Emporia State University - Sunflower Yearbook (Emporia, KS)

 - Class of 1974

Page 1 of 328

 

Emporia State University - Sunflower Yearbook (Emporia, KS) online yearbook collection, 1974 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 328 of the 1974 volume:

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' , ,Qqrv "ge 44 A i ff - V ' ' . .7 if 'f 113 +2 0 2"',p fp, Q 2 iss A A 'f '42 if v i+k :"i",g 9-.x WIFHFH9' K"?N , ' Q Lfl ug fflf' ,xy bf , gig, TA" if ',.f A 3 M' 1 m'1wl5H Mg Y 3 Q ' " Kgsfi " ' xv K xg -. fiff' wg! -,f-'L A if ' "ax A A 6 46 6 I R' 1 J ,S , ,:vi XVII: , ,Q ,N x 4 : X 1-if : 2-mrgrv Q Q, W . ' ff 'wg . ?. v:f ni v 5 T519 ' if L1 as ' 1? 'Z uf, , M4-I ., Q M' 3, , 9 5 lf? ?t!R,tf:?vw.M ,A 'J pg, , 1 JN vim- A fffgffif + qua-hMA5,fJl,24 -A , 4 f -V ,- - ' 'inf' , ,- 9 , A X5 wefll fade into Nea 0 midni bl blue q fallin rafcent oon f , 4.1 I N . A V ---- - KANSAS STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 1974 Sunflower EMPORIA , KANSAS KEN HAMM, Edirol MARGENE ZUMBRUNN, assistant DEBBIE HoLLowAY, staff editor B ROBERT ECKLUND, ...MSM STAFF Monte Borders Danny O'Connor S.P. Calloway Norene Olsen Jill Dales B Jo Snell Marilyn Harper Jim Sweolenburg Shelli Miller Janie Tippet QF , E-531.33 Mfnfvn N dHi..Z.1:ii-iru.A,.... i KA-wav'-A .,4 Q Nei., ,x Y rx., ., r z .A ,Q 5 5 i n 1 f f 1 L E f1mw,', f, .M-" -ey, , ,W . -K Ll 1 Y if 'V if in 9f l l 'W "" """ ' ""' "" ' """ 'H'"""'g"""""M"'w'N J Somewhere W . - . l In thas maze ol masses movmg l H i A vi, Z ,,T , ,A,,o... Tig: f iff: :.Qq...,..g.-,x , . e. sf-....-. , - l - --f--I-----, .'1"'T'z 'f--1 . Sf' A":'TT- T -'S '? '. I . -' , ' ' . zhlgr -1.-:.p,-f1g,Q-V.,-. -v --gf, V Y-,, K ,vYYY,,U, K , ,,,, ,,-.,,,-,,--.,V-A, f.-A., YV-,, X ,---- -----H'f'N"'--"T' """""' NX l 4 l I l l i R A . 1 5 5 l i l 5 l I l , , w ' x l I 1 i r w 1 l i w w 1 l w r Lies a body that is wailing 1 Q To clirecf each fallen soul. ' ' Pa llen fly - Qwwmwmw- -M--un-w Preparing happeningefor the . I crowclf- A There are fhose who lmnow. b f , V , , K 3,71 Vx-"kf5j-5, M, ' -- 'vu . W .. I 'A V- . ff, ,M .f 1 , ,- -, . 41 . .,, , , , A , A ., ., ,v , , -,VI . .,.14,,..',fL- ,.1f- 3,',f.-fQ,,--,-1- -' .-f -V , ,I -I, ,E -.-N ,. .e , 'Q , - . , - gs. msn.-. - ' 1' f ,' ', ' rr . '., ' . , " 'x'A -' ",-.,-.-n. . . " 3 --N 1. -,,. V ...e .,-v. ,ex f-41' 1.1 1,--1'-l, iv.-2.1--,-4-..',---,'L -.-,' . - -f .':z"- . 4 - -, - '.'. J. , . -' , .if -e -g ' 45, ,,SIk..f,-54u.-,e:::4g:-,gegiiff-17.-:ffgQ-iii, fi-Q-L-, A , J 5553- 1:25357 sy'-1-'11 - -1-A Lf e f,.4...,,qa..s-4.-......1...... Qt " , gps-751.411, -""' .--"-f Y Y 4,-if in FA R EMER CU gl t 3 V? Ol l lx lf lllfl',SlDl:N gt 4 tis.- g Quite a familiar spot to KSTC students. 201 Plumb houses the office of the President, OFFICE CF THE PRESIDENT JOHN E. VISSER, PRESIDENT KANSAS STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE Dear Students and Faculty: The Sunflower has requested that each of us use this means to describe the operation of his office. As your President. I am pleased to do this. Most ot' you are aware that the President is the chiet' executive officer of the College and is responsible to the Kansas State Board ot' Regents tor its entire operation. Ile also teels. however, a keen sense ot' responsibility to the students. the taculty. the college community. our alumni and all of the publics which our college serves, lle is anxious. therefore. to keep in close communication with each ot these segments at all times. Our College is yery fortunate in having excellent leatlersltip at all levels ot' its tttlintnistratite organization which cooperates with your Prcsttlent in Ntentnist 5,1 :HITS ,r, .D. tl pill,-,ll -ltli' l"lLlf'Lll K. ct riety 1-ommitte its decisit ot' this me have a sta opportuni developii programs One r administr year is a Ruth Scl Women. Affirmati capacity affirmati College a advisory it. The p College a the inte opportuni as eniplo' These t critical y our enrc mushroo leveled somewh, action l impact k our facu also re dramat educatio Despit enrollme College ' are able immedis and to ir program taculty out' t'oll continue will hz ttlI'zit'll' tint' . 'tllltdllt nittqll ti t- tlx 1 -w t, 'resident ty: requested means to his office. pleased to e that the executive 2 and is .sas State its entire however. sibility to ulty. the r alumni which our anxious. in close h of these rtunate in ahip at all nistrative 'ooperates lent in g.itiniiiiistci'itig our Various tnntjiwiiiis. ln addition our system in gorernaiice actively involves Urn- F3CfLlilX' and Student Senates. a caricty of councils and committees. and several boards in its decision-making processes. All of this means that those of us who have a stake in this College have an opportunity to participate in developing its policies and programs. One new addition to our administrative organization this year is a very important one. Dr. Ruth Schillinger. our Dean of Women. is also serving as our Affirmative Action Officer. In this capacity she has developed our affirmative action program for the College and now. with the aid of an advisory council. is administering it. The program assures that the College abides with the spirit and the intent of providing equal opportunities for everyone either as employees or students. These past two years have been critical years for KSTC. Suddenly our enrollment which has veen mushrooming for over a decade leveled off and then declined somewhat unexpectedly. This action has had a devastating impact both on our budget and on our faculty and staff positions. It also resulted in some rather dramatic changes in our educational programs. Despite the leveling off of our enrollment we are a better College today than ever before. We are able to give more time to the immediate needs of our students and to improving the quality of our programs. We have the most able faculty and staff in the history of our College. Our physical facilities continue to improve and soon we will have one of the more attractive campuses in this region. Our new health. physical education. and recreation complex which we finally opened this year not onli. enhances our instructional program in these areas but it prw.'iflt-s tlic tfollege with a i'cci't-ationnl and intramural "These pcisf two years have been critical for K.S.T.C." facility. including an olympic-size swimming pool. which we have never had before. We are currently planning a new education. classroom building which when completed will pretty well satisfy our classroom needs for some years to come. This has been a wonderful year for our athletic and student activity program. The football team started off by having one of its finest seasons. The spirit which it generated spilled over into other student activities and we had a lot of involvement all across the campus. Our Student Union was the center of most activity although the new HPER building opened and the ttplay factory" got under way, it attracted a lot of action. The Presidents Office, too, is the focal point of much which happens in our College and I want you to know that it is available to you at any time. It is located on the second floor of the Administration Building tPlumb Halll. I would be pleased to visit with you when I am there or else you can make an appointment which assures that I will be there. In any event, you are a welcomed guest at any time. Sincerely yours, fffczi DW John E. Visser, President President and Mrs. Visser pose in their home with their dog Iggy. I The Pfesidenfs office is fhe focal poinf of much which happens in our college." WZ ,lfT'?w "WCW fi W - X N. Q. f Tiff M2 , M ,ff ,,f ,, . ,M f 'Qi M vs . Niafm ,Egg , ew , 'S mi. 41.239 y , ., A 2 Q E .fwfa f - 951 1 , ,A 1-,gt X W 2 N S' Kr hi ' ,M I yy, ., ' Ze .ll I v' 1 1 ' 1 3 f i' . -,- .-...- ..?,......--,--,,, ..-,..- f- - , ' - ' ,fn TN5 , wg ix Q fs: w 1, 5 iw x ' 1 Aix M gps N ,X , Q M x Q, X X X X55 Q Mn f f,, wa 1 f M fm., ff , f Jr fiffffl, 4 , V2 25 , ,,,,,w V ,V M . , ,, , ff hw-W :ff ff My Dear Students, Staff and Faculty of Kansas State Teachers College It has been my pleasure to work with a number of students who either have been collecting data andfor how have offered me assistance in data collection. My office is established to offer service to any member of the college community relative to data collection or analysis and this has been, I feel, a fruitful year in our student-faculty relationships of communication. It is my feeling that a decision based on both judgment and data are wiser decisions. This year we have all grown in our use of data to make better decisions. I hope that in the future we can again concentrate on this main premise. May we always keep the lines of communication open, between administration, faculty. and students. Also so that all may know, let me express the function of the Office of Institutional Studies. The Office was established in 1971 and has four main purposes. 26 The first duty is to offer services in collection. analysis and interpretation of data for decision- makers. The second responsibility is to encourage institutional studies by providing assistance to members of the college community. Thirdly, to assist personnel within the college in long-range planning activities by providing relevant data. And the fourth function is to maintain a file of informational data and to complete forms requested by agencies within as well as external to the College. Let me say thank you to all students and faculty who have helped me in my role as Director of Institutional Studies. IfI may be of assistance to you in your future endeavors, please feel free to contact my office. I wish you success in the future. J. Stanley Laughlin Director. Institutional Studies 1 e f 'Zz fe!!! mama J. Stanley Laughlin. Director of Institutional Studies, helps to keep the lines of communication open at KSTC. f Institutional rommunication INSTITUTICNAL TUDIES li. DEVELCPMENT AND " Emporio Slofe College Endowment Association" ,W PUBLIC AFFAIRS A constant figure seen on the KSTC campus, James Myer is assistant to the President for Development and Public Affairs. To Fltudcnts 3 The Assist. Public Affairt Special Event Services Offic three offices Kansas State specific purpt Affairs Offic found in this manage tht Association community rt The Empoi organized at nonprofit org provide a pla that it will l funds for Ka purposes wh years of ex association millions of d association h on the camp functions of t During tl Association thousands of provided S87 The associa improvemen Contributif students. pa past 20 year: of a million 1 assets of ove these assets the associat years. If yol effort which College. plea Sinc Jan' Ass tf1l'Q -.1-- 111 fittidt-nts and Faculty: Tltc Assistant to the President for Development and Public Affairs is responsible for coordinating efforts of the Special Events and Alumni Affairs Office and Information Services Offices on our campus. The main function of these three offices is to provide continuous information about Kansas State Teachers College to its many publics. The specific purposes of the Special Events Office and Alumni Affairs Office and Information Services Office may be found in this book. The specific purpose of my office is to manage the Emporia State College Endowment Association and to work to maintain and improve community relations within the city of Emporia. The Emporia State College Endowment Association was organized and chartered in 1953. The purpose of this nonprofit organizationdthe purposes are twofold. One. to provide a place where people may put money in confidence that it will be used for a worthy cause. Two. to provide funds for Kansas State Teachers College of Emporia for purposes which are not tax supported. During the twenty years of existence of the Endowment Association the association has provided thousands of students with millions of dollars for loans. scholarships, and grants. The association has also benefited every academic department on the campus and provided support for many worthwhile functions of the institution. During the 1972-73 school year, the Endowment Association provided 3192.743 for scholarships. generated thousands of dollars for National Direct Student Loans and provided 3587.421 for conventional faculty and student loans. The association only exists for the service and the improvement of Kansas State Teachers College. Contributions to the Endowment Association come from students. parents. alumni. and friends. Gifts through the past 20 years have ranged from 50 cents to nearly a quarter of a million dollars. At the present time the association has assets of over one million five hundred thousand dollars and these assets should continue to increase as contributions to the association have increased by 100991 over the past four years. If you are interested in supporting any program or effort which will ultimately benefit Kansas State Teachers College. please make your interests known to me. Sincerely. ff 321 si ics Nl cj, sei X Hiiwltii-i to the President no ffloprncnt and Public Affairs INFORMATION SERVICES Everything you read in the papers about KSTC wasn't written by the collegels Office of Information Services. But it's a good bet that most of it was. Almost 5,000 news releases are written by the office each year and mailed to the press, radio and television stations, magazines and professional journals in Kansas and throughout the country. In addition, the office handles sports publicity. photography and most of the college's publications. , 1 ' Andy Fields types much of the information which passes through this office 30 The aim of all this is to spread the "good news" about KSTC to the far corners of the world. It's done through news releases concerning students, their activities and plansg faculty members, their innovative teaching methods, research projects and other activities of noteg the administration, their plans for the college, comments on academic programs, and efforts to improve the overall academic climate at the college. And it goes farther than that. News releases promote coming events, plays, concerts, lectures, recitals, watermelon feeds and bicycle rallies. They herald new degree programs, new courses and fields of study, unusual classes and individual study projects. They remind students and townspeople of holidays and warn them when classes are about to resume. They reveal the innermost thoughts lacademic-wiser of students, faculty and administrators in in-depth interviews on topical subjects. And they trumpet the glories of Hornet athletic teams, ring out like sounding brass the announcement of new buildings lthe PE complex. for examplel. and quietly tell, on occasion. of an enrollment decline or a cutback in funds fthe sadder news along with the good, but always the truth l. A great deal of the news release output concerns students. The Office of Information Services prepares and mails several thousand hometown stories about students visiting high school or community college students and others to hometown newspapers Received a scholarsh1p'l A story goes to your hometown paper whether its in Kansas or East Orange New Jersey A member of the band? A hometown story Field trips in archeology or a foreign language or social science study toui of the Soviet Union" Hometown stories The local hometoyvn papeis 55i3p1'vtl2llf'll Plum, Scsi of informal black and yvl news sim ies all the ph publications. photographs departments elsewhere. Services pre color slides colleges mu And that's of the offi multi-media utilize fror projectors, c taped mus produced production: orientation prospective As director ofl 4 2 ' K s . . , . I ' ' 1 r. y . Y . , . , .. YH ' . ., T , , , , . Y 'Y ' V ,. M- f ' ' T m ":" " " ""' V - .- h- -- " ' V. '-r - " , , ,, ',,-1 , t ., g gf- 3 -, 1-Ja' rg-, , -hp-. -':q,52f,.,v1.-1' - '.- - . -4 N ,A --,-,.,- , . .V - I , .' . . .'.., ...,11..1,.x,4 1.14.1 ,::gL.:g4-f.1:...a.:..4..p,,f,:..g..f,a.:.:...4...:.4g4:gq+...44...:LI::L.-,g.,4q5mh,gLg,,ag,:,,,g4.4,.a5f.a..QL...c,H..1.4.--..L...-...-,.-'..,.....- 1-v' to spread the TC to the far 1. It's done s concerning as and plansg ir -innovative arch projects of noteg the plans for the Jn academic o improve the mate at the tan that. News ming events. tres. recitals. Jicycle rallies. 'ee programs. lds of study. dividual study . students and tys and warn are about to the innermost ic-wisel of administrators rs on topical trumpet the tic teams. ring brass the buildings tthe xamplel, and rasion. of an ' a cutback in s along with the uthl. : news release nts. The Office as prepares and d "hometown" 5, visiting high inity college to hometown . a scholarship? ometown paper nsas or East A member of vn story. Field or a foreign ence study tour in? Hometown metown papers .ippreciate them. And so do parents. Photo Services. an important part liz information services. provides hlqzck and white photos to accompany mens stories and hometown writeups. all the photography for college publications. passport photos. and photographs requested by academic departments for use in classes and elsewhere. In addition. Photo Services provides several thousand color slides each year for use in the colleges multi-media productions. And that's another important part of the offices activities. Several multi-media productions which utilize from three to six slide projectors. occasionally a movie. and taped music and narration are produced each year. These productions are designed for orientation of new students, prospective students. alumni. the Teacher Corps project, and other college uses. The office also produces, as a public service. multi- media shows for the Emporia Chamber of Commerce and the local United Way campaign. , The office is also responsible for the production of most of the publications issued by KSTC. Office personnel annually produce four issues each of the Alumni News and the Spotlight, numerous departmental and divisional brochures. calendars. sports press guides. informational folders for prospective students. many other individual brochures. folders. pamphlets and posters. and the Round Table. the internal newspaper for faculty and staff. The Office of Information Services also plans press conferences. maintains good relations with As director of Information Services. Larry Merideth supervises the publicity of Emporia State. members of the press throughout the state. works with television and radio stations. prepares public service announcements for radio. and gets involved in frequently strange activities only loosely related to information services. But those things make the job interesting. Members of the office are Larry Meredith. Directorg Robert Ecklund. Assistant Director and Sports Information Directorg Vicki Herl. Media Services Manager: Dave Stormont, Photo Services Directorg and Mary Lou McClain, Secretary. Student employees this year in Information Services are Andy Fields. Crys Peoples. Pam Hill and Patti Carpenter. Student employees in Photo Services are Steve Denny. Bob Kreger. Tom Leitnaker. Allen Mauslein, Monty Borders and Debbie Metzeder. 2 Can you tell director of Pl 6. vi by , Can you tell the boss is out for the afternoon? Tom Leitmaker pretends he's director of Photo Services. Information And Photo Services M! ABOVE: Crys Peoples proof reads a news release for the Topeka Daily Capital. LEFT Shooting pictures for Photo Services, Steve Denny focuses on the Emporia landscape. SPECIAL EVENTS AND ALUMNI AFFAIRS To the Students and Faculty of Kansas State Teachers College: The prime reason for the 'existence of the Special Events and Alumni Affairs office is service to members of the college community and the alumni. In the area of Special Events. the office is responsible for scheduling the all-school calendar. assisting students and faculty in planning and producing all types of activities. presenting the Artist Series. Audubon Film Lectures. popular movie series. Parents Day. Homecoming. and miscellaneous lectures and concerts. The office also plans and supervises summer entertainment and recreation. One of the aims of the department is to provide entertainment that will have universal drawing power for the student body. faculty. and community. The Special Events staff consists of the director. two graduate assistants tDennis Angle and Joyce Walters for the 1973-74 school yearl. about a dozen students assistants ranging from projectionists to student secretaries, and a civil service secretary, Ms. Liz Webb. An advisory committee appointed by the president consists of students and faculty members: it assists the director and staff in selecting entertainment and establishing policy. The Special Events director is the college representative in the Association of College and University Concert Managers. He has served as national treasurer and is on the board of directors. The organization exchanges information concerning entertainment and lectures. holds yearly conferences at the regional and national level. and conducts workshops for concert managers. The Alumni office is continually expanding the services of the Alumni Association. The board of directors have recently added a staff member to assist the executive secretary in field work with alumni. Ms. Carol Roach. BS '66, MS '72, assumed this position in August 1973. The Alumni association publishes a quarterly magazine. The Alumni News: and contributes to the Spotlight, newspaper publication issued to all graduates four times yearly. Alumni gatherings are sponsored over the state both independently and in conjunction with out-otl town sports events and other college departmental activities. Some out-of-state alumni reunions are also arranged each year, usually for the purpose of spotlighting the appearance of a KSTC student group at some national iND the Special members of s responsible Qing students of activities. m Lectures. coming. and ce also plans reation. 5 to provide ng power for director. two 2 Walters for its assistants taries. and a An advisory gs of students ' and staff in y. the college nd University treasurer and on exchanges :ctures, holds nal level, and g the services irectors have Lhe executive 'ol Roach. BS 73. a quarterly butes to the all graduates Jonsored over Jn with out-of- departmental .ons are also Jf spotlighting some national conference. Last year Washington alums gathered to greet the KSTC rnarchingband at the inaugural parade. while the year before KSTC actors appearing in a St. Louis speech festival were honored at a reception given by alumni of that area. Alumni of KSTC contribute to endowment funds for various projects, and in addition set aside S1000 yearly for two work-scholarships in the Alumni office. Active members of the Alumni Association pay annual dues of 35.00. resulting in a life membership at the end of ten years. A graduate may become a life member by payment of 350. If both husband and wife are graduates. one S50 payment entitles both to life membership. Seniors may pledge S100 to the Endowment Association upon graduation and thereby become life members of the Alumni Association. The Alumni Association is a member of the local Chember of Commerce and the Kansas Association of Commerce and Industry. The executive secretary serves on the Education Council and the Great State Council. The Association also belongs to the regional and national American Alumni Council. Gary Sherrer, a 1963 graduate. is serving as president of the Alumni Association for 1973- 74. Sincerely. Director of Special Events Executive Secretary. Alumni Association 3 "aimed to provide entertainment that will have universal drawing power for the student body, focuoify ond community. ABOVE: A wide variety of acts were presented in the Emmett Kelly, Jr. Circus on November 13. BELOW: The Mac Frampton Trio appeared in concert November 26. in Albert Taylor Hall. 36 N The Mart W I ' f WY gr '. 5' ,, . -, -' .f 2" - J f' "fda: .',-'Q f,'.:,g,,,',fQ.f,a5f 1: 7 ,-l f .,,,-'.-f,:: l.L"-,-Q'-7: , "U:!?,,.T2' ' ',. "' 7- -' .e ' ' -Y TT' ' ' '. o"' -.- .- af. ..:- --1-.,., .4..:.-11-a...4f,...Qs... .1....:.x4.fl,3a. '- -' i ' T- .... ' "-,Q.. ' ..,........:, ..-... 1 as ' - , ,,,-..-,......,.......,- - - ' i u ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS The Office of the Dean of Administrative Affairs has overall responsibility for maintaining and improving the physical aspects of the living and learning environment on the campus. Included is a wide range of activities, from the daily t'housekeeping" duties inside and outside of the buildings, through long- range planning for development of the campus and new buildings. Cleaning the academic buildings is done by thirty civil service custodians lsome are studentsl and a like number of part-time student employees. Together, they clean, daily, about 750,000 square feet of floor space fthe equivalent of 500 average size homes, or more than 15 per custodianl. Gerald Ashlock is Coordinator of Custodial Services, as well as Housing Facilities. The later includes maintenance of buildings and equipment and providing custodial services, in all college- owned housing. Operation of the college switchboard is also his responsibility. Maintenance and repair of all academic buildings is the responsibility of Ken Carder, Director of Physical Plant. His staff must not only provide routine services such as painting and repair, and remodeling, but it is also their assignment to keep an ever-greater amount of increasingly complex equipment operatingg this includes heating, cooling, plumbing, Ventilating, lighting, elevators, parking gates, communication systems. etc. A total of about 25 men handle all of these duties. Other Physical Plant employees make deliveries, maintain the college- owned bus, cars. trucks, and tractors: move furnitureg repair locks and make keys, maintain space utilization records and update building and utility records and 38 drawings, provide stage management in Albert Taylor Hall. A crew of 12, assisted by a few student employees, provides tender, loving care for the more than 200 acres of the campus, including the stadium and practice fields. During the summer months, mowing is a continous process, and any spare moments are occupied in weeding, trimming, watering, removing dead trees, and transplanting nursery and greenhouse stock. The same crew takes care of the greenhouse and nursery, providing bedding plants. trees and shrubs for the campus. During the snowy season, they join the rest of the maintenance employees in snow removal. Al Locke is responsible for Traffic, Security and Inventory. The Security Office is open around the clock, every day of the year. A dispatcher is always on duty to maintain communication with officers on patrol, by radio, to respond to telephone calls and to assist persons who come to the office. Patrolmen are on duty at all times, patrolling campus streets and buildings, enforcing parking and traffic regulations, providing guard service, handling mail and bank deposits, and providing limited ambulance service. They are available at any hour to help students, employees, and visitors in any way they can, for example, they 'will relay emergency messages, help locate people, assist in starting stalled vehicles or in obtaining assistance, provide emergency transportation to the hospital, and aid in numerous other ways. The Traffic Office section of the department is responsible for registering all motor vehicles used by students and employees. handling sales of parking permits, and enforcing traffic and parking regulations. This latter function, of course. also involves the onerous task of issuing violation notices and collecting fines. The positive side of this is that the fines supplement permit sales to provide the only funds that can be used to maintain and improve the parking lots. A third function of the office involves maintenance of records of the whereabouts of nearly 50,000 items of state-owned captial equipment used on the campus. New items purchased for use by any department are added to the files. and identified by a numbered sticker. All transfers of equipment must be recorded by the office and lost or stolen items are deleted. after appropriate investigation. Annual inventories by the departments are verified, and updated reports are submitted to the State Department of Administration. The Director of Safety Compliance. Charles Bell, devotes half time to lessening physical hazards in the campus community. More specifically. he recommends action to be taken by departments, to eliminate defects or shortcomings in facilities that might contribute to accidents. In some instances, these can be corrected with minimum expenses. from budgeted fundsg in others, it maybe necessary to request a legislative appropriation to effect a solution. He also recommends changes in work practices of employees, and laboratory practices of students and faculty. which will further reduce the likelihood of accidental injury. The work of his office is assisted by committees. involving a large number of people in the total effort. Dr. Bell also serves half time as Professor of Industrial Education. The activities of these offices and personnel are coordinated by the Dean of Administrative Affairs. who i-f A good sens- Administrati RS onerous task iotices and itive side of supplement ie only funds iaintain and the office f records of early 50.000 ed captial rampus. New use by any to the files. tered sticker. lent must be and lost or rleted. after ion. Annual artments are reports are Department of J Compliance. half time to zards in the ity. More mends action iartments. to ortcomings in contribute to stances. these ith minimum ted fundsg in sary to request tion to effect a recommends practices of itory practices ty, which will likelihood of e work of his J committees. Jer of people in Lell also serves ir of Industrial ese offices and inated by the ve Affairs. who is also directly responsible for facilities planning and construction. serving as liaison person between the on-campus committees. the Kansas State Directors of Architectural Services and private architects. and the contractors who finally construct new buildings on the campus. He also serves as Executive Secretary of the Campus Planning Committee. the Space Utilization Committee, and the Traffic and Parking Appeals Board. These committees make policy recommendations which become guidelines under which the Administrative Affairs Division operates. Another responsibility of the office is representing KSTC on the long-range Physical Planning Committee of the Kansas state- supported colleges and universities. Our goals are: to maintain the campus facilities in the best possible condition. and to improve them as rapidly as availability of funds and personnel permitg to constantly review and revise our operating practices to make best possible use of these facilitiesg and to provide. within the scope of our administrative responsibility, all services to students, faculty, staff and visitors which we hare able to staff and finance. Every member of the campus community can assist in this effort by keeping litter and unnecessary damage to facilities at a minimum. We're all in this together. C526 39 ,, ,, , ,, -.. .. -..1 :...,.,'...,'..7.f..-...z:...' f...:..Tg....a-.-i,..4+,.:...,..?a5g..g55-,z:,.p5ff1........,..-......,-,,5-14..,...v......., HV. .. ,-,-,. ... K, kv , . . - X . -, 1 - .J--1- 'x --:Ll--, W.--'M ff-. '- -Q .- A-is ' . - , "P 1 : , H if Fi? iff? W Q 'f Q' I 4 1 f 4 f r , W U , W--if-H 3-04,11-, ff,LA-1--ff 15,--f--uf.-' ,-' -. , ., -f f- - , f ,,.....,....-,k,.-..-,----.,..,....... ACADEMIC AFFAIRS The Academic Affairs Office 13 vice president and a secretarylis the central administrative office directly responsible for the instructional program, other offices handle buildings, dollars, student affairs and public relations. Instruction is actually offered, of course, by the faculty through the Schools, Divisions and Departments. The Vice President's responsibility is to guide policy development and coordinate day-to-day operations. This is done by working closely on campus with the Deans and the Faculty Senate and off campus with the vice presidents of the other five Regents' institutions through what is known as COCAO fCouncil of Chief Academic Officersl. .i,o.m.MZa -4,-ffmnwwfw BUSINESS OFFICE K . ,S,,,,f 1 T The Division of Fiscal Affairs is one of the four major administrative divisions of the College. The division is charged with administering the financial and business affairs of the College. Walter Clark, Business Manager, is responsible for the operation of the Division which includes the following offices: Business Office Personnel and Payroll Office KSTC Press ' Employee Relations Office The Business Office which is responsible for the accounting, purchasing, cashiering and office services functions is supervised by John Blaufuss, Controller. The National Direct Student Loan Office is also supervised by Mr. Blaufuss. Don Cravens, Personnel Officer, heads up the Personnel and Payroll Office, which is responsible for payroll, personnel functions for Civil Service employees, and all fringe benefit programs of the College. Carl Hoffmans, Print Shop Supervisor, is responsible for the KSTC Press which provides the College a very valuable service in the printing and duplicating area. The Employee Relations Office is a new office which has been established to Work with College employees in the areas of union activities, grievances, etc. Mr. Jerry Vineyard is the Employee Relations Officer. Don Hutchinson, who is the Budget Officer and the Administrative Assistant to the Business Manager. is responsible for the preparation of the College budgets and provides accounting systems services to other departments of the College. The Division of Fiscal Affairs is a service organization which exists to provide services to the faculty. staff. students, and administrative offices of the College. 15' ,, x I , M -4 ' ' WE , .,,' af i -fif as i ' Tw. f if , 1 A 'MP or . ,lby ,gy L! f , .Lf X. , ,. ff -, ,7v.,, ' my QW Wg ,f ,VV f H fr. W.. - g ,. uf., 1 " f ,fl . . .hi -V sbp! WWF' ,Q S' H5 'Q '6 "fy -f 42'5?,:Qg-fr2'2 57 ff, me , U fa 'Taft' gy Lf 'MEG .. , .G,, s .-fd "'fq X 'eu I fi- . p..,... v .vi ,ivy ,ua . aw, , gf , Vi., 4 ,M "f,gcze.,. , ' fi, "lla J ' 1 . Ql.. A, L N Tk . ,.,, ,.. - ' -- r'1:,.4-N.-V-f.f1.-..' ...ala'4342-Il:'-2.12.c..LaL4:-Egg.-l...g153,L:-fgg.iQ.Zf7.- -'2ggg,-,-.--,gy -,haf -. :JL VT. ' 'i'Q. Q ' Q ,i 91 p in WI .t W F Q ,x H., 'Q'-.4 ' , Q ege. The division lich includes the ld office services in Office is also s responsible for :College the College a very Iollege employees sOfficer. iness Manager, is services to other fthe faculty, staff, Wggw My Q, wg ,f 9 Q Q Q ' ' Q ' . f Q jg Q . fl WW Ls-1-.4g.g.1+-n-1 V -',' V. ' . - ry.-f...,g ,-..---,....-... --... SCHOCJL QF APPLIED ARTS AND SCIENCES Business, PI1ysicaI Eciuca lion, Home Economics, Industrial Education Dear Sunflower Reader: The School of Applied Arts and Sciences is composed of two divisions and two departments-The Division of Business and Business Educationg The Division of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Athleticsg The Department of Home Economics and The Department of Industrial Education. Sixty faculty and seven staff positions are allocated to the School. The largest number 1281 are assigned to Business and Business Education and the smallest number 141 are assigned to Home Economics. Nearly 1800 students are currently majoring in the four units of the School and thousands of others are enrolled in our general education and other supportive courses. The School is housed in completely Business, Industrial new, modern facilities. Home Economics and Education can be found in Cremer Hall while the Division of Health, PI1YSical Education, Recreation and Athletics is located in the completely new ands attractive Physical Education complex. The modern, up- l0-date equipment found in each Department or Division of the School makes it possible for our highly qualified and dedicated faculty to M904 offer programs relevant to the needs of our students and the employers that we supply. Systems of equipment rotation in the School are being practiced which will make it possible for us to continue providing these relevant experiences to our students. Bachelor of Science Degrees in Education are offered in each unit of the School while three of the four Departments offer Bachelor of Science programs which prepare individuals for employment in other- than-teaching pursuits. The fourth unit, Physical Education, has developed programs in Health and Recreation for which they are now seeking approval. Each unit, with the exception of Home Economics, offers masters level programs, and Business and Business Education provides work leading to an Education Specialist Degree. Four programs, two years in length, are offered by the Division of Business. Certificates of completion are provided to those who successfully complete these programs. All of the courses taken as parts of these programs will apply toward a four year degree if the students chooses to change his objective. ci career minded school If one were to list the major strengths of this school he would have to place the faculty and staff at the top. The faculty are highly qualified and dedicated professional educators and all staff members are highly competent Q in their areas of specialization. Both faculty and staff are sincerely interested in our students and make every effort to serve them well as advisors and teachers date their courses and programs and Work cooperatively with eachother and faculty from other schools of the College. As a result of this cooperative effort many cross-discipline courses and programs are now being offered by the School in cooperation with other units of the College. The faculty of the School keep in close contact with the World that they are preparing their students to enter and by so doing, keep the courses and programs relevant. The faculty. staff and administration of the four units of the School and the Dean are anxious to receive suggestions and constructive criticism from students. Stop in or write us at any time and tell us how you feel we can improve our services to you. After all, you are the reason for our being here. Sincerely, MW Leo M. Ensman School of Applied Arts and Science 46 Vw School of Applied Arts and Sciences 9 Z S-f una Ascviwm f if ,, 8 . Wh? A K 6 z W y 1, v 4'-' ' N 0, H OO , ,. H Y , V - ,.,..: -a1:L..f:49i7- ifi---f-'lit ff' Yqi z rfze' "' K ' A? J L ' ' .... . . . , , . .. My , I ff , ff ff f P5 vi Y 1: M A X J, 0, , ,..: . . I J fiwlff 1 Mfff, f ' ,771 , V laik! fv l ff f, j fyff vi e M 4, ,1 , , f 1 I :,'f'fiQiZ, , Q H , fav Q , A , 4' f f , 4wa41d6164fWf if JN..-Q.,1 x t ...Nqr SC AI "Prelimina available plans for Dear Sunfl of 1974: It is a opportunit informatio Education functions. and Psych three unde College. Sc the Co reorganiza School Psychologj be formall and was t the forme Education Departmei time the current qu Building. I forward W a new buil some preli made a developme building. ultimately nortliwest sf W ,. f IM, , I ff ff 7 ffh fl f ,V , , V4 ,, f 'ff 7, , 'f wf f - ' I ' ' , ,wc I i , A ' V " f" , - U U ,.4.., - , ' -' 1 ' ::e-:-'11-f-2r'b:-f4gf.lZL:fs1,4.cJ-r.a.3.,.a.4. 'i l ' ' 'f --, .- .'- , --L ' rf. J., A., '- - h V . , --- 1f.,,.....,.,,,--.....--...h-...K ivan SCHCQL 0F EDUCATICN AND PSYCHCLOGY "Preliminary money has been made available for the development of plans for a new Education building." Dear Sunflower Reader of 1974: ' It is a pleasure to have this opportunity to relate to you information about the School of Education and Psychology and its functions. The School of Education and Psychology is the oldest of the three undergraduate schools of the College. Some few years ago when the College underwent reorganization into schools, the School of Education and Psychology was the first school to be formally organized on that basis and was the result of combining the former Division of Teacher Education with the former Department of Psychology. At that time the School moved into its current quarters in the Education Building. However, we are looking forward with much anticipation to 3 new building for the school and some preliminary money has been made available for the development of plans for such a building. The building will ultimately occupy space on the northwest corner of the campus in gi 4 M 4 'mr X KH close proximity to the laboratory school. Hopefully during this coming year we will be working with the Office of the State Architect and with Dr. E. L. Barnhart, Dean of Administrative Affairs, in the refinement of such plans for such a building. During the 1973-74 academic year the School of Education and Psychology consists of 64 budgeted faculty positions distributed among the following five departments: The Department of Counselor Education. Dr. Harry Waters, Chairmang The Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Dr. V. J. Bowman, Chairmang The Department of Educational Administration, Dr. Eugene Werner, Chairmang The Department of Psychology, Dr. pw 49 "in spife of whofever changes may occur of fhe college ciuring the next few yeors, e Dal Cass, Chairman, and the Department of Research and Laboratory Experiences, Mr. Carl Livingston, Interim Chairman. The School also has a Dean, myself, and an Associate Dean, Dr. Fred Markowitz. Mrs. Bertha Bond serves as the secretary in the Office of the Dean. As the Dean of the School, I am directly responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and to the President. The departmental chairmen and the Associate Dean are in turniresponsible to me. In spite of whatever changes may occur at the College during the next few years, teacher education will continue to have a major role and to be given a major emphasis. The mission of the School of Education and Psychology is the same as it has been traditionally throughout the years. that is, to continue to produce top quality teachers. counselors, administrators, and school psychologists for the schools of Kansas and other states. In reaching that goal we are doing many things differently than in the past. The emphasis nationwide on competency based teacher education programs has caused us to move in that direction. During the year the School has experimented with some pilot groups in competency based programs fashioned after a model developed through. the Teacher Corps Project. This has permitted us to offer students options and alternatives in the preparation for teaching and school service and to do this in a competency based program. This School offers programs at the undergraduate level for the preparation of 50 - . ,HI v,,'-Qing:-f. . ...A Qlrglsgvgsgr. .1 ' a- ' ff" A 55:1 gf.. - f ocher educofion wiii confinue fo ploy ci moior role." ,fix ..' elementary and secondary teachers, in early childhood education and special education. In addition, two non-teaching undergraduate degrees are offered by the Department of Psychology and a non-teaching undergraduate degree through the Counselor Education is aimed at preparing rehabilitation service workers. Graduate programs are provided 'at the Master's degree and Specialist in Education degree levels in many of the following areas: Elementary Teaching, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Science, Curriculum and Supervision, Psychology, School Psychologists, Special Education, Counselor Education, Vocationali Rehabilitation Counseling, Educational Administration, and Community College Education. The latter is a relatively new program directed by Dr. Carl Heinrich. It should be mentioned that for the past twenty years KSTC has consistently been the largest producer of college credits on which Kansas teaching certification is based. The College has produced approximately 20 percent of such credit with its nearest competitor producing only about 12 percent of the credits used for certification in Kansas. Mention should also be made of some of our innovative funded programs that are doing much to point some new directions for teacher education on this campus. The Teacher Corps Project. directed by Dr. Roger Pankratz, and funded by the U.S. Office of Education, is a good example. This program adapts itself to the competency performance based criteria and incorporates the idea of portal schools, parity participa' dimensions receiving teacher ed operates il Curriculum year it has l operation o year produi from the project. Through the Departr the Departr for the therapists I began operz is a unique 1 no other ins that provid kind and the people in th. The labor vital comp education p It provic observatioi experienci teachers in also serves school for personnel This year operated gr middle .scht having bee result of positions ri enrollment academic school will 4 This will Organizatioi that of tl Emporia an at a time vs are launchis Program. academic y Research Experienc Curriculum consolidatec Curriculum During thi efforts of tl' and Psy, A - -. ,.......- ,-V..:,......,.,s-m.-.44,.... :Q,Z::1..a-., . ...jf I U I , . V 4 ...PH --4 -0- .......,4,,,.,'3-,,g,t'. F. ,-LM Q -A K .r ext few ' role." ied that for s KSTC has he largest credits on te a c h i n g The College cimately 20 lit with its oducing only credits used isas. i be made of itive funded ,ing much to rections for this campus. as Project. er Pankratz. .S. Office of xample. This self to the ance based ates the idea ls, parity paiticipation and similar dung-nsions that are currently receiving national attention in teacher education. The project operates in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. This year it has been in its third year of operation on this campus and last year produced its first graduates from the Sixth Cycle of that project. Through cooperative efforts of the Department of Psychology and the Department of Art, a program for the preparation of art therapists has been developed and began operating during this fall. It is a unique program in that there is no other institution in the midwest that provides a program of this kind and there is a definite need for people in the art therapy field. The laboratory school is a very vital component of the teacher education programs of the College. It provides many of the observation and participation experiences of pre-service teachers in their preparation and also serves as a demonstration school for in-service teaching personnel throughout the state. This year the laboratory school operated grades EC-K-6, with the middle school grades 7, 8, and 9 having been discontinued as a result of cutback in faculty positions resulting from College enrollment decline. In the 1974-75 academic year, the laboratory school will operate grades EC-K-5. This will give the school an Organizational pattern paralleling that of the public schools of Emporia and the change will come at a time when the public schools are launching their middle school PI'0gram. During the 1974-75 academic year the department of Research and Laboratory Experiences and that of Curriculum and Instruction will be C0nsolidated into a Division of Curriculum and Instruction. During this year one of the major efforts of the School of Education and Psychology was the t i preparation for an accreditation visit by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education which is to take place in the fall of 1974. Currently all teacher education programs of the college are accredited by NCATE and the purpose of the mentioned accreditation visit will be to review the programs and offerings of the college in teacher education for reaccreditation. The visitation is a part of the periodic schedule which NCATE uses in the reaccreditation process: We believe the School of Education and Psychology has sound programs for the preparation of teachers and school service personnel. Such programs have been developed with much thought, effort, and cooperation throughout the College. One of the strengths of the program lies in the excellent teaching faculty which the school currently has and in the resources made available to it by the College to carry out the programs in an orderly fashion. We invite you to visit with faculty in the School. with the departmental chairmen, with the Associate Dean or with me if any of us can be of help to you. We are anxious to tell you about what our school is doing because we believe wholeheartedly in our programs and mission and are more than pleased with the excellent reputation that the College has had throughout the state and nation for the preparation of quality teachers and school service personnel. Thank you again for this opportunity to tell you something of the nature and operation of the School of Education and Psychology. ' Sincerely yours, f2cf0-ara-444.1 ,:a7Au Truman Hayes, Dean School of Education and Psychology 51 llBERAl ART AND SCIENCES The School of Liberal Arts and Sciences is composed of nine administrative units, the Departments of Art, Biology. English, Foreign Languages. Mathematics, Music, and Speech, and the Divisions of Physical Sciences and Social Sciences. Presently, these units range in size from 11 to 30 faculty members. The total faculty consists of 162 budgeted positionsg by the fall of 1974, this number will be reduced to 137. The School of Liberal Arts and Sciences set two primary goals for the 1971-72 academic year. its first as a definite administrative unit under permanent leadership: 111 To develop a cohesive entity of the nine administrative units and the 175 faculty members comprising it so that all components could contribute and cooperate toward the common goal of a first-class liberal arts program. 121 To develop policies, guidelines, and procedures which would describe the School and its methods of conducting its affairs. Some progress was made toward the attainment of these goals. During the 1972-73 academic year, the process of developing the cohesiveness and identity ofthe School continued. General faculty meetings were held during most months of the year when issues and problems common to the entire School were discussed. The chairmen, or their representatives, met with the dean on a regularly weekly basisg although these were administrative working sessions. a better understanding of each others problems and an attitude of cooperation and cohesiveness certainly was a result. A School of Liberal Arts and Sciences Advisory Committee was formed toward the end of the first semester. Nine more School-wide committees were established. joining the seven which had been established during the first year. In addition to its regular academic services to other portions of the College, the units comprising the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and essentially all of its faculty have been rather continuously involved in speaking to, in performing before, and in otherwise serving the high schools, the community colleges, various community groups, and the people of Kansas. The list of these services by individuals and units is far too extensive to be included in this letter. As examples of broader types of scuh service, Art showings. consultations and studies for the Corps of Engineers and for the Fish and Game Commission cBiologyl, the General Education Literature Conference fEnglishl, Butcher School language programs and community bilingual programs lForeign Languagesl, evening class programs designed primarily for local industry employee wide v. performa high sch- programs were vis students Sciencesl Sciencesl Kansas, fSpeechl The Sch Sciences toward students communil activity members comprisin addition, A school br high scho whom cer pace to gc events a Clinic, S1 Composer College st Science a on Sciene Friday ol Foreign a Conferenc Camp, I Drama l Speech ani of these vw time and e the facult Liberal Ar The Schc Sciences I contributic Communit fact. Withc Pflaum l' Debate To Music Fee PI'0gram o musical at and show offerings. Oral Inte The local 1 be bleak. ii The acl school 01' collective ES h these working standing sand an ion and lf was a -eral Arts dvisory ed toward semester. ool-Wide tablished. zhich had ig the first s regular to other 2, the units of Liberal ces and lculty have itinuously ig to, in and in the high immunity :ommunity people of of these ls and units ,ve to be letter. As r types of showings, dies for the and for the Iommission General terature il, Butcher mgrams and l programs sl, evening designed 11 industry employees rMathematicsl, a wide variety of musical performances over the state, high school assembly science programs in which 19 schools were visited and over 2,600 students served lPhysical Sciencesl, the Model UN lSocial Sciencesl, and the Madison, Kansas, Theatre project lSpeechJ may be cited. The School of Liberal Arts and Sciences has done a great deal toward the recruiting of students to our college community. This is a continuing activity of individual faculty members and of the units comprising the school. In addition, the components of the school bring large numbers of high school students, some of Whom certainly consider us as a pace to go to college, with such events as Math Day, Band Clinic, State Music Festival, Composers Project lfor Jr. College studentsl, Workshop on Science and Society, Workshop on Science and Industry, A Friday of Chemistry Project. Foreign and Domestic Affairs Conference, Model UN, Debate Camp, District Speech and Drama Festival, and State Speech and Drama Festival. All of these were made possible by time and energy expenditures of the faculty of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The School of Liberal Arts and Sciences makes a considerable contribution to the College and Community cultural climate, in fact, without Literary Week, the Pflaum National Invitational Debate Tournament. the Spring Music Festival, the continuing Drogramof faculty and student musical and art performances and showings, the theatrical offerings, and the Flint Hills Oral Interpretation Festival. the local cultural scene would be bleak, indeed. The achievement of every school or college rests on the collective attainments of its 9 ,,.fA4"'W ll , - -..-.,--...4:.-f,.1x.,-4...---.M-' +11-:lf--2-w:..M,.-,,,...-,-W-f--YG'f"--Q-fa'"-'-' J w i v 1 I A C 4 r s 1 3 F . A - - ef-f---1-,1-.q.f-Q.-4.-,V . , .,. 5 . ,, ,L-, I Xi. . fx Q., gift z ,Ui LQ ' 7 f. ffff , 1 -Q? kg tx. -fn , .gi f ,f ,K 4 s Q' y elif lf, ii "W ' ' 1 .X ,V faculty. One barometer of such attainment is the professional growth of the faculty. The list of professional meetings' and other professional improvement activities tsuch as workshops, short courses, etc.l which the faculty of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences regularly attends is impressive. Such activities, much of which must be paid from the individual faculty member's pocket, are bound to improve faculty performance. A As a barometer of the attainment generated by the faculty of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 32 members produced a total of 46 articles. reviews, books. and other publications during the 1972-73 academic year. This seems X rather good for a faculty of 174 in an institution which does not emphasize scholarly productivity. In ' addition, several of the 174 faculty members contributed performances, showings, etc. which are tantamount to publications in other disciplines. Two members of the faculty obtained research support from outside granting sources, while several obtained such from internal sources. The School also had six institutes and programs supported by outside funds. ln looking to the future. the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences will continue to expand and entrench its cohesiveness and identity. It will continue to develop, to formalize, and to School of Liberal Arts and Sciences A Fine Art Oriented School give visibility to, a first class liberal arts programg its goal is to provide the best liberal arts education in the Great Plains area, a goal which it feels is realistically attainable for it. It expects to continue to systematize and publicize its pre-professional programs and pre-graduate school strengths to the point where it has the reputation of being the best place in the Great Plains for such education. It will explore other Hcareer-type" programs which are compatible with sound liberal arts and it will institute some of the results of such exploration into viable educational offerings. The School of Liberal Arts and Sciences will continually examine its curriculum and program quantity and quality in the light of the present climate of faculty and financial cut-back and enrollment decline. It will continue to more firmly entrench the Liberal Ar-ts and Sciences position as the intellectual focal point of this campusg this entrenchement is particularly important at this time as KSTC moves from a unifunctional, teacher education college to a multifunctional university-type institution. QM if-.M John E. Peterson Dean, Liberal Arts and Sciences 55 1- fza-.. -., Q. N . . - 11:2 , 'fwPWv ' ' ' ' 41,5 .ny . . I 5,071 47512 ' -"WMV R , .. H., ..,.,..Q-mvww .,g '- I l GRADUATE AND PROFESSIDNAL STUDIES An Open Letter Concerning the School of Graduate and Professional Studies to the Readers of the Sunflower: The School of Graduate and Professional Studies, as currently organized, has four responsibilities: ill The Graduate Programl C23 Continuing Educationg f3J The Function of Research Support and the 'Handling of Grantsg and 143 The Department of Librarianship. One of these responsibilities fResearch and Grantsl came under the purview of the Graduate Office in August, 19723 another 1Continuing Education! became the Office's responsibility only in April, 1973. 56 At this writing, the School is headed by an Interim Dean, John E. Peterson, who is also the Dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Professor Harold Durst carries the title of Interim Associate Dean, and Mr. Louis Fritzemeier has the title of Director of Continuing Education and Graduate Services. These arrangements have been made, and these titles selected, only for this transitional period of the School's existence. A year from now, it is expected that there will be a dean and associate dean. Professor Durst may Well be one of these but the other two will not be so involvedg Mr. Fritzemeier is ready for retirement and Dean Peterson will restrict himself to the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The new dean and associate dean will divide responsibility for the graduate program, the research and grants function, and the continuing education function. The Graduate Office also has a Fiscal Research Officer, Mr. Ronald Pedigo, whose primary responsibility is to oversee the fiscal aspects of all research and grants activities. His responsibilities will probably be broadened to include other fiscal aspects of the Graduate Office as well. The Department of Librarianship, with its faculty of 10 members, is the only academic component of the institution in a position of line rig - Q- -f-'-f- ---1----N -. -.4 ...-1.-.f,..:..-....,4Lze..n -,,4,, 1r'f.--- . , , .' ' ' . .' . . 1 V . ..-.,. ,- , -1 --...f6...1...,N - mg,-,H.. - Q 1 I , ,LV .1 .I - vl - J . . -- ' "' -'-- ..... --..-rears ...L--....,, ,, , 3' nfs E to the Arts and dean and ll divide graduate arch and and the unction. e also has ficer, Mr. e primary Jersee the research ties. His robably be lde other Graduate nent of its faculty the only it of the ion of line s, l Continued Education On A Graduate level School of Graduate and Professional Studies X responsibility to the Dean of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies, As is customary in most institutions. all other components of the Graduate Faculty belong to an academic unit in one of the other three Schools of the College, The Graduate Program of the School is administered by the office of the Dean according to policies developed by the Graduate Council, a body consisting of the chairmen of each department offering graduate work, or his respresentative, and four students. The Council elects its own chairman and the Dean of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies serves as Executive Secretary. The Research and Grants function of the School is in two parts: The fostering and supporting of faculty, scholarly and creative endeavor, and the serving as the institutional fiscal agent where all grant and research monies are concerned, The support and stimulation of research. creativity, and scholarly endeavor is the joint responsibility of the Graduate Office and the Faculty Research and Creativity Committee. This committee was reorganized at the start of the 1972-73 academic year, and its purview was broadened and clarified. Consequently, its ability to support and fund faculty research and creativity was considerably enhanced. In previous years. the committee was restricted to funding small research grants from monies awarded the College by the National Science Foundations Institutional Grants for Science program. As a result of some realignment in the Research and Grants Restricted Fees budget. however. made ave the fundif eligible additiona funds a committe programs faculty publicize' large, an evaluate, The foi entitled and Creai 123 Facul Funds, fi Faculty C Summeri The C function Graduat Educatio and sul undergra college c i d e n t if encourag of evenin on campi departm. programs function organizin cooperati colleges college c programs Continuin and the establis workshop conferenc requests communi includes assisting obtain ap services. s t u d e 1 correspoi 31 i - -----ff-'-..-a-,..... ..-,4....:,,gg,A,, . ,,f, A , S ' 1-ws---...,.-..:..-g,,.g4e,,4,,,,.., , ,. R- ' . X lean of the ,ate and 5. As is istitutions. ts of the long to an ne of the s of the gram of the fed by the :cording to by the a body iairmen of offering or his and four il elects its he Dean of tduate and 4 serves as nd Grants ol is in two ering and y, scholarly 'or, and the institutional ,ll grant and econcerned. mulation of vity, and is the joint ie Graduate ty Research mittee. This irganized at 73 academic irview was clarified. ability to nd faculty ativity was sed. years, the estricted to earch grants warded the tonal Science nstitutional program. As :alignment in and Grants as budget. ,,,--. ,..,-,,. pf - ,,,.,, my-1 1-----",-1 1' V -.V-H' I "'--,' .,,-,,,-,..,,.-.,.,..-3, F - -gr V- AV , T 4 '21 :lr 1 however. additional funds were made available which permitted the tundings of other than NSF- eligiblc projects. With these additional and less-restricted funds at its disposal, the committee established four programs for the support of faculty scholarly endeavor, publicized them to the faculty at large, and proceeded to accept, evaluate, and fund proposals. The four programs were entitled lll Faculty Research and Creativity Grants Program, 125 Faculty Support in Search of Funds, t3l Matching Funds for Faculty Grants, and C45 Faculty Summer Research Fellowships. The Continuing Education function of the Office of Graduate and Continuing Education consists of organizing and supervising off-campus undergraduate and graduate college classes in response to identified needs, the encouragement and promotion of evening and Saturday classes on campus and the assisting of departments with planning programs for adults. This function also includes the organizing and conducting, in cooperation with the other state colleges and universities, of college classes and educational programs in the Statewide Continuing Education Network, and the encouragement and establishment of special workshops, mini-courses and conferences in response to requests from schools and other community groups. It also includes the assisting of assisting of school districts to obtain appropriate consultation services, and the counseling of Students regarding correspondence study. John E. Peterson Interim Dean. School of Graduate and Professional Studies 3 o i in K' if. 2' 'E'--K f 5 gf ' S f Q ' S T ...L """""""""'f t t Dear Students. Faculty. and Friends: We in the Division of Student Affairs welcome this opportunity to relate to you, the campus, and Public communities, our ideas. problems, and aspirations. It affords us an opportunity to realize a vital aspect of the Student AffairS philosophy-that communication is the bridge from misinformation to understanding. At this time we wish to express our deepest gratitude to 'the Sunflower staff for making this opportunity possible. As a service orientated operation our utmost concern is for the education, self- understanding and personal success of the individual. We aim to assist students in obtaining the best education they are capable of achieving, and to help them understand their responsibilities and carry them out in a mature and meaningful manner. To this end the personnel of the Division cooperates freely with all areas of the college community, and with individuals and groups in the public and private community, in an attempt to strengthen the relationships essential for attaining the goals of the Division, the Kansas State Teachers College, and of the student. The Division of Student Affairs is currently divided into fourteen general areas, encompassing the .broad spectrum of student life. Beginning with Admissions, and culminating with Placement. these areas include Health Services. Counseling Services. 60 TUDENT AFFAIRS Services for Disabled Students, the Students Helping Students Program, Veterans Affairs, Student Financial Aids, Housing, Residence Hall Programming, Student Activities and' Organizations, Memorial Student Union, International Student Affairs, and Advisement of Undeclared Students. Our involvement in student life is not limited to these administrative categories only. The Ad hoc Committee on Enrollment Trends. the development of student leadership in the residence halls, improvement of communication with minority students. better cooperation and communication between the Student and the Affir movement. closer rela' International community. ofthe Memo: up-graded orientation p few of the 2 with which t in contact. significant p made in thes and we ai further impi and other are We also potential anc areas whiche attentiong Counseling E for the Disab o f f i c e s 3 communicz maintenance those respon owned housii cooperation v advisement studentsg cc relocation oi Placement, officesg implt placement completion' o refurnishing Nest. These areas whic priority in the In addition concerns. co will be placed of courteous, the thoughtfu P90ple of community. with the Presi among all otk offices. facult and minorit Continue to b which lasting be Sought. As of the e school year. UNO suffered Staff of foul ffnplications c .. -N- .. ,..........,...,....,.4..:......,4 - -ar..'... - 1,--'af . U ' . . - , . , -. ., 1 student to these ries only, iittee on ds, the student residence lent of minority rationand veen the Student and Faculty Senates. the Affirmative Action movement, establishment of closer relationships between International students and the community, improved services of the Memorial Union staff and up-graded new student orientation programs are but a few of the additional concerns with which the Division comes in contact. We believe that significant progress has been made in these areas inthe past and we are committed to further improvement in these and other areas in the future. We also recognize certain potential and existing problem areas which demand immediate attentiong Consolidation of Counseling Services, Services for the Disabled, and the GAAS officesg improved communication between maintenance V personnel and those responsible for college- owned housing, evaluation lin cooperation with the facultyl of advisement of undeclared students, completion of the relocation of the Admission, Placement, and Registration offices, implementation of new placement programs. and completion of remodeling and refurnishing of the Hornet's Nest. These are among the areas which will receive priority in the near future. In addition to these and other concerns, continued emphasis will be placed on the importance of courteous, considerate, and the thoughtful treatment of all Poople of the college Community. Communication with the President's Office, and among all other administrative offices, faculty, staff. students and minority groups will Continue to be basic areas in which lasting improvement will be sought, As of the end of the 1973-74 School year. this Division will have suffered a further loss in staff of four positions. The implications of this reduction. fl MW 1 f ff N and the accompanying decline Ozf f ff fjfff X..,,wm in morale, must not serve to intimidate nor be allowed to preclude a positive approach to the problems with which we are faced. New and courageous ideas, plus the intelligent utilization of personnel and resources are needed if meaningful progress is to be realized in resolving these and other problems of common concern. It remains our firm belief that if sufficiently motivated, provided an atm'osphere conducive to personal growth, and given the tools with which to fulfill individual needs, the individual will assert himself and come to realize 'the importance and meaning of his existence. We wish to join with you in the attainment of this ideal. To this end we welcome your suggestions and criticisms in the attempt to find a better way. Sincerely, 'E.cJJrt- John R. Webb, Dean Division of Student Affairs 'nil N -ll ffl WM x . . ' ' ' ,-.. ,A-Q-.-.Al-4..- r ' " , , ..,...LV -..----f--'L-H+-+:'1!T ""'fT. J"7"f5"'T ' 7 - ' :lf-2,4-5 w Ni+"'Pf:-' ,,v""'.'4'T"'?"1'T'f"""'. ,.' 1 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' -1-My-ff..-,f-gefs4"fQ3?ff:'EifiEIef-fhi:-f:-451-,-1-i-,.4aff1- - - -A -f 1 ld-ii If-J J' l , ., ,,. . , YJ-,hw tl. F- -. -I lk ..-.., - Q., -5- L1-'Q53-1.'l S , "l fx I.. Y -4 7 4' 5 , 4 M7 1 ' , H7 + f, ,gum Yi' 5,. f 132 1 U ,fro V ' lt. ,V , , 1 ,u. ,Lf f ' - W V . ' , vw ,-ft ' V 7 4 If 'ffflj 1 'f-F fi , " H ,vw Z Zfj' gf E 4 :Qfxf+a,':.afiE - ,. X340 ,, ,1,. 5 L v ljwlf ' ' f -uf 5' SEX , f wax , f -'wg-1 , ...X 55,5226 Mx, 1' KA 1' K, ,W f x , if M 5 , S534 ' , 5 N :bg ., za Jian W ,4 sk 'M' ,, M Kf Q , l! 'nl ,,-', , i, 427fS"f:f 'Q f 4 , . -TW f f ,, ,wf2f:7x2 X ff' f ff Q' . MQ., I 1 , - Wf- , ,,ffQP" . 4 ' x X Students Ten ye Union at K the role of and friend created th followingp To serw for all stuc and friends individual 5 level entert The 19 struggle fo college. Tl exception. i However. progress by on the pari Activities C college pro tradition wi Wai? f Mil Un Q65 49 , CLUB 54019 , 7 ,og Q Co 1 was 1 QQ- 190 O t we Q 1 SK lsljs 06:54 f TRIP RGC? '91 Sk x 44' 5 R l 65, JOHN BIGGS M4-J, USGS Students of KSTC: Ten years ago, in order for the Memorial Union at Kansas State Teachers College to fulfill the role of a community center for all members and friends of the college, the student council created the Union Activities Council, with the following purpose in mind: To serveas a community center of activities for all students, faculty, administration, alumni, and friendsg by encouraging self-directed activity, individual social competency, and producing top- level entertainment. The 1973-1974 school year was a difficult struggle for many areas and departments of the college. The Union Activities Council was no exception, in having its share of disappointments. However, I feel the council made sufficient progress by reestablishing trust and new interest on the part of the student body. KSTC's Union Activities Council has always been a. leader in college programming and with your help, this tradition will continue in the future. ,WMM Mike Henthorne, President Union Activities Council Union Activities Council ,NX ,MTV DN BAND mc DENVER19 SON E-SUS MSIINGE Chung? 9,1 oqgommw .wus v vm PEARQQQ, ff awww u.1.fiJN hwdmda ohwgxceltm. S www, oacxmumm .vimdmn , ' A xx - llv . . mm mflwliluwm , EeBk5TC, MMS mm Bw. Swim, Ou: mem 4rL.9:.,u1pcM.0w -9-A-U-Uuzhkwllg bbgkinx px-cuxv Q pmt? .im ugwo wwammmwutqm um wwf 'cm l.9o9zO3j.0adto'dw.wu:i+ Qnvvmnlbmgmib Y -,,.,..-fr . , ,. , 1: . , ,., .,.,-7-'11--v,-.rv---vf-r-1 . ' , Moi-Sl .1 Mk r rmgmo LJJU EW UAC Celebrates 10th Anniversary "Ten Yeo rs Togetherf' K rrrr' fi r r"r Mrs rrrr 1 r31 ?UW- ,,,E,, ,M , ,,, M 5 r Ng? 7 1 M, rm rw Wwafr MW 2 ff A t N5 r X A - .ww . .. I WMI rr WNWW if 1 rr "PWM In N E XNNN . . UU ' l z M Hmmm 1 I ii' 5? le? 111 QS? 5 JAM "mg ff - -nm- .N.R..Q.- , ,.. V, , nl .V-lf' , 3 ' ,ff , 4 5 1 ,ful ff, g l : 49" Q , a Y , ni, ff - V A I I ef Q ff JE f 1 J' M fkff 'QKQ Q 5 Q v 3 q 2 5 ! 1 I F 1 Q I SGS fait? 4. xf J 'S ,F .mn-wf - mum, .W ii T 3 ' x 3 1 in f T01 X, f , QEQA A Q K 553, D 'buf " b f x xx x -1 I -'dugg NH Y n 5 1? Q E 1 1 !m i 3 I i ! 1 N 1, X ,, w 5 w w W 5 . ,,: l eclure Series "Who Shot JF K " Highlights UAC Lecture Series. on his persc Knee incidel 4' , "'-fr iai x .wg 4 Near-record crowds listened intently as Harvey Yazijian and David Williams lectured on the various theories of conspiracy which surround the assassination of John F. Kennedy. 70 Right Aberr enthu - -- ---1 i.---1..f.-.A....,..-..-sl..-. ' --, ' ---',,,,, . ,.-1, . . , . - , V. ,, , , i ,i ' Russell Means, National Coordinator of the American Indian Movement lAIMl, spoke this fall on his personal experiences during the Wounded Knee incident. ss Q55 as , it surround the Right: Civil rights was the main topic of Ralph Abernathy's lecture delived before a large and enthusiastic audience. Current topics, guest speakers, lectures and forums. It is all part of UAC Lecture series. The Forums and Lectures Committee is designed to provide our campus with knowledgeable and qualified speakers who can give insight into areas important to students. This fall the Lecture Committee presented two lectures, the first delivered by Russell Means, national coordinator of the American Indian Movement CAIML and the second delivered by Harvey Yazijian and David Williams, two amateur detectives who have delved into the facts surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy. The Means lecture was highlighted by the Indian's condemnation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. He told stories of how the BIA forces the Indians on the reservations to live under tyranny. Other highlights included his first-hand description of the Wounded Knee incident and his detailed outline of the AIM organization. The Yazijian-Williams lecture, which was delivered to a standing- room-only crowd, looked into the various aspects of the Kennedy assassination. They asked such questions as how could Lee Harvey Oswald have fired the gun, cleaned it, taken off his top shirt, gotten downstairs, bought a Coke, and chatted with a police officer in the approximate two minutes they calculated he would have had. This and similar questions left the audience wondering as they left for their homes. The spring semester also featured two excellent lectures. The first of these lectures was presented by Ralph Abernathy, leader of the Southern Christian Leadership. Abernathy spoke before a large audience on such topics as civil rights, equal distribution of wealth, and the impeachment of President Nixon. However, his main focus remained centered around civil rights, for not only Blacks, but also for women, handicapped persons, Chicarios, Indians, and white poor. Following the lecture there was a short question and answer period, followed by a reception. ' The final lecture of the year concerned the events that led up to the Kent State murders. The lecture also dealt with the investigation and current efforts to re-open the case. 1 5 E l s 2 3 v Q a , f' . 1 I I I w I, . 1 . 2' V Q i 7 ' "N 'W ' -'fu .., 'is 1-g , 'T'-'4 tfq' '-S-is ' jLl"f'fL,-x..-...' "'QqfLx? - ' ' so iaie Shad overn I-rl' An Open Leiter From the ASG President Dear KSTC Student, The 1973-74 school year could be a landmark year for Kansas college students. This year marks the founding of the Associated Students of Kansas. a student lobbying organization. KSTC has played a crucial role inorganizing the lobby. Students were selected from our campus to serve as Chairman of the Board of Directors and President of the Legislative Assembly-the two P0liCy making bodies of the organization. The success of ASK cannot be fairly measured at this early date, however. the mere establishment of a statewide. structured organization is in itself. H monumental step and the future Of the organization is bright. 4 Another program initiated this Year is of significant importance to KSTC students. That is. of course. the ASG conducted Teacher- Course ' Evaluation. About 130 faculty members participated in the first survey. A special feature of this program is the publishment of the results in a booklet provided to the campus community. The hope of ASG is that the booklet will prove to be ,beneficial in giving insight to the student as he goes about his business of selecting classes. ASG sent delegates to Chicago this year for the National Tenants Organization Convention and the Current Grading Trends Convention. We were also able to participate in the National Student Lobby Conference in Washington, D.C. There, We were able to talk to the Kansas congressmen about various issues affecting the students of KSTC and across the nation. Some progress has been made in the area of bookstore problems. We were able to persuade the Memorial Union Bookstore to offer an additional 10? buy-back price. Hopefully, some sort of rebate will be in effect next fall, as ,students are still disturbed with the inequities of the textbook situation. Fall of 1974 will be the first time part-time students will be members of ASG. This will enable part-time students to vote in ASG elections and participate in all ASG programs. At the same time. this step can expand the ASG budget by about 54.000 This year marks the second time ASG has published an off-campus housing booklet. The booklet lists the properties of over 170 landlords in the Emporia community. Also included is pertinent information for the student seeking off-campus housing. ' 75 Above: Thr The Associated Student Government tASGl of Kansas State Teachers College was founded in June, 1969, and is presently composed of a president, vice president and 43 senators. The executives are elected by the student body and the senators by constituents from their respective academic departments. This year's president and vice president were Vic Miller and Richard Gilbert, respectively. ASG was founded with a basic five-fold purpose. First, and most importantly, it was established to provide the means whereby the members of the student body may express themselves effectively through programs in areas affecting their intellectual, social, economic, physical and spiritual welfare. To establish equitable representation and participation for the student in the college community is the second, and equally necessary, purpose. ASG recognizes that a government not representative of its constituents is a farce and is unfulfilling in its duties. The final three purposes could be summed up as follows: 17 to promote mutually beneficial cooperation among students, faculty and administration, 2l to promote democratic participation in the decisions of the college community, and 35 to coordinate and regulate the activities of the student organizations. With the exception of the president and vice president, the work of ASG is done on a strictly volunteer basis-students who dedicate a great amount of time and effort to completing necessary tasks and bettering the academic and social atmosphere of the college. Many sacrifices are made, and the students and faculty of KSTC should be grateful to those senators who were dedicated enough to give of themselves. listens and writes-recording the: work Taking a of a busy senate. amendm Don Stephens and Marty Jones discuss the next bill on the agenda. 78 X Stk 9 X , , ' '1," m , ' ZNFK .AUSKEQWS Q ., .2 aw, 'cf 7 iq, K'..- 2 ,W '9 , Four Committees Help in Functions ot ASG, The Associated Student Government of KSTC functions with four primary standing committees: Finance, Academic Affairs, Student Affairs and Senate Operations. One of these committees, the Finance Committee, is responsible for allocating and overseeing the monies of the Student Government. The amount involved is 57.50 per student per semester-approximately S100,000 each year. These monies are given to the various campus organizations and promotional academic activities that have no other or inadequate sources of funds. Each group requesting funds must appear before the Finance Committee to justify its request. This years' deadline date for applying for funds was Feb. 22, and the end of the school term-consistent with previous years-proved to be a busy and hectic period as the committee discussed, investigated and debated over the funds and the justifications for the requests. The funds are allocated after the Finance Committee and ASG have approved the request. The organization must submit periodic reports to the Finance Committee disclosing expenditure of the funds, it is the responsibility of the Finance Committee to audit those expenditures. ' Another committee, Academic Affairs, is basically a recommending body. The members suggest changes in academic policy, handle complaints by students, and prepare the procedures for carrying out the teacher-course evaluation program. The committee also oversees the publishing of the results of the evaluations. The Student Affairs Committee is a consistently busy group, covering such areas as parking and traffic, off-campus housing and advisement. One could easily say that any campus-wide problem that does not fall in the realm of academics is handled by the Student Affairs Committee. The internal affairs of ASG-elections, chartering organizations, publicity, etc.-are the responsibilities of the Senate Operations Committee. Faces like that of Janet Butcher help add beauty to the senatorial roster. 80 X , , K Waiting to be r v "-'--fa--e--- -H----.L ...-...,.,,.f..:..-..,44,-w.4-. - zf'--f . ,,-1, , . , v . . . .., , . ...........--...,..,-.-,-f...H..e.,4.-:g .s..,4 :..:f,,, L: -1 ' , , , - - Ju.: sg 1 1 7 l x g' KJWJQ H' YV I V, Z ' . , ' ,' ' ' 1 ' n ,,,,--7.,- .., 77-7-7777-----A--, -71 ' -1f--+4-1"-'f--'F'-T"'-'A"7"f""A""""'M"""" 'gum' "',f'Af' ' 11 ' 1 . t 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 I7 1 . 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 A 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 , 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 , .1 "'Wd'wWW"' ' H7 '1"1'wwA1w' 'eww' """'wWM ' 1 1 ' 6 '1 1 1 ,1 1 ' I 1 f ' ,,,?,,.,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, ,,,,g7, M-. ,,,., ,N.7,.,-7, 774,717 7- 7.77-777.7 77 ..7 77.77 7 7 1 1 1 . :1 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 . 11 1 1 1 . -- -,,.... 1 1 'WW' 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1' 1 1 T 1 1 ,V 1 1 K 1 , 1 1 - 1 1 Qf 1 1 1 I 1 1 . . 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 77., ,7 ,-k7V,,NW,w,1-,,T1,, M-E- 1 1 1 1 71 77,7 , 1 J 1 ' Q1.zq11,! 1 11:1 - emma 1 1 ,. ., . 1 K, 1. 1 ' 1 - , , ,711 11 1 F1 f ' 1"1'T 11111121 101112111 1 171- ,771 7, 11111171111 , .1-,Ma 11117. 1111110111 77 7 .1k,1 ,77-.71-- ., .7 1 ' ' , .1141 -' , C5 N A 7,1 we 1i11,111wg11j111111Q1 1111f71'1131Q1111dQ1 ' xxx -gQoj.iQ,. I" W' ' "P" ' ' 2 W ff 3 2, yf 5 1 f , rw' 'f r 'x G x -un.. X 1 A ' ' x I , , X . f X A , X 6? x- ,V f U 1 1, , , X , , Z W I, X ,f 1, 1 , X I ' X 2 Q ,'9,?f1 ?i gli ' 3 12 ' X 4 1. , wg , , L ,i4,9p 5 -,..,m,p1 M. 4 Wffyfiznii? 1 ,W ,f 4 5 ., ,,, X , U 1 .qf f ' ,z . f ,fC-"Aw, . ,W Msn, Inf , ,, , A QV Q ' , GY, M. mp.. , n , .Jw wp' mm 1 1 1, - , A af ' , if : .gh . if 1 ' - is .f f dizv f : - Mini Q W - " Jw o f-hz , 'I' 'X- 84 ,m' f B 4 E, , wg , ,. H 5 1- ,ff K mn ' , 9 ., fx, , fi: 7' R X f S 'Q iff' 15,9 , 1 . 6 300. wa. Wm. 'ix .. ws. X Some paint if on cavern walls, Some on a canvas, Some coax it from sfone, Ofhers shape if in plastic, Some weld, Some spray, A few genfly sfrolce, Some sfrefch, Some mold, One fragilely blows, Some do if beffer, and some not so good. Some have their lives in if, and some only dabble. Caveman, Suburbanife, Renaissance... They did if. We do if, They'll do if, foo affer us .... Ar ,85 Y , N , ,,.r , ,,.., 4-,.4--....,..f..-....-..,,,..-,,.,,1-,f.-r...-,.-. ...... -. ,W ,VA . ,-A. . V ' '57 f ft ff? f' Eff V ff ' LJ f "J ff fe fy an 4 ,i U gi? f f L 'j-gf fly! yy A' ff-lg 5jf1.QA.f:!f4?',5Q7 On the night of January 19, the 1974 Faculty Art Exhibition opened in the College Art Gallery in the Humanities building. For two weeks and a day. viewers strolled and gazed at the widely varied results of the creative talents of K.S.T.C.'s art faculty. Shown were bold watercolors by Norman Eppink, bright acrylics from the brush of Rex Hall. intricate jewelry and delicate glassware by the skillful finger of Don Hazelrigg, and mysterious ceramics from the wheel of John Kudlacek. From plastics, acrylics, and a fleet of water glasses, the eye turned to air-brushes and a "mass" on the ceiling. Variety. color. expression . . . some bold and others muted. At times, a viewer could feel a close bound with the artist through his work. Some pieces grabbed attention. while others wooed and coazed admiration. Taken altogether, an interesting experience. Above: Don Jr the College Ai jewelry, Don Exhibition. H 1. Lg - l 'as ..4:u 4,-..... N . 4' psf' --,',.,- , e-. ,-. M.,-.. V , , A--,A-.. .--5 i., ,-, ..,Y Wu., , , ,. , , , ,, , . X. i' A ' -Y V ' -1'7f'i1'- ""+ff-'-"'-,'f1:fff4-...,.1--,s. -4n:a4-a,.4...4..:, -" f -- f .-ff .- ' 'ff . .., ' - - . , . . fbi- .-......n,frr . v ' ., . ' v . . . F T' , -........--...fs--.. , -..-1 .,...-,--..-.,.-rf-v-4"nr-0'?'Yi. - ff,,,. 1- . ,,,-.-.., .. . , , .. , .. .f, , A Z W "glr'?'Z . f. . ,-,gf 6-'iff ' 'Whig-Qf 210+-,qtif , ve, H V 'Y-9" ' ' ' ,, , x f ' ,5 wfff d in the a day. talents Eppink, ielicate :rarnics rf water fariety. ar could grabbed Lher, an ji ,,.. if " Above: Don Johnson, in profile, instructs a small group as director of the College Art Gallery. Below: Ready to assemble another piece of jewelry, Don Hazelrigg prepares a display for the Faculty Art Exhibition. Norman Eppink, whose distinctive watercolors were displayed at the '74 Faculty Art Show, thumbs through a folio in his office. 87 ! ,M wwf www' W-w I' x f' H.. 'Nm MQ' f NW! 4-Miha 5' :fi Nw.. gk'-a .N Wu ' f Nm Maw 'fl .ggi MPV gi 4- , -'xr Wandering students found the lobby of the Memorial Union crowded Dec. 7th and 8th with an assortment of booths and tables boasting unique forms of art for sale. The event was the annual Thieves Market and was reminiscent of an old city square complete with merchants eager to peddle their products. The Thieves Market, sponsored by Alpha Theta Rho, an honorary art organization, consisted of all types of art creations offered to anyone Wishing and able to buy. The art ranted from macrame to pottery and included some beautiful sketches and paintings and many pieces of hand-made jewelry. Proceeds from the market Went into the Alpha Theta Rho scholsarship fund where it was used to provide four scholarships within KSTC's Department of Art. lf 4 A..-ar..,. fyff J Have you ever strolled alone across the northeast corner of campus just as the last of the light seeped out of the sky? Were you ever walking along there by Beach Music Hall and suddenly you heard it? You thought it was the Phantom of the Opera. You thought it was a time warp and some Arthurian damsel was in distress. Or you caught a wail of brass and thought of a New Orleans honky-tonk. Well, what you heard was none of these. It was music majors. It was those people who study the universal language. Everyone has a certain kind of music he calls his favorite, but these music majors are different. They spend untold hours of practice on everything from Italian opera to our own blues. Some of them are singers devoted to endlessly refining their voices. And some of them have one. two, or maybe a whole group of instruments they use as part of themselves to coax that melody. Whatever their emphasis, they're a breed apart who live in a world of music. 'N , '-'U' It .Z-,Wi 'lb 3 tix. 4lJs:' I-li' 91 . mx ,V , ,7"'-- ,S The Hornet Marching Band colorfully decorated the football games this year by making their first appearances here on campus in their new uniforms. The initial appearance was made in January of 1973 when the band had the honor of representing Kansas in the Presidential Inaugural Parade. The parade was carried on all three national T.V. networks. This year's Annual Band Day, October 20, featured the Hornet Marching Band serving as host to many high school bands. The highlight of the day was guest conductor Colonel Arnald Gabriel, conductor of the United States Air Force Band. The band started off the activities of Homecoming weekend by leading the Homecoming Parade. Following the football game, the band gave a concert in Union Square to an audience of band parents. one of the largest groups assembled for Parent's Day. Kappa Kappa Psi and Tau Beta Sigma, honorary band organizations, served refreshments. Membership in the Hornet Marching Band is open to all students who have had high school experience. The band has appeared at all 'of the home football games as well as performing for the Kansas City Chiefs from time to time. A traditional part of football activity. the band has always maintained a good student and campus relationship. 4""' .165 Eytgf, .315 gf ' V. .l Q7 , . it t l ll avail ..,, 52 A P A Hornet Marching Band I sim E a U '-: Z , V, I Z, . f f vs' WZWZZZ Every music enthusiast at KSTC has most likely heard of. listened to. oris a member of the colleges Symphonic Band. Being a limited group napproximately 75 members. selected by audition 1. a person can be assured. when attending a concert. that the involved musicians will present an evening of quality music. Each year the band makes a tour performing at several different high schools throughout Kansas. This year. on Feb. 26th through the 28th. the group presented concerts at Hillsboro. Newton. Kingman. Medicine Lodge. Chaparral. Cheney. El Dorado. and Eureka. The band also presents five concerts on campus during the year. Several celebrities. such as Skitch Henderson and Doc Severinsen. and many guest conductors. including Robert Russell Bennet and Mitch Miller. have visited KSTC on the invitation of the Symphonic Band. The group. itself. has become somewhat famous as it has appeared before many Music Educators Groups throughout the country. In May. the Music Department highlights the year by inviting an outstanding alumni to guest conduct the Symphonic Band. Melbern Nixon has directed the group for the past several years. 95 "Ibn bz Wmtm " 0,ven: 73- 74 Season "It is 1 With a Eleanor of family. On College Th Winter" li Platagenet somewhat his indecis throne. The valuable ri battle to l precious R squabbling the tide ofl that used h The ma "Lion" mc the royal fq view. anotf into an ine: hatred. At the tensior objectivity growing 2 shattered e Those Winter" yi brought to created a y 4 1 ' X2 ' I ' ---,,..... -V I 4: - A ',-,,, .,.'..." ,.1.51--uw--1',m.av-f"."f"""""'- ,'T"'f""' '-" Y 1, , ' . V A' ,A , . 1 J ,xl , u I 2 i x I L Q 1 J 5 1 gi Ui ii, eq, I ,l 'I E xt Qi 41 ull. I: EM Vi, ini ,115 R xg- . ii , ,. ,, fi gl wr ' v it 1: 1 J vi i EI .' Nl' ' I , , fx B 1 fi ' 1 , 1 1 I I I 5 5 1, i 'V Qi ! ig , ga ul-lt, :Q ii X l ii , QE QQJ ' M 1 EQ ISU Jig iii 1,3 v1 'I' ' l. ,Q L W 'lr W if ' W' :HMI ,N J", xiii: Yi!! wa G1 M123 121, ,fi 1, 452 M gl? 5 V+ 2 ps? : 5. I . Q -ii 1, r ----Y--ff Y 'Y - , , - , .,, -,:-.,tm,, .--.5""x'J , YQ TL Ysinunumii- . 9, .a Zig! f . . ' lp u X I! , ,iq W f 1 if X Q - i :fl ' "'- x- , K I -I .' Y E A, i, ,Q I b I L 1 ' I xx . ., V 1 if '41 iw We ' gsm ai X 1. 'f,g,r-f3fkw,j.' - ' f. K 1 'Hilfe was '. .n w, wf5'Qa1! X VF N M j""'Zg .2rfi,f,5 x. . 3 ' ' vs'-inf ' A f I -, M, Yam.. ' uilkku . if 5 'X I - 3 'Pu -:fs 'Q . ,ff .533 ,fx l irmhihgti A X ww R, VI' '-Hue? 0 G Winnie-the-Pooh, Not only a time-honored childrens classicg not only a Sears advertising bonanza, but this year a live production on the K.S.T.C. campus. Lovable, cuddly Pooh rollicked, pondered. stuck himself in Rabbits Hole, and saved the day for Piglet all in the tiny, 40-seat Pocket Playhouse. Each night of Dec. 4-7 the delighted eyes of adults and youngsters alike watched Pooh and his friends tell one of Americas favorite stories. The show was a creative project constituting partial requirement for three masters degrees in the Speech Department. Pam Conroy directedthe show. Bill Brewer designed the costumes, and Jerry Martin created the "touring" set. A special complication was encountered after Fridays night performance in the form of a trek across campus to Albert Taylor Hall. Cast and crew worked until 3:30 a.m. to put it all together again. then returned at 6:3 a.m. to begin the elaborate make-up for the Saturday showings. These two .special matinees were arranged as a kind of free-for-all for the benefit of the Emporia area school children who were entertained at no charge and without ticket hassles. M N 4 1 5, 3. ' :ff J 'K vt 15 F if 6 My 4 K cgi" Left: Pam Conroy, who directed Winnie-the-Pooh as a partial requirement for her master degree, instructs Kanga fLois Griffinj in the art of feeding medicine to an uninterested Pooh 4Craig Storryl. Below: Christopher Robin fEric Edwardsl questions whether one balloon will get Pooh off the ground. bonanza. ed, stuck ach night all one of :es in the nd Jerry yis night until 3:30 Saturday Fit of the J, l wwe wmauffw. med Ewan! Maxim 7Ze.cLc 1. ?....1-...A,, ,H ., -npwcgrg. 1 My.--.vf--Y..-.-v-,. ., Q ,. . - f... - -YQ... ' ' M - "V :Y . wif l:-":fg,f'E:.g.gf,- ' 0. G, -10? , V ' ,'., f ,, X . , . X X ,I 6, K x new , f 1 f f 4,4 . ', 3xffZQ?'2,QZQ9Jf'f i "4 1f'ffM4,6?:':5"2 'f ' 2 -H ,- E Q 1 . P Q. - ..- ff, f , 5 f-1" , v A ff ,,?f ,- 1 , ' J f N 4 0 ,, v TQ! Nj. . A ,,., ' it lg Y X? , 5 '- 'M ' L ' .. . Spf ' 22' ,Q b 1'-.1--'1 W ,I A Y ugi W 'wfdf V , A ' ik . ' x ' we N . ' -fi 1 ,-5' -' Q -' 3 -f - - - w,. 1 if ,ff ' ' f" .1 , b 3 M 1 In 'Q , ' f 52 4 , . - - 1, Xuv- 1 4. , , Q sf f , X If I 'S ' X f 4 f F' , 1' ,V uf' f ,QM Q A ,v Ju '95 fr, f,,f5fff,ffHf"'7 ...-.,:m4'S'wf2 '59-ff' v M. 41: nygmzzcw ,:- ',:,.ff, ,,f.-ML'-JJ, ., .,. 1 I We 3 . p' . 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Zi- Q ag-2, f gg aa 5 M 4 .px :.-Lf: vi V, . 1331 - '+g-- 3,21-', ffG'2x7+-5 Gifs if? ,,1agq,w5'3,I4-'z'g:1qi . ., K 'f"P+--3L.:fsf, .1 L- N f ' x '-: 14,55,..':A 1 if 5- kgfzQ-,4g-Z- , 157 ' :if 'LT' .L "1:'?Qf7, ' -' ru-1, X ' Mig'-5f,iv?fQfL 1-:Y li ' E144 ,+,5?-:- - 'Lf ww:-V ff ,Q-La 3 -ff , Q- 311, .a Q 12::?f1a1f,g2'2. 53"i,',. 1w5CScL'+'e42,i' , 5? 45: M,-,VT-fs. if , ,F V E 1. Q ,fw ' ..A.,.,., 6 1-www Fa Hi, 4, -'fir y kil- QTL: ..- N 1 9 M ' 1 ' X . Q -"!h..' v, X - -t-.ew-4-4.-,--.-:Sill - A . - f. - ... ,..,....,,,+ --v-- W ,. A X , W A N, LL , .M,..fwf,f LFS, , 1 - iw-'fi Nm i, D . H --a-o"'f X. , kung. 'K ' Pkg , "r of Organization Night On the night of Sept. 18th, the Social Lecture Hall of the Memorial Union was crowded with booths, posters, banners and interested students-symbolic of the annual Organization Night held at KSTC. This was the eighth year the event has been sponsored by Cardinal Key, the national senior women's honorary sorority on campus. It provides an excellent opportunity for KSTC organizationsto start the school-year right by introducing the functions and activities of the organization to the students. It was a colorful evening with a carnivalltype atmosphere. Hundreds of students walked about the hall, being enticed to join organizations ranging from Campus Girl Scouts to the Arab-American Friendship Club. Around 50 organizations were represented and the evening proved interesting, enjoyable and educational. ' . is If 2 -. ,ef f Q' W '. , Ri: V ., U A N, Ma.. nm. N- eff' Z. -i- 5 W M u,f.,1?'-D- V hgripgig QW' lxzi y 2 E i A : X HW! L, kr ' ' . Q it i ,. , Q 5,4 .dgfwrll . .. ,K 1 , . in ' vi .fs 'N LQ 1 Y U . 5 - f , I IM P f H r f' r X W. .. vi: .W ' N 4 . if V 4 V r .,k,,,,, , , -zz 8 .-42,1 ..i 'V fc ,M Y f , 1 !-Yi .,5i'f1!'x3. ,v . ffsiifi ' gigs Q-5?..fw i,,s 1 W . fill is PSX f' s if Q21 av., we ... ffl 0. PSI CHI f A Way ,.. - .- if V -' f ff-f-:---r-1'sr' -rr1!f"f: f -f 1 V - ,,,,,,,..-,v1---1'a-u:v- -- - g- -- . A , A ,. M- The advantages of membership in Psi Chi are both tangible and intangible. As a national honor society, Psi Chi is in a position to provide advantages that would not be possible for a local organization. To have this membership on record is to be automatically recognized as having been trained at an accredited institution with a qualified Psychology Department, faculty, and approved curriculum. It also signifies superior achievement and character. interest, capability, and promise, as Well as giving an added advantage of prestige in both the collegiate and the business and professional World. Among the requirements for membership is an overall grade point average of 3.00 for all graduate students and a 2.85 for undergraduate students, with a 3.00 grade point average in Psychology. Role playing, lectures, mental health center tours, parties, and discussions are a few of the activities that Psi Chi engages in throughout the year. The president for the 1973-74 school year was Patrick H. Allan, secretary, Gayle Bennett, and treasurer, Karen Jaggard. Dr. Barto acts as sponsor. As an effort to establish a student organization to serve as a counterpart to the American Psychological Association, Psi Chi was founded 39 years ago. It is an active group of above average college students and professional individuals Working to advance the science of psychology and to encourage, stimulate and maintain scholarship of the individual member in all fields, but particularly inpsychology. 111 4-H Opens Activities l C O At Hutchison Fair 2 Zi "-Lx ff! ' QWQ aww , ,-N? W f -V W, ,gf ,154 X , N' I '42 2, an 'Q f ff.--' ,f 1 f X' W f 'f I WX , 1 f 'W fwiaf I , W lf! 7, "W ' -, ' , . . , 'L ,, M WMV fjefwlww W X If 6 7 I K I7 4' WN 4 fff .Q f " X' y fy V 'ff ' A my , f V ,, X fy, ..-...,,..4--4-.4-...wq 44. A c present As e events dorms z The gratific Thi E I E l 1 5? 'll' 1 vi 5 U 1 ill in Adventures in Canoe Racing A canoe race, "The Mr. and Mrs. Leggs Contest" and the Book Exchange were among the many highlights presented this year by Alpha Phi Omega. pf As a national service and leadership fraternity, the KSTC chapter of Alpha Phi Omega ushers many of the special events on campus. The chapter sent Christmas cards to the Emporia Rest Homes and Valentines to the girls in the dorms as part of their service to the school and community. f T The members of this organization not only receive benefits by helping their communityg but in turn gain self- ' l gratification. f Q This year's president was Greg Stair and the sponsor was Dr. Keeling. . ,I, . ,ij I .,-. ' i, li l fl 1 T is li ,. no :SV fig ll iff We Egg! z-I5 4 4 ,ll si. 3'l lm 'll 115 T' ' ,, , ,, ,, Y, g VY Mnx, WY V xnxx ,, ,. - . . NT.-.-.,.....,--,-,.-.. ...-......T..,.,T1.,T.-,-..7....T..,.1T?..,.,.,:.,.,...1-..,......4s---9.A -:.f.,f A -k-f. - . nr--- . . ., , A J 9 1 s l P I , M Y,-,,r7Y 4.4,-ff - -,, ., If - - --V, , . - , . ' , -, Y- -f.f,c.f.A,. ,f..-,.g11 Y - . , ..,.,V..., . ,...V- .,- -- Q, "' "' " 'A ' ' .V . , A?,,...,1-,,,.,..1,,-...Q-Q -' VV 4 I W , 'tm-F ! X r i 1 1 1 l 1 I l I I 'L Zi ii I T! Ki ' I4 7, : ,Z 1. x 5 1 S 1' Y i . Q M ii I E 4 Q 1 i Q ! 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JI' ' lil 6W5'f4"3f' 'ff' -SP6-1 -'J.s'r- EM MMP +2-"4??'vw."S'f?fS-Qi' 'vi' "5.-WEWYQ :H W '19 'levi'-w6'1f0?H f' 1' if-v'1'f4'f:M.fm.'v2Vf f'f5"Iw- ffqff-ff' fiwz-2m:v2ea:-' wi' , ' ,.' PM' , . ,1 f JN: GX I ,!'l,VV 'fig .x 1 ' if'-.9 YM: ' ' Z-,W -- wa: W5 ,. -W3-' - 'f'-'-.mini-'f5.' 1 'www'-4-.Q-2"'f,"L R- . S3391 .-ef'f'f" ,fa-a wr-:,:'-'sf'-9' My g1:afv,:,-wr., .V-5 ' ? , ,- f!, ,-- .F ? 01, :, u ,,i .. , v . , -, M ,,- ., -,. , , v. ,-1 . 9 ..'. -Q X-,. . Q . 1 , ,.. ' . V X W V 1 1 ,W , ,W , , , I I . I 1 K ,, ,Q Campus Glr Scoufs 2, il 'E V 1 I V Q K 1 S N V N 4 118 .. .,. ., ......f-.......,.....,.. ,. - ,Z I, . LW l , V if ------- -. -....-,.,,- .. .,.,,,4,,, ,N--M W lib I I l l i I l l A .gi Canoeing - Not Just A Mc1n's Sport A desire for the outdoor-life would be easily satisfied by joining Campus Girl Scouts. One highlight of each fall semester is a Skills Day, sponsored by this organization, and offered to troop leaders throughout the council. Skills Day involves training in areas such as pitching tents, fire building, outdoor cooking, use of knives and hatchets, campfire songs, and other outdoor skills as well as an overnight encampment. There's something for everyone's interest on Skills Day. Other council activities covered by Campus Scouts, include working with troops either as assistant troop leaders, or special advisors for council wide encampments, camp staff for troop campouts, as well as troop leaders for troops that would otherwise disband. Some of the girls even teach Red Cross courses such as swimming, canoeing, and first aid. As a national organization, Campus Girl Scouts is offered to college students wishing to remain active in Girl Scouting. The chapter, located here at K.S.T.C., was one of the first Campus Scout groups organized. It is a co-ed organization which gives service to Flint Hills Girl Scout Council. The only requirement for joining is to pay national membership dues to Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. Campus Girl Scouts are not always hard at work. They enjoy their own outings, such as canoeing, float trips on near-by lakes and rivers, or just camping out under the stars, sharing songs around a campfire, and enjoying life. . ' E , Future Journalist Exeter Club is an organization for all English majors, minors, and faculty interested in promoting better communications between the English faculty and students. The club tries to deal with literature from various aspects of English. Exeter Club was formed in 1971 as a campus organization. Speakers present programs to the group at regular meetings which are usually held once a month. All meetings are open to all students, regardless of their major, who wish to come. In addition, Exeter publishes a monthly newsletter which reviews past happenings and tells of upcoming events in the English Department. Exeter Club gives students a chance to speak up about any questions, changes, or problems they are having in concern with the English Department. Events sponsored this year by the Exeter Club included an open discussion of poetry with Kelevi Leppandlani, Finnish-born poet who lives in Emporia, a review of the English Department currfculum by the faculty and students and other speakers from the literary field. W, W ,, we if ff 120 , ,L ,, L.. Prot function: The students Appi from a t sessions The Mike Ko Bradfiel Mr. Keig Foui Q ----V-- .W A... . ,,., . W r .E ff-Q Magazine Sponsored By Club , Providing an intellectual format for all interested students and publishing a literary magazine are the main functions of the Quivera Literary Society, an English department organization. The literary magazine features the cream of the crop in poetry, fiction, essays, and art work done by K.S.T.C. students throughout the year. Approximately every two or three weeks Quivera has an open meetingg the subjects of their meetings vary greatly from a wide-ranging discussion of the Supreme Court's latest attempt to define obscenity to comic opera "Un-Rapl' sessions, in which students impersonate the great writers of the past in a talk show format. The 1973 officers and magazine staff were as follows: Mike Lechner, president and editor-in-chief of the magazine, Mike Kopf, vice-presidentg Pam Zubeck, associate editor, Gib Shell, fiction editorg Ann Zubeck, poetry editorg Larry Bradfield, non-fiction editor, and Jane Betty, secretary-treasurer. Sponsors of the organization are Dr. Green Wyrick, Mr. Keigh Denniston, and Dr. Gary Bleeker. Founded in 1951, Quivera has no restrictions on membershipg everyone is encouraged to participate. QUIVIRA 121 l , f 1 Math Clubs Start Off With Halloween Party A joint Halloween party attended by members of Kappa Mu Epsilon and Math Club highlighted this year's KME organization. A regional convention was attended by club representatives this year also. Since Kappa Mu Epsilon is a national honorary mathematics fraternity of the Kansas Beta Chapter, there are limitations of membership. The student must have a major or minor in math with 40 hours of college credit, including Calculus I and have completed or to be enrolled in Calculus II. His grade average in math must be at least 3.5 for sophomores and 3.2 for juniors, seniors, and graduate students, The grade average of transfer students must be a 3.2 in math courses taken at KSTC and must have completed at least one. All math faculty are members and Dr. Tom Bonner serves as advisor. This year's officers have been Richard Laird, presidentg Cynthia Sisler, vice-presidentg Charlotte Brungardt, secretaryg Linda Pruitt, treasurer, and Gregg Stair as historian. 123 Kansas Home Ec Association The Kansas Home Economics Association is established to promote a better understanding of the value of home economics, to promote professionalism within the department of home economics, to offer a general organization for interested persons, and to help develop leadership qualities. Yearly activities for the organization includes initiation, monthly speakers, state and national conventions, participation in Future Home Economics Career Day for high school students, service projects and various money raising projects. 41+ -K, f 124 HE N' I - f ff: M 1 , , M ,M 'IP' Y Ay- ,i":- ' 124, Q, 'fa'-. ' , X' H- , Q ,p PM 4 3910 M11: ff, , . ' , :f+g2.w:4w"' f A . 4' , , ,e ff , ,ffm ' , I A is if J ? br 1 ill 5 -in ,fy rw. fn. , if gh W ,,,, X. 'ng'-l HP M ---...,as. ...... - -.. g . ,...... 6 Z ' , , 4 4. A f, .4 44-my Q if pf' ,VA 'fiat -,fs V c .. ff - -f f-ef-. f f ,A v 'yr-fawr:'f:'2'PP1f'r"P" 'T' '. 'ffgz-.Vg-' , ,,,.f- Q, , J - f' -Y' ' Theta Epsilon, signifying the Greek letters H and E for Home Economics, is an honorary organization consisting of actives and alumnae who are majoring or minoring in the department of Home Economics. Selection is based on both recommendation by the Home Economics faculty concerning personal qualifications such as leadership, responsibility, personality, attitude, initiative, and service. Twenty active members and pledges participated in the organization this year. Activities included sponsoring the Judy Wiggins Memorial Scholarship and yearly Theta Epsilon Scholarships. A newsletter, "The Lamp of Theta Epsilon," giving highlights of the Home Economics Department for the year is published in the late spring and sent to all active and alumnae members. Other projects undertaken in the past years have centered around the artistic improvement of the department. Salad suppers after worknights, are held frequently during the year and a picnic by the lake closes the year and serves as a delightful occasion for the new members. 127 Z7 4' l Winte David H former drug interesting n syndrome. "After 1 Harris, who focal point f4 "Unless happening a We should ir They we in the Memr applause the ' v x F1 Ex: 'I -v..,. --,,1 -.,. ' V ,f - at ' ' .-.--. 1 V . , V ' - ,A , bf - 1- - f':1'i.L 2 IPL- J :"-' if-...52":'LfZ'2 :ii ?f1 :fit if ' '47 if . 4 . 1 Mr- F A , W g ,, . ----, -- - - ' ,j'i::A,Q33 51-'gggflffgl-j,i,A -:f,41'g-'piijqg f:ii,.,t?,fF,1 sniff :A--2 a "f- - - .- . , ,,. ,- .--, .-..- , ,tlal-- les4'. ,s.a., 1e , or afiiz., -, 33fJi'fl?'qE?312t4Er7:5giii!'vgf'-'1'L '.'5?'f'f -If-e '51 V ""2 ' 'J' ' " ' .avf5py""5F'5' -551 Winter Soldier Organization Sponsors David Harris David Harris, well-known anti-war activist and draft resister, and Jack McCloskey, Vietnam veteran, former drug addict and organizer of veteran 'trap groups" in the San Francisco area, presented a highly interesting and emotional discussion on draft evasion, amnesty, the Vietnam War, and the post-Vietnam syndrome. UAfter supposedly stopping the war in Vietnam, we're continuing it in Canada and Sweden," said Mr. Harris, who has spent some 20 months in a federal prison on a draft evasion conviction. He sees amnesty as a focal point for ending the strife of a difficult War. "Unless We have a firm understanding of what we have done to Vietnam, there's nothing to stop it from happening again," Harris remarked at one point. HI think there should be Watergate hearings about the war. We should investigate those ten years of murder." They were guests of the local Vietnam Veterans Against the War and conducted their symposium on Oct. 2 in the Memorial Union. The large room Was crowded with interested listeners and the two speakers, from the applause they received, seemed to be everything the crowd had hoped for. rj Q i-.' - 1 2 I Bogue Chitto Alabama. On campus they presented I David Harris and Jack McCloskey in a September rally held in October. , The Winter Soldier Organization, formerly known as the Vietnam Veterans Against the War, would have to be recognized as the most politically-active organization at KSTC. Starting out several years ago as a group whose main goal focused on the ending of a II bitter war. they have steadily expanded their goals, I I desires and activities to include the promotion of all - types of necessary social change. I I Their main purpose on campus is to politically II educate the students and people of Emporia and to arouse these people to directly work for the I elimination of social problems and the advancement I toward social harmony. I The organization is not just a talkative group. - They give active support to the racially torn city of K R I Cairo Illinois by sending convoys of food and QI clothing they aid the Black United Front and send 'I medical supplies to a clinic and people s farm in I symposium and helped organize the impeachment fi The group also continued its efforts toward I I securing amnesty for all war resistors and each I I month set up tables in the Union to distribute information about the organization its desires needs and goals. The group also sold the Winter Soldier paper every month at these tables. The realm of Social Sciences is unlimited It includes studying any activity dealing within the boundaries of the social environment The lecture on the Post Vietnam Syndrome by David Harris monthly meetings concerning possible topics of the Mid East Conflict and Prospective on Man in the Twentieth Century were a few of the highlights presented by P1 Gamma Mu in the 1973 74 year As a national social science honor society there are certain restrictions on membership A person must be a Junior or senior with a 3 00 grade point average and is required to pay a S22 fee which allows him to become a member for life The payment also entitles the student to the quarterly Journal called Social Science and is used to enlist him as a member of the Kansas Iota Chapter along with the national affiliate Some of the articles in the past Journals that have proved to be both informative and enjoyable are The American Presidency Youth Appeal and the Presidency and The Effect of Controls on the Economy WINTER SOLDIER ORGANIZATION PI GAMMA MU so 'I I Jinx -6 I 4 X it y mu T N Ii X N , I N f I 44 97 K X in..-T WS I II - I , I V 5 I I I II ' ' I 4 -fi :II I Q I lil XX 5 I V, I a 1 I I I I I r I I I I I I I I I 7 7 I I' gl Y! I - - , , I .. . , ,.. I L, .M I, II . . . . I III' III cc - ' 77 ' ' I III 1 9 . . . . If ' - ' 77 CC ' ' I T E . ' . . I ,I 97 III I' 7 , . . . . 1 I ' I I I 1 . . I I . . II , ll ' ' 77 Cl 3 ' 77 ll 7 I as E, . I 'I I. II I . I I I I I 1 , -I I I I ,,,,,...--v-1,-.-f-p4--Q,-.---qw V7 " qv----F ,,-.,v-- ,.,.,, .-..--- ,-.,r1..-4- fgga-'nv-11 '-"""""" "' 1 l-4 1 ""' """' ' " . , ' v-.2-A-'- : vi J-: .f. f,-r":-,xV---- -: A., .J V F . lk I X . ,xx - S .4-,ff-' -'f5,w3g?,-nf, N, Q, ' 'E' x O 4,,,.l.,1 ,HQ , N, A, 1 r Y I PQC, x W mfg ,Z U Social Scienqe Crganization Co-Sponsor Nixon Impeachment Rally 1 7 5 i'1 The Young and Old: Getting Together One organization at KSTC that has placed emphasis beyond the circumference of the campus itself and has focused its commitments into the community of Emporia is Young and Old United fY.O.U.l. A fairly new organization, Y.O.U. was organized to coordinate the college students of KSTC in a group whose purpose would be to provide personal friendship as well as activities and services for the elderly people of Emporia. The club focused its attention on the older citizens who still live in their own houses rather than those residing in nursing homes. Members worked on a one- to-one basis, whereas one or two students would work with one elderly person. It's left up to the individual members to decide how much time they could devote to the companionship of the elderly person. The members would help the aged by doing chores, running errands, providing recreation, and simply being good companions. Self-satisfaction is evident in such a service organization, and the gratefulness the members received from the elderly was usually worthy every minute of time they devoted. This organization definitely provided a two-way learning experience, with both participants benefitting. 132 5: g. J e , W: ww I I ' 5 Fond ues, Flowers and Frolicking In France Pi Delta Phi at KSTC is a national as well as a campus organization and thus recognizes two types of membership. Honorary members of Pi Delta Phi must have a B average in all French courses and a B- in all general courses. They also must be enrolled in the upper division of the French curriculum. These honorary members are eligible for membership in the national organization. The organization held several interesting events this year ranging from a Parisian flower sale to the promotion of a Christmas trip to France. Other activities of the '73-'74 year included French fondue dinners, cultural films and plays, the tutoring of French students, an evening of ghost stories and crepes, and a trip to a Kansas City art museum. 2 i J V' 'J X xA The purpose of the organization is to recognize outstanding scholarship in the French language and literature, to increase knowledge of Francets contributions to the world, and to stimulate and encourage cultural activities which will help widen the spectrum of appreciation for France and its people, 134 iioiiiil Q Q, 1 Y ?iQ?i'YiRQi iii REQNSQQEG 'lt' A 'Nile ill ,,n ,f 5 f, .X X rf1.0W D! fm' ff., 4 if s lf,i., l"!"""""' lui! naw' . II. ,- Y' 'sylsaf K" A -4 -new ww V . asv,-"M-"T - ,S 1. ,,.. ,-iz -73 X4 af Xf 'I X -Jgf, Q if . aiigiiafr' 3 Llf ff ' -"LZ ,,, ...T fr, R .fi E Q N i EN E i S x X l i i Y N ,,,, ' 1,1 f' ' U Q ai' .-fi f f ff -,,,,,.,..,.-s infill' 1 Russians Continue "Circle of Friendship" Kruzhok Druzhby, the t'Circle of Friendship." better known on campus as the Russian Club. was begun years ago to promote an interest in the Russian culture and language, and to provide students and faculty with an opportunity for personal involvement in the culture. social life and linguistics of the U.S.S.R. The activities of the Russian Club this year ranged from a "Siberian picnic" to promotion of a three Week Winter field trip to the Soviet Union. The group travelled to the University of Kansas several times to visit Russian classes, view movies and attend concerts by travelling Russian musicians. There were also slide presentations given by people who have visited the Soviet Union. Any student or member of the faculty or administration is eligible for membership. Roger Findlay, professor of Russian at KSTC, has been advisor for the organization for the past several years. .l. SPANISH CLUB If you can "habla" your "espanol" well enough to carry on an intelligent conversation, and can meet the necessary academic requirements, you could have been Cand perhaps you werel a member of Sigma Delta Pi, KSTC's honorary society of Spanish students. Sigma Delta Pi is designed to give the more advanced student a greater appreciation for the Spanish language. The members are required to converse only in Spanish at all meetings, which helps develop confidence in their speaking abilities. To join the organization you need to be a full-time students with at least two courses in Spanish literature or civilization at the third year level. You're also required to have an overall 2.5 GPA and a GPA of 3.0 in Spanish. David Sielert led this year's organization as president with Linda Willard assisting him as secretary-treasurer. Together with the other members they helped plan Sigma Delta Pi's activities, which included Spanish dinners, panel discussions on Spanish literary styles and works, and promotion of a trip to Spain for interested KSTC students. Ms. Patton, professor of Spanish, was sponsor for the honorary society and Dr. Travis, from the Department of Foreign Languages, was this year's advisor. 5' . ., .... . .. ..., -,XFN PM www.-,N,,-. .,.,..., . , L 136 . --,,...... ,,,'--,- HY..- 1 , 5--'-14 """"' , ' Q 4 aw X ,ll-T4 . ,V ,321g5f',1 .1 A 'Mfg .. ls-M-. ' GERMAN CLUB Students wandering on the third floor of Plumb Hall this year were bombarded with pictures and posters about foreign language clubs, giving them much to look at and ponder over. One of the organizations which always had information present was Verein Deutscher Freunde, which means-for those of us illiterate in the German language-the Union of German Friends. Just as the name implies, the German club was open to any student interested in Germany, its language, having fun and making new friends. The membership included students who were inexperienced in German aswell as those who spoke the language fluently. The club met bi-monthly for business, culture, and to plan the many German festivities and celebrations it held during the year. The Oktoberfest and Fasching celebrations were a few of the highlights, along with their bi-monthly Kaffee -Klatch and a variety of cultural programs. The club provided not only enjoyment, but also knowledge about traditional and up-to-date Germany, a chance to become acquainted with the personality of Germany as well as the language, and fellowship with others who shared similar interests. , German faculty members, Ms. Yount and Ms. Binkley, were this year's club sponsors. Greg Smoots led the organization as president, with Bob Storm, vice-president, Kim Thornton, secretary-treasurer, and Patty Arf as publicity chairman. On the national level, members of the German club at KSTC also automatically become members of the National Federation of Students of German and receive the monthly English-German publication, Rundschau. The NFSG holds a convention for German club representatives yearly and publicizes the activities of local clubs. 3 .gy 2 W1 y v I VQLLU r I X I W, w r E I D , 'kv' VIC International Club Promotes Awareness And Brotherhood. While school administrators were concerned last year about a decrease in enrollment at KSTC, there was one portion of the student population that they didn't need to worry about-the international students. There are over 175 international students now attending KSTC, and several years ago, when the number kept increasing, the International Club was formed. The main purpose of the organization is to promote awareness, understanding and brotherhood between the nations of the World, and to educate and inform the students at KSTC and the people of Emporia about the respective cultures the students represent. Besides international students, membership in the club is also open to American students, faculty of KSTC and administrators of the college. The activities of the International Club this year were interesting, educational, and added a certain "flair', to the regular campus events. The International Week held each year at KSTC is one of the biggest events sponsored by the club. During the Week a large variety of cultures are on display and many events are held to educate the students about foreign lands. They also hold an International Dinner each year, besides an assortment of lectures and films dealing with international affairs. Along with their numerous activities, the club also sponsors a reception during orientation week of each semester for international students, and holds a dinner or picnic for graduating club members. Besides these, there are activities during the year for the club members ranging from field trips to parties and picnics. 139 1 I Karate Club One organization at KSTC that's always proved to be very "active" lliterallyl is the Karate Club-and this t , year's group was no exception. The yells and thumps that usually accompany such arts of self-defense could be heard throughout the year wherever members gathered to improve their physical and mental control of the art. The club was organized around 1968 and has steadily grown in popularity at KSTC. The purpose of the organization is to obtain for the members a better understanding of the martial arts, improve their coordination and increase their speed and strength. Each member hopes, by the end of the year, to' have mastered an effective means of self-defense. One man who donated much time and effort to the learning of that defense was this year's instructor, Burt Kajatani. Advisor for the organization was Dr. Robert F. Clarke of the Department of Biology. lr 40 +A :Y .5 ws Q-gb f .A 1 S w 4 W '-A k M- N, ,hh fe,.u-'fix-N, - ,ff ,ai x s m,..p-e-H-nw '- i" K iff 'K ,fp , N L' 'LB ' 35' 'Kivlzgl--, 1 1x Lf f Q,,.,y , .- ,1- rf -gy, .9 5, i:f"f?f'f!:3' -' , n vyffef,"'3' Y ,.. ., . ff. 'mlm is 1 UN Highlights UNA-USA KSTC: UNA-USA tformerly CIRUNAB is asso- ciated with the national United Nations Association of the United States of America. The KSTC collegiate chapter has basically the same goals as the national organization-to present unbiased information dealing with the United Nations, its diverse organizations, and the various issues before the UN. Membership on campus is open to any interested student, regardless of his or her major. The organization basically attempts to study, by simulation, the Security Council and General Assembly of the UN and inform the college student about the issues that are relevant not only to him but also to the country and the world. Each fall KSTC: UNA-USA, in coordination with the Division of Social Sciences, presents a Model General Assembly and Security Council for Kansas high school students. The '73 program, KSTC's seventh annual, was held on Nov. 16th in the Memorial Union, with hundreds of students participating. The organization is also busy in the spring when it sends college students to different collegiate model UN's around the country. This year members were invited to attend the Far West Model at Portland, Oregong the National Invitational in New York Cityg the Midwest Regionals in St. Louis, the UN of the University of Oklahoma at Norman, and a Model Security Council at Princeton, New Jersey. , ll f El l ill , ll, 1 , ,F it Tl i il i It 1, If A l Qi T if 142 g m ff ff 1'-A.. f .X-fl' .lu-Q., , , V'-'NvnwwlM,,,,gu-Q.N,,.,,Q 43 , --mg? - ' A ""' -f ..,g,.,., A . , . . . x . ,. W ,, . , ,,.,,- . ,,w-, , so- ..--..- -. -.-.-..,, .- ..-51, I ,,.:nn-A ..-A, -K -sr- ,, - Q - . . ---V - . V - -...... V ,,, J .., ,.--l ,..-' -.,,-N .N -' ..-. -. asf . f--,-,X j--Vx . V ., -,,. V ,. , A s - wx , 2 'N 2 K4 be 'N-v. 'Nu 1 2 2 , S 2 E: 23 44 if . ,: , QW x- New .Y 'sf' 5. .143 ,.. ...,-- -qp f- P-' , ,fqfv-v 1'-""r-If 4 ,.,., , -..-, ar---.H f--5'- . ' -, 7 - ' ' V' -ff , " 'Jai-Yf'1 1 2 1 .N Nmmwh-W 5, x, , fu' w rv n Phi Beta Lambda is a national busin'ess fraternity for college students interested in the field of business and industry. The Kansas State Teachers College chapter is one of over 600 such chapters in the nation. The activities of Phi Beta Lambda provide an opportunity for business students to prepare for business and office occupations. PBL members learn how to engage in individual and group business enterprisesg how to hold office and direct affairs of a groupg how to work with representatives of other youth organizationsg and how to compete honorably with their colleagues on the local, state, and national levels. PBL provides an opportunity for travel to state and national conferences and leadership conferences, visits to other chapters and to business and industrial enterprises, and close contact with successful businessmen and Women. The purpose of this organization is to provide future business leaders. Phi Beta Lambda has been on the KSTC campus for over 15 ye.ars and has been the most outstanding chapter in the nation for the past 13 years. Seven members of the KSTC chapter have served as national president. The local chapter has well over 100 members and expected to have over 200 members before the close of the year. Members are juniors and seniors in business and business education. Many members are also affiliated with Personnel Management Association and Administrative Society, two specialiied groups under the auspices of Phi Beta Lambda. . 145 Business Crgcmization Picnic In Park Personnel Management Association is a specialized group under the auspices of Phi Beta Lambda, for students specifically interested in either office management or personnel management. Headquartered in Kansas City, the association provides various seminars and workshops throughout the year. Students are given the opportunity to hear speakers of the business field and obtain insight to the problems and functions that may arise in personnel management. All members of PMA have access to an extensive research library maintained at Marquette University and may register for employment services through national headquarters without charge. The society also distributes resumes of graduating members of the chapter to all national business firms which are members of PMA in the region of interest to the student. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students in the Division of Business and Business Education are encouraged to join. Memberships are 86.00 a year. Each student member receives a national magazine which is published monthly. Personnel Management Association holds regular meetings on the third Wednesday of every month in Kansas City. The group has a membership of 15. Officers of PMA are Larry Lucas, president, Scott Wilson, lst vice- presidentg Craig Stensaas, 2nd vice-president, Bryan Collins, treasurerg Ginger Erickson, secretary, and Larry Erickson, student advisor. Richard F. Reicherter, Division of Business and Business Education, sponsors the association. Administrative Management Society, sponsored by the Division of Business and Business Education, is organized for those students who are specifically interested in business management. The group is under the auspices of Phi Beta Lambda, the national business fraternity. The parent organization, headquartered in Topeka, provides various seminars and Workshops throughout the year. Representatives from business firms speak on the functions and problems of business management. Membership is open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students who are majoring in business and business education. The group has 15 members. A national magazine is published monthly and sent to each student. Administrative Management Society meets on the 3rd Thursday of every month in Topeka. Officers of the KSTC chapter are Larry J. Ericksongpresidentg Bryan Collins, vice-presidentg Cathy Ventura, secretary, Craig Stensaas, historiang Ginger D. Erickson, treasurer, and Larry J. Lucas, student advisor. Richard F. Reicherter, president of the AMS Chapter at Topeka and of the KSTC Division of Business and Business Education, sponsors the group. f 46 s l i l fan.. 's"ixf' ' MKZK' L... llhx M, ww' aww- 4 ,, ,. -.... ,-'fg,.n, ",--4..-Y .-,,-L,--1--gig' W 1 - A f --,--4---5 V----V--Y - - - . -V.. A, A V ,- J - , v-f,i.:T- 1 -.N 3: R A-if-1213.2--.17-5 iv ,, fxT..3Z:,n .,Av.,,?...-,Y 1- ...,, J ,,.,, lv ,. ,,-.,. . 3 x 1 I A F ' I I , l f n 1 L R Q V 5 . Y ,, V . iv,-.-.--.....,nn-1... , x Q i I i I I l 1 4 w a j 5. V vi fi Y -1 , ..-......,...-..-T-...,.,......,... , 5 The American Marketing Association is an organization of individuals interested in the professional growth and advancement of science of marketing. Since its founding in 1915, it has grown to more than 19,000 members. All members belong to the parent organization which has a central services office in Chicago. The Association seeks to achieve its objectives through national and regional conferences, chapter meetings, publications, working committees, special task forces and study groups. The individual chapter member keeps informed on: the best uses of facts to improve marketing decisions, new and old basic sources of marketing information, improved methods and standards for marketing planning, and techniques for the acquisition and validation of marketing information. Members of the American Marketing Association include marketing and research executives, product managers, sales and promotion managers, advertising specialists, business concultants, educators and many others. Members include men and women representing: manufacturers of consumer and industrial goods, colleges and universities, marketing research or organizations, radio, television and publishers, wholesalers, retailers, and other distributorsg federal, state, and local governmentsg insurance companies, advertising agenciesg and transportation agencies and public utilities. ini Q til. B. ,I iii " ' Xxx f l 5+ " N Wx l f,f rr-"lf an-.fu-y-rrp-"11g,0lY""l"""','3" 1.7 ' Y ,V ---VY 4- - ' " "Y rf- ? Y "' .' '.-' Y - 4- f ' " ' " , .,. .: .- .- Jrffr 4' fa .V '.3.--J ,:, , ..-.,- P J ,-..,,-.,:.-,J-...-.1-f-ur-1-'Y . ff - '-...'- 1,1-. ,- Z' Afw- -"'4'f- -ff 9, "1 - '- " ' ., ,,,..,...,.-. ,.. V ,. , ,A.1.-. g,7- '.-.g,. .- Ll. -1 w k., J -4 f . . . , , . . . , ... .,,,.,L,.,,.,,, f 1 1-17- 3 Hixkl ,2 M ,Nmap K X ff MK?" 3 N W Q WW 5 J Xb Q Q MARKETING CLUB Women's PE Hold Annual Christmas Party At Pizza Parlor Women's Physical Education Club was organized for the purpose of promoting leadership, professional advancement, and social relationships. The club has about 90 members, and holds monthly meetings. One of the meetings held this year included a Christmas pizza party. The purpose of the party was to initiate new members into the organization. Women's Physical Education Club also sponsors fund raising projects in order to provide scholarships to physical education majors. Club officers are elected at a spring meeting. Officer candidates must be active members of the organization and have a 2.30 cumulative grade average. 152 . ,.,..-,...,-L.--1-----v.. ' - - , , ' 1 I i 5 1 J I X i ,L 'E Ei ml: N 21' :L if 5? if gl gz gn In ' , 1 QM. I X 0 1 ? . - , , , - -' ,,5.-4y-i1vQ:v2"'.'Hu'1"'Y'5'f'Z2"'?,f1f"' f.,, , - ,' - Y " ' nji i' f,,- 'A ,'f :V-. I, - .,-, V-1,---.f ,,-- - A ....,...... .-,..-7-fy-nr--1,,,, - .--cc - , ,,,,- .'.,.+ W .1 , . - ..,.,, .,....,--....,..,....--..f.f--o--v--fv,f":"' ., , 541,51 - 4.51, --..,,r,f,1-,,,fJ,.f,4ff- N' -V - -4 ef ' i . - W - V , rv ,. if I, Y Y.-L' .uf if . ,,i.,,,,.,... .V , 4 t Q Synch ronlzed Swimming Club E .1 . -f af,-5 99 fXw:ff'. sgqirikr 4 kkrr' f , X .J :M Mvw. " f ii 4 ,A ' ft . Aquettes is a co-educational sychronized swimming club sponsored by the Play Factory in the Department of Health. Physical Education and Recreation. All students enrolled at Kansas State Teachers College are eligible to try-out for the club. Members. selected through try- out. are required to swim lengths of the pool using all swimming strokes. and to demonstrate a high proficiency in advanced swimming techniques. A knowledge of synchronized swimming. although helpful. is not required for membership. The group has 32 members. The group rehearses weekly at 3:30 p.m. Thursday in the pool. Each year the club presents a show which is free to the public. Members perform in solo. duet. and group numbers. demonstrating sychronized swimming skills with a musical background. The theme of the 1973-74 show 'was "What Memories. What Memories." It was given at the new physical education building in January. 155 Christian Fellowship Promoted Through Gamma Delta The Alpha Rho chapter of Gamma Delta is located at the Lutheran Student Center, 406 W. 12th. Its purpose is to promote Christian fellowship to the Lutheran students. This is done through weekly Bible study, fellowship meal, activities and retreats. Its goal is furthered by participating in regional retreats and conventions as well as with the national convention held each year. 56 Christian Group Attends FoII Conference ot Rock Fall Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship is an entirely student-led and student-governed non-denominational Christian group. It is students searching for truthfnot as academic questions for coffee breaks or bull sessions, but as a way of life. I.V. is a purpose orientated movement. Our main purpose is to challenge students to live in obedience to Jesus Christ. Our aim is to establish groups of Christian students on the college campus with the purposes of: 17 witnessing to the Lord Jesus Christ as God Incarnate and seeking to lead others to personal faith in Him as Lord and Saviorg 25 to deepen and strengthen the spiritual lives of students through fellowship, and 39 to present God's call in the foreign mission field. Once each autumn and again in the spring, I.V. has a weekend conference in Kansas f usually at Rock Springsb. These are opportunities to come apart from the cares of school, to meet Christians from other colleges, to draw closer to the Lord and His Word. Special speakers, along with small group Bible studies, worship, singing, and recreation round out the weekend experience. INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 1 5-7 J . 5 ! J J, - --25,7--ff P'f'7J' ' ' ' nA . V V, V AVA . -W i I 5 I 4 '4 I I I si 15: WF P Christio n Fellowship 1 Provided at Baptist Student Union The purpose of the'Baptist Student Union is to provide Christian fellowship to all denominations. In the Union itself, you will find students that are Catholics, Mennonites, Baptists, Methodists, and Lutherans. All these people strive for one goal and that is tospread the Word of God and His Love to all walks of life. Membership is open to anyone interested in Christ and the Christian way of life. Some of the people here are college students, while some are career people. The B.S.U. sponsors picnics, films, fellowship meetings, sports and just plain fun. On Sunday nights B.S.U. sponsors what is known as "Rap with the Rev." Ministers from surrounding churches come and talk. Thursday nights include a Bible Study which is student led. On October 4, B.S.U. sponsored a picnic for the International Students from India, Thailand, Kenya, Algeria, and Vietnam. After the picnic all went over to Brighton Lecture Hall and saw the film "His Land." This film concerned the prophecy that is found throughout the Word of God. 160 .G , ,R.'. . i, ,N ww' Y 1' 'LA' if I -,M I my .4 ' ', -,. ff gf -Q.. ,W , 2 , ln.. -Q.. 'B ww Q, ff if 235333 22 wg .Im v. Christian Science Orgonizo tion During the academic year, students and faculty members of several hundred Christian Science Organizations at colleges and universities in many parts of the world conduct weekly testimonymeetings, sponsor lectures, participate in various campus inter-religious programs, distribute free literature, maintain lending libraries and study rooms, and engage in many Worthwhile activities including their own daily demonstration of the Christ, Truth. Through these weekly testimony meetings and other activities, the students and faculty of the Christian Science organization at the Kansas State Teachers College share with the academic community the spiritual truths of Christian Science as found in the Bible and in the Christian Science textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, by Mary Baker Eddy, the discoverer and founder of Christian Science. ' - ---fi ,,,,.f"' ,Q n fs , ,,,, is tif A i -- --mf"f'iff'f:f-,V , """""""" W f M. MW W 'V W-M Qwiwlyfvvfw "'-wma 1. - 'Www W' l Ch ristici n Service Available In Epsilon Chi Nearly 2,000 years have passed since the original meal of the twelve disciples with Jesus was supped, but the generations of Christendom have passed the tradition down the years so that it remains a not uncommon practice with us today. Epsilon Chi, or the Christian Student Center, enjoyed the fellowship of believers around the table as a special event in its activities program. Also on the agenda were youth forums and weekly meetings on Monday nights. This religious organization was founded here at K.S.T.C. in 1968 in order to promote the principle of Christian service and to provide anyone interested with Christian fellowship. Officers are elected to serve September-May. Shirley Lawrence was elected to serve the 1973- 74 term as president, and her supporting officers were Carol Carter as vice-president and Cheryl Smith in the position of secretary-treasurer. 163 , Kansas Association for the Education of Young Children, K.A.E.Y.C., is an organization interested in young children, primarily the preschool and primary aged children. It is affiliated with N.A.E.Y.C. the National Association for the Education of Young Children. The organization is open to anyone interested in children. Membership may be obtained on the local, state, andfor national level. K.A.E.Y.C. activities are centered around the growth and development of the young child. This includes speakers, panels, and video tapes. One event this year was a chili supper where children, supervised by members, prepared the supper. K.A.E.Y.C. members also participated in workshops sponsored by the State Department of Welfare and KSTC, which were given throughout Kansas, and in the K.A.E.Y.C. State Convention held at Manhattan. At KSTC they have worked with the KSTC Color Cubes, color environments created and built for children, and in the KSTC Homecoming activities. Dr. Carol Marshall, professor in Curriculum and Instruction and head of the Early Childhood Program, is the organization's sponsor. The officers include: President, Sandra Turner, Vice- President, Julie Stierwaltg Secretary, Debra Reetzg and Treasurer, Roxy Melander. Other committees include: Program, Marcia Payton and Ruth Zumaltg Publicity, Connie Lockhart, and Historian, Deloris Solis. Debra Reetz has been the State President of the Student Association for the past two years. The KSTC Student K.A.E.Y.C. is one of the most active in the state. Kansas Association For The Education Of Young Children 164 ,,,....,,.--5,11-f-7""v:""""""f ' ' , A --- ff-..----fr--f'ftP"' A ' - - e -- - ' - A A " , 4 " f' 41,2 4 ffQ"'. ff ,. ., ,4. ,!,, f J f X fu E if COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTICNAL CHILDREN Since its founding in 1922, The National Council for Exceptional Children has undertaken many programs to advance the education of exceptional children, both gifted and handicapped. Some of the goals of this particular local chapter of C.E.C. are to promote professional standards o'f high order and to improve the preparation of all professionals dealing with exceptional children, to adapt programs designed to attract students into the profession of special education, and to inform the public about information regarding educational needs of the exceptional children. Early in December, a C.E.C. meeting was held at the Lyon County Center to discuss different programs for the Mentally Retarded. Monthly meetings are held to plan and sponsor professional meetings vyhich contribute to students' professional growth. Planning and carrying out or assisting in volunteer services in the community and sponsoring or participating in a career day for high school students are just a few of the activities sponsored by C.E.C. ir' ZZ AV' . as 1 -,Ek A 4 , 'X 'X . wma, .J-" 165 Pi Lambda Theta is a national honor and professional association for women in education. Its purposs are to recognize women of superior scholastic achievement and high potential for leadership, to foster creativity and academic excellence, to support the function of education in a democracy. to contribute to the solution of educational, social, and cultural problems. and to promote fellowship and cooperation. A member of Pi Lambda Theta must be a junior. senior, or graduate student in education at K.S.T.C.. have a G.P,A. of 3.2 or higher. and be recommended by a member of the faculty and by an active member of the Beta Theta Chapter. They must possess personal integrity and leadership qualities. The organization was founded in 1910 at the University of Missouri. and the Beta Theta Chapter was organized at K.S.T.C. by Dr. Eleanor Hoag on January 8. 1966. During the year the Beta Theta Chapter has been visited by one of their national officers. conducted initiation ceremonies. acted as hostesses for activities at K.S.T.C., completed national, community.,and school service projects. fund-raising projects. and a Christmas chili supper. There have also been monthly meetings to attend throughout the year. Officers for the 1973-74 school year are president. Connie Lockhart: first vice-president. Janet Fick: second vice-president, Janice Springer: secretary, Rita Tyner: treasurer and national student vice-president. Terri Geske. Chapter advisors are Mrs. Frances Jones and Dr. Virginia Ponder. .ai 66 1 . ---,,,....... .,, , ..,..-, . - 1, --"N ,.,...-..--Vf V .-- - h , V 1 s I i I 1 H 1 'a I ! r . E r -r 6 W X z YN A X A. . ,,,., new ,s k " '4 X, ,fm 'lf ff, 3,23 '01, R5 ,ug-mrs-rff?""""9 . V 7 1 . ., f-- V ff , T- f"Il . 3. W ' 'V 'H' K W .rvdk-Y ,, 'V-V 0--.j3,'A1'., - ,, .- L 1 .,.,..., V .. ff, ff-fag, 1+ M :R ff-We A KAPPA DELTA Pl Kappa Delta Pi is a national honorary society in education. The aspirations of Kappa Delta Pi include high professional, intellectual, and personal standards, excellence in scholastic endeavor and achievement, improvement in teacher preparation, and contributions to the field of education. These goals have been pursued nationally since the organizations founding in 1911 at the University of Illinois. and locally since the organization of the Iota Chapter at Kansas State Teachers College in 1920. Membership is open to juniors. seniors, and graduate students 'in the field of education. Requirements include a minimum grade point average of 3.3 for juniors, and 3.0 for seniors, and completion of a set number of hours in education. Kappa Delta Pi holds regular monthly business meetings which include programs and discussions concerning education. The organization also hosts the tea held at the annual Master Teacher Awards sponsored by the Teachers College in the spring of the year. A picnic, hayrack ride and other entertainments are also a part of Kappa Delta Pi's activities. Mr. William Edwards is the sponsor of Kappa Delta Pi. The officers for the 1973-74 term are: president, Dennis Neffg vice-president, Becky Novakg secretary, Sandy Raburng treasurer, Debbie Reetzg and historian, Rosemary Evans. 169 SIGMA GAMMA RHO The slogan of Sigma Gamma Rho sorority, t'Greater Community Service for Greater Community Progress," reflects the purpose of the organization-to serve the people of Emporia so they may progress forward. Sigma Gamma Rho at KSTC is an extension of the national organization founded at Baker University. Its main goal is to help black women become more aware of the avenues open to them through a career-minded education. The only stipulation for membership into the sorority is a GPA of 2.0. There are three groups on campus affiliated with Sigma Gamma Rho-the Philos, who 'help with the organization's major projectsg the Gammette club, consisting of girls who are interested in the sorority but are not pledgedg and a Rhoer club, whose membership includes high school girls wanting to be of assistance to the organization. Activities for the past school year ranged from a "Future Shock" fashion show in October to the Rhomania Ball held in the spring. Other activities included a Halloween party for the children of the community, a celebration of Founders Day, and participation in the Greek March Down during homecoming. The organization was also very active with the Miss Black Teenage Kansas Pageant held this spring in Emporia. 5. ff . f , axis f W . 170 Sorority Sponsors Teenage Beauty Pageant .1-""'5'x MI 1 5 . - .,,,,,, .wY It " ' " Ml f 1 xxx? T , , s ' ' 'g """ ""' "J ""' -' f' '---r4eJ"- Q--.1 3-Q ,,fY..,.1..., , fm-..-V -,,, F A E 1 K 2 ' w L if in Gi ff f? 'VJ za ,A M f ...K -L RESIDENCE HALL ASSOCIATION RHA, the Kansas State Teachers College Residence Hall Association, was formed in 1970 to improve communications between the halls at KSTC. The purpose of the organization is to allow students from all the halls to work together in developing programs and solving problems, with the hope of inaking the Residence Halls at KSTC a better place to ive. There are approximately 1400 students in the Residence Halls, with each resident paying a 85.00 per semester Social Fee to fund RHA. This gives the organization an operating budget of around 310,000 per year. Each hall elects representatives to vote for the hall, but every resident is a member with the right and invitation to attend the meetings and express a viewpoint or idea. The 310,000 in the RHA operating budget is used to sponsor various activities during the academic year. Probably the best known activity that RHA sponsors is Spring Fling+a week of fun, activities, and social events in celebration of National Residence .Hall Week. Free movies and dances are also provided throughout the year for the hall residents. The RHA council consists of the executive officers of RHA, the president of each hall, and the two RHA representatives and judicial board representatives from each hall. RHA forumulates hall policies and plans and organizes activities and services for all of the Residence Halls. This year's officers included Janice Cracraft as president, Jolene Riley as female vice-president, Steve Burton as male vice-president and Dixie Hagnauer as National Communications Coordinator. 174 Q , ,. .,....-- .. , . , VV W" 0' 1"!'tU"f3 fy Gw . I 'AK S Qi, ,lg 1 K xx L X -fkq ,Q 1 ' L ,' ! Vw- fn ' ' !-',- . ' in MX.!f5,L I5 V, , 'v A M x f-. A' 1. ' 1 -V5-yl 'RICK' ,e J . 1 - , .NN QEN Q 4. - ,Ld ,xv mf-49,1 w , HN , ... 'ff 'i ,Q fx s w' T, 1, f-wipe . w.p2 -fix 2 g 5 w g gd , .:v r N lfgiv 5, Q7 sv X 111- Af ,.f '1 'Q if .r . , ...K .I ,f S is 1' .,,4. v,g2f .f X rf ' h aa-If '- 'Q M xv 1 4, -f, ' 5 A 'xi , nf 2 -. ,'gJ,,x A-1 I1 ,g -. 'w M 3 f. ,Q-5.1 f 1 4 s 1 S, -Q " , Q ,r XS' , ' ' " 'A rx ,, A , 1 -ga! j . -5 - . -- f- LU! pkg ..-. N ' , 111 ljkl ' , , K u1zf,x" +- ff' ,- '4 ,, '. ww 'cr - PN Y, k 5 , ,Q I ff f, M, 'f ,-214' - ,ve-'Y' A " ff ' ' Jn, ' -5 5 -" ' - Q 3SVf'2:u' - X' .3 42' QQl'L7'?'??',g7g51 z Q' 1 il W, .. A I .yu Aym, ' ,. ,. jfjtf QVA , -uf .. 5 V "1 'irzvfF241f'. ' IQ! K A ,' f W- ' , . . T'- . f' " 'f .. - vf 1. , if V A f ---Q , jy-g ' 41+ if ' ,-"fu f 1' ' ., 2 ,gf U- , W f . 7.2 ,, br ,lj iqfmt. fi. Q, ,. W 12, Af1i,4 ,Pq,, all I -Q , gy , ff ig - fu: f- .1 11 - -. - . H ,1 .. 'Q -5 I ' i ' 5 X "J, ' - . ., -9 ffzflfv N' --'iq ,gf if p ' W ,gm frm,-r " ' K' .. ., - g . f 1 VS , f -f 5 -, 3,-eb ,r-kin . 4-1, ,A ,f ' 4"',1 .- A " f R ' ,2 '.gf?g ,,jg21". ' 'f,.1j11 J.?::'.b:.i.Mf3:g,9.ge.92:f3i:., i. 5 ,: X. -4.-. XQQ, -:ww --bg .X --ff 'I2.K ' fu' 175 .nu 275 ij 1 ef 5 , Q., ' I M I ' . ,Lf f 'i " U 3 n Y' , I f . . A, ' , ' N. ,, ae: n Q 3 x' fa- P 'Q Luxury And Convenlence Combined II1 Twln Towers .Qu ' Q, f f A f ' W, Lf ..,, im V M 1' ' ,, , f A ' ' " N ' ' ' U - VV lg ,. 15 A ' ' uf 176 ii 'HW -,,,,,4-of-rd'- i n 5' e 2 s . 5 Twin Towers Complex is located Northeast of Lake Wooster. and within the Twin Towers Complex are two distinct environments from which to choose. Everything from traditional to coeducational living is available. This complex features both indoor and outdoor recreational facilities including pool and snooker tables, ping pong tables, basketball courts and a volleyball court. It alsorprovides a large main lounge with comfortable conversation areas and a library for use by the Twin Tower residents. Singular-Trusler Hall, the West wing of the Twin Towers Complex, is located directly across from Welch Athletic Stadium and is coeducational hall with men living on the lower floors and women on the upper floors. The air-conditioned, six story building features study lounges on each floor, recreation and television areas, laundry facilities, and the Iden Meditation Room overlooking the Athletic Stadium. The North and South Towers have two-student rooms with built- in furniture, including study desks, closets and beds. The attractive new Towers have many special features. Each floor has a common lounge with a study room and cooling area, color television, and bath facilities. Luxury and convenience combine to make the Twin Towers a superior living environment. .. , 177 Conveniently located at the west edge of Lake Wooster, the three halls that are included in the Morse Hall Complex offer an interesting variety of living options. These halls are situated within a few steps of most classroom buildings as well as the Memorial Union and the Athletic Stadium. On a warm spring afternoon the grassy, shaded perimeter of Lake Wooster is often utilized by residents who study, talk, sing, and meditate where a few cold months ago, Snowmen watched spirited snowball fights. Such is the atmosphere that surrounds Morse Hall Complex. South-Southeast Hall in the Morse Hall Complex is a favorite of many women students because of its nearness to the Memorial Union and to the center of the campus. The Hall houses 328 women in rooms of four students each. All rooms are equipped with a private bath. South- Southeast Hall is air-conditioned and lounges are provided on each floor. Central Hall is the oldest living area in the Morse Hall Complex and is available to women students. Many women prefer to live in Central because of the movable furnishings which can be arranged according to individual preference. Central Hall, which is not air-conditioned, is also the smallest hall, with space for 118 coeds. Northeast Hall is one of the newest sections of the Complex and offers coeducational living with women on the upper floors and men on the lower floors. There is space for four students per room in Northeast and each room has a private bath. J Residents can make use of the recreation facilities in the Complex, as well as laundry facilities, study areas, and lounges. Air-conditioned and ideally located, this 196-capacity Hall has always promised to be one of the most popular. Morse Hall 178 an VY! ., -,. lg uf'- I 1fff2, JM,- 4 l ulngs as ostudy, h is the rnessto . South- wbmen ference. n on the m has a eas, and opular. 1 W' Y :N- Sl P-Sl' X , ffl Qfi x ,IOVQN ge 80 65" M. if Q, , ,Y rg-835 4n'.CQ9m,,:a. ge ef'- 'Q M' 4. 'N' Q" ff 0' - X1..,':,h, .2 2 ,lk -.,,,f-vr--ovrr- " """'f 5-Q...-v-,sr-' :N un -., 4 .. ,-, - f 4 .--,,, 4..-,:,........f:1-,-5-:1-7g ,.,i JI, -.,A . .- - ....,.. , 0' . as f. , I .- gp.. vit. Q ' Ole'- XQ Q P' 1, W X . ,xl 14: U .I 'vly 1 film' 3, ml fl! A Q.4 f...,." A 1 l,,,n-' W af t - Q ,Mira 1 . .g . .f 'xx '1- f"""" Q-f' G 1 0 ' I Arab- American Friendship Club S Last year a new organization, the Arab-American Friendship Club. was formed at KSTC Their main purpose was to inform the coll d . ege an community about Arabian culture and hopefully to help ease misunderstanding about the Arab peoples. Since then, the club has grown in membership and accomplishments and has expanded it's purpose to include the promotion of relationships between Arab students and the student body, teachers and the Emporia community. 'It has also developed a relationship with the other organizations on campus and continues to be of service to new Arab students who have trouble orienting themselves to KSTC. Membership is open to anyone desiring it-there are no limitations. During '73 the organization sponsored speakers and films about the Arab culture for the students and community, held a fund-raising dinner along with other social activities, and participated in International Week. Issam Al-Usaimi was this year's president. His fellow officers were Ayman Sheik El Aid, vice-president, Sue Sherman, secretary, and Fahad Zamel, treasurer. James Sturgeon from the economics department was this year's sponsor. .fr-' S 181 g i 4 t t The Black Student Union was first' organized in 1967 with a three-fold purpose: to educate black students about their culture and give them a worthwhile organization with which to identifyg to aid blacks in the Emporia communityg and to bring about a sense of black awareness through organizational efforts. BSU has been very active in the past as it still is today. The organization formulated and initiated the GAAS office on campus and has worked with the Emporia black community providing tutoring services and assistance with housing difficulties. The group is also responsible for bringing many prominent black speakers to KSTC. There are no limitations on membership-any interested student can belong to the organization. John Hammond was this year's president, with Arno Sams as vice-president and Mark Sevier as secretary-treasurer. Verdell Taylor served the organization as advisor. The main activities held this year were the Mr. and Miss BSU contest and the annual Black Week, held the week of Feb. 18th. 182 IV BLACK STUDENT UNION J A ' CARDINAL KEY NATICNAL HONOR SORORITY Attig, Linda Hill, Barbara Anderson, Karen Hoagland, Nancy Colgan, Sharon Hogan, Karen Hammack, Cheryl Kirkwood, Jill Harlan, Nancy Korte, Nancy 4 Linares, Elsa Myers, Janet Ray, Latricia Klepper, Vivian Udall, Jackie W C I, ,, ,,,.,,.,-Mn Picturn Chuck Cool Blue State at Me build leg and forn Men keeping and desi more lik Acti Freshml handle tl VY , Vivian Jackie Gl- la-ff of ls ,f r W 'I ' fx L ffl ef! 5- , ' .s ' f f -. 4" . ' J 1 b , .' M , 4,,h ,W i,.i,. . P' , . . N , f 5 ,Q ., 1Q.f,,. 5 , 'fnm.,.,,,v4,?,y..:f'gg: Q S i'iii f . 'f -, r e 1, L N . 1, X ,, ' ' i 9 'sf-J P- . ' f 1 'f ' . ' - A te V Q .fx a e A ,I -W .-J . K it . .X S. K fisitv., ,. Pictured above are the members of the Blue Key National Honor Fraternity. Members are tleft to rightlz Jack Warnock, Richard F. Richerter, Chuck Cooper, Rick Sedlacek, Tim Priest, Larry Erickson, Larry Lucas, Steve Davis, Rich Gilbert, Greg Miller. BLUE KEY Blue Key is a national honorary leadership and service fraternity for men. Its members are selected from Emporia State at the close of their junior year, and they participate throughout their senior year. Members are selected for their leadership ability, scholarship, and service to Emporia. Blue Key does not intend to build leaders, but to take them after they have established themselves, recognize their accomplishments and ability, and form a group of men who will contribute to the welfare of Kansas State Teachers College. Membership is traditionally limited to a small group of men. It is felt that by limiting the number of members and keeping the organization small, the group becomes more effective and membership is something that is sought after and desired strongly by the men of Emporia State. With strong desire for membership, once chosen, a man will be more likely to contribute to the success of the group. Activities throughout the year include coordination of both spring and summer graduation, Founders Day Freshman Talent Show, Prayer Breakfast, Blue Key Darling, and this year will be the fourth year for Blue Key to handle the Student Faculty Directory. 85 , ' 1 i 11 ' 'i 5 l Backhus, Martha Becker, Dorothy Binkley, Connie Blanka, Michel Brandt, Julia I lx ,H i if i, tsl ll ll 5 l 1 S P U R S dpi Lilce a bird ot beauty and grace, may a Spur i soar to acheive the goals ot her flight upward. As she wings through the vastness of her realm, the sun l shall shine to guide her through clarity of tore- l sight. The breath ot the, wind will direct her while she goes forward to serve. As she passes over the ii is C sea of lite, may she recapture the serenity and -l 2' 1 peace she symbolizes and with it the sands ot understanding spread under her feet. With the dawn I ot the day and the advent other flight, she will assume l l her responsibility on wings ot strength ot charac- V, i ter as she sails through 'the light air. And as the day '. , ends, may her personal sacrifices cause her to re- Eil i member their joy and her ruffled feathers be smooth- l . ed by a happy countenance that illumines the still l C night. ii li i ll l 1 i .X , ,. j 1 i. Carpenter, Joy Cutting, Cathyanne Firn, Lori Froelich, Suzanne Gamblin, Jan Cage, Eva Ginavan, Janet 186 4 it 4 Goode, Jane Gustafason, Janet Heitman, Susan Hibbs, Jackie Holt, Jean Hootz, Lois Kauten, Sue Kissinger, Terri Letholt, Renee Litteral, Judy Platt, Cheryl Reed, Carol Rinner, Jean Robertson, Nancy Rochat, Lilly Sawyer, Barbara Scheffler, Belinda Sivyen, Ann Snyder, Donna Veatch, Johna Williams, Lorraine Zorn, Patty 1 87 Bonfire Kicks Off Homecoming Activities i X fi c 3 E9 A i i A cj-' 3 I f K ' if 5 V , Y f mf ' ' 5 - -' QQ :gil FQ K ig , e Q if N Q51 - xy . o M' ,J 2 -X V g b , H 9f:f,.1Qni, . . - CHA ' ALLTH AY I ' I fliw F . C w o Fld Q ' i a M V rg we c . .J ' 5 ' , . .i.. -M--' gf fff' 1f ?'? " 'i v . r Nj V IAKA ,,,' , ,, ,V .,,, I ., , , , , ' . f , . .44 c e' '-o- c of Qleo o f 'f J i ec i i oe X' e - V ' M " i , e "" -P Q ' W i. ' j c i'fo i c i o M c I i I 188 li i 3 4 2 l , .isa - -Ms 4 Ea. vi ,H G X . 9 9 1 n""""'Q""' -A . , Y' -.K 'I 4 lv' . 'W 04" X A - 4 . 4 , Q 41 1 7 - ' ,V .iw " - '71 " il he I W' E ,L V I, 4. ,j Q ' Fa Th: J W - ' -fr X ' th fi' 1 4 , A ' " "' ,' - 5 rr Q t . Q-- - sp 'X-5 5 ' 3 ,, W - D 4 Q W V I ' 1 ,. pr 'Q f f' 'J N3 "H f A ' J , In V ,," ',, T . .M , by J- ,V , , 5 Q -xg 6' A y 1 , ff I vi , 'gf 0, ,Q Avg, in I , , x J. 1' l I I , 1 .. A I - -, . 5. . V V, .T , U, If 1 V ' I 1 W ' , W P. ' , 2 'i ff? MW' 1, Q' ,' 1 r -, , 'W ,Q ' .- 'Y ' 8 4, 'V , 1 .Rf , . .,... , . M V H I ,Nth , M,. Q ,,,. , r VA 'V I 4 .mf , .-1q,.,,,,,. N J If you missed KSTt"s Homecoming last fall you missed one of the best. The weather was perfect. the activities were plentiful. and the memories were of good times, Some of the many activities included a Homecoming parade. sponsored by Cardinal Key where individuals and groups were allowed to participate with decorated cars and floats, The Alumni Association sponsored a Kaffee-Klateh and reunions were held for the classes of 113. '23, '33, 48. and '63 A Hornet Club-K-Club Breakfast attracted about 200. That evening. many people attended a social hour and dance and others saw the musical production of "Camelot.'i Unfortunately. Silent Joe remained silent that day as the football team suffered one of its two losses for the season and were downed 13-10 bythe University of Nebraska from Omaha But. with all else Considered: it was a great day. .,,,......,..f--"""' F-- .,,.. . V .a.,.,,awff - . --v--- "1 'L'-ea., 1-.. 191 its "Z . .X --WE-P '- .-,:"T'-ff-:-P-Y-H..-J -.-1-. - .-,lit-Y71,,, Y -'f-511'-15 . 11", '.1g,f-'fb fil:-T'1fM.-7-iii " i'5iT 'M -"':"'k '1 X4 T'-3" ?'4'y"' -Q-N 1 w ww f mf +7f4 C 1 fi ' L I If 15 -N ' -, fygxfya 'A ..-1, 'W' wa-Yi,-1 ' I or , f "U mg ,f lim' YM 2, Ll i 5- , ,,f, . , Viv, Q, I ,V ,fm ,g.i' Mm A 14 75.1311 V? fl , 9' 3 Wi? I v A' - x.. UW 9 mffkv fi 1 - ' ov may fr if P 'knvr K Q it J! A! ? f 1 .. "is Q Y. Q73 ' V45 A it Q' ,Q if fr - 47 fl 1 ,-MZ? - if ..r" i, , K x "FN-'H , 'Nu 1 ' PP -H., w '- i . , + 'if wh, A ' nf- -Q ' T' -av . 4 ,, A, .4 15 'Nl 1 3 -K Q 'CDU' hgh 'Sf f 1, ,V Q , 'lx Q c 1 I 1 ' J 4 ' I 1 . 1 1' 2 ,. 'W . I 5 00' . JT' " 4 A Mk' , I . ,J 1 ' ' Q ..- Q-. , a v u-Y " .1 Xs'. f ! , . 1' c ,f f ? 1 0, P15 Ns g 11 Q .z Ax 5 1 --1r--lf!---.-.........,-4,.Ai,..,., , ---'-vw---..-.f --......... ,,,,,,,. ,I -ar- The Homecoming weekend Closed on a dismal note as the University of Nebraska, Omaha. beat the Hornets 13-10. KSTC led most of the game on a field goal by Gary Hare. Saul Ravenell. Omaha running back. scored for Omaha shortly before the half but KSTC still led 7-6. As the fourth quarter slowly ticked away. KSTC still leading 7-6. the lVIaveric-ks took the ball and drove 52 yards for the winning touchdown. Saul Ravenell scored his second touchdown with 1117 and a last effort by the Hornets fell short. The loss left the Hornets with a 7-1 mark with one game remaining. 4 lg- f x .g,,,nm,t,w 5 2 4. Ffa?-a1:Yff 'fairy JGA2'-'ff 'M 'Wf"i'M'k72"5f 373 Vis' if t w , 5 f ,M 1:11 YQ ,Fifi ggvafg, M , ,, 7? '35 4 1, YW mug jf' - ,xanffw 1 -in X' 5,2 Q Q. 5 ,Q We awww fir? 195514 fjalrw' ia :.q,, ,va ,,, K . --J 3 . . kg-' W' 'W A V ff", J. A xv .ii 5, NJ I I 'Q -. M f N R Q, 7 V X f j i I :fi H w 5. y r-- .1 a 711,14 ' hi. ' " ' ., I E: v ii Jr . TH wsu 'WS' V- V Q - e .1 H431 ,rl 4 Y5:',,"1 f H, . 1 - ' '-- ' p , - iwrr 1. " 1 P Q 'Q l I -PM 4 .F F 5' , ,'.' .' f ". "V, U ',.r-ifitf 'J5 -6aq?.e,gf 2125 . , Mgr -, -:M 4 if E-my-fr-1-a?tfLf:? H' r' fi . A 7 , f -4: If , V , 5. . , ' ,., ,, Q15-ff 'l" :jj " 4 V , H 4 1 I ' Q,-In-. X ,V , , 1 ,-M4513 ,-:yr 1-aaa: , . -.1 , Q. V , -Y ., n4, , - iv wi . ' 'aww , f n.:m2ffJ"'f- 1 lf - 1 i , ,N I.,- x ' ' ' s , ,sf. Y-L , 'w L'Vf,j,A . ! . v' I '- VA 4 ' 1 . ' J '- f : - -1, s if 10 d!rW1 Q E W , !,, z inf! 5 , 4 .1 Y' X . .ff N ' '14 ,gmt 4 .A A 1 xl -Q, h . 1f. await fx. N. ul? -M1 Distinguished Guest und Hornet Band Highlight Hulftime Festivities Hthjnw-fl.4,4,..., '7-Irv' 4-N iff" PNK: ' L eg, V 45 15 gg P1 I Electrifying Concert Provided by Bench Boys The Beach Boys Homecoming Concert at the Civic Auditorium was a night of smashing nostalgia. The trip back to the past was highlighted by an electrifying light show and such reminiscent numbers as "'Barbara Ann" and "Surfer Girl." Their new style of harmony was not nearly effective and crowd shaking as when they broke into their "rock ni roll" songs of the past. The crowd was so enthused, they were called back three times with everyone requesting their favorite. One might say, "They made their come-back at K.S.T.C." sf ii 92 - w lex, g , B Egg WW 98 ,Q I' 'ht if :N nn V cg nu 1 muh u 'Vu 'wwqw sy lfm in ,--MV 4 p. ,4 1 I f, , BFG!" Y fag QL ' . 57 J ' . 7 ,1 L5 , l . ,ai 1 . 1,53 . 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Eat, ' lx 5 i Q ,, w ,-,w w I . f 4 , . f V i x. w. , r 202 Jim Lindholm- Defensive linebackers Charles Divitto- Offensive line Dick Banister- Defensive interior line Bill Crabbe- Defensive ends Rick White- Quarterbacks and wide receivers Bud Elliott named GPAC "Coach oi the Year" Z - 5 -a FF! if 7' ,ffl ,, M Coach Harold "Bud" Elliott Qwith earphonesj checks with team spotters as assistant Hank Hettwer and wide receiver John Connell watch the action. ,, 1 Hank Cal R Year " ttwer and wide 1 8 l I 1 1 I l 1 1 Hank Hettwer-Offensive Coordinator Cal Reimer-Defensive Coordinator Hornets Tie for GPAC Crown Two late season,s losses somewhat dimmed the luster of the 1973 season for the Hornets although it was still a grand year with the final record standing at 7-2 and the Hornets tying the University of Northern Colorado for the conference crown. There were dazzling moments in store for 1973 as the Hornets defeated two arch-rivals, Arkansas Tech and Missouri Southern, that they had never beaten before, and scored two successive shutouts in conference play as they topped Pittsburg State by a 30-0 count and came back the next week to blank powerful Northern Colorado 10-0. At one time midway through the season the Hornets had reached the lofty pinnacle of a third-place ranking in the NAIA Division I ratings and were one ofthe top teams in the nation in rushing offense. Hornet running back Abe Welcher finished the season in the number 10 spot in national rushing statistics with 128 yards per game and 6.3 yards per carry. Abe's final rushing total stood at 1157 yards. The Hornet defense also carried a high national ranking throughout the season and was especially effective against the run as shown against Northern Colorado when the Bears were able to muster only a total of six rushing yards. 1973 RECORD OPPONENT KSTC OPP. 41 Arkansas Tech 17 56 Central Missouri State 10 30 Pittsburg State 0 10 Northern Colorado 0 45 Southern Colorado 12 15 Fort Hays 9 30 Missouri Southern University 24 10 University of Nebraska, Omaha 13 10 Washburn University 20 203 Mike White 1121 leaps over a fallen teammate as he picks up blockers and some of the 183 rushing yards the Hornets gained against the University of Northern Colorado on the way to a 10-0 blanking of the Bears. ARKANSAS TECH Sept. 8 The season opened in Russellville, Arkansas where the Hornets strode onto the field and pummeled the Wonder Boys of Arkansas Tech, 41-17. Quarterback Mike White, operating the wishbone offense flawlessly, rushed for 117 yards on ll carries and tossed a 26-yard touchdown pass to John Connell. Abe Welcher initiated the new season in top form, racing to a personal one-game high of 202 yards and two TD's. The defense contributed a 6-pointer, compliments of an interception and a 95-yard runback by Bob Clements, to conclude the scoring. CENTRAL MISSOURI STATE Sept. 22 After a two-week layoff due to Wayne State College cancelling their game, the squad travelled to Warrensburg, and devastated the Mules of Central Missouri State, 56-10. Leading the parade was running back Doug Floyd who scooted his way to a personal high of 209 yards rushing and two touchdowns. His touchdown runs covered 92 and 20 yards. Larry Voorhees was on the receiving end of touchdown passes of 30 and 18 yards, one each from Mike White and reserve quarterback Ken Nohe. 204 PITTSBURG STATE Sept. 29 The Hornets opened their conference schedule at Pittsburg State, the only conference team to beat them in 1972. E-State defeated the Gorillas with a steady offense and typically stubborn defense, winning in a shutout, 30-0. Abe Welcher opened the scoring on a four-yardjaunt in the first quarter and in the fourth quarter sped 80 yards for the final score. Greg Ptacek responded with 75 yards on ll carries, setting up a score by Doug Floyd. A TD was essentially all the Hornets needed as the rugged defense allowed the Gorillas only 80 yards total offense. NORTHERN COLORADO Oct. 6 Defense dominated the game between E-State and Northern Colorado but the Hornets prevailed in an exciting 10-0 victory. The Hornet defense completely stifled the Bears from Greeley enroute to a 10-0 conquest, their second conference win and fourth victory in as many games. Northern Colorado entered the game leading the nation's NCAA small colleges in total offense with almost 500 yards per game, but the highly touted offense of the Bears could not get untracked against the stingy Hornets as Northern finished the game with 92 yards of total offense, only six of those coming onthe ground. Mike White scored the winning TD from the 4-yard line as the Hornet offense garnered 250 yards. Mike Denimarck had an exceptional game as he intercepted a pass and crushed Bear ball carriers with 9 tackles and 3 assists. University of e at .hem in Jffense and 0-0. Abe 1 the ls for the Jn 11 as fense e and 1 1 n exciting d the Bears ond es. 1ation's 500 yards ars could not ern nly six of he winning nered ime as he with 9 1 l'lmlllllllllllllillllllllUIlillillllllliUiIIllIUIUQllllllllllllllllllllllllllilll1Ill1UiIll1Illlll1ll11111ll1Ill11111'1111lll1ll1111111111ill1ll11111111ll1ll11111ll1111I11Illllltllllillllllllllll' 1111 ,,11ll1 1111111 11111111111ll11111lllllllll1ll1lllliilllllllllllll 1 llllllllllllllflllllllll ll ll ll llllll llllllllll llllllllllllllll1llllllllllllllllllll SOUTHERN COLORADO Oct. 13 The following week Southern Colorado invaded Welch Stadium and limped wearily out as the Hornets bounced the Indians, 45-12. Gary Hare booted his longest field goal in competition from 47 yards out to give E-State the early lead. Mike White starting quarterback left the game in the first quarter with a knee injury which sidelined him for the year. Ken Nohe spelled White and displayed a running ability which netted him two touchdowns on runs of30 and 10 yards. Abe Welcher led all rushers again, picking up 161 yards and 2 touchdowns, but lost an additional 105 yards on penalties. Bob Ginavan picked up 87 yards on 7 carries and his first varsity touchdown to highlight an impressive day at halfback for the freshman from Topeka. FORT HAYS Oct. 20 KSTC fought from behind to defeat the Tigers of Fort Hays 15-9 and gain at least a tie for the GPAC title. Darrell Bowman returned the second-half kickoff 79 yards for a TD to spark the Hornets to their sixth win of the year. The Tigers took a 3-0 lead shortly before halftime on a 33-yard field- goal by Phil Harris. The lead was short-lived howeverg as Bowman, the fleet defensive back instilled some life in the lagging club with his dazzling second-half kick-off return. On the final play ofthe third quarter, Abe Welcher blazed 63 yards off left tackle for his 8th TD ofthe year and finished the game with 139 rushing yards. ' MISSOURI SOUTHERN Oct. 27 The Lions of Missouri Southern College roared into Welch Stadium, but to contradict an old proverbial phrase, they did not go out like lambs. Southern gave the Hornets all they could handle and then some, but KSTC finally managed to shear them, 30-24. E-State was on the score- board after only 14 seconds had elapsed as Darrell Bowman took the opening kick-off at the 5 and scorched his way to a 95-yard touchdown. Otis Pelham drove through a big hole for the second E-State tally as Darrell Bowman set up this score on an interception. The third period was nearly disastrous for the Hornets as the Lions blitzed the scoreboard with two touchdowns before the Hornet offense took possession ofthe ball. MSC marched 91 yards following the second half kick-offto tie it at 14. then got the ball back on the ensuing kick-off as a Hornet return man fumbled. Quarterback Ray Hamilton found his prime receiver Anders open and the Lions went up 21- 14. Russ Jenkins, Hornet defensive end, dropped a Lion halfback for a loss on fourth down to give KSTC good field position and on the next series Doug Floyd tripped in from nine yards out to knot the count at 21. On the next Hornet possession, Ken Nohe guided the offense to its fourth score ofthe evening to put the game away. Nohe set up and zipped a pass to tight-end Paul Diaz for the winning score. I 205 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 '1 ,I 1 E i 1 UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA, OMAHA Nov. 3 The Mavericks ofthe University of Nebraska at Omaha rode into Welch Stadium to oppose the Number 3 ranked Emporia State squad and proceeded to ride herd on the Hornets, 13- 10. The little dogie who instigated the stampede, Saul Ravenell, amassed 224 yards on 421 I carries, scoring both Maverick touchdowns. His second tally, which came with 1:17 remaining in the game, gave Omaha the lead for the first time and was the decisive score. The Hornets had moved ahead 7-0 midway in the first period when Welcher plunged in from the one after a fumble recovery by Russ Jenkins at the Omaha 21. Welcher went over one-thousand yards for the year on this day with 113 yards on 19 carries. A mishandled center-snap on a punt set up the Maverickis first score, but E-State still led at the half, 7-6, as UNO missed the extra point. Gary Hare booted a field goal from 34 yards out to move the Hornet lead to 10-6, but field position gradually shifted to the Maverick's favor in the fourth period. Their second and only possession of the quarter began on their own 48 resulting in a score as Ravenell dashed in from the two with 1:17 left. On the ensuing series, the Hornets drove from their own 32, to the Omaha 17 but a field-goal attempt from the 30 was no good with 0:03 left on the clock. Omaha had beaten the mighty Hornets. WASHBURN UNIVERSITY Nov. 10 The Ichabods of Washburn University spoiled KSTC's chances ofa post-season national playoff berth and sole possession ofthe top spot in the GPAC with a 20-10 lacing ofthe Hornets. QAbe Welcher was the only backfield runner in that line-up that started the year.5 Ken Nohe who had replaced Mike White in the Southern Colorado win, was held out of.this game with a shoulder injury. Doug Floyd also was ruled out, with a sprained ankle and Greg Ptacek had not played since the Fort Hays game due to a thigh injury. Replacing Nohe at quarterback was freshman Ken McArthur. Washburn took the lead in the second quarter on a 3-yard dive by John Stauffer, and this lead, 7-0, held at the half. In the fourth period the Hornets managed to score on a field goal by Hare. Then the next possession netted E-State a 10-7 lead as Welcher scored from the two. But the Ichabods countered with a score oftheir own to go back on top, 13-10. Down by three with 3:02 remaining and on their own one-yard line, McArthur attempted a pass to get the Hornets back in the game. The pass was intercepted and Washburn got an insurance touchdown leaving the Hornets hanging on the losing end ofa 20-10 count. ' In retrospect, the season can be looked back upon with pride and respect. Followers ofthe Hornets witnessed an overpowering, rugged brand of football. 206 The strained face of Bob Bangston, quarterback for the University of Nebraska at Omaha, reflects the force of a Larry Wall tackle. Bangston steered the Mavericks to the winning score with 1:17 remaining in the game to hand the Hornets their first loss of the year. Mike Denimarck was named on the NAIA All-American first team defense. Abe Welcher was voted second team offense, and Paul Motosko made Honorable Mention on defense. Eight Hornets were selected for the 1973 Coaches and Players All-GPAC Team, nine men on the UPI All- GPAC Team, while Bud Elliot was named Coach of the Year: and nine players were voted to the NAIA All-District 10 Team. The Hornets will lose 10 seniors through graduation and they will be missed greatly, but they will be leaving behind them a talent-laden and experienced team that will be striving to bring to Emporia a third consecutive GPAC crown. Vt, X.. ,, ,,., , ,gat s 1 1721 ,Emi , 5 . , Bob l21l nine V l e University of 1 Wall tackle. :ore with 1:17 ,s of the year. All-American d team ntion on L Coaches IPI All- h ofthe Year: strict I0 graduation saving 1 that will we GPAC Bob Clements 1411 leads the goal line stand and upends the ball carrier as the Hornet defense refuses to yield. Moving in to assist are Mike Pettey 1217 .and Larry Wall 4311. The Hornet defense was stingy all year allowing the opposition an average of just 2.6 yards per carry on the ground, and nine opponents were able to gain only 995 total yards during the season. 207 1 K A zz fp M..-vhs Q ., J, ww I Y, 2, 1 le, ,,. 5 1? W' i' iii, is x Q1 ' ,, fm A af, I , , , 7,3 , wx , A , 4' Dv A ,Q . 1,1 " v - 5 k ,I 4- , , rV"i'v f 3' , W' 'H , 3? 3 L N ff ff . f f-af ..,,, , v V, V V, 42 X x ,, , 1,1 ff , ii M ' ., aw '3 ' V24 i -'M my' ' ag Q X- ff 208 zn, , w !, E I- .M I 1 T7 f, , 1' sf ' f I Z ,I N' , Wg. af '-gkggt-fm f 6 , , x szxvg, ,g2ff'5ff5Q - K If X,,, 1 -ff wwf -"1 .' fv Q NH, ' 7. iff' ,gf -Q , Q' -Mi .A W . , 5 ff X6 f fn, I ,,,f QR-4,fw ' , M- ,-f w Q ,MQW . ' - . .... f LV , , , j . . ,,, , 'ff ff f , 4 ,X . x . ,I , ' -N:-ff , 7 MW -g Q v X,'lV4"g.gh M , , ' 'Q' .. .Y 'f 5 'Q wEif",,. -, NM, J , , .,g:' at Q H V ' . 'Q 4 ' . 5 Q P r,g,, -.,,.,,., ', ' . f i- '4 0' 's ' . . Q. , 5 , K '- K 'G 1 , , .- , 4 is I f A 1 vi Q w , ,- ie '. 1 209 Middle linebacker Mike Denimarck moves in to assist a host of Hornet tacklers who have a Ft. Hays State runner in their grasp. Also closing in are Mark Luedtke 4521, Bob Clements 1415, and Jay Ternes 1451. The Tigers of Ft. Hays State extended the Hornets on this afternoon but still the Hornets prevailed for a 15-9 win, their fourth conference victory in a row. 210 Linebackers Mike Denimarck and Bob Clements take a breather during the Hornets 30-24 win over the Lions of Missouri Southern, the first time that the Hornets had beaten the team from Joplin. In the picture below the Hornet fans show their confidence and loyalty as they inked their names to a booster sign hung on a campus building prior to a home game. At the time the Hornets were ranked number 3 among the NAIA Divisionl schools and a trip to the NAIA cham ions i Q tm: AY P C CHA n A M suPPoR1eas P C Cl'lN'lP5 Qrne it we C 4 Q. X g ' v Dfw? fee-'-ff X .., A -uf' ,A 1 Ar 211 Fifteen Hornets Reap Post Season Honors MIKE DENIMARCK-NAIA All-Americag All-GPAC Coaches and Playersg UPI All-GPACQ All-NAIA District 10. Drafted by Detroit Lions. ABE WELCHER-Second Team NAIA All-Americag All-GPAC PAUL MOTOSKO-Honorable Mention NAIA All-Americag UPI All- Coaches and Playersg UPI All-GPACg All-NAIA District 105 GPAC GPAC3 All-GPAC Coaches and Playersg All-NAIA District 10. "Player of the Year." X 2 12 JERRY and Pla GARY I MARK NAIA FAU Vouc- L h 4 ,,- F. -- H,-..f.,..,.,1-..--., pn-o-"v':"r-"" "Vina, '9' f ' ""- ' J ' .V , an-.' Q- J , A yn-., ' " ' . .. , . U 0 Q 1 -5 'I -"' A' :L ':: :rs ' 9 1 ': -A"ux: -'x- - ' 1 - In wi :lux 77' XI' ivxrmz .:- :H ' " l Hr I" :1.r.'::,i L: rg ' - ' 4 4 'ul .aim .w,vf-- we va-nf-M ,vm xp 1, 5 I I 4 4: ,, II, If IlI III "I III I I - I ,X I .3 I I I I I I I I ,, I II I II I , I II III I I . 'II I I I j I , I I I JI, I I I f. I I , I Il I I I , kr In II I I N I I I , I I I I I I I I ' 1 v Ii I ' Ili - :I sg 1 , 4 I' ' I I1 II I I I I I I I II IU. III IIII1 " III fs! I xl 1 Is: ' lie :III I . ,J I :I 13 . 1 I IIN iIIeII I mg I!.Ig I IIIE Il II" I' gi. I ,I ,. II ' I 1 I . I I I I -- ,'1 I, 11111 Croce-Country KSTC thinclads participated in eleven cross-country meets, including the NAIA District 10 meet in which they placed third, the GPAC league meet placing fourth, the Missouri Valley AAU meet with a third place finish and the Nationals finishing 22nd out 52 competing schools. Although the squad finished the fall season minus any gold medals, the team did acquire valuable experience as only one member ofthe squad, Rick Bishop, will be graduating. Of the strong freshman crop, Greg Purkeypile showed promising form as he placed 14th in the Missouri Valley AAU with an impressive time of26:43 over the 5-mile course. In the Fort Hays-Emporia State dual, Leonard Hall another freshman, placed fifth for the top E-State spot with a 28:09 time for the 5-mile. Junior Del Brandley grabbed a 12th place finish in an elapsed time of 20:52 for the 4-mile circuit. In so far as coaching goes, E-State has one of the finest. Phil Delavan has accompanied U.S. Olympic teams in track and field in 1971, the 1972 Women's Olympics, the 1971 World University Games in Italy and was the manager of the U.S. team in the 1973 World University Games in Moscow, Russia. The experience acquired by the young cross-country complemented by excellent coaching should enable KSTC to compete readily in every meet next fall with favorable results. Team members: Rick Bishop, Senior Del Brandley, Junior Art Millikin, Junior Chuck Weston, Freshman Jim Hickey, Sophomore Steve Mosteller, Freshman Greg Purkeypile, Freshman Leonard Hall. Freshman 217 Hornets Have A Winning Basketball Season The 1973-74 basketball squad included, standing from left-Assistant Coach Maurice Schmidt, trainer Lance Maley, Davy Babb, Mike Lewis, Bob White, Mark Jeske, Pat Ryan, Jess Nelson, Bill Marano, Dennis Supple, Gary Tenpenny, Bill Wakefield, and Coach Slaymaker. Kneeling are Paul Geary, Phil Pettay, Jim Marcantino, Bob Ginavan, Steve Dieker, and Bruce Adams. Two players, not pictured, who joined the squad for second semester play were Jim Young and Rusty Smiley. Both came to KSTC when the College of Emporia closed in December. 218 x Tie in KSTG 68 82 77 62 66 73 77 90 8 l 72 84 72 75 75 99 81 77 7 2 85 82 84 S5 79 99 7 2 k C0 Lewis, Bob ng are Paul l for second Tie For Runnerup Spot in the GPAC At 6-4 KSTC 1973-74 SEASON RECORD KSTC Opponent Opp, 68 Rockhurst College 65 82 Ottawa University 60 77 Baker University 73 62 Northwest Missouri State 89 66 University of Nebraska, Omaha 65 73 Southwestern College 56 77 Phillips University 65 90 Panhandle State, Oklahoma 74 81 Friends University QOTQ 78 72 Marymount College 82 84 Washburn Universitya 75 72 Ft. Hays State College-+1 75 75 University of Northern Colorado: 80 75 Southern Colorado States: 67 99 Kansas State College, Pittsburg: 73 31 Kansas Newman 70 77 University of Missouri, Kansas City 64 72 , Benedictine College 69 85 University of Nebraska, Omaha 91 82 Washburn Universityx 74 84 Ft. Hays State Colleges: 71 85 University of Northern Colorado-r 87 79 Southern Colorado Staten: 100 99 Kansas State College, Pittsburg: 82 72 Benedictine College 60 vConference Games Coach Ron Slaymaker I I Assistant Coach Maurice Schmidt 219 1 A nervous coach Ron Slaymaker paces the sidelines during a lull in the action of the NAIA playoff game with Washburn. The Hornets had beaten the The Hornet basketball team, after a disappointing 10-15 record in 1972-73, surprised everyone but themselves as they posted an impressive 18-7 mark for the 1973-74 year, tied for second spot in the GPAC, and earned a berth in the NAIA District 10 playoffs. And all this by a team that was picked by the conference coaches for a last place finish and with little hopes for a winning season overall. This was all accomplished by the familiar faces left over from the previous season-with one exception-that was Davy Babb, freshman from Topeka and brother of Bob who was a starting guard the previous year. In addition to having a losing season in 1972-73, the Hornets lost for this season their starting postman Ed Burton, who at 6' 9" had furnished some heighth and rebounding power, guard Christ Langvardt had graduated and the other guard, Bob Babb, was lost for the season through knee surgery. The prospects were enough to fell a lesser squad, but as Coach Ron Slaymaker said, the squad thrives on adversity, the tougher things look, the better they play, and that isjust about the basis of their success story. They opened at home with Rockhurst College and squeezed outa 68-65 win-and nobody was impressed. They beat Ottawa at home 82-60 and everyone looked the other way. They went on the road and beat Baker 77-73 but H still no response. Then on the next road game they xr? faltered a bit and lost to Northwest Missouri State 89-62 and the non-believers said "I told you so." beaten the ointing L themselves 973-74 red a this by :s for a 18 ices left lon-e-that ther ar. In e Hornets rton, rounding nd the trough quad, but on Y Play, ory. md squeezed ey beat mther 3 but :Y ,te l 494 S55 Bill Marano drives past a Washburn defender for a layup during the playoff game. Marana was the Hornets top scorer for the season with a 17.9 ppg average through 26 contests. He also was the top scorer in the GPAC with a 22.6 average for conference games. 2 J , . X. ' ' K 1 ' .. . . .- , , , .--,--..,. t... .-..f...-. ,-.v--v.--f'.------'-f'r1-"?'1v-n--'-,--.-,.,,,,.- T 'T"""", , I . 'V' Q , , , V L' ' 4 ,I .A .v .4 Y. 1 . T shooting vars over defender 53" Z it ...af 3 However things began to change. They returned homejust before the Holiday break and downed a big, tough team from the University of Nebraska at Omaha by the narrowest ofmargins, 66-65. During the break they won the Phillips University Invitational and the follow- ing week at the Friends University Invitational they won twice over Panhandle State and host Friends before falling 82-72 to powerful Marymount College, Interest really picked up when they opened the Great Plains Conference season at Washburn University, one of the pre-season picks in the conference, and beat the Ichabods 84-75 on their own floor. They suffered a couple of conference setbacks in the next games, losing to the Tigers of Ft. Hays State in Hays, then lost their only game ofthe season at home to the Bears ofthe University of Northern Colorado. The Bears were a thorn in the Hornets schedule this year as they beat the Hornets twice, but they were the only team to do so. They wound up with a 6-4 conference record having beaten the Ichabods of Washburn University twice in the process, but Washburn lost only one other conference game, that to Ft. Hays State and were the eventual GPAC Champs. It was an exciting season for the Hornet basketball fans and the team added to the excitement by developing a knack--probably much to Coach Slaymakers dismay-- ofgetting behind early and then to come roaring back in the second halfto take another hair-raising win. The Hornets developed into a tough defensive unit as is evidenced by their opponents low field goal shooting percentage for the season. The twenty five teams on the schedule wound up with a slightly better than 42 per cent from the field, while the Hornets boasted a -19.6 average for the year. The Hornets battled from the floor to the rafters as Ray Johnson at left goes for a ball on the floor, and below, Dennis Supple goes high for a rebound. 223 ' Individually the Hornets had some fine performances also, but it was the overall team effort that accounted for the final fine record. Four ofthe five Hornet starters ended up scoring in double figures. Leading the Hornet attack was senior forward Bill Marano who averaged 17.9 ppg for the season. Ray Johnson and Dennis Supple, both seniors also, were right behind with Ray at 14.8 and Dennis with a 14.6 ppg average. Senior postman Jess Nelson had a great year and finished with a 11.9 average. Freshman Davy Babb had a 7.2 average for his opening effort as a Hornet and promises to be a bright spot in the Hornet future. The defensive battle for the Hornets was led by Ray Johnson who averaged more than nine rebounds per game for the year. He had fine support from Jess Nelson and Dennis Supple on the backboards fight as both ended with more than seven missed shots hauled down in each contest. For the season the Hornets held a solid rebounding advantage over their opponents as they averaged nearly 47 rebounds per game tojust over 40 for each of their twenty-five games. A couple of transfers at the beginning ofthe second semester gave the Hornets a big boost in bench strength. The College of Emporia was forced to close at the end of the fall semester and two basketball standouts at C of E, Jim Young and Rusty Smiley chose to complete the year at KSTC, and they gave the Hornets some extra punch in the tough going at the end of the season. So the Hornets closed out a successful season with the best record ofany team in the past decade, and headed into the NAIA District 10 playoffs. Graduation will hit heavily at the Hornet squad. Starters Dennis Supple, Jess Nelson, Bill Marano, and Ray Johnson will graduate along with top reserves Phil Pettay, Pat Ryan and Jim Young. However, the Hornetjunior varsity compiled a perfect record in 1973-74 finishing with a 12-0 record and should provide fine talent to bolster the Varsity another season. 224 Freshman Davy Babb slips past the defense for a quick two-pointer. Davy quickly developed into one of the finest guards in the conference. Below senior Phil Pettay strains for a basket against a Pittsburg State defender. Phil played a vital role for the Hornets as a top reserve. 1 .. ,pggis 2 A . .I q .K . 'it 4'-f Y, ,Q .Wi A . ':"' 2' if The H4 Coach POST! T1 seasoi the at- playofi Ichabr Ichabf beat ti Mary: spot ii N with H Playe Confe valua' Suppl. Confe and P Babb on the C lo a u' two-pointer. conference. tsburg State serve. f ol The Hornet Varsity squad included front row from left, Assistant Coach Schmidt, Davy Babb, Phil Pettay, Jim Marcantino, Bill Wakefield, and Coach Slaymaker. Standing are Mike Lewis, Bob White, Mark Jeske, Pat Ryan, Jess Nelson, Bill Marano, and Dennis Supple. POSTSCRIPT The Hornets completed a successful winning season with an 18-7 record and received one of the at-large invitations to the NAIA District 10 playoffs. In the playoff they met the Washburn lchabods for the third time in '73-'74 and for the Ichabods the third time was a lucky one for they beat the Hornets 74-63 and went on to defeat Marymount College for the District 10 title and a spot in the National Tourney in Kansas City. Numerous Hornets won postseason honors. with Bill lVIarano being selected on the Coaches and Players all-Conference first tem. the UPI all- Conference first team and was chosen the most valuable player in the conference by UPI. Dennis Supple and Ray Johnson were named to the all- Conference second team by both the Coaches and Players and the UPI. Jess Nelson and Davy Babb were named Honorable Mention selections onthe UPI squad. Coach R on Siaymakcr. who guided the team to a winning season after being picked to finish last in the GPAC. was chosen Coach-of-the-Year by the UPI. The Junior Varsity also had a highly success ful season going 12-0 for their scheduled games. Their opponents included some of the JV's in the GPAC and others from surrounding Kansas schools. They also took a win over the Topeka Oilers. one of the top AAU teams in Kansas and a team that had previously beaten the Kansas University freshman team 225 ,. --..--,4.a-n........-.,.. ,---. ..-, ... .Y--, ... V ..,,.-....-...,...,b,.+ h ' Y ' , . za- .m2'f"" '. ' C329 ' '5 , vw 2 f fa y 226 :XTS-wvffsi, 'QYZ-i ww DVR'-1 .. f QM Q, 4 551 .W fa-W3 A ,w ,X-4 X MXW V ,. i. V, . V ...V AW... C, M, ,MQ ,N Lkgrm., LAW W M ,. ' . qwmg, -mv wigs:+f11wfQ',x9fg14.,n: Q-f:,.f au-,.S, if W- , ,ww Q7,Qfi4tv': NNW" .:vY'sNiw-ffgixx 'KW'-M :wwf wi WMM 12- Q 'rv ,, ,,,.0R,.maw. fm . f3:,wxf,wxix fr 3- --www 9 ,v 31:-X..-X +1 . we-v, za -X Q ,QENM-,ff 4 X-i.u:TsmM 227 fi , fr , ,, 71,5 Q ff' ,, V ,, , I 155511 .2 41'-"7 " ' ff ' , f, , 'wi fi 7 "Zf2,N1 -V "wg 'Q , hfggy-vi V . 2,1 1 T?" 1 'Wx . Na we -. 4 f 4 4301 I ,,,,,fl., , J fin-1-i' 44 Returning Tracksters Strengthen Squad The 1973 Hornet track squad travelled to Pittsburg State on May 5 to compete in the GPAC Track and Field Championships. In grabbing three first place dinishes, two seconds and two thirds the Hornets placed fourth place behind winning team Fort Hays, Northern Colorado and Pittsburg State. Larry Hynek heaved thejavelin 239-3 for the winning mark finishing 49 feet ahead ofthe second place Roger Melvin ofNorthern Colorado. Arnold Sams took the highjump gold medal negotiating a 6' 6" height in this event. Arthur Peals won the other gold medal for the Hornets, nudging out teammate Gail Knight by .4 ofa second in the 120-yard high hurdles in a winning time of l4.4. Knight garnered the other second place mark in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles with a :54.6 clocking. Jerry Hinson tossed the shotput Sl-l V4 -feet and the discus 145-5 for third place finishes. With virtually no first place winners from the I973 GPAC league meet on the squad this season and only three seniors, one would be inclined to throw in the towel or in this case, sweat socks, on the l974 track season. Such is not the situation as far as Coach Phil Delavan is concerned. "We don't have any league gold medal winners from last year's squad, and we have only six or eightjuniors and seniors. but l'm very encouraged about our possibilities. We have a better attitude and more potential than in the past several years. Attitude makes a tremendous difference." 229 'S-Q--ev.-.-v-.,i........ V , -1-.Qii ,,,.. ,,,, KSTC Hosts Five Indoor Meets 230 A shows ability junior recorc highjw meet. "Wej I hamp be an in a sm ofthe I impol Univc GPA4 seaso M-mqnwuul M 1, I 'F , 5 It ! . fig f .,..,vsef.:2.gg3 9' L tg 5 mar ' A of" Already in the young indoor season, the squad shows promist but most important, cohesiveness, the ability to work and to work together. Alan Johnson, junior sprinter, has tied the KSTC indoor 60-yard dash record in the Fort Hays indoor. Jay Holloway, a sophomore highjumper, has cleared 6' 6" and is improving each meet. KSTC has six putters throwing the shot over 451 "Wejust have a better overall balance this spring." Last spring a rash of injuries and rainy weather hampered the squad. When asked ifthe weather will be an adverse factor this spring, Coach Delavan replied, in a subtle but reassuring tone, "We'll go, regardless ofthe weather." KSTC is hosting five outdoor meets in I974. One important meet will see the Hornets entertaining Kansas University, Kansas State University, and several GPAC teams. It looks to be an exciting track and field season. I-'lil' -ww V96 4- 4 I w-- --v-- ,,i, Q f , i I 1 T Baenball , 1 ji 535 2. if , 71, 4 ' W 11 , . H , ,K 1 1, , ii 'TAS 1 1 -- 1 W ' 1 .1 sf . ' , ' y P K ill, N xii. ,,, l N3 1 1 1 I .. M x fn H ,, W -' 'IN ,fl ' x V, :iv E KV in ,L 15, W- 'l, ,, QM X W - , 'I ,I i 3 I i W " . L l P 1 :ww - , -1:... V I 1 I 5 Q A 232 The Hornet baseball team finished the 1973 season with a 28-10 record and are looking for even better things for the 1974 squad. The biggest disappointment for the team last year was the fact that for the first time in five years they did not represent the NAIA District 10 in the area baseball playoffs. That honor went to the Tigers of Ft. Hays State with the Hornets in the runner-up spot. A new coach will be guiding the Hornet baseballers in 1974 as former coach Jack Smitheran resigned last spring to accept the head coachingjob at the Uni- versity of California, Riverside. He was replaced by Dave Bingham, his assistant last season, and a former Hornet standout ofa few years back. The new head coach was optimistic in looking ahead to the 1974 season. "We have a good pitching staff returning and with the addition ofa couple of fine freshmen and some really good transfers, our mound corpos should be an excellent one. Add to that the return of some good infielders at third base and shortstop and really fine outfielders, plus lettermen from last year who played backup roles and again some top freshmen and transfers, and the outlook has to be good. We are anxious to get into the schedule for this year." The baseball season opened for 1974 on March ll with a ten-game road trip into Texas, something that has become a standard opening series for the Hornets, and a trip on which they normally enjoy much success. ' A prime reason for such an early-season road trip is the weather in Texas which at that time of the year is much more inducive to baseball than the normal Kansas early spring weather which tends to be uncertainwat best. Good weather and some concentrated play gets the squad in trim for the home season. This year the home opener was with a Big Eight power, the Cyclones of Iowa State University, who came to Emporia on March 22. Coach Bingham is looking for Ft. Hays State and Washburn University to again be the toughest District 10 competition facing the Hornets this year, with Bethany College another possible contender. "Washburn may be a little weak in the field, but they will have one ofthe best pitching staffs in our area and should definitely be a title contender," the coach said. Two Hornets were named on the Great Plains Athletic Conference all-league team and both were back with the Hornets in 1974. The two were sophomore pitcher Bill Wilson and sophomore outfielder Mike Peterson. Mike led the Hornets at the plate with 11.382 average for last season, while Wilson was hurling his way to an 8-3 record and a 1.42 ERA, the best in the conference. Two Hornets. Steve Wilbert and Tom Higgins, were chosen on the NAIA District 10 squad last year. Higgins at second base and Wilbert in the outfield. Both were seniors. 233 1 1974 BASEBALL SCHEDULE Q . !,' 1 1. 1 13 A Date March ll Mon. 12 Tues. 13 Wed. 15 Fri. 16 Sat. 22 Fri. 23 Sat. 28 Thur. 30 Sat. April 2 Tues. 3 Wed. 6 Sat. 9 Tues. 10 Wed. 13 Sat. 16 Tues. 23 Tues. 24 Wed. 27 Sat. 29 Mon. May 3- 4 Fri.-Sat. 16-17 Thur.-Fri. 23-25 Thur.-Sat. May 31-June 5 Opponent xTexas Wesleyan College vUniv. of Dallas :kUniv. of Plano 1fUniv. of Texas Arlington xTexas Wesleyan College xlowa State Univ. +Missouri Western College +Morningside College +Dana College f.Bethany College ffBaker Univ. xFt. Hays State xWashburn Univ. v.Kansas Wesleyan :Washburn Univ. .kliansas University +Sterling College xBenedictine xFt. Hays State College .tKansas State University GPAC Play-offs District 10 Play-offs Area III Play-offs National Play-offs +Denotes Double Header Time Site 1:00 Ft. Worth, Texas 2:00 Irving, Texas 1:00 Plano, Texas 1:00 Arlington, Texas 1:00 Ft. Worth, Texas 1:00 Home 1:00 St. Joseph, Missouri 1:00 Home 1:00 Home 1:00 Home 1:00 Home 1:00 Home 1:00 Home 1:00 Salina l 6:00 Topeka, Shunga Park 1:00 Lawrence 1:00 Sterling 1:00 Atchison 1:00 Hays 1:00 Manhattan Emporia or Hays or Topeka Emporia or Hays Enid, Oklahoma St. Joseph, Missouri ml. lg, 1 If fl l 5. 2. 1' N I' ' 1 i fi il . I r 1 1 1' I 234 ff f y Eff. A VJ 'Q-',. ,ffm-Z, , Q f ffff ff of ff 1 I r 1 .ffr -rf ..,.-,-v fx? 'uf KW if Vw' l vf v we ,F 0-W My 4' X 1 ""' 4 bv ,ii 'Y-A 4? 2 s ifiiwtf Q'-'G' fi K ,K+ We if + 4 .- u J. 1' , Q ' A vf K X x ' lqgiai! W Q 7 f 41" fi' BW' we ar W ...I 4-11- 4 Q 'sv I f J I r W x Zim' Q 'fx' X!! I " Y 5 2 ,XJKg' XX., 'fc sx'Qg,'Qqgf!fiY"!I Q X s8,g3qp'WA.4!v Q ,Q Q ' . M SS- Q,,34f"'f,Q, kan K V9-4 'QR ' Pr 1 4 1 R., ,xl X 4 SU , 1 K r X up N' X + f R! 4 I Q mx 1 N? X it jf X -' -'Q f 1 ' N X0 Q 3 N 1 f S' 4 vr ww 3 K+ Q ii in 35 uv A1854 'ji M' x 'Y 5 6+ ,. gi, QTY!--4' 5 .., ' X'i ' gf iii. E S .- f ,-..- A x r I 4 ' ' nt, , , 1' r a "F 'f I wrt--W -','l"v1'fle xvkst' Q E 171 A 'S' Ski' I 94, ' ' 'JM Q 'I D fn.. ,. Y s 1 n ,, L "1 A 'Wh 'W fem' 1 -R . A -f--' Y x Li 1' 4 R 4 235 'NM' I I I' ' i .1 L - , I , r ' Nfl af V . .7 44,5 4 gk. Hai, A - X V' , , f 'f ,V f gf, , , M'-X, .V Uh , 5 1 X ny. 'aff , ' J , ig V, -Y 22:61 if 4f?w1, , , , X - .K x X ' 3 fel ,',".- lf! I I , ' ' "h , 1 - ' ' ' ,Q M I ,' if -'77-iw' x - Je' , 1255 ' f 'Qi f' if ' ' , Nw! fi! fy I ff , ' ' . , v , VZQRQI. v1'2.M-,, ,, -, -,gif , f nf , , xy f ,f Y, K 'X ,wif V 4 v. .:. -ff ,X 223, f' , f j fi . H. ' ' V , L-. 57? x ' x .fi-A Gif f ' ff f- 4' 7 , ' ' 4 U - T .' ' V 1 , ' ,3 ' 95554 4 'f 5 1, ' W ' ' ' 2, ' ,5 A , '. A 73 w . 1" mel ,- 5, 'axis My-',, , 4. P., Y' , 3' , ' Q.: ff X Q11 A Q 7 'XP'-yt'-g ' - if 7,1 fi ff, X ff ,, ,W X W. TEL- ,- ,Jw 'ffm ' if v-f A AL.- , Y X ,A 3 ,,:v1:,fk:1,' S, 5? F .-. -1 f , - - ,kv . ww 3 V, K In K,-W ,' . 'Y V 1 . f ,, A M y .lgigf 1325. ,A 1.5 1 , 4V Y 1 ' f f I .'jf,f,ifQ 1 I f 'Vi x- if Q w- I ' a? 'ff K wx ' ' f X 2 . x Q av ,7'H?.- ' K Y ,, , . K I , In , 1 g .W , x' x , zu , , . .- , . Y L f ' R K - f ' 90 , R53 ' , WW., , W x - Aw li .Ja ' .'1 I :V 4 NAX1 ' , 1' -L Q 'arf , U QA., nf . .f , f - W' f ' ' n ' ' ,- 5 1' ?', K x A Jig, 4 A' ,V A f . 1 'fy . mpg. , V A 4 ,. -- ,V - A , 1 -if x A V ' ' 1.11 f -3 -X - - K K .'1 z 'V ,kxw V .. ' Fume-3: b . g 4 , -5. 14 -f-f,5'c 1, w" f- .V If W? s, fi :gg .- A -. , A x 4 ' x. .aw -. r, .1 r 1' Y . V.. 1 f..- t-we ' ' ,,gw.,:-4....?,, .,, . 1 . 'H ' W. N -as-2: '--w amy., , .H ,d.,..1-"""" ,,,,,,,.,,--'ff' y 1 - lennic Tennis at KSTC is a combination ofathletic skills and ethical practices. Coach George Milton in his nine years at KSTC, has coached many outstanding tennis players "But along with the aesthetic skill of tennis we try to stress courtesy and gentlemanly conduct." This year E-State will field a disciplined, yet probably the strongest competitive team since Mi,lton's inception as coach. 'This team has the experience and depth that past teams haven,t quite possessed. Another positive factor is the inside tennis facilities which allow us to practice regardless ofweather conditions." Synonmous with the new facilities will be the First Annual Indoor Tennis meet held over spring break. "We will be hosting six dual meets in addition to the indoor meet and in May we will compete in the GPAC Championships in Pueblo, Colorado. f'l,m looking toward a nucleus of Dave Dickman, Walt Rose, Mike Baker, Terry Asbury and Pete Drusch to be complimented by John Rothaus, Rick Leton, Gene Pemberton, Jeff Sanistrom, Melvin Baker and Mike Mallory. The team knows where each of them stand and what we will be striving to accomplish. This in itselfwill assure us of a satisfying season." Walter Rose Home Meets: March 19-Pittsburg-2:30 K,-.-.M March 26-Tabor College-2:30 April 3aSouthwestern College-2:30 April 26-Bethany-2:30 April 30-Ft. Hays-2:30 May 4-Washburn-2:30 W 1 Xt i ,,, -ff 236 S. Terry Ashbury ff ls by '.-1 ,:- 9,5-u gg. xxx The 197 Baker ai TIC CI' OW lrs toward eam 'Jim S. 3-,QWNX s...,,ks The 1974 Hornet tennls squad Cleft to flghtj Melvin Baker John Rothaus Dave Dlckman Walter Rose Terry Ashbury Peter Drusch Jess Sandstrom Mlke Bake and Mike Malloy Coach George Mllton IS standmg Squad members not pictured are Rlck Leton Gene Pemberton and Quand Vmh Do 237 1il!s 2 -5 L I , 3 V 5 ,H ,yy I, i e . , 45 n a h h 1 ' it o . - - y ' 5 - 1 1 ,V 3, 4 we Q X e L 5 s ' ' 2 fi A' ' On S h . A A Q3 ' . ' 'V 5 -G V x. , , , ,.., ' , K , , :nd ji I 1 'i 3 I I . . . , , f K h , 5 L V n 'Q e f ' h Cf, k he Lltfffff ' I , - . f JC mf ,A , Ru-Q - I If, ' 1 I : - D 9 s . 9 9 9 4 s l r . ' ' . , , . Gu f r I E p Q 238 -iam - With no nucleus to speak of, as the KSTC golfteam has only two returning golfers from last year's squad, E-State will be sporting a possible contender depending on how one views the depth and experience chart. Coach Keith Caywood is not overwhelmed by the team's experience but he views the season objectively. "Having only two returnees, Scott Mitchem, senior, and Eric Stevenson, sophomore, I would not look to this year as a possible contending year to the GPAC title. But by the same token some of the freshman crop could come along and the whole team mightjell. But we won't know about some ofthe new kids until we are able to get on the course in various weather situations. Freshmen hopefuls to bolster the squad are Pat Tuback, Steve Shepard, Paul Thompson, Rafael Vaamonde and the first women's golfcompetitor at E-State, Donna Capshaw. 'glt is important for each member ofthe team, regardless oftheir position on the squad, to concentrate totally on beating the course and not a teammate or foe. Each swing costs a player a stroke and low stroke totals are the goal. In some meets the top four scores from each squad are added and the lowest aggregate total determines the team winners. The power ofconcentration is important in this game as in any other athletic sport but in golf you are competing alone, you've got to keep the edge." Coach Caywood will be taking the team to the Heart ofAmerica Classic in Warrensburg, Mo., on March I2 and 13, the Crossroads tourney in Joplin, March I9 and 20 and will be shooting towards the NAIA District I0 championship and the GPAC Championships both in May 239 Woman 9 Field Hockey 240 ' ami J' 5 . , x. fy.. " f' W' Q it-Q. 34.5.2 f. Q KSTC has in its women field hockey, a team ofhigh spirited and talented players. To compete in this game requires not only endurance but grace and agility. Patience would be advised as only eleven players can play at one time and substitutions are allowed only at the half. Yet twenty-two players finished the successful season and ofthis total only four were seniors-Maggie Schutz, .laNean Haynes, Curly Colgan and Jennifer Jones. Next year's squad should be vastly improved with the experience gained this year and a fine crop of returning players. Coach Mary Estes talked proudly ofthe team's fine season and ofthe youth on the squad with hopes ofan improved record next year. The season began on a very wet and dreary day and it did not brighten up throughout the contest as the Hornet Alums won the contest 4-0. Ktc bowed to Central Missouri State 2-0 in the first league game and Kansas University pinned defeat No. 2 on the squad, 2-O in Lawrence. E-State rallied though in the final three games ofthe year defeating the Wichita State Shockers l-O and 2- I, and KU, I-0. With a 3-2 mark the Hornets tied KU for the league and consequently the state title, but on the pasis ofpoints scored, KU edged the Hornets for the top spot. The girls compete in the Kansas Association of lnter- collegiate Athletics for Women. The teams which they played this year are all members with the exception of Central Missouri State. There are only three Kansas colleges which compete in womens field hockey because these are the only colleges which are able to fund this function. Coach Estes would like to see more competition within the state, and she will be striving to add Nebraska and Missouri teams to the schedules. So next fall on some Saturday morning, bright and early, come rain or shine,journey down to the hockey field east ofthe new gymnasium and see what a womens Hornet field hockey player really looks like. You may like the game too. Team members: Laura Augustyn-So. Patti Augustyn-Fr. Mary Bender-So. Connie Chaltas-So. Neva Diklich-Jr. Pat Huffaker-Jr. Donna Kready-Jr., manager Kathy Miller-Fr. Deb Polak-Fr. Susan Sanders-Jr. Debbie Sawtelle-Jr. Deann Scribner--So. Carol Seivley-Jr. Brenda Short-Jr. Dianne Smith-Jr. J. P. Stoss-Fr. Cheri Troutman--So. Patty Utecht-Fr. Cheryl York-Jr. 241 242 as YN.. w www-Nw N-.wx 4 W , lp ,aw W S ,.,, 3 I i "-a I 194135.-5 M.. f I - 5 A V 'rrr T ,,-. :ge L' ,,,,x., .N ,. He V V 4 x , ' N , 3 'M iE ?54'f'1f?sifg, , 3 V, wif'-M V ,,,, -mfg? gf, gf may ISIN, M' 'V Wx! Af 9 ,ai 4, lv X Woman! llnllay Ball Fall holds opportunities for participation ofwomen in various sports. Women's volleyball waa quite popular as 22 womenjoined the team, which fashioned a 7-ll record finiahing fourth in the conference, with KU taking the conference crown. The victories came over Washburn twice, Sterling, Cowley County Junior College, Wichita State Universityy and Kansas State University. Coach Curtis was quite surprised at the team's success as I5 members ofthe squad were freshmen, two were sophomores and five were juniors. There were no seniors competing. This abundance of youth will provide the base for a possible championship team next fall. Also next fall KSTC will be able to host some ofthe volleyball matches in the new gymnasium facilities. Women's volleyball roster: Becky Armstrong Shirley Bergman Diane Dick Carol Freeman Vivki Haskins Lois Hoots Marci Jones Lynn Kaiser Sue Koehler Jody Lilly Luella Moody Connie Pettay Susan Pettay Gay Potter Carla Reece Gaye Theurer, captain 243 Gym nacii J ww Z . -- Rv Wmf ' w, 1, . 'f 244 :Aff 'WUs-f N Womenfs gymnastics while lacking the fast moving actlon of fleld hockey lCnnlS or football features an array ofeloquent routmes performed by graceful and metlculous women The l974 KSTC women gymnasts are young and 1n some 1nstances nov1ce competltors ln th1sfast1d1ous sport Coach Sue Thompson talks optlmlstxcally other squad The glrls are hard workers very competltxve but we have no all around gymnast who can perform 1n all four events The four events are the balance bean uneven parallels vault1ng and floor exerclse Pam Long and Susan Haake are 3 event gymnasts Some of the younger glrls have the ablllty but lack high school experlence so we are havmg to spend more tlme on fundamentals But we have a fme team and all ofthem wlll be back next year except one semor Coach Thompson has as her asslstants Bob Yevak and Petrxna Hanna who are graduate asslstants KSTC w1ll be hostmg the state gymnastncs meet on March 9th Teams attending are Wlchlta Washburn BCflCdlClll'lC Fort Hays Kansas State and Kansas Lfmverslty Team members Pam Long Patl Davls Susan Haake Cmdy Albers Sandy Young Patty Utecht Tomi West Kathy Tlrabosso 245 F , g . x . , l , . f . . . . . . l . . . I, I I . . . I - l f - I 1 L4 . . . ' 7 1 , l ,, I I ' 1 ' 1 l I l ,f 9 ' 5 , , - I as 5 . ' . . ' . l , ' l . l . , , 1 . Kg 3 ' , , ' -Q 1 " ' I I I 1 . 1 1 I . I I I I . I g , . , . . 1 1 . . . 1 I I - s 1 g-,WM , ' ' . . , . E 1 3 1 HR l I ' ' l . 1 1 , - X . 3 l 'L E . . x l V K , , l l l . , . I , . 4 V , . . I 1 , l In ' . f I f 1 M' . X i . p , t 7 1 l , 3,---- - '- -5 .. ,gf 1: I 4 - , t ll sw - .,,,, K . - D N 1 E . Q k 'f ? Qi K K ., , . 4 z xx' v 1' x .. 5 ' . X - fb? , , Y- N - . s , , . . ff A Al-ag, ,,Ls,..-.. .-N, -A--W-A--f fa - f ' V A , ,,,,,, ,,--...- .,.,,.....,..,,......-0 --- - People unfamiliar with synchronized swimming, were treated to a colorful performance by the Aquettes January l and 2. For the 600 who attended the shows, an appreciation for the art of swimming should be in order, not to mention the aesthetics of a synchronized swim team. The Aquettes under the supervision of Sue Thompson, prepared for an entire semester to produce the show, "Extra Edition: The Big Splashf' Thirty kids including two male members who later retired, vied for a spot in Aquettes. "The two boys had to quit due to complications in their schedules, but we want to encourage more men tojoin the team. All that is required for anyone tojoin the team, is to have intermediate swimming skills." . Compliments of the spacious new physical education facilities, the Aquettes will be able to add a variety of new stunts and technique next year. Aquettes Roster Becker, Dorothy Bosch, Connie Davis, Jami Coker, Pam Craig, Candy DaVault, Annette Foster, Barbara Frisbie, Kris Frazier, Linda Goode, Jane Heffley, Debbie Hein, Lynn Hill, Trella Howard, Lori Hughes, Donna Land, Denise Mace, Kathy Reeves, Ginger Rusco, Anita Scheffler, Belinda Scott, Beckie Sivyer, Ann Skolaut, Terri Vineyard, Paula Wagner, Ann Winsted, Nancy 246 il llqu alias 247 "' Viglaniac V W 2-. 248 .Q-v"""MX The Vigilantes have yet to win a basketball game but have improved with each contest throughout the year The Handicapped Student Association has fielded a wheelchair basketball team for several years now, but this year's team is composed of fewer players than in the past. Team members and KSTC students Marty Heide, Gene Fuhlhage, ,Chuck Gambill, Bernie Hoss and Pat Harley are less experienced than much 'oftheir competition but anxiously await the 1974 fall season. The Vigilantes compete in the National Wheelchair Sports Association against teams from Kansas City, Topeka, Southern Illinois and St. Louis. John Kelly is president ofthe Handicapped Student Association, and coach for the Vigilantes is Bill Sundae who travels here from Kansas City for the practices. 249 l! 3 's F H I 5 . 2 9 F? li 4 X r I f w Q 2 ai an r i K I fl in H ii as il V W: We 4 11 1 a 1 1 i 4 I y Play faciury , 1 4 4 J 3 I 5 4 3 Y Q :jx I ,. .X--lg-Q-4' 1 - u A .gvgim 1 'mn Y -ff 2 I X g 1 5 4 I 1 A F 5 4 . . , ,1 , a A ' 1 'N 3 N ,fg.f:V 3 I J . L-vw.. xjgprg, , f 5' . fx yi , . , ,ij..vW,f,f'f,LA,7,.-5 4, ' ,f S 4 Qffixbsf mth! 4 Q ' ,L - .. ,Q-ww! 1 , 1 - . 54, ' Q' 4:1 .9-qfgy -H . - 35.1-M 11,23 3 fa" 119 I I' Mfffx -X 41 'f . 3 A +,,,,,, A 250 A Q-SM K , lf,-i 1 V',,.,hk. JW? 1 ,QL i s W P345 Z' if ,--f""""' ww Y 'Q--..., Intramurals and physlcal educatlon departments as mural sports offlce has been transformed xnto a unrque and unrlvaled orgamzatron known as the Play Factory Desplte the Play Factory havlng been rn extstence a young n1ne months to attempt a succrnct valrd def1n1t1on would be futile and ln vlolatlon ofthe rrghts ofthose whose plannmg and preparatlon gave bxrth to the Play Factory In the flrst monthly propaganda publrcatron the ADVOCATE some 1dea IS glven to the proposed accompllshments ofPlay Factory That rs to provoke thlnklng on the nature and srgmfrcance of play review playbooks descrrbe exrstlng play theorres and Inform players ofsrgnrflcant changes rn both predetermlned frntramuall and the spontaneous Qrecreatronalb play In short the ADVOCATE S trreless propaganda rs deslgned to play on your m1nd and rs otherwrse Intended to brlng play rnto p'ay Dr Brll Harper grves hrs phllosophy ofhrs baby phenomena The whole notlon of Play Factory rs centered around play That rs to reawaken rndrvrduals to play Play Factory rs mterested for the sake of play It rsn t concerned wrth artrcrflclal or secondary reasons for play such as grades or physlcal fltness lfyou either make yourselfplay or are forced to play lt rs work Dr Harper lntends to banrsh comprlatxon ofall school pornts as th1s IS an artlfrcxal reason for play and causes drstress and rn some rnstances physrcal confrontatrons We are try1ng to contrlbute to a possrble re deflnltlon of Man as Man the Play er lnstead of Man the Worker to try out a drfferent model on yyhrch to base schools ln general and to experlment vu rthln phx src ll educatlon to see rf there are other possrbllrtres that have not been explored thus far whlch are centered on play theory he sard 2 a J--..-YV.a-,,-.,,-,..,..,.----,L., . .. .,.,,,,-,,a,,-,.:,,y:T7j,,,,f,-,:,,2-l--AM AW, N, I H VJ, v I JlF"'T' 3 f l, E t ' T f 2 l P .. , ' 1 , lf! V , . y, . f 4 ' ' t 1' f A " 'H V ' f I .' - . , T I if ' , V , X' I A Lrxgvb A 'V ,Lava ,WV M ,..,k V v,,,M ' ' . y y ., y yyyy VM, ra A V ' U - .ff-f G ' f 9-'Q ' ' 'fwfwai ,. ,, ' Mc: rf ' 'A 1 " ,V ,,.f,.e4,.M'V' I .MQW Mfr' , I 4 W U , ' "-- ,, AV , K K K . ,V 'mtl f- V . h1TLid.:Q'!f'i - T V i . wiiffim- l . A l l ' ' ' f f s ' , 'S' A ' ' I , n - - . , ,.., - I ' - ' , ,,, .,a:aa:. i AW y y J V deflned rn the past, no longer exrst at KSTC. The untra- 9 3 , V 5 7 ' "' I . 1 I hs 1 . J 9 7 ' 1 4 f ' 1 I , , . . . ' I V 1 ' ' I as , ' ' ,.' , ' .. ' l . ,,f ,K ,, ,..,fz:f Y' ,- ,N A ,xz4N, WAV -K K , ., K. . I G ' . I I . A F .s4w,,,g,,qA .I K 1 , I, , V A 1 H . . . . l , I ', t s A ,., t .. . ,I 1 Y Veils 3 f ' .gi X A ' . . . . lf 3 P' I N- I , - - as X g , . I ' F' ' - F, ' . . . K L Z jg,."4 . , ' , , v. , ix, . X 1 ' .K , ' f s . ' it-,Q R- 3 v ,- na ," Lf K, Ty 13 x' at 1 -,i, - N, 3 74 ' 3' . , 1 1 1 v . .,, lm - xv,-a ,rr -1? , . 'K' 'Q' .'-.-Y.f5-l- ' . ' 1 5 '.IJ'f- .- 3 . f ' - an law-'r-X ' - -si: 1'- at P. tfwfwf , 1' , ' V V P M V A x,:'f.fs.,g1W i " 'Ei-F v ' 5 , Q44 sf ff .,. ww-vw-9f+"':?f"""' tt to P tw, we Wt 3 s L 4,5 ,- Variety of Sports P r il , 4 ig E sv . . Q Cfterecl Through M- Plciy Factory 3 4 l - t The intramural functions have been expanded and 5 menas and women's intramurals are now located in the I l Factory. After much experimentation the Factory has Q 1 , decided on five different categories of play. These 2 categories are Play 0 through Play 4, the lightest 2 structured to the heaviest. Competition varies in each I division thus calling for various rules changes and I caliber of opposition. 'W ' Up to this point in time, Dr. Harper is pleased with V ' ' ' the Play Factory but the full impact of its works and ' means has yet to settle upon the Physical Education Department, many students of KSTC and consequently on many ofthe Play Factory employees. However, we can I look optimistically to a more clear and meaningful 3 definition through participation in the Play Factory. 1 Where there's a will, there's play. l 5 l i I l 3 .t. fi 252 ta, . ..r-fr--, -- ,.'---,-,-. 'f'ff"' jf --.:-j-Zc-...,-- +V - www IJ galrfx WA A 'Su V v X dw nl Sxs W , .1 be .5 i Q 4. V. ... 5 . N41 I . sgwqpfu al' .4 z 253 ' , - My . V .2 ' .Vx , V, I ,NJ . A r H . ,. . fix? :flu ,. 'fi P" 1' '-' 4' " 'V ' ' ' ,, " . ik V. A Kr . : . , ,-s I , A, K KV ,V . .5 ., . 3- V V 'V - un.. ,.VvfVm.. N- . .'5Vuxw-K . , Wm x , - . , , , - - . V':-1' y ' - .V --x. 1 -' ' - , ' :V V . . 4 -V , . -. ,V , vi .,g. X -, KV. V - - V. .. ,gf v hx 'QMV - ,Q " A i 2 5 . ' '5 1 L - ?..'fsV ,-. V .. VA .- .L V M '- .- ' A 2 -- , V. . -V V. :N 'gmfs - -- ,QV Q, . V ,Q3,:..g.g.-7 5 5 . . -V' 515 AV .A , - I V- gg A ' 'VY A V jam' WE:-' g.'V4V . g V 'V'-' , H , .- K .V V4 . V , K V. '..,,VV X V 1,-2 L.-.f. ... V.. f , . - V I V. f L V V L ' I-, '. 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V.,-.V A bb, ,.Y.M.Vf",h3 si. Ek?.9:V,.,?1K.,v, kd., V : . M ,. YI 1 IV! , A 'V, ,x ,M ,..lg,:' . 3 .,.-A f-1.4, VVKXQVV ips' V-,x,,:gu gf: 1, v -b -V . F :V , -. , V 1 In ni " ' ' - -' - .V - ' . I V - . - - . 1 V' A ff -f 'f -V., K 1. ' '51 JT' ' w-Ki-4 . . if, -'lky x 1 ' 5' 1V 1 - V .., 1 'V 4, x .V V. ,' SVLPA f.-v VV fV -V ,- , . iV.V , ., ww . - fy. A VV.- V., A. .. .. . ,,V.. . 1- - V . V i 4, V., Vg. gf, V. .,f.n..4:, , 1 V Ay, .gr - .1 V. , -,- V ,V .. I .- V V '. Ag LUV - -V V A -, . V ' 1 '- -V ,V T.-fm ' ,.,1, f ' jf- ,f 4' . ' . - ,-V1.4 Vg yn V- - 'f-3: .V V ' ' . - 'V-4.' -,.- -'-.1.-.- , -'-.1 . V 'Y Q- '-,V ,',1g..V-. 1141, V .VAVSV - V- , -'1 -- - V..f.VL- ,, gg, V,, . 'V . - .. f-. . . -. -' 1.89 -V bw p V - . L- . . 5- -' - 1. .L-. - . , - '- - .f'r1V -V .V . SVN: . ' - . " .V-, ,:, ' vs-' I ' " 'V QXVV . V Bijg-gn 7 -'ff'-. .. V V,g,QVsV .V V .xg .. : f. ,L 1 - fl- f . A. V V. . V aff,-3 .. Ti.-. v A in , f " ' ' ., .- V - V 5 ,N nl K V, f..1ffwf l ... "' .,. iff 119 . ' y 295,10 " lj 1, . -can-Nils I-,.,. .xv s. The new physical education building greatly expanded the resources available for students and faculty for recreational and physical fitness use, as well as adding space and equipment for academic pursuits and athletic competition. The training room and facilities, shown above, were in near constant demand and for the first time many of the facilities were arranged for co-educational usage. New facilities also were available as depicted by the racquet-ball courts at right. w-X, ' f all l -:XM 254 1" f . ,Q ' 3-f.i, ' - 22? A , , . , i few 1 ,f ,- fr.. g 1 15: if + .2. , I A :ff 5 E 1 I 5 f z V We i ' x . I 9 ,, as 5 if 4 I 1 W 0 I f stage: HnaH semef ahke crana isdes asthc Mzec Medi recre beus niuh pooh cond roon thee lhes divh schm were har po neu recr lOl wh hui per ide "'v""' 1 4 f-44,4-.l,. ,,,. s E ' 1' - r---I-or--.-.--1 -'-- - -f--'N - F- 44 , -, . , .1 V ' 4. s-- 44 4 .. - ,--a.,..,a.44-4... . 4 ..- .. ,ff . -9""".7'f7"ft'1C'7'P:'P','5 7:'tn'f"'1:f-ffws+--e'- H-f---M-.P - - A- .., ..-.,. a,,,,,4 K, , , ,,,.V ,.,T .,, ., ..,.a,, . .,, .,-gf, 44 4, V, c c After a seemlngly endless txme ln the constructlon stages the new physlcal educatlon bulldlng at KSTC ftnally became a realtty IH the sprlng of 1974 Sprlng semester classes were held there and students and faculty ahlce revelled ln the luxury of adequate space and f3C1l1ll6S And the fac1l1t1es were tndeed a reltefafter the cramped conftnes ofthe old bulldlng but glve ll credlt that IS deservmg smce tt had served the D1v1s1on slnce 1909 as there was classroom space avallable agaln for any stze ofclass offtce space that had been lacking and a plethora of new equipment and gym space for academlc and recreatlon purposes The new bulldlng contatns ftve gymnastums one to be used for gymnastlcs 1nd the other four to serve as multl purpose gyms srx handb ill courts two swtmmmg pools a human performance laboratory dance studlo combatlve sports room a completely equipped tr unnng room condltlonlng room and a speclal adapttve gym wlth the cqulpment needed for rehabtlltatlon students use The recreatlonal facthtnes became an 1nstanth1tw1th the students for use rn thetr lelsure ttme and the dlvlslon seelng th it student demand was so gre tt posted schedules for utrllzlng the ftcllltles whenever they were not ln use for scheduled classes Prob xbly the handball courts and the swrmmlng pool were the most popular ol thc new facllttles but all the 1re1s were IH nearly const int use by students and faculty pursumg therr l'CLI'CdllOIT1lLl1OlLCS The new faclltty IS com enlcnt to the dorms and has adequ ltc p trkmg facllltles for those who hve oll c xmpus and lt IS tntlclp rted th it use ol the new butldlng wlll ste tdtly increase as more md more people ftnd tt an ex er ax ulable source of recreatton tl pleasure 7. New Physical Education Complex 205 4 I 4 -.. I Q . . , ' - l 1 . . . I 9 ' V A r 1 1 . . D ' T ' I 1 1 w ' I . . . ' r . . 4 ' , ' - . . . . . l ' 1 . N . . . I . . w. . K 9 4 4 1 K 1 1 I ' 1 1 ' 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 . . , . , , I 1 1 1 1 . 1 4 3 , ' 2 . 4 5 . c , - c e 2 , l 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 - ' ' 7 S 5 4 1 ' 4 . ' 1 . l 1 C ' ' ' 4 4 1 ' 4 4 4 ' 4 ' l 7 7 4 4 . . . , 4 4 4 1 1 s. 4 4 ,ML ' ,V 4 ""Q,,4R ' L c 3 4 ' f N . , . 4 4 - s 2 - I 4 . , . 1. c , . Q , . . . c . ' f ' I . . L 1 4 1 ' 1 1 T "' 4 T , 4 ' ' ' - 4 4 4 . , c 4. 4 4 s 4 x l ' 1 X ' K , 1 ' ' 4 ' 4 . , ' 3 ', 1 N' c . . - 144, f - 4 4 - 4 4 4 s 4 ' 4 ' ' - - . . L c V 4 s , ' X2 Q ' I Z ' 2 1 4,7 , '04 . . 4 . . I 4 4 - 4 4 s 4 - 4 - 2 L,f 4 - L 4 N ' I, is X 4 V4 4 ,L 4 - L 'Nj I h A 4.4 . ' ""' ' " ' ., " 'fx f-'ZW " ' 1-f:'4'f'- 4 J- A . l- 'Z '-52' 1"':' Af- V- - F-' .-"- fx'--3,,,g, MT '-f ... ., . .. -- K ',-l..7 .,:.-...,-'.-L.- ' v.:.L ,- .-4 . , . , . - ...... - , ., .4 ,44.,,..............- - - -4 .,..,...,,.. , --s- --------1 1, Y , 44 1 1 1 V 1 ' 1 I 1 i ! E Q I 2 a ! f 3 3 1 i m B A I l Recreation ls Far Everyone 256 F-4-N QE ' - .w W... ,,, , M .W ,, I 1 ' :-L Tlx .Q fi v. ev 4 e 'E 4 M A .1 I If -4 W ,A ri .-:,:.L::::.1.,.,L-,..,QL.:...1,- f f -, -'.,""' ' ' ' T-7 'ffl V'-' ' "' 1 4 " ' 1 ' ' .. Q ,...,-7-,,..:?..-f.,v-f-7-7.?:F,1,.3-.,.:.-.5..,-f..,7,.:,.? -1Q,1:-jGfl90fr'7j-1:rgQ-.?,,e,:i,,.i?5,..1:.,?,:,:,:.,,-,, ,....- . , . . 4,1 , .Id . , , . . . I 9- 1 i fd., A if ,fl -A, '4MUWf9ff,y W ff? , f !7f iff IQ! 4. ,.4-disww 'WE' f If 4-ou.p,,....- "'J -4 V .1 f l s '91 X! '92 -'-,P ,.- ,..uL--..,-- y...-.....,.-. v- .....-..- -J- 257 -4, A-J . . . 1 ,, W, . . . . J ' - ' -4 ."' 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Q,-1 . QV 57,-,Xa:,x',, E wvffiigj rj, 'f3Q4 A1+Y 1 k""'- . f' -rl' v--ff-ftyfv-.1 -v - , --wr.,-...,,,-.... 9 ..,,,,f-71:7-.,f,.f - .,,7,.-7,.,,, ..,., .,, ...,,.. ,,.,, ,nm -- ' ' -,-..L,4 ' 57 ,,..q-N. .......,-., I4 ww, 1 'nba g 4+ fd.- fi ffggq.. - ." ," 351 .- X x 931-'?n"' .ig-I, . ,7 .. Q, ' A ' LKQ i . A is "' me , + :, bi . J.. . 'D T4 ' "Z5'3. KW ?' M' -Emil .Q 9,15-U-' A . ' "W- ..- , - -. , , , v :I . "1 ,, '-'f"'lr:.' ' I . ' ' ' ' 'il -' - 'f ..z.4 ' ' 'G' 'f , '- ' .- . Jn- .'f.- . ,' V -:V . if ,--1" 1 '- Tau- f N- . - . - , . . . . 1 .1 . I . f L , - u .. . . . - -, - 2. . --.A . , -1 ffvitp 5: 1 . , ,ag ,. :gw.j"x5"-' "," fr r." , "' ' - T. '-J" ..-: .nf .. -. V :- r . .:.-we f, - gg-.:.f' y,,, x . ' , ' -v.- N I .5 -V Kylix f, K., 3 , if -it --g..lk-VL. -NA : A --. . .-. v '-- ,fn "' I' ' fg ' 5 rQ?:g3I-'L1.. Sh- - " ' "L, . .' .- -' ' ' .-Sk-L-1 . f , -1. . 1 '-, - -f r, v 5. ' :- .f L 1.--.-'W' fgaahr-Jr., A,'.A-. -61,45 2.. . :.,. 5,-b .,., -,, 55r.,1gk4.xf' , . . 55. - T':"!5, '- 13' " , 'W' "ffm ""2 ., .. 'A , N M, I ul -.- ,E - F 1-P -I' J: -I wh -fa-.,,-1 1 , ' 4' 'h '. ' ' '. ' ' -- A- ow.-sv . ' 1 X - - f .H ff 'f A "v -0-H f Ns..-- .-..- .. -.,-,K,-,- ,D ,- '. ,.,p...up,... .-...........- ...im--. ,.-,,,..,s L.. w- ... . ..-N-, -1-.. GRADUATES 260 Tomaselli, Jack White, Wayne Ahmed, Safi Alcorn, Ron Beebe, Jan Disasa, Jerman Gasemloo, Fared Gates, Jack Gates, Janice Ki Lau, Chio McNamara, Thom Safi, Ahmed HS W W V " ' 'N""-fL""" ' .""."""-'---3,VI.-..:.,f,-.rf---,,,.,.......-u--,V. ,....-.. .,. , ,,,. 4 , FQ 1 X i I -a 2 1 Z i Y I V v Y , S , 4 i l x x I i v A Q a i ei ff Yr Qi 1 3 I I 52 Ae 5 5 v 11' 'f -g-...,- -.,.-,.-..-..--.-,. - . ,. . ., . 262 L. Allen Joyce Alley Terry Al-Usaimi Issam Anderson Brad Anderson Linda Andrews George Appelbaum Richard Appleby Darrell Atkins Debbie Augustine Anita Bamblck Kathleen Barlow Scott Bell Anita Belton Ed Bender Marla Bender Mary Bennett Gayle Berg Dennis Bergman David Blasx Paula Blede Joe Boucher Barbara Boyle Marllee Brewer Kathie Brigman Carolyn Bronson Brenda Brooks Janine Brown Kathy Bryan Pam Buenger Hlldegard Buessmg James Bunge Arlen Burnett Diane Burnett Patricia Buselt Joann SENIORS ""? li' rl I r I I 7 2 1 r Il , Y . . 155 ' iii , sh 1 lw 1 1 I 'v I 1 '1 l 1 'sf l lx r ,gl I . I r 1 i ' 1 1 .ul 5 ',.1 ' 2 E I 1 T w ! M I if xzjl YV 1 it ji ai.:- l I1 ' :XII ' , , ,f , ' 1 ? l , T5 A nw l ' . i lg l .5 y A ii, 1 A I fi N' 4 .4 4 NN V ll J ' J . A .i l l A 1 'ff ll: l l - E, i , fi! J g i 4 l K ' r ' y i 5 il , " Zig ! , : x Q li 1 a J 'g 5 J ' Q 5 ' J X s 1 l 2. I 5 N551 3 ' . J V: ' 1 'gag J - , l M l ' Il 1 , Q I J . l EE F 1 'E 1' I -- lei l K Tl i 3 QV! W ' . , J Es 5 J ' ' E 5, 1 5 S lim? 4 J ' l :iJ-- I 9 A 2 all 'il ' sr? N Er A 1 iii ' 155595 ' TE? 1 3' 53 - in 3 7 4' 's , T1 I i W . . f' y ag. , A I v ' ' ' . , . f"'v. ,af"". Y : . f'T"'-e'-f-7'vv:-v:-7-pf-sp-n--1fgrfav,5-mfg-,H-e-1'ri f,4:-11'Pf'-.1, ' ' , - - Ja - '-.Z ' - -,,. ,f 1 1- .'-' --., SENIORS Butler, Glenda Campbell, Nancy Canseler, Phillip Carlson, Karen Carr, Brenda Caton, Michael Chambers, Linda Charlton, Sharon Christenson, Connie Christy,'Lynn Cistle, Karen Clark, Peggy Close, Douglas Clowers, Michael Clune, Connie Cobb, Royanne Coe, Catherine Coleman, Mary Collier, Donna Cook, Cathy Cowan, Leon Cox, James Crain, Jan Cummings, Janet Cunningham, Linda Curtin, Ron Davenport, Jill Day, Bruce Day, Glenda Day, Sherry Dell, Lon Denney, Rick DePass, Reginald Deputy, Susan Diebel. Gary , V , - ve - . , . , . . , ,. f . , f 5 ,, -. - ,.x.--J. ..-s-. . ..--, ,..- - - - - s in ' 1 -, ...Q - ,, , , .. - ,..e...-...T,...........-.........- ,. ...- Divitto, Janet Dohrman, Janice Doll, Trudy Donovan, Carol Dorrel, Sandy Doudican, Barbee Duncan, Steven Ebel, Debbie Ebel, Dennis Eddy III, William Egan, Kathleen Egnatic, Rebeca Elder, Maggie Ellis, Marilyn Ellis, Ron ,, ' ' , ,Yi ' "' - .f -P'l"" f'jt1Y'f"'?'4g 1 . '71i"grv-?'f2'hqvrv-'1r'7r7r1vAhav-n'rvf"j?r'1Qt'l1:T1'P":gP4-'r-'Z'--'- ' 2- W' - -' "'1 ' ,, . ' , , . A: , . W. . ,: ,',,-, Egigv A, An j..il,'vv'f,::Li:,,-', j-,J-:a54',f.4j,',',',,',7f .jjf 5' ,.lgYQ in '. ' fr- -1 ,'..' , , , ,. , , , , . , Nu' SENICJRS IC Emerson, Alice Emerson, Jane English, Peggy Ensiminger, Fredna Fernandez, Nellie Fernkopf, Mary Ferris, Barbara Fick, Janet Fisher, Lyle Flickinger, Judy Forcum, Anthony Forsythe, Doug Fotovich, Ursula Fouts, Ann Fouts, Leroy Freidell Dave Freidell Stephen Fry John Fry Pamela Fursman Nancy Galtan Jocelyn Gallxart Mike Gamblll Charlle Gates Bill Geist Paul Geske Terrl Gibson Cherri Gibson Phyllis Glaser Carolyn Glover Tom Gold Barbara Gotteschalk Ila Greene Pam Greenwood Vicki Griffith Peggy 265 ! 111+ 'ew , XS ,M I , ,J 7 ,yit,.,.. ,i 7 to ., , Y , Y Y Y Y 5 Y , 5 , Y Y , , Y v . . --.-- " '- - . ns, . . "'-'Yf' "i ' - -:.QL-...aa-..-.7 '-.-- -- ' 1 , . . - - - - Y. , .8 N- ' '- , . , ., ,.. ' .. 'L..-,.,..4-x.....-.-..--,.-,.-N- . .. --,, -.. '.3,....,f,s,.4............,....-.a. V -V """" SENICRS Grimm, Janet Guadagnino, Eileen Guadagnino, Salvatore Hague, Heidi Halderman, Gary Halverson, Junko Hamilton, Hope Hamilton, Vada Hamm, Ken Hanna, Petrina Hancho, Steven Hanschu, Rick Harbour, Randall Harlan, Nancy Harper, David Harper, Marilyn Harris, Judy Hayes, Marcia Haynes, Ja Nean Heckert, Sue 266 f ,, ,,,V VA ' ' f',f - LN , I 'V I if I 1 f' , lr , -f-1 ,--.5-1?-5,-....f.-7. it -7-,..,,...-.,,..,......,V-,,-nt-.. ..,,,,-,,.. ' ' ' ' ' ' '- 1 SENIORS M Heim, Kenna Hein, Kenneth Heinen, David Hemphill, Angela Hemphill, Jane Henderson, Janet Hendley, Marilyn Hess, Dee Ann Hetzke, Jean Hiestand, C. J. Higgs, Holly Hild, Libby Hoagland, Nancy Hobbs, Ruth Hodges, Rob Holle, Rita Jo Hopkins, Edward Horten, Shirley Hufferd, Darrel Hyland, Bruce Hyner, Richard Irvine, Debbie Isom, Henrietta Iwert, Susan Jacobson, Greg Janke, Betsy Janssen, Dorothy Jehle, Ron Jensen, Carol Jewell, Ona Jordan, Susan Keast, Mary Keeslar, Myron Kessler, Jim Kimmell, Marcia Kimple, Barbara 267 r tl l l I 1 r 1, ,qt il I I : S , 1 r v- - T-' -- 3, L 1 - .- -.,.-,,,l.,,A,.-. ,1,-..,.t , , U I --'w--l-- Klenda, Tom Klepper, Vivian Knott, James Knox, Dianna Knox, Murray King, Debra King, Patricia King, Robert Kisher, Deanna SENIORS 268 Lassman, Diane Laubach, Stephen Lazorchak, Donna Liedtke, Don Linden, Linda Litiver, Steve Lockhart, Connie Logsdon, John Lopez, John Ludwig, Glenda Koepsel, Richard Kohart, Therese Kolb, Carol Kramer, Patricia Kready, Donna Kruger, Paul Kuhn, Michael Kurtz, John Kurtz, Joy Kuykendall, Nina Kynion, Sherry Land, Michael Lane, Mary Lapsley, John Larsen, Bob F" , . 1,1 K ,. :-"-1rgg--,-f--w:'f.'-"7-',-,---':-,-f--f-"--y--.-v-- .- Ludwig, Mark Lueers, Marsha Lutgen, Vicki Lyberger, Carol Lynch, Helen Lynch, Sharon Lynn, Darrel Lynn, Marion Lynn, Vernon Mahan, Phil Meyer, Jean Middelton, Jerry Milam, Paul Miller, Wes Mitchem, Scott Mohr, Rodney SENIORS Marcum, Barbara Martin, Chris Martin, Julie Mason, Lisa Mastellar, Marietta Matsushita, Susan Matteson, Gary Mattox, Sharon McAllaster, Joyce McCarthy, Barb McCurdy, Lynda McDougall, Mila McEwen, Kathleen McGovern, Keith McGrew, Charlene McKenzie, Rhonda McQuilkin, Mike Melander, Roxy Metz, Corky Meyer, Debra 269 , , ,,,.. A ,,-.... --Q,-n.,-i...----i-f- ---- 'A """ 270 Moore, Randy Moran, Mary Morrow, Mitzy Mosher, Craig Neely, Cindy Neff, Dennis Neff, Susan Neidig, J acquelin Nelson, Jess Nichols, Lorna Jo Nichols, Steve Nickl, Terry Norten, Melba Notson, Steven 0'Halleran, Gail Olsen, Patrick Orme, Lynnette Padgett, Michael Parker, Mary Ann Parra, Robert Parsons, Keith Payton, Marcia Peachey, Linda Peak, Diana Peck, Michael Pennebaker, Keith Perkins, James Perry, Veronica Peters, David Phillips, Dave Pillard, Gary Poovey, Debbie Porter, Deania Price, Basil Purdy, Mike SENIORS fy 4,': I A ' ,. N ,fam 031 -55245121 SENICRR mg X if W ,f4ff AW, , Pursel, Alice Quinton, Kathy Raburn, Sandra Radford, Pat Raines, Vickie Rolls, Cecelia Randolph, Joseph Ray, Latricia Reames, Russ Reed, Sherlyn Reetz, Debra Reimer, Karen Rhodes, Beth Rice, Lynda Rico, Gloria Ring, Richard Roberts, Nancy Robinson, Janet Rock, Ronald Ross, David 2 Settle, David Seymour, Rose Shannon, Roger Royalty, Sharon Rusco, Anita Ryser, Jack Sader, Dale Samples, Carol Sams, Robert Sawtelle, Debbie Schartz, Sharon Schon, Sheryl Schrag, Marcy Schwartz, Carl Schwartz, Kathleen Scorville, Debbie Seger, Rickey Senl, Nadine SENIORS Shannon, Susan Sherman, Lina Sherman, Susan Shindler, Susan Shultz, Deborah Siegrist, Barbara Sielert, David Siemseh, Craig Sisler, Cynthia Sjoholm, John Slack, Rebecca Ann Sloan, Greg Smith, Deborah Smith, Joan Smith, Roger V"""7' fri , , ,, ,, , ,, . gn V--W f ,,. ..,, c.,..,5---r-,.-.n-g:--w--'ur"- ,. , ,.,,.,.... . , ,. V .,,...r,.....,-1 ,ggy-..,-..,.,.,,.f1n,.f--15,10-eva5--gf- V - - -'-' :av ,, -, , . , , ,f - Y , -,Pj -Y, .-L, : , U V ,- - ' ' ' - 'lf' "' - 'J' ' .'-" '., " .,,f: ' :-.1 .1-J-if-,'-v,V.' '.?!'e?' - ' " ' ' , 1 N ,,. , , ,A - .,.--, . ,. -. ,f 7111. -,,-Q ' 1 -.1 ' - - ' '- ' R Stephen, Kenneth Sterner, Steven Stewart, Janet . Smith, Roger Smith, Sarah Smith, Vicki Smittle, John Smoots, Gregory Snyder, Jane Soetaert, Barbara Solomon, Meredith Sentag, Monte Sorell, Gary Southiere, Vinnie Spaulding, Susan Springer, Janice Steadman, Stephani Stephen, Cathy C SENICRS Stewart, June Stoll, Ena Stossfill, William Stover, Greg Stram, Linda Strickland, Judy Stuchlik, Mark Stude, Elaine Stultz, Patti Swanson, Carolyn Swarts, Roger Swenson, Barbara Symmonds, Wayne Taj chman, Marvin Tate, Wayne 273 274 Warren, David Warren, Jolene Warren, Patricia Weed, Deborah Wenzl, Kenny Wheeler, Debbie Wheeler, Merlin White, Warren White, Wayne Whitbredge, John Whittredge, Don Wiens, Gerald Williams, Ivan Williams, Mary Williams, Nancy Williams, Rhonda Winter, Melvin Winter, Vickie Withroder, Roger Wood, Craig SENICRS Terrili, Glenn Thomas, Teresa Tindell, Wayne Tobin, Kathleen Tomek, Deborah Turner, Sandra Udall, Jackie Unruh, Dorothy Van Horn, Roberta Vanneman, Vicky Vinson, Debra Voorhess, Christine Warmker, Gary Warmund, Claudia Warnock, Jack Woodruff, Sandra Woods, Fred Worcester, Ron Wyatt, Cheryl Young, Henry Young, Ron Zewdie, Girma Zerdes, Billie Joe Zubeck, Ann Zuberg, Rick Atherly, Virginia Bayless, Marsha Beerhalter, Lana Berger, Tim Bina, Connie Bradford, Patricia Bradhears, Sharon Bullrihh, Norlene Cartwright, Steven Clements, Tami Cochran, Jennifer Coleman, Ken Collins, Blian Combes, Glenda Compton, Nancy Cooper, Katherine Craig, Candace Crandall, Donna D'Armond, Joyce Douglas, Carol Erickson, Ginger Erpelding, Jan Eubank, Susan Weing, Sally Fenske, Mary Fieandt, Jayne Flack, Mary Jo Fleming, Nancy Flin, Alberta Fredericks, Nina Fund, Jodie Gibson, Julie Gonzales, Michael Goodwin, Judy Grace, John Griffing, Lois Griffins, Charlene Hanley, Roberta Hanschu, Barbara Hanson, John Harder, Rowena Hartman, Glendon Havel, Peggy Hayward, Larry Hazen, Jeanne Heffley, Deborah Hensley, Sara Hollady, Karolee Holmes, Yvonne Honer, Nancy Hurt, Vickie Inlow, Sheryl Irabasso, Kathleen Kasitz, David Kipfer, Martha Kukuk, Susan Labbe, Susan Lammert, Walter Laye, Nancy Lillich, Gerald Lopez, Kristine Love, Jim McAfoos, Kathy McAllaster, Steven McCosh, Jeff McDaniel, Pam McGee, Mark Meyer, Dudley Minor, Janis Morning, Willie Mae Mullin, Alice Murray, Linda Nashatizadeh, Massoud Neill, Jennine Nelson, Kathy B Olive, Haden Overstreet, Richard Phillips, Susan Plamann, Diann Poovey, Becky Rice, Cindy Rink, Julie Rock, Franklin Rowland, Beth Ryan, Renea Ryno, DeAnn Schlesener, Debra Schmidt, Glenda Schmidt, Twila Schrimmer, Harold Schroeder, Linda Schumacher, Pam Scribner, Denise Shearon, David Snell, Jo Shepard, Betty JUNIORS , ,,,, c Agn' 'bt e 'P in lv, l-F' .'.sz'.s: . , l 277 Sherffius, Nancy Shiver, Debbie Sicard, .Tommy Siebert, Jo Sorden, Billie Spears, Laura Spindler, Jayna Stair, Gregg Statch, Brenda Stegman, Dona Steiner, Jack Stensars, Craig Stevens, Lisa Delisle Stone, Sandy Stoneking, Janice Strawn, Sandy Summer, Marla Swedenburg, James Symmonds, Rodney Thurman, Deborah Tippet, Janie Upton, Kathy Urban, Jeanene Van Meter, Ceri Vidricksen, Debra Walker, Alicia Waltman, Craig Warren, Patty Weigand, Katherine Weller, LeAnn Wells, Christiane Westerhaus, Mary J 0 Wilch, Constance Wilson, Cardee Wilson, Scott Winders, Ann Windler, Pam Winston, Coleen Jo Winterscheid, Judy Wong, Peter York, Sheryl Zeller, Elizabeth I 4. ' " A 4'ff"1:"j-:r'r-""'f"'7---:f11--7'.-...--f:f-Q----V-vw-1-fu ,, ... .... "'--'.1-'f--. 1 . 41 X 1 1 x11 1 1 ' , A , ,f ,gf f'1f11,1 A I, ,11 1,11 11, ygg v fl Y 57 1 1 1 1 lf, V , Q , X gi 1 1 5, 4 S 7 , 3 1 auf" if M , get 3 5 f E Q4 ii G! ,Q 2 9 it 1 - 43 4' ' 1 ffl Adamson, Gail Alsalaymen, Patricia Angood, Gayle Austin, Ann Augustyn, Laura Baker, Mary Ann Blasdel, Deana Bozarth, Martha Brenner, De Brown, Dennis Brown, Pam Bryant, Joan Buselt, Jane Cage, Eva Carl, Dana Cossairt, Belinda Cooper, Judy Coons, Tanya Cooper, Nancy Crane, Rebecca Davis, Keith ' Deutsch, Diane Dieker, Steve Diliberti, Vicky Farmer, E. J. Ferm, Lori Fendley, Susie Garwood, Linda Gilham, Rose Ginauan, Janet Godwin, Connie Goertz, Susan Green, Junell Gregory, Michael Hahmer, Coleen Hansen, Rosemary Harding, Mike Hellmer, Lelanie Henke, Judy Hill, Jeannine Hoffman, Michelle Holcom, Sandy Hootz, Lois Jackson, Queen Jaimes, Denise J irak, Ann Johnson, Eloise Jones, Michael Kientz, Karlene Layner, Julie McCabe, Teresa Medlin, Juanita Meis, Carol Merry, Gene SOPHOMORES 280 ,f.:..4M44'viQfWmo,w SOPHCJMORES Mosley, Lanora Nashatizadeh, Debra 0'Connor, Danny Pellegrino, Vicki Phillips, Frani Porkeypile, Rita Quaintance, Ann Redford, Carol Reed, Roxanna Renfro, Joyce Rieke, Diane Reynolds, Kenneth Roberts, Ruthie Robinson, Mary Jane Schwemmer, Roxanne Searles, Nancy Siemnen, Vicky Sickel, Warren Smerchek, Cynthia Smith, Cheryl Smith, Ivy Stegeo, Suzy Sullivan, Janice Syrios, William Terrones, Emma Torres, Gregory Wigger, Peggy Williaps, Lorraine Witten, Karl Womochil, Sandy Zeller, Patricia Zieammemann, Eileen FRESHMEN 282 Adams, Mary Alsalaymen, Mohammad Ashbaugh, Barbara Benear, Kristy Betty, Barbara Biggs, Connie Blackburn, Rod Blinn, Michael Brant, Nita Bronhammer, Mary Brown, Ellen Buckman, Mary Buller, Mary Beth Campnell, Tricia C Carlson, Fred Coker, Pam Corbin, Cecilia Cowel, Debra Y, y ily, 'M"f,",i'f5if'1f ' ,135 74, 'mir 'sm fe ah, 2, ff Q79 ,'i7,9' 132229 ' -v - ev , Y vfyliqffv, X ff fy QQ, ff ,Q ,.,f WT' H I 1 ,f f, 'WY ' f f f V if fff - f 'Cf ' X ff V fgfffky f W ff,f,!,,f, ,,7,cV'fW'6,C,f2 ' ff f Q fi , 'ff ' , ., " f "fjjQ,",ffZ7',77JfV iw' "V ' ' ' 7 13 'fw fwfvfff 1 f,,,, , f ,,,,,ZfW,,qf,,2f , if ,,,, y I ,Wf,,7,,W , , 5 FRESHMEN f f 7' f f Q4fa ww f , ,f,, f .7,,ff, ffffwfff ' fl , ,-tv. Croppl Denise Cross, Larry Cunningham, Debbie Davis, Ginger Davis, Jan Davoreh, Rose Ditzler, Craig Dunnaway, Patricia Ebberts, Crystal Edmunds, Sheri England, Joyce Fein, Bill Feldhausen, Vickie Fitzsimmons, Debbie Flener, Danny Forrester, Cheryl Fryman, Susan Gilman, Mary Habiger, Jo Ann Hadden, Nancy Haemmerle, David Hamilton, Helda Hammond, Dayle Heil, Michael Hemphill, Steve Hensley, Katrinka Herzog, Greg Hinnenkamp, Marcia Hooker, Janet f 5 y 283 Hosier, Janet Houck, Marcia Houghton, Linda Hugg, Joyce Jilka, Luann Johnson, Teresa Keating, Betty Kern, Shari Kimmi, Phillip Kindred, Julie Koegeboehn, Brenda Koehler, Sue Krier, Terry Land, Denise Larrabee, Debbie Lehmann, Susan Lowe, Denise Mallon, Steve Masada, June McGheney, Kathy McKinney, Marsha McKinney, Pam McMurray, Paula Memes, Pam Melton, Georgene Meuser, Julie Miller, Katherine Miller, Mary Montague, Deborah Mosbayar, Ann Nesbitt, Margo Newton, Cheryl Olmstead, Jane Page, Beverly Percy, Mona Peterson, Patricia Prim, Patricia Prophet, Stuart Quirin, John Radford, Nina 1 Rolls, James Rieke, Patty Scheuck, Robin Schutler, Phillip Saukers, Micki Soule, Sandra Stadel, Julie Stenzel, Terry Stoker, Cheryl Swanson, J enita Swenson, Donna FRESHMEN Wall, Linda Webb, Martha Welsh, Donnetta Williams, Wende Sykes, Bonnie Tefter, Debbie Thelan, Kathy Thomas, Janice Timken, Elaine Utecht, Patty sf all WN v X .4Q5ff ": ix X 'ff f I 'fx Y ' ,Vi-' . 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"+ ' ' .I fs! 1 'a , f s ,ff 1.4, 5 . A 1 ,Hu 1 W Ma. -. N 'JZ ' f"I'-1' ' ,F ,W s'fb . 'VNS' 'ffl ,110 Wfgf . , My ' ff.'L:?' 1 E" ' "Q vw' ' I . .vt ,. ,. 1 "Mu 'fn w :fi R rvx a " 4. K' ,. A" fr '51-",'w:foAf 'Q 1 H v 15, .,, . 'A , . f 1 Q K . , . .- at Q - :,f-' .3 . Q . : --', 2 ggi?" ye JSM 'wk we , . .Q - . x .1 mn. ,, .-3 ,... -A. -. . Gftf-.wuiw '-.2-:vfdsi-45 Chi Omega Belle J. Symington, Housemother Karen Anderson Janie S. Banister Beverly L. Banta Denise L. Baragary Dorothy A. Becker Sondra Bishop Debbie J. Bloom Ginny Booker Connie D. Bosch Lisa R. Boyer Brenda J. Brooks Deanna J. Bruey Janet A. Butcher Janice S. Carmichael Candy Carpenter Patti Coffman Leslie J. Cooper Cinda Cox Jeanne M. Cranz Susan L. Cropp Cathyanne Cutting Janice Davis Marcia G. Dix Karla S. Erickson Kathy K. Evans 289 A ' T' J - ' ' - ' 7' ' F " ' f- ' -H",1,f....-a..---.'..-:-. - .--. ...L -.- . , .,. . . .- . - - - - - ,....... ... -..............s,.-,,.,- ... 290 Connie J. Fairbanks Karen R. Gates Jane M. Goode Janet K. Gustafson Susan M. Haake Lynn L. Hein Vicki Hermes Anne E. Jesberg Jan E. Johnson Shelly Johnson Sue A. Kauten Debbie S. Kenney Nancy L. Korte Jane E. Kuharic Karen J. Lackner Karol L. Lackner Kathy Mace Mary E. Overholser Linda J. Peterson Kathy Reid Belinda A. Scheffler Cindi Seitz Lynn Sivyer Marlys D. Titus Paula A. Vineyardl Ann C. Wagner Mary J. Westerhaus Susan R. Whiting Della Sigma Theia Damon Caple Pam Hill Henrietta Isom Sandra Pearson Veronica Perry Patricia Warren Della Zela E. M. Sears, Housemother Barbara Gimple, Advisor Kathleen Aldrich Linda E. Attig Reneta J. Bird Julia E. Brandt Shirley J. Burgman Joy F. Carpenter Marcia Crawford Annette L. DaVault Barb Davidson Jean Flickinger 2 9 Deborah Greene H Cheryl Hammack Dale L. Hannah Paula Harper Nancy L. Harter Frances Heironimus Deborah A. Holloway Martha P. Kipfer Deanna Kisner Terri A. McGinness Debbie L. Miller Kacie 0'Brien Mary J. Richeson Kathryn L. Spence Jolene B. Stolfus Deeann K. Walter Carol L. Walters Tomi West Janis D. Widler Celinda D. Young Pam Zubeck Phi Della Theta Veda Johnson, Housemother Robert L. Parenti, Advisor Don E. Ball Joe B. Barefoot Floyd C. Boss Lynn C. Bott Joe A. Cobb Phil M. Davis Wayne Driggers Robert Gustafson Thomas J. Hardwick Dean W. Hughes Timothy D. Knauf Timothy N. Larson Wesley A. Marks Jeff A. McCloud N. David Montgomery Robert C. Nelson Michael A. Reid Richard R. Ring Frank R. Sanchez Rincard C. Schamp D. Wayne Spencer Jerry A. Wheeler 2 Ph: Kappa Tau Lynn Brigman Mark Buckley Richard Godfrey Dale Leech Frank Mullins Tom Myers Kent Wagner Anne Williams Joan Wysman Sigma Kappa Grace Bridgewater, Jolene Boston Pam Cooper Theresa Cox Jeanne Dailey Terri Johnston Diane McClanahan Becky Novak Marge Miltner Janet Schoap Janet Sinnard Karen Sinnard Carol Smith Joyce Testori Kathy Tipton J ohna Veatch Gail White Housemother 295 Sigma Phi Epsilon Lily C. Strand, Housemother Bruce Andrews, Advisor Jerry Olmstead, Advisor Richard Reicherter, Advisor James Shepard, Advisor Mark Bauer Sid W. Blankenship Jim L. Compton Charles F. Cooper III Pete Drusch 296 Stan Fitch Patrick M. Gillihan Ron Graves James R. Hamilton Randall L. Hendricks Michael P. Jones Wayne Lampson Paul Loyd Dwight Metcalf Robert J. Pennington Joe A. Pyle Mark Runyan Richard J. Sedlacek Lynn Singer Terry D. Skinner Keith Stinson Randy L. Tanner Lyle Taylor Kenneth L. Waechter Henry A. Waggoner Jack D. Warnock Thomas M. Weir Cal Williams Boozer 297 Srgma Sigma Sigma Loucile Lowe, Housemother Marcia A. Arensberg Jody L. Bergner Jodi Biggs Ellen Brown Maggie L. Fehring Janet P. Foncannon Shirley A. Gaeddert Sharon K. Godfrey Mary C. Goodwin Jane Gray Susan J. Heitman Denise M. Hiebert Barbara J. Hill Jeannine M. Hill Karen S. Hogan Dena K. Jenson Cathy A. Johnson Becky Jordan Vivian L. Klepper Marsha Kooser Diane D. Lane Shelley Lyons Linda J. Mantia Debbie Matzeder Clair L. McClure Marylen A. McQuirk Karen K. Miller Linda D. Mosier Christa Mossman Zoa E. Norman Marilene Prease Ann Reid Theresa S. Rohr Farolyn K. Rose .vlary Roth 2, X Andra K. Smith Sheryl A. Smith Debbie Snyder Donna Snyder Teresa A. Stolfus Gwen J. Taylor Catherine M. Vestring Debra K. Woodbury Debra D. Worthy x, - I P- 7 299 lnferfroternt y Council Panhellenic Council Through the joint efforts of Panhellenic and the Interfraternity Council. a Faculty Tea was held during the month of January. The purpose of the tea was to establish a better relationship between faculty members and the Greek system. The Interfraternity Council is the organizing body for the fraternities at Kansas State Teachers College. IFC over the past years has sponsored many functions which include such things as Faculty Senate Tea, Greek Week. Senior Day, various Homecoming activities, and other special events as the need arises. It is the hope of IFC to Work as a cohesive unit to make the organization as effective as possible. It is the ultimate objective of the council to, involve every man of every fraternity in some sort of group or individual function sponsored by IFC. These functions range from social and academic to athletic. ' Co-ordinating Greek activities among the sororities on the K.S.T.C. campus is the purpose to which the Panhellenic Council is devoted. It has six-member organizations, as each sorority at the college is a member of the council. Aside from its main function of organizing and supervising sorority rush week, the council initiates community service projects, including the bell ringing at Christmastime. I The council is comprised of a president, a rush chairman, and a selected or elected Panhellenic Representative from each of the sororities. This year's president was Joyce Testori and the sponsor was Susan Scott. -YN.. ff...-Q.:Qv ' -r:-v-,--..,,,g..,, , , - . .- .N,,x 1, V- ' -. -,, '. I ' ,. X . ,. . . , . xx - 0, ' fl -....1..-mg. A ' , A..- -x - ,4 ,g,...4',.1.,,+,.x fi! 'I ,J i e !I ' If v I , i' I I I ,M-. 'I 'VIII .II I If'f ,J :I I ,r V ,. I I Bulletin M. 302 wmv lx-'-I f , ,Ift. X j f Cf ywwwxyw V, Pictured above is the fall '73 BULLETIN staff. Members are Qleft to rightl Jack Warnock Carl Schwartz and Jo Snell. 7 1 ir- I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I .Lg Thurs of ho fearir Thurs going are c BUII4 CarlS Y WMM Y K3 tz and Jo Snell Thursday, the Union as a httle quieter Thursdays, an Instructor meets a ctassrom ot hoisted newsprmt Thursday, the sound ot tearmg paper selects coupons, ads, artscles Thursdays, tell what s already been and what s going to be Thursdays, the halls ot academra f are a httle deeper undertoot Thursdays, the X Bullehn Edltor Jo Snell concentrates on a last mmute layout Carl Schwartz BULLETIN busmess manager pores over bookkeepmg snags V3 'Sa L 4r"'i- 0 . . 2 a K . w . Y 1 , 'S ,z L I V ' . vnu TJ ,V V . V vw ,1.,1"'uf ', LZ 4 V, W, . V V- x I V!',L- E - : -.. . -"WJ , XY' ' "NX 4.1. f 'FQNV fr - ,xr .1 , x M' Q . f c I 1 N A X -xx V A , v T ' . - 1 1 ' f I T T S wwf. ,.,,, w ' T 1 s ' V l N 1 - v ,J fl' 5' S K, , ,ygtxfuv I -V. , X " :Lwi5'!,1,,3V E I muh, . mfg af " . ,Q .V ., If . ? , - A 1 ' s f t"' ' I I , r , We V K R Y Q: 'X 'B vi ' -ff T , tate W. f- 1 S' Y ' , , M I A '23 riff . N 1 4 fx . 3 T T as 5,1 ,ss S ess: 4-49----S-L---P M 1 r 1 S S I f 1 f ,Ml f f e ff AV f X X , W"."'f '. X ff ' f f' ff 'V ffyuf' 2211?-,.f?,fl f,y:,y.t, w M fAxQ6jQJff- Off if 2 ' V 4,2 f- QTY? 4 ,v 'Qff V71-fl? f Cfffe f 4 ff. f, 4, I W E 3 , , N, , ,, f rl Y 1 9 D V 1,,,,,.,,al 7 1 - 7 x ,L , .Y ,z,,v f , 4 , iff 1 ,' 'Q fr 7715 " Q Ox? zf w If .,f , ' .'?ff,fA'. ,, f -, i ,,,,, ' , W, ,,, ,1,, ,.,,,,t .,.3, WL, fn fq f I W ,, - WWA. The 1974 SUNFLOWER staff include lback row, left to right! Steven Peter Calloway, Janie Tippet, Jim Swedenburg, and Marilyn Harper. Front row, lleft to rightl are Danny O'Connor, Debbie Holloway, Ken Hamm, and Jill Doles. Staff members not pictured include Patti Emler, Shelli Miller, Jo Snell, and Tony Figuerelli. 304 E S ahwa Y acdv Thef Ken Hal 52230 if ff 'fi-amy , ? f.w,4,fyw4yfuq f V WXTXVJ4 fwzmg 2 N l l x 'E gl t Harper. Front ler, ShelhM1ller Sunflower Baskmg IH the warmth of the rays on ltS brlght petals a sunflower s yellow face follows the path of the sun Sunflowers grow naturally 1n Kansas Nobody has to plant them tend them or tram them on a trellls Thev just always grow back 'Year after year they sprmg up hardy res1l1ent forever seekmg those vltal rays Wny name a yearbook the Sunflower? A yearbook l1ves on the essence of college hfe It follows the warmth of act1v1t1es happemngs events people Sometlmes 1t s called an annual every year lt s there agam ahve and growmg The Sunflower Ken Hamm SUNFLOWER Editor relaxes for a moment to dlscuss layout plans for the 74 yearbook fffzf0f rf f 7 ZWW fr ffffxff ijffff fffffffffjl I M' ll.. ei' n 305 . . . . , , . . . , , . . - ' - ' . 7 ' t ' , . . 1 Q -I u 4 I , . 1 y n . . 1 I 1 ' 1 ' I ' ' I . Q ' t I . . , 1 1 Y ' ' Q i , - '7 ff " I 537 277,17 X g Z g X if v ' 1' I ' ' N sv 8 . Q 51 ia G f ' X . i ' ' V - 4 y a fl., I , ' 1 'O-sw X, ' v ' V Q I if ' nj Y 61,1-I V f ,, ' , ' Wf 4 w , 9 ' 1 l . 4 , 'L - 2 J' ' - ' ' . E K KJ' X I 1 1 , . y o v - it ' I J ' ' I F , 'L t V , 4 , Z - I . ' D . ' I , . , X - , , - f W, , , 2 ?4'f.' A.. L-X, ,. M I , 1, Q , 5 , A , f . 'f A , f L, - vw f f ,ea 1 Administrative Affairs Administrative Management Society Alpha Phi Omega Alpha Sigma Alpha Alpha Sigma Tau America Marketing Association Aquettes Arts and Applied Sciences Arab-American Friendship Club Associated Student Government Baptist Student Union Baseball Basketball Black Student Union Blue Key Business Office Bulletin Campus Girl Scouts Cardinal Key Cheerleaders Chi Omega Christian Science Organization Coaches lsportsl Collegiate 4-H Council for Exceptional Children Cross County Delta Sigma Theta Delta Zeta Dept. of Art Dept. of Music Educational Theatre Co. Endowment Association Epsilon Chi Exeter Football French Club Gamma Delta German Club Golf Graduate and Professional Studies Homecoming Activities Home Economics Organization Industrial Education Information Services Institutional Studies Interfraternity Council 306 Gen 9 38 146 114 286 287 150 154 44 180 74 160 232 218 160 185 42 302 118 184 214 289 162 202 112 165 216 291 291 84 90 102 28 163 121 204 134 156 136 238 56 188 124 116 30 26 300 ral Index International Club Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship Intramurals Ks. Assoc. for the Ed. of Young Children Kappa Delta Pi Karate Club Liberal Arts and Sciences Math Club Model U.N. New P.E. Facilities Office of the President Organization Night Personal Management Assoc. Phi Beta Lambda Phi Delta Theta Phi Kappa Tau. Phi Lambda Theta Photo Services Pi Gamma Mu Pi Omega Pi Psi Chi 4Psychologyl Quivera Residence Hall Assoc. Roger Williams Fellowship Russian Club School of Education and Psychology Sigma Gamma Rho Sigma Kappa Sigma Phi Epsilon Sigma Sigma Sigma Spanish Club Special Events Spurs Student Affairs Sunflower Yearbook Staff Tennis Theatre Theta Epsilon U.A,C. Vice-president of Academic Affairs Wheelchair Basketball Winter Soldier Organization Womens P.E. Club Women's Varsity Young and Old United 138 157 248 164 168 140 52 122 142 254 22 108 147 144 293 294 166 32 130 148 110 120 172 158 135 48 170 295 296 298 137 34 186 60 304 236 96 126 64 40 246 128 152 240 132 l Abel, De Adam S 1 Adamso Ahmed, Alberg, Alberg, Albers, Albin, P Alcorn, Alcorn, Allen, J Alley, 'I Alsalay Alsalay Al-Usai Andersi Andersi Anders Andrev Angood Appelb -A: : -W .--- -...- ,. .,..- .f- -'..,,,.,..,, .,, ,,. ,f., ,,,,.,, ,- -1---7 ,.,, , .,, , U 1 Abel, Deanna 261 Adams, Mary 282 Adamson, Gail 279 Ahmed, Safi 260 Alberg, Sandy 287 Alberg, Susan L. 287 Albers, Colin 261 Albin, Patricia 261 Alcorn, Jane 261 Alcorn, Ron 260 Allen, Joyce 262 Alley Terry 262 Alsalaymen Mohammad 282 Alsalaymen Patricia 279 Al-Usaimi Issam 262 Anderson Brad 262 Anderson Karen 184 Anderson Linda 262 Andrews George 262 Angood Gayle 278 Appelbaum Richard 262 Student Index Appleby, Darrell 262 Arensberg, Marcia A. 298 Ashbaugh, Barbara 282 Atherly, Virginia 276 Atkins, Debbie 262 Attig, Linda 184 Augustine, Anita 262 Augustyn, Laura 279 Austin, Ann 279 Backhus Martha 289 Baker Mary Ann 279 Ball Don 293 Bambick Kathleen 262 Barefoot Joe 293 Barlow Scott 262 Baver Mark 299 Bayless Marsha 276 Becker Dorothy 289 Beebe Jan 260 Beerhalter. Lana 276 Bell, Anita 262 Belton, Ed 262 Bender, Maria 262 Bender, Mary 262 Benear, Kristy 282 Bennett, Gayle 262 Berg, Dennis 262 Berger, Tim 276 Bergman, David 262 Bergner. Jody L. 298 Betty, Barbara 282 Biggs, Connie 282 Biggs, Jodie 298 Billings, Anita M. 287 Bina, Connie 276 Binkley, Connie 289, 287 Blackburn Rod 282 Blake Janet L.287 Blanka Michel 289 Blankenship Sid W. Blasdel Deana 279 Blasi Paula 262 Blede Joe 262 Blmn Mlchael282 307 .21 A Boothman, Margaret E. Boozer, 299 Boss, Floyd 293 Boston, Jolene 295 Bott, Lynn 293 Boucher, Barbara 262 Boyle, Marilee 262 Bozarth, Martha 279 Bradford, Patricia 276 Bradhears, Sharon 276 Brandt, Julia 289 Brant, Nita 282 Brenner, De 279 Brewer, Kathie 262 Brigmen, Carolyn 262 Brigmen, Lynn 294 Bronhammer, Mary 282 Bronson, Brenda 262 Brooks, Janine 262 Brown, Dennis 279 Brown, Ellen 282, 298 Brown, Kathy 262 Brown, Pam 279 Bryan, Pam 262 Bryant, Joan 279 Buckman, Mary 282 Buckley, Mark 294 Buenger, Hildegard 262 Buessing, James 262 Bulleigh, Norlene 276 Buller, Mary Beth 282 Bunge, Arlen 262 Burnett, Diane 262 Burnett, Mary 287 Burnett, Patricia 262 Buselt, Jane 279 Buselt, Joann 262 Butler, Glenda 263 cage, Eva 279, 289 Calloway, Steven Peter 304 Campbell, Nancy 263 Campnell, Tricia 282 Cansler, Phillip 263 Caple, Damon 291 Carl, Dana 279 Carlson, Fred 282 Carlson, Karen 263 Carpenter, Joy 289 Carr, Brenda 263 Cartwright, Steven 276 Caton, Michael, 263 Chambers, Linda 263 Charlton, Sharon 263 Chiles, Mickey L. 287 Christenson, Connie 263 Christy, Lynn 263 Cistle, Karen 263 Clark, Peggy 263 Clements, Tami 276 Close, Douglas 263 Clowers, Michael 263 Clune, Connie 263 Cobb. Joe 293 Cobb, Royanne 263 Cochran, Jenifer 276 308 Coe, Caw Coker, l Colema Colema Colgan, Collier, Collins, Combes Comptr Comptr Cook, f Cook, F Coons, Cooper Cooper Cooper Cooper Coopel Corbin Cossai Cowan Cowel, Cox, J: Cox, T Craig, Crain, Crand Crane Cropp Cross. Cumn Cunni Cunni Curtii Cuttir Daile D'Ar Dave Davi Davi Davi Dave Day, Day, Day, Dell, Dem DeP Depw Deu' Diel Diel Dilil Dis: Diti Divi Doh Dol! Dol Dor Dor Doi Doi Dri Coe, Catherine 263 Coker, Pam 282 Coleman, Ken 276 Coleman, Mary 263 Colgan, Sharon 184 Collier, Donna 263 Collins, Brian 276 Combes, Glenda 276 Compton, Nancy 276 Compton, Jim 299 Cook, Cathy 263 Cook, Robert 263 Coons, Tanya 279 Cooper, Katherine 276 Cooper, Pam 295 Cooper, Charles 299 Cooper, Judy 279 Cooper, Nancy 279 Corbin, Cecilia 282 Cossairt, Belinda 279 Cowan, Leon 263 Cowel, Debra 282 Cox, James 263 Cox, Theresa 295 Craig, Candace 276 Crain, Jan 263 Crandall, Donna 276 Crane, Rebecca 279 Cropp, Denise 283 Cross, Larry 283 Cummings, Janet 263 Cunningham, Debbie 283 Cunningham, Linda 263 Curtin, Ron 263 Cutting, Cathyanne 289 Dailey, Jeanne 295 D'Armond, Joyce 276 Davenport, Jill 263 Davis, Ginger 283 Davis, Keith 279 Davis, Phil 293 Davoreh, Rose 283 Day, Bruce 263 Day, Glenda 263 Day, Sherry 263 Dell, Lon 263 Denney, Rick 263 DePass, Reginald 263 Deputy, Susan 263 , Deutsch, Diane 279 Diebel, Gary 263 Dieker, Steve 279 Diliberti, Vicky 279 Disasa, Jerman 260 Ditzler, Craig 283 Divitto, Janet 264 Dohrman, Janice 264 Doles, Jill 304 Doll, Trudy 264 Donovan, Carol 264 Dorrel, Sandy 264 Doudican, Barbee 264 Douglas, Carol 276 Driggers, Wayne 293 Drusch, Pete 299 Duck, Diana 295 Duncan, Steven 264 Dunnaway, Patricia 283 Ebberts, Crystal 283 Ebel, Debbie 264 Ebel, Dennis 264 Eddy, William III 264 Edmunds, Sheri 283 Egan, Kathleen 264 Egli, Patricia 283 Egnatic, Rebeca 264 Elder, Maggie 264 Ellis, Marilyn 264 Ellis, Ron 264 Emerson, Alice 265 Emerson, Jane 265 England, Joyce 283 English, Peggy 265 Ensminger, Fredna 265 Erickson, Ginger 276 Erpelding, Jan 276 Eubank, Susan 276 Ewing, Sally 276 Farmer, E. J . 279 Fehring, Maggie L. 298 Fein, Bill 283 Feldhausen, Vickie 283 Fendley, Susie 279 Fenske, Mary 276 Ferm, Lori 279 Fernandez, Nellie 265 Fervnkopf, Mary 265 Ferris, Barbara 265 Fick, Janet 265 Fieandt, Jayne 276 Firm, Lori 289 Fisher, Lyle 265 Fisher, Sheryl 265 Fitch, Stan 299 Fitzsimmons, Debbie 283 Flack, Mary Jo 276 Fleming, Nancy 276 Flener, Danny 283 Flickinger, Judy 265 Flinn, Alberta 276 Foncannon, Janet P. 298 Forcum, Anthony 265 Forrester, Cheryl 283 Forsythe, Doug 265 Fotovich, Ursula 265 Fouts, Ann 265 Fouts, Leroy 265 Fredericks, Nina 276 Froelich, Suzanne 289 Fry, John 265 Fry, Pamela 265 Fryman, Susan 283 Fund, Jodie 276 Fursman, Nancy 265 Gaeddert, Shirley A. 298 Gaitan, Jocelyn 265 Galliart, Mike 265 Gambill, Charlie 265 Gamblin, Jan 289 Garwood, Linda 279 Gasemloo, Fared 260 Gates,fBill 265 Gates, Jack 260 Gates, Janice 260 Geist, Paul 265 Gerard, Diana G. 287 Geshe, Terri 265 Gibson, Cherri 265 Gibson, Julie 276 Gibson, Phyllis 265 Gilham, Rose 279 Gillihan, Patrick 299 Gilman, Mary 283 Ginavan, Janet 279, 289 Glaser, Carolyn 265 Glover, Tom 265 Godfrey, Richard 294 Godfrey, Sharon K. 298 Godwin, Connie 280 Goenner, Melinda J . 287 Goertz, Susan 280 Gold, Barbara 265 Gonzales, Michael 276 Goode, Jane 289 Goodwin, Judy 276 Goodwin, Mary C. 298 Gottschalk, lla 265 Grace, John 276 Graves, Ron 299 Gray, Jane 298 Green, Junell 280 Greene, Pam 265 Greenwood, Vicki 265 Gregory, Michael 280 Griffing, Lois 276 Griffins, Charlene 276 Griffith, Peggy 265 Grimm, Janet 266 Guadagnino, Eileen 266 Guadagnino, Solvatore 266 Gustafson, Janet 289 Gustafson. Robert 293 Freidell, Dave 265 Habiger, Jo Ann 283 Freidell, Stephen 265 Hadden, Nancy 283 Haemmerle, David 283 Hague, Heidi 266 Hahmer, Coleen 280 Halderman, Gary 266 Halverson, Junko 266 Hamilton, Helda 283 Hamilton, Hope 266 Hamilton, James 299 Hamilton, Vada 266 Hamm, Ken 266, 304, 305 Hammack, Cheryl 184 Hammond, Doyle 283 Hancho, Steven 266 Hanks, Patricia C. 287 Hanley, Roberta 276 Hanna, Petrina 266 Hanschu, Barbara 276 Hanschu, Rick 266 Hansen, Rosemary 280 Hanson, Janet K. 287 Hanson, John 276 Harbour, Randall 266 Harder, Rowena 276 Harding, Mike 280 Hardwick, Thomas 293 Harlan, Nancy 266, 184 Harper, David 266 Harper, Marilyn 266, 304 Harris, Judy 266 Harris, Patricia A. 287 Hartman, Glendon 276 Havel, Peggy 276 Hayes, Marcia 266 Haynes, Ja Nean 266 Hayward, Larry 276 Hazen, Jeanne 276 Heckert, Sue 266 Heffley, Deborah 276 Heil, Michael 283 Heim, Kenna 267 Hein, Kenneth 267 Heinen, David 267 Heitman, Susan 289, 298 Hellmer, Lelanie 280 Hemphill, Angela 267 Hemphill, Jane 267 Hemphill, Steve 283 Henderson, Janet 267 Hendley, Marilyn 267 Hendricks, Randall 299 Henke, Judy 280 Isom, Henrietta 280 Hensley, Katrinka 283 Hensley, Sara 276 Herzog, Greg 283 Hess, Dee Ann 267 Hetzke, Jean 267 Hibbs, Jackie 289 Hiebert, Denise M. 298 Hiestand, C. J. 267 Higgs, Holly 267 Hiland, Gary 293 Hild, Libby 267 Hill, Barbara 184, 298 Hill. Jeannine 280, 298 Hill, Pam 291 Hinnenkamp, Marcia 283 Hoagland, Nancy 267, 184 Hobbs, Ruth 267 Hodges, Rob 267 Hoffman, Michelle 280 Hogan, Karen 184, 298 Hoge, Sherry L. 287 Holcom, Sandy 280 Hollady, Karolee 276 Holle, Rita Jo 267 Holloway, Debbie 304 Holmes, Yvonne 276 Holt, Jean 289 Honer, Nancy 276 Hooker, Janet 283 Hootz, Lois 280 Hopkins, Edward 267 Hopper, Becky 287 Horten, Shirley 267 Hosier, Janet 283 Houck, Marcia 284 Houghton, Linda 284 Hufferd, Darrel 267 Hughes, Dean W. 293 Hugg, Joyce 284 Hughes, Dean 293 Hurt, Robin D. 287 Hurt. Vickie 226 Hyland. Bruce 267 Hyner. Richard 267 Inlow, Sheryl 276 Irabasso, Kathleen 276 Irvine, Debbie 267 Isom, Henrietta 267 Iwert, Susan 267 Jackson, Queen 280 Jacobson, Greg 267 Jaimes, Denise 280 Janke, Betsy 267 Janssen, Dorothy 267 Jehle, Ron 267 Jensen, Carol 267 Jenson, Dena K. 298 Jewell, Ona 267 Jilka, Luann 284 Jirak, Ann 280 Johnson, Cathy A. 298 Johnson, Eloise 280 Johnson, Teresa 284 Johnston, Terri 295 Jones, Lawrence D. 293 Jones, Michael 280, 299 Jordan, Becky 298 Jordan, Susan 267 Kasitz, David 276 Kauten, Sue 289 Keast, Mary 267 Keating, Betty 284 Keeslar, Myron 267 Kern, Shari 284 Kessler, Jim 267 Kientz, Karlene 280 Ki Lau, Chio 260 Kimmell, Marcia 267 Kimmi, Phillip 284 Kimple, Barbara 267 Kindred. Julie 284 King, Debra 268 King, Patricia 268 King, Robert 268 Kipfer, Martha 277 Kisher. Deanna 268 Kissinger. Terri 289 Klenda. Tom 268 Klepper. Vivian 268. 18 Knauf, Timothy 293 Knott. James 268 Kuykendall, Nina 268 Kynion, Sherry 268 Labbe, Susan 277 Lammert, Walter 277 Lampson, Wayne 299 Land, Denise 284 Land, Michael 268 Lane, Diane D. 298 Lane, Mary 268 Lapsley, John 268 Larrabee, Debbie 284 Larsen, Bob 268 Larson, Timothy N. 293 Lassman, Diane 268 Laubach, Stephen 268 Laye, Nancy 277 Layner, Julie 280 Lazorchak, -Donna 268 Leech, Dale 294 Lehmann, Susan 284 Letholt, Renee 289 Liedtke, Don 268 Lillich, Gerald 277 Linares, Elsa 291 Lindell, Connie 284 Linden, Linda 268 Litiver, Steve 268 Litteral, Judy 289 Lockhart, Connie 268 Logsdon, John 268 Lopez, John 268 Lopez, Kristine 277 Love, Jim 277 Lowe, Denise'284 Loyd, Paul 299 Ludwig, Glenda 268 Ludwig, Mark 269 Lueers, Marsha 269 Lutgen, Vicki 269 Lyberger, Carol 269 Lynch, Helen 269 Lynch, Sharon 269 Lynn, Darrel 269 Lynn, Marion 269 Lynn, Vernon 269 Lyons, Shelley, 298 Mahan, Phil 269 Mallon, Steve 284 Mantia, Linda J. 298 Marcum, Barbara 269 Marks, Wesley A. 293 Martin, Chris 269 Martin, Julie 269 Masada, June 284 Mason, Lisa 269 Mastellar, Marietta 269 Matsushita, Susan 269 3 12 .W- A 1 .V-,,...L 1,2 f v G Matteson Mattox, E Matzedel Mays, Su McAfoos McAllas1 McAllas1 McCabe, McCartl McCartl McClanz McClouc McClure McCosh McCurd McDani McDoug McEwe McGee, McGhe1 McGov1 McGre' McKen McKim McKin1 McMu1 McNar McQuil McQui Medlin Meis, 1 Me-lam Nlellie Nleltoi r' w arvr-2'-n.--5 i ' - -von. , F, .-,af ny- ,y ' ' ,.v y Matteson Garv 269 Mattox Sharon 269 Matzeder Debb1e298 Mays SusanM 297 McAfoos Kathy 277 McAllaster Joyce 269 McA11aster Steven 277 McCabe Teresa 280 McCarthy Barb 269 McCarthy Margo 284 McClanahan Dlane 295 McCloud JeffA 293 McClure Cla1rL 298 McCosh Jeff 277 McCurdy Lynda 269 McDan1el Pam 277 McDougall Mlla 269 McEwen Kathleen 269 McGee Mark 277 McGheney Kathy 284 McGovern Ke1th269 McGrew Charlene 269 McKenzie Rhonda 269 McK1nney Marsha 284 McK1nney Pam 284 Merry Gene 280 Metcalf Dwlght 299 Metz Corky 269 Meuser Jul1e284 Meyer Debra 269 Meyer Dudley 277 Meyer Jean 269 Meyer Marylyn 284 Mxddelton Jerry 269 Milam Paul 269 Miller KarenK 298 Miller Katherme 284 Miller Mary 284 Mlller Wes 269 Mlltner Marge 295 Mmor Jams 277 Mltchum Scott 269 Mohr Rodney 269 Montague Deborah 284 Montgomery N Dav1d293 Moore Randy 270 Moran Mary 270 Mornmg W11l1eMae277 Morrow M1tzy270 Mosbavar Ann 284 Mosher Cra1g270 Nashatlzadeh Debra 281 Nashatlzadeh Massoud 277 Neely Cindy 270 Neff Denn1s270 Neff Susan 270 Neldlg Jacquel1n270 Nelll Jeannme 277 Nelson Jess 270 Nelson Kathv 271 Nelson RobertC 293 Nesbxtt Margo 284 Newton Chervl284 Nxchols Lorna Jo 270 Nlchols Steve 270 Nxckl Terrv 270 Norman Zoah 298 Norten Melba210 Notson Stexen 270 Noxak Becky 293 O Connor Dannx 81 304 'Nr' McMurray Paula 284 McNamara Thomas 260 McQullk1n Mike 269 McQu1rk MarylenA 298 Medlm Juanlta 280 Mels Carol 280 Melander Roxy 269 Mellxes Pam 284 Melton Georgene Z84 Mosxer LmdaD 298 Mosley LaNora 281 Mossman Chr1sta298 Mulhn Al1ce277 Mulhn Frank 294 Murrav Lmda247 Mvers Janet 184 My s Tom 294 O Halleran Gall P 0 Olne Haden 714 Olmstead Jane P Olsen Norene 7 0 Olsen Patrlck 7 Orme Lwnnette 710 Oxerstreel Rxchar ' ' ,,,.,Q,, L,, , , , , A , . 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V , ' U V -K F Wm-,L -0 -, -L ' 1 ,jj,,,,,,,,- , ,L.-.g.....:..--1..- .. -2-- , V ...- ,. . . . . -, , . - Schroeder, Linda 277 Schumacher, Pam 277 Schutler, Phillip 284 Schwartz, Carl 272 Schwartz, Kathleen 272 Schwemmer, Roxanne 281 Scorville, Debbie 272 Scribner, Denise 277 Searles, Nancy 281 Sedlacek, Richard 299 Seger, Rickey 272 Senl, Nadine 272 Settle, David 272 Settles, Janet L. 287 Seymour, Rose 272 Shannon, Roger 272 Shannon, Susan 272 Shearon, David 277 Shepard, Betty 277 Sherffius, Nancy 278 Sherman, Lina 272 Sherman, Susan 272 Shindler, Susan 272 Shivers, Debbie 278 Shultz, Deborah 272 Sicard, Tommy 278 Sickel, Warren 281 Siebert, Jo 278 Siegrist, Barbara 272 Siebert, David 272 Siemnen, Vicky 281 Siemseh, Craig 272 Singer, Lynn 299 Sinnard, Janice 295 Sinnard, Karen 295 Sisler, Cynthia 272 Sivyen, Ann 2.89 Sjoholm, John 272 Skinner, Terry 299 Slack, Rebecca Ann 272 Sloan, Greg 272 Smerchek, Cynthia 281 Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, , Ivy 281 Smith, , Roger 272 , Roger 273 Smith, Smith Smith Smith Smith , Sheryl A. 298 Smith, Andra K. 298 Carol 295 Cheryl 281 Deborah 272 Joan 272 Sarah 273 Vicki 273 Smittle, John 273 Smoots, Gregory 273 Snell, Jo 277 Snyder, Debbie 298 316 aww' . , . ,'2V4!f22 x,,, 74842 K! Snyder, Donna 289, 298 Snyder, Jane 273 Soetaert. Barbara 27:3 Solomon. Meredith 273 Sontag, Monte 273 Sorden, Billie 278 Sorell, Gary 273 Soule, Sandra 284 Southiere, Vinnie 273 Spaulding, Susan 273 Spears, Laura 278 Spencer, D. Wayne 293 Spindler, Jayna 278 Springer, Janice 273 Stadel, Julie 284 Stair, Gregg 278 Statch, Brenda 278 Steadman, Stephanie 273 Stegeo, Suzy 281 Stegman, Dona 278 Steiner, Jack 278 Stensars, Craig 278 Stenzel, Terry 284 Stephen, Cathy 273 Stephen, Kenneth 273 Sterner, Steven 273 Stevens, Lisa Delisle 278 Stewart, Janet 273 Stewart, June 273 Stinson, Keith 299 Stoker, Cheryl 284 Stolfus, Teresa A. 298 Stoll, Ena 273 Stone, Sandy 278 Stoneking, Janice 278,287 Stossdil, William 273 Stover, Greg 273 Stram, Linda 273 Strawn, Sandy 278 Strickland, Judy 273 Stuchlik, Mark 273 Stude, Elaine 273 Stultz, Patti 273 Sullivan, Janice 281 Summers, Marla 278 Svoboda, Susan M. 287 Swanson, Carolyn 273 Swanson, Jenita 284 Swarts, Roger 273 Swedenburg, James 278, 304 Swenson, Barbara 273 Swenson, Donna 284 Symmonds, Rodney 278 Symmonds, Wayne 273 Syrios, William 281 Tajchman, Marvin 273 Tanner, Randy 299 Tate, Wayne 273 Taylor, Gwen .I. 298 Taylor, Janice 287 Taylor. 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