5 ralrzg- :Lg ' ' f 1' agggi..-f ' Hi: 3 2 w ff as fi E.. y y si ' 1 YY ag r We gy f - V' 551 , Spf- , 'sifigffiigi-,1tSg:.?l?5iY5f as, 5 sg fe 4.5. ww? .Q-Wixifi 1 1, f . M.. I W, . .. LL' ' 5- y as 75' ,, Q lfsfcfi kg. q, .v 1 iff, . rf 5: 1 5 . Q. 5.4, 5 E. .. Qv S 5 Y ii 1 X Says iv 1- 4 . . V 2 R. , vi 5 : xg inf' 'A A .H- i 'f 5 Eff 5.12:-li 'Q-1 ' -511 .R S sr k..a,,.,,1..N-,gg id, Q35 ., X .ga s I sf - is ..... .. fl. rg f' H J ?'w3,g? rhiaas Qwvefg afik-fs 3-fr . M lil' ll 'T ' Y 5 Mg... ik 29,1 yi ,ff a..-,...r.Q,'. - ,x . -I We -Y i4sj..s2'eff -in 1 .,33fEgif'fI5l.fi , 1 f - 4. . ...f,-ws-va... Lg, J, .- f ,.., . v. Hy- w .- . 1i",w: ., '.,a.s.,s.f,.sxr.nu. Sa.s.ausmQf w...p:,tm.s?..-'-e-En I wi. gg xv.. .- .W i3j5.e1.i:Q-:Q-ffsif 'L W fri. .Lzzafgg "i ...maj ,K We ,isiii QQ. gfsgz 3.21 . 1 gli. ,At A Tina-. ..l,.5i.f ,..... .M .fw,-.....,.- - M-,ng . at aw . L Ei- 1 iziggjij 2215 A , Q,'W'WwSr5W?3'f! we , pf 4 35 V 5, fL.ggsffsa.f.f1wem gy-j Jia ' fl .Jug . ilixfiltfk X 1 W Q43 7 git ,ksxfiyiig 'ig .gi f is ffl .: Inf. 1 e A 'qsf ffv Xw-421' Y. 2 S 2 4 2' 'ui :Frrf fi1 ".. . 75 f' Q"-"..L FW - -1 .' as 54,1 ,miie 1. ,. wamyfg- ll-,fn .X-jvgm. s ss, wage 5 ay... 6g.,i35' 5712112 jf. i . iii " 'I- dr. r 5' Track Events Of 1932 0 r Ne 1' ai. 'A -fit is . .9 ,Y Q 34, J e 1..-xr . 1. 's Y Wes Ball, wee Eureka mite, was high point man for the limiteds. He won the broadjump, took second in the 100 and the 220 and ran on the win- ning relay team for a total of 12 and a quarter points. With the double victory, the Eureka teams defended successfully the titles that they had won in 1931 in the meet at Fortuna. Converting six firsts, three seconds, three thirds, and two fourth places into a total of 57 points, the powerful Eureka track team walked off with the Invitational Track meet held at Grants Pass on Saturday April 30, 1932. About 150 athletes from fourteen high schools representing southern Oregon and northern California sought honors at the meet. The Red and Green team entered only nine men in the meet and their nearest rivals were Grants Pass with 37 points and Klamath Falls with 30. LI GH TWEI GH T TRACK 1 R Page Ninety-four 15' . its Q . ,urn egg: za., Q, T1-if 94" "a ,Q 0. .,, , , ., .-ka, .5 t tang rl. ' : li 15? ,,.3rj.f, x,s ffl' .f , , my fzffagl..-5, i gf.. We Q 3: ,ri .JW .: is 5 ."'l ' Q. Q I , ' -. ,. --. , v 1 , aff .1 A- v.41.+ V f.4M,v 7. A 7? H4 aff- ' 5:1 , ' ,'n ' ' s 5' 4 ,J f, -4. . , .-fn 4' ."- ,, .W L 7 , 'i .. .cv :"Ms'.?:.-+-Wi?" -...W - -wr-ff """ .f.f!-- ' ' frack Events Of 1932 hurdles, as he cleared for a record, his body slipped a full six inches above the crosspiece. The Eureka team encountered ineffective opposition in both meets. The smooth running of Milt McLellan on the track was a feature event. Mc- Lellan won both the half and quarter mile. He breezed home in 2:07 in the half to Win by a dozen strides. His time was a second shy of the county record. But in the 440 he had to run to win. Starting slow he got himself into trouble around the first turn. On the back stretch he tossed on the coal and pulled into second. Down the final S0 yards he picked up with McNeil, Arcata, and Won by three yards in 53:4. Lee Brightman of Ferndale was high point man of the varsity meet with 12 points. He won first places in the 100 and 220 and copped a third in the broad jump. After being set back for a false start in the century he came back to win in the good time of 1014. Hemenway, Eureka flyer, led Brightman for 75 yards, but the Ferndale favorite was not to be denied. At the 80 yard mark he caught the flying Eurekan and with a Hnal burst of speed, hit the tape with two yards to spare. He Won the furlong Without particular trouble in 2321. f 0 .tv ff-gg . f . 1 If 5 2. 'f 5 .Af 51 ,ii , 'r X. tm , '. .S t A- -ss, it J, f' ijlilfgs PGXS 1 . .1-,Q lbw!! Q by ., ...,. 'x 31, 5 .Q Wi W X E? s ig f :N jg? f ' .V, .,-X. ' A. . . .J -J .. 5 5 " his L 2 f X J V yfsifigsiisg 053' V ,ff 'i L-El':5EYi'lt 0 elfiiys-We law ' Q 'W 0 . A A .138 , 301-ii.?'I'.7ff 'JNQ A ,L 15142 751 g'- ' 'fi -I KW.: sk Q. - Ugiirxjs .5 k 5,5 life f4,'.w!32 iiff' 'lizflsi ex.. sy f- si 41, ., .L ' HQ Jai' ,1SQ,5"1aQ ' -miff .-Q as A - f , A Q53 4 ' ,. ' "1a'.5k'- 3 1 g 1, 730. 'o f fs ' ft?-1 . 4 75 is V ' vy ., :rj 1:76 my g,.sQSi Q Q-sr !! . 4 VE 1 -. ff fi? If Pi' silflw ., ' iii 16:2 A 'W ' s g vii sf 'f --s q, , . 1 " st .H f -ik-'is s is -. 'ff' 0 JS? -.ar L-I.. - fs . '- 'fissz 2 'gg' s ffggpg Wi. Fi' - "WG" . 1 S . :WJ- V 1 .pl 5-"ul: ,, x - t 'ga t -a t gil.. 0. I 12. S! . Y"E+'.I 14 Slzila- ' 1 'N . , .Q . ts... .4 ,., ,,,. 13551 F - 4 fsw N . W- . .ig mv' 'X .ww l Y A W ww' k,y - lv J '.Tf,...,a..mN+ Q' r'5jjE"'L,fw-i- .m.:5,L.'Fff53- ' 1 'iwf'l?-5'5Z1'5.iS3::'t?11'fe:' ' f,1:'f-Qf ' 0 . H-""' 4...,i'f"" fl "W Wh.,-N' 'M,.'-ff" 2.1-"""'A, -f- -'V w, 'eh W' ' N 'xg was-o'4N,'QQ T.. an K ',,.,.,u.m.f S,Ww,.:M - .- i-"- L -..4....m3j33g . --ggLg'Lg,,,,f ' " 1 'fsfff,Z.-gas-rg,ffg:f'w I 4 ' 'Mi ff Q dr, t1",.,.a"' - Q., pw 5, .5 H. ' ' '41 .13 .ff ff' . .' . . ,. . ,fda Vg. -A ' f 'ii' ,F f1 . , Q 1 1 0 "Ny-E . ,- r f t' 1 it , ' 31.3 E. . V 1 " .L 1 Q" . K - -..Q- S - x . s' -."-wrt' v 1 . 'L 1 5+ ' ,M .---ww kff', .Tk g ms-U ,. .-Q, 2 - . . . ...,..--.., , .,.,.. ...,'. ' i --. ' ,..... N... ,, ..- ,u 7'Nf"f 3 . fi .si , Y". A . IJ 4, X A A "f ' fm Iv . t ,gk M A 5, , . J 1: - , m .5-. f , A fi 2-- , fs ., Eel . w -- ' fi iii 5 -1 .gi Hg HLAVYWMGHT TRACK as .0 - 'f Page Ninety-three T, A xii.. gil, ig A ' Eff F45 if " 4 ,Q-,f , Q Q x . . to 'viii' 1 -. .gfifixltgll Q -N 5 ' 1,1 22:5 wg gif 4 ..A,i?. k . I-Q9-5,2 -5.i.,ii .,31, . . .g,,:.:7.V g X-pl? .. - j.'iQ'fg,Q,'.,:-fSf"f . et far kv-'mis-2 , f . is . - f -t.. , L. 9- A.-. 1, f , iii!! 'lf if at 'igifiiffi " 1. 1 ,Z-:N . K! mg.. .Air MX.. .5 .Qi G, u sef ul, . gtg 1 mgsgfqjsip A. 's , A lix 5' - El iirlfi . . , .,., . . . . c.. . . . 1 1 L- M1 1 , 5 we . .' ff.f,-..' .. U. , K ,..' N i x? fu I-ki., .tu -. ...M fs,tm.mwuwm:s-sQf N isuE 0 I o I932 Baseball- cont. Q i..-li.. ' EUREKA -- FERN DALE Oscar Beck, Eureka hurler, limited the Cream City to two hits and .enabled the Red and Green to triumph 11-O. The game was played in the Albee Stadium. W This game marked the third straight for Eureka.. Nelson and Nygard were the heavy hitters of the day, collecting five out of eight trips to the platter between them. Hadley was the fielding star, catching two very difficult flies and playing airtight ball on first base. , D , EUREKA -- FORTUNA A The powerful Eureka high baseball squad defeated the Fortuna aggre- gation 7-S. Eureka hit Rovia, Fortuna twirler, hard, and aided by the poor support given Rovia, won with ease. By virtue of this win, Eureka stepped into first place in the C. I. F. league. "Red" Nicol pitched good ball for the local nine allowing ten scattered hits. The fielding exhibited by the Eureka team was outstanding. Nygard in centerfield accepted five chances in the first two innings without a bobble. Captain Larry Nelson led the batters of the day by connecting with the old cantaloupe for three bingles out of five trips to the plate. "Bing" Burwell also fattened his batting average by gettting two out of three. The winning of this game gave the Eureka nine the C. I. F. championship for the 1932 season. It brought back the cup which had been away from the school for four years and at the time was in the possession df Del Norte. Coach Mooneyham deserves much credit for grooming this team to the form which they acquired during the season. It took two years of hard work to do this and we should be proud of such a coach. p Track Events Of 1932 Ervin Hadley, Eureka's unlimited pole-vaulter, lifted his lithe body over 12 feet one half inches to set a new record as the powerful Eureka track team flashed home to a double victory in the lightweight and varsity meets at the Humboldt-Del Norte C. I. F. meet held May 29, 1932 at Ferndale. The final score in the lightweight division was Eureka 45, Arcata 24, Ferndale 19, South Fork, 5. Unlimiteds: Eureka 65, Ferndale 29, Arcata 27, South Fork S.. Hadley who had consistently been vaulting better than the old record of 11 feet in practice, climaxed his final year of C. I. F. competition with a sensational leap. The old record was made by Guthridge of Arcata in 1928. Over a thousand fans were thrilled by the spectacle. Fighting against fatigue, having competed in two other grueling events, high jump and high Page Ninety-two Page Ninety-one ! MILTON COLE Outfield WALT THOMPSON Outfield BILL SHIVELY Pitcher FRED SIEVERT Catcher JOE BONOMINI Outfield "SHORTY" WALKER Infield BILL ROSSIG Outfield JOE TOMICH Infield qv' 1fQ1:zg1 if -ilk. , . W, .M , J , F ,.,'.- ,.iMs1vf:fEf-KIM, . i. f 2 - 1,1 1 5 I fvvglwqq- 5.1, -me f Baseball Of 1933 'Q .-. EUREKA -- FERNDALE In the last game to be played before this writing the -Eureka team walloped the Ferndale nine by a score of 8-1. Thompson and Nicols worked on the mound for the Red and Green, allowing the Cream city boys three widely scattered hits. Starritt, Shively, and Thompson were the leading willow wielders. Joe Tomich made several spectacular plays in the field. 1932 Baseball Led by the hard slugging "Bing" Burwell, Red and Green backstop, the Loggers took the measure of their old rivals, the Black and Gold 15-5 in the opening game of the C. I. F. season. ' The game was played on the Arcata diamond and was an even affair up to the seventh inning when the local. boys forged ahead from a 7-4 score to a 1 1-4 lead before they could be stopped. e After Burwell started the fireworks in the second inning, the Red and Green nine was never in any danger of being headed. Joe Bonomini worked on the mound until he was relieved by Beck in the seventh. He allowed four scattered hits. EUREKA -- SOUTH FORK By a score of 7-1, the Eureka High School baseballers defeated the South Fork pastimers in the Albee Stadium. The South Fork- boys led the Eureka team for the first live innings after Gray, South Fork pitcher, scored on Hadley's overthrow to third. In the sixth and seventh the Eurekans hit the old agate all over the park and scored a total of seven runs, putting the ball game on ice. 3 Beck, Eureka twirler, allowed only two hits in the seven inningsithat he worked and allowed no earned runs. Bonomini finished the game, allowing three hits and whiifing three men. Hitting honors went to Tierney, Eureka short-patcher, who got two hits for two times at bat, one double and one single. . DEL NORTE -- EUREKA Greeting "Shorty" Marple with a terrific volley of hits in the opeing canto, the Eureka High School Loggers trounced the Crescent City Red and White squad by a score of 13-3, on the northerners' diamanod. The hard hitting Eureka aggregation rounded the bags four times in the first inning and was never in any danger of being headed during the remainder of the encountr. Page Ninety Page Eighty-nine ff . 1 -' :gk - . l O? I A5 952i i f 5 sg Vi faMICKYvv .M -,lxr if fx-k Q 1X5 .. AA .'v's'5'5 eff yf- k LOUIS BONOMINI -L iz, fn?-if 'F' F5 my Pltcher - ,QV ig yi!-,SG-1.f . gjgjex 1 5 fgfg . .ef 3, ,Z 'gif-gg?L.L -gala iff 5 f-ag A , iff 52 Q vs-if-A "RED" NIOOL f 5 3 453' fx. .af',,Qs5. . if jg, Q B A Pltcher :winWiki'-f-'f'f,.'TEW:K 1 Amsi ki t,5:i.sfH HSALH .igtf-fi ,. X , Qu: E -A xi i - vin A Catcher 'Q S'-1, QSQSVTX- " 5: AV ig - A ,, Q JRE? zgzggixx if 2, Wi 4' A. 47-252 ,igw - " gpm-zfwvgy, -A g ED ANDERSON W W,-fs-1fffii,O,f' -wma, "Y-,,,f'L.,JM " 'Q A , 'i a . F . VA - 'LQQQ' A m Inf leld - -2?f'ffT"1rvi::3 km5""1.' A - M' guffff'f 324'-Of ' Q 'S f - A 'Nxt 1- FRANK CRNICH f " ' A A 1 5,-:gee Af' Infleld f t K Q .H-i"f" I .f , f fare 1 , . l N-X:ML,f'Q A X. t. ,og s v OWEN , , Y 2 ' f .4 ik ' 5 M9452 1 I x, f , .. I , . , , A f 'A ' ,fi N ,Q E . ' 55? BEN STARITT 5 A - -- "N' CH "Zi" ffl JD, AW,-5 Infxeld A 5 ' F y-:iii COACH MOONEYHAM 3 - ff.:-:mmm f if A . X ' n fi :ii f'f""' , Mfg ' f 'f fy -U ' ' -.ix 1 , YM- . A - S gg 71' K L X -Q -f13S5"v . '. 4 ' .252 '51 .- gzii 23 YL ' 'E 1 K g . , ' '- Q' i .. ,,Q'f'5fr. fi, U ffi .fs Q L f,eg :'.X..?,+g, its f if - 5- 1 , - -- w 1. A M -1 -Q, 3 -'-r ,M - f , ,mfr ,., . N5 .. H K ,Au gg ,O , ' fp fr33 ' w.?,. '- - M, .- M L : A 5- Tlzfymf 4 55.31 we S? A .1 3.41 1'42Q If 1 zgaiaiiyz 3 . fi n- A A -Siwfwiifk. Kigpig l 1 N fssmfi 1: , , A , .. Z.lvEt:TNQ :f:53ig'Q'QJy y:v,E1wE K- t Img?-A O - i Qgik z A .. M,-M. L,,t..m1 -'-f-g1f-4, A L- 34:4 ' ' f'2i-'rg-P: -11 3' -an 1 .+A , ' .A - .Q Q 1' i 'P , ..-,,-s- fr , m - ,, A fg -. ' . .gif gr A -3- ' A fl F. iff ,?5g5'E, , A ,:Q'Jg-fy. A X . "'- A3 1 .3 A i R N sw- ,Q-Mig' J,-.V ALS' . .A ' V A -A M . ..s1!?'-qv.. . A 5-3865" ,f.W.-QQ-Ajxnamuammnsvigtbm-2? ' ,Kuff L: vi ta 1-v -' Baseball. Of 1933 -- Up till the time of this writing, the Eureka High School baseball team had managed to be in second place with no small hopes for the championship. Despite the fact that they suffered handicap early in the season through loss of several of the first string players because of their ineligibility, the team under the able training of Coach Mooneyham has succeeded in forging its way into second place. The baseball season this year was greatly handicapped be- cause of the late spring rains, and the season's regular schedule was changed from time to time because of postponement of games owing to rainy weather and wet fields. 'it FORTUNA -- EUREKA I 'l - " In the first game of the season the Loggers crossed bats with the vallgy city boys and beat them 12-6. Louis Bonomini pitched for Eureka and did a very capable job of it, allowing Fortuna only nine scattered hits, and ex- ecuting some pretty baseball. Wahlund, Cole, Starritt, and Rossig starred with the willow while Tomich was the outstanding man the field for Eureka. EUREKA -- HUMBOLDT STATE The next game was with the Humboldt State. The college team de- feated the local boys by a score of 10-4. Coach Mooneyham was forced to use many of his second stringers in this game. Shively and Rossig did the chucking for the high school in this game. Thompson, Shively, and Starritt were the outstanding stickers for the Red and Green. EUREKA -- FERNDALE The Eureka team, made up mostly of substitutes, was defeated by the Ferndale High team. This game was raggedly played with many errors being made by both teams. Shively pitching for Eureka seemed to have difficulty in controlling the ball, and this fact combined with the nine errors made by his teammates allowed Ferndale many unearned runs, and consequently the victory. Starritt with four hits and Shively with three were the leading sluggers for the Eureka aggregation. EUREKA -- FORTUN A The Eureka team gained a hard fought victory over the strong Fortuna outfit by a score of 5-2. . Nicol pitching for Eureka was complete master of the situation at all times, only six hits being made off his delivery. Crnich, McCrimmon, and Tomich were the outstanding hitters of the day. Many fine plays were made by both teams and the game kept the interest of the fans throughout. Page Eighty-eight Page Eighty-seven 1' ' fri? , . gr, il, gif .. , git , "SHORTY" WALKER Forward , QP 'B 1 CRIS TOMANOVICH 31 1 L ii? W , 5 .1 wi Guard ' id ' L32 si , 3 4 f 54, I , A "BRICK" WALCH fr Forward , . .gm is 4 fs., Q ygkfaik. '5 ui, , , , HKELLY9 SMEDS :gg . Wfsfiif 1- . ' 'gig' Y' L P. Guard frm- A ' 11596 fi, . r ,,1: . 1.. Ag ng' r me N :Nay e V 35 K"-A. ffpwsf vimfi , if "..'1Y?i . Q r ,A Yr 1' ' rf " - tiff d , , R,-,xg -??fht.'A .1 f f , - +5 F - Q i ' is 5, A . A x ' wr' 4. V 5 -Q ZIEGLER d Center L 255' HARRY zooK 5.1, .diT59gz,f A Guard ' 1 W.. .- 9 1 IZOLLIN RYBURN Q Q - H I 1 ' d ffitf Guard ' 3: ., ,J.',,,,,-M-Aa ,gs-3 5,2 2:11372 'CURT" JOHNSON ' Qfsgesessf. F0lWal'd . I Q5 f giilidff se 'L 1 f ' gy ' -1 ' xff.. :X .fwi , K, sr , 5, Q 7 : :LK F. 1 - F, 'i Q53 41: 1 " k i ,gh 1, N2 xiQ 45g . 5 . mp' E K , K X 'lvff 'xx ' 'ft' A , ' u Qfrgftgzfgrgwf, -4 2, rgfgflk ,C ' X ' if mf-ZX -i, R ,JV f.. w....1 . i jg . 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', , . f we ., ' - V' ' ' 5:dKY . ,W ' 35:3 1"3AY' 'ij :Gif .XTR 'J f K4 ,. Q' "-. ,4 P. " WN -,J ' :Q ' ? 4 ir f 'J' 4' 'W " f.':'v.-0211 X . .. .Q f Y Wwe + A JIMMY MOORE FO1W3.l'd ' CORKYH KNIFSENIN Guard ' IKFT' WOLFE Guard E BERRY Forward HUGH CUSHNAGHAN Forward Guard DAVIS LOY LINDHOLM Center Guard ' WATKINS Page Eightgy-S1 ' I . Basketball - cont. Q The Ferndale heavies gave Eureka a close run during the first half. of the game, but after the second 'half began, Eureka put the game on ice. The final score was 38 to22. NicolsQ McGowan, and Hendersstarred. EUREKA -- FORTUNA The Eureka teams won their" second double-header over Fortuna. The lightweight game was nip and tuck all the way with Eureka pulling ahead in the last minutes to win 26 to 23. The game was featured by the sinking of nine consecutive free throws by the Eureka team in the early part' of the game. Lindholm and Knifsend were the leading basket shooters. ' With Belloni of Fortuna and Captain McGowan of Eureka sinking baskets from all angles, the two teams put up a great game with Eureka coming on the long end of the score. EUREKA -- DEL N ORTE The Del Norte lightweights upset the Eureka team by a score of 24 to 20. A little too confident, the boys from Eureka took it on the chin. The lon of Lindholm, star center, at half time made the going a little tougher for the Eureka team. Knifsend with 9 points was the leading scorer for Eureka. The Eureka heavies were too much for the northerners and wonthe game 39 to 32. Nicols was the leading scorer of the game. ' -' EUREKA -- SOUTH FOFK ' . The Eureka fives took a pair of listless games from South Fork. The lightweight score was 46 to 6 and the heavyweight game 48 to 15. In the lightweight game Coach Willard used every member of the squad. This tended to keep the score down. Wolfe and Knifsend scored at will against the boys from Miranda. I In the heavyweight contest McGowan and Nicol ran wild to score 39 points between them. The whole squad was given a chance in this game also. EUREKA -- ARCATA 'Playing before a large crowd the Eureka teams won against Arcata on their home court. The first game was 22 to 12 and the second 26 to 22, both in Eureka's'favor. The lightweight game was hard fought throughout. Knifsend and Wolfe were the outstanding stars. The heavyweight game was one of the best games of the season to be played by the local heavyweights. Arcata put up a hard iight but were finally beaten. McGowan and Miller played fine ball forl the winners. This game ended up the regular C. I. F. season for both teams. i Page Eighty-five T 5-if lid. 5 1 4 Q , QI' ,,.. .. s.. ,I-1. ,jf . L ,JA ni 1 v A Hy, lf. 1 lc q..1sL,T., , ' 1 .' 4 3. .,,. ',.?H,, .Y 1 'l.,u! , gl' w' HES' T' , 5 Q' , J' F ' 1 ,g,, 1 w ,iz 1 A 1-nf. , . ., wg., A LV." t'f..l' ,. Av., iyfe.uv..,1 2. had ,,.R.Lf,' K 3?iLiL,.: ' ' A 'ff '55 ,V .ifiww W I ,www 1'f'w - if W. .qu ,.. A M4 ,J 1 7 4 1' ,.. J 4'6" w ' "a - J f if ' A , er -' 1 -1 -ff agp., 5?-.3 2-gff. , Y V-.1 95.43. R WR: .I ' gif ' .. ' A? 'Q , , A"' Q iv 'az-mf. TF? 4, ...L t gy mfiigjfggg ,gf , l 'n' ,Y WI 'wg xl -.Q,n:T'?.4 A 4 IB' -..f- ROMAN CRNICH Forward ART MILLER Forward "SAL" NYGARD Forward DALY Forward "RED" NICOL Guard ARNIE MALIN Forward ROY FANUCHI Guard Page Eighty-four The Eureka heavies had things their own way most of the time during the game and had little trouble winning. The score was 31 to 12. Mc- Gowan of Eureka was the high point man with sixteen points to his credit. 0 EUREKA -- FORTUNA The Eureka teams brought home the bacon in their first game with Fortuna. The lightweight game was a thriller. First one team would take the lead and then the other. Eureka put on a final spurt to win the game 31 to 23. Knifsend and Walch starred for the Eureka aggregation. The heavyweight game was fast and furious with Eureka having a shade the best of it. The score was, Eureka 40, Fortuna 32. McGowan, Henders, and Hadley were the luminaries for Eureka. EUREKA -- DEL N ORTE ' The Del Norte High School teams came down out of the frozen north only to meet two overwhelming defeats at the hands of the Eurekans. In the first game Knifsend and Lindholm were outstanding with 14 and 10 points respectively. The score was 48 tc 7 in the lightweight encounter. In the heavyweight game Lee O'Brien and Captain McGowan led the scoring for the winners, the score being Eureka 45, Del Norte 22. This game marked the final appearance of "Hairy" Zook, midget guard, and Lemon and Hadley, heavyweight regulars, through graduation. Lee O,Brien also played his last game for the Red and Green. EUREKA -- SOUTH FORK The basketball squads journeyed to South Fork and administered two beatings to the Southerners. Knifsend with 20 points led the team to a 79 to 11 victory in the lightweight division. The second game was also an easy victory for Eureka, the score being 5 3 to 13. McGowan with 22 points and Nicol with 19 were the outstanding stars. EUREKA -- ARCATA The Arcata heavyweights threw a scare into the local team when they stepped out to take the lead in the first quarter but this lead was soon cut down by the accurate shooting of Nicol and McGowan. The final score was 40 o 25 in favor of the Red and Green. L The lightweights had an easier time in winning their game 35 to 19. Knifsend, Lindholm, and Captain Walch were the leading scorers. M EUREKA -- FERN DALE The Eureka lightweights got revenge on Ferndale in their second en- counter, giving them a 27 to 17 beating. The team was "clicking" from the start and was never headed. Knifsend and Johnson were the outstanding Eureka players. V Page Eighty-three 1 Q, sam- ffi 1.2323 -A x Qkkf' A ,,.iSif?'5F1 is-O QQ 'fk'f'3ffi:k f L5,fi9?fQ 4, if 1 ' 12,472 . L 'Tgff' na, A ,Q , ' L , , KIRK LEMON QE j '51 1-'O 6235- fy ' ' Guard iffy. f . Q--1 lk.x,Vv A A 5. 'fri' ' A , ,, X , I X Q5 HOWDY" MCGOWAN gzip, 6 Q- Canter ?psO2'J f 'O 1 'iv,',4,,'.3'i' qi Q T? 'O Qfif he . ff" . 65' L. 5 L m"'-wi . i 1 s ,O-5, Aduizfk , x xg f,. gg-L. 'gy , ERVIN HADLEY A Lsvviif S- O 'fgf Guard -x.2,jggLg 5. -IEA. ,, EFX'- X' 1 3:g.45,3i qgguf-4 , AMQji4 X . wifi h , ' tg,?'if.3:5 'I F. 'Z '1 AZT 5 T! !.f1.'w 515 22 .Q ghd? Q 14 11- 'Ili' 5 !'7.S'f If 'f ' 12' w wtf-Lf!-.if.i,vi1f .s , fir, I 5 gfmfxfrlfe' 'Ury L .Ni . 5 Wi uzx 1, ef :IZ 1 f. 9 f I ,gn qi. Q in . . ' , 1 " 75 ieix Xia -15 wget I ' ak' it fz' 241.-hiv S: A lg :gg ' 5 , ,v-,L MATT JARVI Fozward 9' in ff' .L ' "lf O .an if JOHN JOHNSON efffgqssg. 9s.,,"'1 35 L K '15 xsqgiiki 3 S ii 5 Centel. Rf' HAROLD HUGGLER Guard L L , Q A - . 4' iflf. Q 'lsxjfci LEE O'BRIEN , Center BILL HENDERS ' 1' wg, 1 , 1 xxx , L f fi--'E 121 3 fu., 359325-'-'Y' O 3321321455935 , A 1. , V, x -T ,W-rag., f viii ' N N asf. , A at ' il. lfifziiifb-91? J' 5 - r , 633 a.4'LT'E'f Guard . Q ,is , I 'L R 'L 1542.05-fv l G Page Eighty-two s , 'ix S' A RQ .1 ' Q 19 L rr: fig ss, fi a vii' . flf, :Pg s , 1 Ex E ' 21531 '34 -', 1 .. . F. """"' 'M --fssi E.f L' G fy' ' S -Q5 . 'Vw ,H if , L' N: 17 Q mf, ' ffl 'M k 4, in .:' - .ny Wfigg.. I 'Q I " 5. Lai. ,f ,g5Q"'3'5,'3"fiA 1 5 5 , K V-,Nl MG, 1 , fe 4 5 vm. -A A "muy w. " 'L ' -,fmg?2:e?f5,,w .,,f-3 iw , , L .u,x,,, , ..,,,, lg SX 4 R' 0 'W' 4 r .MWQP Q ' a'i,xTf-1J3.L.f 31' A ' - ' " -V .L ,. T412 5?."'Yi'1a"IP?.5:?lfr?!!1Y?5sfi.' 'S i:a:'.:Q:r.- -. v. 1.-...Nm 520 mam Basketball of T933 This year's Red and Green basketball teams had one of the best seasons of any two teams in the history of the school. Coach Willard's boys came through to win the championship in both the lightweight and heavyweight divisions. This is a feat which is seldom accomplished by any one school. The 1933 heavyweights took up the work where the heavyweight team preceding them had left off and ran the total number of C.I.F. games won up to twenty straight. This is quite a record in itself, not losing a regular game is two seasons of competition. The team lost Ervin Hadley, Lee O'Brien, and Kirk Lemon at Christmas, but even after the loss of these first string men, the team was still able to stave off defeat until the end of the season. Howard McGowan was the outstanding player on the heavyweight squad, and made a great captain. "Howdy" has played on the first team for three years and his presence will be sorely missed. He was also the league- leading scorer. Red Nicols and Bill Henders starred at different times for the Loggers. The lightweights had a harder struggle to gain the top position among the other teams in the league. They lost the first game to Ferndale and then dropped one to Crescent City later in the season, but to the other teams they were "poison". They won a rather easy victory over the Fortuna team in the playoff for the title. Harry Zook was lost to the squad at Christmas, but his place was taken by Walker and the team continued on its way to the championship. Captain Rodney Walch was a good leader and an excellent player. He was one of the best shots on the team and could handle the ball with great skill. Corky Knifsend, Eureka's trick guard, was considered one of the best all-around players in the league. He was really clever on the floor and could handle the ball with unusual ease. Roy Lindholm and Curtis Johnson were also valuable to the team. EUREKA -- FERNDALE On December 9, the Eureka basketballers opened the regular C. I. F. season with Ferndale in the Ferndale gym. The Eureka teams were heavy favorites to win both games but the Ferndale lightweights upset che dope, coming out on the large end of a 41 to 24 score. Zook was the high man for the Eureka team. f Page Eighty-one .5 Q' L., .+W- r -15.3-I, S xi 1 V- ,..,,, 'ima' 'F 44- Ef:i:ff g,g.ef ' 4,, ff'1f":- MM "' iff.-f.,.3.' gR N5 I x 43 .. 1332 1 'f'j': ' . 1 M NVQ? iii., " 2' 3201, A , .R-'M A uyi- 1 '42-:fic fxrfff J' ' , .vi P ' My 5 A. 'lv v?"w ,1 .J A mia'-.Lf,i1.,f,f. - -. LES VANNOY fC21pt.J Right Guard FRED SEIVERT Center JOE WALSH Left End WES BALL Quarter Back uBUSvv HUNrlw Full Back ROY IVANCICH Half Back BOB COONS Half Back DON CRISP Right Tackle Page Eighty EUREKA -- ALUMNI ' I' O In the first game of the season against the Alumni, the Loggers went down to defeat, 16 to 0. The High School team put up a valiant fight, but the Alumni line was too powerful for them. EUREKA -- ARCATA - In the C. I. F. opener with Arcata, the Loggers scored an impressive 19 to 6 victory over the White City boys. The battle was hard fought, the Arcata team showing great backfield strength. Wes Ball was outstanding for Eureka. Spectacular football was exhibited by Nygard, Henders, and Hunt. EUREKA -- EERNDALE The Loggers took the 1931 champions into camp at Ferndale by a score of 6 to 0. The game was evenly contested and not until the last quarter was the Hnal score decided. I The Ferndale team had a hard time to gain through the fighting Eureka line, and they did not make many first downs. It was the accurate passing of Joe Paul, sharpshooting full-back, which put the game in the bag in the last quarter. Ball and Ivancich were the outstanding ground gainers for the red and green. EUREKA -- GRANTS PASS The Eureka team journeyed to Grants Pass and suffered a 7 to 0 defeat at the hands of the Grants Pass team in a hard fought game. The game was played in the rain and the Eureka passing attack could not fuction as well as it had on other occasions. EUREKA -- DEL NORTE The Eureka High team met the Del Norte team twice during the season, winning the first encounter 7 to 0, and the second 6 to G. Both of the games were hard fought and evenly matched. The north- erners put up a stout defense on both occasions, but the Eureka boys dished out more than they could handle. Captain Vannoy helped to keep up the morale of the team and at the same time did his share of the work in these games, as 'was the case throughout the season. . EUREKA -- HUMBOLDT STATE ' The Eureka Loggers tackled the job of playing the boys from the college in Arcata. After putting up a plucky battle, the Eureka boys finally came out on the small end of a 7 to 0 score. The college scored a touchdown in the second quarter and fro-m then on they were unable to score further. The locals played a good defensive game, but they were unable to make any head- way on the offensive because of the weight advantage which the college had. Nygard's punting was one of the outstanding features of the game. EUREKA -- FORT BRAGG In the final contest of the season Eureka went down to defeat 13 to 0 at the hands of the powerful Fort Bragg aggregation. The captain of the Fort Bragg team ran the Eureka team ragged, and no one seemed to be able to stop him except the erstwhile Bill Henders who was playing an end position. Page Seventy-nine fit? i Q kiizfih 1 . . Yr, , Em' , R'??F'z Sififfg ril Q 'RAA- 'RAV H, . rt 5 1 gifk is ,r-.jf '1A'A L 1 J f y.. --. , M. K R 1i5x'y4ifij.' M BILL HENDERS fs. Al A "f Right End .gi '-,f A' . . w ,v iggfz 4 if g .OHNNY FEEKES me f 'f ,g,:,Wf1E. - l Left Em! .. , iii Ei Af f 'J' flfwhgfzy - ' X ff ' :ffm 5 uf :gf L32 5 .L 1 L , WST :, 'zvgf I . V as u ,EQ RED BAUER s i -iw! ,Q-2 ff .Nr ,.-, ,W--X , -,gg X-'3Y!'v!g7w-fix 5127335-R' ' ' if . : jrfgmf 55, ' Lett Tackle .v?f.??' .Q wk? , R gg? "'. A ' A W f, mv, L' W " L Y?ffyz1:5f?i9iA?,, 'SON" TIERNEY , ,wi s M ,s,g':,-il? g3e53,2 , fa.gi,g5ggSlE24 Half Back I fp ,gg--' -I 4 fx U ' ' . f i R KZ 33j'v'xjfix K ' .Q 'Q il gqg'fgg,ge 3, ,ff . ' Qviiiii ai, Jfgf.ff3rgg RL X - -, I-13:11, ,Vx-wp:-f , XFX.. flfq'-will 'gag J. ., -. . Nf.-Jie F' '?fH,fge5f., L, MILTON BRITT am Q VX 391,54 ,.-qi L , 14 ALT' ' 5 .gi ,'fji'A7i .5 Left Guard , .IL if E' :,. 'Y "SAL" NYGARD Half Back L? ' ,af ll ' :QQ -5- :II- 1, Qgi5?1,f Y' ' - .. I Mt T! vw. XX, ',,, qiwmv' , g ' P" F R, 9, I . , - , ' ' .':.',', ., , . , . .R JM, 2 H: -'-w,-f-w:'- ' -' -"su 1" 1l'."'5:Q5., 1.-J, 1. -, ,....,,...4 .,-V.: , .. .. ,,...,., ,. . ---5 -www, , ,.:. .1g..:g,. Of 'T :fs-ms-',4,,-' - ww. f, ' 5 ,x . 3: . vw-4, lQV!Tifi!1N'!""' V: -1.554 -.f , A ' Wai" :P-, gaiggvgfi . """i' '32 wg .45 ,feffl L KQSEQ. BEN CRICHTON Right Guard JOE PAUL Full Back fifff. 1 EIN ,K Wh., ' Q 'L A -, Af fffgggr Page Seventy-eight . 32 2 R N Q 1 .j 541' .3 I , as 7' A , , 3 gif, gd w'ffi'e?K" s S J,- 4' W-bww 'L Jw if bww? at 'S x f AK R SWF'- L M34 if ' yy. L - " ' ' Q I .QL-5,5fff'5.1gfR'fgfpifl' -' - '?"i"1':x.- -13,'m- If .ysiiwyl x ' lY'i'-2 R .L . ., jfgyy wwf, 'X-Igifgigl' . Af x 1 , " ' ' -3-.,l'. Q.. . , "Q, 5 .: .. ' A x,,,,L.. W b ,W . L - 2531? X! 'Q fflku 'lf .' ?5,gi5l7r4-55-w-1: 'ix.-2-1.1V4w.R.':x2-W 'W hm -. . R' 1 f 1 'wa-x,.,j..,i3S'av N wx r g . 4-r-G'-11157. 'Wi'-x""4K'3T"'lfUwwlelx-?--J5?f51?33J.fE?k?SifEigx?QvX.f1'3iii.foY.??.1.fL..xl',K'u.S5xv.L-x-nsL.. ar 4 ,.. ,f 1 . fn. fi' h l ' S ' 'Z' 2' r t Gt1C ection Q s iff A A I yi X Y' Y gil 'A . . gmfys ,LKA gf ',L'1 X A Q. fn- if . 'sis' . xii? . i 8, ,, l X af. wif 'Wil l -42251 2 w lit f' i .fe 5 S 5 MAXINE BROWN AGNES JOHNSON "CORKY" KNIFSEND ,,. 4' - A if Yell Leader Girls' Athletic Manager Boys' Athletic Manager 6 JAY WILLIARD Coach ' T "Y Review of IQ32 Football Games Wfhen old man football's reign was over for the year at the Eureka High School there were many smiling faces among the students. The cause for these smiles was the winning back of the Humboldt-Del Norte C. I. F. cham- pionship. It was a happy day for members of the 1932 football squad when the coveted cup was presented to the student body by the Ferndale student body president, Scott Peterson. The old "trophy case" was a meeting place for days after, where students came to gaze on their won prize. Now that the cup has found its Way into the Eureka High again, it is up to the coming teams to see that it stays here in its present resting place. Taking the past season as a Whole, it has been a really successful one. The Eureka team went undefeated in their regular C. I. F. competiton. The games which they lost were to teams which were heavier and more experienced than they. Coach Willard deserves much praise for bringing the team home in front of the other teams in the C. I. F., and we are wishing him the best . i.. 1 f i ... 5 -- - .-1' i if F E: if t ff.. 5 at' L l . K 1 k . l :Eiv- ' F ra f . . . 1 aww f E, l . , g-.......s sign UW? iii... of luck with his teams in years to come. ' 3, 4, ' ' .. ...viii pb L- ,. ff A i Page Seventy-seven 'V . my Qrfv 5 - Q I f f 1 S' iffy' 'n. 'ik e ,, fm , - 5,3 agff me 'V ' ..5?'igf. " fg ilu .1543 K. exe. '15 J' A ft' ' 5 fi-i'f'3 gf? 1 Q, ' e2f7-'4-iw .. 3' A ' 4. -. K -I .QF 5, 35 j' T A ' N "ff3tfl'l F: 1 C l A 9 'gg' Ni . 1fQg g 'f :g ' 7438 ss. yaggtf. pgs f. pg ?g,.5-iff ' 29 1.1, S .5 'r v t .... , 'W 'V .,w':e- 1 3? fq- " El M Q . f.:ee.amwws1mfe'mf.f sa .an . -. . ' - I' ' Preview of Athletics EEPING fit' is one of the important factors toward the Well-being of any individual. The majority of persons, however, spend little or no time in exercising their bodies sufficiently to keep them fit. High school athletics furnish opportunity for the student to find both exercise and recreation which will be of value to him not only during the time spent in the actual playing but also in later life through the foundation of a more rugged and healthful body. Nearly every true athlete takes pride in keeping himself in good physical trim. Poor physical condition is conducive to poor mental condition and often retards a career which otherwise might have been brilliant. Athletics also often help the individual to form the habit of keeping fit so that after graduating from school the training carries over and the person finds some form of exercise which will be strenuous enough to keep down ex- cess weight. Athletics contain many helpful character building features as well as the body building influences. Dependability, perserverance, pluck, the ability to cooperate, and sportsmanship are qualities which are recognized in the true athlete. rw Q X , Q W g V 9. I 5 ,"f'ai.1fY'3 -' " D bf .L - - .JA -'HWk 37,+v:- v L it V' ' " .l7"1 5 . , ,"i:W,. +R M 'Y' ' ' 1- ....' " . ...."-.xi f ,W 'jew L:fi - 'A ' 1- -V fig. .N 4 ' m.u -Q. VFigEgpn E1QQW?EHigAb-- keys victory. . N ,V K Our old EugLf4 jFj:5lg Now look.: z5 y0..g Fightpn dm! win for ber. d name, Figbtfqig to i . fffbfofh Q ,.. IAV- . ji fkw- '.-' K 5 ,PWM 1'426l9'e4fw MSL ' ' '2EurEkQaHigL5 I I .1 . Our 11i4i3bs.'toq,gge::ll for you, EufekBt.Hi,gQ5-Eiqfeb aliigli Fighi,p5rfq,L:i:Q+y7-'- ' 4 I Ffskfwr ' ,11- Q. .' if fx 1 n Page Seventy-fog? ' ' x, ,I 5. A '- """""'h-.....,, ' mfg w fwmggigwfxxv amlgwf Page Seventy-three VAS YOU DER CHARLIE? ' I . Acknowledgment ' ' . From the beginning of the 1932-33 school year it was a matter of con- jecture as to whether or not a Sequoia would be published in 1933. The reason for this uncertainty was the fact that the country was going through the worse part of"an economic depression which had been 'ravaging the world for three years. Usually the larger part of the yearly Sequoia budget is secured through the solicitation of advertisement from business firms. It was decided that owing to the bleak economic outlook, no sub- scriptions for advertisements would be sold to the business men this year. Thus a new source of income must be derived. Either the 1933 Sequoia would be a 100 per cent school project or it would not be published. The only feasible means of securing money in the high school was through cash donations -from the various clubs and classes. When these groups were asked for their support, they responded immediately with gen- erous donations, thereby showing their desire to cooperate in furthering any worthwhile project and at the same time showing good school spirit. In many cases some contemplated project or feed had to be sacrificed to permit the club to give a donation to the Sequoia. Thus it was through the generosity of the following organizations and classes that the Sequoia was made possible, and the entire staff wishes to ex- tend its sincere appreciation to these groups: Big E Club Excalibur Club Class of January 1933 Class of June 1933 The Sequoians 1 Drama Department Girls' League Pep Committee Alumni Association Many individuals who were not regular members of the Sequoia staff, aided the editor at various times in gathering material and in writing articles for the book when they were under no obligation to do so. This spirit of cooperation is appreciated not a little, for in many instances the help re- ceived was of the, greatest importance to the work. ' In the print shop where the real production work of the Sequoia is carried on, were many boys who gave their time unstintingly during the rush period. The majority of the students cannot realize what a task these boys have completed in printing this book, for no fitting expression of thanks can be adequate for this service which they have rendered their school. Page Seventy-two 3 Q The High-Y Club 9 The Hi-Y club is one of the service clubs in the high school at the present time. The club is a branch of che National Y. M. C. A., and the meetings of the club are held in the Y. M. C. A. building each Wednesday evening. In these weekly meetings the members of the club usually take part in an open forum discussion of the topics of world and national importance which are being discussed by leaders of che World's affairs. After the regular meet- ing, the members spend their time playing indoor games. The Hi-Y club is composed of upper classmen and graduates of the high school. The purpose of the club is to aid in development of high Christian ideals in future citizens of the community and the nation. The Black Cat dance which was sponsored by the Hi-Y club during the spring semester was one of the most successful dances given since Christ- mas. The club entered a basketball team in the Y league competition and they also had a baseball team which furnished recreation for many of the members of the club. Once a month the club goes on a hike in a group. Some of the projects carried on by the club during the past year were of a helpful character and were in keeping with the ideals of the club. One of these projects was the presentation to charity of a box of food during the winter months. ,,, 1,7 . Officers for the fall term were president, Ivan Zerlangg vice-president, fry "VL ' Joe Ruddg secretary, Robert Turnerg treasurer, john McLoughlin. - 5 ' 3' M9 . .. gi. FZ I x I W I .f-. , Ar'f'f ,ff , J---.uw , 41? W, , zfifiiifif I i 'g r 1. 0 5 'L . 4 1? ' i 1"age Seventy-one N y -,if-45.5" 3 ' -'sf t ': b fp M , . ' .,., 4,: - gpg g , ...f,,.::'.g,,, 5 . , ,r Km . L2m...'1,zgr , A . - u -Q g , is-2 ' f M A f' 5.4. ' 1 qw ., sz .-1.431 .M .a M -- V U ii--zli'7?3rq e . K I f Tfiififw si ' V ' iiiiik' s C timlai gsf-F . . s p,,,,.,5,frf, A B 751 W A i is fxhifffii . A 3. 4 . r, ,. M- ......,......4,..... .............q..L.fa.1.,. .wnvx salmon-sas.ur..vi41wfrw..mw:: RwWhY199NW5H??P'f A JA'.f '::.5I5w3"'gi!?iixfd?ii55. lf? 4 Q ' The Excalibur Club 'Q The Excalibur Club is a junior service club for high school upper class- men. Through the efforts of a group of local business men, the first Ex- calibur Club was formed in the Eureka High School in 1925, under the spon- sorship of the Eureka Knights of the Round Table. Since that date, the idea has spread throughout the state, and the Excalibur Clubs are active in Arcata, Fortuna, Ferndale, Oakland, and Fresno. At the present time, plans are being discussed to make the club a national organization. During the past year, the Excalibur Club promoted a series of noon dances, the proceeds of which went to finance the Sequoia. At a convention of the Knights of the Round Table at Stockton in the spring of 1932, much enthusiasm was shown over the prospect of making the club a national organization. The officers of the Excalibur for the fall term were aresident, Harold l Charters, vice-president, Howard McGowan: secretary, Bill Slade: treas- urer, Richard Albert: corresponding secretary, Harry A. Duffy, Jr. In the spring term the officers were president, Howard McGowan, vice- president, Bill Slade, secretary, joe Hinchg treasurer, Joe Paul, correspond- ing secretary, Harry A. Duffy, Jr. Page Seventy 5' .0 The Biology Club 6' I The Biology club was organized for the purpose of conducting speech programs, and for the purpose of securing guest speakers to talk to the club on various subjects which came under discussion during the course of the study of biology. The club also sent messages of cheer to any member of the class who was out of school because of illness. The club was fortunate this year in securing several speakers who were good talkers and were Well acquainted with their subjects. Some of the men who addressed the club were Fred Jackson, who gave an instructional talk on silkworms, their habits and valueg Mr. W. E. Peacock, Who spoke to the club about the life of beesg Mr. Earl Mills, who named and described many of the well known injurious insects of the United Statesg and Dr. G. A. Howatt, Whose speech concerned the outstanding characteristics of birds, which were to be found in Humboldt County. The club Went on several field trips on which they gathered specimens of animals and insects for study. Officers for the club were president, Larry Nelsong secretary, Nora Gallong treasurer, Jean McDonaldg Bark reporter, Mary Burnsg the instructor was Miss Griffin. - if I Page blxty-nlnt ,..:-. . w. . X "f'zff-'. .. gi ,gt 'D "T'25":'Q i'3""E7. Lwivlff- . n v ffwmfi - .-',,wp"' A . Mwif - H ' The Eu-Hi-Phy Club 'Q The Eu-Hi-Phy club is an organization composed of the members of Miss Griffinls physiology class. The class organized for the purpose of having speakers and class speeches, and up to date, the club has had three speakers. Dr. G. A. Howatt spoke about birds, naming those in the show-case and telling about each one. Dr. G. F. Norman explained the methods used for blood transfusions, describing various experiments and the manner in which they were started. The class was interested in the four types of blood and the fatal results of mixing them. Dr. Sidney Bartlett told the club about the eyes, their structure, nearsightedness, farsightedness, and the method of test- ing the eyes and second sight. Officers of the club are as follows: president, Martha Sunnarig vice- president, Evelyn Quarnheimg secretary, Helen Boggessg treasurer, Nelma Similag and reporter, Ed Null. Roy Ivancicli was vice-president the first semester and Helen Angst was Bark reporter. Miss Griffin is the adviser and instructor. X Q Page Sixty-eight -In Girls' Athletic Association 1 The Eureka High School G. A. A., an organization for girls who have won recognition in some girls' sport, has taken part in many activities of an athletic nature this year. Among the most outstanding of their activities were the games played with the Junior High School Athletic Association. The club has its social activities as well as its work in athletics. During the fall term a party was given for all of the members of the club. The party proved to be a success and much enjoyment was had by all who attended. The initiation of new members is always an occasion for a great deal of fun in any organization. The members who were initiated into the G. A . A. this year found this to be the rule. Recently interest in the Girls' Athletic Association has waned somewhat, but the club has kept up its work and has planned many projects for the promotion of interest in girls, athletics. The officers for the year were as follows: president, Ruth Larisong vice-president, Nora Gallonj secretary, Barbara Jean Russellg treasurer, Frances Hunnicutg song leader, May Holmg yell leader, Goldie Tamburovich: sergeant-at-arms, Veronica Quinn. Page Sixty-seven hggk- it 'Elin' .QP . 4, ,v 5 -1- " The Varsity Club 'H The Varsity "EH Club is composed of boys who have won big "E's" through their participation in high school athletic competition. Those who have Won small "E's" are honorary members of the club. The semi-annual Varsity "E" Dance which is sponsored by the Varsity "E" Club is one of the most popular of the social functions of the school year. The initiation of the new members of the club each semester is always an occasion of no little fun on the part of the old members. Things usually liven up considerably when a group of from thirty to fifty boys get together with such an object in view. And these initiations are no exception to the rule. The club joined with the other organizations of the school in backing the Sequoia by donating fifty dollars. The boys sacrificed a feed to do this and they should be commended for their action. A noteworthy service that the club performs for the school is the patrol- ling of the stadium or gymnasium during the athletic games. This is a real service since the games are usually overrun by youngsters Who have little re- gard for the rules and regulations which have been established regarding where the spectators shall sit. The officers for the past year were president, Howard McGowang vice- president, Blaine Boiceg secretary-treasurer, Ervin Hadley. Page Sixty-six i ' ' A -In The Redwood Bark M The Redwood Bark, Eureka High's weekly newspaper, has had the dis- tinction this year of being written by an experiencd editorial staff. According to the system newly inaugurated by Miss McGeorgc, news writing instructor, a student is not allowed to be a member of the Bark Staff until he has com- pleted a six months' course in English N. The present staff is made up of the advanced journalism class, numbering about Hfteen students. The editor-in-chief and the business manager of the Redwood Bark are elected by the student body at the regular yearly student body elections. Ed- itor Selvin Nygard and business manager Richard Albert should be compli- mented on their efficient managment of the Bark throughout the last year. The newswriting faction of the school suffered a severe loss in the passing of Lee Q'Brien. "Hank',, as he was known by all of the students, was drowned in Humboldt Bay after the boat in which he was riding capsized. Although Hank was not a regular member of the spring Bark staff, he con- tributed many fine articles at various times during the term. The staff of the Redwood Bark is as follows: editor, Selvin Nygard: business manager, Richard Albert, feature editor, Grace Schell, sport editor, Curtis Ruzicg exchanges, Frances Hinds and May Holmg news writing in- structor, Miss Edith McGeorgeg printing instructor, A. Bolenbachg reporters, Jean Davis, Joe Paul, Agnes Horntvedt, Cecelia Crowley, Marcial Wooden, Goldie Tamburovich, Agnes Johnson, Leslie Vannoy, and H M moldt Gates. ,van ,Az Page Sixty-five L Q, ii H' The Production Staff 'g No matter how well the Sequoia is written, or how well the art work is planned, if the printing in our High School Print Shop is not properly done, the book will lack effectiveness and will fail to make that pleasing impression we expect of it. It is a difficult job for inexperienced students to do work comparable to that done by printers with years of experience. How well they have done is for you to decide. The following are the members of the Sequoia Production Staff: Leonard Benaski, linotype compositiong William Ziegler and Charles Perrone, make- upq Bill Murphy, Earl Wahlund, George Edeline and Joe Bonomini, press workg Clyde Lawson, stockmang Blythe Clay, charge of folding and assem- bling. The Bark Production Staff has the same problem in getting out a pre- sentable paper and getting it out on time, regardless of lack of practical ex- perience. Bark linotype operators are Selvin Nygard, Leonard Benaski, Clyde Lawson, William Ziegler, Al Simpson, Leo Perrone, Joe Tomich and LaVerne Bonhamg pressmen, Joe Bonomini and Milton W'ahlund: make-up, Selvin Nygard and George Burwellg proofreader, George Edeline. Page Sixty-four Page Sixty-three Q liffi. r. ,sip . . if 3155. i ,a Qing, eq inlay, fgfygiit Qi' A X :JM ' f "FS ' A . v , -fs f i V . ' ii 'i jilf' 91 , Q 1,2 f wr' rs. 1, vi :YQ f P' ' -if ...fi '." "W" .M- ' . ' 1 . Zh -.15 .xiii f g rff i ' 'iii ' f .1 F , Wiz 445: cv ii A..-acl' M 5 gin' .1 .5 PU.. i ' g' Eureka l-ligh Girls' League ' The Girls' League has carried on its usual activities this year and has also put much time and thought on Friendship and Better Programs. In carrying out the motif of friendship, the combined Big and Little Sister party and Girls' Hi Jinks, a noon dance, and a novel Leap Year dance Were greatly enjoyed. Under better programs some excellent entertainments Were given, the outstanding features of which were a charming and instructive talk on literature, given by Mrs. Arthur Gist, an inspiring talk on Norwegian music, given by Miss Florence Craven, a successful style show, a beneficial speech contest on the subject of Charm, and talks from the Girls' League Conven- tion by Arcata and Fortuna representatives. The Girls' League also sent the following delegates to the League con- vention in Fortuna: president, Veronica Quinn, elected delegate, Helen Ruzic, speaker on Charm, Birdena Kennedy. A new committee was added to the League this year and it proved to be one of the most active committees of the Girls' League, the Pep com- mittee. This group of about sixty girls sponsored the noon programs and assisted with the school rallies. The hospital committee has carried out its usual activities this year by giving monthly progams at the T. B. hospital and sending gifts to the patients on Christmas and Easter. This committee also sponsored a public card party. The cabinet met every Thursday noon to conduct the business of the League. Following are the advisers for the committees: decoration committee Miss Borg, hospital comm., Miss Sutton, publicity comm., Miss McGeorge, social comm., Miss Sutton, hospitality comm., Miss Mathews, out-door im- provements, Miss Griffin, pep comm., Miss Jacobson, sunshine comm., Miss Meredith, basement comm., Miss Clark, Red Cross comm., Mrs. Klepper, pro- gram comm., Miss McGeorge, financial adviser, Miss Calvert. GIRLS' LEAGUE OFFICERS First row in picture: Agnes Johnson, Pep Comm., Evelyn Quarnhfeim, Social comm., Marie Knudsen, Corresponding Sec., Evelyn Bagley, Sunshine Committee. Second row: Veronica Quinn, President, Louise Grude, Treasurer, Agnes Horny- vedt, Recording Secretary, Doris Clarke, Hospital Committee. 7 Thi d row: Lena Brambani, Vice President, Nelma Simila, Basement Comm., Jane Chamberlain, Yell Leader, B-etty Wagner, Hospitality Committee. Fou.'th row: Estella Flaherty, Hospitality Comm., Jean McDonald, Deco-ration Comm., Lucille Canepa, Sergeant-at-arms, Anne Montgomery, Program Committee. Fifth row: Merle Tausch, Shut-in Comm., Dorothy Nelson, So-ng Leader, Olive Crothers, Outd-oor Improvement, Elna Orre, Red Cross Committee, Ruth McCabe, Publicity Committee. ,A V3 ,X ,Y p g Page Sixty-two A y . 3313 , ,a,,,.,.. . . ,.,,.w,e- 1:".',r fai5'CC.EZL2 " . latte L V I, W 4 ". v .N-. ' .sr-e , - ws, . . ., - -as an A 1. ' "V . 1. ., .f ' his ,-fuk. .f A . i za. " . 'i':.f"?aP't' ,iw w as Y ,. i, A Q Q Ji L 'H' -. V f sz, . ff ' K f ' fi iz? ' K . , - 1 . g,.,,, 1 -is ' . .1. - N ..'f-.F M. . -F ' , , . r,,. , .8 ri 4 ! f as" f. .4 M, ., . .1 .9 4 -. 4 Q ' Q sz . .Q ,W a ,ii , Y fsrawwlrw.-i.-b . ,535 , .- A tg ' L W" f"'t 1-, ., -...'u,.,' -'s'J. "QM, . La.,,51 ' "'s'H..: V avg -47 .. ,f i r i 43. ,. V . - X. kip ja L n, Q Wx: ' VTR? ff' 9 ' . its A -. 'F-"',' Q ' . - - at-"rt.ws..i F s s 1' I Q 5 ii ,Iii 5 i X 'N .gr 33 we 5 X is 'I .QF-i age . . Q x f ' ,G .., ...g,g,.: we - - f. Y'-. ., , A .3 L? :W if 1 ' 1 K f. gxfjsft 5 .gn , we 1: s. ,iii ...,., , ,e,p !f,,ii3z,.f.Y., X, . my .- .. .. 3, N ..,,,,q -wr'-'r ' . Girls' League Pep Committee 'Q' ' 1 Having as its object the quiclcening of the school spirit as a Whole, the' Girls' League Pep Committee has carried on many and various projects dur- ing the past year such as a noon program which was for the purpose of raising money for the League. The Leap Year Party was given under the supervision of this committee. The committee has assisted in putting over all of the pep rallies given during the year. On May I2 the "Melting Pot" was given as an evening performance which goes down in history as an en- tertainment of great worth and as one of many enjoyable features. The program consisted of dances and songs representing the various nations of the world and bringing out the "Buy American" idea, and also emphasising the loyal attitude which should be held by all toward Uncle Sam. The group has in its membership many girls of no little talent who have assisted several of the other organizations of the school in their programs by contributing bits of this talent in a helpful manner. Page Sixty-one 5 ' The Student Council -- The chief business of the student body is handled by a representative group of six, which is known as the Student Council. At the regular yearly student body election the members are chosen by the direct vote of the student body after each of the classes have made their nominations for the Council members from their class. The students who have served on the Council for this year are among the outstanding students of the school. Aside from the training in parliamentary law which they receive, they have valuable opportunities for executive work and for the use of their good judgement. The Council decides the price of the student body tickets, makes ap- propriations for athletic equipment, and provides for and regulates all student body activities. One dissenting vote to any motion in the Council throws the matter before the Student Body, where it must be acted upon by the students as a whole. The meetings are held each Monday noon, except the Monday preceding the first Wednesday in the month at which time Student Body meetings are held. The student body officers preside over the meeting of the Council. The members of the Student Council for this year are as follows: 4H class, Bill Hendersg 4L class, John Petersen: 3H class, Bill Dalyq 3L class, Sulo Paasog ZH Class, Nedra Bowmang QL class, Robert Armstrong. The faculty advisers for the Council are Miss Smith and Miss Poindexter. Page Sixty 'l, Eureka High Student Body O RODNEY WALCII MARTHA SUNNARI GERALD JOHNSON President Secretary Treasurer The Eureka High School Student Body is practically a self-supporting institution. It owns and operates all the equipment used in the publishing of the school weekly, the Redwood Bark, and supplies all equipment used by the various athletic teams. The chief income of the Student Body is derived from the sale of Student Body tickets, gate sales of tickets at the games, and Redwood Bark advertising and subscriptions. Student Body meetings are held in the auditorium at one o'clock on the first Wednesday of each month, presided over by the Student Body president. All business not previously handled by the Student Council is brought up, and following the business meeting, a program is usually presented. Student body officers hold their positions for one year, the elections being held by secret ballot early in June for the following year. A nomina- ting committee and an election board is duly appointed to carry on the elections. A person is nominated for office by a number of signers, and his eligibility is then checked by the nominating committee, prior to the election. The officers of the Student Body for the year 1932-1933 were as follows: president, Rodney Walchg vice-president, Everett Watkinsg secretary, Martha Sunnarig treasurer, Gerald Johnson, sergeant-at-arms, Cden Hanseng boys' athletic manager, Curtis Knifsendg girls' athletic manager, Agnes johnson, song leader, Melba Corsettig yell leader, Maxine Brown, editor of the Red- wood Bark, Selvin Nygardg business manager of the Redwood Bark, Richard Albert, editor of the Sequoia, Arthur Miller, business manager of the Sequoia, Bill Slade, assistant business manager of the Sequoia, Henry Carlson. Page Fifty-nine ' i 4 W3-59.53 -ir' 355 f - 55 hifi: Hifi? -i 'J .ix-.v,....., V ,f't'!2,, , fy xziiigfa' Preview, Organizations CHOOL life would not be complete without organizations. The school itself is an organization with all the students taking a more or less active part as they see fit. The high tschool student body of today undertakes many more ac- tivities than did the student body organizations of a few years ago. Now the school paper and the school annual occupy major positions among the other activities of the school where formerly no enterprises of this magnitude were attempted. Other organizations such as the service clubs, boys' and girls' athletic clubs, and various other organizations which have a special purpose or are for the development of hobbies, make up an imposing list.e They form a diversion for those who are inclined to take part in activities of this type. At the high school age a student is usually unwilling to lead a humdrum life and must therefore find some activity outside the regular course of his studies which will keep up his interest in the school and the general curriculum. Participation in the club life im- proves and broadens the student's outlook on life, teaches him to be able to meet his fellow student in a social way and to conduct himself according to the best interests of those around him, and makes for better citizens by teach- ing some to lead and others to follow. Thus the nation itself is benefited by the training which the individual student gets while taking part in the club life of the high school. 1 . 1 '? W .s 'x-. .J- . Q., .. '1 .... R v f ge ,Lf-NL, ,, -Q 1 'ff ' ' ..,- ., 1 711.3-, p ' t X . hi.. L if . ., lf fi: AA . 'v-3 .L - 7 v . ..-. . J. 1 - .. 3'-, 'if 'Y' .L , . Q., " S' 'Q I , AJ 1, . .. i . -ir' -iw- mv' x , . . ls. - - lnqmk -13 7: 14' - . .,.f.', ' ,g..x '...1., ' f T M"'f', ,1, ', W A w nu. i A ..,,, , , g V- -A, wg T, , ' V i w Q ' . ff' ' 1' if V24 3 ' Q 15"-'f '35 I fimafa i x Lffni Y Big 'E' Yell e-u-r-e4-k-a x x! If-U-R-B-K-A wi f1j"Q' 4E-ULR-E-K-A , ' EUREKA!!! ! V i Q52 -je -u-r-e-k-a .fgQ" -,ji E-U-lx-E-x-A L 1 E- U5R -E -K -A Afyi,-'ffi 'f if W EUREKAH!! 1- X "i L 45 l QA cpu -r-c-k-a - , 'E-U-R-E-If-A x.i.'4Q'A ' L E-U-R-E-K-A ffV, Q ' EUREKA ! I ! ! , 33' -5 ..- ., 5. . 1 Q P5135 F'ift?'5i'?fL 'V .A -,-- -g.Mv. 1 4 - , ,W . . -U' if ,, .7-'15 . tj. , -. -my 1- yy ' 11:2 2 . M2 f?" yi ,JK , ,ld .,.Lj H' J A 'fffl fflb KX . 4'3" .. :yn '39.Qf - lla. - fy, 5 N K. '. 4 af, if I '5 hifi f - , P -. i 'M .4 "2 ,ga JG? Tu 'E FK, wx P' 51:5 . MY., Q ' lfjgfqs 1 -QQQ: X7 'f '7 3 Y I ll I , . A 'Y A 1 1 'SMP Y Y' HL aw ' K 1 , I X 'T ' .- lyrgiff QL 53 - ,zip P va? l Ae' .Q ,X 13 - ,swf U? A Lia' . fs .,vV" -.-54. .":P, 1 W, . ' V r Y Athi? , QL., 1 .A " I iw '. 46 " . 1, jii - f . 4 N . V -1-Li? , t lyk!! . 51' .Y .- - f' 4' .. . X2 N 1 ,S . Xu' F .s - f '-' '. ' -H. , ' v".1-- T' .na Q " , "f-S3 1 -yQ'45"' ' L,-vntglf ii' -1.95 e, r VW, 4. ,175 - , V , . Q' K ' J' 3 iff A ff. . gk,-. . ,Q .31 s L H' -2- The Alumni Smith, Lillian Selvage, Esther Selvage, Walter Edward Jack Stewart, Simpson, Sullivan, Joseph Shuster,' Evelyn Stewart, Dorothy Stewart, Arthur Samons, Edgar Simpson, Virginia Stenfort, Hubert Stewart, Ewen Smiley, Virginia Shaw, Anita Shaw, Ruth Switzer, Mary Schwab, Katherine Schleef, Evelyne Shaw, Ruth Seeley, Eva Schwab, Irma Taylor, Vernon Thompson, Mary Tornwall, Lillian Timmerman, Gale Tobin, Monroe Tinker Ward Tuiford. Frejqkc Udd, Edith Vineyard, Vivian Wilson, Leona Wasmuth, Marie Wahl, James Wilcox, Frank Williams, Ruth Wahl, Arthur - Wahlberg, Marie Watkins, Arrie Weatherby, Gladys Weatherhy, Letha Webb, Herbert Winters, Roberta Yamato, Bernice Zook, Genieve Page Fifty-five Snow, Flo' ence Stout er, Evelyn Sander, Walter Sunfors, Henry Shuster, Melvin s Sutherland, Stella Swanson, Linda Stewart, Elizabeth Sundfors, Harold Simpson, Nathelle Sullivan, Mae Speeg'e, Alvin Shaw, Mary Savage, Adele Simpson, Virginia Swanson, Claire Spain, John Switzer, Selyn Scott, George Shaw, Lucille Stock, Muriel Sandberg, Kenneth Torgerson, Oliva Twitchell, Ann Thomas, William Thompson, May Thompson, Eliz. Toft, Gertrude Q M? Ng 4 Viale, Oliver Wible, Ruth Wickett, Wilma Weatherby, Mary Westphal, Lily Wagle, Wilma Wooden, Leslie Wahl, Erma Williams, DeEtte Witherow, Virginia Wrigley, Dorothy Weatherby, Ruth Waldner, Glenn Yackley, Dorothy Zook. Kathleen Schmedfer, Charlet Steiner, Mary Stevens, Leynne Swanson, Cherwyl n Stee'e, Kelton - Still, Harlan A Shanahan, Marian Q Schwab, Marthelqlxlt- Stuart, Herbert Stemach, Joe Stemach, Mary Smith, Violet Sanderson, Ivy Swanson, Agnes ' Stewart, Barbara Samulson, Meryn Simpson, Walter Swaim, Frank ' Strand, Leslie ' Sundman, Valpas Semenotf, Violet Swanson, Evelyn Tunnel, Zelma Toft, Walter Tobin, Ruth V Thomas, Helen Thompson, Hazel Timmerman, Dolwi Vance, J ohn Welch, Fern Wooden, Herbert Wahlund, Elizabeth, Wourinen. E'len I Walker, Averill l Williams, Evelyn Wooden, Winifred Woodcock, Janet Wasmuth, Lloyd Weijola, Aili V I Watkins, Ruth ' White, Harry ,ld e Younkin, I-Iarrieti 3 0 Stewart, Muriel Shields, Fre'a 5Smith, Harold Smith, Rand olf f,Stahley, Grace , Stefinini, Mike Still, Adelaide Stock, Edith Stuart, Marion Swanson, Myrtle Stevens, Nila Shields, May Sundquist, Agnes Shutter, Hope Sundel, Erica Shields, Jack Shields, May Semenoif, Vera Schwab, Henrietta Simpson, James Sarlund, Ellen Speier, Linwood Tierney, Earnest Thompson, Thelma Torgerson, Carl Thompson, Robert Talvola, Ralph Thompson, Herman Wahl, Marie Wedge, Marion Wilson, Sigrid Wrigley, Irving Walimaki,, Aili Wilkins, Francis Ward, Kenneth Wrigley, Merged Wrigley, Ted ' Wells, Helen Wood, Lewis Wing, DeEtte Zane, Sim ' Zientara, Elsie I- 1: l Mclntire, Evelyn Martinda'e, Paul Mahan, Edward Maki, Vanio Manty, Tullikki Milled, Evadne Nelson, Edith Nielson, Mabel Nixon, Cecil Nilson, Evelyn Norgard, Wa'frid Nicholson, Irma Nielson, Anna Nordeck, Rosema Ogg, Kenneth Owen, Ralph Peterson, Melvin Peterson, Edgar Prior, Harold Pentin, Carol Porter, Connie Palmrose, Irma Persey,, Elinor Quigg, Thomas Quarnhiem, Elva Renfroe, Camille Rankin, Ansil Rountree, Lynn Ray, Frieda ' Rolley, Rowena Roscoe, Robe't Roscoe, Milton Rourke, Vera Rutledge, Grace Ricci, Matilda Ryan, John Roberts, William Runner, Druci'la Rosaia, Andrew Saari, Signe Sarvis, Melba Swanson, Erleen Swanson, Carl Sfarritt, Wlsie rie The Alumni Mueller, Ernest Morton, Dorothy Mills, Carl Miller, Evadna Merrill, Addie Mills, Carl Nielson, Dorothy Nordeck, Francis Naileigh, Mays Nordeck, Gertrude Nelson, Lorene Nieri, Louis Nelson, Herbert Nichols, Cecil O'sen, Freda Ohmen, Walter Persons, Clarence Poscic, Zdenka Pasola, Thelma Petty, Helen Pride, Mile red Peterson, Elsie Powell, Corewyn Quigg, Charles Quintrell, Pearce Riedel, Martha Russell, Mary Reed, Alison Roberts, Paul Rogers, Margaret Robinson, Peggy Reinholtsen, Irma Ragan, Rosaline Rand-el, Lee Rourke, Donald Robertson, Harold Robertson, Sydney Reynolds, Earla Simpson, Wayne Spiller, Ted Spau'ding, Drexel "aari, Ira Sanberg, Violet Mortenson, Kenny Martin, Wallace McKnight, Gladys Marks, Virginia Morris, Wava Nellis, Jane Newton, Dorothy Newman, Pauline Nelson, Gwen Nelson, Herbert Nixon, Veldon Nellis, Ruth Noyes, Howard Overholser, Wayne Ondeacek, Tony Peterson, Aga Pedrazzini, Ethel Peterson, Jennie Palmrose, Allie Penn, Lillie Pederson, Bill Pride, Gertrude Quinn, Phyllis Reid, Evelyn ' Rankin, Christie Roberts, Earl Redmond, OTive Ryan, Mary Rollins, Raymond Rutledge, Eleanor Renfer, Alice Roberts, Frank Renfer, Rudolph Rager, Clyde Reid., Lenore Reynolds, Susan Stemach, Millie Swanson, Mildred Seely, Elmo Saffel, Dorothy Sears, Mary O Minnie, Raymond Mitts, Mildred Maffia, Annie Moe, Mildred McClure, Bill Neilsen, Francis Nordeck, Edna Neall, Harriet Newell, Herbert Norgard, George Nylund, Marie Nelson, Edwin Ogg, Glen Ohmen, Mar y Palmrose, Helgi 1 Poland, Cherrie Perske, Gordan Plummer, Doris 'eterson, Lester Petersen, Rose Penn, Rose Quinn, Robert Reynolds, Ross Ruegg, Inez Rhodes, Dorothy Ryburn, James Ray, Elsie Ray, Frank Renfroe, Irma Rogers, Wi'liam Robertson, Len Robertson, Claire Robertson, Dot Reese, Cynthia Roberts, Charles Smith, Warren Shanahan, Kenneth Sears. Ada Stubbs, Dorothy Shively, Beatrice Page Fifty-four McDaniel, Blanche .,, sr' 1 J ewett, Charles Johnson, Sophia Johnson, Dorothy Johnson, Vernon Johnson, Vera Johnson, Mable Jannieson, Harry Jefferies, Han'y Kearney, Barbara Kelly, Ray Kappila. Sylvia Long, Grace Lemon, Helen Lewis, Robert Luca , Cora Lane, Henry Loo, Ethel Larsen, Harold Lucas, R-ena Levasseur, Eliz. Larison, Ardyth Leslie, Me'vine Ledstone, Helen Lund, Clara Malloy, Francis Moseley, Izabella McRae, Donald Maisen, Helen Maclnnes, Albert Morgan, Ruth Malloy, Wa1'ace McGa"aghan, Bert McNally, John McConnel, Bessie McDaniels, Lottie Malm, Vera Maloy, Nora Mitchell, Marjorie Martin, Eleanor Moore, Francis Massei, Vincent Mitts, John McQuay, Edna Mabry, Josephine McCann, Dorothy Ma"ks., Helen McCann, Edith Page Fifty-three as ,, The Alumni , -2. Jewett, William J essen, Charles 'Q,33i4 ,,ohnson, Ernest J on-es, Virginia o Johnson, Lyllian ckson, Fred Johnson, Howard Jones, Barbara J nson, Kenneth Johnston, Mary Johnson, Elsie hgf-Q fohnson, George Jewett, Catherine Jack, Marjorie J f,, i Q hnson,VLuci1le Johnson, Ruby Johnson, Elin ckson, E'eanor Johnson, Eilleen Jack, Robert ',li'5i ,,,Q nes, Hally Johnson, Nestor Johnson, Harold Nr ckobsen, Sylvia K e I if Kortell, Vivian Kennedy, Maxine onu, Ino Kovacovich, Chas. Kamm-erzell, Ma ' oskela, Eddie Kirkpatrick, Jennie ' Leese, Ben Logan, Marion 'f?? e' ver, H-elen Lord, Ruth Leonard, Verdon 1,25 iddle, Bernice Lyman, Clifford Laverty, Margarefg v o, Florenec Long, Bill Lininger, Barbari?e,ffA ", doux, James Liddle, Roswell Lewis, Donald ofbourfow, Thelma Look, Sybyl Little, 'rheoeora Hinge--, Carol Lubeck, Ben Lawson, Leland f verty,,Gladys Lindbe'g, Lucille Long, Milton averty, H-enry Lytel, Gene Lee, Valentina ddle, Ethel Lyman, Jam-es La' son, Harold g ndgren, Ivy Lee, Wal'ace Look, Margorie ddle, Ralph Leighton, Jean Lewis, Edward ng, Vera Leighton, Inez Lane, Lora f ' ne, Marjorie M ,hi A vioore, Herb Moore, Maxine Eillortenson, Elsie U Mortenson, Maxine Moorehead, Garland Milligan, Esther McKeehan, Willard Mo' ton, Audrey Malloy, John McGaraghan, Marg. Murray, Irma Murphy, Kate Miller, Carl McGrath, Larry Minor, Harmon Marsh, Lew McAfee, Juanita Marten, Bettse Melanson, George Metcalf, Dona'd Melendy, Marion Morgan, Ida Murry, Bernice Miner, Edith Molash, Estelle Ma' oy, Roy Mitchell, Evelyn McIntosh, Helen Moll, Leno Murray, Eugene Moseley, Marcella Massey, James ' Mackins, Sic'ney Mathias, Shirley Marks, A'len Montgomery, Neal Monroe, Leota Mitchell, Grace Martin, Ethel , 00dy, Robert MacMillan, Cath. lglay, Kenneth McGowan, Winnogelfllontgomery, Jim Harz, Clara MacCormack, Fran Marten, Katherine Melanson, Edwina McA'lister, Hono'a 'Ma1loy, Mary Maguire, Marie Martz, Ellen Murray, Ernest Morton, Donald McGowan, Fred L McKnight, Helen i Malm, Mildred I ' McDonald, Dorothy Mathews, Mabie, Myrt'e Manty, August Moore, Fred Melanson, Marie McGaraghan, Frank Galen John , Allen ' Austin 4-.P ' .1 . , Q, , 4 A 1 1 5 ? . 3gf?WN Q IN YE OLDEN DAYS .1 K -QrWyL.,5Z.,wj:h:..-, ,L,..,vZQwA?.f 4- AT' if 1-fy. - . , . ' . . S- ' ' . ?1.f.,4,Q M Ex ' l ' ' ' V -. ...MAJ Page Fifty-two QW Y7?f5?5?7? ' " yi.. fi ', 'V I W ' 'Lu Elder, Kathleen Eastbrarn, Joseph Eastburn, Jessie French, Irma Frasier, Thomas Fenwick, Hugh Farley, Kenneth Fitzell, Alfred Foster, Edward Flowers, Pearl Graham, Evelyn Gallagher, John Gronemeyer, Helen Gregerson, George Green, Lilliam Goyan, Gerald Green, Pauline Grey, Anthony Gregewsen, Helen Goodwin, Ralph Gillis, Bernard Gross, Katheryn Hamby, Ted Henrick, Alil Henricks, Sadie Hi'l, Curtis Hinikes, Beatrice Halvorsen, Marie Hellbefg, Isador Hemenway, Bernice Hibler, Lucille Hill, Lenore Hinch, Mevine Herlbutt, Eileen Howard, Phyllis Hornung, Francis Havemann, Dot Hansen, Elbert Hansen, Harold Holm, Anna Hill, Welle Harper, Arvilla Huber, Erla -Irving, Ralph Ivancich, Zora Page Fifty-one swipe-V? .,gr,,- e5q5f,s 7 l 'i' The Alumni ' Edwards, Marie Everts, Grace Flaherty, Frank Fitze'l, Edward Fleishman, Hellen Foley, Kenneth French, Evelyn Freitas, Mary Green, Mildred Green, Carl Girsback, Eino Glenn, Marian Godfrey, Hiletta Giacomini, Audrey Goodwin, Fred Gove, Alice Gallagher, Thomas Gould, Maxine Godfrey, Frances Hanson, Ann Hamann, Eleanor Hanson, Dorothy Howard, Marie Hubbard, Clara Hansen, Laura Hi'flicker, Harry Holmberg, Harold Heney, Marian Helstrup, Harold Havemann, Alice Harvey, Marian Hess, Marie Hill, Kenneth Hodges, Dorothy Hermanson, Lylvia Hibler, Watt Hill, Gladys Huber, Lloyd Hutchinson, Barb. Hanka, Elvi Ingalls, Louise Edson, Marian , F '- is 'L Fraser, Charlotte H Frey, Carolyn Englehart, Chrisiitiz Etter, Wilhelminai '1 .gi 5 r 1 3 4 1 5 ,z -l Frederickson, Rf fl Finley, Irva 7 ' Frederickson, Lo Q H A: 1 flatly, Gennieve Early, Mary Fry, Florence Frost, Leonard Finley, Percy Flowers, Kemp -Feenaty, Milf red "Flowers, Grace Frey, Doris G N Gregerson, Anna 1 jv Getchell, Mildred 2: Goodwin, Ruth . Gould, Donald Gooc'win. Dorothy Graham, Barbara" Gastman, Annettiffg 2 s A Gerard, George Guiott, Carl Gustafson, Julia if Billette, Carol ffieorgeson, Fred qGreen, George ,bi Georgeson, Robehigaj Gow, Errol ,ji Greenburg, Geering, Henry 3Glenn, Jana - Getchell, Eleanor Gillis, Curtis Groshong, Maybelle Gutsch, Vivian 'T H ,ff Haugan, Clarence, Henders, Dolores Z Hodges, Lola f Holm, Mildred Hinch, Jessie Hart, Lylian Hale, Helen Hudson, Ruth Hunter, Haro'd ,,- S i Hemenway, Emil f Howatt, Haven Hemenway, Bernard Holm, Earl Hendricks, Arno ' Hemenson, Ted Hutchinson, Stella, Henderson, Graham Herron, Mabel Hansen, Esther ? Hemphill, James Hazelwood, Bob Hine, Mary Head, Herbert I , Irving, Theodore he c Holm, Herbert Head, George Harper, Laura Henry, Janet Hudson, Georgina Hanna, Astrid Hermanson, Julia Hilton, Corinne Ho'lenbeck, Alta Hoover, Nina Hultine, Leonard Hensel, Robert Hemley, T4-d Hungate, Norman Harper, Margery Hill, Audrie Hud6 art, Donald Hanna, Selma Huggler, Gertrude Isackson, Iver L P 5 V dunce, Ivan Bernier, Edna Borup, Leafy Benjamin, Phyllis Barnum, Fred Belcher, Kate Ballard, Dona'd Boies, Winfred Biord, Clyde Benzinger, Al Bacon, Harold Bartlett, Sydney Burgess, Gerald Bryant, Mildred Brisley, Mildred Boice, Blaine Cave, Helen Conant, Helen Cartright, Mary Curry, Douglas Calkins, Raymond Corten, Everet Cook, Edwin Chain, John Cartright, Louise Curr y, Mary Cannam, Burr Cave, Norene Craddock, Harriet Cartwright, Ruth Cronin, Catherine Cralle, Bertha Carlson, Edna Ch' istie, Florence Clancy, Mildred Corten, Agnes Cave, Cora Carlson, Goldie Calkins, Olin Dinsmore, Laura De Cantillon, H. De Carlow, Wilbur Delaney, Ellis Dean, Olive Doane, Walter Doane, Edwin Duck, Esma A The Alumni Beamer, Loganell Brennan, Ada Brown, Hattie Barnes, Chester Benton, Daniel Boice, Clara Brantley, Lucil'e Ballard, Rtlth Burroughs, Neva Baldock, Charlene Brown, Kenneth Brown, Carvel Brantley, Kenneth Boice, Charles Bell, Lincoln Baronti, Albert Cartwright, Elta Cloney, Mae Cockran, Melvina Cummings, Laurel Curry, C'yde Cornwell, George Childs, Edrice Cameron, Shirley Comrick, Louis Carrington, Bert Cronin, Dorothy Crowley, Frances Cowen, Edward Callihan, Sht,rley Chandler, Bessie Clark, Fae Clark, Clifton Clay, Margaret Carrington, Virginia Clary, Raimond Chamvers, Russe'l Carlson, Edith Christopher, Eilleen Dinsmore, Ted Danielson, Ermel Dimton, Harrieta Delanyi Zelma Duff, Lucile Derby, Eleanor Duck, Charles , Davis, Gladys Davis, Marjory Bell, Fred Bailey, B'ossom Bernell, Elvie Brod-erick, Helen Bruce, Phylis Boydstein, Aubrey Bryant, Arthur Barber, Lucille . Burman, Ellis Burman, Ellen Brohaw, Rhoma Baldwin, Doris B'iven, Brunson Bartlett, Harlan Belas, James Baronti, Julio ' C Carlson, Howard Cottrell, Lois Cowen, Harry Carrington, Phyllis Crowe, Clarence Clarke, Hilda Cummings, Curtis Copeland, Beryl Crane, Walter Carson, Charles Co'lins, Portia Crichton, George Campbell, Helen Cloney, Gerald Cloney, Elinor Carlson, Martha Cousins, Howard Campton, Donald Campbell, Nellie C'ary, Gail Cave, William r Clay, Helen Caviness, Robert D Dorais, Sidney Duncan, Lucile Daly, Cornalius Dunn, Evelyn Damgaarf, Lillian Davis, Catherine Derby, George Dolf, Llowd Dzvcnport, J. C. O Boggs, June Bucholzer, Elsie Barber, Charles Belch-er, Jean Brantly, Genevieve Bleything, Capitola Brantley, Margaret Bal'ard, John Baumgartner, Elva Baldwin, Dougla Brackens, Lloyd Biord, Wayne Berrie, Catherine Barnett, Eugene Brower, Catherine Crone, Ellen Celli, Joe Cronin, Mary Cannem, Melpha Cochrane, Lois Curry, Robert Cotter, Jane Coffey, Mary Carson, Ruth Carlson, Selwyn Celli, Ida Clark, Frank Cochrane, Grace Co'lins, Dysta Canepa, Lois Christensen, Freija Canepa, Louis Cloney, Katherine Culley, Dorothy Cevich, Marie Crossley, Charles Cuanto, Joe Dunton, Ora Duffy, Katherine Dolilni, Pauline Diamond, Sam Duck, Anda Dorais, Wi'fred Duffy, Mary Delaney, Kate Page Fifty ff "seq-fr1fqafs'2p1i25'51':.,, N ,E . 2 5 O ' 5 O l.- The Alumnl 'gl ---- ii Cloney, Miles Delaney, Helen Hill, Dorothea Waldner, George Barkdull, Lottie Fennel, Erhard Hunt, Marjorie 3 Hlinarich, Marie connick, Percy Dickson, Jessie McKenzie, Kate M semen, Arthur Gustafson, Esther Hamilton, Mabel Jackson, Jessie Parker-, Delia Cunningham, E. Goessi, Irene McCormack, Marg, Reynolds, Nan Parker, Caroline Stoifer, Opal Woodward, Halliefgjg Swithenbank, Merle Taylor, Blanche Yates, Rose Wass, Carl 5 Yermini, Cora Fraser, Harold Brisley, Ellie Long, Eldon, Smith, Frances Andrain, Meta Barkdu?-1, Calvin Boyd, Russell Brown, Wallace Connick, Florence C1 rry, Joseph Davis, Gertrude Dickson, Cath. Falk, Lane Bohmansson, Rus Carlson, Otto Christie, Amos Blrnham, Irma Corten, Amos Curry, Margaret Daly, Charles Carr, Francis Downing, Bernice Downing, Ilene Holman, Lydia Dolman, Francis Woodcock, Lou Aho, Matti Abrahamson, Violet Anderson, Edith Anderson, Agnes Anderson, Pearl Atwill, Dorothy Bu' nell, Comming Page Forty-nine Stewart, Kenny Freeman, Lurline Christy, Howard Falk, Dorothy JUNE CLA Falor, Mae Fraser, Elizabeth Hansen, Mildred Daly, John Hubbard, Dorothy Kopajtich, Jose Lambert, Alice Langford, Jean Lindell, Charles JANUARY CLASS OF 1919 1, 5 McCutcheon, Johgi'1,,.'lHcGrath, Homer Chisholm, Ed Ryan, Helen , A Rotermund, Alice ' ss or 1919 Martz, Mabel Little, Clarence i McKeehan, Porter McLaughlin, Vera McMullan, Elizabeth Merryman, Louis Nichols, Kathryn Pink, Samuel Rasmussen, Elmer 1 JANUARY CLASS OF 1920 Gross, Marion Winzler, Maude ' J ewett, Evelyn Hendrickson, M. Ogg, Gracwe Hurlbutt, Marg. Toft, Fred Rankin, Victoria JUNE CLASS OF 1920 Dunton, Erna Farrar, Ernest Ford, Geraldine Haley, Muriel, V-iibler, Wilma Jackman, Ted 'aarte, Ruby Kildale, Doris McCabe, Lorain McCurdy, Herb McCurdy, Helen Me'endy, Lee Mitchell, Carson Monette, Chester Olsen, Thelma Perrot, Thelo Rew, Andrew Scott, Louise THE ALUMNII1920 to 1932 Akins, Mary Aho, J anko Abbott, Melrose Adams, St. Claire Anderson, Mary Aho, Aili Abrahamson, Walt B Buttner, Ethel Anderson, Helen Anderson, Muriel Angst, Derrill Atwell, Lorene X Loofburrow, Edna Iohnston, Robert iamieson, Bill 4 r . , . 1? 1, lobinson, Grace 5 loss, Richard J Shields, Daisy l , Sinc'air, Archie Skinner, Margaret Thurston, Zola ' Warren, Joseph Williams, Alice Wrigley, Ruth Jensen, Vance Hitch-ell, Mina Nelson, Mildred Smith, Milton, Smith, Mae Smith, Muriel Stoifer, Erma Sutherland, Leona Swanson, Ethel Swithenbank, L. Tornwall, Aina Wiley, Eleanor Armstrong, Elsie Anderson, Dorothy ' Anderson, Lois Abrahamsen, A'fred Anstris, Felrcidad , Abrahamsen, John Anderson, Bob Arvola, Toivo . 5 Brovfn Virgina , Akins, Evan Bell, John 1:1 The .All.ll'1'1l'l1 Emont, Hazel Kildale,,Malcolm Peterson, Anna Falk, Audrae Langf0rd,' Vern Philips, Burke Fitzell, Charles Langford, Les'ie Robb, Georgia Hamilton, Francis Libbey, Howard Sandstrom, Hazel Walsh, Elmo Withere'l, Blanche JANUARY CLASS OF 1916 Ruport, Marian, Hodgson, Zoea Gossi, Louise Allard, Mabel Langford, Zella Leamey, Lucille Long, Mildred MacDonald, Byron Urquhat t, Ethel Shaw, James Donahue, Anne Barnes, Edna JUNE CLASS OF 1916 Atwill, Florence Duprey, Emify Johnson, Allen Atwill, Beatrice Farley, Marie Lampela, I-Ioldey Baird, Clyde Feistner, Elsie Lord, Mifiam Brewer, Leslie Greenlaw, Geraldine' Loofbourrow, A'ma Clark, Lee Gray, Evelyn May, Lenora Corbett, Atlstin Heasman, Marie Nagley, Edward Connick, Chester Hill, Lola Philips, Donald Criss, Vernon Hovgaard, Irwin Quinn, May Danielson, Mae Hunter, Lois Remell, Enshelm JANUARY CLASS OF 1917 Joyce, Evelyn Wooc, Denzil Soules, Ella Smythe, Helen Foster, Clara Johnson, Clara Smith, Eunice Davis, Fred Gibbs, Florence Davis, Mayo Torgeson, Emma Nesman, Dot Heasman, Dot Connick, Grace 'JUNE CLASS OF 1917 Falk, Stedman Copeland, Zelda Mahan, Francis Gerkey, Ruth Danielson, Dewey McLaren, Rae Hamann, Helen Drew, Dorothy Me'-ler, Margaret Hitchcock, Ivye Burlaga, Mary McMillan, Don Bohmansson, E'sa Barkdull, May McMillan, Eliz. Bosley, Eldred Har ghey, Robert Nelson, Albert Desmond, Argyle Anderson, Ada 0'Donnell, Frances Cave, Winifred Krupka, Ma"y Petty, Minnie Carbray, Catherine Kane, Jennie Peterson, Minnie ' Lambert, Donald Loewenthal, Leon Rager, Alice Wahander, Esther Wahl, John Winzler, George JANUARY CLASS OF 1918 Brown, Everett Fitzell, Mary ' Larson, Se'ma Adams, Beryl Georgeson, Clair Lockwood, Immy Bohmansson, Greta Hodges, Blanche Lord, Mae Bosworth, Marie Kring, Elna McGrath, Esther Duprey, Alice Larson, Alfred Olmstead, Harry Swanson, Velma Smith, Ralph JUNE CLASS OF 1918' Anderson, Ethel Ellis, Wi'liam Heinrici, Husted Conant, Ralph Ci tten, Page ' Griffith, Clair Bang, Gladys Falk, Drury Hiliiker, Ruth O Zerlang, Beth Walters, George Watson, Robert Wells, Carlton Meiendy, Howard Foster, Elizabeth Peterson, Esther Olsen, Clarence Sarvis, Lyle Stenfort, Fern Sunter, Janet Swanson, Ruth Thatcher, Muriel Vietor, Lynn Watson, Margaret West, Fay Winzler, Clara Langdon, Alma Crow, Dorothy Schulze, Grace Barkdull, Joe Reckhart, Arfus Pew, Co'olyne Roberts, Ruth Roscoe, Helen Sanders, Gurney Sanders, Me'vin Sevier, Kenneth Shaw, Helen Unger, Maude Swithenbank, M. Peterson, Brewer Robinson, Ed Selvage, Abbie Smith, Alice Smith, Gertrude Jewett, Janet Mitchel', Eliz. Langdon, Earl Page Forty-eight O Hin, Ruth Gyselaar, Rose Ayers, Frances McKay, Eleanor Shurtleff, Lodema Stoodley, Gerald Hammner, Keith Swanson, Cora Beckwith, Anne Broderick, Elma Fitzel', Susan Mathews, Lucy Croghan, Bertha Maneval, Eflie Watson, Allan Hodgson, Ernest Long, Francis Spain, Kathleen Foster, Mildred Halliday, Evadne Ottmer, Elvina Cruickshanks, Nora Sevier, Ernest Wright, Carl Knudsen, Hattie Nordquist, Olga Connick, Carol McCurdy, Emily 1'-H"-if The Alumni CLASS OF 1912 Brown, Wilda Loofbourrow, Fern Hodgson, Muriel Bryan, Il'ah Weaver, Lea Zimmerman, Etta Hill, Ward Balm, Vera Labeau, Bill Sinclair, Valerie Fulton, Florence Schortgen, Stella Combs, Ellen Fearrien, Neta McCurdy, Pearl Dick, Agnes Falk, Muriel Trott, Ida Carson, Marion Allard, Irving CLASS OF 1913 Kellett, Frances Doty, Arthur Schoenemann, Lulu Brown, Patricia Connick, Milton ' Norman, Guide Conant, Zelma Hottinger, Margaret Hansen, Viola Holms, Karen Ohman, Ethel Quinn, Percy Pierce, Frances McMurty, Grace Copeland, Leland . Copsay, Harlene A Tomlinson, Tomailh Fulton, Irving' 2 Wass, Alice McCann, Andrew Haughey, Isabel Spain, Cecilia Haw, Curtis Brown, Katherine Higgins, M-erle Maxwell, Mae CLASS OF 1914 Mclntosh, Etta Shaw, Ernest Gale, Mildred Freeman, Elinor Hamilton, Starr Gunderson, George Beckwith, Carol Timmons, Glen Witherell, Dea MacFarlane, Muriel Campbel', Florence Wrigley, Ethel Acorn, Leona Cook, William Hartin, Kate Heinrici, Carl Ballard, Lucille McGilvray, Sara Barnes, Grace Cairns, Cyril Bryan, Verna Lord, Clarence Tower, Gladys A selstine, Dot Baumrucker, Mae Baker, Howard Bond, Dorothy Carbray, Irwin Campbe'l, Colin Coonan, Madeline Campbell, James Davis, Bertha Denham, Frank Dickson, Eleanor Donahue, Frank Page Forty-seven Q Lee, Harold Gossi, Marguerite Woodcock, Leighton Irons, Mitchell Haw, Doris Lane, Joseph CLASS OF 1915 1 Hansen, Esther Hansen, Agnes Hansson, Genevieve Hansen, Roberta Harmon, Ellis Handelin, Stella Hill, Anna Hill, Sidney Hitchcock, Flovence Holcomb, Donald Hughes, Rose Jewett, Helen- Christie, Amelia Q Hamaan, Clara i I Merkey, Esther 5 Melendy, Helen McCoy, Lloyd McLean, Fannie Monroe, Clinton Montgomery, Viola Moorhead, Ruth Mulford, Grace Nilsen, George Norman, Edith Olsen, Alma Pettersen, Ed O Abrahamson, Elmer Buchanan, Florence Axe, Leslie Parks, Lela Christie, Beryl Georgeson, Vira Nesman, Hazel Fraser, Ethel Robinson, Frank Watson, John Layton, Dexter Klepper, Winfred Borg, Agnes Knudsen, Eflen Gale, Alice Clark, Bruce Zientara, Josephine Lampela, Nina Parker, Webster Quinn, Harold Kramer, Helen Gerkey, Ada Hanson, Margaret Kay, Irene Fraser, Miriam Smith, George Shields, Ralph Connick, Cecil O'Donnell, Eleanor Campbell, Collin Merkey, Verna Benbow, Clara Mamilton, Mary Sevier, Randolph Smith, Doris Sou'es, Gertrude Spindler, Helen Stewart, Alice Swanson, Mildred Underwood, Rilma Urquhart, Ethel Young, Margaret Wood, Leona Wood, Ida Wood, Hel Henderson, James Beckwith, Jenny Langford, Steve Carson, Bill Cameron, Frank Allard ,Emily Bacon, Clara Bolton, Leta Bradford, Albert Black, Leanora Beasley, Clara Bruhns, Harold Campton, Jessie Chapman, Elsie Christie, Gladys Cloney, George W Cloney, Eugene Cooper, Wu-ren Cook, Edith Allard, Florence Allard, Jessie Barnard, Muriel Barnum, Myrtle Bartlett, Bernard Beckwith, Shirley Bridges, Floyd Brod-erick, Hazel Chapman, Rose'le Dalton, Nellie Farnell, Fred Waldorf, Li'ian Cummings, Kate Duprey, Elizabeth Aubin, John Kellar, Fern Pine, George Hess, J emw Sinclair, John Schortgen, Anna Hermanson. Ida -The Alumni CLASS OF 1907 I Harris, Victor Mackinnon, Lena Tabor, C'arence Roscoe, Grace ' Hannah, Shirley Pratt, Irma Christie, Eleanor Libbey, Nathaniel Clark, Earl Woods, Henrietta Hart, Florine Lovejoy, Eden CLASS OF 1908 Dunn, 'Anna Dinsmore, Edna Drew, Roy Froberg, Alben Ferguson, Norris Harmon, Rena Herrick, Leslie Heckman, Irene Hemstead, May Monroe, Eugene Brantley, Eva McCurdy, Ralph Naileigh, Agnes Murray, Mary Morris, John Naileigh, Pauline Pehraon, Alice Stern, Henry Spencer, Martha Waldner, Clara Weatherby, Mary CLASS OF 1509 Connick, Alice Hill, Earl L, N ovman, Gus Dunten, Myrtle Eklund, Ernest . alor, Irvin Fenwick, Gera'd Frost, Maud Fulton, Lilian Georgeson, Don Loewenthal, Myrtle Mathews,'Jamee McCann, Della McCurdy, Hazel McDonald, Mabel McMi'lan, Douglas McNamara, Jean Ricks, H. L. Jr. Ross, Jessie Ryan, Clarence Selvage, Merle Sevier, Henry Smith, Marguerite Waldner, Clarence Whitney, Willard Hilfiker, Christine Monroe, Thomas Wrigley, Alice Zimmerman, Nellie CLASS OF 1910 Felt, Muryl Kimba'l, Elena Pine, Shirley Frey, William Kinville, Stella Ryan, Loretta Falk, Harry Loughbridge., Mrytle Saunders, Loretta Georgeson, Lloyd Greenlaw, Charlie Hansen, Elva Hansen, Elzaida Hi'l, Marsh Hinch, Vera Holmes, Fred MacKinnon, Florence Sevier, Stanley McCurdy, Arthur Madsen, Florence McLean, Alta McKeon, Elizabeth Moore, Joseph Ness, Lina Parks, Mildred CLASS OF 1911. Kelly, Earl Clattenburg, Herb Tripp, Myrtle Drake, Edith Hunter, Mildred Day, Carrie Bryant, Eleanor Watson, Charles Beckwith, Harry Durnford, Lorene Heckman, Greta Brown, George Gale, C'oyd Mathews, Margaret Heckman, Vesta Wilson, Nellie- Edwards, George Slmpson,, Florence Epps, Bryan Monroe, Anna 1-Iency, Paul Quill, Nellie Parks, Evelyn Showers, Irene Sinclair, He'en Tracy, Morris Watson, Eunice Watson, Madeleine Whitney, Willard Zimmerman, Lillie Monroe, McDougal Connick, Leland Monroe, Gerald Moore, Charles Loofbourrow, Irene McMil'an, Helen Jennings, Ethel Peterson, Mar rice McLean, John Roberts, Florence Pehrson, Eleanor Page Forty-six MW s, , .,A '3' The Alumni CLASS OF 1899 Bonstell, Blanche Casterlin, Madge Davis, Lilian Evans, Mary Flanigan, Helen Inskip, Augusta Bell, May E Dalton, Julia Goetz, Annie Harmon, Wesley Hitchings, Nettie Bradford, Alma Callahan, Tim. Chelstrand, Maud Ellsworth, Alice Acheson, Barbara Acheson, Robert Bryan, Lloyd Chidester, Maude Cloney, Mary Dinsmore, Alice Baldwin, Walter Connick, Laurel Cottrell, Charles Ellery, Hazel Ballard, Ernest Croghan, Anna Cone, Minnie Dalton, Bessie Darden, Della - homson, Ursula Acheson, Lucy Matthews, Florence Georgeson, Frank Axe, Beiva Young, Cora Hine, Thomas McLellan, Ethel Page Forty-five Inskip, Albert Johnson, Alice Kane, Viola Long, Alfred Murray, Margaret Monroe, Grace Rose, Elizabeth Schaflert, Gertrude Thomson, Frank Tracy, Edith Tracy, Eleanor CLASS OF 1900 Hunter, Amy Hutchins, Roy Janssen, Minna McGeorge, Grace Mitchell, Clyde Pa'mtag, Kate Moore, Alice Persons, Louis Pierson, Sadie Ritchie, Will Tomlinson, Charles CLASS OF 1901 Fraser, Maggie Gunther, Martha Keflog, Adelbert Hitchings, Frances CLASS Engles, Addie Falk, Laura Griiliths, Farnham Hunter, Maude Kimball, Lettia Mathews, Mary ry McAdam, Jennie McGeorge, Edith Payne, Maude Dudley, Blanche OF 1902 Morton, Gertrude Pascoe, Susie kRotermund, Olga Rutledge, Helen Sevier, Florence Sevier, Nellie CLASS OF 1903 1 Forbes, Janet Groves, Alice Hanson, Mamie Hermansen, Emily Harmon, Brenda Hendee, Myrtle Jarvis, Lela K McCurdy, Blanche Young, Clarence CLASS OF 1905 Edwat'6 s, Juanita Gillet, Efiie Graham, Helen Halloran, Alfred Hazelton, Rose Walsh, Joe Hunter, Grace Kel'ogg, Pearl Langford, Ethel Lehman, Estelle Nelson, Hans Woodcock, Bernice CLASS OF 1906 Bell, Frances Hanson, Clara Solomon, Wiiliam Fenwick, Harriet Whipple, Stephen Farley, Mildred Brown, Florence Wa'ter, Irene Thomson, Edna Hine, Harry Quill, Grace Edmonston, Art Bennet, May Wallace, Lloyd O Tracy, Joseph Warren, Chester ,7Warren, Charlotte Weaver, Bonita Wildes, Corinne gkogers, May fBevier, Irving i8hiel6 s, Harvey lomon, Anna i ibbetts, Freda McAdam, George Simpson, Maggie Turner, Waldo Young, Chester Simpson, Elizabeth .S!!lith, Aaron Bell 3Qnith, Agnes Stafford, Grace ,fWright, Curtis ,Hklund, Frank Rogers, Clara Smith, May Swortzel, Ada Weatherby, Bessie Odenbaugh, Kate Roscoe, Agnes lRoss, Alice lRobifns0n, Edward iRoberts, Charles Murdock, Anna Shaw, Grace xLocke, John ,Van Horn, Luella iilfitzell, Bertha Fflanigan, Joe 5 Welch, Harriet 5 A 1 a 9 E si ,V Fn F nr, 2, -1 we .Qfrigigp The AlUH1U1AS9OC13t10H Of Q The Eureka High School 22374-Q L-i- 1.1.... ll The following list of names and pictures has been taken from the records of the Eureka High School from the year 1899 up to the last publi- cation of the Sequoia in 1932. The names have been compiled by the Alumni Association of the Eureka Senior High School. Although this list is not en- tirely complete, the committee feels sure that the rostrum of the graduates of the school is nearly correct. The pictures have been taken at random from many of the old annuals, and many prominent citizens of the community are pictured therein as they appeared in their high school days. The Alumni Association was formed for the purpose of aiding the Se- quoia, and of bringing the Alumni of the Eureka High School into closer contact with the school. If possible, the Alumni Association would like to , be the means of contact between the school and the graduates of the school. iilziipj 71 . .J 'E K' 1 .'1.- S, n ,fx 1 :QL -U.. if f ,n , fi .ll V, .f. WM. 97' 3' rx- 'T or 4. -Q wr ,., P.. . 1 an Q ,L '. -W. Iva.:-F1 . 4" . ll 1. P.. , nf Ps. Six 91356 fi , . A 3, - If this were brought about, the activities of the school would have better attendance since more of the Alumni would be informed of what is going on in the school. . ,rs . The Tennis Team, 1915. George Waldner, Mitchell Irons, Howard Libbey, Star V Hamilton. Esther Merkey, Dorothy Falk, Verna Merkey. Mary Esther Hamilton. " f"V3':7i-' ivglspi- 5. fy.,.,1, , Page Forty-four - -X. ,Q QffJ,g.f 1 LJ M E F , . i 'rf' ir L14--fzgrmf' P' jf , , -- 4 .. ..-, -53-,gg :Q X , I N ' W if . P , we ' --f'f?1n'1t-..wsf'f- .M f !Jlj?x"" . "-f.a"'4+."v'Sv'L'fK21:- ' " Andrews, Ruthe Boice, Blaine Burman, Evadna llimpbell, Charles Charters, Harold Vox, Emma Crnich, Annie- Doren, Ed Duffy, Harry Flaherty, Estella Genzmer, Muriel Hansen, Carl Harvey, Alta Hess, Lewis Jacobson, Hazel Larsen, Gerda :re l"01'ty-tlii'ee is uates Post Grad Lemon, Kirk Lennox, Jai-k Manty, Tuilikki McLaughlin, Amelia Nellis, Jane Pasco, Edabeth Russ, Leland Sancfberg, Kenneth '4aunderson, Nellie Sundfors, Henry Turner, Carlton Sutherland, Stella Vannoy, Leslie Walsh, Joe Williams, Maxine VVils0n, Ella l 41'-Skt Sholes, Orville Shore, Cliiord ' Sievert, Gladys Sims, Bill Smith, Edwing Stahlbusch, Myrna Steenfott, Nedra Stewart, Margaret Stewa t, Romayne Stockoif, Charles 'T E at: V-wmpeemfa: W-wi' 'Fife' O The 2L Class 'O Streblow, Alvin Sundfors, June Sutherland, Gil Swanson, George Swensen, Ray Tatka, Henry Thomas, Adeline Thompson, Walter Thomson, Carl Tornroth, Ed Thorne, Phyllis Townsend, Bob Tuxon, Kenneth Veit, Gladys Veit, Louise Villa, Milton S Vincent, Thomas Vincent, E6 na Vose, Verna Watkins, Alice Post Graduates Walker, Kenneth ' Wrigley, Kath. Wooden, Ruth Woods, Donald Walund, 'Clayton Walsh, Jack Wyman, Billy Wyman, Dick Young, Lloyd ljerlang, Evelyn - The Eureka High School Post-Graduates organized themselves this year into a luncheon club, for the first time in the history of the school. The meetings of the club are held every other Friday noon in the club dining- room. The primary purpose of the Post-Graduate organization it to bring the students and the alumni of the school into closer contact with one another. Many of the alumni of the Eureka High School are business men of the town and have lost interest in the school. Closer contact with the students may create more interest in the school among the alumni. For their major project this year, the Post-Graduates volunteered their services in helping the Sequoia management put over the sale of the books among the business men of the community. For the benefit of the Sequoia the Post-Graduates have sponsored dances and programs such as the first annual Alumni dance held at Christmas time in the Masonic hall, the Mardi Gras dance which was held in the gym in February, and an evening of one act plays in April. The officers for the group for the fall term were president, Blaine Boiceg secretary, Gussie Soules. . The officers for the spring term were president, Harold Charters, secre- tary, Blaine Boice. ' Page Forty-two ,l'- l?, , ,511-w . 4 ,nag . Johnson, Leonard Johnson, Violet Jones, Howard Jones, Lloyd Jones, Willard Jordfald, Clara Kinkela, John Kreps, Clyde Kretnrrr, Louise Krinik, Emil Kuhnle, Ross Larsen, L'0yd Lewis, Howard Littlefair, Harry Look, Billie Look, Flldred Lolax, Eda Lundbeek, Elmer Lundbeck, Ernest Mclioth, Alice MQC' immon, John Page Forty-one n '- The 2 L Class McDonald, John Mac-Innes, James McFarlan, Felton McLaine, Aura McMil'an, Dolores McReynolds, Clar. Mclleynolds, Dot Martin, Dorothy Matthews, Bonnie Matson, Milton Mavey, Oran Metcalf, Cheryl Miller, John Millerbis, Frank Mi'ls, Carol Minnie, Richard Moore, Vera Mozzini, Selwyn Mulvany, Darrel Mulvany, Ruth Murray, Carla Nelson, Courtney Nelson, Elizabeth Nelson, Wesley Newton, Sibyl Noga, Adolph Notley, Thelma Ohl, Mildred Olsen, Lfznwood Parks, Elva Pavlich, Paul Pawlus, Mary Penoli, John Pc-rrono, Loo Peterson, Darlene Petty, Reginald Pezzotti, Dante Piini, Arthur Pifgeon, Jack Pollard, Bob Pollard, Jessie Poppe1', Sarah, 'lflif-' .QA I", '-3 , fi. 1 , , 1 ., the ". q'y.fEfe'5I55'-1 - If ' ' gr . 1 . f 4 ffffl-Q' ' A f T' -V l 'Q' ,. QQ! i , . . 3,31 3' ,V f..gg l 2-'auf-',gj "V 1 ' za ,-1.1-is 'I s ws.- Procissi, Livio Pulkkinen, Agnes Quinn, Clare Renfer, Ada Robinson, Grace Rochat, Ezvlla Ross, Grace -3, 'f , Ross, Harriet ' 3 Rossig, Bill K" Rowe Myrle Rube B'irbar'x 'f 1 Rosskopf, Walter L auiiiek, waltm- rt' Russ, Beverly ' Sampson, Erling Saunderson, Frank Schell, Helen Seaberg, Annie y Seely, Walter is Q. 1., Salvage, Barbara Sepic, Stanley :sei .,,,.,- i +5315 J Q: ' L -A v , " -" C2121 if it ' H s 1 E? 1 -623.51 iff iff' 4 3 s,,ii,g, We ' if 'M M . o -,Yt,,gigg?3'2f Q A -S V I. , W 0 f T ' ' .,' 1 yi. fy. i. ' Q A " , rf" -.4 4 .. -as os- ,Tf 53253 :ZX4 3 f' ,V Q 'K' .HE .' '- -f 12. v' 3- t V ,:, The 2L Class .g- Although they have been in the high school only one semester and are just beginning to lose their bewildered look, the Scrubs seem a promising lot, and great things are expected of them. The class numbers approximately 200 students and is the largest class in the school. The Scrubs have not taken part in any of the school activities as a unit, but various members of the class have taken an active part in several projects. Already some of themihave signed up for school plays and have taken part in them, surprisingthemselves as well as others with their talent. Although they have not been in the high school long enough to have had an opportunity to participate in all of the sports, several members of the class succeeded in securing positions on the baseball squad. Louis Bonomini and William Ros- sig were both active members of the pitching staff, and until he sustained an injury while practicing which rendered him unable to play for the rest of the season, Jack Walsh appeared to be a promising prospect for a second baseman. Many of the Scrubs have come to be very much in demand by their op- posite sex among the upper classmen, and their faces are becoming familiar at all of the dances, school entertainments, and games. This shows clearly that the Scrubs are ready to be considered an integral part of the life of the school with no more delay, and that they are willing to do their bit toward bettering the spirit of the school. The officers for the class were president, Rudolph Abrahamseng vice- president, Milton Villa, secretary, Adeline Thomas, treasurer, Harmony Har- per, student council member, Robert Armstrongg advisers, Mr. Morgan, Miss Borg, Mr. Hunter, and Miss Jacobson. ' Abrahamson, Rudy Burns, Margaret Agee, Eunice Anderon, Elmer Armstrong, Bob Bagley, Robert Ball, Westley Barnard, Harold Beasley, Virginia Belfils, Norman Black, Emmitt Boice, Rae Bonomini, Louis Borneman, John Bott, Edith Bowman, Nedra Boyce, Merle Bradley, Helen Britt, James Burg, Helen Burgess, Wilbur Burgess, Elvin Canepa, Alvin Carlson, Irene Carlson, Ruth Casagrande, Tosca Cate, Clarence Chamberlain, Irene Chiaroni, Dan Christensen, Karl Clark, Murray Conry, Lewis Cope, Albert C ow'ey, Loretta Davalos, Albert Davis, Richard Dearinger, Bill Deckert, Helen Dias, Tony r Dinsmore, Bob Duffy, Lois Dunlap. Robert Durnford, Jack Edeline, George Ellis, Dorothy Filgate, Lloyd Filkins, Chester Finley, Edith Fleckenstein, Ernie Ford, Robert Foss, Allison Foster, Herbert Froloff, Albert Garcelon, Zona Garland, Max Gist, Amy Glenn, Robert Goodrich, Edith Grand, June G"uhn, Helen Hager, Bertha Hager, Glenn Hal-ey, Ray Harper, Harmony Heney, William Hess, Maraget Hill, Louis Hine, Carol Johansen, Agnes Hinman, Friedric Hixon, Charlotte Hodges, Barbara Hoopes, Lewis Howard, James Hughes, Arthur Huntsman, Claude Hutcheson, Jimmie Ingraham, Blanche Jacobsen, Florence Jarvis, Henry Jewett, Edith Johnson, Ella Johnson, Helen Johnson, Kathleen Page Forty ':' The 2H Class -X- Just gettings its legs again after the shock of becoming ll part of the liureka High, the ZH class is showing the kind of stuff of which it is made and is taking an active part in the life of the school. Already a great deal of promising material for athletes has been discovered in the class by Coach Wil- lard, and the drama and musical departments have been materially aided through recruitings from the class. The officers for the year were president, George Leeseg vice-president, Marv Samonsg secretary, Elvira Champig treasurer, Howard Lewisg student council member, Nedra Bowman. Virgo 'l'hirty-nine P 45:4 f""X 'izgltffg i1'1Ff3?'f' 7 ,,,i,"1 T Q 9 ii"g4liil'5 - .. Q11 e ' N. 3 gg. 1 i xii - .' 'gif . is i,-g,v,.9Q5. sign. . ,.wJfv fu I ii' T-ff 4 Adams, Robert :Anderson, Dorothy Bag'ey, Jeanette Baldwin, Gae'yn Baldwin, Lyston Barber, Esther Bauer, Kendall Beam-er, Anne Bennion, Dorothy Ber y, Frances Bonham, LaVerne Bonomini, Joe Bull, Marjorie Cabral, Milton Carlson, Jule Carter, Li'lian ' Cartwright, Roger Cavo, Jack Champi, Elvira Chandler, Clifton Christensen, Geo. Clarke, Rodney Christiansen, Auria Coffron, Berwyn Cole, Mere6ith Colwell, Stanley Connick, Helen Coulter, Jean Cox, Gordon Cox, Laura June Cushnaghan, Hugh Devlin, Les'ie Devore, Bryan Domaz, Helen D: apich, Sam Durdan, Art Edeline, Raymond 9 The 2H Class Roll' Eiselstein, Dixie Fanucchi, Roy Livesay, Charles Lufwick, Violet Ferguson, Margaret McCabe, Jean Filkins, Chester McCarlie, Dorothy Fleckenstein, Dot McDonald, Marion Franzoni, Ed Madsen, Robert Fulkerson, Charles Manfredi, Alice Giffin, Everett Martenusen, Robert Gottschalk, Dorothy Marquart, Melba Graham, Joel Matsen, Magnus Gvauman, Carolyn Melendy, June Gregory, Lanette Gustafson, Elvin Hansen, Margaret Hib'er, Fred Hinch, Jack Metcalf, Frances Milton, Margaret Moore, Gi'bert Morgan, Bill Mumay, Blanche Hochstrasser, Eugene Nellis, Lois Hodgson, Donald Hornbrook, Janice Howland, Elizabeth Hughes, Dick Nellist, Mary Nellist, May Beth Nelson, Mary June Nicol, Raymond Ingebrethsen, Solway Nielsen, E'na Ingraham, Dorothy Innes, Sandy Johansen, Harold Johnson, Kathleen Jones, Maxine Kennedy, Birdena Kinkela, Lillian Kness, Shirley Knudson, Elaine Kreps, Mrytle Larison, Ruth Lawson, Nathafie -Jesse, George Light, Mabel Lindholm, Elsie Nielsen, Helen Nieri, Livia North, Ingeborg Pal-mer, Irene Pawlus, Lloyd Pearce, Alyce Peier, Doris Pelascini, Annie Peterson, Aaron Peterson, Ebba Phelps,, Arthur Pomeroy, Elizabeth Pozanac, Charles Pratt, Margaret Procissi, Peter Ragon, Anna Reinholtsen, Art Roberts, Adair Robinson, James Robinson, Jean Rogers, Lewis Rogers, Virginia Ruzic, He'en Rudd, Joe Saffell, Herbert Samons, Mary Shay, Edgar Shepard, Ray Simmons, Margaret Smith, Donald Smith, Marie Tambu"ovich, Nick Tanner, Einar Taskinen, Sylvia Thomas, Merle Toft, Henry Tomanovich, Cris Tooby, Arthur Toroni, Silvio Utley, Evonell Vidas, William Wahlund, Earl Walunc, Milton Webster, Elmo Westby, Violet White, Eleanor Wilson, Lloyd Wilson, Ruby Wirtanen, Into Wooden, Lucretia Page Thirty-eight I cl , 1',4,' I1 'I . G Q The 3L Class Arvidson, Virginia Arvola, Elma Back, Charles lleck, Emma Biafca, Ellen Biasca, Emily Blend, Pauf Boyce, Anita Bralich, Jennie Burg, Orville Burroughs, Kenny Cakin, Alice Canepa, Lucille Cannam, LaVaur Carlson, June Clay, Blythe Crivelli, Lena Crnieh, Frank Crosby, Ruth Dahle, Maxine Delaney, Sadie Dunlap, Alfred Page Thirty-Seveli Falk, Harry Gallagher, Cath. Goodwin, Edwarc' Haley, Elaine Grossi, Lydia Hihliu' d, Viola Hemenway, Vioia Hodgson, Mildred Holm, Howard Hunnacutt, Frances Hurst, Mary Jackson, Glenn Jarvi, Matt Johnson, John Johnson, Me1'ton Johnson, Perry Kennedy, Bill Knudsen. Marie Kr:-ps, Ethel Laakso, Ilona Lambert, Virginia Lasell, Sylven Lexdn, Sarah Lueich, Darinka Mcflonnaghy, Cut'er McKay, George McLaughlin, John MeReynolds, Floyd Maffia, Charles Malin, Arne Mamon, John Marchi, Henrietta Massagli, Harry Mattson, Waite" Moore, Jimmie Murphy, Bill Nellist, Edith Nelson, Peter Null, Leonard Ogleshy, Ray Paaso, Sulo Patten, Barton Pavlieh, Zora Pinkerton. Dot Prather, Darrel Roterrnund, Nathalie Ryburn, Rol'in Schell, LeRoy Sepic, Emerik Shanahan, Paul Shipley, Ben Shively, Bi'l Simpson, Al Souza, George Starritt, Charles Stewart, Lynwood Stricklanr', Go'da Svc-nson, Kenneth Teel, Kenneth Thomas, June Turner, Robert Van Vlack, Jeanne VVilhelm, Ruth Zerlang, Ivan an gflfqg . QM"-gfi, .. Jgfiiff? P l 5 fjjf t w., my 1 , was C 43' J, , , ,Q " ' "'+i,.1il33l? ,,,, Mndff R . -:I Class !:! The terror of being a Sophomore class is over for the JL class. Although the class has had its share of the knocks that are customarily given to scrub classes, it has at no time shown the white feather of defeat and has kept the respect of the upper classes by its display of marked leanings toward leader- ship and talent. In cooperation with many of the programs both musical and dramatic, the class has contributed to the talent of many of its members, such as Lucille Canepa and Elaine Haley. These two girls are the most outstandinig in this respect but there have been many others who have aided to such activities. The class has contributed its share of athletes to the teams of the school, and among the girls are many who are prominent members of the Girls' League pep committee and those who take official part in the carrying out of the Girls' league itself. The basketball squads have found that such men as Jimmy Moore, Rollin Ryburn, and Hughie Cushnaghan were very valuable men this year since they have another year, they must come to be considered among the stars of the school. Ed Goodwin, a member of the class, was selected as the representative speaker for the Eureka High School Excalibur club to speak in competition with other Excalibur clubs held in San Jose during the spring semester. Mr. Goodwin succeeded in being awarded the second place in this contest. This not only is a great achievement for Ed, but it is good advertising for the school. It is easily recognized, therefor, that many of the members of the 3L class bid fair to be among the leaders in the school. Some of the members of the class show a marked ability in the art of elocution. Several have competed in the Speech Arts Contests and others have given excellent talks on student body programs. Officers for the fall term were president, Sulo Paasog vice-president, Lu- cille Canepag secretary-treasurer, Charles Starittg student council member, Sulo Paaso. Officers for the spring term were president, Lucille Canepag vice presi- dent, Frances Hunnacuttg treasurer, Charles Starittg advisers, Mr. Fick, Mrs. Klepper, Mr. Bolenbach, and Miss Mathews. Page Thirty-six Thig H Class 7sA,.fCC1-'J iQ0,4Mc N If 'Y ' iff-R .7 1 , I-X. 'wg ,wg mf Abrahamsen, Guy '1.'f.c--ff, ' The 31-I Class Since entering as Scrubs, the 3H class, being a large class, has had little difficulty in keeping pace with the other classes of the school. The first dance given by the class was more than just a dance and this success gave the class such confidence that they have contributed their utmost toward the best interests of the school ever since. I The class carried off the laurels in the lower division in the 1932 Speech Arts Contest through the efforts of its representative, Olive Crothers. The class officers for the fall term were president, Dorothy Carricog vice-president, Zonna Murray, secretary, Alberta Laws, sergeant-at-arms, Art Miller. The officers for the spring term were president, Jean Lawyer, vice-presi- dent, Alberta Laws, secretary, Olive Crothersg treasurer, Catherine Bull, council member, Bill Daly. Adler, Elsie Allen, Gladys Anderson, Walter Anderson, Helen Anderson, Runar Bill, Virginia B :rbe", Frances Bzumgartner, June Bel', Leslie Berry, George Berta, Francis Bonini, Flora Bowman, Robert Brown, Dorothy B own, Maxine Bryan, Barbara Bull, Catherine Burgess, Frances Carlson, Albert Carlson, Henry Carrico, Dorothy Christiansen, Carl Clarke, Charles Clark, Marion Coon, Dorothy Crnich, Roman Cushnaghan, Bob Dahl, CTarence Daly, Bill Leal, Elisa Dellanina, Algia Dillon, Bernice Leith, Helen Lindholm, Roy Doughe' ty, Jeannette Lyman, Anne Ellison, Ruthe Feekes, Hattie Flaherty, E'inor Fridley, Ben Gastman, Burnell Glunt, Helen Gragg, Bror i A Graham, Thomas Haight, Harry Haley, Carolyn Haney, Margaret Hinman, Gladys Holm, Edna Howard, Jane Huggler, Haro'c' Humphries, Grace Hurlbutt, Helen Hvall, Earl Jadro, Helen Jewett, Fred Kelly, Frances Kness, Curtis Knifsend, Curtis Kovacovich, Emma Laurila, Elona Lavel', Frances Laws, Alberta Rhinehart, Cosma Lynn, Dean McAllister, Ruby McKay, Eleanor McLaren, Bob ' Malm, Shirley Martin, Elvira Mason, Ruben Mathisen, Eva Matti'a, Irma Miller, Art Miller, Hollis Milotte, Charmion Mitchell, Kathleen Mulvany, David Murray, Zonna Nelson, L'oyd Nichols, Hazel Nixon, Jean Null, Edmund Paulson, Spigne 'awlus, Julian Pidgeon, Frances Pinochi, Corrado Poscic, Raymond Pozanac, Frank Proud, June Reynolds, Priscilla Zerlang, William Robertson, Hazel Robinson, Joe Rockey, Luci'le Schocker, Waltez- Scott, Beverlee Selvage, Mary Shuster, Carol Sievert, Fred Smith, Hazel Solee, June Stashuk, Nick Stemach, Wiliam Stewart, Madeline Stuart, Virginia Swanson, Clinton Taylor, Esther 'l'hu"-eson, Joe Tomich, Joe Turk, William Vandiver, Virginia Van Horn, Lue'la Van Pelt, Phyllis Vaughn, Francis Vidas, Annie Warren, Irene Warren, Mike Wing, Lois Wolfe, Idris Wooden, Marcial Wrigley, Elizabeth Page Thirty-four X An: erson, Ed Anderson, Walter Angst, Helen Antich, Frances Aivola, Waino Bagley, Evelyn Bauer, Elclred Bi ambani, Lena Brown, Beverly Carter, Daisy Clarke, Doris 5 Cochran, Wayne Connick, Darrel Crichton, Ben C' isp, Don C'ross'vy, Florence Crothers, Olive Dillon, Errol Finley, Jack Page Thirty-three The 4L Class Frey, Louise Frywrs, Stedman Garcelon, Winston Gates, Humboldt Gould, Margaret Grude, Louise Hansen, Oden Hayden, Audrey Hemphill Robert Hinds, Frances Holm, May Horntvedt, Agnes Johnson, Agnes Johnson, Curtis Jylkka, Jacob Lambert, Bill Lawyer Jean Laurila, Toivo Look, Urdine McClellan, Ed McGowan, Howard Mclntire, George McLean, Jean Nelson, Virginia Nicol, James Nix, Thomas Nygzard, Selvin Peugh, Glenn Pine, Ellsworth Pinkerton, John Rasmussen, Louis Renfer, Marie Reynolds, Donna Runner, Betty Ruzic, Curtis Sarvis, Elmo Sears, Malcolm Shipley, Dean Simmons, Alex Smeds, Clarence Storm, Hazel Storm, Helen Talmadge, Bob Taylor, Dorothy Thompson, Verla Tierneyyilrnest Underwood, Bob Wahlund, Helen Walker, Maurice Wallace, Jack Waters, Don Watkins, Everett Wheeler, Fred Winzler, Lovina Wrigley, De'mar hE.,f5i,. if :aaa .. 4'l' , , if rag? We 3' .ma ,y,,f - 4 f-,. 1 .lJx'.,'.' - 3 wwf. x fl ' ,a . . i 0. 4- . , ' f he- ' r I ra . Hia? if , ez "fi, r", .,,,,, .. . ...,... mil- fQfgl1r'4.:.X .wt Q, K i 53 vb-vi,-2 f -fx we ln I .X ' F Tefiiissi Aye' ' i . , I ,, 1- ,- 'u-fi I V 'l' N 5. fi- 'ni ' A s n "'?"'7f'5i'l 'X -1 1. ,fjxf -- " A ' 4 9-5 .A V. ' ' lsmlfema . W iimm. Q 3 Nami , f a ' The 4L Class The 4L class as a whole has stood out as an active and school-spirited class. It has been well represented in the majority of the activities of the school. In this class are students who have gained recognition as mem- bers of the high school athletic teams, others who have contributed their bit toward the musical and the dramatic life of the school, and still others who are recognized as being not only good athletes and leaders in " ' ' " ' ' the school, but also excellent workers in their scholastic pursu The representative of the 4L class in the 1932 Speech A elyn Bagley, was judged the winner in the upper division. another member of the class, held the position of sergeant-ab dent body during the past year. Howard McGowan was championship Eureka High heavyweight basketball team, Excalibur club, and president of the Varsity E society. Tl.,.. .,..., .... ...... the class has contributed to nearly every phase of school life in the Eureka High. V Several outstanding dances and entertainments were promoted by the class during its high school career, a few of which were the Shamrock Frolic, a farewell dance for the january class of '33, a Barn Dance, and the Irish Jig. The class officers for the fall term were president, jack Wallace: vice- president, Marie Renferg secretary, Frances Antichg treasurer, Oden Hansen. Officers for the spring term were president, Oden Hansen, vice-presi- dent, Evelyn Bagleyg secretary, Virginia Nelson, treasurer, Clarice Moselyg student council member, John Petersen. Q V Page Thiriy-two fag, 1 V, A r' . . 1.6-"fQlggX11" e - 'ilu WILLIAM RYBURN A , Epi' , He seldom spoke. ' ELDRED BAUER A He was a bundle of cheer. Wi 1.2 T- 14' -I, 3 REW MELENDY f -' ' V He was a vender of melody. " . " yi ALEX SIMMONS 'f His studies first, then his play. I , 9: .v EDWARD MILLELLAN He wrote with ease. "V" " I LENA BRAMBANI Well known and well liked. v vii BEVERLY BROWN A So courteous and considerate. ' IIARVEEN MCELROY .ilgfv No praise too high for her. 1' DONNA JEAN REYNOLD ' V K ' A Everybody's friend. W an--, ALICE BARRY I Her heart is tender. . ERROL DILLON A gentleman -of leisure. ' fifjys 5 - ff 'fllq 'A 13 MARIO NIERI I R- 'll.,- ',+. I A friend indeed. ' ' A I DON CRISP A ' He was terror on the line. if A GLENN PEUGH 'Q f. A farmer of achievment. 3 n -LQ EVERETT WATKINS Q' . ' A smile for everyone. ff 1' li ll Page Thirty-one I ,, I O ""fi'E?5f?' . .F ' gh,-5-I h , if , A 1 ' W 5' l 2-To fi-'fp A " Q ' i ,1Al,w.Q?Jg,g4 'T' Q Q Q ' .,Qyf3':-'fry fs -I . y:"?!wif zQus,.fi1"' ' f C fi. 'RLS "N--A" . 'I YI-., ,f ' M Q ' -, ,I 4 I , ' . ' ,I ': 6 5 Images not available EM A - 35 e ,Q L .ggi K, . if vet-4 - ,Q s ,S ef f y Q. 2 0:9 5: X ii ., ' X -i 'li .2 ' sz- ,. ' gr? 5 Ji .. 322. .. N -V5 1 a I llfs " iii" ' . , . .Af1.Q: ' .KY . ge Y I , r 1. ,rf J , 13 ,- pk '- .I . Sf . .. 1 Fil i 1 ' 3 Q ' ' . gf- jx H- 16 ,E iii.-f. ' 1- fn, , X , Es A: K'62.i,yi V K. . .i fi 'sg-'91 - ' ,' 11. x ll., ,' f . 5 pf gs. I-,. , .5 lf ,-'iff '. " ' al ' ' A l f'-,,Wl'.iy i".fi-.2 'X-Tl 4 -aw' 5 W. .. .. .H , A, , ,, 15's , 3' ,eg Us , ,Tj : ' if:-,-1.x 4 'W ' ' . a-, -9 .w - .4 gg-A gm' . , .f . ies z L9 " 'iJ 'iiA2lv'iXi4. i ff, 'kj' 'L f QilF5'?34!Q' .fxk-F., . gifts, 3. ' . Fw' -pr, .. 4 if :EET Lf, i A -, ig . Qglijalkfgfor I X51-.--ff Qqlzvz: y'Pf'Jf'5--' 1 1,55 "mi, -. 'gm' , ,1- - 1 rpg. rg., af, V, 5, Q. 15 ig ' .gv ' -,F "3 .135 9459. . '1 :lv gives . ff. f , 'SWT . . . -Q if L 4 - 34, .354 , ,Z ":'g5ff35,:1, .. .y .L w .-:wg ' "iii-5 , ww f 'il P . g 5 5 5 ' is . 4.x r' ,V ,5.,J93., .fame . K., ,vs - t-f1".'ig1f'-1 ff' 1 . - .541 A iii. K! 3 3 "f?i'i'i2:1 '..-ffff 45151-Qi, ,z"Q1-fiffii ui Y we-1-'. 9 "'-:if sw. 4, 1. .W 1-11 avg' :rw ,'Zr.,,,,41?.x,,' . X .-..,,,.8., . v 4 143314: ' r . ., 'ii -'Z 'I' 5' '3.'f.i" , 'li 5 Kr 'ac 1' " tl 'X' ' ' ' W ffcit:-,'Q.:Q-'1 ', f - V v ,. ru. i .. f "' n.i"4. ' V g -5 - If , 5:03 he sc-. .vwff-'sw K.. ,Lu , -.ky-af Q... .. .fit . ,c.. ,,-. . yy. 'Tz ' 34:-,VJ ui. it V ei? .. l, ...5Ei. 'ls -Y-A CECELIA CROWLEY Smilin' through. LILLIAN MINTZ She was very modest. MELBA CORSETTI With a song in her heart. BARBARA JEANNE RUSSELL Whose ambitions knew no rest. ROSEBUD WATKINS Ne'er a bud that didn't bloom. LORNA MULLEN She sees a future ahead. DONALD FAY He knew the best school. DON WATERS A jolly good fellow. C. G. BETTS Where a will, there a way JOHN FEEKES A friend to all. EDWIN ANDERSON He loves athletics. ERNEST REED On a horn he did toot. GENEVIEVE BRYANT No thought for trouble had she. RAMONA CONRY A oebonaire Iassy. HELEN STORM Just like her twin, Hazel. HILDA MUSSER A wholesome country lass. URDINE LOOK Smilin', rain or shine. BARBARA CABRAL She danced divinely. Page Thirty . 5224. L , f ., 4 ' .A ? ' 'J .Ht .,. - Q.. H 3 k B F MERLE TAUSCH A disposition of the sweetest. WILLIAM ZIEGLER Athletically inclined. , p RQ, QR 1. MARTHA SUNNARI Always a good sport. ' AGNES JOHNSON Hers was leadership. ERVIN HADLEY He was a three letter man. RUTH MCCABE Her heart was in her work. MILDRED SMITH . Q A typist with fingers swift. A ggi, f or 11 W CLARENCE SMEDS X" Whoever knew him, liked him f 'ffgilflf E ' ' Nfiiftw h 5,3 if .ii 3, LOIS HOWATT ,gl M, Tried and true. ,if p I 2 ie: C-"'ii'i2lp.-f'iT-We ' ' -f KATHRYNE HALEY f QW. Her smile turned dark to light. q L 5 4 nw Q'- ec-' . ,,.. . t LAURENCE NELSON ' He mac'e few errors. ff REBELLA THORN M 1 Her ways were pleasant. 3? 5. HELEN MITCHELL .42 She never shirked duty. PAUL ROCHE 73, Work before play? "W MARJORIE PEUGH X 5 Her laugh was ever heard. ' EVELYN QUARNHEIM A friend to all. f 4 f 5 f ' 'K 1 MILTON COLE , J , A cheery word always spoke. 1 ., ...,.,,...... f .gd ',:.my JEAN DAVIS 1 my N ff' ' L71 Would more were like her. E V Staff.-fax i 3 QXETQT.-v i . ' is A c - . , ' ,, 'iff Aifgx Faure Twenty-nine fi 5 M.. -- I. ffl? I ,LW fl. fn -1. W K. . -ffsxf .ee L ..QW'3'Q 19 ' A fl f 2 . i .isig:f'f'f' 1 ' . ' ' Q' Wifi, ,- Hfff ff' " it .. . -. . it .fmseL.::ff?afs.MfzQHi'.,p..i+Ef?fiH9???:f:i.qrfftff , t lag. , ,L ,,.. , , NH ,. 'W-. if, , ei , ., ,yi .:. 5. - -if ,iff E.-33,.N BN . 4, . .,,.,---nl, . iff i --uf'-'7 WPHi15Ef3i5A"'5 sf A df'-iv All 'X 5' JANE CHAMBERLAIN Sweeter than Sweet. FRANCIS SHANAHAN With pals, talkative. GRACE SCHELL Mastery of language. VERONICA QUINN A leader of her sex. JOE PAUL A ready wit. ELAINE ROBINSON Slender, young and fair. VIRGINIA CLARK Always on the job. GEORGE BURWELL Baseball was his game. HELEN FILGAS Serious in her work. HEL E BOGGESS She w s good as fair. ILTON BRITT e played varsity football. - NORA GALLON A "gallon" of cheer. DOROTHY NELSON Her music hath charm. SELVIN NYGARD He is an all round athlete. LOUISE CARTER Always dependable. MARGARET BERNDT An excellent printer. WILLIAM HENDERS Laurels he won in the sports DORIS SARLUND Doris or Dorothy? Page Thirty-eight O BETTY WAGNER On with the dance. LEONARD BENASKI The printshop was his domain. LILY WILSON S0 modest and unassuming DORIS HUBBARD She was accepted as the best. WILLIAM SLADE A business man was he. ANNE MONTGOMERY None was truer. i , 2?S.+'i,R,,.'1 5 if -R' .M gs: f Y is A . J - . O .4 1 gli-L 'J' is AJ B' . . ,W . x ! L- ' 3 13,8 V A' gw'ig1.i - ' f. f 17- Q :lff Z.: I .1 .E 73555.35 K 'i :' 2 f " ' A ' ' K if f ' f if u.i,,iy sq- H I gag: K. YQ if .gffgx .W figii FC , A -:ff ' 3 " . Q5 "flier 5 QQ? kg 1 ' if if I 4 lf lt.: ex ' . . ' ' iii . L A .' . - ' P ir- A. a'F,:A , 4 .ga i. -'.,w, ix-.f.: - if 't,gAi"4ft . 1 U . I ff. ' "W Il A , A - tlgyviivrjiatjaf X. .V . JEAN MCDONALD She was tri. e to "Mac." , is JOE HINCH Always ready to lend a hand. 2 k I ff, ' aftffkgi I I 'S A f Af' 1'.k-- T AUDREY WAGLE , ggi She played the clarinet. Q i.' I lgl'-A 'f LUCILLE JACOBSON X 'F ' f .a f A small maid, a large heart. 'L ' A fsf' ERNEST LORENSEN . W ,z ,... A A carefree lad was he. 2fi,fig.1"f--ffl'If WLqv.gA53E4ih A if A'K"'yl'f'f.'fl DOROTHY SARLUND 'riff Dorothy or Doris? . I ' .g'f"g.Q,iL5: AUDREY WICK I ij? A composition of cheer and fun. 4 'A b iVA' RALEH HELMINEN I ff' A He held his own. If 4 tv 5 fl. ,BARBARA EARLY E She was in the orchestra. ff. ALMA TORONI if, if 6 'f7jA,f Shy but efficient. fi f 11, 5 HANS NIOOLAISON . He was known as "Fritz." ' f A "ti 11521-SEK LOUISE FREY E . 5, - .Ni Www? Small but dynamic. i gg . O A . .1 . ' axial 6 ff7lJf.'E:i'5- 2 ,QE I iv3':1s'l,,4lfh. I 1 ' ' A 1 4,-Aif f- ',f-tiifjgllfx 5+ ' j wgggg-jQ.Q"a2g-gill E+ . i . -?i1Qfs f,.gli1' x gg 3. I "'i- if is 'ii' ',-' T 'ef' 1 y igfc, . ' ,. if' .. ffl, 1 ' 71Fif'ii'i 3' 'ly fi, , - .. N . 1. 1. ,, y O A mi 'f :Q - Q., .. R, . was fftiiks Q - 1, .xiii A View A -may si .wi 'fic - A .gf ij.:-' sn.. ,V sinus aw' . 'X '5 .-4-3 -f 1-"few 1 '. '4- Q1 ,. -E' wif . . ' gy' im 'g -'.2i. ,1 IRVING MANSON He blew on the trumpet. nf. ' 6 1 P' . ,A O , . ' 'S 4: . 15 Q ," .41 -. 5. A l ' LH" 5 I TQ! 5 4 3 . fs Q- H1 .th i-'r . 5 "ii .9 Z ,sv e 3 3, .K'Rk 143' X . . K., ,. '26 1 13415, was R Y V -gm if-,O ,,i,.1g.p fi' .Q if g 95 H1 ' 32" rio 13- 'sf 'ii nfs' 'T ii., . 'L I . ,i cy. ,fs w.- . k we vi A. X SHI'-1:5 .'- ' K-'.s ,wvgwn . .yfz M s ifpii K-m9 .lx Us .v E an iz, 'J sf Y if ' - Q ,mx - 4. ,, UNK... Q. , Y Q x gf M.M..3 ,lyg ag., 1.52 if , ag if-4 ,113-x ,gf i:4"'i.'. 9-,L fiff 1 gi-X sy: .ii A W' E'. - " , jg. . l ii . wwf: y, 1 .f,, 1 M ...W L . ,,. ,x I .1 L ,xi iw- Q . A .aiv wi -r K.. .5 5. v,,. .yrs . f f., 1- RW-11 A "'.e- . K, Q A, ' ' . .,B,: 3 4 ..Ms, 1, QAYVQR ,Vg V, b is. 1 .j2g'.g. exif ti ii 1, 'msg rf' :P sig? ,il f Z.. a 1 9 ga 'wi "' l E' kv' ' P? ? E 4 sw- 1. S .gi ' 'sxljfi A ,x 36 i .S , X if sf E 2 Q, if ,Q S .-i .K 5' . ,-g..,.E2 A .yf 1- is f Wi? ,vv 'T , ,w., A .-1:62 , ig iw Tfyu iq , xi '1":iflg 1 ' lyme i ' X, A 19", gy., , ' 2254-'s - 41:5 I ' 'f ' K -' 'F fmi' if if iii ef,5.1l . 65' l i gqgaffsf, K V ' ' -ff,f2ST'!1 lei'iZ'5" 'Hifi N' ' -ff: . :X . uv A, Q ry? . ,.,,.,, 7,-kay., l F l e 'sf sal 'aff ...+ 4. 1 w. . .Q . ,bg I Q. . JESSIE JONES Small but undaunted. GERALD JOHNSON I shall be loyal. CURTIS RUZIC A man of words. IONE HANSEN She made many fxienrls. JOHN PETERSEN Here is a philosopher. JACK FINLEY He excelled in basketball. LAURA HAUGAN She reward-ed with a smile. TERRY KARAS Football was his pastime. ROY IVANCICH He brought home the bacon. NELMA SIMILA Her companions we'c many MARVIN KREI Anc' his Ford Terxaplane ALBIN GRUHN Smiling while others frown. ELNA ORRE A housemaker and a cook. ROBERT TALMADGE A student of wild life. is JAMES HUNT A hero on the gridiron. BETTY LOU THOMAS Her future looks brght. ROBERT COONS He was a history shark. Page Twenty-six ,ge c x fl A 5 . ZW 3.13.-ff is g 5' k W. . f .gig ,gp . f. . 4 ,gi35,'.w . U. Q ff-W assay .5 .W Qtigyfkzvfll - WT. .. .. ,M N.. ,H N :.., 9. -y , ib -L .wyfsi A . ,Q,.is 5. W. A P -. .,x , k - . 1, if f S N 3 Q 'N 11 J r . v 1 Ms .ff 'i ' lv' .1 . 2 , Q M , t . V is . wax ..-ky XM tn ,. 75 -e?u'e.3YT'I'?1..,ai' 4 . . ,. . '. " ,. 2g.3ig..za.ih U V4 ' 51 -, .a..""',-Q., I V fs 5' , .. . .Y ,, .f x...:.,mf...if- -- A ' ..Q mvwf' if 1 :-1Ssn4J4:!f'S4ff--:,.af.i4I5i:h-.farm .n . V. 1 . JOHN GALLOP He did a bit of acting. CORA LORENSEN I must be good. EDWARD CARLSON He seldom spoke. NORMAN BECK A mechanic of great skill. MARGARET HILL She stood on her own shoes. HERBERT URBAN . President of his class. X Q 4 1 ' ETHEL LEE DELMAR WRIGLEY This country boy made good. 1 w Hier smile displays pearls. X RODNEY WALCH Captain of the crew. .L,,, EZIO POLA As a draftsman he excelled. X GOLDIE TAMBUROVICH A bug for biology. 'Q DENO MASSAGLI He excelled in Spanish. ROY JOHNSON He loved the open spaces. HJORDIS PELLAS V She was shy but successful. CLYDE LAWSON ' He stuck to it and won. JJ - s f RICHARD ALBERT x l i Always a cheery word he spoke. , 'Q ,VMARGARET GOULD i A ffl Clever on the typewriter. p , .Wy ROBERT UNDERWOOD 41-lf ' s Milli Always a true friend. fi 931135534752 ' A 1 - Q Lomax s 5 Page Thirty-five K . , .iliigejy gif A ffj ig K 1-Z , .ji 3 " X e,-52,-g .2 . " 5'1xffl5lf ' fi!5" fe ' f, 'wffff 1 ' ' ' A 1 ,s sgf K. K J "' " Y Pri! as ' f-'Y 12.1. . . . . ' . .as 5 ii .1g3'1,,1.iws-A-4, . K, -3.-i.AfjAe4, - - , xr- A -V.-, .a5'wf,qi'gSgjs.., A f 1 .. is ,eggge.,gat.s?isTfsZ3S e'gf-,sg.,, vm ' V . Q 'N . f -.di : jx - 13.45 . - V- M . -,sf , , 1 ff ,,.:L K. M., . if fi-of og-3rf'f++e ggffigt 1 , ., . ,A Ni 3 ' 'X ,gyjf-'f - fy A - yay. -1 M ,Q 1 .,,. - 5:5"'3'ffF455"35--4 J 'gfwi ri: N5 sim g U - --,sWf.f,s-4 we is Xsqggggegggxxs Xfv' e Q ,-f" -S. X - - --sl' ,..- 'P-. -- . is. Q . ,W . .X . F R C A C ff' - JUNE SENIORS For the June class of '33, the joys, worries, puppy loves, and good times of high school days are over. This class is the largest class ever to graduate from Eureka High. A spirit of cooperation was usually prevalent among the students in the class, and the majority of projects which the class attempted were successful. Under the management of Jean McDonald, the Junior- Senior Banquet which was given in the spring of 1932 for the June graduates was a very enjoyable affair. Several very good dances were given by the class, one of the latest ones being a valentine dance which was called the Cupids Cut Up. The attendance at this dance belied the fact that the depression was at its worst. Many members of the class were active in the student body affairs of the school. Among those who held student body offices were Rodney Walch, stu- dent body presidentg Bill Slade, business manager of the Sequoiag Martha Sunnari, past treasurer of the student body, and present secretary of the stu- dent bodyg Richard Albert, business manager of the Redwood Barkg Gerald johnson, treasurer of the student body, Everett Watkins, vice-president of the student body, Selvin Nygard, editor of the Redwood Bark, Agnes John- son, girls' athletic manager. The class was unfortunate in losing its president, Bill Levings, who moved from the city the first of February. Bill was an excellent leader. On the other hand, the class was fortunate, for Herbert Urban Who was elected in place of Bill Levings proved to be a good executive. Although he was president only a part of the year, most of the heavy work prior to graduation fell on his shoulders. The class voted to give their class gift to the Sequoia, which was having financial difficulties. The gift aided greatly in the prc-duction of th: annual, and the class should be commended for its timely gift. The advisers who lent their time and effort to guide the class wherever guidance was needed were Miss Fitzell, Mr. Doren, Miss Beaver, Mrs. Layton. Bill Levings, Pres. Evelyn Quarnheim, Treas. Bill Henders, Sec. ' Q Page Twenty-four Page Twenty-three 4. .. . . jk' isa. Q 35 Vik: 2. 955. ESTELLE J. FLAHERTY Vivacious coqufette. 1 'S' E' 4 JOHN H. MCOLURE ,Q S Sf A Wgssif Man about town. .gg 1: Q R E STELLA THOMAS , A noted athlete. iiwgj A E ,fe A -:Set KATHRYN MYRTLE ALBERT . Always cheerful. f -' Mn A , if LESTER RAYMOND LEE Y True to Ruthe. 1 . 9 Y, A Q., , . 3.1 4 ,S A HAZEL JACOBSEN , gegmfy A brown-eyed blonde. A 'Ai' M Jiiffijf . PATRICIA OROWLEY A Sl ggi, . What a inconsistent flirt. HARRY ZOOK 33igrqT'?'Q5Ey1. .:f.3.f,ih Puck II. ' VIOLA SAARI 15? 'R Good classmate. . rv ISABEL SHAY Fond of good times. V- ' , Y All -if , Y -z K ' ,. ,.., .W A LESLIE O. KELLY in , 3 Leading man. M, ,, -1,f gy ' "1 f1Li,f5.,.1fw'-A ' ALTA MARIE HARVEY .A V. QW, is A .dr Pepsodent smilie. E Gift" PAULINE M. HOWATT Y- . GM.-. I , ,Awe Mischievous-teacher's pet. M HARRY A. DUFFY, Jr. -5 A Fritz Kriesler II. " . 'ff' " ORA WILSON She makes sweet music. A ' IL ff ' A Y 9' . 5 5" FEET.: ' Y l S' L H 3: . .H- X v. MRYTLE WHALEN 5 ' S ' ' Prefers opposite sex. ,. A. :a' 3 A , 5, 1.1 3 I . fps.. l.3p.-Sk-4 ARTHUR CHRISTIANSEN fi Qi-,f,,f,3q,fAqfeYi Everyb0dy'S pal- 2 r' - a' . -All YA' 52? Q 313 , K A K 3 A - V .iz T' f' EA! xy. if , 3. , .gli its A A fi . , , Q il? ,gt 4 2' - Hi L' O i'i.gy"1f iw K ' IRAQ. - H fx-Wifi. ' . 'f'g?,1E5'f'5, gg ,V , A k ISIN. 555.4 . S Y 7 ii: H QQZRTIT J. 'k'5i3',p7fa5bzZi.'fJf"'f Se ' f A le ei S LN : -. , ., .A . . . .r,,.S.-,fmr fkj - ,KYXALAQ 3' ,I S, A 7 M . A I A . .V . 3, . ?3g,,i,,A,EYWA ,K ikwfigllg 12,2 fs :X -4.. .. A . -Ag ia 2. -, , 4.: A- rk z -nf, rig. . itil 0 Ll lyiyww nf lg . swf., , - 355,56 film: . , h . Y. ,M , ks, A ire A. ..,.swh!fug15.' QS, iii? ,fpgagxg 33. kg., Kb it QA ....,,..f.t..A. AiaaE..,AGn f1- ver ' Gg:iir5:f.f2L2' we ,ff 'f J, f 4 H, it 1'fX'f2.:'fE' ' A X s .5 if fffffi geek if Jgeggi A - .-x, Hvfai " ts.. 25535 Q gig ff ,f P fi. I ':1,.Q'75'.Y? ,k.,. fy- N., ' a ff. i .. X , , ., . . . 23'4v'.,.'l, Kg iii- f II- 44 1 ,FE J ...A . . 'fi' AJ.-1 X , .L - . 5 . 1 '-vs. V- 'uf gi". t -I. Q. f E. .iv f 3 vt. A.lfff'-?'l.- . f 'I' -3 13.fif,.j .3' tlfiekglfn -.U ,v.k g' 'K .- '-.i.lfr?fti. . W, ,T W .F A I R :mf f'1q,g .,vef. -, f. few .fairs . A . -.V-. .- Agni 2. H 5.6, .Q , .,... ,.w.y',, ,cf-,-QQMQJW1. ?g fe ff!! 5 44 J' ' ' - :. A fl, 21,15 I QI. "L L lfw. vb ig iw' xg. 1 2. -fi ' f l' ' -- K iw lx 'yi irq E. 'I , 5:33. Y Q ' Q . .x 1, ,A i.'r 'fi . A 5. i 5 .Q . 1 21" Qfiwf ' 1' gsffau Var A 9' wr 1 . sa f i if Z: I 3 " W' fm , ef . 'ei 'A E .ik 19. fl li 5' 3 4, , Xb ngfxix 4 I I I l gil ff as ff' "ii: l 5 . " :I fx MQ , "37i'rx X, , if '5 52211 i' if i 3' . W 5 1 a ,, 5. Q.-ff, ' . -t .sw- ly, A. V , . X. 2 ,V ' , " I 'Y' ' Q " A y i. Zufxiixiy I S I , fjfxlbsf .- . .si . I .1if'5"'fp':'f. Vg.. - " . l"wf H- 'sf ' ' L' .F - 5. fgtzin si I Iggzi.. ' ' ' . 31. " Q I A, .fillgbifffftlf Q iw?-'3..'f ' K . Q.. K N. . 'H,. - N. .Q .G . ...A fx O55 gf ,. - gi qw. .rx 'g....sur..,-, 3 N' T I ' - .' his ei F L :Mi - f, 5 ,. ,x ,,5 K in . 4 1-. foltdieygi 1 ff -. I Q' , ., " 'h f il- Q ,-,gxff I Uv, -' gg.. Y ' -df, wP:YHy.Q!W,. 25 yt. .gift-, .6g4LPQ'Ff4'f. - .V . 3' :Y 3 . J- , X ',g1d:'?E.,.'L.::p E... ' I . :IT -'Ni f i'f'r'YrZQf.:i'f. . . . ' aai'arnfvei'f fmt' k'T?Qikf" .fy ?fffz1'.-gf5?+f?w" X ' . Q, ..pf',rsk. I K . ,L 1 . yxv-v . keg?--X3-51. is Q L .warn , K 4. .. , . f ' ,.3'f f7w, L+.3Pff456'l5Pig,g3f - A I 3-6f,wf,:..,,, . , 31 .iffel'.i"-.iz A' 'l ?f 5-""lSf5s...,.:a ' V ' 535 . , Q . SML -1.619 A I I ' 'S "LS .KJ .zizvfb afmsff' AMELIA McLAUGHL N N True daughter of Erin. JOSEPH FRANCIS WALSH Eveready for fun! and frolic. EVADNE BURMAN Expressive eyes. MARGARET LENNOX A warm friend. LEWIS A. HESS Independent and dependable. MAXINE WILLIAMS Handy with a needle. MARY KATHRYN BURNS Just a bit of Ireland. MORRIS LESLIE VANNOY Beau Nash II. DOROTHY JONES Track star. LEAH THOMAS Noted for athletic prowess. STILLMAN FRYERS Serious minded. RUTHE ANDREWS Lester's better half. MARY E. SHAY Silent and deep. KIRK D. LEMON A jolly good fellow. CATHRINE M. HIBSER Full of fun. GERDA LARSEN A sincere friend. RALPH WILLIAM WIDNES X ' Tattling Tom. D EMMA COX Indefatigable. Page Twenty-two - January Seniors The January class of '33 entered the portals of the temple of learning in 1930. ,From the start, it was noted that this was an unusual class, because they carried themselves, not with the timid mien of the ordinary scrub class, but with the stately air that has characterized their sojourn among the erudite ones. . These uncommonly progressive sophomores did not bother to dabble their toes on the edge of the rapidly flowing river of school activities, but jumped in with a splash by giving one of the most successful after-school dances of the semester in their scrub year. This merry affair was succeeded bi-annually throughout their career by even better dances. During their 3H year, not being content to follow the beaten track of others, they originated the "De- pression" or "IO cent Dance". These dances have proved themselves popular CVCI' SIIICC. Ora Wilson and Harry A. DuHy, jr. were outstanding in the display of musical talent, while Emma Cox and Leslie Kelly represented the class in many of the dramatic productions of the school. The class was ably represented in athletics by such students as Joe Walsh, Harry Zook, Kirk Lemon, Les Vannoy, Jack McClure, Milton McLellan, and Harry Duffy. Gerda Larson Ralph Wienes Margaret Lennox Secretary President Treasurer one . ' I ?g?'i gl 51- 9 gags c. , . f if igfiifsi if 1 uw 5 X . 'Ni X 1 T T T Ci 5 f my 1 wifi A 7 sf?-4 . si? 'Qs , 'ire' ' + if 595.gif , Jn., 3 S .:.' L-1' 'H J ' ,-3 "ff sf: ' Q'E1,ffx:w.f .S a if-, . . V 5 Mir. 3 , X. nf: 'fififil' " 'gagix -J 'f Ns ,f .Q s. s iid. S' . .S E' . -if i fl Q W' v .9 iw N, 4 . 5 Y, if .fi J Ii LP, 1 Y, ,Lf-z ' 3" i -fixwf f. Q i F,r.Q'3-:wifi X iv -'Nigga g. -55. ,Q K QE. in-'XS Q ,- - t+V.if3g p - i fini 2 A, ,sg so 3 o K. meg: ,Q V' t 2.:,g1g' . 'a 2 2 i bfi 53 f'f.w' ...M-nf: giffsrhr V 'twxliik ,X ,g jf1g22'x:!'g .f S as Rags: i " , , 'ii ff s i . gt iq.. X3 , Wffaf l5,g..f5,S.fj gs.: ggi I.. ,xg Q wry' 3 - 3 'f L' Bbw 'begat' 22 Egg A 3 'H " ,. A ? K' 3 s. -I K "'t 3 an si , w ,. ,ig travis eiz:--5554 ti 71. . ,N .na 3 fzlfligi 'f!L..ifQe-,,, iff A 1: ea.. ta- V ' .4 ul GK. to. Z , A 75ii'F' 155 ' 'fin .. 'X' k FF- i M 5gg.,.::.f:Z'!i fs ms. f 1 , 3. Lx . . .Mgr , , ,,. . Q A r3'g,i..,,mMS.aLkw s W ea-f-Q f -' 53' 1 r i"!ffl ' V. . , .ftfiiigf 1 XS . N , , . , lf.,sfi3f5i xl, its K, . Sgr S Page Twenty-one . x fa.-nr . Q J Q, 'Q - .j' . .. i.v.- gg. ,Q , 'fx QQ, si ifffw Q' . Pi- , ,i 15 Q 13 1. . ,A . ie? -53 K 25,5 twig: sk A 1 X ,gag iz is . ,, . , -1.2 1 . i f L ' 3'f' fs ' , A ,R ' fi .ff ij., 5 at ' !gl5fJ:Q'ri"f,6k'ii 'i i?1f g'3li:'iNiFQ'g' 5 ' f . - g U , o . ,-,:,,. N, Eg, ffisiv ,Ps , .J gi '-fs IW -2' - N L . 1- ual 1. 3 tj'-5.13-3' .' 1 iiseuigi. J 3 325' if? fa- e Y iifigkfr"'7fw.1'i2s' 5.11 . to . . , 5, , , ,. . , V. . Y ,af-My ' ,uit " . q. i.a1w.aiasz-grew:-wszxk gf ,.:i.f.i.vai3S?ifEQ?t'f-A t Preview Of Classes HE organization of the class plays its part in the education of the students who participate in the affairs of the differ- ent classes, in that it develops at least the spark of leader- ship in those who are called upon to H11 the various class offices. Others of the members of the class find beneficial training in the working out of ways and means of meeting the problems Which every class has to face. Each class puts on dances and carries on projects of that type, and of course, cooperation of the majority of the class is essential if these undertakings are to be successful. In this way the students learn to work in unison. This training will carry on into the later life of most of the students, and will aid in developing better conditions in the nation, since many of the ills of the country could be averted if the people would work out their problems together. The class to which the student belongs usually speaks of the length of time which he or she has spent in the pursuit of a high school educa- tion, but occasionally there are students who because of their diligence or lack of it have attained a higher or lower rank than the one which under -'ordinary circumstances they should have attained. The student may take part in the affairs of any class for which he has acquired enough scholastic credits to be an accepted member. The senior class is usually the class which carries on the most projects since it is their last year in school, and many fetes such as the Senior Ball and the Senior Class Nite which require much preparation must be presented as their parting gesture. "Alabeevo" ALABEEVO ALABIVO ALABEEVO BIVO BUM BOOM GET A RAT TRAP- BIGGER THAN A CAT TRAP BOOM GET A RAT TRAP- BIGGER THAN A CAT TRAP CANNIBAL CANNIBAL, SIP BOOM BAH EUREKA HIGH SCHOOL RAH ! RAH ! RAH ! FIGHT, TEAM, FIGHT! FIGHT, TEAM, FIGHT! FIGHT, FIGHT, FIGHT! FIGHT, TEAM, FIGHT, TEAM! Z FIGHT TEAM FIGHT Friends of Home and School 'QTHL EUREKA HIGH PAR E NT-T EAC H E R ASSOCIATION is a con- tribution of the elementary school Parent-Teacher As- sociation. Its aim is to co- ordinate the home and the school efforts so that the resultant will be the sum total of the home effort plus the school effort rath- er than the difference be- tween the two when not coordinated. "The beneficial influ- ence of the Parent-Teacher Associations in the elemen- tary schools is an estab- lished fact. Why stop this beneficial influence at the end of the child's elemen- tary school experience? The home cooperation is too often broken abruptly when the child enters High School. The effect of this sudden break in the sup- porting influence of, the home to the school is not without injury to the child. "In achieving "High School Mindednessn par- ents learn their position in the picture is a gradually receding one and that the ultimate goal of the combined efforts of the home and school is to prepare for complete in- dependence of the child as a self-directing member of the society. "The attainment of such a resultant can not be developed through any better copperative enterprise than through the Parent-Teacher Association." Mrs. Baylies C. Clark. In the past year the local High School Parent-Teacher Association has carried on despite lack of interest among parents and has completed some helpful projects. The outstanding task was the supervision of the making of uniforms for the Girls' Glee Club. The officers for the past year were as follows: president, Mrs. Fred J. Moorcg vice-president, Mrs. J. H. Crothersg secretary, Mrs. Fritz Baumgartnerg treasurer, Mrs. C. H. Stewart. I if Kel: , Wall' ,Q iiam-1 'fy iii: .'Q,f:.'i:v- , '1 Riff .f 1' w - 35.4 sjli , ,.-!5:.l glli , A Wig. s I J if . fl 5 I5 i -v x i Wg. liuvizign 1, xr. ,fl 1 fi 1, :i.'5 a5i: I . 24 ll , . A f' liilma int, , , .4235 ,- .1 1 ' .Qi C sr i , 1 Ig if I '-arg.. J' . '1'?'.l:fv 5. P1 'Ii"13E5i lghfg r 4.,N ., fs: if.:--2f'1fii'w A 1' L I ig' '."'-JQSIQ T! Fi-fi lifsfiti 5 FOR Home andSchool '- THE BOARD of EDUCATION is the managing unit, school department of THE CITY OF EUREKA, CALIFORNIA. It consists of five trustees elected from the five wards of the city for a term of three years. The trustees represent the taxpayers and parents of the schools. The history of the Eureka City District shows that many prominent citizens have rendered splendid service as members of the Board of Education. The Board tries to furnish to the boys and girls who attend the schools within their district an education adequate to their needs and ambitions at the lowest possible cost to the taxpaying public. In a period of widespread depression such as the one which has had this country and others in its grip for the past three or four years, an organization such as this which has the responsibility of expending the public funds must be subject to much thoughtless criticism by those who know little or nothing of the problems and changes in the educational system which must be con- tended with constantly. During this last year the School Department lost by death Mr. Guy Roberts who had served for years as a member of the Board. He always took a great in- terest in the activities of the High School and par- ticularly in the athletic sports. His kindly interest will be deeply missed. George B. Albee has served since 1914 as secre- tary of the Board and as City Superintendent of Schools. He acts as general manager of the whole city school system, carrying out the policies and in- structions of the school trustees. The Board of Education for the present year are as follows: Dr. B. M. Mar- shall, presidentg Ritchie Woods, W. L. Goyan, Dr. John A. Belfils, and Dr. Charles Tomlinson. P1 e Tu lve Honor Home And School THE HONOR STUDENTS have worked their way through four YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL, doing their work well and adhering to the rules of good citizenship. The school is proud of them, for in them is found the example of the type of product which the high school is constantly seeking to turn out, a good worker and a good citiien at the same time. The homes from which the honor students have come may well be proud of the success which the boy or girl have achieved in their high school work. The home plays the large part in the development of serious minded boys and girls who realize that to work and to achieve is of utmost importance. A committee consisting of the heads of the English department, the math- ematic department, the science department, and the language department selects the students whose grades are better than a B average and who have carried the required number of preparatory subjects. Two students who rank highest among those honorably mentioned are chosen as honor students class. Often however, there are several students whose ranking is so close that no from each graduating distinction can be madeg hence it is necessary to se.cct three or four honor students instead of the customary two. As a general rule, the outstanding students are not bookworms, but have some special interest out- side of regular school Work. If the student can acquire the habit of mak- ing good use of his spare time while he is in high school, the training will undoubtedly be of great value in making him a more satisfied person in later life. Thus the honor student, although not necessarily a superior person, has come near to the realization of many of the ideals which are held up to those who aspire to any large measure of greatness. Page Fifteen l'lOITlC and School 0 THE THEME AND ART 0 0 MOTIF of the SEQUOIA are both centered around the school and home. Both the school and the home must work in harmony if the product of each is to be praiseworthy. The home is the foundation and the background for the work which the school has to do in training the student as thoroughly as possible in the time which he spends in attendance. It is a lack of this fundamental home training which often times leads to the failure of in- dividuals. Naturally the theme of the Book is the school, since it is a school publica- tion and the material in it is chiefly concerned with the activities carried on in connection with the life of the school. But the home has been chosen as the supplementary motif since the homes from which the students come play the supplementary motif since the homes from which the students come play the large part in thc upoulding of the appreciation niceties of life so that they may be cultured enough to use the education which they are receiving to the best advantage. Therefore, it is fitting that the theme and art motif cm- phasfze the interlocking interests of the home and school in the student. The annual is primarily a memory book, and although it does not con- tain in detail all of that which goes to make up high school life, it will bring to mind many cf the incidents experienced by the individual in connection with his or her membership in a club or participation in athletics, or in dram- atic prcduction, or it may serve as an aid in remembering the highlights of the time spent at Work on some project in the shops cr in the art room. Then, too, it will cause one to look back with appreciation on his high school days, realizing the value derived from them and the help which was received in making life more enjoyable and study more facile. Page Fourteen To WHO This Book? TO THE GRADUATES of the EUREKA HIGH and to those FRIENDS INTERESTED in EDUCATION, we hereby dedicate this Sequoia of 1933. The best friends of the school are those who have made the most of their high school education and realize the value of the high school. No nation can long be a leader among the nations of the earth without a system which will educate its people to a point where they are competent to deal With the problems that confront any modern nation. The high school is the middle step in the ladder of education, and its im- portance cannot be overlooked. Those who have benefited from their high school education usually have the insight to recognize this fact, and can seldom be heard speaking against the interests of the school. The courses which are offered in the average high school are many and varied. It remains only for the individual to take advantage of those courses which he desires to make a part of his pre- paration for higher educa- tion or of his vocational training. It is true that many students go through high school without deriv- ing any great amount of good from it, but that is purely their own fault. The courses are usually of excellent quality, and it is the fault of the student if he does not receive the in- tended amount of training from it. The general purpose of the high school is to teach the student how to study intelligently, think sensibly and logically, and to work without the aid of others. Those who are not friendly have it in their power to do an unlimited amount of harm to the schools, but the boosters do a lot of good. There- fore, it is to the friends of school, whom it must de- pend upon for support that We dedicate this book. Page Nine i e WHY ls This Book? . THE VALUE OF A SCHOOL ANNUAL IS difficult to estimate with any degree of accuracy. The first consideration is of course the educational value of a proiect, such as this Sequoia, which fur- nished training in various fields of work to those who participate in its pro- duction. The editing and planning of the book give those who are responsible for that part of the work. the experience in writing and supervision of the writing of the subiect matter of which the book is to be composed. The production work, which in the case of the Sequoia goes on in the high school print shop, furnishes training to the printers in the make- up and technique of the book. The financing of the annual provides problems in securing revenue enough to make such a book pos- sible. This phase of the work is carried out by the business staff who are also responsible for the cir- culation of the copies as well as the selling of them. The art department 'comes in for its share of the work in the making of the cuts for division pages and any other of the art work which is necessary, furnishing the students an incentive to do better work since it is to be displayed so prominently in print. To the majority of the students, the real reason for such a publication is that it furnishes them with a book which will enable them to remember their school days after they have been graduated from the school. The third purpose to which the book may be put to advantage is in ad- vertising the school, both to other schools through the exchange department, and to the business men and parents of the community, showing the type of work which the high school is capable of doing, thus furthering the cause of education is public opinion. Page Eight By WHOM This Book THE PRODUCTION OF THE SEQUOIA is a student body project CARRIED ON BY THE STUDENTS to provide a project for the students and to make a memory book for those who do not wish to forget entirely their high school days. The production of the annual is overseen by the editor and the business manager who are electd by the student body each year. These two are responsible for the planning, financing, producing, and cir- culating of the book with the aid of the faculty advisers and the staffs which work under them. Those who really wish to profit by working on a project of this nature, may easily do so, for the educational value of the training and experience received in the work may be used to good advantages. The production of an annual would be extremely difficult were it not for the faculty advisers. They, in their particular field, really do the executive Work and make most of the valuable sug- gestions. Here is Where the real value to the student comes in. The opportunity to work under those Who have the experience of pre- vious similar projects, and to learn through their helpful suggestions the best and most business like Way of doing things is recog- nized as being valuable to anyone just forming the habits which will follow n.m through life. W This year's staff was ed! itor, Art Millerg business Q manager' Bill Slade, Cal- endar, Edward Goodwin, sports, George Burwellg art, Roy Ivancichg organi- R zations, Harold Chartersg S girls' sports, Goldie Tam- Y burovichg snaps, Delmar Wi'igleyg assistant business manager, Henry Carlson. Faculty advisers were Miss Fitzell, Mr. Bolenbach and Miss McGeorge. Page Eleven ' ' ' I ' QQ' For Home And School THE HOPE OF THE NATION IS THE YOUTH OF THE LAND. The destiny of America will depend on the character of our people, on their moral standards, on their enthusiasm for lifeiand their desire to preserve the preeminence of their country among the nations of the World. That the children When grown may be able to carry on the functions of government and have these characteristics, public schools have been established and are maintained. But the school can not hope to reach these objectives if the home has not these same ideals of honesty and integrity. It is in recognition of the need of working together in the common cause that Parent-Teachers Associations have been organized and are being maintained. The Parent-Teachers Association of th: Eureka Senior High School has for years enrolled a number of the parents of the pupils and teachers of the school who have been determined that the true objectives of the school and home in character building and citizenship shall not be forgotten. The value of this work as an aid to the school is hard to estimate. The fact that the Eureka Senior High School has for years graduated young men' and women who have gone out into the community and served in places of responsibility and honor is an evidence of the splendid cooperation that has existed between school and home during the history of the school. Page Ten Their ames And '3 Their ork - In first row opposite page: Agnes Borg, Art Edith McGeorge, Vice-Principal and English Frank, Fick, Mechanical Drawing Bertha Fitzell, Head of Mathematics Department r Mabel Griffin, Biology and Physiology In second row: Ruby Powell, Latin and Drama Frederick Frye, Mathematics Minnie Smitn, Typing and Office Practice Susie Sutton, Librarian Frank Flowers, Band and Orchestra In third row: C. G. Dryer, Head of Machine Shop Lena Guidery, Part Time Director Marguerite Bedell, English George Morgan, Head of Science Department Mary Beaver, Civics and History In fourth row: Phoebe Duame, Stenography and Typing Margaret Mathews, Spanish Page Seventeen Ina Meredith, Mathematics and English Pearl Jacobson, Vocal Music In fifth row: Bessie Klepper, Head of Home Eco- nomics Department G. J. Guthrie, History Irma Stevens, Secretary Cecile Clark, Head of History Dept. Jay Willard, Physical Education In sixth row: Elizabeth Layton, Physical Education J. E. Doren, Heac of Woodwork Department Elene Knighton, Head oi' English Department Not in the picture, Joseph T. Glenn, Principal A. Bolenbach, Head of Printing Department Emily Pointexter, Head of Language Department M Nathaniel Sanders, Head of Commer- cial Department Harold Hunter, English and Math ,f!y'1'lf,7f4"M'AyA! Clava Calvert, Bookeeping' Mrs. Smith, Cooking Some of the Teachers ?Yl7QHzaQ,Q Q " ' , E P S t mgww George. B. Albee, a Veteran School Man Superintendent of Schools V- . -x 1 fx of .5 ' ,f Axis,-1 t IK 1. : 1 ' The Gizls' League Fountain is a Real Colorful Backyard Beauty Spct Such a View as This Makes One Proud of Our Buildings an6 Grounds. Did You Ever Realize What an Artistic View This Back Entrance Makes? The Restful Green, Close to Nature and Close to Learning. C3 1933 -II- COMPOSED And PRINTED By the EUREKA HIGH PRINT SHOP EUREKA CALIFORNIA The EUREKA HIGH SCHOOL YEAR BOOK PUBLISHED BY THE EUREKA HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT BODY Uolume Twentq Iline 5 1 x Q 1 E I ,ev.4,L. -W, +,,r'g -1 ., gc r ,7fq-ww fq+,1g5-1g'fwf-vw- 'gn ,,q5,1. rr 2 ' ,f , H.-. A. , .f.,..w. .wr ff .Har . ., , K .A ,.,.L M 4 3L,..g'.',', -fry ,K -Y V,A X-1-Ayifgv . , i t 1 T 1 . . L , ' A -ff.ff?f'?Q 21 '12 " ' , 2 , -1. , " .K 1 wc, ' -V ' , 25,7191- . 'LW' Q- AA ' . W. na' x ' -9 '13, . ' f , ,, . .4 1 H '-' , ,V ' - X .A fax?-,, ' f -1 , ,'- vi5"'f:'f". , fa ' Lf ff ' ' 'H' ' ' f1'f5?5F,'i .ne .x -flafiiiwwl-f,Sf'H3435 i . 5,4 ..1,w.,ff,wj.:,:f5,!,1,.k,.,jg'?1f.nf - , w ,Eiga .5 fb. 1: if iff. MTW " -,. .Q L1',f,gi:f , ,g"fl2?m ,.'135P5:fQ' -Fw ,xt .5 Y .gqjglf 1- 1 . 'H' 'sf X W: , .91 fy , .N . L.-.w .- .AJ ,. 1, 5 , , 1" my w, - ,Q -1 - W .- .1 . f A., wg L I' H - Z, I ' ,v iz W , Aw' QE' x Q . 1 1 11 ,- , ,L . 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Eureka High School - Sequoia Yearbook (Eureka, CA) online yearbook collection, 1930 Edition, Page 1

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Eureka High School - Sequoia Yearbook (Eureka, CA) online yearbook collection, 1932 Edition, Page 1

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