English High School - Blue and Blue / Record Yearbook (Boston, MA)

 - Class of 1944

Page 1 of 124

 

English High School - Blue and Blue / Record Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1944 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 124 of the 1944 volume:

Zhe Record FOR 1944 JAMES H. GRAHAM, JR., ’44 Editor-in-Chief JAMES A. TRAVERS, ’44 Business Manager MARTIN F. KANE Faculty Adviser Che A student publication THE ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL Published Jive times a year Entered as Second Class matter November 2, 1885 ISH HIGH SCHOOL PON your thirty-fourth year at The English v - ' High School and the twenty-second year of your head mastership, Ave, the one hundred and twenty-first senior class in our school’s history, salute you. With people everywhere, we take pride in the measure and quality of your civic and educational leadership in the City, in the Commonwealth, and in the Nation. With our organized alumni we acclaim your un¬ flagging interest in the graduate men of English; but with abiding gratitude we acknowledge your paternal interest in us, your wise counsel, your great hopes for us, both for the turbulent days ahead and the peaceful days beyond. You have implanted in our hearts the seed of Loyalty—to God, to Country and to School. May the seed take root and grow and bear fruit each succeeding day, to be merged in the crown¬ ing glory of a purposeful life. As an earnest token of our affection and esteem, this, our Yearbook, we dedicate to you. ' Dedication ♦ ♦ ♦ Jh the Pages of Mistory . . . the year nineteen hundred and forty-jour will live in blood-stained words. It will be said that in this year the flood tide of despotism receded into stagnant pools of nigrescent scum , and that the light of peace began to finger its way through the livid dark¬ ness of a world at war. Here in the halls and in the class rooms of our beloved Alma Mater , we have felt the effects of the chaotic turbulence raging around us. We have watched with eager eyes the struggle taking place , we have lis¬ tened with increasing pride to the reports of what was happening on far-flung outposts , and we have waited for the day when we should snatch the sword from older hands and take up the good fight. We watch no longer , we listen no longer , we wait no longer; our destiny has long since been revealed. There will come a day , however , when peace will come and abide with us again , and strife and chaos and clangor will be stilled. On that day , when treasured memories of days gone by and comrades once held dear come flooding back to weary minds , this yearbook will serve the purpose. It will rekindle the fires of remembrance. Against that day do we hopefully fashion this year¬ book. Joreword Zkere Jre Many Zkings... . . . that we would like to set down within the pages of this book , things of great pith and moment , meaningful things that have enriched our formative years here to an immeasureable degree. For indeed , four years to¬ gether in the halls of The English High School are , in microcosm , as our oncoming years , filled with re¬ liefs and shadows , progressions and retrogressions; these years were inter¬ laced with the golden thread of democratic processes , proper con¬ cept in the dignity of man , mutual respect , the fundamental equal¬ ity of all. We would fain linger here yet awhile. But we have a rendezvous with Destiny. And we won t forget; the inexorable march of time controls. So in word and picture shall we keep the memory of our days here forever green. We unfold the scenes as they pertain to Faculty , Seniors , Activities , Athletics, Military , and Business Friends. Contents I he second year of the War saw six members of the faculty in the field with the Armed Forces. Others were in the process of following. In the design of total war, the schools were most articulate. So with newer reponsibilities and a reduced per¬ sonnel, the remnant faculty faced the challenge. And magnificently did they meet it in the very best tradition of a distinguished heritage. Under Head Master Downey the school was geared to the war effort, and with scarcely a perceptible ripple the stream of learning flowed on. Fourth Row: Mr. Atwood, Mr. McCabe, Mr. Kane, Mr. Connell, Mr. Maurice Murphy, Mr. Charles Murphy, Mr. Peterson, Mr. Woodwell. Third Row: Mr. Clark, Mr. Kenney, Mr. Hamer, Mr. Dooling. Mr. Adams, Mr. Peacock, Mr. McGrath, Mr. Brett. Second Row: Mr. Sheehan, Mr. Roche, Mr. Moloney, Mr. Eccles, Mr. Powers, Mr. Shore, Mr. Wallace Clark, Mr. Brack, Mr. Macllroy. Front Row: Lieutenant Clement, Mr. Weber, Mr. Brown, Mr. Hatch, Mr. Card, Mr. Hill, Mr. Kierstead, Mr. Quinn, Mr. Ward, Mr. Coughlin. THE INSTRUCTORS ENGLISH GERALD F. COUGHLIN EARL M. BENSON DONALD DEWART THOMAS G. ECCLES FREDERICK O. GIFFORD WILLIAM J. HAYES THOMAS C. HEFFERNAN (on leave) MARTIN F. KANE ALFRED B. KERSHAW CHARLES E. McCOOL MAURICE F. MURPHY GEORGE I. PETTENGILL WILLIAM J. ROCHE CLINTON C. SCHEFFY ROBERT G. SIMMONS PHILIP M. WOODWELL WALTER F. DOWNEY HEAD MASTER HISTORY RALPH F. V. QUINN RICHARD E. BURTON (A rmy) JOSEPH L. KENNEY FRED H. KIERSTEAD BERNARD H. McGRATH CECIL D. MacILROY FRANCIS X. MOLONEY DEANE S. PEACOCK ELMER H. PHELPS LATIN JOHN H. WARD WILLIAM J. DOOLING WALTER L. LEIGHTON BERNARD L. McCABE KENNETH G. RICHARDS (Army) JOSEPH F. SHEEHAN MODERN LANGUAGES BARNABY M. HOGAN J. ALBERT BRACK WALLACE M. CLARK ROBERT M. EVANS LEO V. HALLORAN CHARLES J. HAMLIN MERRILL C. HILL ALBERT I. MAGUIRE JEREMIAH J. O’LEARY FRIDOLF H. PETERSON EDWARD J. POWERS FRANK A. REPETTO PAUL M. SHEA (Army) EDWARD J. WALL (on leave) EDWARD N. WILSON ■V Rear Row: Mr. Evans, Mr. Sullivan, Mr. Traniello, Mr. Bell, Mr. McCool, Mr. Ohrenberger, Mr. O’Leary, Mr. Hamlin. Third Row: Mr. .John Keelon, Mr. Ford, Mr. Phelps, Mr. Glavin, Mr. Halloran, Mr. Simmons, Mr. Hayes, Mr. D’Amelio, Mr. Rudman. Second Row: Mr. John J. McCarthy, Mr. Lundin, Mr. Ronan, Mr. Bowler, Mr. Scheffy, Mr. Gifford, Mr. John F. McCarthy, Mr. Dewart. Front Row: Mr. Downey (Headmaster), Mr. Hogan, Mr. Charles Keelon, Mr. Welch, Mr. Barber, Mr. Benson, Mr. Rand, Mr. Snushall, Mr. Wilson, Captain Hennessey. MATHEMATICS CHARLES J. KEELON HARRY C. BARBER JAMES A. CAFFREY (Army) MICHAEL D’AMELIO JAMES A. GOLDTHWAITE MYRON C. HAMER ENOR E. LUNDIN john f. McCarthy CHARLES F. MURPHY WILLIAM H. OHRENBERGER BARNET RUDMAN JOHN D. SHORE SCIENCE LOUIS R. WELCH CARL H. ADAMS LAURENCE R. ATWOOD HAROLD I. BROWN JOHN H. CARD FRANK H. CLARK EVERETT J. FORD ELLIOT P. FRAZIER HOLLIS D. HATCH COMMERCIAL DANIEL FOLEY EDWARD F. BELL JOHN E. BOWLER EDWARD J. CONNELL MIAH J. FALVEY FRANCIS P. GLAVIN JOHN K. KEELON john j. McCarthy LEROY M. RAND J. CLIFFORD RONAN WILSON SNUSHALL ARTHUR J. SULLIVAN ANGELO TRANIELLO CHARLES A. WEBER PHYSICAL EDUCATION LT. COL. JOSEPH McK. DRISCOLL (Army) MAJOR WILLIAM H. MEANIX (Army) CAPTAIN THOMAS HENNESSEY (Acting) MASTERS EMERITI MALCOLM E. BARROWS LEON COLMAN FRED J. MILLER HARRY E. BRYANT and readily molded upon entrance into high school , the char¬ acter ., the outlook on life , the life itself of many boys has been unmistakably influenced in those treasured four years. The boys of The English High School , class of 1944, enter upon a sea of strife mentally and physically prepared as are those of few other high schools. Theirs is the knowl¬ edge on which the world of tomorrow will depend. They shall not fail. Boys of ' 44... C HE Class of 1944 leaves school in a year of war and turmoil. Those privileges that have always been ours are threatened. We thought that they were here to stay. Now we know that such things as liberty, freedom, and peace have to be protected. These national blessings were purchased at a high price of blood and treasure away back in the days of 1775 and 1776. At that time the peop le, and particularly the young men, had such a burning desire to be free from foreign domination that they were willing to fight for it. They did so! America became a free nation because of their sacrifices. Again a little less than a century after¬ ward the unity of our nation was threat¬ ened. Once more, in large numbers, young men, many of them from this school, made similar sacrifices so that we who came later could enjoy them. The same call—liberty for all, this time. The Union was saved. English High School boys have always been conspicuous when there is a national crisis. Now the greatest national and world crisis of all time faces us. We all wish that this were not so. We hope and pray that it may not be for long. However, since there are ruthless brig¬ ands who have upset the peace of the world, who are crushing out freedom and spreading cruelty, and are threatening this nation of ours, we must fight. We must fight wherever we can help the most,—some at the front—some at home. Thousands of our boys are now scattered all over the world, fighting on every front. How proud of them we are. All of them. They are our kinfolk. We are theirs. So, boys of ' 44 , we are proud of you. We wish you were stepping out into a world of peace. Oh, how we wish that! Since it is a world of war, you will do your duty and do it well. I want you to know that you are not just a class to me —you are a group of boys. In each of you I have a deep personal interest. I wish to share your adventures, your honors, and your sacrifices. My message to you is very simple — GOOD LUCK TO EACH — GOD BLESS YOU — EVERY ONE. Head Master {14} Classmates... r OUNG, eager, and free, we step out into the immenseness and. turmoil of this war-seared world of 1944. Of our youth and our zeal we can he certain, hut for our freedom we must and will fight, fight not only for a complete, shining vic¬ tory, hut also for the genuine, lasting peace that will follow. The nucleus of our ideas and ideals has been formed in these past few years at The English High School. Man, we are told, is the lengthened shadow of the hoy; thus, the environment, habits, knowledge, and ambitions we now experience will, in some measure, motivate our future actions. Times of gratitude are not always easy, ' for with them is usually mingled a poig¬ nant farewell. We have come to know our teachers as f riends, guides, counselors, —helpful to our efforts, hopeful for our futures. . . . Words themselves become meaningless when we try to express our heart-felt appreciation towards our inde- fatiguable headmaster, Mr. Walter F. Downey. His wit and wisdom, his hard work and humility have given us the per¬ fect example of a man of honor and achievement. The years ahead pulsate with promise. This—our graduation from The English High School—marks only the end of the beginning. Many of us in the close, coming months will live whole lifetimes, for the clash of arms and the din of battle press time into a narrow, swirling, action-filled epoch. We rise now from four years of work, seasoned in studies, social activities, and athletic triumphs. Little is to be said of school spirit, for that is our natural herit¬ age. The paths we will follow spread out in different, devious directions. They will run sometimes tortuously, often pre¬ cariously, but always and always upwards, where each will find the keys to his own kingdom, for “It ' s a rough road, and a steep road, and it stretches broad and far, But at last it leads to a Golden Town where Golden Houses are. " Charles P. Changelian, ’44 . Class President WILLIAM ABBONDANZIO “Abby” 14 Kelly Ct., Brighton IV. H. Taft, Brighton Ambition, College. 17. S. Army Air Corps JAMES ADAMS “Jim” 15 Christopher St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Air Corps ALBERT P. AHERN “Al” 98 Paul Gore St., Jamaica Plain Curley, Jamaica Plain Football, 4; Current Events, 3; Ambition, Drafting. U. S. Army JOHN J. A’HEARN “Jack” 64 Martin St., W. Roxbury Morris, IV. Roxbury Football, 3(E); Track, 4(E); Ambition, Aviation. College DOMINICK J. ALIZIO “Mickey” 67 Shawmut Ave., South End Abraham Lincoln, South End Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Law. College VINCENT AMPOLA “Vinnie” 43 Billerica St., West End Blackstone, IVest End Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Medicine. College HERBERT B. ANDERSON “Andy” 105 Wellington Hill St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Football, 3 (E ); 4(E); Track, 3; Ambition, College. U. S. Merchant Ma rine JOSEPH ARBEELY “Owie” 70 Hudson St., South End Abraham Lincoln, South End Baseball, 1, 2; Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Theater. U. S. Army Air Corps LEO R. ARSENAULT “Dick” 103 Faywood Ave., E. Boston Blackington, E. Boston Lawrence Prize, F. D., 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Drafting. U. S. Army Air Corps ROBERT B. ASTRACHAN “Bob” 98 Willowwood St., Dorchester Thompson, Dorchester Aviation Club, 3; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Army Air Corps •{16 HOWARD L. AUERBACH “ Howie” 121 Wellington Hill St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Room Captain, 2; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy RICHARD A. AYLWARD “Dick” 2 Helena St., Jamaica Plain Lady of Lourdes, Jamaica Plain Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; Telephone Staff, Chief Operator, 1, 2, 3, 4; Ambition, Foreign Service. College JOSEPH A. BAGLIONE Joe 36 Draper St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland, Dorchester Ambition, Aeronautical Engi¬ neering. U. S. Army Air Corps ROBERT W. BALLOU “Fuzz” 31 Upcrest Rd., Brighton Edison, Brighton Track; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy JOSEPH F. BANNON “Joey” 40 Monastery Rd., Brighton Edison, Brighton Tennis, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2; Athletic Captain, 4; Cadet Cap¬ tain, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy JAMES P. BARLAS “Jim” 1458 Blue Hill Ave., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 3, 4; Room Councilor, 3, 4; Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; French Club, 3; V.T.U., 3; Ambition, Naval Architecture. M. I. T. CHARLES V. BARRY “Head” 88 Tuttle St., Dorchester St. William ' s Dorchester Room Councilor, 2, 3; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Marine Corps ROBERT J. BARRY 39 Dunlap St., Dorchester Woodrow Wilson, Dorchester Hockey Team, 2(E), 3(E), 4; Captain, 4(E); Ambition, U. S. Army Air Corps. U. S. Army Air Corps JACK BERG “Jack” 841 Blue Hill Ave., Dorchester Lewenberg, Mattapan Ambition, College. VA2 ALBERT M. BERMAN 57 Clarkwood St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Ambition, Science. College { 11 } CHARLES W. BERNARD “Charlie” 41 Long Ave., Allston IV. H. Taft, Allston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Track, 2,3; Hockey, 4; Ambition, Aeronau¬ tical Engineering. U. S. Army Air Corps JOSEPH W. BLANKE “Joe” 35 Mt. Ida Rd., Dorchester St. Peter s, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 3; Ambition, College. U. S. Navy ARNOLD E. BLOCK “Arnie” 80 Radcliffe St., Dorchester Holmes, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Prize Drill, 2, 3; Aviation Club, 2; Record Business, 3, 4; Ambition, Chem¬ istry. College ALLEN R. BLUMENTHAL “Duke” 59 Esmond St., Dorchester Thompson, Dorchester Trick Squad, 2, 3, 4; Ambition, F.B.I. U. S. Coast Guard ALEXANDER L. BOCH “Al” 47 Langley Rd., Brighton Lady of Presentation, Brighton 1A ; Honor Roll, 1; Lawrence Prize, HI; Individual Prize, N4; Room Councilor, 2; Ambition, Travel. U. S. Navy ELISHA S. BOLAND 3 Fairfax St., Dorchester IVoodrow IVilson, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy MAX BORNSTEIN “Mac” 199 Quincy St., Roxbury Blackstone, IVest End Ambition, Cartoons. Business SIDNEY BORNSTEIN “Sid” 655 Morton St., Dorchester Lewenberg, Mattapan Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; V.T.U., 3; Ambition, Dentistry. Tufts College CARLO A. BOSCHETTI “Charlie” 123 Cottage St., E. Boston Lady of Mt. Carmel, E. Boston Honor Roll, 1; Lawrence Prize, F D, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Electrical Engineer¬ ing. College JOHN S. BOUTILIER “Boots” 52 Chesebrough Rd., W. Roxbury Shaw, IV. Roxbury Cadet Captain, 4; Football, 2, 3(E), 4(E); Track, 2(E), 3(E), 4(E); Baseball, 2, 3; Room Cap¬ tain, 3; Ambition, Red Cross, Field Unit. U. S. Naval Air Corps ■(18 CHARLES E. BRADY “Bozo” 220 W. 6th St., S. Boston St. Augustine ' s, S-. Boston Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy PAUL K. BREADY 21 Speedwell St., Dorchester St. Peter’s, Dorchester Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy NELSON A. BRIGGS “Nellie” 95 Warren Ave., South End Rice, South End Track, 1, 2(E), 3(E); Football, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Record Staff, 2; Ambition, Cartoonist. U. S. Marine Corps ROBERT F. BRODERICK “Bob” 5 Harbell Ter., Dorchester Grover Cleveland, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces ARNOLD F. BRODIE “Babe” 23 Wilcock St., Dorchester Lewenberg, Mattapan Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Aviation, 2, 3; Ambition, Cartoonist. College FREDERICK BROUSAIDES “Freddie” 135 W. Canton St., South End Rice, South End Track, 3(E); Ambition, Ex¬ plorer. U. S. Signal Corps ARNOLD S. BROWN ‘ ‘Brownie” 37 Gleason St., Dorchester Holmes, Dorchester Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Track, 2, 3, 4(E); Am¬ bition, Medicine. Harvard LAWRENCE M. BROWN ‘ ‘Lonnie” 11A Rockland St., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Track, 3(E), 4(E); Am¬ bition, Music. New England Conservatory PAUL G. BUCHANAN “Buchy” 195 Neponset Ave., Dorchester St. Ann ' s, Dorchester V.T.U.; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Naval Aviation THOMAS E. BUCKLEY “Bucky” 21 Mansur St., Jamaica Plain Cheverus, Jamaica Plain 2 A ; Honor Roll, 2; Baseball, 3(E), 4; Hockey, 4; Ambition, Teaching. U. S. Navy •{19 J GERALD G. BUDD “Jerry” 60 Lorna Rd., Mattapan Thompson, Mattapan Ambition, Civil Engineering. College DONALD J. BURNS ‘ ‘ Burnsie” 29 Webber St., Roxbury St. Rita ' s, Roxbury 2 A ; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Honor Roll, 3; Ambition, Busi¬ ness. U. S r Armed Forces CAROLD A. BYLANDER “Swede” 67 Codman Pk., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Accounting. U. S. Navy JOSEPH W. BYRNE “Joe” 415 K St., S. Boston Gate oj Heaven, S, Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Army JOHN J. CALLAHAN “Cal” 6 Hardy St., S. Boston Nazareth, S. Boston Cadet Captain, 4; Drill Team, 2, 3, 4; Individual Prize, 3; Execu¬ tive Committee, 3, 4; Track, 2, 3; Baseball, 3, Manager, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Armed Forces EDWIN D. CAMPBELL “Ed” 6 Parker Ter., Dorchester P. L. S., Boston Ambition, College. U. S. Marine Corps ADAM P. CAPUTO “Biff” 62 Arborway, Jamaica Plain Curley, Jamaica Plain Hockey, 2(E), 3(E), 4(E); Ambition, College. U. S. Marine Corps PAUL H. CARLIN 19 Aberdeen St., Back Bay St. Columbkille ' s, Brighton Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Chemistry. U. S. Armed Forces ROBERT E. CARO “Bob” 45 Englewood Ave., Brighton Edison, Brighton Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Record Business Staff, 3, 4; Yearbook Business Staff; Ambition, En¬ gineering. U. S. Army Air Corps ARTHUR F. CARR “Art” 22 Pelham St., South End Rice, South End Cadet Captain, 4; Football, 3, 4(E); Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Marine Corps J20 WALTER V. CARTY 22 Dairymple St., Jamaica Plain Roosevelt, Roxbury 3 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Lawrence Prize, F D, 2, L2; Cadet Cap¬ tain, 4; Record, Literary, 4; Ambition, Medicine. College GEORGE A. CARVER “Al” 180 Fairmount St., Dorchester Thompson, Dorchester Ambition, Draftsman. U. S. Armed Forces ANTHONY J. CATALDO “Tony” 127 Endicott St., North J nd St. Mary ' s, North End Individual Prize Drill, 2; Ambi¬ tion, Business. U. S. Armed Forces LOUIS G. CATALDO “Gino” 18 Wilbur St., Dorchester St. Peter ' s, Dorchester Cadet Captain, 4; Athletic Cap¬ tain, 2; Ambition, Physical Cul¬ ture Teacher. U. S. Armed Forces DOMINIC P. CERULLI “Dorn” 174 Bayswater St., E. Boston St. Lazarus , E. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Junior and Senior Class Vice President; Record, Art and Literary Staff, 3, 4; Lawrence Prize, F D, 1; Room Councilor, 4; Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Ambition, Commercial Art. U. S. Navy V-5 CHARLES P. CHANGELIAN “Chan” 14 Mark St., Jamaica Plain Curley, Jamaica Plain 3 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Indi¬ vidual Prize, 2; Record Adver¬ tising, 3; Trick Squad, 3, 4; Junior and Senior Class Presi¬ dent; Ambition, Mechanical En¬ gineering. M. I. T. HOWARD H. CHAUNCEY “Howie” 165 Chiswick Rd., Brighton F.dison, Brighton Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Camera Club, 2; Chemical Lab¬ oratory, Assistant; Ambition, Chemistry. M. I. T. HOWARD S. CHIN “Howie” 60 Harvard St., South End Abraham Lincoln, South End 2 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Room Captain; Li¬ brary Corps, 2, 3, President, 4; Alumni Committee, 4; Record Contributing Editor, 4; German Club; Ambition, Aeronautical Engineering. M. I. T. CONSTANTINE CHOHARIS “Dooley” 433 Brookline Ave., Back Bay Martin, Back Bay Cadet Lieutenant; Drum Corps; Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces NERSES CHOPOURIAN “Chappy” 1118 Tremont St., Roxbury S’.erwin, Roxbury 3 A ; Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4;. Ambition, Busi¬ ness. U. S. Armed Forces 21 ARTHUR G. CIAMPA ‘ ‘Archy” 148 Bayswater St., E. Boston Blackington, E. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Aviation Mechanics. College FRANK J. CIERI, JR. “Nubby” 172 Cottage St., E. Boston Me Kay, E. Boston Ambition, Draftsman. Business ANTHONY F. CINTOLO “Tunney” 31 Haynes St., E. Boston Lady of Mt. Carmel, E. Boston Glee Club, 4; Ambition, Phar¬ macist. U. S. Naval Air Corps JOSEPH D. CLANCY “Whitey” 1 Jess St., Jamaica Plain Lady of Lourdes, Jamaica Plain Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces EUGENE D. CLARK “Dave” 17 Fessenden St., Jamaica Plain Curley, Jamaica Plain Honor Roll, 3; Trick Squad, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; Cheer Leader, 4; Ambition, Teacher. College SIDNEY E. CLARK “Sid” 38 Hollander St., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury 2 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Lawrence Prize, F D, 2, 3; Cadet Cap¬ tain, 4; Track, 2; Room Coun¬ cilor, 2; V.T.U., 3; Ambition, Teacher. College JAMES F. M. CLEARY “Big Jim” 26 Harley St., Dorchester St. Mark ' s, Dorchester Record Business Staff, 3; Room Councilor, 3; Ambition, College. U. S. Army ROBERT A. CLUNE “Bob” 393 Main St., Charlestown St. Francis de Sales, Charlestown Ambition, Naval Aviation. U. S. Navy MORTIMER W. COAKLEY “Mort” 153 Eustis St., Roxbury St. Rita ' s Roxbury Ambition, Success. U. S. Army MATTHEW J. COFFEY “Mattie” 73 Montebello Rd., J amaica Pl’n Lady of Lourdes, Jamaica Plain Honor Roll, 1; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy { 22 } FRED A. COHEN “Freddie” 802 Blue Hill Ave., Dorchester Holmes , Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Success. Northeastern ROBERT J. COLLERAN “Bob” 79 Greenfield Rd., Mattapan Chittick, Hyde Park Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Football, 4; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Navy JAMES F. COLLINS “Red” 15 Arcadia St., Dorchester St. Mark ' s, Dorchester Honor Roll, 3; Football, 4; Am¬ bition, Economist. U. S. Navy JOHN T. COLLINS 7 Hallam St., Dorchester St. William ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Army JOHN F. COMMINS “Frankie” 747 Broadway, S. Boston Nazareth , S. Boston Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; French Club, 3; Ambi¬ tion, Dentistry. College RONALD A. CONANT, JR. “Bud” 11 Ranelegh Rd., Brighton Ediscn, Brighton Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Track, 2(E), 3(E), 4(E); French Club, 3; Ambition, Advertising. 17. S. Air Corps MYLES T. CONNORS 60 Richfield St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland , Dorchester Baseball, 3; Ambition, Baseball. U. S. Navy JOHN A. COONEY ‘ ‘Johnny” 117 Seventh St., S. Boston St. Augustine ' s, S . Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Track, 1; Football, 4; Switchboard, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy THEODORE COSTARAKIS ‘Lefty” 7 Hillside St., Roxbury Martin, Roxbury Switchboard, 3; Baseball, 2; Hockey; Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces PAUL A. COSTELLO “Costi” 66 Percival St., Dorchester St. Peter ' s, Dorchester Record Business, 1, 2; Ambition, Business. U. S. Army {23 JOHN P. CRAVEN 160 Boylston St., Jamaica Plain Roosevelt, Roxbury Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; Record, Literary, 3; Switch¬ board, 4; Ambition, College. College WILLIAM H. CRAVEN “Bill” 1619 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton Woodrow Wilson, Dorchester Individual Prize Drill, 2; Ambi¬ tion, College. U. S. Armed Forces EMANUEL CRAWFORD “Mickey” 32 W 7 ilcock St., Dorchester I.ewenberg, Mattapan Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Radio Mechanic. Radio School FRED N. CRONIN 38 Baker St., W. Roxbury Shaw, W. Roxbury Ambition, Priesthood. Pro. Seminary JOSEPH L. CRONIN “Joe” 54 Grampian Way, Dorchester St. William ' s, Dorchester Tennis, 2, 3; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy PAUL D. CRONIN 1 ‘ Dennis” 66 Union St., Brighton St. Co umbkil e’s, Brighton Hockey, 3(E), 4(E); Ambition, Journalism. College GEORGE S. CROSBY “Cros” 114 Allston St., Allston W. H. Taft, Allston Ambition, U. S. Maritime Serv¬ ice. U. S. Marine Academy RICHARD P. CROWLEY ‘ ‘Professor” 49 Bakersfield St., Dorchester Everett, Dorchester 2 A ; Honor Roll, 2; Lawrence Prize, F D, 3; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Room Captain, 2; Ath¬ letic Captain, 3; V.T.U., 3; Am¬ bition, W ' est Point Military Academy. U. S. Army ANGELO R. CUCUGLIATA “Andy” 125 Saratoga St., E. Boston Barnes, E. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Track, 2; Ambition, Radio. U. S. Air Corps WILLIAM J. CULHANE “Bill” 20 Fairfield St., Back Bay Prince, Back Bay Ambition, Civil Engineering. U. S. Air Corps J24 JOSEPH P. CULLINANE “Joe” 130 Wrentham St., Dorchester St. Mark ' s, Dorchester Football, 3; Ambition, College. U. S. Marine Corps ROBERT H. CUMMING “Bob” 157 E. Cottage St., Dorchester Russell, Dorchester 3 A ; Lawrence Prizes, Dl, D2; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Athletic Captain, 2, 3; Record Art Staff, 2, 3, 4; Ambition, Commercial Art. Vesper George School of Art NORMAN A. CUR ' I IS 50 Rosemont St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy HUGH B. DAKERS 11 Roanoke Ave., Jamaica Plain Curley, Jamaica Plain Hockey, Manager, 4(E); Track, 2; Football, Assistant Manager, 3; Ambition, Newspaper Re¬ porter. U. S. Navy ERNEST L. D’AMATO “Ernie” 46 Logan Way, S. Boston Andrew, S. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Commercial Art. U. S. Marine Corps SPENCER L. DAVIS “Spenny” 1742 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton W. H. Taft, Brighton Ambition, Agriculturalist. U. S. Navy ALBERT J. DeBENEDICTIS “Benny” 224 Chelsea St., E. Boston Barnes, E. Boston Band, 2; Ambition, Business. U. S. Marine Corps VINCENT T. DeFILIPPO, JR. “DeFlip” 372 Summer St., E. Boston Lady of Mt. Carmel, E. Boston Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy FRANCIS J. DEGNAN “Frankie” 244 Notwell St., Dorchester Holmes, Dorchester Cheer Leader, 3(E), 4(E); Track, 3(E); Alumni Commit¬ tee; Ambition, U. S. Marine Corps. U. S. Marine Corps HARRY L. DeROEIIN “De” 331 Freeport St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland, Dorchester Ambition, Travel. U. S. Armed Forces { 25 } CHARLES DESAULNIERS “Charlie” 76 O’Callaghan Way, S. Boston Russell, S. Boston Cadet Captain, 4; Trick Squad, 3, 4; V.T.U., 3; Switchboard, 3, 4; Ambition, Success. College CHARLES N. DIAMOND “Nick” 60 Raymond St., Allston IV. H. Taft, Brighton Honor Roll, 2; Ambition, Engi¬ neering. M. I. T. IRVING M. DIAMOND ‘ ‘Issie” 1638 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton Edison, Brighton Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Armed Forces EDWARD J. Di CICCO “Ed” 134 Brighton St., West End St. Mary ' s, North End 2 A ; Lawrence Prize, 12; Honor Roll, 1; Cadet Captain, 4; Room Councilor, 4; Ambition, Ac¬ counting. Boston College GEORGE DiGENIO “DiGen” 636 Saratoga St., E. Boston Cheverus, E. Boston Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps SEYMOUR A. DiMARI 60 Orient Ave., E. Boston St. Lazarus, E. Boston 3A ; Honor Roll, 1,2, 3; Law¬ rence Prizes, 12, F D 2; Room Councilor, 2; Record Business, 4; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Chairman, Alumni Committee; Ambition, Medicine. College ORESTE V. DiSCIULLO “Rusty” 247 Kennebec St., Mattapan Abraham Lincoln, South End Cadet Captain, 4; Room Coun¬ cilor, 3; Ambition, Aeronautical Engineering. V. S. Air Corps WILLIAM E. DOLAN “Bill” 135 Carolina Ave., Jamaica Pl’n P. L. S., Boston Hockey, 3(E), 4(E); Ambition, College. U. S. Marine Corps FRANCIS X. DONAHUE “EX” 1258 Commonwealth Ave., Allston St. Aidan ' s, Brookline Record, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps JOHN J. DONAHUE “J.J.” 20 Boynton St., Jamaica Plain Lady of Lourdes, Jamaica Plain Ambition, Business. U. S. Armed Forces { 26 } RICHARD A. DONAHUE “R.A.F.” 10 Norton St., Dorchester St. Peter ' s, Dorchester Room Councilor; Ambition, Success. Business College FRANCIS X. J. DONELAN 141 Marcella St., Roxbury Timilty, Roxbury Current Events, 2, 3; Stamp Club, 2; French Club, 2; Ambi¬ tion, Welfare Work. U. S. Army JAMES J. DONOVAN “Jimmie " 53 Johnson St., W. Roxbury Shaw, W. Roxbury Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy JOHN E. DONOVAN “Dunny " 11 Harbor View St., Dorchester Russell, Dorchester Record Business, 1, 2, 3; Cadet Lieutenant,4; Ambition, Success U. S. Air Corps JOSEPH E. DOWNING Joe 150 South St., Jamaica Plain St. Thomas, Jamaica Plain Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Glee Club, 4; Ambition, Success. Business LAWRENCE D. DOYLE 1 ‘Larry” 4 Mt. Pleasant PL, Roxbury Dearborn, Roxbury Fife and Drum, 4; Ambition, Law. U. S. Army WILLIAM D. DRINAN “Bill " 137 Orange St., Roslindale Irving, IV. Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Marine Corps FRANCIS E. DUBRAWSKY “Frank " 20 Edwin St., Dorchester John A. Andrew, S. Boston Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps GERARD J. DUCIE ‘Jerry " 19 Wyman St., Jamaica Plain Cheverus, Jamaica Plain Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy THOMAS F. DUFF “Tom " 42 Pierce St., Dorchester Woodrow Wilson, Dorchester Baseball, 2(E), 3(E), 4; Foot¬ ball, 3, 4(E), Track, 3, 4; Am¬ bition, Baseball. U. S. Navy {27 WILLIAM DUHEY “Grantland” 70 Cabot St., Roxbury Sherwin, Roxbury Honor Roll, 3; Room Councilor, 4; Rand, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2; Ambition, Musician. U. S. Marine Corps ISAIAH EDWARDS 434 Massachusetts Ave., S. End Abraham Lincoln, South End Lawrence Prize, F D, 2; Cap¬ tain, Bugle Drum Corps, 4; Ambition, Chemistry. College COURTLAND H. ELLIS “Court” 30 W ' abon St., Roxbury P. L. S., Boston Cadet Captain, 4; Cheer Leader, 4; Track, 1(E), 2(E), 3(E), 4(E), Captain, 4; Room Cap¬ tain, 4; Ambition, Athletics. U. S. Maritime Service CHARLES J. ELMORE “Charlie” 78 St. Andrews Rd., E. Boston Blackington, E. Boston Switchboard, 2; Track, 1, 2; Ambition, Veterinary. U. S. Marine Corps EDWARD F. ERHARD “Eddie” 66 Wyman St., Jamaica Plain Curley, Jamaica Plain Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Record Business, 4; Ambition, Ortho¬ pedic Surgery. U. S. Air Corps FRANCIS A. EVANS 1 ‘Amby” 72 Westglow St., Dorchester St. Ann s, Dorchester Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps MILTON FACTOR 52 Hosmer St., Mattapan Lewenberg , Mattapan Ambition, Success. U. S. Army JOHN J. FARRELL “John” 55 Leicester St., Brighton St. Columbkille ' s, Brighton Track, 3; Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Army JOHN J. FARRELL, JR. “Jack” 7 March Ave., W. Roxbury Shaw, W. Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 3; Picture Committee, 4; Football, 4(E); Baseball, 1, 2(E), 3(E), 4, Cap¬ tain, 4; Track, 2(E), 3(E), 4(E); Ambition, College. U. S. Navy, V-y MELVIN FELDMAN “Mel” 44 Erie St., Dorchester Holmes, Dorchester Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; Record Business, 2; Current Events, 3; Ambition, Mechani¬ cal Engineering. Northeastern WALTER J. FIDROCKI 615 Massachusetts Ave., S. End Dwight , South End Ambition, Electrical Engineer¬ ing. U. S. Army MYRON FINKELSTEIN “Fink” 202 Callender St., Dorchester Holmes , Dorchester Cadet Captain, 4; Senior Alumni Committee; Ambition, Medical Research. University of Kentucky ELLIOT R. FINN “Finny” 27 Symphony Rd., Back Bay Rice , South End Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Engineering. Franklin Institute MAURICE J. FITZGERALD “Fitzie” 9 Flavia St., Dorchester St. Ann’s, Dorchester Flonor Roll, 1, 2; Room Coun¬ cilor, 1,3; Lawrence Prize, F D., 1; Ambition, Success. Boston College JOSEPH F. FLANAGAN “Joe” 176 Train St., Dorchester Woodrow Wilson , Dorchester Hockey, 3(F.), 4(E); Baseball, 3(E), 4(E); Ambition, Baseball. U. S. Marine Corps MICHAEL B. FLYNN “Brenda” 109 Baldwin St., Charlestown St. Francis de Sales, Charlestown Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Navy THOMAS G. FLYNN “Jerry” 118 Chandler St., South End Crosby High , Waterbury , Conn. Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Radio Engineering. U. S. Navy JOHN J. FOLEY “Joe” 111 Sydney St., Dorchester Mather , Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces THOMAS J. FOLEY “Tom” 9 Milton St., Dorchester St. Gregory ' s , Dorchester Ambition, Teaching. Harvard LEONARD W. FORBES “Len” 327 Neponset Ave., Dorchester Woodrow Wilson , Dorchester Ambition, Radio Engineering. College { 29 } II. NORMAN FORGUITES 1315 River St., Hyde Park St. Raphael ' s, Hyde Park Honor Roll, 1; Ambition, Ac¬ counting. Business GERALD A. FORTE “Jerry” 31 Village St., South End Holy Trinity, South End Stamp Club, 1; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Ambition, Office Worker. U. S. Armed Forces ROBERT J. FOUNTAIN “Bob” 3 Bayside St., Dorchester Everett, Dorchester Football, 4; Hockey, 3, 4; Room Captain, 3; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps SYDNEY H. FRANCER “Hecky” 31A Fessenden St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Individual Prize, Drum, 3; Drum Bugle Corps, 2, 3; Am¬ bition, Medicine. College IRVING A. FRANCIS 883d? Newland St., South End Dwight, South End Ambition, Accounting. Accounting School JOHN O. FRANCIS “Johnny” 6 Prentiss St., Roxbury Dwight, South End 4 A ; Lawrence Prize, F D; Individual Prize, Drill; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Civil Service. Business School WILLIAM F. FRANKLIN “Bill” 365 Massachusetts Ave., Back Bay Rice, South End Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces HERBERT FRIEDMAN “Cousin” 90 Waumbeck St., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Engineering. Boston Technical School CHARLES F. GALLAGHER “Gal” 40 Larchmont St., Dorchester Holmes, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Navy JOHN F. GALVIN “Jack” 188 Wren St., W. Roxbury Shaw, IV. Roxbury Ambition, College. U. S. Marine Corps 30 JAMES J. GANNON “Jimmy” . 45 Compton St., South End Abraham Lincoln, South End Athletic Captain, 4; Room Councilor, 4; Record Business, 4; Ambition, Business. U. S. Armed Forces T. C. GEANACOPOULOS “Genny” 118 Malden St., South End Rice, South End Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Civil Service. U. S. Armed Forces JOHN D. GEARY 62 Gretter Rd., Roslindale Shaw, IV. Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Room Captain, 4; Record Business, 4; Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Coast Guard Academy GEORGE N. GENES 6 Atherton St., Roxbury Roosevelt, Roxbury 2 A ; Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Medi¬ cine. College GEORGE GEOGERIAN “Muscles” 246 Hyde Park Ave., Jamaica Plain Tilton, Haverhill 1 A ; Lawrence Prize, F D, 1; Honor Roll, 2; Ambition, Suc¬ cess. U. S. Navy FRANK J. GIACOBBE 16 Mather St., Dorchester Abraham Lincoln, South End Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Journalism. College WALTER F. GILBERT “Gil” 178 Bowdoin St., Dorchester St. Peter ' s, Dorchester 1 A ; Ambition, Business. U. S. Navy WILLIAM M. GILBERT “Red” 178 Bowdoin St., Dorchester St. Peter ' s, Dorchester Football, 2(E), 3(E); Track, 2(E), 3(E); Athletic Councilor, 3; Ambition, College. U. S. Navy JOHN R. GILLINGHAM “Gill” 317 Wood Ave., Hyde Park St. Raphael ' s, Hyde Park Football, 4; Switchboard, 4; Glee Club, 4; Ambition, Avia¬ tion. U. S. Marine Corps GEORGE U. GILMAN, JR. 1 ‘Georgie” 1163 Boylston St., Back Bay Weston Grammar, Weston Ambition, Business U. S. Marine Corps •(31 CARMEN F. GIROLAMO “Peggy” 159 Cottage St., E. Boston McKay, E. Boston Ambition, Accounting. Business School MELVIN GOLDSTEIN “Mel” 15 Estella St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Aviation Club, 2; Ambition, Pharmacy. Mass. College oj Pharmacy MELVIN E. GOLDSTEIN “Emmy” 77 Deering Rd., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Drum Corps, 2, 3, 4; Band, 3; Swing Band, 3; Orchestra, 4; Ambition, Music. U. S. Marine Corps MEYER M. GOLUBCHIN “Limpy” 1049 Blue Hill Ave., Dorchester Lewenberg , Mattapan 1 A ; Record Business, 2; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Ambition, U. S. Marine Corps. College LESTER S. GOODMAN “Goody” 19 Portina Rd., Brighton Edison, Brighton Ambition, College. U. S. Armed Forces RICHARD L. GOODWIN 1307 Commonwealth Ave., Allston St. Aidan s, Brookline Individual Prize, Drill, 2; Trick Squad, 1,2; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps GREGORY A. GOOLISIIIAN “Gebby” 24 Westland Ave., Back Bay Cathedral Grammar, South End Ambition, Electrical Engineer¬ ing. U. S. Navy THOMAS C. GOULD “Tom” 4 Colonial Ave., Dorchester Woodrow Wilson, Dorchester Ambition, Commercial Aviation. Business JAMES H. GRAHAM, JR. “Jim” 30 Lorette St., W. Roxbury Shaw, W. Roxbury 1 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Law¬ rence Prizes, E2, L3; Cadet Cap¬ tain, 4; Room Councilor, 3, 4; President, Student Council, 4; Record, Sports Editor, 3, 4; Edi- tor-in-Chief, 4; French Club, Treasurer, 3; Ambition, Jour¬ nalism. Columbia University ROBERT H. GRAHAM “Bob” 37 Fairmount St., Dorchester Woodrow Wilson, Dorchester Ambition, Architecture. Northeastern RICHARD L. GRANARA “Dick” 67 Neptune Rd., E. Boston St. Mary ' s, E. Boston Ambition, Success. Boston University ERNEST G. GRANDE “Lindy” 182 Cottage St., E. Boston Me Kay, E. Boston Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps ANTHONY J. GRAVINA “Greek” 441 Dudley St., Roxbury St. Patrick ' s, Roxbury Honor Roll, 1; Room Councilor, 2; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy ALLEN GREEN 1 ‘Greenie” 221 Harvard St., Dorchester Holmes, Dorchester Individual Prize, Drill; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Aero¬ nautical Engineering. Northeastern JULIUS H. GREEN “Curly” 37 Egremont Rd., Brighton Garrison, Roxbury 3 A ; Honor Roll, 2? Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Suc¬ cess. U. S. Navy NORMAN GREEN “Greenie” 7 Monument Ave., Charlestown Edwards, Charlestown Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Engineering. College SIDNEY GREEN 691 Morton St., Dorchester Lewenberg, Dorchester 3 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; French Club, Vice President, 4; Ambition, Medicine. Harvard MORTON GREENBERG 24 Fessenden St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Tennis, 3; Ambition, Chemistry. College DAVID H. GREENE “Dave” 25 N. Anderson St., West End Blackstone, West End Honor Roll, 2; Individual Prize, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambi¬ tion, Biology. College THEODORE A. GREENE “Teddy” 19 Hazelton St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Honor Roll, 2; French, 3; Cadet Captain; Track, 2(E); Ambi¬ tion, Electrical Engineering. U. S. Navy GEORGE L. GREENFIELD “Red” 27 Egremont Rd., Brighton Edison, Brighton 2 A ; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambi¬ tion, Aeronautical Engineering. M. I. T. JULIUS S. GREENSTEIN “Greenie” 646 Morton St., Dorchester Lewenberg, Mattapan Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Medicine. College JOSEPH P. GRIFFIN “Griff” 12 Stonehurst St., Dorchester Mather, Dorchester Ambition, Success. Business DANIEL E. GUIMOND “Froggy” 55 Silver St., S. Boston Sts. Peter and Paul , 5’. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Marine Corps LAWRENCE GUPTILL, 2d “Larry” 2 Murdock St., Brighton St. Columbkille ' s, Brighton Honor Roll, 1; Glee Club, 1,2,3; Dance Committee; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps F. W. GUSTAFSON, 2d “Fred” 112 Regent St., Roxbury Timi ty, Roxbury Honor Roll, 2; Glee Club, 3, 4; Ambition, Teaching. College WILLIAM HADDON “Bill” 18 Medfield St., Back Bay Hunting, Quincy, Mass. Lawrence Prize, M3; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Air Corps PHILIP C. HAJJAR “Phil” 142 Warren Ave., South End Rice, South End Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Success. College WILLIAM HALL “Bill” 120 Bower St., Roxbury Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces DAVIS K. HAMER 1 ‘Lefty” 43 Salcombe St., Dorchester Everett, Dorchester Cadet ILieutenant, 4; Fencing Club, 2; Ambition, Teaching. U. S. Navy •{ 34 } WILFRED HAMM “Will” 336 Hyde Park Ave., Jamaica Plain Irving, Roslindale Cadet Captain, 4; French Club, 3; Track, 3, 4; Ambition, Engi¬ neering. U. S. Marine Corps CHARLES V. HANDY “Charlie” 67 Humboldt Ave., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces EDWIN F. HANNON “Ed” 520 Randolph Ave., Milton St. Gregory ' s Hockey, 3; Baseball, 2; Ambi¬ tion, Law. U. S. Air Corps JOHN P. HANNON “Harry” 41 Mt. Ida Rd., Dorchester Lewis, Roxbury Honor Roll, 1; Cadet Captain, 3; Ambition, Journalism. Boston College FREDERICK W. HANSON “Fred” 1115 Adams St., Dorchester Gate of Heaven, S. Boston Ambition, Engineering. M. I. T. JOHN J. HAPPNIE “Hap” 5 Dever St., Dorchester Mather, Dorchester Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 3, 4; Ambition, Mechanical Engineering. Army Air Corps RALPH A. HARMON 48 Charme Ave., Roslindale Irving, Roslindale Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant; Ambition, College. U. S. Air Corps GERALD HARRIS “Gerry” 782 Morton St., Mattapan Wolcott, Mattapan Ambition, Commercial Art. Massachusetts Art School CHARLES H. HARTMERE “Chuck” 19 Churchill Rd., W. Roxbury Morris, W. Roxbury Ambition, Law. U. S. Air Corps ANDREW F. HARTUNG “Stretch” 189 Bowen St., S. Boston Bigelow, S. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Air Corps 35 DONALD P. HARVEY “Harvey” 7 Delle Ave., Roxbury Martin , Roxbury Ambition, Journalism. U. S. Air Corps PAUL W. HASSETT “Hack” 101 Cabot St., Roxbury Sherwin, Roxbury 8 A ; Honor Roll, 1,2; Lawrence Prize, F D, 3; Cadet Cap¬ tain, 4; Library Corps, 2, 3, 4; Room Councilor, 1, 2; Student Council, 1; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Navy EUSTACE M. HAYNES “Mike” 30 Haskins St., Roxbury Timilty, Roxbury Track, 2; Glee Club, 4; Ambi¬ tion, Music. Business WILLIAM J. HEALEY “Bill” 186 Grampian Way, Dorchester Everett, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps RICHARD M. HEILIGMANN “Dick” 201 Maple St., W. Roxbury Shaw , IV. Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Glee Club, 3; Track, 2; Ambition, Den¬ tistry. U. S. Navy MELVIN HERSHMAN “Mel” 6 Vesta Rd., Dorchester Greenwood, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Individual Prize, Drill, 3; Ambition, Me¬ chanical Engineering. Northeastern JOHN J. HICKS “Johnny” 38 Harvard Ave., Hyde Park St. Raphael ' s, Hyde Park Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces ARTHUR P. HILL 9 Dahlgren St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy MYRON HOFFMAN “Mike” 66 Am. Legion Hwy, Dorchester Lewenberg, Mattapan Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Drum Corps, 1,2,3, 4; Ambition, Civil Engineering. U. S. Air Corps THOMAS W. HOGAN “Tom” 5 Helena St., Jamaica Plain Lady of Lourdes, Jamaica Plain Honor Roll, 1, 2; Lawrence Prize, F D, 1, 2; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Athletic Captain, 4; Room Councilor, 3; Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces WILLIAM L. HOGAN “Bill” 261 W. Fifth St., S. Boston St. Augustine s, S. Boston Lawrence Prize, B2; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy ROBERT F. HOGARTY “Red” 15 Orchard St., Jamaica Plain Curley, Jamaica Plain Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy CHARLES B. HOLLAND, JR. “Buzz” 58 Lithgow St., Dorchester St. Mark ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy JOSEPH G. HOPKINS “Hoppy” 10 Wade St., Brighton Garfield , Brighton Ambition, Medicine. Boston College SIDNEY HORBLITT “Hakie” 38 Hosmer St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Cadet Captain, 4; Record, Ad¬ vertising, 3; French Club, 3; Ambition, Chemistry. U. S. Navy SAMUEL HOROWITZ “Hockey” 83 W. Selden St., Mattapan Thompson, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition Chemistry. Mass. College of Pharmacy FREDERICK H. HOWALT 391 Poplar St., Roslindale Irving, Roslindale Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Football, 3, 4; Hockey, 3, 4; Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Navy CHARLES B. HUTCHISON “Hutch” 257 Savin Hill Ave., Dorchester St. William ' s, Dorchester 2 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2; Athletic Captain, 3; Room Councilor, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy WILLIAM L. IRISH “Bro” 15 H askins St., Roxbury Timilty, Roxbury Ambition, College. U. S. Armed Forces WALTER H. JOHANSSON “Joe” 54 Westland Ave., Back Bay Glenwood, Back Bay Ambition, Success. U. S. Air Corps {37 EDWARD KACIIADOURIAN “Kachy” 20 Cobden St., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury 4 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Lawrence Prize, P’2; Ambition, Aeronauti¬ cal Engineering. U. S. Air Corps EDMUND KALINOWSKI “Stuff” 56 Dorset St., Dorchester St. Mary ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Accounting. Business EDWARD D. KANE “Eddy” 392 Norfolk St., Dorchester Thompson, Dorchester Honor Roll, 2, 3; Band, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Chemical Engineering. M. I. T. LOUIS KAPLAN “Kappy” 40 Jones Ave., Dorchester Thompson, Dorchester 1 A ; Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Cap¬ tain, 4; Record, Advertising, As¬ sistant Manager, 3, Manager 4; Track, 2, 3, 4; Ambition, Dent¬ istry. Tufts College CHARLES G. KARAFOTIAS “Karry” 223 Spring St., W. Roxbury Shaw, IV. Roxbury 1 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Drum Corps, Officer, 4; Individual Prize, Drum Corps, 2, 3; Ambi¬ tion, Physical Culture. U. S. Coast Guard MILTON E. KARGER “Milty” 153 Strathmore Rd., Brighton Edison, Brighton Honor Roll, 2; Room Councilor, 2; Ambition, Engineering. College GEORGE J. KATZ “Katzie” 634 Harvard St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Honor Roll, 2, 3; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Ambition, Engineering. M. I. T. RICHARD G. KAUFMAN “Kaufy” 1474 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton IV. H. Taft, Brighton Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Record, Advertising Staff, 4; Ambition, Medicine. Harvard JOHN D. KAZAR, JR. “Jack” 136 Beacon St., Hyde Park Rogers, Hyde Park 2 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Room Councilor, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Lawrence Prize, F D, 3; Am¬ bition, Physics. U. S. Armed Forces JAMES F. KEANE “Jay” 147 Elmer Rd., Dorchester St. Ann ' s, Neponset F ' ootball, 2, 3(E), 4 (E); Ambi¬ tion, College. U. S. Armed Forces { 38 } WILLIAM G. KEARNS “Bill” 35 Richview St., Dorchester St. Mark ' s, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Individual Brize, Drill, 3; Ambition, Aero¬ nautical Engineering. U. S. Air Corps GEORGE KECHES “Ketch” 11 Vancouver St., Back Bay Martin, Roxhury 1 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2; Cadet Captain; Athletic Captain, 3, 4; Glee Club, 2, 3; Senior Song Committee; Record Business; Ambition, Chemical Engineering. U. S. Army JOHN H. KEFEYAN “Johnny” 80 Sudan St., Dorchester Everett, Dorchester Honor Roll, 1; Ambition, College U. S. Navy JAMES A. KELLEY “Kel” 66 Westville St., Dorchester St. Peter ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy ANDREW J. KELLY “Kell” 36 Oakton Ave., Dorchester St. Ann ' s, Neponset Room Councilor, 1; Lawrence Prize, F D, 1; Football, 2(E), 3(E); Captain, 4(E); Track, 1, 2, 3(E); Secretary, Treasurer, 3; Picture Committee, 4; Ambi¬ tion, Success. U. S. Armed Forces PAUL F. KELLY “Kel” 18 Longfellow St., Dorchester St. Peter ' s, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces ROBERT J. KELLY “Kel” 1 Lamartine PI., Jamaica Plain Lady of Lourdes, Jamaica Plain Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy ROBERT L. KELLY “Bob” 14 Turner St., Brighton Edison, Brighton Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Armed Forces PHILIP J. KENT “Phil” 127 Milton Ave., Hyde Park Rogers, Hyde Park Cadet Lieutenant, 4; French Club, 3, 4; Current Events, 3, 4; Stamp Club, 3, 4; Ambition, Law. Dartmouth, V-12 MARTIN S. KILGALLON “Marty” 62 Durnell Ave., Roslindale Irving, Roslindale Track, 3; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy {39 ABRAM O. KING ‘ ‘Honest Abe” 19 Kenilworth St., Roxbury Timilty, Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Room Councilor; Track, 2(E), 3(E), 4(E); Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Foot¬ ball, 3, 4(E); French Club, 3; Baseball, 2, 3; Band, 1; Ambi¬ tion, Medicine. College ALAN KLEIN “Ai” 20 Supple Rd., Roxbury Gibson, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Record , Business, 3, 4; French Club, 3; Ambition, Success. Rhode Island State College o HARRY KOLOMBRATSOS 53 Whitney St., Roxbury Martin, Roxbury Aviation Club, 1; Glee Club, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Student Councilor, 4; Ambition, Civil Engineering. Northeastern STANLEY KOPELMAN “Kopy” 1666 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton Edison, Brighton Ambition, U. S. Marine Corps. U. S. Marine Corps JOSEPH T. KREBS Joe 31 Lambert St., Roxbury St. Joseph ' s, Roxbury Lawrence Prize, F D, 2; Am¬ bition, Science. Technical College EDWARI) A. LAMPIIIER “Ed” 51 Ellison Ave., Dorchester St. Gregory’s, Dorchester Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Marine Corps HARVEY LANDER 899 Morton St., Mattapan Thompson, Mattapan Ambition, Aeronautical Engi¬ neering. U. S. Army WILFRED LEFKOVIGH “Lefty” 646 Morton St., Dorchester Lewenberg, Mattapan Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Photog¬ raphy Club, 2; French Club, 2; Ambition, Electrical Engineer¬ ing. Northeastern DONALD J. LEON “Don” 49 Avondale St., Dorchester St. Gregory ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps EUGENE P. LEONARD “Red” 199 Falcon St., E. Boston St. Mary ' s, E. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Football, 4; Glee Club, 4; Room Captain, 1, 2; Trick Squad, 1, 2, 3; Ambi¬ tion, Engineering. U. S. Navy {40 DAVID A. LEVENSON “Al” 141 Sutherland Rd., Brighton Edison, Brighton Cadet Lieutenant, 4; French Club, 3; Ambition, Aeronautical Engineer. U. S. Army Air Corps JOHN E. LEVREAULT “Jackie” 10 Egleston St., Jamaica Plain Roosevelt, Roxbury Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Chemical Engineering. Boston College WILLIAM A. LEVREAULT “Buddy” 10 Egleston St., Jamaica Plain Roosevelt, Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Navy, V-12 ALFRED J. LEVY “Lev” 88 Bernard St., Dorchester Lewenberg, Mattapan 2 A ; Honor Roll, 2; Track, 2, 3; Room Councilor, 2; Stamp Club, 2; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Law¬ rence Prize, F D, 2; Ambition, Teaching. College JOSEPH LIEBSTER “Joe” 1282 Blue Hill Ave., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Track, 2; Orchestra, 2, 3; Band, 2, 3; Am¬ bition, Music. College oj Music THOMAS J. LIFRIERI “Tommy” 292 Bunker Hill St., Charlest’wn St. Francis de Sales, Charlestown Cadet Captain, Fife Drum Corps, 4; Ambition, Engineer¬ ing. U. S. Armed Forces JOSEPH L. LINGOES ‘ ‘Lenny” 52 S. Huntington Ave., Jamaica Plain Rice, South End Athletic Captain, 3; Honor Roll, 2; Track, 2; Ambition, Radio Engineering. U. S. Navy JOSEPH C. LoSCIUTO Joe 7 Cameron St., Dorchester Mather, Dorchester Football, 3; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy JAMES J. LYDON “Bud” 91 Sheridan St., Jamaica Plain Cheverus, Jamaica Plain Glee Club, 2, 3; Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces FREDERICK L. LYONS “Fred” 2 Pearl St., Charlestown St. Francis de Sales, Charlestown 12 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Law¬ rence Prizes, H6, E6, Ql; Indi¬ vidual Prize Drill; Room Councilor, 3; Ambition, U. S. Government Service. U. S. Armed Forces C. L. MacGILLIVRAY, JR. “Charlie” 25 Wolfe St., W. Roxbury Mann, Roxbury Honor Roll, 1, 2; Football, As¬ sistant Manager, 3, 4; Out Door Track, Manager, 4(E); Record Secretary, 4; Baseball, 3, Mana¬ ger (E);’Ambition, Draftsman. College GEORGE R. MacPHAIL “Mac” 356 Columbus Ave., South End Rice, South End Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Cadet Lieu¬ tenant, 4; Ambition, U. S. Marine Corps. U. S. Marine Corps GERARD A. MADDEN “Gus” 7 Howe St., Dorchester St. Peter ' s, Dorchester Athletic Captain, 1, 2, 3; Room Councilor, 1, 2; Ambition, Avia¬ tion. U. S. Armed Forces JOHN G. MAGUIRE “Muggs” 24 Juliette St., Dorchester St. Peter’s, Dorchester Glee Club, 2, 3; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy WILLIAM F. MAHONEY “Bill” 38 Glide St., Dorchester St. Ann ' s, Dorchester Cadet Captain, 4; Drill Team, 2, 3, 4; Picture Committee, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps ROBERT J. MAIER “Bob” 1063 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester Everett, Dorchester 6 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Law¬ rence Prize, F D, 1, 2, 3; Cadet Captain; Harvard Club Prize; Glee Club, 2, 4; Room Councilor, 1; Ambition, Den¬ tistry. Boston College JOSEPH P. MAIO “Blackie” 27 N. Anderson St., West End St. Joseph’s, West End Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Spelling Bee, 1; Ambition, Accounting. U. S. Navy HENRY C. MALAGODI “Mai” 80 Roslindale Ave., Roslindale Irving, Roslindale Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Dentistry. College WILLIAM F. MALONEY “Oscar” 142 Perham St., W. Roxbury Shaw, W. Roxbury Honor Roll, 2; Ambition, Civil Engineering. U. S. Marine Corps ANTHONY MARAGIOGLIO “Tony” 55 Chelsea St., E. Boston Me Kay, E. Boston Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Air Corps {42 LEONARD F. MARINO “Lenny” 69 Gladstone St., E. Boston St. Lazarus, E. Boston Cadet Captain, 4; Record, Art Staff, 3,4; Ambition, Cartoonist. U. S. Navy FRANCIS J. MARSTON “Babe” 56 Corona St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland , Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces BARON H. MARTIN “Shorty” 14 Wabon St., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Track, 3; Assistant Manager, 4; Ambi¬ tion, College. Howard College JOHN G. MARTINEZ 969 Morton St., Mattapan Thompson, Dorchester Honor Roll, 2; Lawrence Prize, F D, 2; Room Councilor, 4; Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Armed Forces WILLIAM MATFESS “Vel” 67 Phillips St., West End Blackstone, West End Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Armed Forces ARTHUR D. MATZKIN “Art” 250 Walnut Ave., Roxbury Higginson, Roxbury Honor Roll, 2; Spelling Bee, Winner, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Armed Forces WILLIAM F. McCABE “Mac” 91 Clifton St., Dorchester Campbell, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, U. S. Air Corps. U. S. Army EDWARD B. McCarthy “Windy” 40 Harwood St., W. Roxbury Shaw, W. Roxbury Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps FLORENCE T. McCARTHY “Mac” 2 Sunset Ave., Forest Hills Parkman, Jamaica Plain 3 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Law¬ rence Prize,3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, College. Boston College francis t. McCarthy “Mac” 83 Crest Hill Rd., Brighton St. Columbkille’s, Brighton Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Air Corps john j. McDonough “Mac” 72 Codman Pk., Roxbury S7. Joseph ' s, Roxbury Ambition, Engineering. College Joseph m. McDonough “Mac” 72 Codman Pk., Roxbury St. Joseph ' s, Roxbury Ambition, Success. U. S. Army ALBERT L. McGEORGE “Mac” 596 Gallivan Blvd., Dorchester Perry, S. Boston Ambition, Boston University U. S. Coast Guard L. PAUL McGILLICUDDY “Mac” 1617 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester Woodrow Wilson , Dorchester Cadet Captain, 4; Alumni Com¬ mittee, 4; Ambition, U. S. Air Corps. College FRANCIS D. McGRATII “Mac” 60 Charlemont St., Dorchester Baseball, 3(E); Ambition, Suc¬ cess. U. S. Army ALBERT F. McISAAC “Mac” Shaw, W. Roxbury Track, 3(E); Football, 4(E); Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps ROBERT W. McMAHON “Mac” 1980 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester St. Gregory ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Journalism. U. S. Army JAMES F. McMANUS “Mickey” 5 Lincoln St., Dorchester Rochambeau , Dorchester Ambition, U. S. Navy U. S. Navy john j. McNally “Mac” 12 Lorenzo St., Neponset St. Ann ' s, Neponset Glee Club, 3; Record Business, 2, 3; Room Captain, 3; Ambi¬ tion, College. U. S. Armed Forces ALFRED H. MELLINO ‘ ‘Archie” 49 Allston St., Charlestown St. Francis de Sales, Charles town Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Navy ■(44 ROBERT A. MESSINGER “Messy” 43 Regis Rd., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Cadet Captain, 4; Individual Prize, 2; Record Business, 4; Am¬ bition, West Point Military Academy. Holderness Preparatory AARON M. MILLER “Mill” 125 Homes Ave., Dorchester Grover Cleveland, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Individual Prize Winner, 2, 3; Record Ad¬ vertising, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Armed Forces ALLEN M. MINTZ 43 Columbia Rd., Dorchester Campbell, Roxbury Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Track, 2, 3; Stamp Club, 2, 3; Ambition, Engineering. JV. P. . DANTE F. MONTUORI “Monty” 8 Prince St., North End Michelangelo, North End Record Business, 4; Ambition, Aeronautical Engineering. Northeastern FRANCIS X. MORAN “Dusky Dan” 33 Mt. Vernon St., Charlestown St. Mary’s, Charlestown Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy MELVIN T. MORAN “Mel” 3512 Washington St., Roxbury Timilty, Roxbury Band, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 3, 4; Ambition, Music. U. S. Naiy LIVINGSTON S. MOYSTON “Livy” 2548 Washington St., Roxbury Dudley, Roxbury Track, 3; Football, 2, 3; Ambi¬ tion, Success. U. S. Armed Forces FRANCIS P. MULKERRIN 49 Robinson St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland, Dorchester Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy Air Corps LEONARD D. MURMES “Lenny” 23 Lane Park, Brighton Edison, Brighton Baseball, 3; Ambition, Chemical Engineering. U. S. Marine Corps FRANCIS X. MURPHY “Murph” 56 Nottinghill Rd., Brighton Edison, Brighton Athletic Captain, 4; Track, 2 (E) 3(E), 4(E); Football, 3; Ambi¬ tion, Teaching. U. S. Navy ■{45 HARRY S. MURPHY, JR. “Murph” 12 Gannett St., Roxbury Atlanta University H. S. Laboratory, Track,4( E); Ambi¬ tion, Aeronautical Engineering. M. 1. T. JEREMIAH F. MURPHY “Murph” 14 Brockton St., Mattapan Lewenberg , Mattapan Athletic Captain, 2; Student Councilor, 2; Room Councilor, 2; Cadet Lieutenant, 3; Ambi¬ tion, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps WILLIAM E. NAAS “Bill” 26 Fox St., Dorchester Mather , Dorchester Ambition, Radio. U. S. Navy RICHARD W. NAGLE “Dick” 53 Whitten St., Dorchester St. Mark ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Chemistry. Franklin Technical Institute WILLIAM E. NAGLE ‘ ‘Spunky” 5 Hillside Ave., Jamaica Plain Turkman , Jamaica Plain Cadet Captain, 4; Hockey, 3(E) 4(E); Ambition, Engineering School. U. S. Navy MAURICE W. NATHAN “Billy” 27 Glenville Ave., Allston IV. H. Taft, Brighton Cadet Captain; Ambition, Suc¬ cess. College EDWARD C. NAZZARO “Eddie” 33 Peter Parley Rd., Jamaica Plain Curley , Jamaica Plain Lawrence Prize, F D, 3; Track, 2, 3; Stamp Club, 3; Ambition, Architecture. U. S. Armed Forces RICHARD J. NEDDER “Dick” 2 Blanchard St., Readville St. Ann ' s, Readville Individual Prize, Drill, 3; Senior Dance Committee, 4; Ambition, Civil Service. U. S. Armed Forces MAURICE T. NELLIGAN 20 Bean Ct., Roxbury Cheverus, Roxbury 4 A ; Lawrence Prize, F D, 2; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Room Captain, 3; Ambition, Chemis¬ try. U. S. Marine Corps MANUEL J. NEUMAN “Manny” 36 Wilcock St., Dorchester Lewenberg , Mattapan Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Ambition., Engineering. U. S. Navy 446 JOSEPH V. NORTON “J.V.” 160V£ H St., S. Boston Gate oj Heaven, S. Boston Honor Roll, 1,3; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Ambition, Engineering. College WILLIAM N. NORTON, JR. “Billy” 15 H ammond St., Roxbury Sherwin, Roxbury Cadet Captain, 4; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 3; Ambition, Success. College FRANCIS X. O’BRIEN “Obie” 723 E. Third St., S. Boston Nazareth, S. Boston Track, 2(E), 3(E); Senior Dance Committee; Room Spell¬ ing Champion, 3; Ambition, Civil Engineering. U. S. Marine Corps ROBERT J. O’BRIEN “Bobby” 58 Hunnewell Ave., Brighton Tucker, Milton Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Navy WILLIAM T. O’BRIEN, JR. “Blackie” 27 E. Springfield St., South End Dwight, South End Cadet Captain, 4; Record; Room Captain, 4; 1A ; Ambition, Baseball. U. S. Armed Forces ROGER J. J. O’DONNELL “O’D” 92 Beaumont St., Dorchester IVoodrow Wilson , Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Army Air Corps GEORGE F. O’HARA “Wiffle” 45 Clifford St., Readville St. Ann ' s, Neponset Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps DAVID A. OLDHAM “Dave” 52 Westland Ave., Back Bay Prince, Back Bay Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Armed Forces DAVID W. O’NEILL “Dave” 18 Welles Pk., Roslindale Irving, Roslindale Ambition, Engineering. Northeastern GEORGE OSGANIAN ‘ ‘Ozzie” 100 Faywood Ave., E. Boston Blackington, E. Boston Football, 3(E), 4(E); Track, 3(E),4(E); Ambition, Medicine U. S. Marine Corps {47 HOWARD OSHRY 22 Radnor Rd., Brighton Edison , Brighton Ambition, Salesmanship. College SYDNEY S. OSTROWSKY “Ostey” 25 Hosmer St., Mattapan Lewenberg , Mattapan Cadet Lieutenant, 3; Individual Prize, 2; Yearbook Staff, 4; Am¬ bition, Dentistry. Tufts College JAMES E. O’TOOLE “Jimmy” 87 Belvidere St., Back Bay Prince , Back Bay 3 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Law¬ rence Prize, F D, 1, 2, 3; Lawrence Prize HI; Cadet Cap¬ tain, 4; Room Councilor, 2, 3, 4; Student Councilor, 2; Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Army A-12 HAROLD F. PAGE “Pagie” 31 Sudan St., Dorchester Everett , Dorchester Track, 1, 4; Glee Club, 1; Am¬ bition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy RICHARD K. PAUL “Dick” 34 Hastings St., W. Roxbury Olney, W. Roxbury Ambition, Literature. U. S. Armed Forces LEO D. PICARDI “Lee” 61 Trenton St., E. Boston Sacred Heart, E. Boston 1 A ; Honor Roll, 1; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Room Captain, 2; Senior Dance Committee; Am¬ bition, Engineering. U. S. Marine Corps NUNZIO J. PICARDI “Pic” 126 Webster St., E. Boston Me Kay , E. Boston Honor Roll, 3; Track, 2, Cap¬ tain, 4; Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy IRVING E. PICKERING “Pick” 6 Loring St., Hyde Park Edwards , Charlestown Honor Roll, 1, 2; Lawrence Prize, F2; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Room Captain, 3; Class Song Committee, 4; Orchestra, 2, 3; Ambition, Business. U. S. Armed Forces FRANCIS X. PINK “Pinky” 21 Dracut St., Dorchester St. Mark ' s, Dorchester Lawrence Prize, PI; Cadet Lieu¬ tenant, 4; Track, 3; Ambition, Business. U. S. Navy JAMES S. PINO 15 Ashley St., Jamaica Plain Curley , Jamaica Plain Honor Roll, 2; Room Captain, 4; Ambition, Success. College ■{48 J DAVID R. PLUMB “Dave” 401 Market St., Brighton Edison, Brighton Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; Chairman Picture Committee, 4; Assistant Manager, Yearbook Business; Ambition, Engineering U. S. Air Forces ANTHONY M. POLCARI “Tex” 232 Hanover St., North End Michelangelo, North End Ambition, Musician. U. S. Armed Forces JOHN POLLIS “Jack” 11 Tolman St., Neponset St. Ann ' s, Neponset Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy GILES B. POWELL “Gill” 109 Peterborough St., Back Bay St. Aidan ' s, Brookline Football, 3(E), 4(E); Baseball, 2(E), 3(E),4(E); Track, 2(E), 3(E), 4(E); Ambition, College. U. S. Armed Forces CALOGERO A. PRINCIPATO “Charlie” 140 Prince St., North End Michelangelo , North End Cadet Captain, 3, 4; Ambition, Civil Engineering. U. S. Army ALBERT W. PROCTOR “Bud” 28 Montvale St., Roslindale Prince, Back Bay Record Business, 3; Room Coun¬ cilor, 2; Honor Roll, 1; Ambi¬ tion, Engineering. U. S. Navy ROBERT F. PUDDISTER “Putt” 179 Milton St., Dorchester Woodrow Wilson, Dorchester Ambition, Success. Post Graduate JOSEPH J. PUGLIELLI “Captain Tom” 205 Endicott St., North End Michelangelo, North End Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy ANTHONY QUARTARONE “Quad” 98 Orient Ave., E. Boston Blackington, E. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Track, 2; Glee Club, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Army JOHN F. RAGUSA “Pierre” 61 Hamilton St., Dorchester Mather, Dorchester Cadet Captain, 4; Record Busi¬ ness, 4; Ambition, Success. 17. S. Air Corps J49 ANGELO S. RAO “Rao” 49 Barton St., West End Blackstone, West End Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps ALFRED J. RECCHIA “Freddie” 174 Cottage St., E. Boston Me Kay, E. Boston Ambition, Engineering. Business DANIEL S. REED 49 Greenwood St., Dorchester Holmes, Dorchester Honor Roll, 2, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Chemical Engi¬ neering. College WARREN C. REES “Pee-Wee” 46 Vassar St., Dorchester Holmes, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Chemical Engineering. Louisiana State University JOHN W. RESMINI “Resi” 21 Salem St., North End Michelangelo, North End Honor Roll, 2, 3; Lawrence Prize, F D, 2; Individual Prize, 2; Cadet Lieutenant, 3; Ambition, U. S. Army Officer. U. S. Army MICHAEL P. RICCIO “Mike” 125 Cottage St., E. Boston Me Kay, E. Boston Track, 3, 4; Ambition, Business. U. S. Armed Forces STANLEY M. RICE “Stid” 8 Balfour St., Roxbury Campbell, Roxbury 2 A ; Honor Roll, 2; Lawrence Prize, S3; Record Business, 2, 4; Yearbook, Fife Drum Corps; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Accounting. Boston University DONALD G. RIEDELL “Dink” 979 South St., Roslindale Shaw, W. Roxbury Cadet lieutenant, 4; Track, 2; Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Armed Forces LAWRENCE P. RIFCHIN “Laury” 33 Claymoss Rd., Brighton Edison, Brighton Honor Roil, 1; Rifle Club, 1; Ambition, Chemical Engineer¬ ing. U. S. Armed Forces WILLIAM J. RIGGS “Bill” 108 Moreland St., Roxbury St. Patrick ' s, Roxbury Ambition, Business. U. S. Armed Forces 450 JAMES A. RILEY “Jim” 7 Amesbury St., W. Roxbury Shaw, fV. Roxbury Cadet Captain, 4; Individual Prize, 3; Room Captain, 3, 4; Drill Team, 3, 4; Ambition, Technical Engineering. U. S. Marine Corps WILLIAM T. RILEY “Bill ' ’ 48 Presentation Rd., Brighton Edison, Brighton Record Business, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy KENNETH J. RITCHIE “Ritch” 162 Rosseter St., Dorchester St. Peter ' s, Dorchester Cadet Captain, 4; Track, 2; Drill Team, 3, 4; Ambition, Electrical Engineering. Northeastern JOHN T. ROBERTSON “Jack” 15 Woodward Pk., Dorchester Campbell, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Track, 2, 3(E); Ambition, Business. U. iS’. Air Corps DONALD C. ROCKSTROM “Rocky” 18 Garrett St., W. Roxbury Shaw, IV. Roxbury Ambition, Electrical Engineer¬ ing. U. S. Army ALBERT J. ROSE “ Albie” 51 Bennington St., E. Boston Barnes, E. Boston Cadet Captain, 4; Football, 4(E); Record Business, 3; Am¬ bition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps ROBERT L. ROSE “Bob” 5 Greenheys St., Dorchester Campbell, Dorchester Ambition, Accounting. Bentley ' s LEONARD N. ROSENBERG “Lanky” 54 Westmore Rd., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Ambition, Government Service. U. S. Army TOBIN ROSSI “Toby” 18 Hendry St., Dorchester Mather, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces LOUIS W. RUBINO 1 ‘Louie” 7 Upcrest Rd., Brighton Me Kay, E. Boston Honor Roll, 1; Current Events, 2; Track, 3, 4; Ambition, Avia¬ tion. U. S. Air Corps •{ 51 } CHARLES RUDNICK “Chuck” 51 Quincy St., Roxbury Campbell, Roxbury Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Medicine. Boston University PAUL V. SABINE “Sabe” 43 Hancock St., Dorchester Mather, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Room Councilor,3,4; Student Council, 4; Spelling Bee Winner, 1; Year¬ book, 4; Ambition, Journalism. U. S. Marine Corps MILTON M. SACHS “Milt” 19 Evelyn St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Honor Roll, 2; Bugle Drum Corps, 3; Room Councilor, 2; Record Business, 4; Ambition, Chemistry. College STANLEY F. J. SADOWSKI “Stan” 25 Howell St., Dorchester St. Mary’s, S. Boston 1 A ; Honor Roll, 1; Lawrence Prize, El; Cadet Captain, Phys¬ ics Laboratory Assistant, 3, 4; Stamp Club, 3; Football, 3, 4; Track, 2, 3, 4; Athletic Captain, 1, 2; Ambition, Teaching. College FERRIS F. SAWAYA “Ferris” 16 Union Park St., South End Abraham Lincoln, South End Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Accounting. U. S. Armed Forces MAXWELL J. SCHLEIFER “Max” 31 Wellington Hill St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan 1 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Stamp Club, 2, 3; Track, 2, 3; Lawrence Prize, F D, 3; Ambition, Success. Harvard BERNARD A. SCHULTZ “Bernie” 7 Frawley St., Roxbury Prince, Back Bay Ambition, Accounting. U. S. Navy JOSEPH SCIFO “Gussie” 72 Cottage St., E. Boston Me Kay, E. Boston 3 A ; Ambition, Business. U. S. Arined Forces ROBERT F. SELBY “Robby” 24 Hansborough St., Dorchester Lewenberg, Mattapan Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Bacteriologist. Boston University JOSEPH C. SEMINARA “Semi” 690 Adams St., Dorchester Kenny, Dorchester Athletic Captain, 2; Room Councilor; Ambition, Salesman. U. S. Coast Guard { 52 } PAUL E. SEXTON “Red” 115 Neptune Rd., E. Boston Cheverus, E. Boston Track, 2(E), 3(E), 4(E); Alum¬ ni Committee; Ambition Naval Career. U. S. Navy MARTIN SHAFFER “Marty” 104 Humboldt Ave., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Chemical Engineering. College MYRON E. SHAPIRO “Mishie” 144 Sutherland Rd., Brighton Edison, Brighton French Club, 3; Drum Corps, 2, 3, 4; Ambition, Aeronautical Engineering. U. S. Air Corps JAMES A. SHEEHAN “Jimmy” 65 Bainbridge St., Roxbury St. Joseph ' s, Roxbury 1 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Engi¬ neering. M. I. T. MARSHALL SHEER 1781 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton Edison, Brighton Ambition, Aeronautical Engi¬ neering. U. S. Air Corps JOSEPH P. SHERIDAN Joe 96 Bunker Hill St., Charlestown St. Catherine s, Charlestown Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Business. U. S. Armed Forces HERBERT SHERMAN ‘ ‘Shermie” 31 Tennis Rd., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Ambition, Business. U. S. Navy DAVID SHNAPER “Moe” 5 Cedar St., Charlestown 1 A ; Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Busi¬ ness. Northeastern THOMAS G. SHRUHAN 39 Cushman Rd., Brighton Gate of Heaven, S. Boston Ambition, Architecture. College CLIFFORD O. SJODIN “Ozzie” 188 Marlboro St., Back Bay Prince, Back Bay Lawrence Prize, F D; Cadet Captain,4; Ambition, Dentistry. College WILLIAM F. SMART “Bill” 87 Waldeck St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S’. Navy GEORGE A. SMITH, JR. “Smitty” 85 Tuttle St., Dorchester St. William ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Music. College HUGH W. SMITH 75 Glendale St., Dorchester Mather, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces JOSEPH A. SMITH “Joe” 270 Bay State Rd., Back Bay W. H. Taft, Brighton 2 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Aero¬ nautical Engineering. U. S. Armed Forces SHELDON SOKOL 507 Norfolk St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Room Councilor, 3; Record Busi¬ ness, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Medicine. College STANLEY S. SORKIN “Sookie” 943 Morton St., Dorchester Thompson, Dorchester Cadet Captain, 4; French Club, 3; Ambition, Medicine. Boston University VINCENT I. SPAGNOLO 26 Ashley St., E. Boston Blackington, E. Boston Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces CHARLES F. SPELIOS “Chick” 15 Mercer St., S. Boston St. Augustine ' s, S. Boston Ambition, Business. U. S. Navy JAMES S. SPELIOS, JR. “Lefty” 15 Mercer St., S. Boston St. Augustine ' s, S. Boston Cadet Captain, 4; Track, 1; Ambition, Army Aviation. U. S. Air Corps SAMUEL SPIEGEL “Sam” 203 Callender St., Dorchester Thompson, Dorchester Track, 2; Spelling Bee Winner, 2; Ambition, Journalism. College 454 } ARNE H. C. SPONGBERG Sponge 111 Commonwealth Ave., Back Bay Prince, Back Bay 1 A ; Ambition, Linguist. College ROBERT H. SPRENGER “Bob” 716 W. Roxbury Pkwy Roslindale Shaw, IV. Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Orchestra, 2, 3; Ambition, Engineering. Northeastern THOMAS H. SPIJRR “Tom” 11A Dalton St., Back Bay Prince, Back Bay Fife Drum Corps, 1, 2, 3, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Air Corps JAMES M. STAFFORD “Jim” 30 High St., Charlestown St. Francis de Sales, Charlestown 1 A ; Lawrence Prize, F D, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Athletic Captain, Ambition, Business. Boston College PAUL L. STAPLETON " St ' a ' p” 35 Ellison St., Dorchester Nazareth, S. Boston Cadet Captain, 3, 4; Individual Prize Drill, 2, 3; Football, 3(E), 4(E); Track, 3; Ambition, Surgery. Georgetown University FREDERICK S. STEARNS “Stearnsie ( ’ 26 Am. Legion Hwy., Dorchester Lewenberg, Mattapan French Club, 2, 3; Drum Bugle, 4; Record Business, 2; Ambition, Architecture. U. C. L. A. HAROLD STERN “Hal” 911 Morton St., Mattapan Thompson, Dorchester 3 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Law¬ rence Prize, M2; Cadet Captain, 4; Record Business, 4; Ambition, Medicine. Tufts College MILTON STERN “Mickey” 14 Wilmore St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan 1 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Record Business; Map Reading Club, 4; Ambition Chemical Engineering. College WILLIAM M. STOKINGER “Stoke” 6 Littledale St., Roslindale Irving, Roslindale Football, Manager, 3, 4(E); Dance Committee, 4; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Naval Career. U. S. Navy FRANK V. STRYCHARSKI “Starchy” 9 Woodman St., Jamaica Plain Curley, Jamaica Plain Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps DANIEL E. SULLIVAN “Sully” 11 Pershing Rd., Jamaica Plain Curley, Jamaica Plain Football, 4; Room Councilor, 2, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Air Corps GEORGE W. SULLIVAN “Blackie” 5 Melvinside Ter., Dorchester Everett, Dorchester Student Council, 4; Room Coun¬ cilor, 3; Ambition, Naval Career. U. S. Navy JOHN G. SULLIVAN “Sully” 26 Corinne Rd., Brighton Edison , Brighton Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Baseball, 3; Current Events, 3; V.T.U., 3; Ambition, Business. Boston College JOHN K. SULLIVAN “Jack” 209 W. Fifth St., S. Boston St.. Augustine ' s, S. Boston Football; Baseball; Basketball; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Navy JOHN T. SULLIVAN “Sully” 2 Mapleton St., Brighton St. Columbkille’s, Brighton Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces THOMAS F. SULLIVAN “Sully” 20 Compton St., South End Abraham Lincoln, South End Ambition, Business. U. S. Armed Forces WILLIAM P. SULLIVAN “Bill” 23 Edwin St., Dorchester Nazareth, S. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Chemical Engineering. Post Graduate PAUL J. SUNUKJIAN “Polly” 306 Talbot Ave., Dorchester O ' Brien, Roxbury Honor Roll, 2; Orchestra, 1, 2,3; Ambition, Mechanics. U. S. Army ROY H. SUTHERLAND ‘ ‘Suthie” 91 W. Rutland Sq., South End Prince, Back Bay Cadet Captain, 4; Track, 2(E), 3 (E), 4; Ambition, Aeronautical Engineering. U. S. Air Corps HERMAN S. SWARTZ 22 Oldfields St., Roxbury Whiting, Lynn. Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Medicine. College -(56 SIDNEY B. TARTARKIN 10 Balsam St., Dorchester W. H. Taft, Allston Band, 4; Ambition, Chemistry. College ARTHUR TEPLITZ “Teppie” 19 Ransom Rd., Brighton Lewenberg, Mattapan Honor Roll, 2, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Advertising. Boston University JOHN D. THOMPSON ‘ ‘Johnny” 558 Columbus Ave., South End Webster 1 A ; Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Law. U. S. Armed Forces JOHN J. TIERNEY “Jocko” 11 Elder St., Dorchester Andrew , S. Boston Song Committee, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps FRANK W.TOMASELLO, JR. “Tom” 34 Alteresko Ave., Dorchester Taylor, Dorchester 2 A ; Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Cap¬ tain, 4; Football, 3(E), 4(E); Hockey, 3(E); Executive Com¬ mittee, 3; Senior Dance Com¬ mittee, 4; Ambition, College. Annapolis Naval Academy JOSEPH D. TOOMEY “Joe” 303 Bolton St., S. Boston Gate of Heaven, S. Boston 2 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Room Councilor, 1; Senior Picture Committee; Ath¬ letic Captain, 2; German Club, President, 4; Ambition, U. S. Army West Point Military Academy BENJAMIN L. TOY “Ben” 16 Gilmer St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan 5 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Law¬ rence Prize, G2, 3; Cadet Cap¬ tain, 3, 4; Record Staff, 2, 3, 4; Literary Editor, 4; Spelling, 2, 3; German Club, Secretary, 4; Ambition, Physical Science. M. . T. RUSSELL M. TRAUNSTEIN “Russ” 27 Mechanic St., Allston W. H. Taft, Brighton Individual Prize Drill, 3; Am¬ bition, Medicine. U. S. Air Corps JAMES A. TRAVERS “Jim” 688 Parker St., Roxbury Timilty, Roxbury Honor Roll, 1; Record Business, 2; Circulation Manager, 3, 4; Room Councilor, 3; Student Councilor, 3; Yearhook, 4; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Lawrence Prize, F D, 3; Senior Class, Secre¬ tary, Treasurer, 4; Ambition, Law. College JOSEPH TULIPANI “Tully” 53 Jeffries St., E. Boston Me Kay, E. Boston Honor Roll, 1; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant, 4; Ambition, Radio. U. S. Armed Forces {57 THOMAS B. TURLEY “Tom” 324 Park St., W. Roxbury Cathedral, South End 1 A ; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Travel. U. S. Armed Forces PELMUST A. TURNER, JR. “Pel” 69 Camden St., Roxbury Dwight, South End Ambition, Postal Service. U. S. Air Corps THOMAS A. UVA 48 E. Glenwood Ave., Hyde Park St. Raphael ' s, Hyde Park 1 A ; Honor Roll, 1; Ambition, Chemistry. U. S. Armed Forces SALVATORE P. VALVO “Sal” 51 Snowhill St., North End St. Anthony ' s, North End Alumni Committee, 4; Ambi¬ tion, Medicine. U. S. Armed Forces A. J. Van NEWENHOVEN “Gus” 9 King St., Dorchester Russell, Dorchester 1 A ; Honor Roll, 3; Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Armed Forces LOUIS VAZZA “Ale” 25 Temple St., W. Roxbury Shaw, W. Roxbury Track Team, 2; Cadet Lieuten¬ ant; Ambition, Medicine. U. S. Air Corps JOSEPH F. VILES “Joe” 23 Sunset Hill Rd., Roslindale Irving, Roslindale Ambition, Success. U. S. Air Corps ALFRED R. VITALE “Scoop” 156 Everett St., E. Boston Me Kay, E-. Boston Camera Club, 1; Record Staff Photographer, 4; Ambition, News Photography. N. Y. Institute of Photography VINCENT A. VITALE “Jimmie” 122 Everett St., E. Boston Me Kay, E. Boston Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Navy GEORGE VOLINSKY “Red” 8 Wardman Rd., Roxbury Thompson, Dorchester Cadet Captain, 3; Individual Prize Winner, 3; Ambition, Medicine. Tufts College { 58 } JOHN A. VOZZELLA ‘ ‘Johnnie” 76 Wellesmere Rd., Roslindale Irving, Roslindale Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Marine Corps JOSEPH F. VOZZELLA “Joe” 851 Saratoga St., E. Boston Cheverus, E. Boston 6 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2; Lawrence Prizes, F D, 1, Latin, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; French Club, 3; Ambition, Engineering. College JOSEPH L. WALDRON “Joe” 69 Oak Sq. Ave., Brighton Edison, Brighton Golf, 2; Baseball, Assistant Manager 3; Track Manager, 4(E); Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Newspaper Work. U. S. Armed Forces BERNARD F. WALSH “Bernie” 19 St. Gregory St., Dorchester St. Gregory ' s, Dorchester 1 A ; Honor Roll, 1; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Room Councilor, 2, 4; Student Council, 4; Secre¬ tary; Record Business, 2; Am¬ bition, Success. College RICHARD A. WALSH “Dick” 15 Saxton St., Dorchester St. William ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Navy LAWRENCE WASHINGTON “ Larry” 76 Harold St., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury Track, 2, 3; Ambition, Business. College DONALD H. WAUGH “Don” 17 Brinsley St., Dorchester Mather, Dorchester Stamp, 3; Rifle, 1; Aviation, 1; Band, Fife Drum Corps; Room Captain; Ambition, Business U. S. Army SIDNEY WEINBAUM 41 Joy St., West End Blackstone, West End 1 A ; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambi¬ tion, Teaching. College LEONARD S. WEINBERG “Lenny” 3 Ruthven St., Roxbury Gibson, Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 3; Ambition, Journalism. U. S. Armed Forces FRANCIS A. WELLING “Frank” 75 Logan Way, S. Boston Andrew, S. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Veterinary. U. S. Air Corps 59 JAMES F. WELLS “Jimmie” 175 Brown Ave., Roslindale Lady 0 Lourdes, Roslindale Ambition, College. U. S. Army PAUL C. WENGER “Paul” 150 Arlington St., Brighton St. Columbkille ' s, Brighton Yearbook ; Library Corps, 1; Glee Club, 2; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Aeronautical En¬ gineering. College JAMES E. WEST “Jimmy” 1217 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester Public Latin School Room Captain, 2; Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Air Corps GEORGE W. WESTGATE “Wes” 3 Hooper St., Dorchester Hart, S. Boston Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Business. U. S. Army JOHN H. WHALEN “Jack” 11 Summer St., Dorchester Everett, Dorchester Ambition, Accounting. Business JAMES L. WHELAN “Hawha” 25 Corey St., Charlestown Nazareth, Charlestown Football, 4; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Business. U. S. Armed Forces NORMAN W. WHITE 757 Morton St., Mattapan Thompson, Mattapan Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Radio Engineering. U. S. Army JACOB D. WIGOD “Jack” 33 Greenock St., Dorchester Lewenberg, Mattapan 6 A ; Honor Roll, 2; Lawrence Prizes, L3, L4, F3, E3; Record Staff, 3, 4; Literary Editor, 4; French Club, 3; Current Events, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 3, 4; Spell¬ ing, 4; Ambition, Teaching. Harvard RALPH H. WILCOX “Will” 354 Savin Hill Ave., Dorchester Everett, Dorchester 1 A ; Honor Roll, 1; Room Councilor, 3; Student Council, 3; Ambition, Success. College LaVONE O. WILLIAMS “Boots” 434 Massa chusetts Ave., Back Bay Lewis, Roxbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Track, 2; Ambition, Business. U. S. Armed Forces {60 WILLIAM H. WILLIAMSON “Bill” 24 Hobson St., Brighton St. Ann ' s , Somerville Honor Roll, 2; Ambition, Chem¬ istry. U. S. Navy, V-12 ALBERT WINEBERG “Bert” 103 Chambers St., West End Blackstone, West End Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Navy MORRIS D. WINER “Danny” 23 Greendale Rd., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Ambition, Teaching. U. S. Marine Corps ALBERT S. M. WONG “Ai” 363 Harrison Ave., South End Abraham Lincoln, South End 1 A ; Honor Roll, 2, 3; Lawrence Prize, F D, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Scientist. College ENOCH WOODHOUSE, JR. “Woody” 609 Shawmut Ave., Roxbury Sherwin, Roxbury Honor Roll, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Track, 1; Athletic Captain, 4; French Club, 3; Record Business, 4; Ambition, Teaching. 0 . C. S. NORMAN F. WORKMAN “ Workie” 85 Westville St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland , Dorchester Ambition, Chemical Engineering College LEO ZOLL “Leo” 250 Chambers St., West End Blackstone, West End Ambition, Plastics. U. S. Army HERBERT E. ANDERSON “Andy” 27 Midland St., Dorchester Edward Everett, Dorchester 1 ; Honor Roll, 1, 2; Record Representative, 1, 2; Aviation, 2; Ambition, Master Mechanic. U. S. Navy JOHN V. BELLINO “Butch” 690 Columbia Rd., Dorchester Rice , South End Lawrence Prize, Bl; F D, 2; Track, 2, 3; Ambition, Account¬ ing. Business College ALBERT J. BOLDRIGHINI “Al” 588 Adams St., Dorchester Abraham Lincoln, South End Lawrence Prize, 12; Cadet Lieutenant, Staff, 4; Ambition, Civil Engineering. U. S. Navy THOMAS E. BOOGUSCH “Wishie” 114 Pilgrim Rd., Roxbury Timilty , Roxbury Ambition, Politics. U. S. Navy WILLIAM S. BRADY “Bill” 276 Commonwealth Ave., Back Bay Prince, Back Bay Baseball, 2(E), 3(E), 4(E); Football, 3(E), 4(E); Hockey, 4(E); Room Councilor, 3; Am¬ bition, Professional Baseball. U. S. Navy. MAURICE A. BROOKS “Artie” 668 Tremont St., South End Rice, South End Ambition, Professional Sports. U. S. Army VITO J. CAPRIO “Cap” 199 Salem St., North End Michelangelo, North End Honor Roll, 2; Cadet Captain, 4; 1 A ; Ambition, Medicine. College EUGENE CARIDEO “Gene” 21Whitby St., E. Boston Blackington, E. Boston Ambition, Success. U. S. Air Corps WILLIAM J. CHEBBA “Buddie” 3 4 Melrose St., South End St. John’s, Roxbury Ambition, Plastics. U. S. Naval Air Corps N. CIIRISTOPOULOS “Nick” 20 Seneca St., South End Abraham Lincoln , South F.nd Ambition, Poet. College PASQUALE A. CONTRADA “Pat” 21 Cooper St., North End St. Mary ' s. North E.nd Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Sports. U. S. Armed Forces ROBERT O. CREAMER “Bob” 65 Templeton St., Roxbury St. Mark ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces JOHN J. CROWLEY “Johnny” 107 Sawyer Ave., Dorchester Edward Everett, Dorchester Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy ROGER M. CUNNIFF 50 Guernsey St., Roslindale Irving, Roslindale Football, 3(E), 4(E); Track, 3; Ambition, Marine Engineering. U. S. Armed Forces EUGENE W. CURTIS “Gene” 1051 Columbus Ave., Roxbury Dwight, South End Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Track, 3; Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces ALPHONSE A. J. D’AMICO “Al” 154 St. Andrew Rd., E. Boston Donald Me Kay, E. Boston Ambition, Chemistry. College JOSEPH M. DARE “Joe” 30 Forest Ave., Dorchester St. Ann ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces HENRY M. DeANGELIS “Hank” 186 Leyden St., E. Boston Blackington, E. Boston 3 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Law¬ rence F D; Room Captain, 1, 2; French Club, 3; Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Engi¬ neering. U. S. Army Air Forces THOMAS P. DELANEY 48 King St., Dorchester Woodrow Wilson, Dorchester Ambition, Aviation. U. S. Army Air Corps CHARLES S. DiGIACOMO 491 Broadway, S. Boston Hart, S. Boston Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy FRANK G. DiGRANDE 51 S. Margin St., West End Blackstone, West End Ambition, U. S. Postal Service. U. S. Navy WILLIAM M. DRISCOLL “Bill” 35 Mt. Evefett St., Dorchester Ambition, U. S. Navy U. S. Navy PAUL F. DUCEY “Paul” 140 Wilmington Ave., Dorchester Wilson, Dorchester Ambition, College; Hobby, Sports. U. S. Coast Guard GEORGE P. EIERMANN “Eimie” 102 Hancock St., Dorchester Mather, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps ROBERT M. ENDLER “Bob” 180 Commonwealth Ave., Back Bay Brookline High School, Brookline Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces EDMUND P. FELONI “Eddie” 63 Salem St., North End Michelangelo, North End Ambition, Business. Business School FRANCIS J. FLAHERTY 1326 River St., Hyde Park St. Ann ' s, Dorchester Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy EDWARD C. FLEMING “Ed” 58 Cabot St., Roxbury Sherwin, Roxbury Honor Roll, 2; Ambition, U. S. Army Officer. Officers ' Training School GEORGE T. FLETCHER 10193 Tremont St., Roxbury Sherwin, Roxbury Lawrence Prize, S2; Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Armed Forces WALTER G. FOLEY 19 Moraine St., Jamaica Plain Cheverus, Jamaica Plain Football, 3; Track, 3; Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps VINCENT J. FRACCASTORO “Nick” 17 Hartland St., Dorchester Edward Everett, Dorchester Ambition, U. S. Navy U. S. Navy RICHARD E. GIUSTI “Dick” 14 Whitby Ter., Dorchester Edward Everett, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces HENRY T. GORMAN, JR. “Bud” 52 Perham St., W. Roxbury Ripley , W. Roxbury Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps ALBERT GRAY “Ai” 55} 2 Allen St., West End Blackstone, West End Ambition, U. S. Army. U. S. Army JOHN F. GREENE 79 Van Winkle St., Dorchester Wilson, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces GUY GUARNACCIA 49 Charter St., North End Michelangelo, North End Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Army JOHN HARRINGTON “Hago” 3 Herman St., Roxbury St. Joseph ' s, Roxbury Lawrence Prize, F7; Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy JOHN F. HEFFRON “Heffy” 11 Everdean St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Army DANIEL E. HUGHES “Dan” 34 Leyland St., Dorchester Campbell, Dorchester Ambition, College. U. S. Army HAROLD L. JACKSON 73 Sterling St., Roxbury Sherwin, Roxbury Ambition, Engineering. U. S. Army RONALD B. JACKSON “Jack” 70 Symphony Rd., Back Bay Timilty, Roxbury Map Club; Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps WALTER J. JACKSON “Wee Willie” 35 Catawba St., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury Ambition, Travel. U. S. Army MARTIN J. JOYCE “Marty” 70 O’Callaghan Way, S. Boston St. Margaret ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Business. U. S. Marine Corps MELVIN KACHINSKY “Kutch” 30 Hosmer St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Honor Roll, 2; Footabll, 4(E); Ambition, Law. U. S. Army Air Corps ISIDORE J. KAPLAN “ Kappy” 85 Kingsdale St., Dorcchster Holmes, Dorchester Honor Roll, 2; Ambition, Engi¬ neering. U. S. Armed Forces 63 LEONARD A. KERR “Lennie” 60 Compton St., South End Abraham Lincoln, South End Ambition, U. S. Marine Corps. U. S. Marine Corps FRED A. KOFMAN “Fred” 103 Wellington Hill St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy JULES L. LAZAR 52 Allen St., West End Blackstone, West End Ambition. Success, U. S. Armed Forces PHILIP S. LeDUC “Duke” 52 Westover St., W. Roxbury Lyndon, W. Roxbury Cadet Captain, 4; Ambition, U. S. Army. U. S. Armed Forces , A-12 CHARLES E. LONG “Doc” 28 Eastman St., Dorchester Edward Everett, Dorchester Ambition, U. S. Marine Corps. U. S. Marine Corps JAMES M. LONG “Jim” 358 Columbus Ave., South End Lincoln, Boston Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy RICHARD A. MAGRATH 168 Huntington Ave., Back Bay Morey Junior High, Lowell Ambition, Architecture. College CHARLES W. McINNIS “Charley” 113 Howard Ave., Dorchester Campbell, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy JOSEPH P. McNEALY “Joe” 5 Ellison Ave., Dorchester St. Peter ' s, Dorchester Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy DACE J. MOORE 74 Horadan Way, Roxbury Blessed Sacrament, Jamaica Plain Honor Roll, 1; Room Councilor, 2, 3, 4; Student Council, 2, 3; Cadet Captain, 4; Drill Team, 2, 3, 4; Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces JOHN J. MORI ARTY “Lucky” 127 Dakota St., Dorchester Curley, Jamaica Plain Football, 3; Ambition, Forestry. U. S. Navy RICHARD P. MORONEY “Dick” 17 Alpine St., Roxbury Timilty, Roxbury Ambition, U. S. Navy. U. S. Navy JOHN M. MORRISSEY “Jack” 24 Wakullah St., Roxbury St. Joseph’s, Rozbury Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, College. U. S. Marine Corps JOHN F. NELSON “Jack” 32 Wilcock Rd., Dorchester Woodrow Wilson, Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 4; Ambition, Radio. U. S. Merchant Marine FELICE A. PAGLIUCA 109 Charter St., North End Michelangelo, North End Ambition, Aeronautical Engi¬ neering. U. S. Armed Forces NICHOLAS J. PERELLA “Perry” 306 Harrison Ave., South End Abraham Lincoln, South End Ambition, Music. College WILLIAM R. PRESKENIS “Press” 439 Weld St., W. Roxbury R. G. Shaw, W. Roxbury Ambition, Success. 17 . S. Armed Forces ARTHUR J. QUINN “Quinney” 15 Gavin Way, S. Boston Hamilton Junior High, Baltimore, Md. 1 ; Honor Roll, 1; Record, Busi¬ ness, 2, 3; Ambition, Journalism. U. S. Army ALBERT L. RADSPINNER “Al” 34 Anderson St., West End DeWitt Clinton, New York 2 A ; Ambition, Radio Engi¬ neering. U. S. Navy Air Corps ANTHONY M. RIZZO “Tony” 41 Charles St., Dorchester Grover Cleveland , Dorchester Cadet Lieutenant, 3; Ambition, Radio. U. S. Navy ROBERT W. ROGERS “Bob” 90 Forest St., Jamaica Plain Curley, Jamaica Plain Ambition, Success. U. S. Navy JOHN L. ROSSI “Tex” 167 Leyden St., E. Boston St. Lazarus, E. Boston Honof Roll, 1; Ambition, Music. U. S. Armed Forces STANLEY M. ROZANSKI “Star” 135 W. 8th St., S. Boston Andrew, S. Boston Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces FRANCIS T. RYERSON “Gama” 3 Bird St., Dorchester Mather, Dorchester Football, 2; Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps FRANK R. SANNING “F.S.” 19 Gloria Rd., W. Roxbury R. G. Shaw, W. Roxbury Ambition, Success. U. S. Marine Corps MORTON W. SPAULDING “Mort” 56 Moreland St., Roxbury Lewis, Roxbury 3 A ; Ambition, Aeronautics. U. S. Army RICHARD G. SWARTZ 12 Castlegate Rd., Roxbury P. T. Campbell, Roxbury Ambition, Success. U. S. Armed Forces ABRAHAM H. WARNICK 133 Ormond St., Mattapan Lewenberg, Mattapan Ambition, Drafting. Technical School WILLIAM N. WELCH “Bill” 11 Wall St., Charlestown Mass. Hospital School, Canton 2 A ; Honor Roll, 1, 2; Lawrence Prize, F D, 2; Am¬ bition, Engineering. M. I. T. JAY R. WILLS “Willy” 29 Mendelssohn St., Roslindale Irving, Roslindale Ambition, College. U. S. Marine Corps EDWARD YOUNG “Ed” 116 Elm Hill Ave., Roxbury Roosevelt, Roxbury Ambition, Law. U. S. Navy J64 •sR SOL D I ER I Pen Points By WALTER V. CARTY, ’44 THIS DAY Look to this day, for it is life, the very life of life. In its brief course lie all the verities and realities of your existence: the bliss of growth, the glory of action, the splendor of beauty. For yes¬ terday is but a dream, and tomorrow only a vision. But today, well lived, makes every yesterday a dream of happiness, and every tomorrow a vision of hope. Look well, therefore, to this day. —from the Persian. T HE day has come when we must answer the challenge of the years. If this were another year, we Avould think far ahead: of lengthy college semesters, of towers of commerce that must be built higher, of the wheel of life that must be kept spinning. As it is, we think mostly of a great, grey ship ploughing through the foam, of a plane taking off for a distant target, of a tank rolling towards an embattled enemy. Perhaps it is, as some say, a pity that we were born in this generation. But we shall not bewail that fact, for we were born also as Wednesday’s children: the offspring of freedom. THE BLISS OF GROWTH Youth is our greatest weapon. Soundness of mind and body, springiness of step, and clarity of outlook—these will be the stepping-stones CLASS OFFICERS Second Row: Janies A. Travers, Secretary-Treasurer; Mr. E. Frazier, Faculty Adviser; Dominic P. Cerulli; Vice President Front Row: Vincent J. DeFillippo, Executive Committee; Charles P. Changelian, President; John J. Callahan, Executive Committee towards a complete victory. And when that dawn does break, these same possessions will be the foundation-stones upon which to build and consecrate that “brave new world,” for which we have been praying, and whose eulogies have so strongly been sung in recent months. . . . We have grown during these past four years. Our study of the major fields of art, science, his¬ tory, and mathematics has widened the pan¬ orama of our vision. Wartime classes have stimulated our imaginative powers and most certainly have given us a firmer grasp of world affairs. To live perfectly we do not ask, for we know that this is a world far from perfect, and there is no Shangri-La to which we can escape. The poor we shall always have with us . . . and the cruel and the criminal, and yes, the power-lusty. But we do ask, and we must struggle, to live wisely, and we can say without compunction that The English High School, in no small measure, has directed our talents and resources, our stores of knowledge and our feelings towards a wise, wholesome American life. THE GLORY OF ACTION The trumpets sound, the banners fly, and more men stand ready to fight and to die. From the very vaguest days of this country’s history, action has been the key-note. Over boisterous seas the Pilgrims sailed to what was the vastness beyond, and on the seemingly bar¬ ren soil of New England, they planted the seed of liberty. But that seed took firm, deep roots, and in time, sprang upward, upward, until it became the tree of liberty. Then stalwart pioneers slashed forward, pushed the Indian out of his grounds, controlled the wilder mani¬ festation of nature, and quietly hewed a vast new kingdom. From our own very first days, some inward impetus has driven us on. When we were very young, we knew the awful thrill of creeping into some neighbor’s backyard, stealthily climbing up the precarious branches of a certain tree, and then, uproariously ravaging the crab-apple crop. As we grew older the exhilaration that bubbled in our veins found a new vent, when hard muscle struck hard muscle on a football field. These same lads are today upholding the flag of liberty upon alien soil where hard muscle strikes steel: human flesh clashes with inanimate armor. Four years make just a fraction of one’s life, and yet, during this time, action and re- action, toil and its fruits, have instilled qualities, (even- if involuntarily) into each one of us — qualities in the highly-lauded tradition of The English High School. And what is bred in the bone is hard to knock out of the marrow. THE SPLENDOR OF BEAUTY A marine, veteran of the battle of Guadal¬ canal, said that one hour under fire brings a fellow face-to-face with the stark realities of life: man is just a particle of humanity caught in the mighty, all-embracing whirlpool of war . . . to the left and to the right of him, he sees his buddies shot down and he can’t help but contemplate on the strangeness, the brutality of the world. Loving life, and the beauties of life, and then seeing the threads of that life cut so ruthlessly, so swiftly. . . . Art is long, life is short, and history rolls on forever. And we of this history-making epoch must roll on too, or else be lost by the wayside. True—most of us have so little time, so little time to learn and love all the great things of this earth. We shall never, perhaps, visit the excavations of ancient Tibet, or marvel at the world’s seven wonders, but the sum total of all beauty can be found in our own back-yard, as it were. Our home . . . our school . . . we have all felt somehow or other the strength that surges from the words of Shakespeare, the unique pleasure and satisfaction of a well-solved algebra problem, the thought-provoking curi¬ osity of American history. We, too, have found the response in a Tchaikowsky waltz or a Harry James arrangement, in a shadowy Rembrandt or a pert Petty number. Learning has done much more for us, too. A tree was just a structure provided to block the hot sun, until we perused Joyce Kilmer’s poem and found it to be a real, living, pulsating thing. The blithe and bonny skylark we dis¬ covered in Shelley’s little masterpiece. War has seared the face of this planet once again, and amid the ruin and wreckage, the chaotic calami¬ ties and lingering loneliness, we have renewed our faith in mankind ... a thing of beauty is a joy forever. . . . DO YOU REMEMBER? . . . the well-worn green bag filled with so much of man’s knowledge and beliefs ... a sun-swept stadium, hats off, and our Alma Mater . . . a clanging street-car and you sitting beside an inquiring passenger who was so-o-o interested in your educational future . . . the volcanic gentleman with the bellowing voice who molded that quartet of magnificent teams . . . lunch when hunger proved a great sauce . . . the bright-covered, war moded volume standing side-by-side with the sleepy-looking, thumb- besmudged Victorian classic . . . the eternal bedlam of a last-period study-hall . . . the heterogeneous spray of odors emerging from the chem lab . . . steely eyes upon a dusty American flag, the thick, irregular voices singing the na¬ tional anthem, and the tiny tingle in your spine . . . a fascinating array of legs racing towards the gym . . . the soap-stone sinks, dripping- faucets, and white glare of lights backgrounding Archimedes’ principle ... a bell ringing fol¬ lowed by a mad stampede to the basement . . . the jack-knife scars on a decrepit desk . . . the suffocating silence of the assembly hall as the Head Master read the Bible ... a wholesome- looking milk bottle suddenly smashed to smith¬ ereens upon the stone floor . . . the slightly enthusiastic crowd, tossing hats in air, standing on chairs, screeching themselves hoarse, as E. H. S. heroes made a touchdown . . . the great joys you felt looking towards the Halycon days of summer . . . the funny feeling you felt on leaving the Old Joint, forever . . . forever. Prize-winning Staff of 194-4- { 67 } The symbolism created in “The Spirit of English High School ” is epitomized and fulfilled in this dominating group that was given to the school by Mr. Charles Hayden, ' 86. This newer statue shows a warrior, completely clothed in armor, supporting a weakened and helpless comrade, who has been stripped of his armor.in battle. The warrior, strong and courageous, symbolizes an alumnus helping a comrade with whom life has not dealt very kindly. What are “honor and achievement ' ' but service to mankind? Evelyn Beatrice Longman, the gifted sculptress, has many products of her classic execution erected in parks, museums, and libraries throughout the country. But few, we might say, compare in character, beauty, and significance with our own “Spirit of Service. ' ' This statue is located at the cross corridor, first floor, south side. •{ 68 } The English High School Spirit of Service The Spirit of the English High School Donated, by Mr. Albert H. Wiggin, ’ 85, this towering bronze group symbolizes the undergraduate who, as he is about to start out on the race of life, is being told by the robed woman, Alma Mater , that “the aim of every English High School boy is to become a mun of honor and achievement Much of the fire and the faith of its sculptor, the famous Daniel Chester French, has been cap¬ tured in the smoldering, life-like lines of this masterpiece, which, through the years, has become historic. The statue is located at the cross corridor, first floor, north side. •{ 69 }- ON GRADUATION By BENJAMIN L. TOY, ’44 np HE senior slowly rose to his feet, and made his way nervously toward the scholarly figure awarding the ribbon-bound scrolls. For four years he had eagerly anticipated this very moment when he would be certified a member of the graduating class of 1944 of the English High School, and it had finally arrived. In another moment he would receive his diploma and be sent out into the world to carry on the noble traditions of his Alma Mater. He would go forth on his long journey, struggling toward the goal of every son of the English High School ... to “become a man of honor and achievement.” He had dreamed of charging forward in a blaze of glory; he had imagined that he would proudly push the labors of four long, difficult years to one side in his pompous march excelsior. There had even been times, he remembered, when, in the utter depths of melancholy, he had longed for the end of the whole, painful ordeal. But where were the glory, the pride, the longing? Now that the supreme moment was facing him he felt somewhat deflated. He felt no pride. He felt no longing for the end of the scene, and he certainly felt not in the least glorious. He felt only the deepest sense of re¬ gret. The awful realization now came to him that it was all over. No more would he walk through those hallowed corridors. No more would he know the kindly counsel of his understanding instructors; he was on his own. Never again would he feel the radiant pride that had been his that first time he had been awarded a place on the Honor Roll. Such thoughts as these flashed through the tense mind of the senior with every step he took toward graduation. He remembered every scene, every occasion of his four years at the English High School. The senior remembered the infinite patience of the elderly teacher who assisted in the preparation of that first program card; the inspiring faith of the headmaster as he read a Biblical selection during the first assembly; the precise truth of a geometric axiom; the profound terror represented by the Flight from Pompeii; the whiteness of a piece of paper; the benevolent English teacher who shook back his wild, unruly hair while driving home an important point; the malicious stub¬ bornness of a fountain pen gone dry during a weighty examination; the beauty of Heine’s Lorelei; the dynamic variety of matter in a Record; the awful, cataclysmic events described in Dickens’ Tale; the incessant babble of chang¬ ing classes; the cold scrutiny of a military in¬ spection officer; the absolute futility of a study period; the brilliant strategy outlined in Gallic Campaigns; the noble determination of the Spirit of Service. In those last, few moments the senior remem¬ bered the indisputability of a physical law; the outward seriousness of the teacher who lectured on the principles of his “old friend Archimedes;” the porosity of those checkered tile floors; the proud beauty of the flag in every classroom; the humorous speech of a yo-yo spinning candi¬ date for class office; the inflated sense of author¬ ity attending a newly appointed sergeant; the mock viciousness with which a faculty adviser blue-pencilled manuscripts; the universal jubila¬ tion which followed a gridiron victory over Latin School; the penetrating squeak of chalk against a blackboard; the high-pitched whirring of a generator; the busy staccato emanating from any typewriting class; the intense rivalry, and horrible self-consciousness out on the prize drill floor; the hardness of the now extinct “spucky;” the endless variety of French irregular verbs; the mirror-like surface of a “glossy” print; the transparency of a newly cleaned window; the ancient, dust-covered stage in the heights of the south side; the budding artists sketching objets d’art in 311; the egotistical “ich bin” of a Ger¬ man text. He recalled the forbidding attitude he as¬ sumed when on patrol; the humble “Yes, sir” of the freshman; the sincere devotion that was the Pledge of Allegiance; the clean-cut lines of a mechanical drawing; the political jibes that “Our great Lexicographer” inserted in his work; the beloved chemistry teacher who consoled failures with such remarks as “Not your day” and jestingly asked others about “Potash production in Arizona;” the coveted diamonds that followed prize drill; the informality that {70 prevailed in an advanced language class; the optimistic souls who cried “Rear door!’’ in every trolley car; the wild and boundless prom¬ ises of a class election; the derogations he applied to the school in his own humorous way, and the almost violent manner in which he rushed to the defense of his Alma Mater if any¬ one else ventured the same comments; the unsentimental chronicle of the history of a nation; the efficiency of a library catalogue; the understanding countenances of the students who listen to the final lecture of a retiring teacher. The senior’s turn had come. He felt almost reluctant to receive the sheepskin. He did not wish to terminate the existence which centered about, and, in reality, was the English High School. He wished that he might turn back the pages of time, and once more become a part of the classroom, the hubbub, the school in every phase of its activity. He longed to once more cruise the corridors. He wanted to become absorbed once more in those milling throngs which jammed the venturi-like cross corridor. He longed for the English class, with its daily discussions on this or that topic ... he re¬ called how he had “lost face” in one of them, and how he had longed to see the affair gone and forgotten, but he missed that, too. The senior still heard the voice of his E4 teacher, breathing life into the printed page, and then searching the opinions of his pupils for new interpretations. The senior longed for the chemistry laboratory, with the genial instructor who exchanged new bits of knowledge for the old reports, who would liven his instruction with a merry quip, a wink of the eye, a smile of encouragement; the mor¬ bid tint of Prussian blue; the coughing, spitting stream gushing from a faucet; the avid thirst of hydrogen chloride; the sharply defined cones of a Bunsen flame. He longed for the rottenness of H 2 S; the slimy feel of hydroxide; the accuracy of an indicator; the small placard which silently requested labor, not oratory. He longed for the mathematics class, with its intricate geometric figures, its page upon page of tables, its irrefutable truths; the language class . . . any one will fit . . . with its rules of grammar, its day-to-day translation, its out¬ side reading texts; the drill hall, and the hollow, echoing 1-2-3-4 of marching feet, the cool, criticising eye of the drillmaster, the critical angle of a rifle, the trim snap of a saluting officer. The senior had arrived before the beaming figure. He numbly extended his left hand and accepted the diploma. He felt the warm grasp of a hand, and a cordial “Congratulations!” reached his ears. He smiled his thanks, and returned to his seat. It was over. The senior was no longer a senior, but an alumnus. He sat there, watching others advance and go through the same change. He wondered if they had entertained the same thoughts that had permeated his mind in the last few seconds. He knew by their expressions that they, too, were reluctant, just as he. They realized the significance of this moment, just as he . . . no longer seniors, but alumni of the class of 1944. Yet, it was not over. The bonds which so permanently linked him with the building affec¬ tionately named “Montgomery Manor” had not been severed, as he thought and feared they might be, but had been strengthened all the more. This the Alumnus now knew. It was his lot, and that of others like him, to venture forth to carry on the traditions of the school. Those traditions, he remembered, had seemed mushy sentimentality when he had en¬ tered those halls four years ago. As he had matured, he had become a part of them, and they a part of him. Only now did he sense their true meaning. He knew that he must keep them ever in mind, that he must do his bit to bring credit to his own Alma Mater. He thought of the Spirit of Service, the Motto. He must let them govern his every deed. Then would he be a man of honor and achieve¬ ment; clean, courteous, and square. {71 Class Will By BENJAMIN L. TOY, ’44 E, the Seniors of the Class of Forty-four, Do offer this last Will and Testament, To be entered in the annals of the School, The final proclamation of our Class. TO THE FACULTY TO THE JUNIORS We leave the dignity and honor of The senior class; we leave commissions and The many sacred traditions of our school To be upheld by yours, and future classes, too. To Davis, Kaplan leaves the Blarney Stone For use by future advertising staffs. To Milton Stern, our own Bob Cumming leaves A rusty pen, and wishes of success. TO THE SOPHOMORES We leave one set of master sergeant’s stripes, And then some biceps great with which to fling Aside the rifles you no longer need. TO THE FRESHMEN To you, who just begin your long careers At English High, we leave our hopes that you Will follow in the steps of bygone classes. That you may better fill the seniors’ role, We leave six hundred pairs of trousers long And then six hundred shiny, gold key chains. TO LATIN SCHOOL We leave a padded, heated football bench. To you we leave desires that you may find This board of use when future Blue and Blue Armadas force you, vanquished, off the field. TO THE SCHOOL Jim Barlas leaves a squeaky violin, While Carty leaves in haste, for he has learned: To next year’s class of chemists, Haddon leaves Ten liters of that fragrant H 2 S. Stan Sadowski leaves to Mr. Ford a box Of special, tasty, home-baked doughnut holes, While Rudnick leaves the school with sagging- floors. Cerulli leaves a tie of horrid hue To all who’d dare to wear it in the light. Not to be outdone, Jim Graham leaves a sheaf Of manuscripts to plague the Record staff, And that is quite a weighty gift, indeed. Jack Wigod leaves, the Poet Laureate Of our great class, and promises to write Someday an ode of unmatched, worldly fame. Then Howie Chin leaves Mr. Card a new Our heartfelt gratitude for counsel wise Offered us in hours of tribulation. To Mr. Downey do we wish success In resumption of his duties as headmaster Of our noble Alma Mater, English High. We leave to Mr. Kane and Mr. Evans Empty yearbooks to be filled by future Staffs, and then to Mr. Evans we Do leave a horde of super-duper salesmen, Whom we know he’ll use to good advantage. We leave to Mr. Brown a box of test tubes Of ultra-microscopic size, which are To grace the closets of his midget lab. To Mr. Welch and Mr. Hatch we leave Assignment cards to fit the hooks of their Respective boards, reminding them of us Who used to listen as they moved the earth. We leave to Mr. Barber twelve-place logs, That he may please (?) some future M4 class. To Mr. Scheffy we just leave, and that Will please him more than any other gift. The Headmaster follows the team Lab coat of proper size, with memories Of many an hour spent isolating e. Giles Powell leaves a flock of sporting “E’s” As well as luck to future football teams. Our own Joe Toomey leaves to Doctor F. A famous military stratagem. To each and every of our faculty The Levreaults leave an optical illusion. Fred Hanson leaves to Mr. Hill a work In German tongue turned out by his own hand. Marino leaves a monstrous portraiture Of Umbriaggo, sage of forty-four. Jerry Murphy leaves ’mid trumpets’ blare To join the eagles in the azure sky. MacGillivray leaves typewriters strewn about The many offices wherein he worked. To all who yearn for oratorical careers Martinez leaves a gavel bound with gold. The Sterns do leave a sheet of circles squared As proof of skill in plane geometry. Bob Messinger leaves twenty sacks of snuff To next year’s Senior Class, then, to assuage Resulting agony, one aspirin. Bruce Anderson does leave a school relieved, While Valvo leaves his empty pocketbook, Remarking that it certainly does cost A lot to graduate with this, our senior class. Moe Winer leaves Mt a sophistry To fit a corner of his home-room board. E. Woodhouse leaves a pair of silver wings For every one who’ll strive to win in track. Will Lefkovich leaves tons of nitro-g. To show that he has busy been this year. Jim Sheehan leaves his “Life of Frederick The Great” in twenty volumes as his gift. Shel Sokol leaves through any handy door. “To leave without a legacy would be To leave in vain,” says Maier as he leaves His interlinear edition of “The Wars.” In T-Formation Not doubting this, Sid Weinbaum leaves the school A book of syllogistic arguments. DiMari leaves a bottle cap to show That he has seen the cafeteria, Wherein an empty seat is left by Wong. Then Mintz does leave Mg a history book, That’s coverless, and has no leaves as well. Bill Williamson, he leaves without a sound To follow trails of crushed potato chips Left ev’rywhere by Shaffer in his dash To flee from scores of hungry, wild eyed mates. George Katz, disgusted, leaves this page to see How many times his name in “Cruising” does appear. The author leaves the science department gear For blowing glass, to put loose wind to use. We, the undersigned, have hereby ’fixed Our signatures on this eighth day of June In nineteen forty-four, at Boston, Mass., In solemn testimony that this is And shall be known as our last will and testa¬ ment. I hereupon do set my name and seal As B. L. Toy, Attorney Without Law. The following, as witnesses, do sign; Headmaster Downey, and the Faculty Advisers, Mr. Kane and Mr. Evans, too. { 73 } Cruising the Corridors ... By DOM CERULLI, ’44 W ITH a funny, sad feeling we elbow our way into the crowd for our last hike through the Hal¬ lowed Hallways of our beloved Alma Mater. . . . Near the first floor cross corridor south, we see standing before the statue the class officers, saying goodbye and wishing each other good luck; they read from left to right Changelian, Travers, Callahan, DeFillipo, and an unidentified yellow tie. . . . Over by the office the Levreault brothers are discussing their latest invention: Bill, “I’ve just invented an alarm clock that wakes you up without ringing!” John, “How does it work?” Bill, “Someone throws it at you!” ... At this point we shall mention MacGillivray and laud him for the splendid work he has done with the baseball team, and with his typewriter . . . Also, we pray that he won’t mention his name more than nine or eleven times as he types this! . . . Joe Vozzella, the incomparable, put a blotter to his ear so he could hear the Ink Spots . . . As we stroll by the office we see DiMari and Co. busily filling out the last of the Alumni Membership slips; they deserve a medal for the swell job they did! . . . Everyone was surprised to see Finn back after his operation; he had an “Esquire” removed from his fist! ... Is it true that Marino had an operation, was sewed up with nylon, and dunks himself in Lux every night? His operation was a success; Hollywood gave it four scars! . . . Chauncey may join the parachute troops! Oh well, it only takes a jerk to open one. . . . Speaking of friends, (and who was?) there’s nothing Katz wouldn’t do for Brodie, and there’s nothing Brodie wouldn’t do for Katz; so they go through life doing nothing for each other! . . . We climb the stairs and saunter over to the Record office where we see two of the mad members of our talented (?) staff putting all the pictures they can find of themselves into the double-page spread for publication. As we watch them sitting, Chin in hand, we decide not to say who they are; we’ll just Toy with the idea. . . . Carty brings our atten¬ tion to a sign on the bulletin board that reads: “House for sale; how would you like to see a model home? She quits work at seven!” . . . Incidentally, those articles Walt has in the yearbook are tops! . . . Graham reminds us that he conceived the idea of the theme, so if he will let us up, we shall give him his laurels. . . . We say farewell to the hard-working staff who did such a swell job this year and move out into the corridor again. . . . “Bob” Cumming staggers by under a load of paint, brushes, etc., off to paint the baseball scores for posterity on the blackboard downstairs. . . . We adjust our oxygen mask as we climb into the sub-stratosphere of the third floor. ... In the Assembly Hall, the Glee Club sings “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes” from one of the Fred Astaire pictures. It is followed by “Ether Gets In Your Nose” from one of the Dr. Kildaire pictures. . . . We pass the Chem Lab very quickly because King, Haddon, Sorkin, Resmini, and Pickering are making H 2 S: need I say more? . . . Physics teacher to “Bob” Astrachan: “Bob, I’ve been watching you work and you have a mechanical mind—but why didn’t you wind it up this week?” ... As we go downstairs we see Disciullo, who tells us that Umbriaggo wrote a letter to Betty Grable, then went nuts trying to seal himself in the envelope. . . . Does your cigarette taste different lately? . . . Clark knows a fellow whose shoulders slope so much that he has to glue his coat on! ... It is the ambition of every cadet officer to get a prize stripe on his uniform; Ciampa is still trying to get a uniform! . . . Kaplan can always be found in 056 sitting amidst stacks of Records all opened to “Cruising—” and saying: “Kaplan, that’s me!” . . . Well, we are finishing our last Cruise, and as we approach the front door, look back and see four glorious years here at English High. Then open the door, stand for a second on the threshold of tomorrow, close the door forever on your high school days, and go down the steps to meet your destiny. . . . Wherever you go, and what¬ ever you do, may God be with you always! . . . Good Luck, Fellows! Class Prophecy By HOWARD S. CHIN, ’44 W ITH blinding flashes of light and thunder- ous explosions, my rocket plane hurtled through the hazy atmosphere towards the earth below. Looking at first like a pin dot, the East Boston Airport rose up with alarming swiftness and spread out before me, revealing its enormous runways dotted with rocket planes, autogiros, and a few outdated eight engine aircraft. With ever increasing velocity the plane plummeted downward . . . downward . . . downward, un¬ til the ground loomed up with terrifying abruptness. I made frantic attempts to level off. . . . Fifteen minutes later the filmy mist which had swallowed me up cleared, and, hearing the banshee-like wail of a siren and the shrieking of brakes, I realized that I was in an ambulance. I painfully forced my eyelids open and looked straight at the countenance of my ambulance assistant. I received my second shock when I saw that he was Kolombratsos. My words of greeting were cut short as our car took one corner on two wheels, and another on one. " Is it-,” I gasped. " Yes,” grinned Kolombratsos. " It’s our old friend McGillicuddy.” In spite of several other frightful moments I reached the famous Guarnacdia Hospital in one piece (although there are still many who differ). After I had been hauled into the accident ward, I was prepared for an examination. You may well imagine my astonishment on discovering that my doctor was Vito Caprio. While probing my body, Dr. Caprio informed me that the hospital boasted of such famed diagnosticians as Genes, Carver, and Cataldo, and of equally renowned surgeons like Finkel- stein, Martinez, and Erhard. Dr. Caprio finally removed his stethoscope and exclaimed, " It’s a beauty, but we’ll have it out in a few hours!” After I had been wheeled into a hospital room and lodged in bed, the soft patter of footsteps echoed in the corridor and stopped before my door. Visions of beautiful nurses filled my mind. As the newcomers entered, I saw that they were nurses, but Cooney and Costarakis are hardly pin-up girls. That I might pass the time before the operation, they had brought a radio and newspaper, which they placed at my disposal. 1 picked up the journal, dated June 25, 1964, in order to find the radio schedule, and was sur¬ prised to find that it was owned by the Levreault brothers. If I was surprised at this, I was stunned by the headlines. In glaring print was the following: " Charles Changelian elected Mayor of Chelsea over Dace Moore.” I read incredu¬ lously of the deciding influence of " Montgomery Hall” Travers. Congratulatory telegrams had been sent by Vice President Williamson, Chief Justice O’Toole, Senators King, Proctor, and Sheehan, and Congressmen Spongberg, Sulli¬ van, and Stearns. Also on the front page was an article about Dr. Toy, founder of the Home for Wayward Atoms, who had recently been awarded the Nobel Prize for his discovery of an odorless perfume. On page two I read that thirty days had passed since the world last heard from Golubchin and Connors, who tried to prove that they could circumnavigate the globe on a raft. Turning to page three, I saw several revealing items. One was about Senator Callahan, originator of the bill to furnish streets with hot and cold water sewers. After a long struggle, Senator Callahan had succeeded in having the picture of Veronica Lake placed on the new three-dollar bill. Hollywood Director De Filippo protested that the bill was contrary to all congressional principles. At the bottom of the page I found several lines about a banquet to the noted engineer, Wong, for his remarkable feat of spanning the waters between China and the Philippines with a bridge suspended from sky hooks. In his speech Wong modestly declared that a good measure of credit should go to his assistant engineers, Green and DeAngelis. On turning to page four I was astounded to see that Hanson was the editor of a lovelorn column. The following page contained a feature about a proposed expedition to Moon Island. Leading the expedition was the great archaeo¬ logist, Dr. Ciampa, accompanied by assistants Carideo, Cataldo, and Cohen. The journey was to be financed by the Boschetti Ashbarrel Company. A few paragraphs on page six mentioned the many unique recipes originated by Chef-de- Cuisine Chopourian of the T.S. (Tough Steak) Hotel. Among his more recent achievements is the " MacArthur Special,” featuring a hard boiled egg. The editorials I found on page seven. When I saw the milelong adjectives used by the editor, I knew immediately that he was Graham. His editorial was entitled “The Consequences of Umbriaggotism.” Scanning page eight, I read that Caro, Desaulniers, and Gustafson had been graduated from law school and had passed the bar, carry¬ ing four roses along with them. With anticipation I turned to the literary section on page ten. Yes, Wigod had scored again with his best seller, “For Whom the Dice Roll.” Another of the nation’s most prominent authors, Carty, announced that “How Lean is My Sally” was about ready for publication. Craven’s latest work was “The Ocean Wolf, or Stapleton Puts Out to Sea.” Further down the page I noted that the widely publicised “Marino Girl” calendars had been completed, and would be published in the next issue of a certain well known magazine. In the theatrical column were many familiar names which had been flashed from marquees from coast to coast. Appearing at the Opera House was the noteworthy tenor, Mclsaac. The roster of the Metropolitan Opera Company included such talented singers as Contrada, Greenberg, and DiCicco. The orchestra fol¬ lowed the baton of the accomplished DiMari. The stage attractions at the Sexton Theatre were Schleifer and his swing band, honors of the day going to Liebster at the saxophone, Burns at the clarinet, and Valvo, the Frank Sinatra of Yesterday. Guest star of the ensemble was the dashing Hollywood man-about-town, Aylward, who played the leading role in Sjodin Studios’ “A Man to Dismember.” As I reached the sports page, I was not in the least surprised to see mentioned former E.H.S. athletes, but I really did not expect to see Clark’s by-line. He wrote that Giles Powell had been graduated from Boulder Dam Univer¬ sity (better known as Dam U.) after twelve suc¬ cessful years of gridiron glory. It was also announced that Ahearn, former major league home run king, had been appointed manager of the Boston Red Sox. He openly declared that Boston would surely finish first—in the second division. At the recent Olympic games in mammoth Boutilier Stadium, Ellis smashed another track record in the hurdles event. When asked to what he attributed his success, Ellis replied, “I eat Mexican jumping beans.” The comic section contained Cumming’s latest creation, “The Hiccoughing Hero.” As I expected, the radio schedule was on the very last page. On examining the list I noticed several intriguing programs. One was sponsored by MacGillivray Noiseless Alarm Clocks, Inc., and featured the Rossi concert orchestra, as well as Toomey and his famed all-girl chorus. The broadcast that aroused my curiosity, however, was “The Adventures of the Mad Chemist.” Leaning from my bed, I switched on the set and punched the proper button. I heard Dr. Brousaides telling his glassblower, Haddon, to mix a quantity of chlorine and hydrogen in the midday sun. Just then my door was pushed open and a litter wheeled in beside me. The tender hands of orderlies Osganian and Kelly transferred me to the mobile bed. A few minutes later I was on the operating table, and the anaesthetist, Vozzella, was preparing his equipment. As the leering surgeon, Berman, bent over me, scalpel in one hand, knife and fork in the other, I stuttered, “It’ll come out all right, won’t it?” He stared at me pityingly. “Hmp, optimist,” he sniffed. Vozzella placed a mask over my face, and gradually the room began to revolve. I soon felt myself floating away into outer space. Far up in the clouds I saw a speck drawing nearer. Soaring through the air, I saw that it was Barlas plucking his violin. Before I could utter a word, I was past him and heading for another cloud¬ bank. On this group was Anderson, painting a picture of the gorgeous panorama, while sitting beside him was Farrell, writing his magnum opus, “Life Upstairs.” Out of the mists now materialized a rainbow, and perched on its zenith was Hassett, huddled in a fingertip coat, and sorrowfully shaking his head as he con¬ templated the world below. “Where did you get that coat?” I cried. “It used to belong to Heiligmann,” he replied, “But he won’t need it where he is now.” Suddenly the heavens grew dark and omin¬ ous, and a monstrous, black cloud drifted past. Astride this harbinger of doom was Cerulli, mischievously casting jagged pieces of lightning downward, and occasionally whacking a huge bass drum. “Blivots!” he cried joyously as he drew back his arm to let one fly. I heard his cry of warning as the blivot slipped from his grasp, but was powerless to evade the missile. There was a blinding explosion, and I felt myself dropping unsupported into the depths of the scene. I hurtled down . . . down . . . down. . . . Slowly the gyrations of the room stopped, and I was shocked back into the world of reality by the face of Dr. Berman. The grin was gone. “It was a success,” he moaned in disappoint¬ ment. A month later, I was discharged. With sing¬ ing heart I strode through the main door and reverently kissed the ground—for how was I to know the steps were so high? Mm, ?« ' wm AIL rm euas Tow ored 7 ?r n’ZZs, and led her laureat hand CLASS POEM By JACOB D. WIGOD, ' 44 Through halls where men of fame have strolled, Where moments of the past were spent In jovial friendship, true as gold, Which priceless treasure ne’er could rent: The bell rings clear, its echoes bound From wall to wall, from ear to ear; In thinner strain now dies its sound, And with it dies the last school year. A bubbling spring of hope and joy, Yet still a stream of youthful will, Pours forth this day from English High To take its place on foremost hill Of social, moral duty’s range; Achievement beckons, honors wait! The cry is heard, to youth not strange, And carried on, through every fate. A sudden flow of mem’ries pure, A swollen heart of bursting pride, A fallen tear of grace demure, That decorum cannot hide: These are signs of faith and sorrow, Mingling with the parting knell; The hopes of youth but face the morrow, Farewell, English High, farewell! CLASS SONG “THE BLUE AND BLUE LEADS ALL” (Tune: “Battle Hymn of the Republic”) By Irving Pickering, ’44; Abram King, ’44; George Keches, ’44 We sing to you the praises of our cherished Blue and Blue, t Our Alma Mater, English High, loved by her sons so true. How oft we’ll yearn for our return, familiar scenes to view— Our English High leads all! CHORUS: Glorify the name of English, Honor to the name of English, Famous is the claim of English, The Blue and Blue leads all! The Fli 0 ht f™ m Pompeii The loyal sons of Blue and Blue go marching off to fight; They are making sacrifices for the cause they know is right; Their school is ne’er forgotten as they bring this world new light— Their English High leads all! Class History By WALTER V. CARTY, ’44 COMETHING of a church-like solemnity hangs over Tremont Temple as a cross-sec¬ tion of America—young men, crisp of dress and slick of hair, file slowly down the aisle on this unforgettable evening of an unforgettable year, 1944. On the sides, parents scan the long line in search of their own: mothers bite their lips in a kind of heart-throbbing pride, fathers laugh at themselves because of that funny, choked feeling in their hearts. So this is it . . . the awesome cliche trickles through your teeming thoughts as you quietly take a seat. In a few moments you’ll be awarded that shiny roll of paper that represents four swell years at The English High School. . . . The auditorium is atingle with expectancy, but you, rather dazed, slowly, almost dreamily, become oblivious of your surroundings. The throng gathered here for the ceremony hazily surges back into space; the stage filled with the dignity and eloquence of guests likewise slips into obscurity. The past four years, a kaleido¬ scopic dance of images and events, shuttle about and finally weave themsleves, before your some¬ what heavy eyes, into the warp and woof of your life’s tapestry. You wipe away the mental cobwebs that time has spun, and you lift those wonderful recollections from their beds of camphor. . . . Remember that first day of school? You huddled in the corner of the street car as shy and sensitive as a fawn, while the big, brawny, worldly fellows, pressing around you, blew rings of smoke in the air and spoke so knowingly of that vast edifice on Montgomery Street. Your heart played leapfrog as you turned the corner to find the sun-washed, red-brick building stretching along the whole block and rising up against the clear, pastel September sky. And the dungeon-like basement, the labyrinthine sprawl of checkered corridors, the dark, chaotic locker pit, all these at first possessed a certain terror. To your young mind, the program card was a duplicate of Edgar Allan Poe’s crytograph in “The Gold Bug.” When you stumbled into the lunchroom, you thought you had entered another world: the forsythia-yellow of its brick, the long rows of smooth tables, and the warm sun falling through the ceiling of isinglass were a disarming contrast to the brooding shade and Gothic air which pervaded the rest of the school. That year was one of search and discovery, of observing and storing in mind. You met Mr. Reed and were struck by his calm efficiency and quiet dignity; you were introduced to the splendid stories and articles of the Record; you got quite a thrill when you sewed that two- tone insigne of blue upon your drill uniform; you reached for the package of slippery-elms after that roaring Thanksgiving Day game; you became acquainted with that delectable bit of dough known as the “spucky” (Inci¬ dentally, isn’t it strange that the spucky dis¬ appeared from the lunch counter at the same time the government announced the synthetic rubber discovery?). The first day of your sophomore year found you a startingly different fellow than the one who sidled so timidly through the massive portals a year ago. You thumped in with pants rolled up to reveal your rainbow socks, you cocked your hat to one side (All you needed was a feather to make you a prototype of the “High¬ wayman”), and you strutted along in that typi¬ cal sophomoric step, your fingertip-coat hardly covering your seat, and a blazing tie pulled out, the better to view, of course. Once you had become oriented, you started to learn about a man named Pythagoras, who spent a lifetime developing a certain theorem just to torment you. You came to know more intimately the lives and times of Shakespeare, Dickens, Eliot, and Scott. John J. Walsh was the editor-in- chief of the Record that year, and with a large and able staff, a prize-winning magazine was turned out. The pre-eminence of those gallant teams was easily recognizable when the hockey team were crowned city champs of ’42, and the track team once again proclaimed Regi¬ mental Champions. That first week-end in December started like all the rest of them, but the Macchiavellian tactics at Washington, accentuated by the shock¬ ing Sunday of December the 7th, filled you with a kind of rage you had never before experienced. The name—Pearl Harbor—one which you per- { 80 } haps had never theretofore heard of—was in¬ delibly printed upon your mind and heart. The crash of bombs on that distant port re¬ sounded loudly through the high-ceilinged rooms and hallowed halls of English High. Major Meanix entered the armed forces, and his posi¬ tion was filled by Captain Hennessey, and Lieu¬ tenant Clement replaced Lieutenant Gately, who, so soon after his entrance, distinguished himself in the Solomons campaign. The faculty and student-body alike began to deplete and deflate. And you, the lowly sophomore, went back to your schoohvork with grim determina¬ tion, and learning that Caesar crossed the Rubicon, you decided to follow him—into your third year. That third year you sewed on your sergeant’s stripes, and piled your books high in a south side locker, and yelled your lungs out to a sweeping E.H.S. victory at the Turkey Day Classic. The Record , under Harold Orel, once again came through with the Columbia Scholastic Press Association prize as one of the best high-school mags in the country. Quite an honor! As the year faded out, the days were filled with the furore of election time. Charlie Changelian was elected President, Dom “Yo- Yo” Cerulli, Vice President. The last few weeks of your junior year resulted in a fanatic rush to get things up to date. Final exams loomed menacingly. They came. You conquered. Th en the fall of 1943 ushered in the glamour and expense of your annus mirabilis. It was the beginning of the end . . . the ever retreat¬ ing El Dorado had been reached. You were the lofty senior, the authoritative cadet officer. With the whole-heartedly welcomed return of the sweepingly efficient and energetic Mr. Walter F. Downey as your headmaster, certain changes took place. The V program became an integral part of your curriculum. The science and math courses were tightened, and all subjects had their military applications. The election returns gave, or rather, re-gave, Charlie and Dom their positions as president and vice president. You elected James A. Trav¬ ers as secretary-treasurer, and John J. Callahan and Vincent T. DeFillippo as members of the executive committee. Senior year would not be complete if it were not studded with scintillating athletic victories. Among this constellation, certain stars shone brightly: Captain Andy Kelly, Giles Powell, Jackie Farrell, and Bill Brady, who helped form the grid machine that moved forward to Co-city championship; Cap¬ tain Court Ellis, whose nimble feet carried E.H.S. to State Championship; Paul Cronin, who, the day before entering the Navy, scored four goals and an assist in the game with Dorchester. The highlight of your high-school society came December 3, 1943, when the doors of the Georgian Room were opened to the Blue and Blue Prom. You worried about gas coupons and transportation. You peered deeply into your pecuniary status, and weighed the question of whether or not you should call up an escort bureau (so that all the girls’ hearts wouldn’t be broken). The night came and you appeared dauntless and debonair in your sharp monkey- suit. You sweated and twitched and wilted under that stiff collar. Whether you jived or jitteredbugged or waltzed or just wobbl ed, you had a grand time. . . . Now you sit there waiting for your name to be called. The end has come . . . the end of your stay at English, but certainly not of its memories. You soon will go up there as a graduate of the Class of ’44—suave, chivalrous, svelte, and scholarly (?). There is immense joy ebbing through you at the thought of going out into the vast uncertainty of the world, first, to help restore its freedom, and then, to come back home and preserve that freedom. You leave now, with eagerness and a sense of accomplish¬ ment, and surely just a slight tinge of sadness. IMIS SCJkUCi.SUT f " Cf 4 4 Nl 4. Ready, able, and willing. 5. Mr. Card demonstrates. 6. English on the march. 7. “You see, it’s this way,” says Mr. Hatch. 1. The President receives his guests at the Senior Prom, Hotel Statler. 2. Shooting the sun. 3. “This one is ours.” In any study hall. The guard lines up. The physics bulletin board. The business managers confer. Recorders at the Senior Prom with their guests. In search of the philosopher’s stone. The literary staff of the “Record” holds forth with Mr. Kane. ::S ; ' !H i§ ' | I . ; I J.ir d 1 j 1 111 ft - • 1 j ' ||; i Jj ftf ■ ; 1 1 if 1 0 1 ft; % 4 9 ■■ H —-- 1 - T A i { .. j »«f la Ft —I n a war-troubled year many clubs have of necessity been forced to disband. Yet the spirit of bind- ing good fellowship has not been lacking. The Senior Prom was a stunning success , and the orchestra , the band and many other organiza¬ tions have flourished. The clubs which coidd not con¬ tinue failed through no fault of their own. They will lie dormant only until conditions again permit their existence. Then shall they rise up to be bigger and better than ever before. Rear Row: Walter V. Carty, Jacob D. Wigod, Robert H. Cumming, Leonard F. Marino. Front Row: Benjamin L. Toy, James H. Graham, Mr. Kane (Faculty Adviser), Dominic P. Cerulli, Howard S. Chin. RECORDERS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF JAMES H. GRAHAM, ’44 Literary Editors Benjamin L. Toy, ’44 Jacob D. Wigod, ’44 Contributing Editors Dominic P. Cerulli, ’44 Howard S. Chin, ’44 Walter V. Carty, ’44 John P. Craven, ’44 Art Editor Robert H. Cumming, ’44 Artists Leonard F. Marino, ’44 Milton R. Stern, ’45 Photography Alfred R. Vitale, ’44 Maurice J. Reutter, ’45 Worcester R. Angell, ’45 Secretary Charles MacGillivray Jr., ’44 Faculty Advisers Mr. Kane Mr. Eccles Mr. Evans Business - Circulation JaMes A. Travers, Mgr., ' 44 William Riley, Asst. Mgr., ’44 David R. Plumb, ’44 Edward Tolson, ’45 Jerome M. Leonard, ’45 Eugene J. Moore, ’46 Frederick J. Gilbert, ’46 Alexander H. Doucette, ’46 Peter V. Morris, ’46 Donald J. Amirault, ’46 Advertising Louis Kaplan, Mgr., ’44 Aaron M. Miller, ’44 Robert A. Messinger, ’44 Stanley M. Rice, ’44 Milton M. Sachs, ’44 Gerald S. Davis, ’45 Seymour Salett, ’46 David B. Greene, ’46 Fred Vimick, ’46 Richard G. Kaufman, ’44 COMBINED COMMITTEES r T ' HE combined committees have labored in comparative obscurity, but the results of their efforts have been gratefully acknowledged by the members of the class of 1944. Under the apt direction of Mr. Frazier, the various committees have smiled in the face of priorities, the draft, theOPA, and countless other war-occasioned obstacles, and have given freely and willingly of their time to assure the speedy and proper execution of the divers functions of the senior class. They have given us a prom to be remembered in years to come. They have labored to have the photograph of every senior appear in the yearbook. They have assisted in having the rings made and delivered ahead of schedule. They have endeavored to enlist each and every member of the graduating class in the ranks of the Alumni Association. In short, to them belongs the credit for the success which has attended the undertakings of our last year at English High School. We salute the com¬ bined committees, the unacclaimed but not unappreciated leaders of the class of 1944. 7 W Row: francis X. O’Brien, Salvatore Valvo, Francis Degnan, Joseph Callahan, Andrew Kelly, Ronald Conant, Leo McGillicuddj, Wdliam Mahoney, John Farrell Second Row: Headmaster Walter F. Downey. William Stokinger, Paul Sexton, Francis Welling, Joseph Toomey, George Keehes, David Plumb. Myron rinkelstein, Mr. Frazier Front Row: Vincent DeFilippo, Dominic Cerulii, Richard Nedder, Seymour DiMari, Paul Hassett, Abram King, Irving Pickering, Leo Picardi Third Row: Bernard F. Walsh, Seymour H. Goff, John A. O’Hara Second Row: Mr. Downey, John O’Toole, Paul V. Sabine, Eugene O ' Donnell, Richard J. Kearns, Mr. Frazier Front Row: Eugene 1). Moore, James F. Abbasciano, Harry T. Kolombratsos, James H. Graham, Edward E. Toison, Ricardo DiGregorio, Edward A. Halligan STUDENT COUNCIL - ' DEMOCRACY in action; this is the student council. This group of students is representative of the entire roster of The English High School. The members are elected from the student body, by the student body, and act in the best interests of the student body. At the beginning of each year, each class chooses a representative, the room councilor, to the student council. At a special meeting this group elects the council itself. Four members are chosen from each class, and the final council of 16 then carries on business with the Headmaster. Through the distribution of honor buttons and the periodic discussion of current school problems, this organization makes easier the long road to graduation and makes stronger the bond between teachers and students. For the work done this year we owe a rising vote of thanks to the student council—may it enjoy success in the future as it has in the past and present. r •{ 88 RECORD BUSINESS STAFF JNDER the able direction of Mr. Evans, the business staff functions as an effective, well in¬ tegrated unit. The members, many of whom pursue commercial courses and find in this work a proving ground for classroom theories, lend their efforts to obtain advertising, publicize the magazine, and make circulation widespread and efficient. The members of the business staff have received no by-lines in the issues, but the proof of their activity is the magazine itself. Theirs has been a weighty responsibility, and well have they borne it. They have contributed in no mean amount to the success that has attended the Record in the last few years, and are deserving of much credit for their endeavors. Third Row: David B. Greene, Fred Vimick, David F. Siegfriedt, Robert A. Messinger, Gerald S. Davis William A. Mahoney, Robert E. Caro. Second Row: Maurice T. Nelligan, George Crosby, Seymour Salett, Frederick J. Gilbert, Edward Tolson, Donald J. Amirault, Jerome M. Leonard, Alexander H. Doucette, Mr. Evans. Front Row: Charles L. MacGillivray, Louis Kaplan, Janies A. Travers, William Riley, Richard G. Kaufman, David R. Plumb, Stanley M. Rice. Michael J. Donovan, Charles NeHalsingh, Gerald Weinberg, Donald Amirault, Charles W. Cameron, Joseph P. Soracco, John L. Cohen, Norman Berris. Ray¬ mond L. Shaw, Donald A. Cameron, James F. M orris. Back Row (left to right): Mr. Downey, Robert S. Shea, James J. Keanneally, Edwin H. Rubin, James J. Aylward, Miss Kelly, Librarian Front Row: Eugene D. Moore, Donald D. Flaherty, James P. Doyle, Howard S. Chin, Joseph W r clch, Richard J. Kearns, Paul D. Kearns THE ORCHESTRA THE LIBRARY CORPS 1944 ushers in the fifty-sixth year of the existence of the English High School Orchestra. Under the efficient leadership of Mr. Trongone, a splendid group of music- makers was trained and molded into an organization that we may well be proud of, and who certainly performed with the traditional English High School skill. Under the direction of Miss Irene Kelly, the library corps has completed another great year of service to the school. The members of the corps, without which the library could not function, are boys who have attained the highest grades in personality and scholarship. Beside? handling the distribution of books and keeping the files in order, these boys aid in the arranging of exhibits. Since most libraries operate similarly, the experience one gains can be very useful. SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS Under the direction of Mr. Hayes, our instructor in Oral Expression, this well-trained group, by means of the interschool telephone system, has put to practice the fundamentals of good speech. Courteous and alert, these fellows have done much to keep rolling the every-day life of English High School. LABORATORY ASSISTANTS This year the number of laboratory assistants has been substantially reduced, but the service they render has been as great as ever. Not only have these fellows been of great assistance to the school, but they have done much to further themselves in the field of chemistry. Cleaning the equipment, keeping record of the many chemicals, and becoming general handymen around the lab—these are a few of the duties performed ably and faithfully by the lab assistants. Rear Row: Donald A. Cameron, Nicholas Meimaris, Robert Finkelstein, Francis M. Coyne, Joseph Kelliher, Joseph V. Hardy Front Row: Paul Buchanan, John G. Martinez, Paul D. Kearns, Anthony J. Feil Lejt to Right: Robert S. Mason, Stanley F. Sadowski, William Haddon. D 1 ejoice and fill the halls of Montgomery Manor with joyful hallelujahs for the glorious athletic victories which shall never die , and for the athletes who shall never be entirely forgotten. The record is one which any school in the length and breadth of America would be intensely proud of: Co-City Champions in football , runners up in a hectic hockey race , City and State champioiis in track. We leave it to you whether or not The English High School athletic prestige has suffered at the hands of these boys. Fourth Row: Melvin Kachinsk.v, James F. Keane, Robert L. Murphy, Robert J. Boutilier, Abram 0. King, James F. Collins, Matthew J. Ruggiero, John N. Bowes, Donald G. Murphy, Harvey G. Fagerstrom, Albert F. Melsaac. Third Row: James G. Jennings, Frank W. Tomasello, Francis P. Driscoll, Herbert B. Anderson, Paul R. Bjorklund, William F. Blakeman, Thomas F. Duff, Carlo V. Mantini, William G. Verrochi, William M. Stokinger (Manager). Second Row: Coach William H. Ohrenberger, Robert B. Farrell, Albert J. Rose, John J. A’Hearn, Roger J. O’Donnell, George Osganian, James L. Whelan, Paul L. Stapleton, William A. Northridge, Walter F. Downey ( Headmaster). Front Row: John J. Farrell, Peter J. Kalafatas, William S. Brady, Captain Andrew J. Kelley, John S. Boutilier, Giles B. Powell, John H. Maloney John N. Bowes, Donald G. Murphy, Harvey G. Fagerstrom, Albert F. Mclsaac. CO-CITY CHAMPIONS, 1943 C HAMPIONS all. That is the best and only way to describe these boys. They all shone through¬ out the season, some more spectacularly than others, perhaps, but every man of them doing his job and doing it well. It was teamwork that counted with those boys, not individual star¬ dom, and it was that one characteristic which made them truly great. In the backfield, of course, the big noise was all-scholastic Giles Powell, but Jack Farrell with his blazing speed, Jack Boutilier with his crushing blocks and Jack Maloney with his heady field generalship contributed handsomely to every victory. The line, too, was a standout, holding the opposition to no points in eight games. Captain Andy Kelly and Bill Brady were standouts on the ends, while Captain-elect Frank Driscoll and George Osganian were rock-ribbed tackles. Bill Verrochi, Jim Keane, and Pete Kalafatas were standouts at guard, while A1 Rose and Roger O’Donnell took care of the pivot position very nicely. The total score of the season: 226 points for E. H. S. to none for the opposition. The only disappointment: a heartbreaking tie with Latin on Turkey Day. We’ll get ’em next year. { 95 } Third Row: Daniel R. Gangemi, Edwin F. Hannon, Leftaris T. Costarakis, Albert F. Mclsaac Hugh Beakers Second Row: Mr. Downey ( Headmaster ), Thomas F. Duff, Roy E. Fredeneksen, Daniel E. Sullivan, Russell 1. Mr. Ohrenberger (Coach). Front Row: James G. Jennings, Aloysius J. Mahoney, Joseph F. Flanagan, Robert H. Barry, Wdl.am E. Dolan, Adam (Manager). Mahoney, John H. Maloney. P. Caputo, William E. Nagle, HOCKEY SQUAD T ADY LUCK is a fickle dame. These boys found out just how cruel she could be when in the -L last game of the season she turned a rigid back and vanished completely in the swirling eddies of chipped ice. In a thrill-packed game the Purple of Latin tumbled our boys from their lofty perch by a hair breadth 3-2 score. . , Up to that time the Blue and Blue had rolled over Dorchester (7-3), Roxbury Memonal (5-3), Mechanics Arts (4-2), and Commerce (5-fl). In between the last two games mighty Trade was tied (3-3) and the City Championship seemed secure, but then came Latin and the iiacc championship went a-glimmering. Stars of the season: Captain Bob Barry for his all-around play; Adam Caputo, who set up a goodly proportion of the scores by his brilliant playmaking; and A1 Mclsaac, who came fast in the nets and had one whitewash to his credit at season’s end. . , Thrill of the season: Watching six forwards storm the Latin cage in a vain attempt to tie up the game in the closing seconds. , IF of the season: If Paul Cronin, big, fast, capable wing veteran had not left the team to enter the Navy after the first game—things might have been just a wee bit different. { 96 } REGIMENTAL AND STATE CHAMPIONS, 1944 H ERE arc the boys who gave ye olde English High its most successful track season in many a moon. They’re all champions,these boys,and yet some had the good fortune to shine more brightly than others during the season. Of course the brightest star in all the glittering array was the team Captain, Court Ellis, who topped off a never to be forgotten high school track career with a great season. Some of his achievements included first in hurdles and high jump in both Northeastern and State Meets and second in the country in the National hurdles in New Y ork. the other A-B stais were Jack Fan ell, Ronald Conant and Fran Murphy who formed the State Championship relay team and Giles Powell, Red Sexton, Frank Degnan and Harry Murphy. Dave Krivitsky and Herschel Sternlieb were the two most consistent winners m C with John Bowles, Paul Noble and Larry Brown chipping in needed points and in D, the incubator of the champions of tomorrow, Phil Bloomfield, Earl Tucker, Ed Woodhouse, Sumner Frank and Conrad Balfour established themselves as the ones to watch. Here they are. Look at ’em once more for they are the boys with the never-say-die spirit, which you have heard so much about—the spirit that wins track meets and the spiiit that W INfs WARS. Fourth Row: Karle F. Siegfried!, Henry E. Lesser, Edward O. Woodhouse, Joseph F. Flanagan, Ted E. McRae, Paul E. Noble, Alfred Abate, Jr. Third Row: Joseph L. Waldron (Manager), Lawrence M. Washington, Frederick Brousaides, Matthew J. Ruggiero, Harry b. Murphy, Abram . King Otto P. Becker, Sumner Frank. Paul J. Egan, Conrad G. Balfour, Earle F. Tucker, Charles L. MacGillivray (Manager). Second Row: Walter F. Downey (Headmaster), John J. Farrell, Giles B. Powell, John S. Boutilier, Rogert J. O’Donnell, Nelson A. Bnggs, Her¬ schel Sternlieb, David S. Krivitsky, James A. Atsales, Philip M. Bloomfield, William H. Ohrenberger (Coach). Front Row: Lawrence M. Brown, John N. Bowes, Paul F. Sexton, Ronald A. Conant, Courtland H. Ellis (Captain), Francis J. Degnan, hrancis X. Murphy, Robert B. Farrell, John V. Bellino. BASEBALL SQUAD I N the war year of 1944 high school baseball as all other sports has felt the exigencies of the turmoil in which we live. However, to see these boys play you’d never know it. Working as a unit they gave Ye Olde English High School one of its best teams in years. Teamwork above all else was responsible for their excellent record, and not the individual brilliance of any one star. The rock-ribbed infield consisted of Joltin’ Joe Flanagan at first, peppery Bob Pierre at the keystone sack, hard-hitting Captain Jack Farrell at shortstop, and veteran Bill Brady at the hot corner. The outfield could scarcely have been improved upon with three such sure-fisted ball hawks as Roger O’Donnell in left, Giles Powell or Tom Buckley in center and Jack Maloney in right. Powell and Buckley alternated on the mound, while Mario Di Gregorio and big Paul Bjorklund took turns handling the tricky slants of the twirlers. This was the team that swept through a host of first rate opponents like a prairie fire. Many of these same boys have the talent and spirit to make the grade in the big time and some day a boy who played on this year’s team may be carrying on in brilliant fashion on the Yanks or Red Sox. But before that there will come for many of these boys a bigger game than any of them has played before. They will be just one of many and yet when the last Long Tom thunders its defiant challenge over the western front they will experience the same thrill that a victory on the diamond gives. Once again they will emerge on the long end of the score. ■{ 98 } Third Rote: Da niel R. Gangemi, Russell F. Mahoney, Robert H. Barry, Frank J. Galvin, Aloysius J. Mahoney, William G. Pfau, Charles L. MacGilli vray. Second Row: Mr. Downey, Richard C. Lawler, Alphonso J. Luciano, Ronald A: Conant, John J. Callahan, Robert M. Pierre, John H. Maloney, Mario D. diGregorio, Coach Ohrenberger. Fiont Row: Thomas F. Duff, William S. Brady, Paul R. Bjorklund, Captain John J. Farrell, Joseph F. Flanagan, Giles B. Powell, Thomas Buckley. MANAGERS These boys are the unsung heroes of any athletic season. The work they do is unheralded and unsung, and yet without them the smooth-working, elocklike precision with which English High School athletics is run would be sadly lacking. It is the managers’ job to see that the boys on their particular team have all the equipment necessary. It is a colossal job, but, as in years past, they have been equal to it. It is the cheer-leaders’ job to arouse and nourish the true Blue and Blue spirit which exists deep down in every English High School boy. How well they succeeded could be clearly and decisively seen at any football game in which our boys participated. It was our boys who yelled just a little bit louder than anyone else. As we mentioned before, these are the unheralded and unsung heroes of old English High School. So just once before they leave the hallowed halls of their Alma Mater, let’s raise our voices in a mighty cheer for the boys who work behind the scenes. MANAGERS Left to Right: Hugh 15. Dakers, Hockey; William M. Stokinger, Football; Charles 1.. MacGillivray, Outdoor Track; Coach William H. Ohrenberger; John .1. Callahan, Baseball; Joseph L. Waldron, Indoor Track CHEER LEADERS Left to Right: Herschel Sternlieb, Francis J. Degnan, Eugene I). Clark, Courtland H. Ellis BASKETBALL I T looks like basketball is here to stay. It has come with a rush in the past year and the Blue and Blue basketball squad under the expert supervision and tute¬ lage of Mr. Sullivan has added to no small degree in mak¬ ing the public court conscious. They have completed the season in a triple tie for the City Championship with Latin and Trade. The record is as follows: E.H.S.—51 E.H.S.—49 E.H.S.—27 E.H.S—37 E.H.S.—24 E.H.S.—29 E.H.S.—23 Dorchester—17 Mechanics—30 Roxbury Memorial—19 B. C. High—18 Trade—29 Commerce—27 Latin—25 The team itself was led by sharp-shooting Len Kerr who operated smoothly and efficiently from his left de¬ fense position. Bobby Lynch at left forward was the team’s leading scorer. The lineup: Killiam, Williams, right forward; Lynch, Golubchin, left forwards; Proctor, Rabinovitz, center; Northridge, Raskind, right guard; Kerr, Etter, left guard. ENGLISH HIGH CLASS “A” RELAY CHAMPS Left to Right: Francix X. Murphy, John J. Farrell, Courtland H. Ellis, Ronald Conant, Jr. BASKETBALL Standing: Walter F. Downey, Headmaster; Meyer Golubchin, Kent A. K ' llam, Edward Raskind, John H. Etter, William L. Rubinovitz. Seated: Kenneth C. Williams, William A. Northridge, Captain Leonard A. Kerr, Albert W. Proctor, Robert Lynch. Coach William H. Ohrenberger, E.H.S. ' 23, organizes and directs the extra mural competition program and the intra mural physical education program. SPORTS HIGHLIGHTS By JAMES H. GRAHAM, ’44 N the three short years that most of us have graced the halls of Montgomery Manor the world about us has changed completely from the one we used to know and love. The sea of strife and turbulence upon which we have of necessity embarked has tossed its ugly white caps into the homes of all America. Nothing has remained completely unchanged. In the field of athletic endeavor, there is a vastly different set-up from what we have come to expect. Indeed, professional athletics as they exist today are not even a shadow nor a semb¬ lance of their former selves. But we are di¬ gressing. High school athletics have not escaped en¬ tirely unscathed. Material shortages and players departing regularly into the service have hurt, and hurt deeply. Yet, as far as we can judge, the rivalry has been so strong, the student body spirit so unflaggingly high that high school athletics have been big enough to brush off these hindrances as a pesky insect to be removed and at length exterminated, and have thrived on their wartime fare. At least that has been the happy case at English High School. A typical year in the fortunes of the Blue and Blue has been the one from which we have just emerged. As such, we shall dissect like some rarity of the insect world and place it under the crystal-clear microscope of reality. The double Blue athletic season opened with the clarion call of the pigskin and the soul- satisfying thud of bodily contact still reverberat¬ ing sharply in the crisp Autumn air. Andy Kelly led the charge onto the green sward of Billings Field and Coach Ohrenberger wasted no time in gathering the young fledglings under his pro¬ tective wing and the molding of a championship team had begun. We shall never forget the thrills of the season, nor the boys who blocked and tackled and ran with knees pistoning and churning always for that extra yard. Nor shall we forget the sheer savage exultation with which we witnessed those crushing early season vic¬ tories. In all respect to a gallant Purple eleven it is our own humble opinion that had these two teams met earlier in the season, and on some¬ thing remotely resembling a dry field, the result (a scoreless tie) would have been vastly different. But there we go second guessing again. We’ll always remember: The awe-inspiring sight of Andy Kelly and Bill Brady swooping down like avenging Titans upon the hapless opposing safety man; lightning¬ legged Jackie Farrell skirting the end and run¬ ning the enemy ragged on his pet reverse play; the look on the other guy’s face when Jack Boutilier hit him with one of his devastating blocks; Giles Powell’s complete nonchalance and almost indifference as be scampered through and around and over all opposition; and last, but certainly not least, the overwhelming feeling of uncertainty and despair and hope and vivid fear that engulfed us as the seconds ticked off and the Latin game neared its end. The football season, even with this last game tie could scarcely be called other than a success. Certainly one could not ask for any more spirit or enthusiasm or teamwork in this football { 100 } season. Let us then remove the microscope and select our next victim, not forgetting to put a “Success” label on our ex-subject. Following the Turkey Day clash, all was quiet on the Western Front until the advent of King Winter and the freezing of Turner’s Pond in Milton. Then it was that Bob Barry strapped on his glistening skates and glided out for the first practice of the season, followed closely by a nucleus of fast-skating veterans and ambitious Krauts. This time the city championship fell completely from our grasp however as the boys from the other side of the tracks eked out a victory by the scantiest of margins and scarcely the width of Uncle Charlie’s beard. Never to be forgotten epics: Joltin’ Joe Flanagan’s pick-me-up-and-lay- me-down body checks; Bob Barry’s savoir-faire and smooth-pistoned workmanship; Alby Mc- Isaac’s smallness and watchful courage as the tidal wave of opposing players swept down on the cage; and Adam Caputo’s complete refusal to shoot for a goal if one of his teammates was in even a slightly better position. This last we consider the most important of all. Even though the championship slipped through our fingers in the last possible moment and in the most heart-breakingly possible way, this season too must be counted as a success for the camaradarie and complete disregard of personal honors which existed on the team. Shades of Eddie Shore! What more could you ask from a team than that. The third victim in our qualitative analysis series approaches with an air of sure-felt strength and knowing power which makes us look askance and immediately delve deeper into the victim’s secrets. Ah! This was the one we were waiting for—the track season. This year, in truth, did all the wing-footed Mercurys ascend from their lofty perches and take up residence in the Halls of Montgomery Manor. Before these human torpedoes fell the City and State titles and the glory of one of the the best track teams in English High School history. Events of the year: It could be a lot of things in this most memor¬ able of all track seasons—It could be the incom¬ parable, the nonpareil Court Ellis, all by himself a one man full-fledged track team; it could be t he joyous sight of Ronnie Conant as he trailed after the Hyde Park boy who set the pace in the Reggies 1000 and played cat and mouse with him until the closing lap when he fairly flew around the Armory track; it could be Jackie Farrell’s gameness in running with a bad leg or even Fran Murphy’s blinding brilliance in the dash, but none of them will be so indelibly printed on our mind as an event in the State Meet. It was just before the final event on the program when the score stood at 25 points apiece and loyal English hearts softly turned five flip-flops and just as quietly stopped. Then it was that the four members of the English High School relay team (Murphy, Conant, Farrell, and Ellis) arose from their reclining positions and crossed arms in silent tribute and hope. It mattered little that they won the race, for somehow we knew they would, but it was that simple display of all that English High School spirit means or can ever hope to mean, that made the track season instantly a glorious one, a wondrous one and a championship one. Introduced into the Boston School system this year was a new sport and yet one which millions of people cheer the world over. The same spirit was manifest during the season and once more English High wound up in or near the top, finishing in a triple tie for the City Championship. Captain Leonard Kerr presents to Basket¬ ball Coach Arthur J. Sullivan a token of regard from the squad upon the completion of Mr. Sullivan’s first year as coach. E .quipped with a military training , the equal of any given elsewhere in fair Boston , this year s senior class waits impatiently to take up the torch of freedom, and follow the flag wherever it may lead. Their task is crystal clear; their mission vividly defined. They face the future with confidence in them¬ selves , in their school , and in their country. They join their brothers on the land , on the sea , in the air , to make bright our land with Tree- dom ' s holy light. STAFF NO. 1 Fourth Row: Paul J. Drago, Albert Wineberg, James L. Whelan, Morton J. Greenberg, Herbert B. Anderson, William Haddon, John J Donahue Third Row: Kenneth Greenberg, Gaetano Guarnaceia, Alan M. Mintz, Stanley Sorkin, Wlliam Matfess, herris I. Sawaya, Robert C. Powers. Second Row: David H. Greene, Wdfred Lefkovich, James M. Stafford, John F. Commins, Myron Finkelstein, Charles W. Bernard, Francis A. Welling, David Shnaper, Arnold S. Brown. Front Row: Vincent Ampola, Leo R. Arsenault, Charles E. Martin, Captain Hennessey, Abram O. King, Benja ijamin L. Toy, Samuel H. Horowitz. STAFF NO. 2 Fourth Row: Dominick J. Alizio, Edward D. Kane, Stanley F. Sadowski, John Donahue, Aaron M. Miller. Third Row: Richard D. Barbera, Robert J. Colleran, Calogero A. Principato, Matthew J. Coffey, Allen M. Blumenthal, Frank X. Donahue. Second Ro w: George W. Westgate, Charles W. Desaulniers, William N. Norton, Jr., Lavone 0. Williams, Walter V. Carty, Irving E. Pickering, John W. Resmini, LeRoy J. Nutile, Richard G. Swartz. Front Row: John E. Donovan, William A. Levreault, Joseph E. Downing, Captain Hennessey, Robert H. Gumming, Donnnic P. Cerulli, t arlo A. Boschetti. FIRST REGIMENT Fourth Row: Robert J. Maier, Leonard F. Marino, William F. Mahoney, Louis Vazza, John J. Hicks, John J. Callahan, Frederick H. Howalt, Jr., Bernard F. Walsh, Sheldon Sokol. Third Row: Sidney Ostrowsk.v, Albert J. Rose, Gerald Harris, Stanley Fay, Walter H. Thorpe, Francis X. Pink, Kenneth J. Ritchie, Charles P. Changelian. Second Row: Mr. Downey, Joseph W. Burne, Robert J. Colleran, Henry M. DeAngelis, Herschel Sternlieb, James Adams, Robert L. Kelly, Robert H. Gumming, Frank Samuels, Captain Hennessey. Front Row: Milton Stem, Edward F. Erhard, Robert H. Sprenger, William C. Burns, James H. Graham, Theodore A. Greene, Abram O. King, Louis Kaplan. SECOND REGIMENT Fourth Row: Joseph D. Toomey, Donald C. Rockstrom, Richard P. Crowley, Robert M. Shore, Albert S. M. Wong, Henry C. Malagodi, E. Morris, Elliot R. Finn, Robert D. Wallace. Third Row: Sidney Bornstein. James S. Pino, David R. Plumb, John D. Geary, James E. O Toole, Arnold E. Block, Eugene D. Clark, Howard S. Chin. Second Row: Gladstone S. Scott, Julius Greenstein, Arthur F. Carr, Ernest D’Amato, James Barlas, Jacob D. Wigod, John I. Robertson, Julius H. Green, Manuel J. Neuman. Front Row: George L. Greenfield, Thomas J. Foley, Herbert Friedman, Mr. Downey, Captain Hennessey, Courtland H. Ellis, Paul L. Stapleton, Alan Klein. THIRD REGIMENT Fourth Row: Joseph A. Smith, Milton Factor, Daniel Reed, Ralph Harmon, George J. Katz, Richard G. Kaufman, Andrew Hartung. Third Row: William G. Kearns, William P. Sullivan, Arthur G. Ciampa, John Levreault, Maurice T. Nelligan, Eustace M. Haynes, Robert A. Messinger, Norman Green. Second Row: Oscar J. Sjodin, Samuel J. Tobias, Sidney Greene, Martin Shaffer, Melvin Feldman, Enoch 0. Woodhouse, Arthur D. Matzkin, Thomas C. Geanacopoulos. Front Row: Joseph C. Gallagher, Charles Rudnick, Howard H. Chauncey, Mr. Downey, Captain Hennessey, Thomas E. Flynn, Sidney Clark. FOURTH REGIMENT Fourth Row: Thomas H. Spurr, Stanley M. Rice, John F. Ragusa, William D. Drinan, Roy H. Sutherland, Joseph Liebster, Lawrence M. Brown, Joseph Vozzella, David W. O’Neill. Third Row: Harry T. Kolombratsos, Oreste V. DiSciullo, Albert F. Mclsaac, Stanley M. Rozanski,Vincent I. Spagnolo, John J. Happnie, Nunzio J. Picardi. Second Row: John D. Kazar, John J. Keane, Harold Stern, Philip S. LeDuc, Donald G. Riedell, Richard M. Heiligmann, Philip J. Kent, Wilfred Hamm. Front Row: Donald J. Burns, John C. Francis, Charles V. Hardy, Mr. Downey, Captain Hennessey, George Keches, Louis G. Cataldo, Anthony C. Quartarone. Alma Mater (Air: Maryland , My Maryland) Alma Mater, tried and true, English High, our English High, Oft our hearts shall turn to you, English High, our English High. Should e’er the laurel wreath be mine, I’ll lay the honor at thy shrine, Our hearts, our hopes, our prayers are thine, English High, our English High. Men may come and men may go, English High, our English High, Yet in deep and peaceful flow, m English High, our English High, Shall thy stream of learning wide, Through the ages grandly glide, Ever to thy sons a pride, English High, our English High. T he demands of war have played havoc with many concerns; none has been completely unaffected. Some have profited and reaped a golden harvest , while others have succumbed to the vicissitudes of a world at war. In spite of their many difficulties , our friends have not withdrawn their aid , without which we could not continue. We shall not fail our friends. FRIENDS • • • PLAN YOUR PLACE IN THE POST-WAR " PARADE " ! BRYANT STRATTON 3 3 4 The Commercial School of Boston BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON The demand for business-trained young men and women after the war will be tremendous . . . with opportunities for greater income and faster advancement more promising than ever before. Plan your place in that world NOW! Under the Bryant Stratton system, you will complete yottr commercial training sooner . . . start working sooner . . . start earning soonerl Diploma Courses . . . Stenographic, Secretarial, Junior Accounting, Business Administration Single intensive subjects in Typewriting, Shorthand or Advanced Accounting. We wi arrange your training to fit your post-war business objectives. WRITE FOR DAY OR EVENING OR SUMMER CATALOG RICHARD H. BLAISDELL .. . President ft u« » the under-grads ,n w tween ' ll that exists between There is a bond °i 3 °° W ' men ot New Eng- KennedVs and the smart Tet demands tor their . . ha ve given t a Place rn their warf«J are iust as V wtoch enthusiastic m geared to the trmes. SH OP nM ous undeb-gRA g? KENNEDY’S { 110 } In the Long Run . . . you and your friends will prize the portrait that looks like you —your truest self, free from stage effects and little conceits. It is in this “long run’’ photography that PURDY success has been won. Portraiture by the camera that one cannot laugh at or cry over in later years. For present pleasure and future pride protect your photographic self by having PURDY maketheportraits. • PLEASING PORTRAITS • PROMPT SERVICE • RIGHT PRICES Means Satisfaction Guaranteed PURDY 160 TREMONT STREET.BOSTON Official Photographer of the Class of 1944 {111} KEEP BUYING WAR BONDS WHEN YOU NEED SMART SHIRTS, TIES, SOCKS, AND SPORTSWEAR, VISIT OUR CONVENIENTLY LOCATED FIVE BOSTON STORES. LAMPSON ' S BOSTON’S LARGEST HABERDASHERS APPROVED BY THE CITY OF BOSTON • The land on which the Franklin Institute was built was donated to the institution by the City of Boston. The funds for the building came from the money set aside for 100 years by Dr. Benjamin Franklin, printer, publisher and philosopher. • He was anxious that men and women without large financial background be provided with a means to obtain an education. The city gave its seal of approval to the same idea by joining in the enter¬ prise. The youth of Boston and vicinity have profited. Write tor Illustrated Catalog • Berkeley St., Boston 16, Hon. 6590 PRANKL1 Technical Institute Industrial Engineering Courses in Mechanical, Electrical and Chemical Fields { 112 } J. RICHARD O ' NEIL 1 CO. 1 • Class Rings Ultra 1 J. RICHARD O ' NEIL CO. CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE SESSIONS BEGIN APRIL 5 Pre-Veterinary School Sessions Begin April 5 and August 7 • • • Prepare for a successful career in Veterinary Medicine! High school graduates may enroll in the one-year pre- veterinary course. Middlesex offers standard courses lead¬ ing to D.V.M. degree. Veterinary Medicine will present attractive opportunities in private practice after the war. Write tor catalog: EDGAR A. CROSSMAN, M.D.V., Dean, Waltham, Mass. MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY 113 } Autographs . . .


Suggestions in the English High School - Blue and Blue / Record Yearbook (Boston, MA) collection:

English High School - Blue and Blue / Record Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

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English High School - Blue and Blue / Record Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Page 1

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English High School - Blue and Blue / Record Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1943 Edition, Page 1

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English High School - Blue and Blue / Record Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Page 1

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English High School - Blue and Blue / Record Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1946 Edition, Page 1

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English High School - Blue and Blue / Record Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

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