Emory University - Campus Yearbook (Atlanta, GA)

 - Class of 1983

Page 1 of 336

 

Emory University - Campus Yearbook (Atlanta, GA) online yearbook collection, 1983 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 336 of the 1983 volume:

J wr l gnum Wig 1983 , I! Features .............. Academlcs ............ Sports .,...,.. ...... Organizations . . .... . . Greeks ....... ...... StudentLife Sponsors .... ...... 4 GC 232502 X 25 gl '-LCCNIENIS-i V I . x 1 L 1 Closer ook ATHEP6 WEGXWAL LKBRARY 2025 BAXER STREET gfgyfvuc' QP 'DNZOC 1983 CAMPUS EMORY UNIVERSITY ATLANTA, GEURGIA VOLUME 79 Uiiffizbvfs' it W Z 1 " I 1 1 If 1 H 4 ' x 1. i ll I vi 1 r 4 'i 1 " 1 - 4, ' an H 1 I 1. li I' 1 35 in 3 1 1 4 A1 71 Vincent 1' rx' K xx fg- ., xml i,fgH lllllllll lllllllll lllllllll lllllllll lllllllll lllllllll llllllfl IIIIIIIN llllllll llllllll llllllll llllllll llllllll llllllll llllllll llllllll llllllll Illlllll Illlllll Illlllll llllllll IIIIIIII llllllll llllllll i MOYNS Vincent 2fOpening -11 g Extra. Extra! Extra! Woodruff gives Emory S100 million By now, the gift from Robert W. Woodruff in 1979 is old news, but its consequences are having far reach- ing implications for us. The second batch of Woodruff scholars arrived in the fall. The Turman Center and the gym will be ready in the fall of 1983 after much anticipation. The Peavine parking deck will alleviate some of the parking problems. Plans for the new student center are being final- ized. Coke toast sets world record Wonderful Wednesdays are days in the past now, cherished by seniors whose final year is less Wonderful and juniors and sophomores who will celebrate them no more. The toast is a memory of an "apathetic" campus coming together, world record or not. Jimmy Carter accepts academic appointment What other university can boast a former President of the United States as a University Distinguished Professor? Only us. Morris OP 7 It s We Know Emory As "That Place I Go To School" It's the school Ralph Kinney of Doonesbury fame attends. It's the subject of stories and Atlanta Maga- zine. Yet, how do we describe it? Temp or no housing Coed freshmen dorms "Premed cut-throat" Constant construction "Your student activity fee at work" The list goes on. Emory means all of the above and more whether or not you are actually involved. There is something that goes beyond words and photos which describes our school and ourselves, perhaps "school spirit" or "loyalty." We could hate or love it here or just no carey however we feel, it's our inside story. " A -' -f H- 5 -,W -W-sv -s People, Places And Q.-..uf......v. w c- M-WM X e 5 A--'V ,. +1-. Kr. N " ,. ,N V " .Fw-'.,g.agN 1:21 ,Ian LQ.-Q: A - H if t . T ,,,, , 1 X- " . -P sails- 'fi' Q I Qi, . 251- Q ' wrt' . ,-::,,1j.' , 39 'A+ "' -gg , , ,, . ,s - - is X XX xx is si Q ,flu , X X 5 N t , V. , ss- ' ik.. 1: .R , Harwell .xx NM. N.. Morris m,pv--W Vincent 4fOpening TNQ!!! Events . .XX X 3X X. X . X . N' xi- '- NSNF X X ww X X X QR ,XI J X x Ax XX McEachern Moms Q' 3 5-VME-, b . nf .. " fm f A , Ifllffl' 1 V I 'A Wg, A ' X. ,, u4...,.a Vincent -ff' vzxf ,," " EA M. 5 QI MOfTiS Mgffig Openingf5 features Vincen FY 741, 1 Q' X 1 1 Vincent Vincent 6fFeatures Vincent Gonzales Featuresf 7 So Much For Study During TI-IE RITES GF SPRING Everyone Catches Spring Fever The alarm screeched its wake up call. I hurriedly turned it off and unwillingly opened my eyes. Something was differ- ent in the room. Could it be? I stared out the window in disbelief. Sunlight did in- deed pervade the room. A blue sky domi- nated the outdoors, and nary a cloud dared show its cotton candy feathery face. Below me, students scuttled to class, encumbered no more by down jack- ets and the heavy warm clothing winter demands of us. I could almost smell the coconut oil slathered all over bodies in an early attempt to produce THE TAN. "Ah yes," I said as I rummaged through my closet and drawers for springtime wear, "l've got the fever." Spring fever, that is. Anytime the sun shines in Atlanta during the winter months for more than two days, hope springs up from the depths of our cold weary hearts fand hands and feet and nosesl. When it rains incessantly, the con- stant tempo of rain falling lulls one to a reverie of those spring days of warm tem- peratures and sun. As the quarter ends and exams are ready to descend upon us, it's only the thought of spring break that makes us read those history pages of men Morris 8fThe Rites of Spring ,ps 4 , if g , -:s:.,.M vv, A fx .f,..lfzwf fr ' , " , 4 ,,..,:,,,... .,.. , ,Mm U ' .jg 4, Ng. '-5, A' ,... A M 9 My if ,ff . a 4 . I QW 'gk f 'W 3:53-Sief-1, g.. 2:-2.1-sg, -' , Q 'If' 9 ., V P ,W 1.-:iw-. A, 1: ' "' ' 'A' m"'l.LAv' my f H .. H "" ' Q- J ' 'ff Gaz Morris ., fx Vincent A mi 1 , ,.'.-. 5 . , a .1 . . ..- -,.,uJ' v-4--. , 1 l f Q-vfgx .540 'N' . -as x X N A , u 2-f w 5. 7 ?L' X fgw' -55? J ' X5 l A . f. 11, .r . -,ff Q . X A f .f 'fi A f," iff" fr P -1' k . , I r K- r X M I i x Q 4? , w V lffdiflilfllif-,TER DAY UP, UP AND AWAY The sun shone clear and strong that bright Saturday afternoon as the third an- nual Campus Life sponsored Lullwater Day brought the Emory community to- gether. Originally scheduled for April 25, the event was rained out as we exper- ienced a few weeks of unusually cold and rainy weather, but the raindate of May 2 dawned without rain clouds. We flocked to Lullwater Park to eat, drink, and be merry. It was worth waiting in line for a 50c meal consisting of Ken- tucky Fried Chicken, corn on the cob, a baked potatoe, watermelon, and a soda. The Campus Life staff served the food. Emory Jazz Ensemble filled the area with music, and "The Little General Clog- gets" from nearby Kennesaw, Georgia, entertained us. Some of us even dared to accept their invitation to try a few steps. The "biggest" attractions were the two hot air balloons. The more adventure- some patiently waited in long lines for a chance to, for a few minutes, get away from it all. Those of us who liked where we were, preferred our feet on the ground, or were just plain impatient set up nets to play volleyball while the musi- cally inclined strummed their guitars. Cthers whizzed flying frisbees over heads and beyond outstretched hands and leaped high into the air or dived onto the sweet-smelling grass to catch that disc. We all enjoyed the beauty of Lullwater as we sat, played, sang, laughed, and ate. The special comraderie felt that day proves that despite what people say, we've got a school spirit. - Helen Bledsoe 1O!Lullwater Dav Vincent i ,x F C v 7- V 1 r-. wich! ' T L . -,Nu '.,' ,, wk. A . EW' QP: qimfj., 4 h . V--1 'v-.i.L1..-JH, , " Vincent Vincent TT" W " Vincent If Vincent v.l -1 ," -0 , ANY' -11 ' qi" :.,., 7 A Vincent I-'Q A, . 'if F' ff., iv Q , . 'I -1 ,ihfy 'fffqk' ': ,i w T-'r f , ,UWM ' ' i 21. K V ,m- V H- .V ig . ni ..i ,2'..'.X. -. -' . ' - -i - -'an :-- me rf-i iw A. .4i,-'.-.,.- -hy - ,'f,' . 3 ,riff-' 1? FW if " -,', 'YQ-, '2 , .- 1. , -' ' 1 '. s,' ' ' ' I 4 if! ' r l V' V I V" .F-iam. ,Lim t .Ai ',1,.xv. 4 3' ---V753 ' ,gif "' x ,- ' ' 'L' ' t"' "bv -H 'Sf - 'XL - ' qi. Morris Vincent Lullwater Dayfll The Death Of WO DERF UL WED Fatality Cf The Semester System There it was - a broad blue back weaving through the maze of bookbags and button-downs. Yum. Closer, I saw that the T-shirt belonged to a part of the "old guard". Emblazoned on the back - right across the shoulder blades - was the mark of a true 'Roid. "Thank God lt's Wednesday." Sigh. Where have all the flowers gone? When did all these changes occur? The blue shirt seemed suddenly inappropriate for the occasion, it should have been black for mourning over the death of that much-loved institution, "Wonderful Wednesday." Emory students were a rare breed in the years between 1966 and 1982, bask- ing in the luxury of what approximated two weekends. From the 1967 CAMPUS: "Dean John Stephens announced the ini- tiation of a classless Wonderful Wednes- day in the College to allow expansion of individual study - research time, and the library packed in hundreds of knowledge- hungry students." Emory's move to that scheduling brought campus groups a spe- cial opportunity for planning activities to- gether, sprouted a 'LWednesday series" of lectures and entertainment, and gave students a chance to relax and enjoy their studies, their friends, and their city. lt is hardly conceivable that the original WW proponents imagined the final ef- fects of their idea on the community. Bars and restaurants began to cater to our nocturnal whims by offering amazing Tuesday happy hours. Campus movies furnished another diversion for that extra night of liberty. Add to that list the dances, concerts, and plays. Alternatives were limited only by the imagination of the individual student. lt was a sweet life We did not choose to give up this mark of lazy affluence without a fight. No one who was anyone applauded the sugges- tion of the change to a semester system, and the death of WW. Students banded together to protect their haven of deca- dence - but without success. Alas and alack, the administration overruled. 12jThe Death of Wonderful Wednesday fi-42 An institution was abolished by their decision, but the riotous living goes on, apparently undisturbed. Amazing! Many people now have more "nights of wanton living" or nights of blissful rest than ever before: Monday night, Wednesday night, Friday night, and Saturday night. Others have constructed marvelous four day weekends. Some attend only two hours of class every day and use their other hours in the playful pleasures which Wednesday used to afford. Most upperclassmen expected to be dissatisfied tour conservatism surfacing in our loathe for changel, but the transition has been peaceful. Nice, even. Wonderful Wednesday was fun while it lasted, and it's last remaining evidences can easily evoke good memories. Some days the suggestions of it are everywhere. A sign for Tuesday specials. Wonderful Wednes- day concerts. A lost club meeting or re- hearsal. Or perhaps just a half-faded T- shirt - stretched across a broad blue back in the autumn sun. - Ginger Rucker N WD D55 Z' il Vincent AME wa qu. Vincent Vincent if I x . Vincent NA. .,Q ,ff x , A, 1 yr Pnmerantz Vincent , at Sz -L AFAREWELL ToAsT 14 f Toast Goodbye Wonderful Wednesday "Awesone!" "Record-breaking or not, it was FUN!" 'KA rare display of Emory spirit!" These were among the many positive impressions students used to describe last spring's toast bidding farewell to Wonder- ful Wednesday, one of our favorite insti- tutions, But with the conversion to the semester system, those precious Wednes- days became numbered. Toward the year's end, we sadly followed the count- down into the single digits. And so it seemed only fitting to send off the last Wonderful Wednesday with a glorious farewell. And so it was. The idea originated in a casual conversation between Jim Wasser- man and Kathy Tobin as they discussed ways to end our day in style. They began to search for funds to "pull off" the tri- bute to Wonderful Wednesday. UCB ab- sorbed over half the cost with College Council, MOVE, and SGA supplemental funds paying the rest. These organiza- tions collaborated to sponsor the event that made Wednesday, June 2, 1982, an unforgettable day. Planning the event were Jim Wasserman and Mary Abbot from UCB, Ken Johnson and Jenifer Ol- ing from College Council, and Jennifer Brown from MOVE. Though billed as "Toast Away Wonderful Wednesday," this was to be no ordinary toast. This was an attempt to set the world's record for the greatest number of people simulta- , neously giving a toast. l That last Wednesday was a hot, bright, sunny Atlanta spring day, The toast was 1 if scheduled for twelve o'clock noon. Never before in recent years had Emory seen such total participation in a university event. Deserting the rest of the campus, people streamed out of every building and headed for the upper field in front of the gym. Herds of people swamped the tables where they were carefully logged in and given Coca-Cola filled commemo- rative cups lnow jealously guarded collec- Vincent T ls' Wen' Vincent il X Vincent l X tl Lag.. s . . . 7 V ncent 4 . - ga' ' '. ,lu .Lg 4 -I A ' ':'1LfnQ ' 53 s ' 5 ?'l R. A h '3"' m fzwmsj , v . X - 'HS-f+ Ap , ",q.!,' 51.4. xt f x , D , ' ' R NN f . 3 fs, 1 " ' L K M ' ii'-V ,, E ij ih4z1 ff - i f -Y Q L' ' W .I . , - I. - -:PER I - b ..,- ' -f,, , r'-2,551 0 ' """ "':i' ' ff' fl! 41' ' V j r A' ,I X '54 'zfi 1 'fr xjilli- ., .1 Toast f 1 5 t aSREc:oRD BREAKER 16fToast tor's itemsl. So many people attended that the toast itself was postponed for a half hour to allow everyone a chance to participate. As toast time neared, the crowd filling the field became excited. Three television cameras, plus a helicopter circling over- head, heightened the tension, Dust rose as the crowd surged forward when Dean Fox, dressed for the occasion in a tophat and cane, called for the toast to begin. A favorite ancient Emory tradition, James T. Dooley, arrived in a cab to give his official sanction for this event. Lest the students be carried away by the event, he reminded us that: "Professors may come and professors may Q0- and Presidents may come and presi- dents may go, and Wonderful Wednesdays may come and Wonderful Wednesdays may go, But Dooley lives on forever." And finally, Dean Fox and several stu- dent leaders offered a round of toasts with an exhilerated crowd cheering wildly after each one. Victory was ours! We had established a new world's record with 2,283 people cheering in the largest non-alcoholic toast recorded although all 2500 cups were distributed. The celebration moved to LongstreetfMeans courtyard where free Blimpie subs were served. For a university without colossol athle- tic programs to unite the student body and often fraught with a lack of "Togeth- erness", this had been an important day. Proud as we are of the record, what im- presses us the most was the rare exper- ience of total participation and communi- ty feeling that this last Wonderful Wednesday had given us. ln Wasserman's words: "The best thing about the toast was that it was a student generated idea and a student run project. Everyone gave up their apathy and came out for it re- gardless of the record." - Richard Wachob and Helen Bled- soe 5 Vincent Vincent MM,,,.....f-.- -4 c I Pomerantz X" 'ww 4-'K -tvs Ami ""i WOIXTEEWTUL 1 was f XJ Q-- fn' .hu in I . 41 r-silvgk , 7 '. as ' 'Q X. f.-' ln I .n AX QV L .nu .,- . .-4' rr '1 EQ,-i sh ,. 1 dui 3' utr 1 Oliver a v in 4' 4 Ohver ..,j ft ' . 'fn , ,Q-f Toa5tf17 '. ggafs - V5-Afsl DO0LEY S EEK A Weeklon Celebration Dooley is undeniably his own best kept secret, but every year he reappears for his week to renew our curiousity about his origins and identity. This week long clue, agonizing as it is to our curiousity, makes for the most exciting week here. At no other time can one find planned ways to procrastinateg we all took advan- tage of it! The week began with a cocktails get- together with the faculty. We partied away the formal in the Peachtree Center, a very classy ending to a week long cele- bration. We punked out at the 688 Club, rocking to the Swimming Pool Q's. We trekked through the mud to hear the Press and Baby and the Pacifiers on the upper field. On Friday, the fraternities honored Dooley and entertained us with cartoon characters skits. We laughed at "Fratman and Robin," a duo who tried to save frats from the evil plots of the Ad- ministration. Sigma Nu won first place with their version of the "Peanuts Gang" whereby a drafted Snoopy finally shoots down the Red Baron. Later that after- noon, MOVE awarded Dooley his first Golden Egg Award. Earlier that day, John Patrick of "P.M. Magazine" inter- viewed Dooley, or rather, Mr. Patrick in- terviewed Dooley and his bodyguards an- swered. Our tradition in a time where traditions are few and not cared for is a reflection on us. The best part of the week was Dooley himself. He arrived one day in a helicop- ter. For the first time, he released us from classes all week long and not just on Fri- day. Those of us enjoying Sunbathing 101 or the more advanced Stone Moun- tain 315 returned to class in hopes of being released by a squirt at the professor and a rhyme like "As l am now, soon all shall be, So why waste time with history?" All too soon the festivities ended, and life returned to normal. Sigh! No longer could we look forward to being released l8fDooley's Week ,. u 9 1 X -f-'lfli sf'-i 3? ' r ' l - 1 l. 'M - ' I " v A Nt 3 A 1 I Sai?-,'E11l - 4 .t M cs. s A 5 1 r N-2"-m-Ev ' -1 - tr - f.. sv .- 3 , is 15 ,,t,g,r .. iv R . J" ax. IS- r ' 5 , -Q f ' it iw N ' ' :gt w. 'N' N .. .Q . - - .K 5 - ' 1' P.: 15 ifirfif is-2 .A 5 ss , .,,-. M E-ng. :ggi W 2 Q . ., X - 1 im - y 5, , - .. f . X X h 1 9 "'.,e.-'if ll: ' E M - f ig-' ' f X ' . ' Hmm ' ""fi2LS.L..1'-' wg.,-si' . -3 4 . , - , X Q-' r Y . . rw, 'H . 1 ' .: , . A X ,Nei nv-lag. 6 fr ' Q s i iff! YW ff -iq 1 .r , 1 i rr . f . , . , c., s 0 R 1 gg . of 1' xl ' v u ,S i ., ,., , S .. ,Q ' , A X jf' ' A T73 X5 .,.. . xxx R N, j : s -Q 'r P ' H1 ' " ee ' ' r D r Q-is . bkkq Q., ,lp 2' - S X ,,:,.,,q S aw 5 . 1 R. ' ' K ffw' . gli ,, . Q .. . Av I., . l - W XR. 7 1 . fl ' ,is X l 9 ,FJ ' 7 Q Q V, H, - l -N ,N-6 wsnanw at .Q s g. . X r 1 l Q- li R t mx X K A ' is X' " ' I, -. X .. ' If X' J-4, 2 t .r- from class or squirted with a water pistol. However we were left with a calling card f"Eternally yours, James T. Dooley"l, a story on "P.M. Magazine", and the hap- xi py knowledge that Dooley lives forever. - Lynne Harwell H fi: jn- Morris Y .W , 1 'mx ,J qv- Q Morris qi if N Zu - I S , L ' 4 32, 1 ,' j -F 7 . g Eiga ' . '4, -43. g A - X15 - " ' '.i'. ' S x . "W "9 4 - 'Q-- P , X ',,-.E-J.: , . -A . , N 5' Q' ' "3 J- .- . 5. L- . 3 ...JL -. E, . Q 1, - z.,.:n Dooley's Weekf19 Believe It Or Not - Spring Is More Than F un And Sun The last spring quarter. Spring is eter- nal but the quarter system wasn't. Among the many events that occurred during this time were the already mentioned Toast, Lullwater Day, and Dooley's Week. Out- door concerts abounded, and Lullwater Park and the Quad were student havens. Atlanta offered its brightest and best with the Piedmont Park Festival, concerts, and just its natural scenic outdoors. Sunbath- ing 101 was the most popular "non- course," and for the spring graduates-to- be, Lake Lanier or Stone Mountain was the Wonderful classroom on Wednes- days. Semesters or quarters - spring is beautiful, 153 .w Kauai B. 'lv 20fOverview Of Spring The Health Fair provided the Emory community a chance to get a health up- date. The housing lottery is a source of anxiety, except for those who manage to pull a low enough num- ber. Outdoor concerts took advantage of the weather. Ground Zero Week pro- vided a forum on the nu- clear war issue. The groundbreaking for the Turman Complex offi- cially began a long antici- pation for the new dorm behind Haygood. 4--3- , 5 .0 l 9 2 If Harwell .5 .I A 5.5 3 Z l Morris is ,Q t f Gm... - ,Z kip, .i,, Y - ,Q-gi.. f 7 i Q , .Qu i 'bf-9, ' T , Morris it ef- it Morris Barkin Gonzales Senior Weekend: A Chance To Ask "This Is College?" Garter Garter Morris i i 3 -1 .4 Garter They come from around the country, and even from around the world, like hordes of wandering nomads. They wan- der the campus with maps in hand and nametags glistening in the sun. "Excuse me, how do I get to White Hall?" Every April, hundreds of high school students flock to Emory for one of two Senior Weekends. The weekends are de- signed to provide all accepted seniors a chance to visit the campus and get a thor- ough, although sometimes hurried, look at life here at good 'ole EU. Visiting seniors experience first hand, from the time of their arrival on Thursday to their departure on Saturday, life in a freshmen dorm ian experience indeedli, attend real college classes, and get a taste of slightly improved Cox Hall food. For many students, Senior Weekend is the first visit to Emory, and it influences the decision on where to attend college. For others, it merely confirms their belief that Emory is the place for them. What- ever the reason for visiting, almost no senior leaves here without having a good time. Band parties, dinners at frat houses, and tours of Atlanta all contribute to a varied and fun time. The weather is al- most always exceptionally beautiful. States freshmen Amy Sonin: "Senior weekend is a time when you really get a taste of all aspects of life at Emory." How true! As senior Christie Ernst her senior weekend four years ago. She states, "That's the reason I chose Emory over Vanderbilt. The visit, in retrospect, pro- vided a good representation of Emory even though the flowers are not always in bloom. People I met then are my friends. It was better than the other senior week- ends I had attended because it was longer and a better indication of what college life, and classes, are like here." If you see a student wandering the campus wide-eyed and lost, be kind, you may have once been a visiting senior. Mike Feinstein Senior Weekendf21 Shortages ' '3- Where Has All The Money Gone? The Financial Aid Gffice Searches For The Answer 22fShortages "l'll be leaving Emory in 1983. No, Pm not graduating. l'm only a junior now. The truth ls I can't afford It anymore." These were the words of Felipe Jara- millo as they appeared in the September 24, 1982 edition of The Emory Wheel. This was just one of the many instances when students were forced to leave Emory due to a financial crisis. Even though the essence of Felipe's letter and others like it seem to convey a cold, non- feeling attitude of the Financial Aid Of- fice, this was not the case. The Office has done everything possi- ble to try to ensure that students with financial problems continue their educa- tion. lt awarded funds, the positions of resident directors and advisors were open, and students were eligible for a variety of work-study positions. It just happened that 1983 was a bad economic year, and for those at Emory, it was just a fact that there weren't sufficient funds to meet the needs of students. Naturally, Reaganomics had its effects on those few students with loans and fed- eral grants. But the truth remained that the majority of students rely upon the private funds provided by the institution they attend. These funds may have seemed unappropriate, but according to statistics, the percentage of scholarship funds available has constantly increased for the past several years. In the past, Emory has been far behind its rivals lTu- lane, Vanderbilt, and Dukel in the amount of aid being offered. However, this has changed for the better even though some students were still left unaided. This was due mainly to who received priority in the awarding of scholarships. Freshmen and returning students were aided first, and Oxford continuees re- ceived the funds that remained. With this process, transfer students from other col- vawnnq-..... leges were without much aid because the money just ran out. Time and time, a budget for transfer students has been asked to be considered for the allocation of funds. The problem was that there was no place within the university from which money could be extracted or found. As the saying goes: "You can't rob Peter to pay Paul." But despite all these setbacks and problems, the financial aid office succeed- ed in fulfilling the majority of the needs of students. There just happened to be a few "Felipe's" who were categorized as unlucky transfer students. However as Dr. Reese from the office remarked: "If we had the money there would be no end to our expenditures. But since they are limited, we have no choice but to follow our priorities. We just hope that the stu- dents realize that we want to do more. Emory does care." Linda Peacock Everywhere Signs With over two hundred parking spaces eliminated by the construction on cam- pus, parking became a serious problem at Emory. Even though a 875 space parking lot was to be finished in the Peavine area, in 1983, that did not solve the students' problems this school year. Students dealt with the situation in dif- ferent ways. Some found other means of transportation lbus, walking, bicyclingl rather than hassle with parking while oth- ers formed car pools with friends who had similar schedules. Still others were forced to leave home twenty to thirty minutes earlier in the hope of finding a space. Virginia Cope, a sophomore, re- marked on the situation: "I was late to class a lot, because I had to tour the campus for forty-five minutes. And re- ceived four tickets, because the only spaces I could find were either number one or two!" Many people argued that the S65 car registration fee was an awfully steep price to pay compared to the previous years' fee of S45, especially since a park- ing space is not guaranteed. Others paid the additional S27 for a Fishburne park- ing deck card lwhich did not go up in pricel because of the assurance of a park- ing space. Many students hope that the additional parking will benefit them before their graduation so that the troubles suffered this year will somehow be amended. Ellen Pastorino Shortages f 23 Dear President Carter, Help! Do You Know How Reaganomics Works?" Dooley's arrival was greeted by applause and cheers, but the first of the many laughs of the evening erupted when his slogan was said prior to him shaking Carter's hand: "Presidents may come, and Presidents may go " Laughter abound- ed as President Jim- my Carter answered the question submit- ted by senior Bill Combs at the Town Hall meeting on Oc- tober 6, 1982. s 24 Town Hall Meeting Vincent Emory's newest Distinguished Professor was not lecturing lat least it wasn't billed as suchl. But instead, the former president found himself before a Glenn-filled student body. To equalize everyone's chances of their ques- tion being answered, paper and pencils were dis- tributed and later placed inside a lottery bin. The noisy anticipation amidst murmurings of "What do I ask?" was intensified by the unexpected but certainly welcomed arrival of Dooley and his body- guard who sat front row center, waiting also for the town hall meeting to begin. It began with "l like Coca-Cola" and laughter, lCarter's reason for deciding upon Emoryl. He talked about Reagan's budget and analyzed Hamil- ton Jordan's book. We heard jokes: "I was trying to think of someone else beside Phil Niekro" lin response to Marc Frankel's question of the great- est Americanl. We heard an honest appraisal and his considerations on his decisions about the hos- tage crisis when he answered Bill Yerman's ques- tion lthere was an initial wave of whisperings as Dean Fox read itl. Perhaps it was fate lor Dean Fox's handl that left the twenty-second question for last: "What can we do as a community for you?" The media was again on our campus as Monica Kaufman and News Services Director Julia Hoye check over last minute details. 7' 4 , . .- 9 4 1 I ,, .12 , 92 ,., Q -Ja , '-1:9 is Z1 M- , " vii sir' , 1 ig 'V --we grey- ""' f -V, ,ug - s "It Doesn't" Vinent ,6 :Q 5 2 . , 4 -mis . 3 1 Garter Q . r '29 Garter iI'llI' 7, ' "ui ll' i if 77119 . ,i I i T 1 7' .- x 7 45 4 Y l ll Hx l 'L if x 3 0,, 'rf' PQ KY.. D N, T' ,f 2 S71 -nf S., Garter Bryan Matanky was the first person to stand up as Carter answered his Karen Larkin asked about the Russian oil question regarding the pros and cons pipeline, and Carter replied the embargo of socialized medicine. was a mistake. L E. A xifffikil 1 . , 4 ff fs F- '- , lv 'A 1 Garter Brenda Joy Bernstein 's question brought up the Russian inva- sion of Afghanistan and the three options fmilitary, political, and economicall Carter had and the reasons why he finally chose the economic boycott, Town Hall Meetingf25 Th E15 Nu Plan: E lt Tremblin' Trimble. Eiueet Hume Fllabama, Ur "'5.F'.l.E. .- " Saunders The one thing that all college students dread worse than finals is the weekly chore of cleaning their rooms. However, a few select Emory students are immune to this fate because they have the luxury of living in a motel room. This is just one of the policies that Residence Life is proud of in that it will guarantee campus housing to any student who continues to request it throughout their college years, even at the college's expense. lt was estimated in the spring of 1982 that some 500 people who requested housing would be housed in the various motels, Emory Pines and Sheraton, that are in the vicinity of the campus. But there is speculation on behalf of Dean Moon of residence Life, that this does not represent the entire portion of the stu- dent body that wants housing. Dean Moon remarked that transfer students rarely apply for housing because they know their requests probably will not be honored. However the number of stu- dents in off-campus housing has been re- duced significantly to less than one-hun- dred fifty students because of no-shows by freshmen, upperclassmen, and alter- native housing arrangements made. With the addition of the four hundred unit Turman Center, the housing short- age would seem to be a problem of the past. Dean Moon sees the opposite oc- curring, because more students will be 26fThere's No Place Like Home! attracted by the new center, to apply for housing. Also since Winship, a freshman dorm, will be demolished in 1983, there will only be a net gain of 300 units. In addition to the new Turman Center being constructed, the older dormitories are being renovated to correct electrical and other maintenance problems at an estimated cost of 51.5 million. Everything possible is being done by Emory in order to offer a more attractive housing pro- gram for its students. Despite all these efforts, the faithful "Lottery" system will continue to be a spring tradition at Emory to determine fall housing arrangements. Dean Moon and the other members of the Residence Life feel it is the fairest system available and they would greatly appreciate input on the students behalf, regarding the housing situation and the Lottery. However, taking everything into con- sideration, the situation is not as bad as it could be. ln fact Emory's is quite proud of how it has handled the problem. As Dean Moon remarked, "To my knowl- edge, no other college does what Emory does by way of housing students off-cam- pus at the school's expense. I personally am proud of this because it shows that people care and we here at Emory, espe- cially care about our students." - Linda Peacock Lil-I Hum l The old Emory taboo of freshman males and females sharing living quarters gradually became history as the 1981 Dobbs Experience spread in 1982 to all the freshman dorms except Means and Longstreet. Separation of the sexes by floor was the norm except for one floor in McTyeire Hall where both girls and guys became neighbours. The coed experience is a major factor Gonzales in adaptation to college life. A feeling of closeness resulted from the daily interac- tion with each other, the gain of mutual respect, and learning to watch for the privacy of others. The closeness ex' tended not only to dorm mates dating but even sparked brother-sister relationships. One dorm, Trimble Hall, initiated a Big and everyone spied, guessed, and await- ed the end of the week. When the identi- ties were revealed, something happened The floors became "one big happy fam- ily." Students help each other with home work and personal problems and general- ly interact as siblings. Brother-Little Sister program for a week. - Linda Peacock Clues and presents were left at doors, ,pf , S Ill 4' Morris - ' - EMOHYUNIVEWITY Gassner N TURMAN CEN TER sruoslvr nsslnszvmu. FAcw.m' i f Gassner There's No Place Like Home!f27 Summertime And The After the hectic activity of graduation, the Quad was very beautiful and peace- ful. The grass and trees were green, and the flowers were in full bloom. It was always strange to walk through this tran- quil scene and not see anyone taking ad- vantage of the soft green grass or the late afternoon sun. I found myself on many occasions searching the streets for peo- ple, often with no luck. I was one of the few who stayed close to Emory but didn't go to classes. Friends who did attend classes always talked about the relaxed atmosphere during the summer session. The classes were small enough so that everyone became close, including the professor. However, the major difference be- tween summer and the rest of the school year is the atmosphere. The summer scholars lhigh school seniors attending classes herel lived in Dobbs where a desk lnot normally found during the school yearl checked in all visitors, and also kept the boys on the first floor from seeing the girls on the second floor. Things certainly did change during the summer! Friends who worked at the AMUC actually had time to call me. The post office was actu- ally clean due to the fact that there wer- en't many interoffice notices sent out. If Vincent 28fSummer People Are Missing you wanted to eat on campus though, the only place to go was Cox Hall because Dooley's Den closes during the summer. This depressed many students, faculty, and staff because we all know about Cox Hall food, therefore, the Village restau- rants had many summer school patrons. Although some of the usual campus activities continued throughout the sum- mer, so many of the things we count on and take for granted were gone. UCB still sponsored movies, and the Summer The- ater produced plays. However, the book- store closed on Saturdays, and the AMUC ran on very strange hours - clos- ing at 1O:0O! The atmosphere is very peaceful, but I prefer the hectic conve- niences of everyday school life like cash, ing checks on Saturday, getting the mun- chies at 11:00, and people. Kim Oliver and Lynne Harwell Vincent Ili T ""' 'EI' E E! ' 4Z,5,,A,:,,,--.f:. av-...err r :gg ,ef . -1.:,,.ej.f- 2'-11" . -'- . iuhfim M5 Vincent Vincent me -6 Vincent Vincem Summerf29 Q Q ,. caL.::sr--4:A D Jul! Collier An Annual Headache: Moving In The scene: the door is propped open by a fridge. People passing by in the hall inadvertantly peer in, smile, and walk on. They're going through the same thing: utter confusion. lt's moving in day, the opening date for former high school seniors now college freshmen to begin fall semester in a new school. Parents trudge up and down stair- cases with boxes in weary arms, suitcases are hauled out of car trunks and vans. Unhung posters, stuffed animals, and fans litter the room as the contents of the "I just had to bring that, Mom" boxes are dumped onto sheetless beds. Manuever- ing by an almost bat-like radar, room- mates dodge rugs, records, and each oth- er as they try to stuff the more important items from their 18 years of existence into every nook and cranny the small Opening Daysf3O dorm room has. Stereos, TV sets, a pa- per piriata, and even the state flag of Texas would soon occupy places of hon- our as freshmen downplayed homesick- ness by decorating the room that would be home for a year. "How could l have brought so much stuff?" It's easy. Finally, it was all in the room. Almost. Somehow roommates managed to find ways to accommodate all those posses- sions within the four walls of a small shared room, At first it seemed impossi- ble, but by nightfall most rooms began to reflect the personalities of their occu- pants. The unfamiliarity and "newness" of the surroundings only intensified fare- wells. Freshmen hug goodbye to Mom and Dad while at the same time say "Hel- lo, roommate." Orientation manages to keep freshmen busy and provides enough opportunities for friendships to develop. The campus buildings and landmarks start sounding and looking familiar: AMUC, Cox, White Hall . . The dorms quiet down into a quasi-normal routine. Even though classes and schedules might get confusing, nothing will ever come close to those first few days when anxi- ety, tension, and anticipation prevailed in the emotions and minds of the newest members of the student body. As Stacey Roberts put it: "It's nice decorating your room. I'm just thankful it is only an annu- al event." - Linda Peacock Swmisfif il? team ix. 6 I l K L 'tiki rw IDL Q' i- raw- Eishiofzs W . J V f' AV X . P ,fxkliwi-foie DP Z -MEL 1 r- .rkf 'L 151- I, l - wc: 5 1 A I f"'? I 4: 1 . I H :- I-4 2255 EL' n: :E uc: .4131-1 'P' Collie' Collier Each heshman dorm had to come up with a theme for the year. -1-he Rick Steinberg and his father move a not so compact compact refrigerator into McTyeire. other themes of this year were Longstreet-Means - "We're into L 81 M," l , ' , V bn tht LAN Alabama - "Oh what a state we're in," Winship - "The Last before the ' ' W' " ' ' Blast," Dobbs - "Dobbs. lt's not just a dorm, it's an adventure," and ev , . 4 , , Q Trimble - "Trimble trembles but it doesn't fall down." Vt" 'H 'L 1 ' ' f" 'V IW 'N' lm lion On Qvuclraf. l T e - , f '2...x., Faux., ...i A,i,:....t.. Nik lcrii- 3-r Bl-as anna U53 ,Krabi '5 nn Him k.Q.,,a.v Ski-dults qdf' 1 fx' McEachern Left: "Why In It that college students pack everything they own." A father makes another numerous trip with luggage. Above: Bob Shelrman welcomes Dobbs' freshman. 31 Moving . A PREVIEW OF THINGS TO DO: STUDE T ACTIVITIES FAIR The Student Activities Fair was held in the beginning of fall semester. The Fair f "" A : " i ' :':1 5 5 ,:.. H was sponsored by College Council and organized by Jean Dornhofer. It provided .- ,.f:A . .. J b X f 'N -'S 5 , A X 3 old and new students a chance to join H A clubs or find out more about the various as organizations on campus. v .I I , .::z5sf1y" ' F 5 S I t ., .p..:?v - .,.. :1:1.::,: Q , :NM ,lg IW:S,..,, . , ' 'Q F' f U 'S!':' :x"A ' -, " .- 1 ' N """' -v1'ssy.t... Q . 'f' '-qi' -, . I .t,, :fin , Q, . ,. . I, , , ....,, , . .. 4,,. . ,, . ,,,,,..aN- A V, W-cs --I ,. .I iwmv .. At. . he ' an .'. xsfffQL.: 4r""' I :f-552' "" :Naam-: gr I quzgqz-Q, cw- 5,45 ., N H ,-:, .. . W WBVWNXQ , .mt N R ,, ...,: 51 ' X X 5 Concerned about the threat nf ' ,i'r I 2 it EX Aff is gt g- fi: as, ,r ii - Here5 your chance for IME Mcvhv . M7 W1 .. Q91 1 , I A7 iw ' . ' V U . V an If , I, V. .ggi 4 ' . W,-, , M if i 1 ' g 5' 6, f, 3 ,S"1 S-Fab 5 , , 5 , 'jf IV 32fStudent Activities Fair Phgtgg by Vincent OTloYlI,QI,iOYl 9.8 ff' X figs A sm? 'X L ...N t iii? 'T' 3 uv- 1 f Q- yygulyqgs DOBBSljALLMCth3S 'll105o First, ow DQYSJ In A ow Omo Soom 50 Long Ago In anticipation of their first college year, freshmen arrived the morning of August 24 in cars, trucks, vans, and campers. All vehicles were piled high with every conceivable device designed to make the dorm room more like home. After finally settling in and becoming acquainted with roommates and hall- mates, the class of 1986 eagerly went through a hectic week of orientation that previous classes endured. They attended seminars, took language placement tests, met with faculty advisors, and registered for their first semester. For most fresh- men, registration was a strange and har- rowing experince. Why? "lt was new and drove me crazy. l didn't know where to go, and it took me awhile to finish. l had never done it before and didn't know what to expect." Social events were planned in addition to these orienting activities. Barbeques, mixers, and a square dance enabled ev- eryone to mingle and meet each otherg friendships developed that would last through the years. Consequently, orientation was very successful in familiarizing freshmen to the campus. Hopefully when 1986 arrives, the "new', campus will by then be home to the freshmen of 1982. - Missy Wrenn - AK gg VLQQ57- jgjdrcfe V if ,lg B l " lr sms QE 'wNEBLAr' ,Fm - - 3 JT . c V eiilluiix t L' ' ', l W' 31- -sf wtf f L ' e I ,Z '- 'f H -1------ Orientationf33 x ,, . K 1 Qat' 5 " W' . .. " dm. Q-vf sr? ' s,. 4 - g jg 1,1 1' ' A .- on ., f..,.. '. , ...- f f . 'T .:.'!.:,-. ,- an nv, V 4 ,Na ' . 45' we-ln.. ' E J I u - if YV ' ' 'ww 3 1 5 Q M - 4 -fi ' . A. frm "4" JK fi -. .J ,. ' I '1., 'T ' . 5 1 1, X.. in Y . --s. .- ' 1 5, 'a ' T X Q' K, .PU- , f e 57 V. 1 4 "VW X . N Q..-. . W S -x 1 -x A 184-"gt 4 0 U" 'Q-gif? " 5 may , L .xflgr ' - .l'i'f'N'1 7455. Q x , gi. 'N - pin yi- gf X Q .' , .. ,I "AQ " Q' ' f J ' ,IVA in 'l K, " X- 9.31, ' I :m.tQ',,kln'Dd5-.I .ag 5- , ' ', "1 I, - , " . ,- -, jr -'11, ', .., ,,..:, 5 , NL.. X f.,,.,, . , Q xx :SQ-., . 2 LNASFK 1 " - ' 'UA - ' V Q ,JL , - W, Vg ,.' '. ,PWQ5 Q 'f"'- , 1? Q- gf , H" 9' ' -1' -mm' ' ' " x gf "' mx ii l - Y X 't-..4.m-wg Garter --Q..-1-5 ,X , 3 .IN A ' xx X x ti Y ag .xlv I9 'K MQ A K 7 x ff' Q ! . 1 , f9"" , 15""v x ' ' K 1. 'W' A YHV! . ,-'- ,,,MmM ,. 'M 1-ii W ahuf Vincent Garter Q, Morris Opening DaysffS5 NIJTH Fl LlN TU l.I.I lT EIN , ,, -,-.........-..-.................--.. ..... -----....-.--. QSouthernBeIl ana sas-axsz SEP 20 1982 R07 U35 s DETAIL OF OTHER CHARGES AND CREDITS PAGE 5 . . ITE! PEI HDHTN AHUUNT IUG 31 B2 CHARGE FUR NEH SERVICE q FRUH SEP I BZ THRU SEP 19 82 I. CENTRAL DFFICE LINE 13 70 I SB 2. TUUCHTDNE SERVICE L UU 63 UNE TIHE C ARGE FUR 3 rstevwuus urszce uns cuwuecrmw is un 1. annex Pnocessnus zs un Lines, lines, lines It seemed that for the first few weeks of school, every- one was confronted with lines. Lines for registration, lines for drop-add, lines for phones, even cafeteria lines. Students constantly stood in line for one reason or another. However, the line that had to be the worst was the drop-add line. Some stu- dents actually were up as early as 5:30 a.m. in order to get near the front of the line. In previous years, students waited in line several hours to change their sched- ulesg however, a different system went into effect fall semester. Numbers were distributed to alleviate the wait. One would then gauge by very roughly ap- proximating about 20 people per hour going through the line, calculate the time, and return early to play it safe. Somehow the plan backfired or at least left many students dissatisfied and still waiting in line. lt turned out that if one missed the calling of his number, he was forced to stand in line again the day new numbers were distributed to obtain a number. A revision of the system is now underway. - Missy Wrenn 36fBills And Lines Vincent TUTAL OTHER CHAIBES AND CREDITS a--1--un-an--..- 50.31 ....-.... .-. QT J l R .-1:.., 1. 5. s Q2 L... - 1!mBd LB . . . FINUTHEFH BILL TU PFW! 'vs-.x WhQm Leaves Tulffm fffcsmwm ' 'i s .Siu-.4.1y.X,,,,, .ef-u 381511 Bord , . New X 'Q Gonzales ' : ,v-H51 VZWYS3 f J 52-if-:A '95 , hw' '- ,, ff- avrnrf -ASV' 'xl' An Gonzales Morris I CEA .- -.512 -f K 99' Gonzales !!!lll, UQWP1 ' 'Q'-cu IISIIOPS IIALL 4 'Yip- l.., l l lllll fflf clllyf A 'Q Gonzales HI Q HQ nv Gonzales Moms 1: 4. . -V- s . Morris FaHf39 f , vm.. wx. vw K " .-... 5 ' x .q,, . fe f-fs Q nl . Q ..:- in ' IQ.. gif' l Q F '- ,if . Ai - if .f Y' N5-Z-. ,f'-'x'lff, - . wfkiri- Q Q .Mx Q x X 1. Q? X ,,,.. .ig x -5, 1, xmlkqwgmfxp, A ----' .fig 52 Ia' 5Y'..ff'fliWh,,5,-Q5-ff.'?33vi,,.e A . 3 Nw A 1.9 K ,wx WGS- ., A, .x ' f N18 1544 ,Y 1,,Ak.51'w4f:::Q3f3 5 ,mg TT wr . ' fwf .K 4 as ,r v. 'fm N--V Ja . rw I . E E Af .. Q . J ,... H, 1 I ' +31 9' , 'iff iii. Qian" " .1 't' A W R Q . ll X x .I fx N ,it .Tiff J D . fiaf- X S fjf.. Q, .. 1 . 1 AaXR1'i,.'f55L111' 'fi "TNl',Q. ff bs' 1 --xr-5fQf".r' , ' 1.. W X .3 S! Q! .-., -Q v F SMS ' v, V 'wx y 1 ...W v' , , sLg,Y ,. NT, ,. .X f -s Kg.,-f 4. :fe .. :Mmm Wh- K ' K 445, fwyi' ' . v L .. ,umm L. ,N .... .. Dey, , ,. DNYQW ' Pau G, . T616 were ,. ,Au .-S , .Q . :,,g.,w..-Q x,f,-9-5 . , 'N . wx frf-N.. X Q JA H xi -. I V N. 3NQ,:,.f- gl-N X., X 'Q-:YS-,z-.1fs,4x5b:2::xx ,,.-ww, kr? .TE Ya.- .. ' ,. , ,N . . .-1 . Q x. 5:-KE vl N . .cxv,.:' "'x.sf. -,Nm X Q , .Q ,Q - ,.3,g,Q,.v I ,s. K I 1:23, Q' X , N 0 2 W nf ! X ' V '91 ' fi - :' ' , ,Vi Vfgaifiggl Ay, Afnsf ZPQ ,.V , ..,l ,135 ,f 4 , fx Y f J 1lTfi3'lI?TESXQ'QQS5Q'f?Yf -Q X X X X-xx si X. . x wp .X xmr Qx f- Sf-rf: xx: :r:a:1'SS:r Nxfvi fx tw:- -,mz N553 Q1 Sl X ar X ,- Q .Q ,...-1 ip:-, Vmcent M!! Morris 'ww A -- - . I 4-'mx P ICKUP QQ 223 Eff A 1 f5?701', r y 'Pb by 'Q A X Appel fda: K 7 XX .ww mr yr f. Mak i nw, V" ' jg Appel A Day In Front Of The AMUCf41 eyond ree Is There Life After College? Graduation!?! ls that what we've all been waiting for? Commencement seems to be a strange word for what signifies the end of all we've come to know. ls there life after col- lege? l.et's take a look at six members of the class of '82 to see what happens after Emory. Carole Balzekas is from Chicago, Illinois. She obtained her degree in political science. and is currently interviewing with several large corporations such as Rouse and IBM. Her career goal is to work in the field of marketing within the ranks of the corporate world. Or, in her words, the ranks of "the corporate clones.', When I asked her if there was life after college she responded: "Yes, there is life after college, but l want to go back to school. ln school, you have no real and you know where your next worries, meal is coming from." l asked her for some words of wisdom for up and coming gradu- ates. She advised that "it's a dog-eat-dog world out there, and if you donlt have any skills on top of your degree, you might as well forget it." Nancy Wasserman graduated with a de- gree in russian and is from Newton, Massa- chusett. She is currently a first year law student at Emory Law School and eventual- ly hopes to work in the field of Entertain- ment Law. When l asked her about life after college, she retorted: "You're talking to me three weeks before law school finals, don't ask me that." She continued by comparing law school and college. The "major differ- ence is that when you're called upon in law school, you have to participate, so you bet- ter know what you're talking about!" Her words of wisdom follow: "A college degree doesn't seem to help much anymore, you've got to go to graduate school. Graduation is only one stopping pointg you've got to keep going." Dave Mason is from Hilton Head, South Carolina. He graduated magna cum laude in history with a second degree in economics. He is presently working three part time jobs to make money for University of Texas Gra- duate Business School next year. His career goal is to work within the realm of banking 42fBeyond The Degree Nancy Wasserman is in a class all by herself. Beth Wallace is now getting paid for what she used to do for free as a student working on student publica- tions. and finance. When asked if life existed after college, he shrugged his shoulders and just said, "No." He advises prospective gradu- ates frankly: "Get a job before you leave school." More philosophically, he adds: "College is the ivory tower where you form pie-in-the-sky ideals. It's only after you leave that tower that you are forced to change them." Our fourth graduate, Jeff Sartin, is from Rossville, Georgia. He majored in history and biology. Currently, he is a first year medical student here at Emory's School of Medicine. He is participating in the Health Professions Scholarship Program of the United States Air Force and will graduate as a commissioned officer. His response to the question about life after college follows: "It's been reported that conditions exist for possi- ble life but so far l have yet to detect it." His words of wisdom for '83 grads: "ln the words of Hunter S. Thompson, 'Forget it, you're doomed. "'. When further asked for specific insight for pre med students, Jeff remarked that they shoucl be aware of im- portant changes occurring in the field of medicine. The role of the doctor may change drastically with overall income de- creasing. ' 1:1 : V: AK yi sw VCC 52.7 ' ' David Parker trades in his Sigma Nu jersey for a busi- ness suit and a mack truck? When Jeff Sartin was accepted to medical school, his head was in the cloudsg now after a semester of hard work, he's now back on earth. Allison Campbellchecking out beyond the degree possi- bilities, Dave Mason now foams the city of Atlanta rather than the Emory Campus. st .waz in 'ii' ii XXX U 4 -iyfrgw .. ii 7,5 xx ., D- A J Z if 5rX KL I . Xl. Photos by Gonzales Beyond The Degreefll Life After lIl0l' Get a job before you leave school. Beth Wallace is a native of Macon, Geor- gia. She graduated cum laude in psychology. She is currently the production manager in the Publications Office here. In February of her senior year, she changed her career goals, a decision that was not easy to make. She concluded that 'Lgraduate school is for the birds." Instead, she decided to go direct- ly into the field of journalism. As editor of the CAMPUS, she had gained the necessary skills and experience for her present job. Beth asserts that 'Lextra-curricular activities give you important management, organizak tion, and leadership skills." Being involved "allows you to have the best of both worlds - skills and a liberal arts education," Her advice to graduates is uto do exactly what you want to do! lf you have a dream, go Forget it, you're doomed. Carole Balzekas looks for her fortune in the corporate world. . . . do exactly what you want to do! 44fBeyond The Degree after it! Don't worry about money or what others may want you to dog just go for what you want." Our last but certainly not least graduate is David Parkerfrom Nashville, Tennessee. He received his degree in economics. Presently, he works with Rollins Trucking Leasing Cor- poration. ln the near future, he is hoping to obtain a master's degree in international business at the American Graduate School of International Management. His career goal is to work in the area of international finance. He laughed when asked about life after college and said, "Yes, but call it hell." He said that "part of the reality is finding the right job." His words of wisdom follow: "Ap- ply to graduate school." After that? "Apply again." He concluded by saying 'iYour fu- ture is all up to youg it's not going to fall into your lap." Well, as we can see there is some question as to the prospects of life after Emory. If you are seriously in doubt, you could always join the five-year plan, or even better, stay in school forever. For more information on these alternatives to graduation, write the CAMPUS to get your copy of Allison 's Easy to Follow Guide to Becoming An Eternnal Student. - Allison Campbell Your future is all up to you . . . Q5Nb . . gb ,t si Y? L -fs QQ in xr -. X, X swf. r . ., 5-1 . . '- Q A ' lx . " - xx ,. + , , , .N .1 Q M 3. s 'fx : s-aw ,. "xl, t ,sv : . -.. , A. - . lf N ' ' .. ' A: ' an Suv Y X 4,- The Career Planning And Placement Center Looking Beyond College . i gi I hich of the following statements are misconceptions about The Career Plan- hing and Placement Center: Al lt is just for seniors lBl lt is just an on-campus employment agen- CV Cl lt is run by little green men in silver suits. The fact is that the first two statements are just as false as the third. Emory students are encouraged to go to the Center, on Clifton Road next to the Law School, as early as their freshmen year. As it's name suggests, it is involved in career planning as well as the placement of Emory graduates into jobs and grad schools. The people that work at CPPC believe that career planning is their most important function. The Center has many resources to aid the student with no objectives for the future. Along with a Career Library, with extensive volumes on career and grad school selection, the Center provides indi- vidual counseling for the confused Emoroid. Last year the staff of CPPC spent over 1400 hours counseling students. .1 del 3' u1uv'1"""' The Center also has the Georgia Career Information Center, a computer that aids students who are uncertain about possible careers. The student inputs information about likes, dislikes, and other relevant in- formation. The computer, through the mir- acle of modern technology, gives the student a list of possible careers worth looking into, One of the Center's most beneficial pro- grams to students is Career Day. One day in the fall, students have the chance to talk to over 100 young Emory alums in over 50 career areas. For students who are undecid- ed about their future career direction, Ca- reer Day is an excellent opportunity to gath- er information about a variety of fields. The choice of a major is another impor- tant decision in which Career Planning and Placement can help. This is but another rea- son to visit the Center early in one's aca- demic career. With so many of the students at Emory looking ahead to graduate schools, the CPPC aids them in that decision by sponsor- ing a Graduate and Professional School Day. lt is similar to Career Day in that Emory alums come to White Hall as representatives of various graduate schools. They answer With Information, Internships, And Interviews questions and supply information about their school. Seminars on Interviewing Techniques, Job Search Strategy for Liberal Arts Majors, and Summer Employment are also spon- sored by the Center. Along with helping stu- dents prepare for interviews, they set up interviews for students with corporations na- tion-wide. Last year companies such as East- ern Airlines, Merril Lynch, Arthur Ander- son, and, belive it or not, Pepsi, came to Emory for interviews. Internships for Emory students are also arranged by Career Planning and Place- ment. Internships are work experiences which complement a student's academic training and introduce him to specific ca- reers. Most internships last a semester, while others can last up to eight eight monts. Stu- dents receive academic credit for their in- ternships, a salary, or both. Summer and part-time jobs are posted in the Career Library of CPPC and are open to all Emory students. The Career Planning and Placement Cen- ter is university-wide and is certainly worth stopping by, even if you have definite plans for the future. The staff, headed by William Brake, is very eager and does its best to put to rest any fears or uncertainty for the fu- ture. - David Altman Career Planning And Placement Centerf45 EH li ight Qt rifks limi treats Halloween night reached its tenth hour. The ballroom of the Peachtree Tower was beginning to fill with all of Emory's population. Ghosts, witches, ghouls, and all the traditional goblins abounded. Also lurking around were Smurfs, rabbits, pirates, the Fruit-of-the-Loom guys fwithout Grannyl, and even a MARTA bus fEmory 6 no doubtl. lt was evident that a lot of time, effort, and imagination had gone into the preparation of the costumes for this particular evening. However, the costumes were not the only results of hard work. The ballroom was filled with orange and black balloons. The lights from the stage added a certain mystique to the atmosphere. The mood was right. Quiche, eggrolls, shrimp, and various delicacies were provided by the hotel. lt was definitely a feast fit for a king. One appropriately dressed fellow attracted much attention as he made his way through the masses to the dance floor. James T. Dooley was greeted warmly by the students. Even Dracula and a bed stopped dancing long enough to say hello. Dooley was ushered away by a mob of gangsters at about the same time Franke and the Knockouts engulfed the stage and the room with their music. The first annual Halloween ball was sponsored by Panhellenic, IFC, and UCB. Linda Peacock These residents of Alabama Hall know how to party. Above are the resident directors, Virginia and Greg Oxford. 46fl-lalloween -wut I J? AX C. Q HalIoweenf47 Evelyn Warshaw and Daniel Michaels treat Emory to a little bit of the old country. Craig Schwamm shows some leg, 48fHaIloween K Kuglel I ff -Q7 Y -4 'a 1 . Q. L 0 Y K: Garter Garter l !lJi11! XlWlW QXW lW .- gg-1 . Q, . gy ' ,SQ xx ,xl W YS 1 Ah A + .Q qw Q QM 4 Wm P W D W n M Jun, mn, eva J., 2 hmn- ND FR FILV ' Llfvi 353. 'W ..gifix.i..i"5 Q. Q .4 h 4 : .1-. .A ' ' fix' Q 2,5 in iv , K if .L as .- 5155 X J ' ' ' -Sw. . -"T Q Y 5' - an 'S -Q - 5:11 'X . ' . A zz! 1 .--"2 1. py- . Q if' 1' f " ff. fy ' Q . f ' , QXP- 4 . , .1 A , ' ' , -. 2 ,E:L..qjgg V.. ,X raw: ,I . -QL.. ,ff 1 1, L 5 . :QS fylvvxi x K Si bi AA Dwxib-Q ' x C Q. - Q ' X N gs., A ...Adi g wi. .X .Q , .. Q. 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Heritage ' eeh The second annual presentation of Heritage Week by the Student Govern- ment Association started off spring se- mester 1983 with a bang. The festivities began on Tuesday, January 25th, Charter Day of the University. An organi- zations fair was held all day in the AMUC lobby with a celebration of Emory's 67th birthday highlighting the day at 3:00 pm with the serving of a giant birthday cake. On Wednesday the 26th, Dean Charles Lester gave an informative and amusing lecture on Emory's history for the Histori- cal forum held in White Hall. During the week, a "Traditions at Emory" display showing old photographs, textbooks, and memorabilia could be viewed at Special Collections of Woodruff Library. On Fri- day the 28th, the Pushball Game tradition was revived with a battle between the underclassmen and upperclassmen on the upper athletic field. Unfortunately, the underclassmen won that match. Follow- ing the game, an all university Happy Hour and Sock Hop was held in the AMUC auditorium featuring fifties and sixties music of the "Retreads." The sec- ond annual Heritage Week with a budget of 514,000 proved to be a great success. Allison Campbell 50fHer tage Week Vincent N . ff'1c"Vw R V w- H ' N- .1 :g f 4 1 U. gf ,fri v J ' 14 ,57-35,2-xigfmz 5 ' I 55317 G' ' i -me V c f l . 3 'Mr Y ." 7 f" M fa , 1 J A ipvjgxy V A L. J XX q A r wg L-V1 5' .-, ,AJ I f , A 7 nf- y , V- L I V A "fix Z J 7' X 'J' "A4 fs, " ' X " if D Y V, f"' 7:31 ffrfffw f Ac exe 44, Q Vincent mcent Y 'Q 30' .0 Q' Lf rf, ' as ,... Vs ., Y, -fu, 1 , 5... i -Q P -" . .f,,"' - --., , 1-? ,I x ,M ,an ,., s JA L1 4' .1 I 4 ,Q , ,Q , . , , M- MJ -H' . -..4, . -." .,'f.:".'.' ,,,,.'. V-. ,,-. 'fs .x , ".,7. ' 2 ,Lg ' 43143, 4115.7 . 2' " ,....x .f. f' x-SX' X 1 . I . N A i I In V Vincent Vincent Vincent Heritage Weekf51 ' ' hirling ' Gonzales The highlight of Heritage Week, the Heri- tage Ball, was a grand event. The ball fea- tured the big band sound of the Jimmy Dor- sey Orchestra under the direction of Lee Castle. The event was held on the night of Saturday, January 29th, with the setting at Colocny Square both beautiful and spacious. During the evening, faculty, alumni, gra- duate students, and undergraduates could all be seen gracing the dancefloor. President James T. Laney and Vice President Bill Fox both called the event well-attended by repre- sentatives from the entire Emory communi- ty. All in all, it was a night of splendour, romance, beauty, and celebration. This tra- dition will continue through the years as a celebration of Emory's unique heritage. Allison Campbell 52fHeritage Week Ball Nix J 'fi W 'W ly, fi . .: . f-'i P .m,'.-2, ,,, f 1 ,. ' r lf-.,x'?,jZ , . Mg. 1 a ,B In L ,I y E . Mt . '-, V. . '- f Q 1 . A W rw ,pw 1,2 W f si, 5 H fl l,.q P 1 This year we were quite fortunate to have so many outstanding people to come to campus. The Human Rights Symposium brought the different aspects of Human Rights. Fortunately for us the Symposium continues for the rest of the year. The religious and cultural side of Human rights was presented by a number of celebri- ties. Father Andrew Greely spoke on the human side of religion. Reverend Jesse Jackson presented the on going shortcom- ings of human rights in this country for 'Special Events Spe iii gl xilbiig ffl G51 fff Q iiaiig Ilk- .X X- , t .si RN Mor Qi" mmf fc., f minorities. And Reverend Kiyoshi Tani- moto came to present his views as a Hiro- shima survivor. The Human Rights Symposium also brought entertainers, who through their art were able to make us think about the plight of people. Josh White Jr. and Tom Paxton gave a concert in Lullwater Park. White performed his own blend of folk-blues mu- sic, and Paxton sang his humorous and thoughtful songs. Sweet Honey and the Rock performed an entire concert of soulful ,ff r".aIlf 5 J' AQ, -wmgirf' 'Hn-., wx, 'Q P HI! music A Capella. Peter Tosh and Jimmy Cliff gave us the Reggae sound in the Agora. And Shlomo Mintz performed the classical violin. The unusual and the com- ic were also well represented. The avant- garde dancers Eiko and Koma gave a per- formance and held workshops. The Theatre Department produced the full-participation play Everyman. Ad Hoc sang and danced their way into our hearts, in Your A Good Man Charlie Brown. And Robert Klein Qave us an entire evening of his best material. Special Events Special E 5' Most of the culture we were exposed to this year was fleeting. Great performers came into our lives and promptly left. How- ever, we were also honored to have such greats as the playwrite Oyomo and the At- lanta Chamber Players to remain as artists in residence. All in all we have been very fortunate this year. ffl f f Norris steme Special Eve nt 1982 was much like any other year, it had its tragedies, wars, and joyous mo- ments. However, each year is special in its own right, and we would like to take this time to reflect on the events that make 1982 memorable. On the world scene England fought Ar- gentina for possession of the Falkland Is- lands. Most people had never heard of the Falklands, and yet suddenly they were the major news item. All the world was stunned by the Beirut Massacre. After an interna- tional investigation, it was determined that lsreal and especially Sharon were at fault. A View Cf '82 A View Of 'S 58fA View Gi '82 3 W We :fx 'Q 1 ina , of 1 L, ,Q Q . M '17 M ci? 'J Iv 3 'if 5 is , ' . Qilqmb 4 Q Sharon was finally forced to resign, but will probably keep an unofficial post in Begin's cabinet. The USSR mourned the death of Lenoid Breshnev, and hailed the rise of An- dropov. Here in the US we anticipated the new leader, among media rumours of an entirly new Soviet-US relationship. And fi- nally, all the world rejoiced the birth of England's new crown prince, Arthur Phillip Louis. Here in the US, progress, both good and bad, led the news. Reganomics reduced the rate of inflation, but the unemployment rate rose steadily. Regan also introduced his A View Cf '82 A View Of 'SU 1 11 l A vew Of '82f59 plan for the "Peace-keeper" MX missiles. Yet here in the US and in Europe hundreds of thousands of anti-nuclear protestors gath- ered. Hundreds of thousands also gathered when the Rev. Moon married 2,075 cou- ples, in Madison Square Garden. We were all gratified when we finally honored our Viet Nam Veterans. Football fans learned the names of several Canadian players, and had to find something else to do on Monday nights, during the football strike. The sexual revolution came to a screeching halt, when Herpes became a household word, and reached epidemic proportions. People also A View Of '82 A View Cf 'S som view Of 82 became more cautious about the things they bought from the store, when someone had laced Tylenol with cyanide. The Ty- lenol scare led to the invention of safer packages. Most products now come with tamper-proof caps, as there were many pro- ducts poisoned by copy-cats. Barney Clark was given a new lease on life with the worlds first artificial heart. Although he has never left the hospital, he is now walking about. DeLorean was arrested for conspir- ing to sell cocaine. He says he did it to save his company. We really were able to get a grip on the new age when the Home Com- A View Cf '82 A View Of 'S A view Of 'szfei puters was named the Man of the Year. In Georgia, we elected a new governor, Joe Frank Harris. The Braves began the fall with a 13 game winning streak, but couldn,t manage to win a pennant. We all waited patiently for the snowstorm that would ar- rive at 10:00, 12:00, and finally arrived at 3:00, not nearly as terrible as we had feared or hoped. The bill to raise the drinking age to 21 was defeated, with the help of a great deal of student support. And Georgia cele- brated her 250th birthday. A View Of '82 A View Of '82 K ll .L i 'WX - . 3 Slum' 62fA View Of '82 is In Atlanta, Plaza Drugs closed another Atlanta institution down the drain. A new MARTA station opened, and the committee decided which of the remaining stations will be completed first. Wayne Williams was convicted for the murder of two of the 28 murdered children. The Peachtree Road Race was held on a Sunday despite the protest of area churches. Here at Emory, the entire year was dedi- cated to Rethinking Human Rights. The new Theater Department opened. It pre- A View Cf '82 A View Of ,S Ez . ff ga - ."- I-I ,, I 1" fig. . UR iff- gf-1--,M Ex - Tidgfcwr iiiiige as ravi' V' , If W: if' -'HQ' - A v W Of 732163 miered with an elaborate production of the medieval morality play Everyman. Presi- dent Carter was added to the list of faculty members. He and his entourage created quite a lot of commation. We were assured that Wonderful Wednesday was truly dead when the first day of classes came on a Wednesday. The 14 week semester was very long, and quite a few cases of burn-out were reported. 1982 also saw the death of more than Wonderful Wednesday. Dr. Crawford and A View Of '82 A View Of '8 64fA View Of 82 Dr. Conant wlll be sorley mlssed from our whlch E T was created and the year that campus Around the world such greats as M A S H flnally lald the Korean Confllct to Bear Bryant Prmcess Grace Henry Fonda rest Eubie Blake Ingrld Bergman Bess Truman and Karen Carpenter wlll also be mlssed Lynne Harwell 1982 wlll also be known as the year ln SA- VIEW Of 82 A VIEW Of 8 ya r' 7 , I li ' f :,HQPEN XALL N srl W ML A WJ .1. , Acaclem WU btmfAcadem Morris Morris Morris ACdd2mlCSf'O7 Dean Julianne Daffin From Assistant Dean Of Women To Executive Associate Dean Of Campus Life And Section Overseer Why does Julianne Dafhn upkeep and Health Services Committee, and the Cam- W ..:1r.:.,-.- -,,...., maintain approximately six miles of the pus Development Committee fwhich eva- i Appalachain Trail from soil erosion and fallen debris? It could be the title, Section Overseer, but the Executive associate Dean of Campus Life states the one day a month activity of hiking and hard duty work results in very tired muscles but a "natural high" comes from the satisfac- tion of a job well done. It also strengthens her sense of perseverance and patience, qualities a good administrator should have. Dean Daffin is an Emory College alum- na. She has a Master's degree in Counsel- ing and a Ph.D. in Educational Leader- ship. She began her administrative career in 1972 as the Assistant Dean of Women. Her main function, now, as Executive As- sociative Dean is to serve as a liason be- tween the administration and the universi- ty services she is in charge of. Which is saying a lot. She could be acting for the Student Health Services, the Barkley Fo- rum, the Emory Theatre, or the Counsel- ing Center one day, and the next day be attending to matters relating to student publications. She is the faculty advisor for Mortar Board and the Senior Honor Soci- ety, She participates in the University Af- firmative Action Committee and the Childcare Task Force. In addition to these activities, Dean Daffin is also active in two committees of the University Senate fthe governing body for the faculty which ties together all the schoolsl. She is a member of the Student Life Committee, the 6 Th Featured Dean lutaes proposed changes on campus such as new buildings and landscapingl. She also chairs a sub-committee for campus beautification which attempts to preserve the natural environment by growning more native plants here. She continues her work for the women on campus by serving on the President's Commission on the Status of Women at Emory. Born in Panama City, Florida, Dean Daffin loves to be outdoors and tries to take time out whenever possible to play golf and sail. But her main "extra-curricu- lar" activity is the care of her part of the 21,000 mile footpath called the Appala- chain Trail. The Trail extends from the Blue Ridge Mountains in Georgia all the way north to Maine and was recently de- clared a national wilderness park. Section overseers are citizens who volunteer their efforts to remove fallen trees and control the inevitable erosion of the soil. Dean Daffin feels accessibility is the most vital quality an effective administra- tor could possess. Without this, she feels, "The students lack a sense of community involvement, and mistrust often devel- ops." She acts out this basic premise of hers by meeting as many students as pos- sible, often trying to take the time out for a one-to-one interaction. She hopes for a unifed campus where all students have a place, and she works earnestly towards this goal. Amy Livingston .-, V is .f3'Mi9-if "iii X' B QS ' mse,Q-:tri 1: MN- " maxi!!-, ,,-fs Dean Julianne Daffinf69 Emory College TOXIC Text- Affliction Of The Pre-Professional You always seem to find them concen- trated in libraries. They study such things as organic chemistry, physics, biology, and core requirements. They are known as "pre-meds." They are also affection- ately called cut-throats and curve wreck- ers. Why do these people study so hard? Most say they are driven, driven by the opportunity to serve. They realize that by the end of these years they will have the specialized knowledge and skills of the medical profession to help someone else in need. Others are driven by the glamour and responsibility, a few, their parents. No matter the motivation, they all know to some extent the odds. Over 30,000 pre-meds last year applied to medical schools. Only 12,000 were accepted. ln the past, Emory pre-meds have beaten these odds. The outward competition is more visible, but the inward competition is no less obvious or intense. The idea is not so much to beat the next person as it is to do whatever is necessary to achieve a good grade in the particular subject area, and of course, a high GPA. It takes much dedication to so focus one's life for so long. The challenges at times can seem overwhelming. The years seem to creep by, and the end always appears so far away. For some, medical school will become a reality, a dream come true. For others, the disappoint- ment, disbelief, and hurt from a shattered dream will be devastating. Only time land admissions committeesl will tell, and so, the race goes on. John Frenzel Christie Ernst practices medicine on her roommate, Roma Trousdale. The chemistry building looms into the sky as an apt reminder of the dedication required as a pre-med. 70fEmory College Book Syndrome Ask someone in the college, "What are you studying? " Chances are eventually the word 'pre-med" might arise. l came to Emory mainly because of its reputation, it is widely known for the quality of its pre-med curriculum. But I soon learned quality is syn- onymous with difficulty. However, ever since l was a child l have wanted to be a doctor, and l came here knowing that it would be rough. The pre-med core classes of calculus, chemistry, biology, and physics are all hard. But as a freshman l learned the rule: invest in a lot of quality studying time. Soon studying 'till midnight wasn 't as im- possible or even considered late. The word allnighter meant all night to early morning to an occasional sunrise. As "stimulating" as the classes are, they aren 't as demanding as people believe, Of course it 's fun to bellache about how hard everything is but all pre- professional programs are like that. Believe it or not, l have time to relax and have fun, I even participate in some extra-curricular ac- tivities. To me, being a pre-med is challeng- ing, stimulating, and brings out the best in youg it makes you realize what you can, and cannot, do. Larry Garter It's six weeks after his interview at Ston- eybrookg he'll find out within a week. How- ard Silverman, like all the other pre-profes- sional seniors, feels "the waiting to hear is crazy." lt's batty, and he jokes that he makes three trips to the P.O. He's a chemistry major, he was a biology major ll won't write it Howardl. He would become an elementary teacher if he wasn't planning on being a pediatrician."l love the little kids." Why a doctor? "I wanted to work with people and utilize knowledge in science and math." He was nervous at his first medical school interview. "After all the stories from the other people, I didn't know what to expect. But the guy was easygoing. l was relieved Gonzalas after the first one. I was more confidant and had more of an idea of what it's like." His most difficult question was the one that dealt with euthanasia. The medical school costs range from S4000 to 520,000 "The eight years of study is a little much" but he feels the stu- dent uneeds that time to mature." He feels that medicine has become too specialized and lost contact with the people, which is why he wants to be a primary care physi- cian. How does he feel about his years at Emory? "I loved it." He feels prepared for the future: "Yes, I want to start so I can finish." Emory Collegef71 A Day In The Lite 0 Bruce Sabin First Year Medical Student Bruce Sabin is a first year medical stu- dent at Emory. Bruce really likes being a med student. He does not find the work too difficult - "lt's not hard, just a lot of work." Because it is a lot of work, medi- cal school can be tiring, but the end result is well worth the labor. The only disap- pointment he can find with first year medical school is that there is no hospital contact, just science classes. During the second year, however, there is half classes and half hospital work. Then the third and fourth years are spent all in a hospital. Below is a typical schedule for a first year med student: 7:30 - Get up in order to leave the apartment by 8:15. 8:50 - Arrive at Emory. 9:00 - First class of the day is Human Genetics. Today, they studied genetic dis- eases related to sex chromosomes. 10:00 - Cell and Histology - Today's conference is an a disease called meta- phasia. 11:00 Neurobiology - Today's topic - Chemical neurotransmitters that send messages in the brain. 12:00 - Eating lunch at Cox hall with classmates. Today Bruce has the Lunch Special! 1:00 - Physiology - Topic for discus- sion is the hormones produced from adrenal glands and their effects on dis- ease. 72fMedical School 2:00-4:00 - Neurobiology lab - Today - experiments with the brain. 5:00-9:45 - Study in Woodruff Library. Usually Bruce would stay to study much later, except that tonight "Hill Sreet Blues" comes on, and medicine will have to be put aside for an hour. Normally he doesn't come home until 11:00 or 12:00. He tries to watch the nightly news and "Barney Miller." 12:00 - Hit the sack in preparation for another long school day. Bruce's schedule is not exactly the same everyday. He has different labs everyday since every class he takes in- cludes a lab. Another course he is taking is Analytical Medicine - a course which helps prepare the student to think like a doctor, teaches himfher how to order tests, read test results, which tests to run, and how to interpret medical literature. lt is interesting to note that the whole first year medical class of 110 have all the same courses at the same hour and in the same room. We thank Bruce for taking us through a day in his very active life. Lynda I-lamby X ' Nix Morris L Medical Schoolf7fi School Cf Law Student Legal Services: More Than Just Free Advice More than 140 Emory University law students are participating in a greatly ex- panded Student Legal Services program. Six year-long projects have been inaugu- rated in areas of poverty law and prison reform to supplement the program's tra- ditional service of providing legal assis- tance to Emory students, spouses, and dependents. Legal assistance is provided by student volunteers who staff a clinic at the law school Monday through Wednesday from 3 pm to 7 pm in Room 142. Students with legal problems are interviewed by law students who then complete the nec- essary legal research and consult with an attorney retained by Student Legal Ser- vices. The attorney later meets with the student client to explain the results of the research and to offer legal advice. Law students do not offer any advice to these clients, but are limited to research and investigation. Student Legal Services President, Meghan Howett, this year has retained the student-aid program but has expand- ed Legal Services by creating six new student run projects. The first of these new services is an inmate assistance pro- gram, run in conjunction with Georgia Legal Services, the Southern Prison De- fense Committee, and the Georgia Clearinghouse on Prisons and Jails. Ap- proximately 20 Emory law students are working in the service fall semester, an- swering inmate letters for attorneys in- volved in prison reform, doing legal re- search, and interviewing inmates in the discovery phase of ongoing litigation. One Emory law student is volunteering with translation at the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary where several hundred Cu- ban immigrants are still being retained. Deborah Yungert has been appointed to coordinate the inmate assistance pro- gram. Another project is the death penalty 74fLaw School project. Law students are working with Team Defense and attorney Millard Farmer on several capital crime cases. They help to prepare briefs, writs, execu- tion stays, and generally handle basic re- search for Farmer and his team. A third program inaugurated is a legis- lation project headed by third-year stu- dent Granvette Matthews. This commit- tee is working with groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union, Georgia Legal Services, and the Georgia Council on Children to monitor key legislation and assist in research and drafting of new legislation. This group will become espe- cially active in the winter with the conven- ing of the General Assembly. Another program that will begin this winter is the volunteer income tax assis- tance project lVITAl. Emory students will staff a clinic to prepare income tax re- turns for the elderly and needy. The pro- gram will be provided in conjunction with the lnternal Revenue Service. Third-year student, Leigh Clack, has been appointed as project coordinator. A fifith project started is a legal aid project focusing on unemployment and housing grievance hearings. Approxi- mately 20 students have been trained by lawyers from Atlanta Legal Aid to repre- sent indigent clients in the spring. These students will first assist the attorney as he or she conducts the hearing, but later in the semester, the students will represent the clients themselves in front of a hear- ing officer or tenent panel. Kate Young, a third-year student, is the project coordin- ator. Another program offered is a project on the rights of the handicapped, Wayne Lee is the third-year student who is co- ordinating volunteers working with Geor- gia Legal Services and the Georgia Advo- cates for the Disabled. The students will assist in the preparation of class action suits affecting the rights of the disabled. The group will also focus on drafting leg- islation regarding education and mental health services, as well as legislation re- garding services provided for the phys- ically handicapped. One other project Howett is working on and may initiate in the spring is a mediation project. The program will fo- cus on mediation and other alternatives to litigation, and will be run with the help of one of the nation's leading opponents of mediation, Judge Jack Etheridge. Judge Etheridge, a recent appointee to the Emory faculty, has long advocated that courts provide various alternatives to the litigation process, especially for small claims. The project will be modeled after a program at Harvard Law School that gives students the chance to mediate dis- putes brought before a small claims court in Boston. Howett plans to begin the pro- ject on Emory campus by having law stu- dents mediate disputes for university cli- ents. Howett also has plans to include pre- law students in several of these projects. "Our main function will always be to pro- vide high quality legal services for Emory students," she said. i'We are receiving part of each student's activity fee to do that, and as long as we are receiving mon- ey, this service will be our primary func- tion. But there are other areas of 'legal aid' that attorneys must become involved with, and these projects are only a begin- ning. Most of the Emory law students volunteering in Legal Services will even- tually work in a practice which is not legal-services oriented. It is my hope that students who are interested in this area, however, will be exposed to the problems by working directly with Legal Services lawyers. ln this way, students graduating from Emory will continue to work for solutions to community problems, per- haps on a pro bono basis." David Bedingfield '3'?k'T YZ5 ,X 3 i S.: . Q 1 fgw u -is ,xx MYR . If rg. . 1 ,A l ji, ti' yd Y "-s.. fv -,tilt -1 f V Na WN KW:-vw A MX un A - ,........ ...-... V' ,- 4 Q -- X K V, ff 1Lvxfffgi-W+w4.Qw.v.,.NwNw...wN...w,.... 13-nggnafsazrrsxefgl "" f 1--1-'IW-w ------ 'ln Kolb Vincent Law SchooIf75 A Day In The Life D Sally Mowery Doctor Of Philosophy Candidate The Graduate School of Arts and Sci- ences offers the Master of Arts degree, the Master of Science, the Master of General Studies, and the Doctor of Philosophy. ln addition, the Master of Education, the Mas- ter of Librarianship, and the Master of Arts in Teaching are offered. Two diploma pro- grams for advanced study are offered, the Diploma for Advanced Study in Teaching and the Diploma for Advanced Study in Li- brarianship. In all, the school offers the mas- ter's degree in 24 departments and divisions and the Ph.D. in 22. Two graduate students await their results on the com- puter in the Chemistry building. Opposite: Psychology is another department that offers advanced degrees. Rats are usually part of the curricu- lum for experimental and behavioral psychology 76fGraduate School Of Arts And Sciences 7:15 7:30 7:45 8:15 8:50 9:40 10:00 10:30 10:45 12:50 Wake up time. Send son off to school. Leave for Emory and hit traffic. Arrive at Emory and prepare to teach an 8:15 class. Teach class to Emory students on study readings. Class over. Leave Emory and go to son's school. Teach study skills to sixth grade. Teach the class. Class over. Back to Emory. Spend time in the curriculum li- brary at Fishburne, reading or writing doctoral qualifying pa- pers, all the while drinking coffee. Head towards the gym to have Karate class which she is audit- ing. Spend time doing blocks, kicks, and stretching exercises which she particularly likes. 3:00 4:00 4:45 5:45 6:30 7:15 7:30 9:15 9:30 11:00 eat lunch drink more coffee and wait for son to get home. Son comes home from school. Pre- pares his snack and send him off to rehearsal. Carpools kids to rehearsal. Takes a much deserved nap. Showers and has another cup of coffee. Son gets home. Run to MacDon- alds for dinner. Back at Emory to prepare to teach adult reading class offered by Evening at Emory. Teach the class. Leave Emory. Put son in bed. Son in bed. Has a glass of wine. Relaxes, answers phone calls. Time to watch the eleven o'clock news. Then time to call it a day. 2:30 - Karate class over. Goes home to Lynda Hamby I ,, gaquniw' . . .- V -, .fllffifi V .V :W . :g Gonzales if ' su- . sz- . pnmulf-I R X N-vb-bv ' ' 'xx ,, A -1-.. E I gzzfw-' f ,W ,W , :VA 1 4'7- v ,- ,L ff ' 4' M- ' . 1 M , , fy' 'rr' , gtk, 'inn 01.4 O' -1, ,fr .ffm v, 41 Graduate School Of Arts And Sciencesf77 The School Of Business Getting Ahead With An MBA ln these times of economic hardships, students are looking for a degree that will at least offer them a fair chance of a job. Many students are finding that a master's degree in business administration is their answer. MBA's are in great demand. Bu- sinesses are looking for bright executive prospects. The MBA program helps pre- pare students to perform well in a busi- ness environment. The MBA program at Emory is an ex- cellent program, designed to meet the needs of both the student and the busi- ness. Emory offers a fulltime, one year program that will lead to accreditation with a Masters of Business Administration degree. Students must take 58 semester hours which amounts to twenty different courses. During the first year, the student must take a core curriculum. There are thirteen different courses in the core cur- riculum, so that allows flexibility in the second year. The student thus is able to map out his own program of study. There is a possibility that the students can waive one or more of the core curriculum courses by placing out of them through examination. During the second year, stu- dents may choose to concentrate in ac- counting, management, finance, or mar- keting. Emory's undergraduate business pro- gram was established in 1919, with the graduate program following only in 1961. lt was one of the first sixteen graduate schools of business to be accredited with the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. Since then, the school has striven for a place among the highest ranking business graduate schools in the nation. Emory's strength lies in the relative smallness of its classes. The first year student can expect classes from 30 to 35 78fBusmess School people in size. The second year seminars, however, consist of as few as 8 to 12 students. The present enrollment of the MBA program is 210 students. The facul- ty of the business school is another strength. The faculty are easily accessible and this is quite important to many stu- dents. One special program offered by the Graduate Business School is the Execu- tive MBA program. This is a program of continuing education offered to emerging executives who wish to receive their mas- ters in preparation for moving up the executive ladder. lt is a 17 month, 20 course curriculum. Classes are held on Fridays and Saturdays every alternate week. The special part of the program is that students in the program continue with their present jobs. The program is offered to mid-position executives who have had 10 years of full time business experience and who have the potential to rise to a higher executive management position. All in all, the graduate students are very diverse in character - coming from North, South, East, West and from for- eign nations. They have different under- graduate degrees - 35070 have Liberal Arts, 2370 have MathfScience, 21070 have Economics, while only 15070 have Business. These figures are based on the MBA class of 1983. They attended such diverse colleges and universities as Cor- nell, Georgia, Darthmouth, Yale, Yonsei, and Emory. The success of the MBA pro- gram can be evidenced by the fact that past students have been hired by such companies a AT 8: T, IBM, Coca-Cola, Bendix Corporation, Citicorp, Southern Bell, and Hewlett Packard among others. Lynda l-lamby it Administration 2 lk ',:s 2 - v X Business Schoolf79 A Day In The Life 0 . Diana Spencer Second Year Nursing Student Diana Spencer is a second year nursing student. She really enjoys being a nursing student. She comes into contact with many different and interesting people - People who are having their first baby or recovering from a heart attack. She's see- ing people go through changes in their lives. She is in a position to help them through these changes and help them with their problems. ln this context, Diana enjoys being a second year student much more than a first year, because the first year was filled with only science classes. Now in second year, through her clinical experience, she is beginning to realize the fruits of her labor. Here is a typical day for a nursing stu- dent: 6:00 - Wake up and face an exciting day of nursing. Have to be at clinical by seven. 7:00-7:45 - Hear the morning report. The morning report is when the nurses from the night shift relate information to incoming nurses about their patients the night before. 8:00-10:00 - Busy with a multitude of work duties ranging from changing beds, giving baths, and administering morning medicine. 10:00-1:00 - Spends time by talking to 8OfNursing School doctors about the status of patients, talk- ing to patients and to their families. Also, have to do charting which is recording how the patients feel during the day, tak- ing their vital symptoms and recording the data, and making plans for the pa- tients' care during the upcoming day. Also, find time for lunch. 1:00-4:00 - Give patients their after- noon medicine. Then give report to in- coming nurses. Then time to return home. However, not everyday is clinical day. Whereas Wednesdays and Thursdays are spent in the hospital, classes are held Mondays and Tuesdays. A skills lab is held on Fridays. Mondays entail lectures on different diseases such as infant death syndrome and hypertension. There is a seminar in the afternoon where issues that effect nurses are discussed. On Tues- days, a two hour discussion group is held, The topic is a particular patient with a particular problem. All aspects of that patient are discussed as well as the dis- ease the patient has. On Tuesday after- noons, nurses attend an hour of either speakers or films relating to nursing or the nursing profession. On Fridays, skills lab is held. Nurses practice working with test tubes, oxygen masks, crutches, ban- dages, and CPR and other relevant areas. Lynda Hamby Cheryl Standard charts a patient's progress. Sara Shorr dons a gown before she attends to the infant. Opposite: Sonja Narr and Cheryl Standard show that pills aren't the only mediine. 2- Morris Morris Morrfi Nursing SchooIj81 Division Gt Allied Health Is There A P.A. In The House? What exactly is a PA Program? The Campus decided to take a closer look. PA stands for Physician Assistant, and the PA Program is the Physician Assistant Program. This program is just one of the aspects of the Division of Allied Health Professions. Well, just what are physician assistants and what do they do? As their name sug- gests, they assist physicians in dealing with patients. They gather information that is necessary for doctors to reach de- cisions for diagnoses. The PA also carries out the doctor's orders for the patient's care. The PA's main functions are taking patient health care histories, giving phys- ical examinations, presenting the data to the physician for diagnoses, performing some routine procedures, assisting a phy- sician with more complex tasks, and pro- viding patient instruction and counseling. The PA Program lasts for two years. During the first year, students take basic health sciences, during the second year, the students get firsthand clinical exper- ience. The program is a rigorous one, and the two years of studying are very de- manding. Each year, only forty students are admitted to the PA Program at Emory. The Program's chairman is Dr. Glenn Clark. ln order to be considered for the PA Program, a student must have taken at least sixty hours tsemesterl at an accredit- ed college or university. If a student does 82fAllied Health not have a batchelor's degree, he must send his ACT, SAT, GRE, or MCAT scores. Also at least one year of health care experience is required. Most PA stu- dents typically have a baccalaureate with premed emphasis and two of more years of health care experience. Once admitted, the student can expect to take anatomy, biochemistry, physiol- ogy, microbiology, and pharmacology, as well as other courses during his first year. The second year is the clinical phase. Students may choose to do their clinical practicum in Atlanta or Columbus, GA. Typically those who go to Columbus are concentrating on family practice. The clinical facilities in Atlanta include Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center, Grady Hospital and Emory Hospital. The facilities in Columbus are the Columbus Medical Center and Martin Army Hospi- tal. Once the students successfully com- plete the program and pass the National Certifying Examination for Primary Care Physician Assistants, they are certified by the National Commission for the Certifi- cation of Physician Assistants, Inc. It should be apparent by now that PA's serve some very useful functions and that the road towards certification is a long, rough one but with many rewards. We hope you have enjoyed taking a closer look at the PA Program at Emory. Lynda Hamby 'Ka r . ft- , ' s m 3 it 'rfiti -'A' LQ. '. f A it '3 - -. r f - - f s My if ii" "wwf 'if - , L A,,v : A .,.. - lg., -wj:fZig,,f,, f ' - r i,,s -W . ' . , . s,E' wry, f' 6 - ' l. f--- I ' 'f, z ., - f' gtk .ef . A-ifinift, Q ,Lf -T .j , E' 2 ', .p' by-- "f5ii T l ,f,..w-mans-"2 - ' "' sg, I 5+ , A ' 31 3-.VI A . Q, " J . f A Professions , , - x xx . YM W dl sl 'N ' fs 'E WN gs 53 fm: ,f r W' x H-6 Q NCD HZ JLJIJKKE - For A Lon Weekend Snowsham, Snowjob. Whatever name you use, the snow- storm of '83 wasn't quite what we ex- pected. Weather bulletins solemnly told us to be prepared and to remember what happened last year with the '82 snowjam. Well, Atlantans didn't forget! Mayor An- drew Young evacuated the city early on, and the bars filled up as grocery shelves emptied. Trays began disappearing from Cox and Dooley's, and we tuned in to radiodisappearing from Cox and Doo- ley's, and we tuned in to radio disappear- ing from Cox and Dooley's, and we tuned in to radio and TV for the inevitable can- cellation of classes on Friday. lt was only the first weekend after classes started for the semester so there wasn't much work to do. ln fact, there really wasn't much to the snowdays ex- cept gray dreariness and cold mush and ice. lt snowed again on Feb. 5, but it didn't last long as the later blizzard that ravaged the country bypassed us. l,- fliJLfYl,,V belwaed, Vincent 84fSnow ".,,.f"' wpunudv-nun .-.-p---1.---.-o-v-1 Garter 9 as i fi SNQW DMZ L , -4- 1 I , 1-1. .. .,f4qM'd-Q ,K ,5 ,,.,,5: In il I f N Vincent 8. 7.1 E., is fn .- ' " , ,' X VW . 7' 'A - Q' C N 'i. . . -1' n -fxS1,- Axxzf 'QF: -m ' -Q 4-Q . :A N - gx 51 tg 'MM Q. 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Alors Etudiez A Paris Pendant L'etE Directing the Emory Summer Study Program in Paris with other members of the French faculty has certainly been a memorable experience. Discussion with students that have participated in our pro- gram has reinforced my belief that our program is, indeed, a special one. For six weeks, students live in private homes with French families accustomed to welcoming American guests or in a student boarding house with an Emory faculty member in ' ' W F rw i residence, according to their choice. The curriculum, housing arrangements and ex- cursions are designed to ensure progress E in language proficiency and literary ap- .,, preciation and to increase understanding 'N of France and French culture. Both the Emory and non-Emory students with sum- mer transient status who join the program f soon find out that Paris and the trips to ? wh, , 1 the Loire Valley, Chartres, Fountaineb- 1 leau, Versailles, Rheims, and Giverny, the home of Claude Monet, offer unique op- portunities to explore the richness of 5 f 12, French life. Of course, the fact that stu- dents can earn eight semester hours of 1 . 5. f 1 course credit is another attraction of the ag -1 program. Perhaps, more importantly, stu- ' dents grow as individuals as they broaden , f, their understanding of the human condi- tion - a cornerstone of a humanities edu- cation. Professeur Carol Herron . .f,- ' 'W' I, SL 88fFrance Summer Abroad M, A , 1 gigs -me 5 f I- SN i,,..,.t 5 i I P X is X K -.'1 e W ,sw M,v4mwziuwuMfww-M410-I di w France Summer Abroad 189 E716 Jlflcmvry Of Hobby jones o what are these pictures of a little Scottish village doing in an Emory yearbook? This little Scottish village is St. Andrews in Fife, Scotland where four stu- dents are sent on an exchange scholar- ship - The Robert T. Jones Memorial Scholarship - for a year of study. lt is also the home of four St. Andrews' schol- ars who spend their year at Emory. St. Andrews has special significance to Emory through Robert T. lBobbyl Jones, a world renowned golfer and prominent Atlanta lawyer. Alistair Cooke writes: was born in Atlanta in 1902, and died there in his seventieth year. His father was an Atlanta lawyer. At six, a friend of the family made a present to young Bob of a cut-down old iron club, with which he subsequently began to chip and putt on a rough lawn. He was too shy to take les- sons, but he was a natural mimic, and having noticed at a tender age that Hsome people play better than others," he be- gan to imitate the lazy swing of the club professional, an immigrant Scot of much wisdom and few words. From there until he had no more worlds to conquer and retired from com- petitive golf, his story is one of the clas- sics of sporty literature. The 192O,s were his golden time. He was not only the best player in the world, probably the best there had ever been, but by all odds the most attractive sports hero of his day. On both sides of the Atlantic, he was idolized and by people who knew no golf, but his God-given combination of flashing good looks, wry humor, and unflagging mo- desty. He became, and remained 'till the day of his death, the First Gentleman of Golf. But more so than other people, golfers tend to forget that he never was a profes- Photos by McEachern 901A Little Scottish Village A Zifflf: Semi if sional, he was, in truth, a weekend golfer, and that he made a successful life as a family man, an engineer, a student of English literature, and a lawyer. On the British and American tours today, they talk of the newcomers in their middle to late twenties as "the kids," but Jones was only 28 when he performed the still une- qualled feat of winning in one year the British and American Open champion- ships of both countries. There was no- where else to go. So he retired into his law practice and the nursing and fashion- ing of the Augusta National course. The Bobby Jones memorial trust had been set up by Jones' friends as "a living memorial in the hearts and minds of the young to forge a permanent link be- tween Emory University, of which Mr. Jones was an alumnus, and the university at St. Andrews which stands in the burgh for which he developed a special affec- tion and of which he was granted the freedom," The scholarship is for one year of fully paid education and living ex- penses at both universities for the eight participants known as the Bobby Jones Scholars. 'H 4" ,. ,a 72: 5, ficfzi ' A fi Q ' ' :Fl 5 T 4 V' 1 T ... 'j g E 'I ' ' ' .Lif- , Y-li 1 F' .. gg...-. 1 . .y , Q- . :........ T. i.. A- L", -rs r-. ' I 'fr .if e 5 SL-.- Q L 'F' . '. 5 f E L. 5 l 'GA -.... ',... . . Eu: , W1 Zlr +5 sg::,x,-,- F as 11-I ir.. at . l l Village F ' Y .. Y, I - 1: ,-,Q - X"""' ' - I x H' s, 5' 5, Q. E ?"'1- r. . M Q., r Y A Little Scottish Village f 91 A L7 fle Seeffislz Village ,4 View 9mm St. Andrews o this pair of eyes accustomed to the ubiquitous newness of Atlanta and Emory where things are carried out on a grandi- ose scale, St. Andrews is quaint yet bub- bling with living history. Founded in 1412, St. Andrews Univeristy is the ol- dest in Scotland. Many of the buildings date from the Middle Agesg consequent- ly, the university is well dispersed within the town such that often a building owned by the school is often indistinguishable from a house belonging to a townsman which stands beside it. Although this is true, the town's four cobblestoned streets and high-gabled sandstone houses cover about the same area as Emory's campus. The university is comprised of St. Salva- tor's College l1450l, St. Leonard's Col- lege f1542l, and the University Library, founded by James Vl in 1612. University College f1881l in Dundee, Angus was af- filiated with the University of St. Andrews in 1897 and in 1954, as Queen's College, joined with the Univeristy Advanced Medical School and Dental School. There are faculties of arts, sciences, and divin- ity. Enrollment is about 3200. St, Andrews. The city, royal burgh, uni- versity town, international golfing center, and former fishing port of the county of Fife, Scotland is situated on a bay of the North Sea. lt was once the ecclesiastical capital of Scotland: its religious traditions began in the sixth century with the found- ing of a Celtic ecclesiastical settlement. By the eighth century, there was a new church dedicated to St. Andrew who had been adopted as the patron saint of Scot- land. Relics of St. Andrew, believed to have been brought to the site during the middle of the eighth century, acquired such celebrity that the community be- came known as St. Andrews. The town became a bishopric in 908, in the twelfth century it became the most important one in Scotland. lt was elevated to an archbishopric in 1472. 92fA Little Scottish Village -wi, As Scotland's ecclesiastical capital, St. Andrews was much affected by the Refor- mation. The cathedral and priory fthe lar- gest one in Scotland when it was conse- crated in 1318l fell into ruins, and the town gradually degenerated into a squal- id village where the streets were "filled with dunghills, and were extremely nois- some, especially on account of the her- ring guts exposed on them." St. Andrews also almost lost its university to the more prosperous city of Perth, but conditions later improved especially under the lead- ership of Provost Playfair f184O-18611 who revitalized the town, restoring its reputation as a university center and holi- day and golf resort. The Royal and Ancient Club, the ulti- mate authority in the golfing world, was founded in 17543 some believe that golfers had been active as early as the fifteenth century. There are four main golf courses, of which the most famous and internationally renowned is the Old Course. Edward McEachern Bobby Jones Scholar Emory College 7. ,mm Lw.axn4:' ' A-,Qi f fp," .W Y .. , , - ... , ,,...1 ., - - . , ,,.,.,,-.N , ,M,.,.,v-.w:..-1' W"""' ' .nv Photos by McEachern -.., - 54 'x A Little Scottish Village! 93 flour llonor um, magna 131' Bumma 44 rf Emory's Honors program Emory's Honors Program offers students who excell in their studies an exciting chal- lenge to do an indepth study in a chosen area. Nearly every undergraduate depart- ment offers an honors program. Students are eligible for the program if they have maintained a 3.5 grade point average after three years of college work. Exceptions to this average can be made if the student is recommended by a certain department. This recommendation must be approved by the Honors Committee. Students in the Honors program take a graduate course or seminar. They are re- quired to complete a thesis which will be the equivalent of a B.A. or B.S. thesis. Also, they are enrolled in a supervised reading course or perhaps another Special Honors 94 f The Honors Program course. These requirements for successfully completing the Honors program vary from department to department. All entail an in- depth study of the student's chosen field of concentration. Credit for the Honors course and graduate work count towards fulfillment of the major although the Honors Program usually increases the major requirements by about four semester hours. Upon successful completion of Honors Program, an exam is administered to the student that covers the work done in the program. The exam can be written or oral, sometimes both. A group of examiners, one of which is outside of the student's chosen department, test the student and decide which degree the student deserves. The stu- dent may graduate Cum Laude fwith Hon- orsl, Magna Cum Laude lwith High Honorsl, or Summa Cum Laude fwith Highest Hon- r 7ZW .We . .. uf -, nw. 7 r. ff? . r.,f .e.2 rZ4ZZTmfS orsl. This degree is then printed in the com- mencement program which should delight the student and parents. The degree is also placed on the diploma which makes it suit- able for framing. Those who graduate Summa Cum Laude have successfully completed the program and written a thesis that could be read orally to other experts in the field. Those that graduate Magna Cum Laude have excelled enough that their thesis is suitable for pub- are dis- lishing. At any rate, these thesis played at Woodruff Library for the public to scrutinize. Such a program that offers this prestige is a suitable goal for all students to strive for. - Lynda Hamby lllaioritis lfnergonfs 1-lad llt Majoritis Emory students have many common experiences - waiting in long dropfadd lines, eating horrible Cox Hall food, suf- fering through Health Education. An- other common experience is deciding upon a major. At the end of their sopho- more year, Emory students declare their major. This major represents the field of study that the students will concentrate on during their years of study. Most stu- dents choose the field that they are most interested in, however, there are some who have career opportunities foremost in their minds. Lucky is the student who finds a major in a field that interests and compels him and also provides ample ca- reer opportunities. Though the decision is quite momen- tous, the process of declaring a major is really simple. After much deliberation, the student goes to the College Office located in White Hall to fill out a form declaring hisfher major. The College Of- fice then sends the student's transcript to the appropriate department of the field chosen. The department assigns the stu- dent an advisor. That is the entire pro- cess. If the student should decide that his declared major is not suitable for him, he may change his major. This is no major ordeal. The process is quite simple also. The student goes back to the College Office and repeats the same procedure again. - Lynda Hamby Ten of the Most Popular Majors Five Least Popular Majors Major Total No. Listed Majors Total No. Listed Classics 0 Psychology 40 1 Medieval f Renissance Chemistry 268 Studies O Political Science 257 Romance Languages O Biology 216 French Studies 1 Economics 184 EngIishfClassics 1 History 142 English 139 Total Number of Majors Listed - 2,237 Mathg Computer Science 63 Total Number of graduating Seniors - Philosophy 58 697 French 39 Students With More Than One Major - 348 Graduating Seniors with Two Majors - 102 With Three Majors - 1 - Source College Office for Spring 1982 Majoritisf95 96fProfessor Jimmy Carter I-Iere's Jimmy There were many new professors at Emory this year, and each is a great asset to the university. However, one new professor caused students to prepare questions before class, and change their routes to class. This professor was always escoted to class, not only by the six or eight secret service men, but also by the constant clicking of cameras. This professor was President Jimmy Carter, and this university may never be the same. How often have students gotten up early for an 8:30 Thursday class? This was no ordinary Thursday, it was the day of Cart- er's first lecutre. The students in the class had to go early to get a seat and to get checked off a list, no guests auditors were allowed. Outside the door all of the network news stations were present. They were crowded in the tiny hallway outside White Hall 112, jockeying for position, and trip- ping over all the electrical cords. My room- mate had to fight through the cameramen and reporters to get to her class, which was in the room next door. She weaved her way around bodies, cameras and lights and finally burst into the classroom 10 minutes late. She was relieved to find that her professor was also trapped on the other side, he ar- rived 5 minutes after she did. Inside the class where Carter lectured, he provided students with an excellent oppor- tunity to ask questions and get first hand information about world personalities and world events. John Rappaport, in his editori- al in the Wheel, described how he wanted to ask Carter what he thought of the Braves chances. However, at the last minute he thought the best of it and asked about the Middle East instead. Somehow, Carter just wasn't the average professor. Another stu- dent told me how he dressed in traditional Arab dress for his Mid East History class, when Carter lectured. He was quite proud of himself for asking some very pointed ques- tions. "How often can you match wits with a president?" Carter also helped make Emory a house- hold word. Gary Trudeau mentioned Emory in Doonesbury, as the only place where they found a Black Republican. And we knew we had hit the big time when the National En- quirer misquoted our students. Well, by now some of the novelty has worn off. The press doesn't come to campus every time Carter appears. People are rath- er used to seeing the secret service wander- ing around. On the other hand, though, it really is still very exciting to have the Presi- dent come and lecture. My excitement has been mounting ever since l found out that he's coming to lecture in my history class. Will wonders never cease? - Lynne Harwell 'Q Morris Morris 41 J' .' zzz- W ,' I 1 I 4 Ur b l 5 f ' '. J 1' ., .1 Lqixf'--T '-L? I+ " 'Tiff ' 'C V- 4 , , , . -. , , 1 ., A gg , -J, wg, ., , , A , 7 ' 1+ V X v ,ms lj, W' .4 V- ew, 'CL nv 'fl - - ,G ,,j wt" , -"' 5 ,16.',7a4:w 1 "' , , ?F' ,.f'T 'Pl , qi, , Qt, 19? -' f , f - 9' .' ff' '- ,p"','f' ,- F -47""" ' - I -'fl :QF ' '-fE ".W":'f31i 'N 1 . ' 1. 5 i,"S'5ff37' rf .: fr 'ff 49 ' ff 'SV - , 1 ffj 1 Qt' 1' 3, 5 5 -X. ., vi . ,., z,vafM F'-1 ,, . P 5'C'i1i.'w-' NE? 3' 4 1- L mg , W 4 Q -V ., f"" M , ix .A .V w I' -1 '-' 5: fkilssngfi e.:ir27f'?1 ' "' ' , 3 ' P' i A ., ,,, MW- , kg - ell ' .- .7 , fx " 1 3 . . 'I gif ' Y' I . , FV . ' J' ,, Q , A , V---H A, , r 4 J ,E o ,. v , f A If p W fig ,.--M-mmf-,r-:-gziniif v .M ' .gvflir if g 1' Q ll' Q. , ., 'U' ,4-rx , 1 N 'Q 6? r tv "' . ' 1 X. ' -, .-159, Q 5. ' m 1 0 QQ? Q 1 'V is M? 12 v -J' iff' ' i O9 Vincent Peacock Professor Jimmy Carterf97 Sfebruary 23, 7982 Heritage Week ?0rmal My bones rattle with delight as I remember this wondrous occasion - the Heritage Week Formal. Lee Castle and the .limmy Dorsey Band played many of my favorites. My bones were warmed with the pleasure of seeing so many students partaking of the festivities. My hot goes off to those who made this night so special and established this very, very. special tradition. April I5 On this warm Spring day, Pollard Turman, Emory trustee emeritus, broke the ground for the new housing Complex named after him. I am proud to see that the dream of getting adequate student housing is finally being realized. April 21 I trembled with excitement as National attention focused on Emory when reporters, administrators. faculty. and students gathered in the Woodruff Medical Center Administration Building to hear President Carter accept the position of University Distinguished Professor. Indeed Emory has acquired a professor of national and international prominence. April 22 Emory University, along with hundreds of other campuses nationwide, recognized the threat of nuclear arms on Ground Zero Day this Thursday. The Emory Waging Peace Committee set up information tables, sent over a thousand petitions to various Congressmen and Senators, sponsored speakers, and ended the day with a peace vigiL where about one hundred students marched from the AMUC to the Quad with candles and -gathered for a short but memorable service. May 75 I was pleased to see my friends on the first annual May Day Play Day. Good work, Volunteer Emory and Circle K1 I seriously considered personally volunteering for the wet sponge toss, but decided that it is a bit too late for me to "cleanse the soul " ,May I6 DooIey's Frolics. My week of festivities and frolics began as I made my first appearance of the spring at the EBS Musical Showcase in the LongstreetfMeans courtyard. My escorts served me well as I limped through the crowd of students. This was just the first of my appearances. I will attend several other events in the next few days. May I9 I made my grandest entrance on this day when I arrived by helicopter on the Upper Field at the Dooley 's Week Concert sponsored by IFC and Panhellenic. The punk and new wave music played by the bands was a little jarring for even my hard-of-hearing ears, however, I found the bands' unusual and colorful outfits and their energetic on-stage shenanigans to be curiously interesting. I was happiest of all to see the Committee for Waging Peace members releasing the black balloons, as they were trying to heighten our campus awareness of the dangers of nuclear war and fallout. This symbolic event and the concert provided a healthy contrast to each other, I hope to see more occasions in the future where students can relax and have fun, yet still show concern for pertinent world issues. .May 27 I made my longest fand HO TTESTO appearance on this day, as my weary bones arduously made their annual journey down fraternity row. The theme this year was "Comic Strips," and the judges had a tough decision to make as many fraternities performed creatively. Congratulations to the winner - Sigma Nu, Their rendition of 'Peanuts" was delightful. An event such as this always cheers me, for I firmly believe in frolicking as well as studying during Emory's spring quarter. june 2 On this day, over 23419 students, faculty, and administrators gathered in one of Emory's biggest celebrations, to TOAST A WA Y one of Emory's great traditions - WONDERFUL WEDNESDA Y. In its I8 year existence, I have grown attached to this wonderful tradition, but I am sure that in its passing, many more traditions will arise. September I5 I would like to extend a personal welcome and I would like to thank Distinguished Professor Carter for opening our "Year of Human Rights." Although presidents may come and presidents may go, I'm glad that this president has come to Emory. 0 October 20 Over D0 students met with Dean Minter in a townhall meeting sponsored by the College Council to discuss the lack of a reading period. As a result of this meeting, a proposal for a reading period was brought to a faculty vote. Although this proposal failed, the spirited activism of concerned students succeeded in achieving a reading period for later semesters. My bones delight in memory of this exemplary display of spirit and unity. October 37 On the final night of Greek Week, I made a long visit to the Omni for the first annual campus-wide Halloween Costume Ball. I was amazed at the huge diverse crowd, the student body has certainly grown in the past 50 - years. I was proud that university and college organizations such as UCB and IFC and Panhellenic Council could unite to put on such a large-scale party for the benefit of the whole campus, I especially enjoyed celebrating my time as Emory's grandest ghost with the students. My escorts and I danced. I danced as best as my frail bones would allow that I overtaxed myself in my excitement. I need a long rest before I can appear again in my week of Frolics this spring. November li I am overwhelmed to hear that the campaign for Emory reached the 5160 million goal a year and a half early. The support of alumni and friends will always be crucial to continued excellence at Emory. December 5 Twas beautiful music to mine ears: I was overjoyed with the splendid singing of the Glee Club and Chorale. This year, as in the past, there were so many faces. Graduates of classes from years ago, recent graduates, current students, administrators, friends of Emory, faculty - it looked as if the entire Emory community was present. It's good that so many people came to share this rich university tradition. january 20 Snow .lam '83 was a wonderful surprise. Dean Fox, it was great to see you once again lending your services to Cox Hall Thanks also to the Residence Life staffers who helped out. The comraderie that developed throughout the campus in the bitter cold warmed my heart. Dooley's Dairyf103 '7 1 wi 3" .:'f'..f':f'2f1gi?n -xi Y. .f, if-fi. ,-11 1' Nz, ,1 w:,',wh ,Il ,Wi .V Z.:HE,,i,A1An,W,!J'3Mi?d 0' 4 - -ai ff -.. N "' LS , , WS?Z"f4wf'+'?5',f3V I -xmaumw-W Sp It H V ,,., W-, 14,1 -Q. .QA f Y Vincent 104fSports xx, ' 3 I N. Nik .J , -.xr - I . - -, f.. ' ff' 'lz'.. V Sport sf105 as-are rr Runner." Dawn Disher was the only sen- ior on the team. Overcoming an extreme- ly painful calf injury, Disher, "Most De- termined Runner," was instrumental in the regional championships. Junior Anne Evans and sophomore Ruda Meskauskas, both displayed steady improvement and admirable effort and were valuable as- sets. Esther Silver, who last year as a freshman was Emoryls number one run- Cross Country The 1982 cross country season clearly displayed that the quality of competitive racing here is increasing at a rapid and promising rate. For the first time in Emory's history, the men's team defeated such cross country powers as Vanderbilt, Georgia, and Davidson who regularly re- cruit scholarship athletes. The women racers also exhibited a quantum leap over past seasons. At the end of the season, their progress and determination was re- warded with an impressive third place finish in the regional meet. The men's team performed their most imposing exhibition at the Davidson Invi- tational in North Carolina where the Ea- gles placed third out of ten highly com- petitive teams. Placing tenth overall, freshman Jeff Klein ran a time of 26:18 for the 5.1 mile course. Juniors Jay Gotlesman and Bill Mackey followed close behind, finishing with times of 26:23 and 26:55 respectively. Inconsistency however plagued the Ea- gles in some of their bigger meets. The men's team was disappointed with both their sixth place finish in the state cham- pionship and their eighth place finish in the regional championship. Eight runners on the twentyone mem- ber squad earned letters during the sea- son. Providing a fine example as a fierce and scrappy competitor, Bill Mackey led the team as captain. The encouragement and support that Mackey rendered to his teammates proved invaluable, and he was awarded as the "Most Valuable Runner." The recipient of the "Team Leader" plaque was Jeff Galin. During the middle of the season, Galin who is a senior emerged as Emory's top racer. Sharing the title of "Most Valuable" with Mackey, Jay Gottesman was a devoted and steady runner who set high goals that he was determined to achieve. After an outstand- ing cross country season, Gottesman went on to break Emory's marathon re- cord with a time of 2:34:20 Despite un- fortunate midseason health problems, ju- nior Jeff Wingate seemed to always come through in crucial races. Wingate, "the "Most Determined Runner," was the sta- 106 Cross Country bilizing force for the team, both emotion- ally and physically. Sophomore Grant McAllister began the season as the eighth or ninth runner, but his incredible and admirable persistence elicited advance- ment to the number four position. Hard working, yet witty and easygoing, McAl- lister was awarded as 'iMost Improved." Sophomore John Hayes and freshman Jeff Klein lwho Coach Gerald Lowery described as the Hfreshman sensationl both revealed awesome capabilities and spectacular promise, but injuries prevent- ed both athletes from reaching their full potential. Affectionately labeled "Team Pest," freshman Andrew Allden enthusi- astically supplied the team with vital mor- al support and promising athletic ability. Other important contributors to the team were Mitchell Clair, Ed Crawford, Steve Fine, Dan Huntington, Jeff I. Klein, Willie Mondzac, Raleigh Rogers, Randy O'Neal, David Solomon, Kurt Staven, Brian Vroon, Scott White l"Most lm- proved"l, and Don Williams. The vvomen's team ended the season with a peak performance at the regional meet, Racing against several extremely competitive schools, the Eagles drew upon team effort to achieve their com- mendable third place finish. Earlier in the season, the women racers placed third in the state championships, and at the mid- season Berry Invitation, they finished sec- ond. ln this 5000 meter race, junior Deb- bie Terry led the Eagles with a time of 20:09. Freshman Leslie Mayer and soph- omore Jeanne Hoffman finished 20:30 and 20:52 respectively. Eight women also qualified as letter earners. Debbie Terry, serving as captain for the second year in a row, was award- ed the "Team Leader" plaque. Terry is a smart tough runner who organized the team through moral support and promo- tion of team communivation. Co-captain Jeanne Hoffman, who Coach Lowery de- scribed as the "rock" of the team, fin- ished thirteenth in the state champion- ships. Hoffman placed team needs and performance before her own, and she was recognized as the "Most Valuable 4 ,,V'. ,ma W4 ,-sn... .' - A 'fyf-713. , ' ., 1, . .r' Frear ner, was very competitive for the Eagles. Leslie Mayer strengtheded the team as a knowledgeable and experienced racer, and her natural athletic ability deemed her lalong with Hoffmanl the title of "Most Valuable." Mayer and the "Most Improved Runner," Karen Ogle, were the only freshmen on the squad. After overcoming health problems that restrict- placed eighth in the regional champions ships. Dodie Goodyear, Karen Murray, Carol Ann Coleman, and Andrea England also were important members of the team. Dr. Taffy Martin and Bill Walsh were indis- pensable as assistants coaches, and Ran- dy Prunty, Jeff Jefferson, and John Bar- bour aided the team as coaching assis- Coach Lowery described both teams, men and women team members as " fine individuals a credit to Emory," and his athletes feel the same towards him. Senior Jeff Galin wrote that if it had not been for Coach Lowery, " I would not have had the opportunity to accomplish all that I have." ed her for most of the season, Ogle tants and knowledgeable advisors. Karen Ogle . lil I1 I- i l'a ' "fi i'1e5.fsfi" i,,- l 5 - atrt . l ,. .P ' . A vm . .W iv iz. 'Q 'snqt 1 08 l aan . . ' ,. : '- Q .ff :gn wk H' , -Q k g I k,j,,i, S 1 -rim. g f' ' ' Y 5 l V is ., H S'La,.e5g,.," iw. -bl Q N . afff "" ff . 'A .ff af-lf' . . . Psqiguii s.?'5.w!-, -.1 nah - ' ' . 5 'wr-N1 fl' V ' A, 3. . . Hkff' i f ' t N-,a-.rzr-fi, 'Q Qi f. v Q -"V 'ws -' llgfifif-35? ' ' egg'-935-x i N Oyman 1982 Cross Country Team Roster . 2 if Andrew Allden Mitchell Clair Frear Edward C. Crawford Dan Steve Fine Jeff Galin Jay Gottesman John Mosely Hayes Huntington Jeff Ira Klein Jeff Todd Klein Bill Mackey Grant McAllister Willie Mondzac Raleigh Rogers Randy O'Neal David Solomon Kurt Staven Bryan Vroon Scott M, White Donald Williams Jeff Wingate Carol Ann Coleman Dawn Disher Andrea England Anne Evans Dodie Goodyear Jeanne Hoffman Leslie Mayer Ruta Meskauskas Karen Ogle Esther Silver Deborah Terry Cross Countryf 107 C ,AV4 ..v,,'J.,,,4 .3 f' wa'-.4 - La-crosse 4.- 52351 1 'fwllff A " 1983 Lacrosse Team Roster 108f Lacrosse Scott Roam Mark Asbury Larry Rosen Dave Needle Jeff Padua Neil Smith Mark Nolan Dave Reemer Jeff Brodie Howard Green Mike Bloom Jeff Nelson Michael Salamar Ricky Reider Rich Steinberg Stewart Neft Bob Jones Phil Westie Jeff McCartney Paul Lee Marc Fernandez Ken Tepper ! ' sg". . ,.a"I . -. 41.4 . 9 .vV. :V I ft - -V.. 5 44- .' ax L. -Q. u :A 35-0 j ,fi 5' T , .h 4, .., . F. , " .g . 1- ' -,' ' , iq. ,., - X :AV vw .- g-. Jw i . f - f ,4 "H at f- ': ,' . , -fs-'fs - ', I 'r. , - , " ' ,, r ,f ,ma ' ,,- f 1 ..' -, ' ln. - .Q 5 : - . . ' . nl!-T M , ,nl:'9'5- Sify' V57 , , , . 4 ,. - - i - . uv ' -" -.QW ff M. ,.. rn. . hi -,. -, .V , ,,-,. J' ,:. - ,.-.- .. N . ,. qw, V. ,. ,-.,5kM-.V,i- . . i -'snr - "We're improving quickly, and we're definitely going to be com- petitive this season. Mark Asbury .""-S 1 4-4 "rx - 'f J .,. - .Q ,vp A. Aw an .2 . ' 1 ar 1 ,1--' Ju. Jv- , , 'C 01 up 4. l0'w. 1. -.N - --an-ul 4? , -I Q-.. gal' wp- ' 'x.1, --..,L: -vs,-.,.-A. ..- , -50 . .-.-.v-f -, r K --,- 4.1 1. -z J 'L ,A--uv-f S .. 'V-.ll .1 , - i'ZrA..A Vx, u v if -. o 'I f"'7 , ju-Uln..L': gf E ' xl A -4, -- -2, it I . ' an. , H+-. -. P., 1 my-undpvy .""9'i 'I . ,.v-r V'., -1' '!51.?'.,. -.- -4.-,1 it , Tn. 'l n-.Aly -lunflip I K is ,-L 92,57-,J '-' -3 4-:-f...3,qf- 5 L- -' ,- ,,.'w,- ' --pe Amin of .'f,f.x1- - Ir "'f,-'..--.1 a' -5- A'-.sv 4-5.1 4- I. .r .' '. ' -cr. 5, ,-'Z..Qf' Mf- '- ..: -J-' A s .44-J-A ' ' -T' A N . . , ,- .Q1 -Ln A W . P. - . ' ,A K A! -rn- x .. '-I 21 v - - -l'-, . Y Lacrossef109 Emory lVIen's Rugby Ch-lb The Emory men's rugby club, exhibiting their vast improvement and steadfast deter- mination, ended their 1982 fall season with an imposing 36-6 victory over the Atlanta rugby football club. ln a preseason scrim- mage, the squad had fallen to Atlanta 9-10, but driven by an insatiable lust for the fast- paced sport and transformed by hours of rugged training, Emory had achieved an awesome comeback. Commenting on this impressive turnaround, Captain Paul Don- nan enthusiastically reported, "We looked tough! We man-handeled them." Emory's most disappointing game howev- er was their 1O-21 loss to the University of Georgia in the Georgia Cup Championships. Having already tied Georgia Tech and tri- umphed over Auburn and Georgia South- ern, Emory entered the tournament in good standing. Although Georgia had previously defeated Tech and Southern, the Dogs had fallen prey to Auburn. The Emory team dominated the field in this championship game, yet their untimely errors made in several crucial tries cost them the game. The University of Georgia team thus advanced to Princeton where they re- presented the state of Georgia in the Eastern Rugby Union College Championships. Frus- trated and dismayed, Donnan described the game as " the worst type of loss, be- cause we had the potential to winf' Nevertheless, Emory's fine performance did not go unrecognized, the day after the Georgia championships, four Emory athe- letes were chosen to represent Georgia on the 25-man "all-star" roster. They are Don- 11OfMen's Rugby nan lscrumhalfl, Bill Brooks, lbackl, Leigh Finlayson lbackl, and Craig Wilkinson Hf8l. Other players who performed well through- out the season were seniors Barry Belmuth Kpropl and Michael Abbo lhookerl. By scor- ing five tries in the last two games of the season, junior Derrick Beare also proved exceptional. The 1982-1983 rugby club was coached by the infamous Louis Babinsky, and the team leaders were all juniors: Michael Cotter lpresidentl, Shannon Mudd ftreasurerl, Paul Donnan icaptain and match secretaryl, and Kenny Hagan fsocial chairmanl. Other mem- bers Not previously mentioned are Ralph Ierardi, Rick Crawford, John Behan, Eric Bender, Rick Gross, Don Faulbaum, Andy Donnan, Brock Magruder, Taegun Moon, Cortney Morgan, David Pardini, Andy Cole, Stefan Tigges, Thor Hessla, Martin Berman, Steve Kauf, Tom Wisnieff, Lars Granade, Steve Lazirou, Marc Abrams, Todd Krouner, Craig Bickley, Rob Weiss, Jeff Crowley, Kip Cox, John Oliver, John Noe- san, Don Fowler, Steve Crenshaw, Clark Smith, and Eddie Brock. Coach Babinsky was pleased with the fall season. "We were looking good towards the end," he commented, Hand we just need to gain confidence and learn not to be afraid of making mistakes." Babinsky also explained that the team's goal for the 1983 spring season was to qualify for the regionals in Princeton. Rugby is a strenuous sport and those par- ticipating are constantly subject to grueling workouts and much physical pain. Shannon Mudd however claims that the pain is all worthwhile because after difficult workouts, he often receives massages from sympathet- ic females. Some atheletes believe that rugby provides an excellent outlet from pressures of schoolwork while others admit they are lured by the traditional parties that follow each game. On a different level, Leigh Finlayson concedes that rugby had made him " a devout existentialist. l now know that l can do anything l put my mind to." Speaking for the entire squad, David Pardini explains: "My friends and I have achieved a true and meaningful attain- ment to the Godhead." Karen Ogle Wx- 1 1 , f Ng: 1 ,IN HUM X Q. Wit.-" " .wFl.r..v ' Xe, T 5 , I xg? ,, ,- f-.,. b at- . wr la- 1 il , .1 'I Q -' 9.1, Q A N . H! f j Q at , fl , S . ,. ' ff35l:S,x'5ksx,,L 'K N spa.-.'xP' V .X a i , K - ,X .tk .K x' 9,9 ' t' ,xxx ., . x1.1-gkgoiq. ...f ' 1 .r - 'Y , Sf 'K 55 f . V- xv:-11.3, e v' "'-, , N ,. gy 5 Li: fm I Kneeling: Marc Abrams, Steve Lazarou, Leigh Finlayson, David Pardini, Paul Donnan, Courtney Morgan, Hector Santiesteban, Standing: Ralph lerardi, Kenny Hagan, John Behan, Billy Brooks, Rob Weiss, Taegun Moon, Stefan Tigges, Shannon Mudd, Clark Smith. Men's Rugbyfl 11 Soccer The 1982 Emory University soccer team compiled a record of 11 wins, 5 losses, and 3 ties. The season produced two Emory records. Led by Junior goal- keeper David Smith, the Eagles shut out opponents on 7 occasions Iprevious re- cord was 6I. Another record was estab- lished when junior forward Derrick Beare scored his 19th goal in the last match of the season. Beare's 19-goal production eclipsed the longstanding record of Jeff Solem fone of two Emory graduates who played in the North American Soccer Leaguel. Beare, who is from Durban, South Africa and Smith, who is from Mi- ami Shores, Florida were voted Most Valuable Players by their teammates. While Beare and Smith were outstand- ing throughout the season, a number of players produced consistantly strong per- formances. Sophomore midfielder John- ny Stone, from Tucker, Georgia, played a significant role in the success of the team with his leadership to 5 goals and 7 as- sists. Other noteworthy performers were: Billy Sheppard, Dan Mannix, Mark Heil- brun, Brent Norris, and Hamish Taylor. During the season, Emory was runner- up in both the Emory Invitational and Georgia State Invitational Tournaments. The Final Intercollegiate Soccer Associ- ation of America poll listed Emory as number 2 in the South behind nationally ranked University of North Carolina - Greensboro, On several occasions throughout the season, Emory was either ranked in the top 20 nationally or re- ceived mention for the top 20 NCAA Divison Ill. While Emory is a member of the NCAA Division III, the 1982 schedule included 10 Division I schools as well as regionally andfor nationally ranked NCAA Division ll and NAIA teams. Dur- ing the 17 years that Dr. Tom Johnson has headed the soccer program, Emory has had only one losing season. 112fSoccer Collier .- .' ,rg 1 t Q . .ns ,N 2 xx '. '5':"1f .,,., -ful ff' 2,-sg -- 5,0 - ,-54.5, Jv- ::, , wAg,Q,NQrk ' - ' ' -.f , I - K Q 1 Q, 1 . A . A s ,Q- , - ,' 'rw 3:44 , . ' tif' Qfs,--, 'P .' s V , . ,X s x - . - - . I 1 .' ' ' V N 'A an N.. l - 1 -' s .K ' ' N, - A' - . ' . 9 -- n , , A 5 V , .f -'-'fig ,.f.',N F- mis 2 , 3.11. TJ.-"' .41 os.. ' J - .1 Lit 52... Collier 1...'L ow- 4,, 'I v ,fi +st- wr...-s Eyng- 4 ,, . ",',"'s.7' .v r I , ffl, a " Le- ggq .ggi C 1982 Soccer Team Roster Derrick Beare Haynes Brooke Harun Durudogan Tony Ferrara Chuck Hamilton Mark Heilbrun Deryk Jones Ted Madara Dan Mannix Jim McGean Brent Norris, Co-captain Chris O'Keefe Billy Sheppard David Smith Johnny Stone Hammish Taylor Woody Wood, Co-captain Max Wright Dr. Tom Johnson, Head Coach Steve Swaim, Assistant Coach ollier Collier Soccer! 1 13 l I l 1 "We didn't win a lot, but we had fun, because the team is really close. It's not a high pressure group." - Bridget Brennan l14fSwimming , Swimming ' .,.....-.5 H Q Y Xa xx 35X sig K 5 Q if ai R ' Q 3 ,,,. gl V In water, Larry Carahalios, Janet Groves, Scott Freeman, Bridget Brennan, Jeanne Liebman, Alan Rabb, Seated Stewart Brann, Mark Kassels, Kathy Per- menter, Mark Chaet, Tracy Kritchman, Wendy Goldberg, standing, Myles Wal' lace, Dan Zylanoff, Pat Solomon, Robert Weiss, Greg Bauer, Becky Taggett, Mag- gie Akers, Steve Cannon, not pictured, Allison Fitzgerald, Herb Dubrow, Curry Graham, Linda Marcusky, Ed Wilder, Coach Smyke. c..............uu.'.,,v " Vx. f k- fs: 2, 2 H , .,,,,-... -,,,.., ' K, wm- "k "A f .,,. ,,,.,,,l,,W..,. V , , 5 5 nd! 4' MII? "l"""s 7, 1.5! Q5L..4L,,1w, '. -dng1j,, f H32 iggf,?'f.z?'M 3' "L feta f e "f 1 -..- ., ' , jjj. x , X A' aff' " ' , i ' 7-,i Q. .. Ihr" '.w1','w,,43 ' .Q Q V1 4,1 .4 A ff. 'f , "3 W' ' 5 ., 'W v . Adm 'Q W.. ' a 44 N- i'1D..f1l.a'f t -sE?""7'Q an Q s . V "" , 4 uf: '- 1. AN. -'fs N- . C Q .N-.4 '. l ' -4' "HCI ' -f' I ."J -f , 41" ' , .1 yn,-j - sr 'lFlt X ...-A.:- WIS-Q - 'fix 4 , L 9:4 .1 'L-1:5 fx. Q Swimmingfl 15 Women's Rugby' Qub The Emory women's rugby club ended their 1982 fall season with a meritorious first place finish in the consolation divi- sion of the Ruggerfest Tournament in Athens, Georgia. The Eagles returned with a hardearned trophy and a respect- able 8:8 record that reflected their fine seasonal efforts. Team member Susan Nelson commented, "lt's been rough, but it's been fun." Club coordinator at the South Carolina State Tournament as being the highlight of their autumn exhibitions. Referring to the Eagles' victory over South Carolina and Atlanta, Moore exclaimed that the women ruggers had " played beauti- fully in the two elimination games." In the decisive finals however, the squad was confronted with the University of Georgia team. Despite a gallant team effort and an outstanding defensive game played by Patty Connell, the Eagles fell to the Dogs by the slim margin of a single try. Thus, Emory finished in second place. There were several individuals who made indispensable contributions to the women's seasonal success. The exper- iences and skill of veterans Kathy Man- ning fwing forwardl and Vickie Stevens Hf8l were invaluable, and until her unfor- tunate leg injury occurred, Kathy Schwock was an awesome power as cen- ter. According to Moore, rookies such as Connell, Melinda Hayes lpropi, Tracie LaSalle lwingl, and Lora Rand fwingl "picked up lon the gamel quickly" and through much progress and determina- tion proved themselves as gifted competi- tors. Other key participants were Karen Brack lcaptainl, Claudia Burgess, Robin Carney, Anna Lisa Colbert, Deanna Col- bert, Becky Copeland, Tara Darling, Eli- zabeth Gillespie, Ginger Greer, Cindy Grieves, Robin Grindle, Barbara Heyl, Margery Khaw, Mary Kuck, Cherry Ome- ga, Jan Peterson, Polly Price, Libby Prince, Pam Smith, and Christina Zierav. Moore, who also served as match sec- retary and resident cheerleader, admitted that the fact that the team could not re- coach greatly "hurt the team's cruit a morale." Expressing her desire for more college involvement, Moore also com- mented that rugby is a " new game to women and l'm sure most girls don't know much about it. There's more to it than just playing the game " For Moore and her fellow atheletes, the com- raderie that emerges from participation in the demanding sport are the most valu- able part of their rugby experience. Karen Ogle 116fWomen s Rugby S .e 'a.:,,, , Kugler 4 nf- ,iv . za . Aw, f . x .- 1 "ffm-, Bout -5 Vw "ls, -uw-f. -I w '1 3 ' i., al . , ' 1 I - U I - .A X . ew 1 ai 6.-'al 'G V: fin. . , - -. w A V -f m. -Q . H., -M - si ""' -f 4'53LTffL4 1 . 1 Q15 fir, Women's Rugbyf117 Track And Field 118fTrack And Field Portrait Of An Athlete Andres De La Cruz "My most memorable experience was during the Georgia Relays Invitational in Athens. I had the opportunity to see great athletes such as Herschel Walker. Competing with such top athletes helped me achieve my best time of the season. I have yet to reach my set goals, which is one of the reasons which I remain actively involved with the track program. Being part of the track team has helped me make strong friendships. I encourage people to participate in any sports pro- grams offered because it's a great exper- ience." Andres De La Cruz is a concerned and dedicated athlete who contributes im- mensely to the varsity track team. His college record time of 11.13 in the 100 meter run, places him as one of the best in this region of NCAA Division III. His goal is to make it to nationals with a qualifying time of 10.8. In addition, he participates in the 200 meter run and the 400 meter relay. This active participation earned him the Most Improved Athlete award for the 1982 season. Andres is a fine example of the dedica- tion of the track team members. lt is this kind of dedication that has led to the great success of the entire team. - Sllvlo Blanco -,...JL' -jj Howard :?!.'l1'.??'2"i! 59 - . ,ps , H ,li ff J , , 0 K Lge, f L H ,I J . ,vi 'fy Q 9, 1,1 Av , 1' , ,mw3eW, ,, , f , 1. . -I 5 , bil, 2 is I hhjgw - ,cgi H 1 14, inf, 4-if Af! ,V g I' y. . V " .H Y ,J ,V M V' AV . 1 4 llif' f 41'Qf,Uiti Y", 2 'f 3' ff A . i f ' fx? gl .f V ,M , 332,-, lj, .' ,Q ,, 'Z i 'Q R 1 fv lnlf' 'f ' 3 M- f' 1 A fri :fill l. if 4 "1l sr fmav C " ' ,Q In ,Z ,V T, ggpixigj 425,41 .,, 4, .1 '- 4" ' ,.,' , 4 ' r -v V- J- '14 T if ' Q ' ww 'aff l ' , ' r 443, 'J C 1 'X K: I -H 1, i Kleiman 'EVE' An., w,..s3,, ,eg . 53, V ,.. N .,n.-1-- - 'Ezine Sega- 1 5,o5gv:',J-smiym. - ' be .. is -f ,A-Q. .s ,.: .wif P13 Howard Center: Coach Lowry, Mark Kleinkopf, First Row: Bruce lrom, John Robitscher, Rob Golden, Raleigh Rogers, Chris Yandow, Silvio Blanco, Marc Engel, Second Row Andy Wakstein, Scott Kleiman, Andres De La Cruz, Neil Goulden, Jeff Samuels, Jeff Galin, Third Row: Asst. Coach Sobel, Mike DeVoney, Webster Owen, Turner Duffey, Pedro Malavet, Russ Bailey, Fourth Row: Jim Sanders, Lewis Trauffer, Brooks Barnes, John Mosely Hayes, Doug Wichman, Mitchell Clair, Grant McAllister, Toby Meek, Eric Norenberg. "After I graduate, my best memo- ries will be the times going home after a weekend meet. Everyone is tired, but happy knowing we've done our best. 'l'hat's the best part of being on the team." - Brooks Barnes Co-captain Track And Fieldf119 A Progregsj RQ-fobrt I - 120fGym a fi 1 .2- Av' A N""' jhhn N .. X Morris -.N 11. . 4 .Wm wa,- 3 Garter X ll xv: - .eff Y 0 -11-"1 CS"-Li-' ..-',, E -xx. 1, I. ,-Vw, 5 N .4 - K , , F '. .I ca -f Xl K I K . Q . V Garter R L 'QL 'S-X . - , ,, ,,4f.'fmN: :.f- Q- '-'M .-52 -,jfs-NE-' Gnfi "K"-AP' f ,L 49- W 51?-'f'f'Pfffsf'2'-r ,, -451 .--.Q 'Q ff-, ,ww-""'f'. - 4 A Q-4 - . '- -f I h A , ,,,. Y , V li' 'atmkfd 1 A Garter Gymf121 Just -Eg Fun 122fIndividual Sports Morris ..,-annul' v W Vlppent Z. A-iii-0' 7'4"F?x 5 rpg 9- f. Lv' ' ' "1 N, .w 4 s . ' ' 1 5 P , A Q. ,. . - 1..-R--LJ -Q-EA, 1 ' :- X. 4 ' :wx 1 s X ' . w - 1 1 'J 'X .. ,iw i 313 'F--il? -.2 1,1 , TTX 41 ' ,CZA-'51-P -- . .1--"""'.-.af 5 222 isa 2 . 1' . Sig .',. O . vm as . , , 'S .-. 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'gm ' - 3 - ',' -1. .. , 531 V vp-WI 4 mf' zfff. nf'-s,..-fn - -. -4-- -' 1 4: ...M-. 'lr-f 'ff Q2 . T ,.."' .a'..l L- -fl 1 .41,1i..- .2 - r'5'2-!f-- L1 W, 43-wan w+- ' -' ' " " 1 . ' 1 . E . voor -- 1 -1 eau Q40 Q n Q . .av .Q 'Y. .nn -QL ' , ..... , Intl ' I .. .... v .. 5 Garter Individual Sportsf123 -n .4 i Intramurals I l S i 1 I 'ETZZEWFTW ' ' L N 'mmm f' ' i , A K- is 5-e:siilsf-f'ff x- - . f wuz- sg. f:-:Q--C +:-.z :- O hx, 124fIntramuralpNV X Q Y- -ff. .xy gzgx. : if- ETQE Pig,-11' ,: igmggrq .i .. K .,,k-Nt. 1 W ' " mv. - - , V . ly-,Avi V,,, 1. ,Q ' 71 zkfwf' 1 il 4255 'I-"Z vu, in . Ai 135 , ,.,, fjxgivi '5v1"r"f?v-W2vm-- ' 'wfffffa rfbvf- .. K. I4 4- .. --,Mx ' "lf K" ,J 5 :F gy, lla, 443: 11 , 'fr'7?'i33'53j'?4"Vf r, I. . . " T+L- S l 7 -af' f' . r ' Wg A , , an . if 1 v F gg f ',-,f'i- , ,H :' ' ,xI,a,-11?-L ," ' Z " .if A A Lf ' a Bour ff' V' I . ,- N Sterner lntramuralsf125 Intramurals I 126flntramurals iii vs, V aww? ...wc 1 D 'e S5 Q. ,T ,,,, s. W er: 29 V 'hu X3 , . A ' J Garter 1 .Q fe. '4 -Q.. 'QW .. . , . I V .1 .. .g MM. .- ,r A y -v 1- - rv .frf HV. ,mr ,. ....-f:?"'f, . f ., ' J' " , '.4"2af'Ww1f'?""S3 ,. fy ff' 1: 'ff5'f'S?":X 222' M,af,-f'g?N- ,, ' 4g ' :'- ' ,M +1 ,- ,sw V- - - ,: V V V' 2:5-1:-',1,g,,'V4 f,,V:y5,, 3 V -- - L V 1, , - , " , .?f5"4"55:"'i""2'wP'E11"Qz1gv-,v1'ff'qi 4 ,Wax , .V . A V Vuaqfz-V ., .lyk - WVQQQ- V, " WM,w,., m .Q--A 4 vm..-S A Nickeg - ' V r.syfghV - ., ...Hamm I' ,... ' , ,flfffggfz ji "" -" 2" , .gfl ' V '?QL'E'f"fII1fc'-1-gfgf V "--. 7' W -5 L. Gossner V.,-., R.",ff1.-' pn ,-Q-.. -... .iff-tilh, ,,, 1-Q:f,"'ellU if --Shel-.3 ., .L 5.4-' -Q. "'-""o,:,T'i 1 f .-.f"'3'-1 6.3" 2'-Q' I A, .mb - ". ..,.109',-AJ' , Y I V. -.-f-nur I W--'-7 . N-.f,..A. , , .A " ' s 4' u ' vt' ft .-.f ,fa ', . I1 Aj, 5 . .- Y, ' 4 . 4 . :,,,,L,J., ' I '4 ivl- .D 1' i . -U, Q: . 1, N ',11',.:, , '-- UI.- fbf' '. I" "'."'-".. ",.' 22 ' 'T 1' . -, ,- " 1' -- . .. 4- - ,a wx-,r 1 2. I Y' ' - 1'-.A fn if .1 --:'4J'l'. H - ' . . . . V 'ici' 4 :vb liar! W, 5: -R .V .fl , . J 14.34 I , ', . H y 9 , . . - . , , lntramuraIsf127 , Q wie, f 3 ,Alla fix!" 2,1 'Q ig? 5 sg X W N' vi-Q wvgglf' as x ,S -K xg gl -A -y Q,-4 u N 4x X X S 4' Q-1' M xx wl- Nqr Q Nd, , ,ew M.. 1 ,V xI-- K, Q ,S X , - .,.,.-NI T2 X . f, , M X" ,- ,jx X X fx , -.',5.:sg3qxae 'X . , . W -.-.vii J-SIN Q- Q 21,55 X vzywx -. . -- 3 X,-N - f-,Q - It 5 ,N x 'ik "fXI,.,x N " , - 1, . :gli yi- ' ' fig X X VX' ..1pvg4'ist? X , 55 Q . 5. fN:.w91-f XXX- ' Cf , fsig A J -rg' ' ,.5" '11 -- " '?5i.i' liljffi-f X ' ,. f -1fQ, ',iA. -b f K Y .5 '- ,X - , 5 'f Sgi fgrx W S' .' l .. ., N '. .Q .,-1 'ff .ys"1- I k. '- fm f -5,- -X "11. U. ' ' 'N"':e . +- . , if " 'xrxwbg - ' " e f5"f"F Ax 1 'l"3':w- Vx: ff A ' ' if ' ..-fg, "A N- ri.. . '! 'gf' -1 fig. ' " .X b- V Q.. we . , X 1 x X x 5 Q x , Ggnzales IQ nlldtwns T5 we I 5 f 1 5 fb N, X., Collier 128fOrganizations Collier Orgamzatuonsfl 29 A.E.S.E.C. Anlage Potts T? AIESEC fThe International Association of Students in Economics and Business Management! Front row: Kathleen Compton, David Self, Elva Moole chan, Rachael Dreyfus, Tom Weaver, Patrick Hennes- sey, Suzanne Cooperstein, Stuart Youngentob Back row: Ted Cater, Miles, Barry Bannister, John Peters, Jeff Drobner, Caroline Kelly, Mara Kelly, Craig Brook- well. NOXAIESEC Anlage is the newspaper of the Emory medical community. Directed and operated by sophomore and freshmen medical stu- dents, the quarterly tabloid reports on health care matters that affect the Emory University School of Medicine and its affili- ated institutions, as well as those of state and national medical concern. ln addition to covering news items, An- lage serves as a forum for academic views on such issues in medicine, setting medical priorities, and the attributes of the successful physician. The newspaper also offers an outlet for creative expression. lt publishes poetry, short stories, essays, humor, original artwork, and photographs from medical stu- dents and other health care professionals. According to Anlage editor, Mark S. Litwin, "We've undergone some major revi- sions this year, which we feel have made the paper a better planned, better executed, and more respected journal within the Emory medical community." Anlage Staff Anlage: Mark S. Litwin f Editor CM-2l, Bruce F. Walk- er IM-2l, Daniel R. Jacobson KM-ll, Alfonso l.atifflM-21, William H. Greenwood CM-2l, Sophie Kramer lM-ll, Cathy Lipton CM-2l, Martha Mary Wilber QM-2l, Richard Kaplan tMe2l. Archon -45 1? A 'hh ' i l . i Gonzales Atlanta-Emory Grchestra ,E 'x X ,,,J,,,,, , -"HCT Vincent Vincent Ad Hoc is a student-run musical theatre group which allows its participants to pursue and develop their creative interests and be in- volved with all aspects of musical production, This year's musical revue was And now in the Center Ring. Archon Seated: Barb Zamost, Don Rainone, Editor in Chief. Front row: Dina Franch, Marcia Blackburn, Ma- deana Antinezi, Ron Mancini, Elise Haberman, Back row: Chris Cook, Bill Hyland, Kevin Abbott, Bill Schneider. Archon, Atlanta Emory Orchestrafllil ADEC Mau' ",,,,.A4, 1 , ,.. ff Z fn 4: 'T Feinstein Vincent y. ' Q Vincent GREEI How MANY 6-RACKS OF GREEN BEANS DO You NEED TO MAKE YOUR WEEKEND FUN? -Q31 in 'V Fi! l ""' 1 It QWQCO, l Ciman ll,-F Gfq,,1U EUQFWR l Scans 30.3 ,gg R i jd! -1' 1 IF YOUR FRIEND WENT OUT AND ATE A SIX PACK OF GREEN BEANS EVERY NIGHT WOULD YOU TALK TO HIM OR HER ADfNl l'l'l'I'YQ Gram VW' 132fADEC Kneeling: Cheryl Fazio, Sharon Rogers, Stacey Funt Back: Richard Parker, Lisa Angert, Robert Klinger Peter Cohn, Stephen Pomerantz, Doug Senderoff, Bar bara Rothberg, Amy Solomon, Lisa Cohen, Kim Nato vitz, Georgette Johnson. Not present: Tracy Bishop, Tom Calkins, Melissa Davis Michele Jaffe, Lisa Kiell, Jack Seidel, Leslie Silverman Penny Steele-Perkins, Kathy Suerig, Sue Yowell, Cyn thia Shaw - Advisor, New A as as as ASI EAN you could tolls to your friend obout islhor Qroon Boon problem But... wk xii.. Ss.-To--'FWZ' f Con you fill! Obbllf o drinking sizzzgz Pfoblom? This year Emory started to find out that the Alcohol and Drug Education Committee KADECJ really wasn't the group of prohibi- tionists many had assumed it was. ADEC is a group of concerned students who feel that Emory needs a force for moderation and responsibility in the areas of alcohol and drug use. With the help of its newly formed advisory board and other concerned per- sons, in the Emory community, ADEC has attempted to provide students with the nec- essary information with which to make in- formed choices when exposed to the new situations college presents. ADEC supports those who choose not to drink and seeks to make the Emory environ- ment more conducive to moderation and responsibility for those who do drink. For this reason, ADEC attempted to convince student organizations to provide alternative beverages and food at parties in addition to the ever-present beer kegs. It was hoped that this would be appreciated by those who do not drink, those who after a couple beer, have had enough and are thirsty for some- thing non-alcoholic, those who do not like beer, or those, for whatever reason, want a choice. ADEC believes that alcohol doesnlt need to be the key to a party or that it should be assumed that beer is all students want. In addition to pushing for alternative bev- erages, ADEC's very large active member- ship has undertaken numerous projects to fulfill it's goals. It continued from last year, its "ADEC Education Series," a series of posters which presented factual information about alcohol and drugs. With the help of the R.A.'s, the posters managed to make their way onto walls, doors and bulletin boards all over campus. ln the middle of fall , semester, ADEC mounted a "Greenbean X! Campaign." fillustrated on this pagel On ' ' xiw- 4. T each successive day of the week, interesting I l 6 X -W X' xi ' X if .sf t-,,. ,sf . I1 5 Id xx Courtesy of ADEC and somewhat confounding posters were placed all over campus. The first day, a large poster simply picturing a green-bean appeared, followed on the second day by a poster asking, "How many six-packs of , Siudyn-sg For rv'edru9S7 wofm-d abwo cam.-.3 ser class' 7us+ 90+ vow f A- 5 ' a Z-X 3 o 'I 1 G QQ' mm 2 G D L e4 f tf D 3 'v VI Z T Q J '1 X W Q -v workshop Thursday February IO 700 9 OO pm Xlxlhlfe Hall Room Ill r 1 5 g 2 a I i L 3 Xi i I I 1 . I 1 CD E X 0 L, , S E 0' Q i 5 2 is as 1 2,6 f N 5 L41 u+ 'o :amid Iwo--no -H, si a ,-no ua Guru wwf ty aa'-ww AMA" 2.99 Sm L wap-5 Mm 1+ greenbeans do you need to make your weekend fun?" picturing a six-pack of green- beans. The third day's poster asked, 'Alf your friend went out and ate a six-pack of green- beans every night, would you talk to him or her about it?" The last day's posters and doorknob signs cleared up the confusion and revealed that ADEC was behind these strange posters. lt related the message that students shouldn't be afraid to talk to a friend they thought might have an alcohol problem. ADEC tried through the Green- bean Campaign to not only raise this specific issue, but to get people talking more about alcohol and problems related to it. At the same time as they were selling greenbeans, ADEC members were taking part in the freshman seminar programs. Each freshman seminar group allowed an ADEC member to attend one of their ses- sions, to lead an informal discussion de- signed to explore people's attitudes, values, and concerns about alcohol. ADEC led simi- lar programs in Winship dorm and in the Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority. CBS televi- sion came out and filmed the sorority pre- sentation and showed part of it on the na- tional news. The presentation included a mock driving while intoxicated KDWIJ arrest. Just before Spring Break, in order to bring up the issue of drunk driving, ADEC offered students a card to sign that had a pledge which stated, "I, fperson's namel pledge not to drive drunk or let a friend drive drunk." Hundreds of these cards made their way into homebound student's wallets. A final example of what ADEC was up to this past year involved getting at the alcohol and drug issue from a different angle. Realiz- ing that Emory is an extremely competitive and stressful environment, and that many students use alcohol and drugs in an attempt to relieve that stress, ADEC presented a stress workshop designed to teach relax- ation techniques, and to help students better cope with stressful situations. ADEC is looking to improve itself and its programs. Questions, ideas, and especially, new members are welcomed. Just drop a note to Drawer VV or talk to any ADEC member. - Stephen Pomerantz President ADECH33 BLACK STUDENT ALLIANCE f 4M4,.,M,,,' 1 'WZ' I I ,as BENJAMIN S. PIUS PRE-LAW SOCIETY Bland Gonzales Benjamin S, Pius Pre-Law Society Executive Council: Randi Ratiner - Secretary, Laura l-9993! - PublicityfNewsletter, Elaine Nussbaum - Vice president, Julie Fershtman - President. Not pic- tured: Vicki Arroyo, Wendy Feldman, Gary Yablon, Bob Shearman, Miriam Davis. Black Student Alliance seated: Eric Morrow, Linda Jor- dan, Sherri Arnold, Selena Atkinson, Middle row, Ros Cannon, Kurt Lange, Shelley Robertson, Craig Holmes, Torri Hornsby, Chandra Stevens, Sheila Bryant, Sherrie Pettiford, Yves Grayer, Felicia Poree, David Butler, Valecia Andrews, Lisa Turner, Rose Eiland, back row, Marc Adams, Ralph Reynolds, Steve Hood, Rickey Adger, Willie Strong, Mike Davis. 134fBlack Student Alliance, Benjamin S. Pius Pre-Law Society More than just a "social-type" group of pre-professional Emoroids, the Benjamin S. Pius Pre-law Society continually strives to present interesting programs to pre-law stu- dents. This spring, a new tradition will be estab- lished as the Society presents a practice LSAT for all interested Emoroids. Under the same conditions of the actual exam, our test will help students predict their forthcoming LSAT scores on June and October exams. We're looking forward to this new service and expect much enthusiasm from the cam- pus, as well. "Perry Mason-ers " as we tend to be, several of our members assisted the law school during its Moot Court competition. While the law students acted as 'profession- als, we simply acted in roles of witnesses and defendants. Julie Fershtman President Q lT:Cll.sl'Cl If J N , -A ii. X? M A Ns X T ' ' -- ' 4 The publications sent delegates to the ACPXNCAP convention held in St. Louis, MO. Lynne Harwell, Tony Vincent, and Joy Gonzales from The Campus, Jim Marion, Mike Barkin, and Wendy Meyer from The Wheel, and the publications' advisor, Ginger Kaderabek attended three days of sessions and workshops relating to issues as freedom of the press, motivating the staff, and tech- niques of reporting and writing. There was a preview of the movie "Gandhi," And Jim Henson and George Kurtz brought clips from "The Dark Crystal" and provided us with a glimpse of some of the background technical effects. A tour of a television sta- tion, KTVI, was included. BUSINESS SCHOOL COUNCIL Gonzales Business School Council Seated: Debbie Dunbar, Dr. Fernandez, Wey Camp Standing: Kathy McMillon, Mary Noll, Amy Cassatt Ellen Berlin, Jon Foster, Tricia Smith, Carol Dalton Jodi Bergman Gonzales Business School Council X135 CANDLER COORDINATING COUNCIL CHAMBER SINGERS Gonzales 32 Q 1- :1-, N 5, , 1 .-,Q-f2:::'W .-1-is is : w:.t.,N .,,. X. g , vfz' iifli-SSM 3:--sXL'5ii:i:E.Q1r.-. . ' ' "9 X I N. 4 -I 1, f 1:1 arm t. if '-1 1 '11--::' ": ASA' 4Xfsr::-'zarvl 1 X . wx :N :Q Xxxxx t -,..-N it Q., N-f-js Qc, QW 22:5 .' 'L 1 P5 A ...N w::IrifQ.-f"'- - ,::i-: 5155-,j:: .:f.-S:4i:::1.1L""' N 1, D uunmmmixwwg,-. .,: ' , "4' if! Q - A X' . X4-'E' "Viv:-.-'I-' 5 ,A 11:1 f .. -. ' ' S Y ggi -W QE., 3382? .Q , 2:52. ' -. . ., A A 'i-"E5?5'lf2.15'ff'"e.as2:2-1-Sf-.Z.-.,...51 ' 5 '51 "Ni ft., . , ,.,i 4 A. f " 136fCandler Coordinating Coucil, Chamber Singers Candler Coordinating Council Seated: Greg Bergquist, Paul Escamilla, Lewis Strickler, Standing: Laurie Jones, Bill Payne, Randy Miller, Ken Irby, Melanie Stanley, Robert Brown, Vance Lanier, Patricia Lewis. Chamber Singers Back: Laura MaGahee fTreasurel, Mark Rushing, Joe Follman, Jeff Collier, Jennifer Brown, Gary Deariso, Jeff Clark, Patton White, Lynn Dietrich lLibrarianl, Bruce Wynn, Mike Gary, Jeff James, Lea Gilliam, Byron Hoover Middle: Susan Gary, Leigh Hardison, Cynthia Clark lChairpersoni, Kennon McLendon, Melissa Cobbs, Mary Murphy, Susan Dinwiddie, Debbie Smith, Kathy Gairtner Center: Jeff Billings, Dr. William Lemmonds lConduc- torl, S. Mark Clark Not Pictured: Caroline Chapin, Elizabeth Cooke, Vince Johnson Bark: CIRCLE K Gonzales ,, V . V V1 ey af. , " ., - -' ' . 2 T 'EV 1 i xiii-?? '+ 'E'?l2l P , , . 4 ' Q f ixitu ' 4- V if -A ' H .I , ', gl' . Jil . ,J '1Lf'3lf'f"5f5 1 vf. , 4. A, ' '71, . . Z, ve ' ,fx . 1:51 ggi ,,' , ,,, 5 .. " , -1 '- Q . N or . at fi. i t ' ,. V1 ,eg 1 ' f- - gig' -' ,Z 'Z , A :fli- T ,, , Vi -Qfigqf be 1 - 1 1, 1-ff, " if: 'f - . " 4 ' if fi 3, ,, "Q ,Le " I - ' , 4, . , ' -H , , . ' , in Q?""A, .f-""'f 1'-v , ' VI-Z-.-,L 7111, .i,.Z':ff,' , V. , N , Z ' ' r .1 MIN " 'a. 4 ' he T K T mi, as , Garter Circle K Bottom: Lynn Morelock, Donna Scolnic, Shinwon Bang, Nancy Bolling, Byron Hoover, William Levy, Lisa Fren- kel, Jupe Potitong, Stephanie Henriquez Top Left: Mike Levine, Jim Wasserman, Richard Park- er, Miriam C. Davis Top Right: Richard McCammon, Amy Silberman Thomas Gray, Susan Gillespie College Bowl Standing L to R: Philip Rogers, Lloyd Busch lCoachl, Mike Barkin, Andy Corwin, Fred Benario, Todd Leo- pold Sitting: Robn Johnson, Mark Volmer, Steve Luxenberg, Dr. Mike Decker lCoachl, Keen lCaptainl, Sally Tyler, Ondina Passaniti, Miriam Davis, David Henry lPublicity Director and All-Around Good Guyi Not Pictured: Keith Abney, Brian Beasley, Drew Lane Circle K, College Bowl, Barkley Forumf137 COLLEGE COUNCIL me DVS W Ea Vincent DVS-Senior Honour Society Seated: Becky Farmer, Renalda Mack, Joanne Pulles, Susan Laney. Standing: David Lauten, John Robitscher, Ken John- son, 138fCollege Council, DVS College Council Sitting: Kenny Schoen, John Rappaport, Phil Caplan, Jean Dornhofer, Brenda Joy Bernstein. Standing: Mark Toubin, Kyle Katz, Todd Foreman, Rob Pearlstein, Lee Oberman, Mark Gilder, Harold Grodberg, Ken Johnson fPresidentl, Janice Nathanson, Randy Vickery. EI Elemento Espariol is an organization dedicated to the promotion of understand- ing of the Spanish language and of the Span- ish and Latin American cultures. It is open to Emory undergraduates and graduate stu- dents, as well as faculty and staff members. It provides the opportunity for both native speakers and beginners to practice the lan- guage in an informal setting. EEE sponsors casual conversation sessions, formal lec- tures, social programs, and cultural and community projects. Randi Ratiner President Vincent EL ELEMENTO ESPAIAZIOL Gonzales EMORY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP Gonzales EI Elemento Espanol Kneeling lL to Rl: Felipe Jaramillo, Bruce Pendley First Row Sitting: Caroline Kennedy, Maura Kelley, Beth Morris, Catalina Bravo, Susan Duhig, Anne Toma- lin, Stacye Steele Back Row: Randi Ratiner, Sterling Gillis, Bill Oglo, Alex Marban, Susan Morgan, Jim Cavanagh, Nancy Bolling, Jeff Cheek, Tami Walker, Leslie Stewart, Miriam Fin- kel, Michael DiSanto, Angie Nevarez, John Rachlin El Elemento Espanol, Emory Christian Fellowshipf139 EMORY GO CLUB N ll EMORY HUNGER AWARENESS Gonzales Gonzales Emory Hunger Awareness Marianne Maher, Martha Feller, Cindy Stone, Mike Honor. Emory G0 Club Steve Richard, David Werner, John Pedersen, Yahyi, Fathi, George Stathan. 140fEmory Go Club, Emory Hunger Awareness The Emory Student Nurses Association is an organization devoted to encouraging high quality health care and aiding and support- ing the individual nursing student. With these primary purposes in mind, the ESNA has several goals. It aims to contribute to nursing education, to represent fundamental and current interests of the nursing profession, and aids in the development of the total person and in their role in the health care of the total community. The ESNA carries out these goals in a variety of ways. lt influences health care nursing education, and nursing practice through appropriate legislative ac- tivities, encourages participation in commu- nity activities directed towards improved health care and related social issues, pro- motes student participation in interdisciplin- ary activities, and encourages collaborative relationships with nursing and related health organizations. Jane Watson President 'fi YXNXXPV, MSN Vincent -A EMORY KEYHOLE . ,-. . -Hx , x s , .,.,i?s2e1+r ,el-,.-f ' 'sf' :iiii 3 EMORY STUDENT NURSES ASSOCIATION , v . ,,. ,, . 3, V , -..J4 -w ,s .J-141 S sl 1 ,IZ we F I iiiiihl Emory Keyhole Left to Right: Ann Cornell, Sylvia Chang, Amy Silber- man, Dwight Marsh, Marcy Meyers, Josh Kugler iedi- torl. Joy Gonzales, Robert Rockwell Student Nurse 's Association Front row: Ella Hendrickson - First vice president, Jane Watson - President, Alys Holt - Treasurer, Roi Germain - Second vice-president, Barbarab Sverdlik- GANS Treasurer, Sonja Narr, Wanda Lanham, Lucy Rogers, Second row: Debbie Arnold, Susan Donohue, Anna Parker, Kristen Keller, Randi Margolis, Eva Silbiger, Dawn Sultzer, Kim Riedy. Third row: Lauren Dodek, Donna Dorough, Luanne Cranston, Alice Wilson, Ellen Hamilton, Pam Morrison, Catherine Cutler, Kathy Keever, Suann Mangels, Back row: Diana Spencer, Jane Conner, Debbie Dody, Karen Cooksey, Judy Bowman, Ann Satogkit, Judy Wells. Emory Keyhole, Emory Student Nurses Associationfllll GLEE CLUB rd Garter Glee Club Row 1 KL to Rl: Jeff James, Craig Evans, Jeff Billings Row 2: Byron Hoover, Marty Klee Row 3' Greg Savitt Row 4: Mike Gary, Dennis de Gracia, Lester Leung, Jon Flacker Row 5: Kennon McLendon, Bill Oglo, Bryan Darling Row 6: James Orrell, Vince Johnson, Jack Wright Row 7: Jeff Collier, Greg Batson, Frank Twitty, Taegun Moon 142fGlee Club Front Row Along Railing: Jeff Clark, Patton White, Greg Peirce, Rene Aguilar, Brian Levitz, Carson Fuller, Mark Clark, Donald Martin, Howard Louthan Back Row Along Railing: Gary Deariso, David Cos- grove, Brad Howell, Mark Richardson, Joe Follman, Bruce Wynn, Berke, Landrum, David Butler Not Pictured: Neil Black, Steve Horne, Toby Meek, Matt Noah, Mark Rushing, James Upshaw, Ricky Wright Gassner EMORY UNIVERSITY JAZZ ENSEMBLE EMORY UNIVERSITY SYMPHONIC BAND 9 ,, . ,- -vv.-Vw. Y ,.-,......,.....,., - V -- IMIMIMIM WWW? lf. I .It I .f:'Zf'L' If 5' uXwi'T'i' F v irysmlmlnl at-1 sf '-if ,WMM .V v J ll ' l1,.ll2-ll1trJ'--I---vfsv'-'Ill Emory University Symphonic Band: Row One lL to Rl Debbie Aiken, Roma Trousdale, Michele Davenport, Alson Karis, Stephanie Yancy, Donna Palley, Elizabeth Carmichael, Andy Gothard, Eddie Young, Andrea Sabatini Row Two lL to Rl Lee Greenberger, Anna Lott, Triscia Townes, Jerry Moreno, Terrell Miller, Tom Schrand, Jerry Finegan, Steven Cannon, Chuck Cox, Debbie Blumenthal, Joe Quattrini, Renata Kendrick, Ann Walk- er, Steve Foley, John West, Mike Friedman, Row Three lL to Rl Mary Francis Fanslow, Cathy Hans- ten, Kim Cummings, Linwood Early, Dan Finley, Kevin Cloud, Joe Vallette, Bill Stull, Harry Lynn lStudent conductorl, Ron Pauldine, Mark Pennybacker, Phillip Per-Lee, Chandler Finley, Ann LaCwreca, Renne Hog- gard. Leigh Hamby, Jim Mallison, Karen Naiman. Row Four lL to Rl Jeff Collier, Paige Ammon, Richard Parker, Derek Bennett, Peter Stephan, Mike DeVoney, Lisa Angert, Cathy Green, Mr. Joseph Kreines, Vicki Stephens, Walt Linz, Dr. Dinkins, Ken Erwin, Jeff Piep- pert, Richard Takamoto, Ken Johnson, Dwight Errick- son, Willie Strong. Emory University Jazz Ensemble: Row One lL to Rl Srah Richmond, Joe Quattrini, Mike Friedman, Steve Foley, John West, Ann Walker. Row Two lL to Rl Chuck Weslowski, Willie Strong, Dr Dinkins, Philip Per-lee, Chandler Finley. Row Three IL to Rl Billy Kravtin, Ron Pauldine, Harry Lynn, Mark Pennyback, Emory University Jazz Ensemble, Emory University Symphonic Buni I45 f , f 6 f 1 1 ,y ,, 0 H.. r I M Q? 014,41 I f, . . fr .Aff f?, W, gl - , , ii' ff, I fo' 1 f ,f f ' f ? 4 , if H fm ,f ' I EMORY WHEEL . 57 I . , Q 8 ,-fd . ff 10- .A , f, 151, ,' " 1.4 I 5' EMORY WOMEN'S ASSEMBLY Gems 2 in 1--.M . !fl - 2 Gonzales Emory Wheel KL to Rl Gail Goldsmith - Features Ed., Jim Marion - Ed. in Chief, Dave Shevrin - Sports Ed. lSit- tingl, Mike Barkin - Photography Ed. lStandingl, Matt Scheckner - Asst, News Ed., Susan Sterner - Asst. Photo. Ed., Loris Green - News Ed., Louis Weimer - Asst. Sports Ed., Fred Diamand - Executive Ed., Joe Sexton - Production Man- ager, Wendy Meyer - Managing Ed., Martha Ev- ans lNot picturel - Entertainment Ed. A college newspaper is the kind of or- ganization that remains relatively consis- tent, without much claim to change. This year, however, The Wheel made a signifi- cant transformation and definitely one for the better. In the past, The Wheel was a weekly newspaper, distributed on Tues- day. Now the paper is twice-weekly, be- ing delivered on Tuesday and Friday, providing a greater service to the cam- pus. News, editorial, and sports sections run in both issues, with a feature section in the Tuesday paper and an entertainment section on Friday's. With this new format, The Wheel is able to provide a more current coverage of events and more in-depth reporting. The Wheel has made the first step toward helping Emory in its continuing growth and improvement. Jim Marlon Editor in Chief ' ' u.,..g9 gy-1-I2 . -- T25 at V i. H wiv' I ' , '-. f . ,,,,.,.,. . i 111 " ' f f' - MY' -1 ' fa" s M - L A. , - Q E? -I Y 'iz ' ' Q 1 . ' - - V I 9 mon ' - ' Wliimih' -i n . m f ,. .. E , -:W . , ef- -f -up A- " ' -fa M. . ,,-W - A-, ' f ifa-ff' ' ., . " iff Emory Women 's Assembly Seated: Maryann Tucker, Diane Glauber, Jodi Kudler, Julie Fershtman lPresidentl, Tammy Schuster, Mindy Agin lNewsletter Chairl, Anne Tomalin, Bobbi A.B. Patterson Standingt Libby Prince, Elise Haberman, Alli- son Alford lPublicity Directorl, Margery Khaw lPro- grams Directorl, Linda Wimmer, Cecelia Bonn, Kim McFann, Dean Carol Thigpen lSponsorl, Dr. Bella Zweig 144fEmory Wheel, Emory Women's Assembly Our emphasis has changed following a campus-wide survey we distributed last May. As a result, we are attempting to program events geared to women and careers - the -lil concern of women at Emory. Also, the Womens Assembly is collaborating more than ever before with other campus groups such as the Women's Caucus, and the Presi- dent's Commission. On the Status of Wom- en. Together, we are working to implement a Women's Resource Center on the Emory campus as well as to initiate women's studies courses in the Emory curriculum. As usual, though, our meetings and corr mittees address a wide variety of issues cor cerning women, such as safety, health, ant political matters. Also, in collaboration witl the Campus Ministry, we will be sponsoring a fantastic program next spring, entitlei "Women's Week" in which we will present a variety of speakers, and entertainers on con sideration of the guiding question," What i QM it to be human. Julie Fershtman President Matt Pomerantz EMORY WOMEN'S CI-IORALE kg S F ,I fr- i ,iff f., 51.-E: 'ri 1- L. -. 3 f- ,W til. Gonzales EPISCOPALIANS AT EMORY Gonzales Emory Women 's Chorale Front Row lL to Rl: Susan Dinwiddie, Laura Fandrich, Laura Garber Row 2: Suzy Strickland, Marlette Williams, Laura McGahee Row 3: Lee Hamilton, Ann Compton Row 4: Lea Gilliam, Paula Mueller, Rachael Gerkin, Beth Bronnum Row 5: Kathryne Howell, Cynthia Clark, Susan Gary, Marcy Blackburn, Lynn Meadows Row 6: Melissa Lerman, Melissa Cobbs Row 7: Kim Riedy, Leigh Hardison, Leah Vinson, Kathy Permenter, Beth Scherer, Angela Edmond Row 8: Beth Cook, Loris Green, Gene Gunn, Rachel Dreyfus Row 9: Sharon McGrady, Diana Rasch, Jill Bouma, Gay Aves, Parthy Jo Walker Row 10: Judith Hersh, Sara Zitta, Lisa Sanford, Lynn Dietrich, Deborah Smith, Nancy Bolling, Jennifer Brown, Beth Feichtinger, Mary Priest, Maureen Jenci, Anne Meyer, Mary Murphy, Romy Viera Not Pictured: Denise Bradley, Caroline Chapin, Lor' raine Davis, Kathleen Frawley, Kathy Gaertner, Patty Galarza, Becky Gerkin, Cassandra Gordon, Debbie Hew, Julie Justice, Sally Knatchbull-Hugessen, Jennifer Laszo, Laura Legett, Sallie McGill, lrene Monnet, Heather Morrison, Valerie Parham, Carmen Short, So- nya Tjepkema, Angela Vick, Valerie Vroon, Christine Werft, Litia West Emory Women's Chorale, Episcopalians At Emoryf145 GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL HILLEL if if YRS SN' f Gonzales Alive N gy TT T' T TT t TTT TTTT I , .. l 1 ' v 4. , i .. V y me XX Q " i 3? Y N 'N 6 ww xx N -v. at Nicks I 'dnb Hillel Back row left to right: Lee Oberman, Mark Furman, Bruce Lieberbaum, Sloane Blaire, lan Lerner, Jennifer Laszlo, Mark Kasman, Marci Linder, Linda Latter. Middle Row: Sonje Danoff, Jayne Bloomberg, Jack Arbiser, Tom Schulman, Lisa Kiel, Gary Dolgin. From Row: Debbie Black, Leslie Silverman, Stacey Funt, Missing: R, Rodriguez, M. Wirth. Graduate Student Council Heather Hilton - Secretary, Anne B. Hall - Presi- dent, Carolyn Weber - Treasurer, John Marvin May - Vice president 146fGraduate Student Council, Hillel 1982-83 has been a year of exciting changes for the Graduate Student Council. Due to our increased responsibility in the disbursement of graduate student activity fees, the Council has been working hard to re-structure and improve the use of these funds. The annual Graduate Spring Sympo- sium and Science Poster Fair have been combined into a truly interdisciplinary Spring Colloquim. The graduate school jour- nal, Mind and Nature, has been redesigned to include publications from all graduate dis- ciplines, as well as information concerning campus activities of interest to the graduate community. This year, a new policy was devised for redistribution of a portion of student activity fees to each graduate de- partment on a per capita basis. The GSC has also sponsored the purchase of a typewriter available for graduate student use in the Woodruff Library. The GSC officers wish to thank a particu- larly dedicated group of representatives for our most productive year to date. Heather Hilton Secretary Lambda Alpha is the Academic Honor Society of the Anthropology Depart- ment. Lambda Alpha's membership is limited to majors in the Anthropology Dept., though its scope and purpose is aimed to include the entire Emory com- munity. LA is working to fister a sense of awareness and appreciation for the disci- pline of anthropology on our campus. To help achieve this goal, the organization sponsored world reknowned physical an- thropologist Don Johannson in the Spring of 1983. The society also seeks to en- courage and stimulate scholarship and re- search in anthropology by recognizing and honoring superior achievement in the discipline among students, faculty, and other persons engaged in the study of Anthropology. LAMBDA ALPHA President: Gigi Pappas Vice President: Lynn Dietrich Secretary: Gregg Cochran Members: Allison Alford Eric Bour John Cervent Elizabeth Clarke Roger Conrad Joan Creigh Steve Goldfine Daniel Michaels Lloyd Minsky Advisor: Dr. E.N. Smith LE CERCLE FRANCAIS Gonzales Gonzales Le Cercle Francais is Emory's student-run French club. Le Cercle is like a part of France at Emory, trying to increase the level of awareness of the community towards French culture. Le Cercle's main purpose is to give all those students interested in learn- ing or practicing their French a place to get together with other students who have the same interests. Le Cercle sponsors French- dialogue luncheons, French lecturers and French Cuisine Potlucks. Lambda Alpha, Le Cercle Francais, Dance Anvef147 MORHMXBOARD MOVE 7, w f' wx ' .5355-jx 'X X2'sgf3gg':g3:53R?11Fxx W ,qw -wmmsi. ANNQSKRQ fww ,.,N ... --sz-:sw XmQfQ3-qgkks . -. Q.-Q., Ag- L 5 5-. .vm X K -z :fee 3,135 tg , ,, . - tam -1 " 'TK N ' X?"-.YN QQ- 385159. K .4 ,.,. - C .. :-,Qs-iswa53,55.., -.,,-A,.,g-Y., - vig.- A .,,. A f X ,sis X NX' , FY? ' 3 F ' 'f ' , x N 14 -.:,,1xg5:Xs: A 1:-::1.-1-f.::"f ww ' XXX Q., 5 . s. . was X' A ' .N es 'X ' 122,15-.rlf Y 'sz Q'-"" - . . , - .qi fffifw X . ' wwkwwmwwwww . M Xw - M, X. Rf V ' fzfixirxtmggq ,- if S1 mx X XX ' 'asf-:ss - X -Iss X is '--' . - K X -.QQT-arms wigs, is A .. . 1.. ,X., 'X s . I V x - V . , Q -1+Q3-.Q.:-QE:-:aw-. .-:-ss:-. ww , Q h N l . w 'E' 'ws . 1 1,-1: .- - . -s-rss:-.1:1::. -"'-Nw-'Isxg-:,,,5S .gg mrawmwmxw is-r it X , , '- i-ai? " M 'i X 4 QS" b X 'fs' ffffxx-WS 5 's P si 1' .Q:.r.- Yin, RQ. -1 1253-gg-, N552 -T -ss A - X - X iq.- , ' 'x"N X .. ,.A 5 4 ., - V'q24 Xx,, fb ,qs-19X --3.:.,,1g- aaa ' Nice- N X P, . fE3r,3iQ'SS ERT? x-., -5 N -X s I wt Nw. - 1 A 1 gan, --4s ,Q- .--ffd , ,. , i . 442, , ff z , -,sw Gonzales Garter W s A - s. , w....w.-as.,-N x .. ., S . .V M .I Mortar Board Front row: Michele Jaffe lSecretaryl, Nancy Hodge, Allison Alford, Jeff Galin. Back row: Bryan Darling lPresidentl, Peter Cole, Rob Klinger lVice president of selectionsl, Shan Young, Jim Marion, Dr. Tom Flynn. Members not present: Jeff Billings, Jennifer Brown, Jennifer Bush, Becky Farmer, Karen Fowler, Meg Gaz- zola, Monica Gourovitch, Tom Gray, Sheri Hinson, Ken Johnson, Kevin Johnson, Susan Laney, Amy Logan, Renalda Mack, Edward McEachern, Joanne Pulles, Charlotte Reed, John Robitscher, Tali Segal, Debbie Smith, Robert Threlkeld. 148 Mortar Board, Move MOVE Row Row Adam Fisch Chris Row to sc cers: Kathy Minter, Liz Brownin, Mark Rabinowitz. Two: Jill Ross, Catherine Verdery, Nick Sciarrino, Fiskhler, Daniel Michaels, Donna Saliter, Matt er, Debbie Zevine, Sheila Lanport, Srah Elliott, One: Kempton. Barb e Stev Johnson. Three: Rob Landon, Debbie Kors, The Egg, Carol Clough, Lewis Perry, Ron Ferguson, Stacy Mantzaris, Wilson. Sorry, many members are not shown due heduling lnconveniences. Thanks to our past offi- Jennifer Brown, Michael Henneer, Linda Johnson, While leisurely strolling the Emory cam- pus, you may have found yourself face to face with an oval-shaped being wearing dark glasses and tennis shoes. Who is this mysteri- ous creature who adorns T-shirts, cups, and pins? lt is the one and only MOVE egg, mascot of one of Emory's finest land funniestl cam- pus organizations. MOVE sponsors band parties, guest lecturers, faculty-student wine and cheese parties as well as other social and cultural events throughout the year. Debbie Levine Member of MOVE E Courtesy of MOVE SPRING 1982: Juniors - Craig Ivan Balsam, Raymond Neill Brolans, Leon Cohen, Russell Austin Flint, Mark Ira Fur- man, Ruth Lillia Hughes, Kevin Reed Johnson, Stefan Martin Lampe, Marshall Louis Moss, Barbara Alison Roughton, Marc Scott Schwartzberg, Patricia Anne Sinoway, Seniors - Jack Leonard Ar- biser, Becky Ann Bailey, Steven Louis Bello, Jay Alan Bernath, Randi Gale Boyers, David Bruce Brothers, David Hunter Brown, Eric John Bucsela, Gwen- yth Margaret Crawford, Peter Robert Ennever, Donna Cyd Fell, Barbara Jane Goldstein, Ira D. Hammerman, Mark Christopher Hanson, Howard Doug Hin- son, Daniel Stephen Howe, Lisa Michelle Isaac, Walter Scott Josephson, David Louis Kaplan, Theodore Michael Katz, William Michael Libit, Paula Renee Ly- ons, Bari Jane Mattes, Rachel Youngjin Moon, Samuel Lorenza Norwood, Robert OMICRON DELTA KAPPA Gonzales PHI BETA KAPPA Alan Nussbaum, Elizabeth Annette Prather, Bruce Howard Sokoloff, Anne Flora Swartz, Laurie Anne Washburn, Randall Francis White, Douglas Davidson Zone. Alumni Member - Dr. Irwin T. Hyatt, Jr. Honorary Member - Dr. Sid- ney Perkowitz. FALL 1982: Juniors - David L. Kirshenbaum, Steven Howard Koval. Seniors - Dale Ralph Belles, Ralph Gregory Cochran, Mark Alan Codner, Peter Scott Cohn, Craig M. Fern, Gary Lewis Glick, Jennifer Kane, George Russell King, Donna Carol Lee, Vivian Beth Levy, Helen Beaudry Mat- thews, Janice Anne Nathanson, Elaine Nussbaum, David Alan Picon, Laurie Su- san Pomerantz, John Eugene Reiner, Benjamin Conrad Smith, Charles Stephen Theofilos, Frederick Paul Walters, Louis Howard Weimer. Graduate Students - Susan VanZanten Gallagher, Penny Ben- son Zeimer. Anyone who is interested in having memo- rable good times, meeting new people, and belonging to a great campus group can join MOVE. So, the next time you run into the lovable MOVE egg, stop and ask to be pointed in the direction of the nearest MOVE function. The egg won't steer you wrong! Debbie Levine MOVE Member Omicron Delta Kappa Spring 1982: Robert Keith Ahrens, Robert Henry Benfield Jr., Lori Lowe Bishop, Syl- via Lee Cerel, Dean Lelia Crawford, Nesba Alane Crenshaw, Rebecca Nell Farmer, Mar- go Ruth George, Robert Ernest Going Jr., Nancy Randolph Ingram, Kenneth Lance Johnson, Allan Hal Kaufman, Kathleen Ann Kelly, Susan Elizabeth Laney, Michele K. Oliver, Helen Ruth Pearson, Donna Lynn Springer, Dr. F. Brown Whittington, Johnny Shan Young. Fall 1982: Marc Anthony Adams, Linda Gay Brindley, Peter Alexander Cole, Lisa Ange- line Catherine Cooper, Julie Ilene Fersht- man, Thomas Geoghegan, Joy Gonzales, Akiba Donna Sullivan Harper, Michael Ed- ward Hutchins, Amy Therese Logan, Bar- bara A, B. Patterson, Gregory Allen Paulus, Stephen Michael Pomerantz, Joanne Fran- ces Pulles, Deva J. Scheel. Patricia Sinoway, Mayola Cecilia Walters, Ian Mark Weiner, Susan K. Yowell. Omicron Delta Kappa Tricia Sinoway, Peter Cole, Marc Adams, Joanne Pulles, Linda Brindley, Ken Johnson, Bob Hamilton, Dean Moon, Reanlda Mack, Dean Crawford. Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Beta Kappaf149 PHI SIGMA PHOENIX Bland ll its ll anti? E32 WULX Phoenix IL to Rl Kelly Wilkenson, Bill Hawkins, Kari Haisel, Jonathan Reiss, Chip Wilmont, Jim Marion, Joe Sexton, Georgia Dopplewell, Sheila Langenhenning, Robert Rockwell, Jason Schneider, Vicy Arrayo, and Wendy Meyer. Phi Sigma Honorary Biological Society Front row: Car- lyn Rosenberg, Ellen, Martha Jo Feller, Lucy Northrop, Craig Kalter. Back row: Sheldon Cooper, Diane Bowen, David Ross, Dave Kinne, Katie Dew, Wynne Brinks. The Phi Sigma Honorary Biological Society is a small tightly knit group of students held together by the common drive to want to learn about the beauty and the mystery of life's design. Undergraduate and graduate members freely exchange ideas with each 15OfPhi Sigma, Phoenix other and with members of the biology facul- ty. Perserverance, dedication, and research orientation are characteristics of our cause and members. This year's activities have been primarily informal gatherings. We showed a movie, "Strange Sleep," for openers, and we were invited to the biology faculty's annual Christ- mas party at the Houston Mill House at the end of fall semester. We look forward to a camping trip in the N. Georgia or North Carolina mountains, and we anticipate hav- ing an "evening in Jamaica" with Mr. Brill- hart. Carlyn Rosenberg Z .G K. rh- 1: ,,,, 11 aes. X. ,N s-i5L5-fi . L' f. I I 11-2: I- ' ' .. i , fi g- f' I l 'L ' A riffif :Za f-'f 1 , .E k tsl..-. , .f V . wwfia-as. ,..., V R V ' 73w5a, '-" ' -3 M .,.... f, I Barkin PRE-VETERINARY SOCIETY . Y, t --f1".,S.,f:3ir' :-. - X xjm.-. bg 5 4 N41 5' t Y S x Gonzales PSI PHI QIVQA M , -A , - .wi ' LJ f . " ..l',.-aj -L Barkin P55 Phi, the Emory science fiction and chael Bishop lNebula award winning writer Back row: Dr. M.S. Silberman - Advisor, Bernie Fi- fantasy club, was founded in 1980 by a group of a dozen students who wanted an organization to promote science fiction and fantasy in the Emory community. Psi Phi currently has a membership of 88 uniquely different individuals whose varied interests range from Star Trek to H.P. Lovecraft, from comic books to classic films. Each year, Psi Phi sponsors the Emory Science Fiction and Fantasy Symposium, which brings to campus such noted science fiction and fantasy authors as Robert A. Bloch lof Psychol, Jack Williamson, IThe Humanoidsl, Frank Kelly Freas lnoted sf 8: f artistl, David Gerrold IStar Trek writerl, Mi- from Georgial, as well as other talents. This year's symposium, with Bloch, Ger- rold and Bishop, was the major event for Emory's sf 81 f fans. Attendance was estimat- ed at 285, and the UCB helped with the programming. And next year promises to be even better. The symposium this year has shown that Psi Phi has achieved its goals of bringing science fiction and fantasy to the Emory community. Randall Landers Pre- Veterinary Society Front row: Tia Joslin, Dr. M.N. Cole - Advisor, Mau- reen Abbate - Vice president. scher - President, Mike Cotter, Jeff Jackson. Not pictured: Dana Levy - Secretary-treasurer, Sibel Oyman. Psi Phi lidentified by Randy Landersl First row: Vice president Kevin Abbott, J. David Fowler, Gary Deariso, Symposium director Thomas A. Gray, Guest speaker Bill Ritch. Second row: Lenore Parks, Marc Adams, Programming director Alex Rosen, John Frenzel, Eddie Something, A cute alien! Third row: President Randall Landers, Publicity direc- tor Karen Jordan, Two strange pseudo-members. Pre-Veterinary Society, Psi Phif151 Rathskellar Vincent X-2 ' no in ' an i s . 2 'Z 5 Q 5 Vincent Vincent Y 3 ,bi 9 Q if 5 I 5 W A I C 4 1, Pk 423' 71 1 is 115 A Y, X , ix ' . qi . 1'fv,Q'Q , Alt- Yi .Md if ff X -x,--V I:- -4:! ' iv.. VM T- v ff A 'wx' -W 'N W ,. v pi! . ., 152fRathskellar vincent l'lC2nf Vi 2 Vincent . lfvfi ,gy X i f QQ A Vincent Front row: Bob Herndon, Allison lckes, Linda Capa bianco, Collette Taylor, Mike Diehl, Corey'Jan Albert Holly Vigodsky, Angela Edmond. Back row: Cynthia Proust, Ron Mancini, Marc Peters Andy Ordover, Lloyd Minsky, Tim Strayer, Larry Fish Aaron Gilbert, Diane Rosenberg, Kristine Norris, Gonzales Rathskellarf153 PUBLICATIONS COUNCIL ' flziim 'L till, 4 SIGMA TAU DELTA Fernstern ,pfgnnlnnl , r,,,,,,.. Representatives from the student publrca trons rntervrewed President Jimmy Carter a few hours before hrs speech opening the Year of Rethinking Human Rights on Sept 15 1982 They were Sarah Alexander lWheell Joy Gonzales lCampusl Josh Kugler lKeyholel Edward McEachern lCam pusl and Sheila Langenhenmg lPhoenrxl We waited for him in hrs secretarys of fice People with one ear Walkman s milled around l talked with Dave Picon a Carter aide Finally it was time to go We all straightened our clothes and walked out We stood for a few minutes in the hall way There was a petite woman and we began talking with her I hnally realized she was Rosalynn Carter friendly voice soft smile genuine We walked in what used to be the Coke memorabilia room He shook our hands one by one as we hled in He has a firm handshake and put us at ease This is the president l m actually going to interview? A man who wears his wedding band has blue eyes wrinkles and graying hair? Then rt started Hrs introductory state ments expressed hrs hopes for frequent en counters with students and he welcomes questron Contact Dean Warts I scrrbbled rn my notebook as the man to ask Carter s role rs prrmarrly wrth the students especially the undergraduates Srnce he was opening the Human Rights Symposium the first questron asked was re gardrng human rrghts Carter declared that he has been concerned about human rrghts and vrolatrons and hrs admrnrstratrve record wrll attest to hrs commrtment He laughed when he was asked rf he con srdered himself a neolrberal He answered not really perhaps more lrke a fiscal con servatrve and a liberal rn socral and envrron mental rssues The government is lrke a busr ness and the rncurrrng of defrcrts rs not good for either Publications Council Seated: Lynne Harwell, Don Rainone, Dale Hughes Josh Kugler, Wendy Meyer, Beth Bowden Standing: Amy Silberman, David Altman Fred Dia- mond, Joy Gonzales, Jim Marion, Larry Mandala Sigma Tau Delta Seated: Mary B. Fort Standing: Dr. Bugge, Jett Short, Todd Cecil, Renalda Mack. 154fPublrcations Council, Sigma Tau Delta, Interview With Carter Why Emory? He admitted that he had been invited to other schools, but Emory has "a bright future." There is "a strong aca- demic base" and "broad range of strong departments." lt is "adequately endowed" llaughter greeted this understatement, and he seemed amused at our reactionl. The "reputation is good." It is not world re- nowned yet"but he is confident las we arel that we're getting there. He feels what he has to offer correlates well with the universi- ty's strengths, especially political science, law, and history. lt's "close to home." And he has been "strongly welcomed" by the people who have been accomodating with time and scheduling. Also the association between his policy center and Emory will benefit both. Though he has no actual teaching exper- ience, his personal experiences balance the schoolbooks. He has learned the undercur- rents of political science from his career ranging from local service to state legislature to Congress to governorship and finally to the presidency. Therefore, he can supple- ment what a professor can offer because he can lecture from a practical I-was-there ap- proach. After all, he went from the peanut field to the presidency. His position as Dis- tinguished Professor is for an indefinite time. lAt the lecture later on, he joked with the audience that being a college professor was the culmination of a lifelong ambition but that it had come four years earlier than he had anticipated. Laughter greeted this ad- mission. There was a knock, and it was over. He had to prepare for the lecture. Instead of the strictly- timed 30 minute chat we'd expect- ed, it was over 45 minutes. We stood up, and he again shook our hands as we small- talked. Wait-our picture-no one's going to believe us. So we gathered around him and smiled. He walked us to the door. lt was over. We waited for the elevator, got in, and started gabbing away at our impressions. Y! SOCIETY FOR COLLEGIATE JOURNALISTS 'S ,f Q, K 1 ,Sabi .1m,,g3f2 ',.,,, Blanco SPOKE ff 4 fg, fr 437825 L I ic- 58 ' . ,, 1 N:'-l:i.lau,'- IN- I--4 if-. V' ,L L, ,. -N ,L ' V, i-N1 'y v ,-' K - ' , .. M, j x. . k fl. .X McEachern Society for Collegiate Journalists: Seated - Loris Green, Kathryn Kolb, Laura Gussin, Barb Zamost, Lynne Harwell, Kathleen Compton, Tammy Schuster. Standing - Steve Pomerantz, Kevin Abbott, Peter De Natale, Jim Marion, Wendy Meyer, Tom Stitt, Ron Mancini, Ginger Kaderabek, Craig Kaleer, Joy Gon- zales, Josh Kugler. Spoke lL to Rl Production Manager Joe Sexton, Adam Michael Fivish, Mark Robinowitz, Kathy Minter, Rabbi Don Hantula, Debbie Kois, Pope Charles Wesowlowski, Lord God King Emperor Tsar Marshall Newman, Graphics Editor Julie Fershtman, Executive Editor Mark Adams, Julie Shapiro, Associate Editor Kevin Abbott, Craig Blafer. Not Pictured: Managing Editor Wendy Mayer, Deadline Editor Kathy Taylor, Execu- tive Editor Larry Mandala, Associate Editor Amy Roth- stein, Craig Green, John Dunphy, Kara Bryant, Scott Alter, Carolyn Davies, Virginia Cope, Ellen Pasterino, and Kate Hoernle. McEaChem Society For Collegiate Journalists, Spokef155 STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION N-4 gf ZW... The Student Activities Fee of S35 per semester went into effect the fall of 1982 after a long hiatus. The distribution of the UNIVERSITY CENTER BOARD money was by me QQ Still as 5 ss. :., ,T 0 ,gi as I if -1 , -a X 5 Vincent 'PV' '29 336. Vincent l56fStudent Government Association, University Center Board UCB lL to Rl Mike Brown, Elton Bowen, Peter Delmon, Eric Friedberg, John Mitnick, Nancy Zefft, Jim Wasserman, Errington Thompson, Janette Mikity, Mary Abbot, Russ Bailey, Mike Israel SGA Seated: Gigi Pappas, Vice Presidentg Shan Young, President, Destiny Mansour, Secretary Standing: Lonnie Brown, Wilson, Cook, Trisha Bren- nan, Debbie Dunbar, Melissa Papontones, Steve Rogo- sin, Allison Campbell, Brian Goldstein, Todd Cecchini, Sylvia Chang, Gregg Russell, Robert Brown, Jay Kelley, David Schwab, Bill Lieberbaum, Darryl Tookes, Bill Greenwood Not Pictured: Greg Paulus, lTreasurerl, Jeff Cooper, Kathy Gaunt, Evelyn Warshaw, Alan Forman, Carol Phillips, Carolyn Fort, Mark Held, Lewis Strickler, Tim Bellamy, Bill Brosius, Sara Fideli, Jay Lazega, Maria LaTour, Lisa Pulliam, Tom Anderson, Roger Hess, Steve Bateh, Mike Hutchins, Michelle Cox, Russ Schmidt, B.B, Gregory 1 mm N nh VOLUNTEER EMORY V ,x "" , -3 . 'L' I , . 'a AS A Garter SGA treasurer and the Budget Com- mittee. ln the spring of '82, several orga- nizations appealed their distribution of the funds, their budgets were relined. . , he-W'-A ' Morris X Volunteer Emory Standing lL to Rl: Laura Hoagland, Gillian Goddard, Peter Cole, Joanne Pulles, Bam Taylor, Susan Laney, Kurt Lange, Linda Brindley, Terry Gallagher, Peter Strott Sitting: Barbara Rothberg, Andrea Sabatini, Nancy Hodge, Roni Tomback, Kathy Benson Waging Peace Carol Stevens, Amy Logan, Elizabeth Rose, Patti Mc Gee, Dina Franch, Alison Karas, Florence Lusk, Kim lVlcFann, Mary B. Fort, Bobbi Patterson, Volunteer Emory, Waging Peacef157 WHO'S WHO Undergraduates: Jack Leonard Arbiser, Patricia Ann Brennan, Edmond Weyman Camp IV, Allison Kone Campbell, Peter Alexander Cole, Lucinda Fay Dallas, Bry- an Keith Darling, Jamil Khalid Elayan, Rebecca Nell Farmer, Mary Elizabeth Gazzola, Joy Gonzales, Ronnie Dale Hughes, Kenneth Lance Johnson, Steven Howard Koval, Susan Elizabeth Laney, Renalda Eugenia Mack, James Leon Mar- ion, John Edward McEachern, Joan Georgette Pappas, Joanne Frances Pulles, John Webster Robitcher, Tali Joan Segal, Patricia Anne Sinoway, Deb- orah Anne Smith, Errington Casdale Thompson, lan Mark Weiner, Johnny Shan Young Graduate School of Arts and Sciences: M. Eloise Brown Carter, Heather Elizabeth Hilton, Andrew Robert Schiff THE GOSPEL CHOIR "May we release our joy and share our faith unto the Lord through the Emory Gospel Choir." In realizing the need to release our joy and share our faith, the idea of the gospel choir began to take form in 1979 under the direction of Mr. Alvin Moore. During a course of two years, performances were given quarterly. This did not seem to fulfill the spiritual needs of the black students on campus. ln the fall of 1981 Dr. Don Shockley, impressed with the talent of the choir, decided to form the Emory University Gospel Choir to pro- vide an opportunity for total student par- ticipation. From its beginnings under Dr. Graduate School of Business Administra- tion: George Edward Barlow, Bruce Elliot Lamb Graduate School of Nursing: Linda Lee Homes, Connie Michelle Renee Cox School of Dentristry: Thomas Neil Ander- son, Gloriana Maria Lopez, Myra Lynn Miller School of Law: Sidney R. Barret, Jr., Dennis Robert Dunn, Thomas Dale Hall, Meghan Anne Howett, Gary Paul Kohn School of Medicine - Physicians Associ- ate Program: Thomas Goree Little Jr. School of Theology: Lori Lowe Bishop, Rebecca M. Radillo, William A. Thurston Shockley, the choir continued with a full blast under the direction of Rev. Steven Daniels, Ms. Linda Jordan and Mr. Alvin Moore. Because of the high spirit pro- vided by these three people, the Gospel Choir was destined to move in an upward motion. They achieved ever-increasing recognition throughout the campus and the Atlanta area. Presently, under the leadership of Steven Daniels and Linda Jordan, the choir's expectations of itself have increased tremendously, leading them to a more successful year in 1983. Charlene Scott 158fWho s Who, The Gospel Choir Lin r-1 rn rg gd' fax ff, Vincent Vincent Christmas Festival Chr stmas Festivalf159 l fi X Circle K As part of the largest collegiate service organization in North America, the Emory chapter of Circle K International strives to combine social activities with service activi- ties while helping the school and community and building its members leadership poten- tial. This past year, the Emory chapter has successfully completed many projects which have not only served others, but have given our members a chance to reach out and help others. One such project was our Share the Treats Project. Circle K members contacted several local elementary schools and asked their students to donate part of their Hallow- een candy so that Circle K could give some to those children who did not get a chance to go trick-or-treating. Due to the children's generosity, we were able to have a late Hal- loween party for the children at Carey- Steele Pitts Home for Children. Everyone had a blast! Not all of our projects are one-time af- fairs. In fact, most are long-term projects which are traditional to the Emory chapter. Two projects which have long-term goals are i,,.,,i 3 the Wesley Woods Project and the Tutoring Program at Morningside Elementary School. At Wesley Woods, Circle K members pro- vide small parties for the residents. At these parties, our members not only provide the refreshments and entertainment, but also friendship and companionship. The goal of out tutoring program is to help fourth, fifth, and sixth graders who need help in reading comprehension and word recognition. Sev- eral members of the Emory chapter travel to Morningside Elementary School each week to meet with their pupils and spend at least an hour with himfher and provide support and encouragement as the child learns. These are only a small fraction of the many projects we accomplish each semes- ter. There is also another side - socials! ln order to create an atmosphere of together- ness, our chapter has socials which all mem- bers attend to relax and enjoy each other's company. What Circle K really means is: service, friendship and leadership. Richard Parker Secretary Qiilllll Z maxaman Si Q. ... ..-. .. 160fCircle K Circle Kf161 SAA Preview Day Have you ever seen a group of wide-eyed high school seniors traverse the quad led by an equally wide-eyed and enthusiastic Emoroid? Have you ever been called and asked to house a visiting senior tonight? lf so then you are already acquainted with one of Emory's largest and most vital organizations - the Student Admissions Association. With well over one hundred members, SAA coordinates many activities throughout the year with the primary purpose of making that all- important selection of colleges easier for seniors. On a regular basis, SAA members conduct campus tours every day. These tours provide seniors an opportunity to see our campus and also to talk with a 'Roid for forty minutes or so and get the Real story about Emory. SAA also coordinates a host program whereby visiting seniors can spend the night in a dorm and get a real view of campus life. SAA also coordinates two large-scale events each year - the Emory Previews and Senior Weekend. The Emory Previews, held in November and January, provide seniors from the southeastern states with an opportunity to spend one day 19:00 am to 4:00 pml on campus Cparents are invited tool and get an intense view of good 'ole E.U. , , Programs include campus tours, an academic fair where students can speak to professors from the various academic departments, and panel discussions on extra curricular activities open to students. This year, approximately one thousand people attended the previews, and they seemed to genuinely help the students who attended. Said Noah Breakstone, a senior from Miami, "You really get to see all of what Emory is about - not just isolated aspects." SAA's biggest event of the year is of course, Senior Weekend. This year, due to scheduling problems incurred by the semester system, only one senior weekend was held. However, the students who attended had a great time, as did all the SAA members who helped in pulling off this grand event. Next time you think about what made you decide on Emory, remember - SAA probably influenced you in some way. Mike Feinstein 162fSAA Preview Day : .21 e 32.5 314' . ,pest '49 'fliz ., 4 '. ,I ' ' 'vc 1 2 '4 f - ,X V l t QV 'SK i 5 V . .. E SAT' , x f'-, Q , , K' N IVQA ,S 311 .. .:., , . l.,y I V ' WG x I M ., 5 f L - ' ' , gg ' 5 T, gif-2 QQ!-f ' 'F '. j' " ': Aw' . . v fw V ' 1 -if-' f' Lf 'mf .5-'2 ' - , ' Q .g.3z15gg4ff:s'Q, jx, ' SAA Preview Dayf163 eehs ? - h Vincer 1 f 1 , 1 Morr 164fGreeks aw 'V Qr 94"-Lx M Mx 1. z-ai V if Nickey Greeksf165 GO GREEK 'F D 166fGo Greek X -.3,:..:x,- ' f km, Q' . fi ..: . , the Panhellenic Council are the governing bodies of Emory s 14 fraternities and sororities. In addi- tion to sponsoring and supervising Fall Rush, these groups foster sororities, fraternities, and the campus as a whole. The IFC and Panhel coordinate Greek Week, participate actively in Dooley s Week, and plan social and athletic Other activities include service projects for the Atlanta communi- ty as well as for the campus. The Interfraternity Council and friendship and interaction between functions for Emory's Greeks. '1 ,LA 4 Garter ..4n4. A , ,V A , 4. f , at 2 , ' A . 3 I I gg yr .1 Q-. ig uv ' 9 Panhellenic Council left to right. Front Row: Susan Row: Connie Fry, Lisa Odierna, Alyson Levy, Holly Matalon, Judi Renbaum, Patricia Galarza, Stephanie Casey, Becky Farmer, Holly Vigodsky, Susan Hamilton, Cathy Cornett, Laura Lover. Third Row: Sanders. Gouinlock, Anne DeFranks, Erica Stumvoll. Second Joy Benjamin, Lynn Dietrich, Dianne Elsom, Marcia IFC, Panhellenic Councilf 167 1 ' -r C 'Q ,Av .lfigg :Kms ' 1. . .r w , ,A 5 'Qifw' 9- 2 95. V ' 'I ' f , If' . ., Q ,giving xl 171 .1 "I 'Nl '. -4'f"',",.. xiii r ? QA' qi' L' A' ,gi X Q I..-SE. A ,..-rg' ff.. il.: wr- 1 -QYSWS. "f'i!'?-z-A . -.. 3, , ,.,: an Uk, . +L. l qi 42: ' ',,.v5'f'5f. F' f' ". no ,-if K, 4.15 -,, ,gl - , "'?'s1 1 f' .f ,if ' S ' "k':5'I?Ni M 4.1 . ' + JS X Q - " A lv .aft , 5 .L , sw' Qs 5: E' , ., QT' Q. ,,,' gr. fr , . .. ,5 .. . - ,U J',-.- Y '. nr 1 'un --L INS , x,:",:v...,Z. - '.'I.?,1 s-Ag . Xi. fa. .-, "fi . xg ibm h yn emi ' ...- x 1 68 f Greeks 3 ,, I QR. of 2 Fimm! 2 -'is . E 'IIIIIIIIIE-EJ-.1-2 , f- 555 - 'e i f-1 -:.: '9 9 il O, ii ' 6-asxi :fe Cf "7 -6. A 4 if 5' 'minced X15 I i A l '- ' ' ' - -2 4 ' ' 1 Q I . s ' T V i C N ' : 53? fills Nfl' ' ll sl bl . h :- J. ' I ,Fi- e Q, T 'V .4 L Qt ' 15 T. V ,- Q NDI' yitw rf s' r v ' Ei :'1 lt' Q A 'Qiiff E . T. if 1' ff, "ll " ow' . . -ff. . J-V w . Tl .sf ., . 'fzgjh V. in Vincent Abba Epsilon Pi left to right. Front Row: Mike Cohen, Al Kurland, Jonny Lewis, Craig Lustig, Sheldon Black, Slinky Siegil, Andy Friedlander, Crash Kaplan, J.T. Teplitsky, Billy Yerman, Steve Weill, Stu Schiff, Scott Debop, Mark Goodman, Neil Burwick, Howard Doppelt, Fred Diamond, Stephen Block, Phil D'Adesky. Second Row: Jay Silver, Steve Bernstein, Sammy Samuels, Jeff Weinstein, Chuchi Siefil, Jeff Brodie, Jon Mazursky, Albert Saltz, Dave Kusiel, Don Greenwald, Bubbles Greene, Mike Wolf, Lane Frostbaum, Dan Lux, Dave Gottfried. Third Row: Mike Honor, Jay D. Kilty, Tom Zeiler, Pete Cohn, Billy Barn, Dave Socolow, Dave Tupler, Mark Levitt, Glen Handler, Lewis Feinstein, Steve Hor- witz, Spike Luz, Glen Rubin, Ozzie Ostrow, Paul Hirshfeld, Josh Kunter, Lupie Dem, Dave Fallick, Lou Nelson, Back Rows: Randy Schwartz, Rick Blumm, Paul Schlessinger, Dave Savage, Gary Glasser, Steve Wallach, Jay Gottesman, Doug Sandoff, Joe Bos- ton, Paul Peck, Rich Berman, Chuck Dieserhouse, Marc Byron, Brad Howell, Lary Fish, Mike Mann, Dave Needle, Wex, Mike Jaffe, Rob Ehudin, Mark Ripps, Mike Bronstein, Jay Rap, Howard Sklar, Jay Haslpern, Harold Grodberg, Jordy Plasker. Alpha Tau Omega left to right. Front Row: Rick Kosow, Fred Glassman, David Cohen, Evan Myrianthopoulos, David Keirholtz, Felicia Serpico. Second Row: James Alpert, Kathy Cavitch, Neil Smith, Chris Cronin, James McMahon, Tom Korchak, Abe Arril- laga, Mitch Davis, Betty Prior, Ron Ferguson. Third Row: Kevin Scollard, Russ Broda, Frank Shaffer, Clark Smith, Joanne Rigney, Joe Miller, Karen Gleicher, Seth Weissman, Robert Morley, John Allison, Andy Lee. Fourth Row: Willard Brann, Jennifer Brown, Chris Eames, Chase Donaldson, Doug Winokur, Chris Bach. Fifth Row: Bill McAlvany, Scott Shepard, Andy Cole, Eric Waldorff, Howard Green, Quinn, Jonathan Paul, Paul Marquardt, Mark Light. Sixth Row: James Fox, John Springer, Ed Crawford, Chad Ciotti, Gorm Ferger, George Dell, John Day, Jerry Beauchamp, Gordon Barclay, Dave Mycek. Seventh Row: Tom Henry, Eric Olson, Adam Waltzer, Matt Fisher, Ken Blue. . Alpha Phi Alpha left to right. Front Row: Ted Gullatt, Eric Morrow, D'Angello K. Collier, Eddie Murphy, Daryl Haynes. Oliver Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha Tau Omega, Alpha Phi Alphaf169 - Ns 5 , , .wi ' -B, '- ms., , " F" 5 m x- , Sv ax s f .fig A S :J 4 -H x S X .Qfih r. :S x-X.5.fg rx-NNQ Mfg.-:w a xwbifggeyk .. 6 X X: gg+fkfg? Qi' Q. 4 X ' " - w " xr Rib.- X N X ,. 4' 2, use ff. .2155 . -,Q f.-0.2, . gn- . 3 SSM x, . VN X XXJX , .x 170 f Greeks W ' SK X as uv' 4343 vi LGQQ. V..if Q,-ns. x 5 A f,. .SQ ya x, X 1 ' -i- i I .nt v ,kb W I Nickey Beta Theta Pileft to right. Front Row: Joe Valette, tani. Back Row: John Probst, Ken Gilbert, Bret Marks. Not Pictured: Philip Quinn, Marc Engel, Har- David Keiser Melody George Melissa Mogelnicki Crumpton Wesley Wilkins, David Oakes, Lenny ry Green. Susan Harrington Richard Takamoto Andy Mah- Vincent Delta Tau Delta left to right. Front Row: E.T. Drachman Howard Chetkoff Rico Roaman Alan Bob Eno. Seth Warech Dalfe Whiffs- Baek R0Wi McClymonds Mary Hart Humble, Ricky Solomon. Birdman. Third Row: Doug Barnett Geoff Gordon, Jeff Fwall Ken Moskohil-75 John B355 Jed Metzger Second Row: Mario Bass David Wipple Jr. Count Boris Alpern, Izzy Olson, Phil Diamond, Sig Freund Mike Busehman Jimi V55il0ff- I 1 l . , , v 1 , v i r v v - y ' 1 3' Lk X 5 21 Q t ' - n YV' ti J ' Kappa Alpha left to right. Front Row: Jerry Jack- Blancard, Ty Tison, Tom Curtis. Third Row: Lee ham, Bob VanOrden, John Muntean, Brett Baines, son, John lrvin, Phil McCurdy, Anthony Everett, Fontain, Danny Rabb, Randy Johnson, John Noe- Scot Callahan, Ritchie Williams, Paul Scott, Jeff Tony Consalo, David Walker, John Clagett, Randy sen, Steve Winch, John Paul, Powell Jones, Jeff Wingate, Sean McReynolds, Jay Kelley, Greg Pau- Towers, Bill Dallas, Paul Spitznagel, Tom Esposito, Short, Clark Armitage, Doug Griffith, Alan Butts, lus, Gary Leonard, Mike Hehman. Second Row, Tom C. Johnson, Greg Mickey Waters, Bryan Woods, Bucky Byrwa, Den- Bauer, Evan Jones, Dan Mannix, Alan Boling, Bob ver Clark, Ellen Jones, David Moseman, Mac Beck- Beta Theta Pi., Delta Tau Delta, Kappa Alphaf171 L., I f .2 m lx 5' I If .'.K.k.g. N ., fy I fm 4: 47.524 ' , :X 'ai ' 'i- 'W - . y . ' '57 75' , f' .9- 'M-f A ...J 6' My I 'a M V ff . .. 'L f J, ' I ' F N. -W1 lf ' ,g Qif' , gf' ' NA ' "ff" 4 , r fj - A 6 ,' ,Q ' A J , 7 ,. v t - 5 ,gg 1 ' YJ ' f ' W 'Q nf 'L AY" ' , is 'A Y. an Y 1. fiat 80 U! LI 'I VV W A 1.-+M..ff .4 V ffm2 "' Q ff' . ' -- -:'fif'w'r':fm4 f-- ,. ij we 2, m V Q iw Q " ' 1-3 9 1 'Q' -3 ., ' iz. ls . H' 4'-N L .1 ,a ' ? . ,f 2 7 1 . N -1 1 37 ,fix VS. --, A 1 72fGreeks k WEQE1 MLNIHUL THEN! fu? i1 , Pi Kappa Alpha left to right. Front Row: Kim Dun- ham Joanne Oakes Ramie Little Laurie Irvine Kim Broadbooks Leslie Albin Michelle Stark Eleni Martine Kathy Schwartz Judy Pecarsky. Second Row: Rick Mars David Green Larry Stoumen Jeff Meltzer Bruce Wobeck Phil Arlen Scott Porten, Rich Steinberg Tony Berkman Ray Benson Larry Goodman, Third Row: Jon Ambos Joe Balmer Herb Subin Roland Kratzer Lee Bagel Steve Mor- ganstein Ted Millison Fourth Row: David Kossoff, Lester Leung Breay Paty Shaun Houston Lloyd Gritz, Stu Statland Steve Winter Joel Perchik, Jeff Bloom Ben Smith John Reisman. Filth Row: Tom Root Rob Krug Terry Fowble Ted Carter, Tom Epperson Jeff McCartney Russ Alper Aaron Gil- bert Phil Malakoff Julio Hernandez, Rob Pearl- stein, Ken Schoen Jeff Goss, Scott Kilpatrick, Mitch Bernstein, Andy Bauman, Mike Levy, Mitch Katz Ken Levy Lee Rothman, Kyle Katz, Mitch Auerbach Dennis de Gracia Randy Vickery Anth- ony Ferrara, Scott Gurwin Dave Rodriquez Andy lserson Scott Nadler, Danny Minkin Herb Beron Mike Hellstrom Eric Hovdesven. ur Sigma Nu left to right. Front Row: Kevah Kaj- heni John Kahn, Louis Gvay, Scott Rome Pe- ter Maxman Vincent Boyle. Second Row: Ja- mie Steinman Liz Wickstrom David Chener Julie Kurzman Philip Kaplan Paul Lalli Andy Schwartz, Manan Powers. Third Row: Mark Weinberger Rich Cohn Roger Desenberg Da- vid Bennfield Armando Gonzalez Sherri Wil- liams Mitchell Marcus Stevie Jurnavey, Jeff 'ff Lackner David Postem, Berg Dave Lawson. Fourth Row: Andy Chonoles, Tom Murtaugh Mark Kolligan, Craig Dershowitz, Andres Dela- Cruz, Steve Borowka, Mahlie Lindquist There- sa Gallagher Marc Goldstein, Robert Appleton Neal E. Schulwolf. Fifth Row: Sal Buffa, Tom Speir, Jim McGean Steven Cazarou Jim Gril- lich Howard Klar, Peter Soloff Bruce Flegel- son Bobby Simons Barry Pfeifer Jon Leven- stein. Sixth Row: Jeff Block Brian Wood Ralph lerardi Kenny Lebersfeld Rick Vaughn Tom Powell Brent Norris, Rich Redvanley Sam Katzman Bill Sevalas Scott Kleiman. li - -5.1 ' A G i 11.1 - ,f I ?' ' - Pi' 1 - 2 -- i A' -2 Bland The Brothers of Sigma Chi Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Nu, Sigma Chi! 173 ., . C .ff . 1 '-. 1 -' ff . v 1 V ,. . 'ws j I 'I 'l 5,,r-Af-'fl' , J 4' 3 f fi 11- Q I 4 " 5 " ki"- , 4 ...V '. -.4 Y, w 'P Q -dr" F 6' EQ? X f gg '- K ?, X I 1 Q s ., 9, me X, V I X 4 f Q I 174fGreeks Tau Epsilon Phi left to right. Front Row: Opie Adler, Barney Garner, Adam Semla, lra Grossed, David Fuchter, Harry Carrier, Larry Leager. Second Row: Bob Dix, Paul Schrigi, Andy Silfin, Lance Silfin, Steve Tilcman, Deryk Jones, Ricky Blade. Third Row: Barry Parness, Amy Hubby, Mike Bumbler, Chuckles Berk, Ira Splatt, Evan Rosen- stein, Craig Virginia, Cory Less, Richard Plow, Adam Ridell, Joe Gilliam. Fourth Row: Rick Rimler, Rich Liebowitz, Dave lrwin, Johny Walin, Phil Poodolsky, Dave Garden, Coach Phillips, Dave Weiser. Fifth Row: Bernard Berger, Sam Gevisenheit, Neil Cohen, Dave Hers shey, Dave Storkenstein, Bob P. Young. Not Pictured: Fallan Roth- schild, Rob Freigot, Mark Klinea, Cliff Lieb, Brian Karefield, Glenn La Shchleen, Todd Froget, Marc Senet, Mike A. Kidorf, Rich Bender, Brad Fishsense, Brad Burnstein, Marc Forrister, Jr. NICKEY Phi Delta Theta left to right Front Row Randy Orlando Craig Eichler Doug Arney, Susan Goar, Vince Spoto. Back Row: Jeff Booth, Chip Wilmot, Wilson Shawn Coady Todd Mack Mark Garrison Jay Rotholz Tom Copulos John Johnson, Rick Cordell Ratno, Dave Ross, Dave Ruth, Alan Klas- Second Row Rob Kodsi Dave Levy Reid Glaws Roth Tim Strayer Ken Murphy Ron Pauldine, feld, Leo Eickhoff, Barbara Pruitt, Andy Ordover. Phi Gamma Delta left to right. Front Row: Larry Carahalios, Jay Wolitz, Mitch Clair, Jeff Robbing, Howard Silverman, Craig Kalter, Rocky. Second Row: Steve Rudd, Ben Bobon, Steve Klein, Randy Altmann, Third Row: Fred Leahy, Jerry Moreno, Don Williams Fourth Row: Craig Goldenberg, Scott Freeman, Scott Galin, Marty Steine, Gerald Lowrey, Steve Kloosterboer, Ken Harsen.Not Pictured: Bernie Fischer, John Millner, Brad Glick, Jeff Unger, Mike Devoney, Larry Wiseman, Mark Euster, Lance Schreier, Louis Weimer, Dave Suddeth, Scott Niditch, Mike Frank, Phil Solomon, Tracey Roth, Andy Wedeen, Gary Schrieber, Dave Shevrin, Andy Kronitz, Barry Greenberg, Jer- emy Kraff, Gary Morton, Mike Rubenstein, Russ Marwin, Dave Fisher, Bill Brosius, Ted Schiff, San Hasabris, Marc Schwartz, Gabe Spector, Brian Wallach, Rober Berger, Dave Klein, Mike Sard, John Riemensch, neider, Stuart Soberman, Ken Udell, Brett Roth. Tau Epsilon Phi, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Deltaf175 Greek Week Greek Week is one filled with activities edl rounded out events open to the cam- designed not only to unify the members pus. of the fraternities and sororities here on Several activities were held that were campus but also to increase awareness of exclusively for Greeks. An all Greek the goals and ideals of the Greek system chapter featured an alcohol awareness throughout the entire Emory community. program by Craig Jones of BACCHUS This year's Greek Week, co-sponsored by and a hilarious performance by Tom the Panhellenic and lntra-Fraternity Parks, a Punchline comedian who has ap- Councils, was definitely the best in recent peared on the Johnny Carson show. years. Coordinators Becky Farmer, Su- Later in the week field events dominated san Gouinlock, lan Weiner, and Brent one afternoon with contests as beer-chug- Norris worked together on lining up a ging, sack-races, and "grudge match" variety of events that included everyone tug-of-wars in sloppy mud. on campus: faculty, administration, and Undeniably, the highlight of the 1982 students - Greeks and non-Greeks. It Greek Week was Dooley's Halloween spanned the week of October 24-31, Costume Ball at the Omni. A UCB co- The week was blessed with beautiful sponsored event, it was open to the en- weather and welcomed enthusiastically. tire Emory community and was a tremen- Kicking it off was an open 2.1 mile "Fun dous success, a fact verified by the atten- Run" held on a brisk sunny day in Lull- dance. The recording group Franke and water Park. Co-sponsored by the Easy the Knockouts performed foracostumed Striders, the run was both well organized crowd which included, of course, the and well received. guest of honor, James T. Dooley. This A definite highlight was the UCB co- night accomplished the almost impossible sponsored concert performance by feat of unifying the entire Emory commu- J "Bush Doctor" Peter Tosh, Students nity in a feeling of school spirit and pride. packed the Agora and danced to pulsing This, ultimately, is what the cherished tra- i , , reggae rhythms while quaffing quarter dition of Greek Week is about. f brews in souvenir cups. A Faculty Wine and Cheese Happy Hour and two show- Maureen F. Abbate ings of "Caddyshack" tvery well attend- . ,Q Nickey Q . , Eo5'!s'.LxvJric.f',9 1 I -I N -I V, U ,Ewa-v ue-, .,,,, A .- ., - ,W .v. - E .Q?.g 1'6" ,sf f,,,. 9 W . v .vs , -. - ,ff e ,YQ exif' l 7bf'Greek Week Alpha Delta Pileft to right. Front Row: Dorle Kind, Cindy Grieves Elizabeth Holcomb Michele McKuen Mary K. Dyer Leigh Topping Tandy Stiller Celia Stewart Andrea Allen Susan Hicker- son Becky Lanford Kate McCrary Valerie Bialko. Second Row: Fran Morris Carol Dalton Jayne Cas- sidy Gail Goldsmith Lynne Garrison Meredith Bishop Carolyn Anderson Marian Mercado Susan Armor. Third Row: Simone Dumermuth, Mary Rosser Cherie Wilson, Janet Hallazgo Judith Prough. Fourth Row: Sahdna Vijay, Tona Munday, Missy Wrenn Sarah Cone Jennifer Pirkle Nancy Norris, Lisa Deangelis Anne Schwartzmann, Holly Hamilton Courtney Franz, Jan Ellington Carol Anne Duffel, Lisa Lankau Susan Sorenson, Debbie Mancoll, Barbara Hoffman Emilie Morris Margaret Gonzales Bradford, Desiree Demarest, Katie Hurley, Heather Heintz Sherrie Williams, Mandy Rubin, Helen Schulman Laura Goldrich Ellen Davis Natalie Al- derson Mary Noll Kathy McMillon Kim Haiback Sue Bennett. Fifth Row: Mary House Gay Turner Larissa Kopps Alexandra Sack, Kristen Huebner Susan Landsdell Julie Hall. Alpha Epsilon Phi left to right. Front Row: Judy Bachrach Marlene Ginzburg Geri Leff Jodi Cory Kopitsky Debbie Herbert Allison Klein Sherri Arbiser Randi Sausner Ellen Sabin Sue Gel- len Vida Buchalter Amy Solomon Lori Berman Diane Kohn Eileen Ruston Ray Dickman Jackie Jove Melissa Mesulam Wendy Feldman Sue Fein- berg Marla Klarman Beth Karpel, Lisa Snyder, Gail Small Linda Zuckerman Sue Ellner Lori Fal- lis Roni Rothenberg Lori Klinghoffer. Standing: Marnie Lustig Sherri Kronthal Jodi Bergman Deb- bie Binder Kim Natovitz Debbie Loeb Donna Ols- zowka Penny Masur Donna Palley Wendy Kestin Debbie Fine Cheryl Cohen Stephanie Gross Deb- bie Richman Bonnie Cammeyer Erica Wald Leslie Deming, Andrea Paul, Karen Kabram Nancy Pitt- man Robin Federman Jan Schwob Elaine Kauf- man Judi Renbaum, Terry Levy Phylanne Oken berger Pam Fried Stacey Kaplan, Holly Vigodsky Bonnie Rubenstern Heidi Silverberg Michelle Bern- stein Karen Rock Laura Klein Lisa Rosenblatt Gay Nortman Tammy Schuster Denise Gotsdiner Miriam Ginzburg Hope Chafiian Caryn Feinberg Valerie Engel. V V V V V V V Kudler, Janet Savelle, Heidi Torosick, Dana Semet, Jeanne Liebman, Jane Miller, Nancy Schiffman, Kelly KOSSQI, Jill Mackler, Pam Weiss, Debbie Neu- V V -..,. V V V V V V V V V V V 2" ? A PHA .4-,, Vv 4.5.1 1 if ff Alpha Kappa Alpha seated Wanda Owens, Sharon Glover, Gladys Jones, Lisa Cooper Standing Char- lette Reed, Kimberly Oliver, Angie Hankinson, Vashti Ray, Valerie Rudolph, not pictured Shelley Robertson. Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha Kappa Alphaj177 5, 'Y .j, .gi Greek Week 'S Nlckey in 30 .E U ,Q 1 Nickey Nickev T W.. .ff- 1 ,ij Nickey Nickey 178fGreek Week Alpha Chi Omega left to right. Front Row: Cindy Krus, Amy Ginsberg, Rindi Kixson, Noelle Scaldara, Paige Ammon, Debbie Spenger, Ann Parsons, Me- lissa Lehrman, Melanie Chastain, Beverly Liggett, Kathy Krog, Kathryne Howell, Paula Mueller. Sec- ond Row: Amy Jacobsen, Amy Palder, Leah Berkowitz, Daphne Pierce, Sarajane Conklin, B.G. Brooks, Margaret Walker, Susan Baer, Third Row: Jennifer Waddell, Joanie Creigh, Linda Eades, Kathy Dixon, Sharon Terr, Mindy Agin, Marycarol Joyce, Jennifer Brown, Winnie White, Lauren Do- dek, Fourth Row: Carrie Gilbreth, Melissa Williams, Andrea Weinberg, Janie Plessett, Lillian Riesel, Laura Fandrich, Susan Donohue, Connie Fry, Moni- que Huiet, Barbara Pruett. Fifth Row: Karen Weaver, Karen Emery, Carla Pope, Amy Logan, Beverly Campbell, Shelly Cannon, Cheryl Fischer, Patricia Armstrong, Leanne Mason, Dania Long, Sue Fishbein, Becky Livingston, Beth Bullock, Danna Fugate, Ju-Hsin Wer, Donna Fong-Yee, Lauri Bower, Lisa Odierna, Eleanor Jones, Delta Delta Delta left to right. Front Row: Delynn Devidson, Sara Wells, Debbie Leeds, Teresa Penly, Jeanne Maguire, Angie Perella, Kristin Norris, Kelly Ray, Carole Whaley, Sue Peace, Susan Ferrara, Brooke Eaton, Aynne Granet, Pam Johananoff, Tri- cia Smith, Erin Hurley. Second Row: Shari Cavan- augh, Rande Dworkin, Pam Daiker, Sheryl Spinelli, Leah Rhomberg, Helen Tarver, Ann Harris, Mi- chelle Stark, Laura Dew, Jordana Eisner, Elizabeth Nickey, Karrie Walters, Maria LaTour, Janet Kohn, Jennifer Bush, Maggie Acres. Third Row: Kiki Lar- kin, Jeanne Keller, Jeanne Wilson, Nancy Vasquez, lngrid Voljavec, Laurie Irvine, Julie Culp, Leanne Wilson, Jane Cooney, Mary Doerhoefer, Erika Noonberg, Connie Hammonds, Lisa Royal, Kath- leen Osvath, Randi Fireman. Fourth Row: Suzanne ii 1 ,Ln Szabo, Grace Flynn, Nan Rigby, Judy Arthur, Kelly Thoburn, Susan Clay, Angie Drado, Sandy Gardner, Coleen Tomasik, Grace Clegg, Marci Elliott, Karen Henry, Robin Levine, Coleen Hartsok, Sarah McKinnon, Jane Davis, Lauren Genck, Debbie Ai- ken, Dianne Elsom. Delta Sigma Theta left to right. Seated: Linda Jor- dan, Sherri Arnold, Lalla Walker. Back Row: Mi- chelle Rogers, Casandra Gordon, Sherlee Parkin- son. Alpha Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Sigma Thetaf179 KK l Y 4 , 2 f - '- ff-12-V2-' 31 , 'E X xii., ff x N, x .Q -S'--x E 1Q.'- POWS for -.... Fm my, " v H - ul". mb 'LT 1 , ' .' ,' -' ZW ' .-1- ., 'EE-:-'17-5 5'-N?-. A . 5155? E1-,sgfqi 11 :aa-E --fi' v A L11- vigr fx, r-.v any L..l1u,,, , N 51, .sf-"H ff' xfx - .2 H552 :I 'in N. 4. . X 'hw' I rwmrlsi Morris Morris L-is Delta Phi Epsilon left to right. Lying Down: Teri Platt Marcia Matalon. Front Row: Sharon Garson Leslie Rogovin Rachel Weinstock Lisa Brownstein Susan Ballato Nicole Wilson Margo Simon Debbie Glick Tammi Goldin Janet Weisinger Allison Sands Abra Mattenson Linda Teltsher Diana Grub Karen Kress Second Row: Amy Leach Jill Kotlove Debbie Klein Karen Dow Mindy Katz Alese Teres Risa Satlof Leslie Berkelhammer Stacey Funt Lauren Hagendorf Jennifer Jackman Amy Sonin Jane Oberwager Lisa Kohn Elyssa Kolin Michelle Speigelman Gail Silberman. Third Row: Nora Leiman Leslie Albin Lynn Lowry Lauren Lucks Wandy Goldberg Laurie Mayerson Hope Tieman Suzy Goldberg Laurie Stanley. Fourth Row: Sandy Tatarsky Amy Blum Elaine Gendel Melissa Moses Robin Carney Julie Solomon Susan Boolbol Susan Conrad Sharon Fein Karen Slove Ellen Berlin. Fifth Row: Faith Leifman Joanne Stein Andrea Schneider Sheri Kesser Nancy Carrol Lauren Raukind Jamie Steinberg Liz Friedfeld Vivian Levy Lydia Lakind Debbie Lieb Mara Fisher Stefanie Porges Suzan Feld- messer Victoria Pepe. Sixth Row: Lilly Golden Lauren Rio Lauren Putter Debbie Swartz Bonnie Kessler Lori Greenfield Adina Weiner Gay Rineberg Kerry Iris Lori Nadler Julie Perelman Elaine Nussbaum Stefanie Sanders. Seventh Row: Jane Florin Beth Wilcov Jacqui Aghion Terry Gallagher Ellen Diamond Adele Obermayer Kathy Schwartz Brett Shulman Gail Lang Jacalyn Claire Debbie Stein. , 'Q V1 ,Y Y i v v . 4 e E , , , . , 5 'S 'J . . . . . . s as Kappa Alpha Theta left to right. First Row: Pam Feige, Mary Quoyeser, lrene Monnet, Kelly John- Holt, Ginger Greer, Patti Westermann, Louisa Jus- Beaverforden, Trish Baughman, Robin Adams, Me- son, Susie Padgett, Janice Butler, Sigrid Kim- tis, Annette Hickham, Diana Llorca, Lisa Halpern, lissa Mogelnicki, Joey Lowenstein, Catherine Hel- brough. Third Row: Bonnie Padwa, Gay O'neal, Cammie Caine, Cindy Monson, Gayle Hastings, derman, Becky Weincek, Leslie Guenther, Kim Ruth Hughs, Susan Crawford, Carol Brisbin, Susan Sharon McDonell. Fifth Row: Carol McDaniel, Deb- Boyd, Susan Pyle, Emily Looney, Deanna Kosh, Sirmans, Theresa Blum, Maureen Abbate, Lori bie Dunbar, Cathy McCall, Margie Mothershead, Andrea Boone, Melinda Sheppard, Melissa Dever- Katz, Laura Gussin, Susan Harrington, Melody Miko Oei, Gina Greco, Kris Yohe, Debbie Ramos, eaux, Linna Fox, Nina Kelley. Second Row: Joy George, Becky Farmer, Debbie Marcadis, Barbara Susan Casey, Sarah Harton, Polly Johnson, Erica Routzahn, Cindy Read, Alyson Levy, Kathy Mullins, Wilson, Jennifer Jennings. Fourth Row: RoseAnn Stumvoll, Carolyn Williamson, Elizabeth Wagner, Cassandra Cook, Ann Digirolamo, Jennifer Bon- Hansen, Mary Middlemas, Katherine Thomas, MaryLee Gold. anno, Margaret Kawula, Leslie Turinsky, Kyra Gretchen Dill, Leigh Hardison, Ann Compton, Alys ' 2 ff' Jw',,., 'li' - t, ' J 1 :L ,ou I AL 4' -fit, . ' ' ' 1 " W "" ' cw it i V ' f '75 . 5 ' f - in I V ar A , z 1 wa- V 5 ' " , at " , F A' 1 '- W v Qi- ll 1 jj, .fgf:E' ",, 'ft Garter Kappa Delta left to right. Front Row: Laura Lover, cos, Laurie Crowe, Bonnie Weisman, Kathleen Hinson, Tracy McKinney, Mag ie Green, Leah 9 Sara Sundheim, Melody Younglove, Cindy Kochen- Compton, Beth Stubenbord, Andrea Binner, Beth Simpson, Catherine Baum, Roxanne Cox, Julie sparger, Selena Chen, Laura Bachman, Mary Jane Goldie, Jeanne James, Sharon Coull, Amy Fillingen, Merrit, Lisa Matthews, Donna Higgs, Helen Bled- Steinthal, lna Allison, Kathy Taylor, Joanne Scott, Ann Garrison. Third Row: Jill Sellers, Robin Pep- soe. Jill Fields, Sallie McGill. Second Row: Julie Paplea- pers, Lisa Kaley, Lea Gilliam, Kimrey Ross, Sherri Delta Phi Epsilon, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Delta! 181 E 5- 'La Kappa Kappa Gamma left to right Front Row Rachel Gerkin Katheen Frawley Cathy Burgess Laura Browne Wendy Antonoff Second Row Lau ra Weeks Cathy Wilbourn Karla McCullen Ellene Welsh Kathy Schulte Debbie Smith Carol Hall man Amanda Rowell Wendy Scherlis Judy Jor dan Patty Brennan Jill Fasulo Third Row Tia Joslin Celia Hemer Nancy Hodge Misty Sperry Carolina Arias Shelly Hyer Brenda Joy Bernstein Tracy Ovard Powell White Pam Mattinson Martha Farabee Kathy Jackson Virginia Cans Susan Stan fill Elizabeth Miles Tracy Messmer Beth Stuart Karen Webster Fourth Row Karen Wohlleben Sarah Reese Allison Bass Theresa Stack Debbie Match Ann Whistler Sarah Friedman Sarah Elliott Karolyn Carr Joan Hogan Jennifer Morss Risa Swell Emily Heller Margaret Welch Fifth Row Gwen Jolly Beth Morrison Liz Wickstron Susan Gouinlock Page Buckhannon Missy Collee Debbie Allen Maureen Jenci Lynn Dietrich Susan Higgs Ann Day 1 1 1 1 1 -1 1 1 ' 1 V 1 . 1 1 1 1 . -I -1 ' 1 I 1 h A 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 V 1 I 1 1 .1 ' - I 1 1 41 V A 1 V 1 Chi Omega left to right, Front Row: Kim McFann, Livingston. Second Row: Jenny Arend, Lisa Howe, Not Shown: Christie Ernst, Becky Watson, Clau- Marlette Williams, Pam Morrison, Paula Collins, Ka- Elva Moolchan, Kathy Garbrick, Diane Ochs, Mary dette Carrion, Denise Cardot, ren Gheesling, Stacye Steele, Cathy Green, Amy Weaks, Anne DeFranks, Chris Werft, Ann Walker. Chi Omega, Kappa Kappa Gammaf183 Student life .gi Cartel McEachern Student Lif:-11185 l86fSe SI NIIIUIIQY Seniors J oy It Will Soon Be That Time Of Year Gonzales and Denise Cardot smile for the future. Anticipation. Frustration. Rejections. Interviews. Pass-fail. Senioritis. Pick one of the above to describe your year. Pick all of the above if it was your senior year. Senior year. Soes anyone hear the toll- ing of a bell? What would it toll for? Drownproofing. Registration in the gym land always being the last letter.l Dummy courses or alt 3 from computerized pre- registration. The LOTTERY. The new gym and dorm opening after we leave. Plusfminus. Four, three, or two years of images and memories packed inside and ready to explode the morning of May 16. Friends. No more "See you in fall" or "How was winterfspring break?" lt's the time for letters and serious letter writing to maintain these friendships we've earned. It'll be true: Long distance is the next best thing to being there. The last time. No more pre-registra- tion, drop-add, or tuition payments. Uni- form requirements - did I fulfill part C of area II? IOf course.l Explain once again niors ibn . .- V" W. Y .-!,,, v Al ln. how quarter hours convert to semester's. INo more.j It is a good thing our Wednesdays are not Wonderful. What better way to pre- pare us for the professional Ii.e., outsidei world? Of course, after three years of Wonderful bliss, it took time to adjust. But Titillating Tuesdays and Terrific Thurs- days, or Marvelous Mondays, Whimsical Wednesdays Inothing's the same as Won- derfulj, and Fantastic Fridays Idepending on your schedulej made adjustment possi- ble. Except for those stuck with just Sleeping Saturdays and Studying Sun- days, but then again, that's life. Wow. Life, as in out there. ls there such a dichotomy between college and the real world? Doesn't the real world exist during the summers? ls the fact that there's no Emory after this summer important? Status. After May 16, no longer can we claim to be the "top eagles", the number one class Iahem, biased I know but this is the senior sectionl. The class of '83 will be the newest alums on the block for rather the computer. Did you know about the alum association? You will soon, one of the hazards of graduation.l Oh no - the word. The official cere- mony of the passage to somewhere. We're all going, that's the finality Ifatali- ty?j of senior year. Even if we stay in Atlanta or at Emory, it won't be the same. It can't be, it shouldn't be. It won't be our college years. College years. Forever in our hearts and memories. The good and bad, the fun and sad: what a way to learn. Cheers to our past and, most importantly, to our future. IStrange - the word memory has emory in it. Hindsight or foresight - de- pends if you're arriving or leaving.l People are unreasonable, illogical and self-centered Love them anyway. lf you do good, people will accuse you of ulterior motives Do good anyway. If you are successful, you win false friends and true enemies Succeed anyway The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow . . Do good anyway. Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable , Be honest and frank anyway. People favor underdogs but follow only topdogs . . Fight for some underdogs anyway. What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight . Build anyway. People really need help but may attack you if you help them Help people anyway. The one you give to and love the most may leave you alone . . . Love that one anyway. The treasures of life may be quickly taken away by death . Live life anyway. Give the world the best you have and you'll get kicked in the teeth . . Give the world the best you have . . , ANYWAY Submitted anonymously "Emory is very much like I imagined it would be before I came here. The main difference is that I expected Emoroids to be 'masterminds', whereas I found out all Emoroids just wish they were masterminds. Long live the Emor- oidsf' Submitted anonymously lby B27 This is the first of the Senior Memories sub- mitted by those graduating in May. Letters were sent out asking for experiences, and these stories are the replies received. Thank you to the people who were willing to share their stories and pictures. Se o f187 AII3II3'U'-II3Ilf'l2IIiIEII2 Michael Y. Abbo A Kevin C. Abbott Amy Abernathy A A Lynne Adler A A A Allison Alford Andrew Altman A Karen Appel Jack Arbiser Jennifer Anne Arend Deborah Arnold A A Russell Bain A Carina Banez John G. Banich Ramie Baraff A Phyllis Barker Brooks Barnes Alison Bass A A Kevin Charles Bast George William Baxter A A Ellen Becker 188fSenior Biology Biology Psychology Economics Anthropology History English Chemistry Accounting Nursing Chemistry Finance Economics Psychology A English Marketing .Nursing Economics A AAPhysics A AChemistry IBIENIEZIDAI-IBIDAIDIBlljllly N. s s 41? X C SZ L if' . F' l .44 Marc Benezra Debra Bercaw Scott B. Berger B.J. Berger Jodi Beth Bergman Charles Berk Michele Bernstein lohn Berry Jeffrey Billings Debbie Birkey Deborah L. Black Laura Black Cindy Blair Jayne Bloomberg Raymond Neill Borland Lynne Y. Borsuk Eric Bour Elton Bowen Theron C. Bowers, Jr Jane Bradbury Psychology Psychology Psychology Chemistry Business Economics Political Science English Psychology Nursing Liberal Studies Geology Biology Economics Chemistry Political Science Anthropology Chemistry Chemistry Nursing Seniorsf 189 IBIIQUCIK'-'CIHAIDIB UNIEAVU Eddie Brock Thomas William Brooks, Michael Brown Phyllis Kaye Brundidge Sherry Bryant Eric Bucselal Salvatore M. Buffa Beth Bullock Pamela K. Burrell Joanna Burt Wey Camp Catherine A. Cardosa Denise Cardot Luis Carrillo l Claudette Helena Carrion Sandy Caswell Gary Cato Jim Cavanagh Sharon Chadwick Cris Charboneau 190fSeniors Chemistry Management Accounting Chemistry Sociology Physics Psychology Mathematics Marketing Finance Accounting Biology Chemistry ChemistryfBiology Psychology Psychology Business Administration Spanish Accounting Political Science 'CIHIEWlllfli-'DUIIQMVIIN ff -if. X 2 Amy Chefitz Psychology Cathe Ann Chiaramonte Biology Suzanne Chung-A-On Chemistry Cynthia E. Clark PsychologyfSociology Jeffrey A. Clark History Elizabeth A. Clarke Anthropology Grace Clegg Marketing Geoff Clement Mathematics Melissa Landon Cobbs PsychologyfMusic David Cochran Biology Elizabeth Berkshire Coe Political Science Cheryl Faith Cohen BiologyfPsychology Leon M. Cohen Mathematics Michael Cohen History Maria S. Cohilas Peter Cohn Peter Alexander Cole Roger Conrad Peter Conroy Andrew Corwin Political Science Political Science Chemistry Anthropology Psychology History Seniorsf 191 SIENIIIDIID MKlIffM'UII2lIIIf5 "Oh look. It says 'Formal Pose.' If I'd known I would've worn my tux," some- one ahead of me joked. "Just as well," I thought, "since we're already in costume." I was wearing a skirt, a navy blazer, and a rust turtleneck. I had rolled my hair in defiance of Atlanta's October monsoon season. Prepared to pose, I looked like a Pomerantz gn Photo by Sara Lash mature future leader of America, the hopes and dreams my class yearned to remember from the Emory era were per- sonified in my conservative garb and pol- ished makeup. Young men in line behind me looked equally farcical in their outfits. Guys who had forgotten the artistic pleasures of ty- ing the perfect Windsor knot had searched out tweeds and buttondowns. No more tee shirts and gym shorts. This was the senior photo - excuse me - portrait fit even sounded pompous and planned to our earsl. The classic look was the guy in scruffy jeans and sneakers who looked like a Britches model from the waist up. "Smile for the camera." Luckily the whole world knows that a photo is flat, two dimension- al, and not really publicized as representa- tive of reality. Illusion, then. An image we wanted to begin seeing when we looked at ourselves. From the waist up, we com- formed to the norms of the real world, and prayed they would not soon ask us for a full length view we might feel awk- ward producing. lOne young man said that he really wasn't too "hung up" on looking like a junior executive, he just wanted to make it into the CAMPUS for the first time in his four years here. Something about being a Senior had brought out that last ditch des- peration to be a part of the school we're leaving.l - Ginger Rucker f 'E'UlU'ClI'l"lD'UlDlDlElllI- Cathy Couch Joanie Creigh Kelly Cummings Bill Custer Carol Dalton Bryan Keith Darling Angela Davis John Davis Psychology French Nursing Political Science Finance Chemistry Accounting Biology Gary Dearison MathematicsfComputer Science John Debenedett Anne J. DeFranks David L. Del Vecchio Renata Dennis Eric B. Dent Pedro Diaz Dawn Disher Kathy Deleda Dixon James F. Dolin Chase Donaldson Howard Doppelt Biology Computer Science History Nursing Computer Science Chemistry Nursing English Psychology Political Science Biology Seniorsf193 IDIIJNIBAIIQI-IFAIIQMKIEIID Debbie Dunbar Carolyn Duncan Douglas M. Durrance David A. Eagle Chris Eames Jacqueline Edinger Mary Susan Elias Chet Elkind Sarah Elliott lrving J.P. Elshoff Julian Emanuel Terri England Roseanne English Christie Ernst Dwight J. Errickson Mark Euster Craig Evans James l. Falek Jane E, Fanslow Rebecca Nell Farmer 194fSeniors Marketing Chemistry International Relations History Political Science Psychology Political Science Psychology Geology Computer Science Finance Mathematics Mathematics Biology Biology Psychology Chemistry Mathematics EnglishfPsychology Political Science IFAUIIEIIQI-IFIIQIEIEMMXN '41 Y fl' pi -es' Jo Beth Fater Armando Fernandez Julie I. Fershtman , Lucy Fieldhouse . Jill Fields , . Amy L. Fillingim Debra J. Fine . Steven Fine Bonnie Finklea Scott Firestone Adam Fischler Cheryl Fisher I I Russell Flint Karen Elizabeth Fong X 6 fi Donna J. Fong-Yee l A . Jeffery Forbes Alan Forman Mary Buford Fort Donald L. Fowler Scott Freeman Nursing . Biology Political Science . Psychology Nursing Psychology . , Finance Computer Science English Chemistry Chemistry Political Science Chemistry Business English Chemistry Economics English Biology Accounting Semorsf195 IFIIQIIIEID'-'l3'DlllD Pamela Fried Gary Friedlander , lra M. Friedman Michelle A. Friedman Nicholas Friedman Donna Fugate Carson Fuller Mark Furman Jeffrey R. Galin Scott Galin Anne Garrison Meg Gazzola Anthony Geist Rebecca L. Gerkin Roi Germain Mark Gilder Suzanne Gillespie John Gleiter Brad Peter Glick Mary Lee Gold l96fSeniors Political Science Biology Business Administration Mathematics Chemistry , English Political Science Mathematics English Computer Science Psychology Nursing Biology Psychology Nursing Biology Political Science Business Chemistry Psychology l3'UllIDII3lElIQ'l5'-'EIUSS Carl Goldberg A A Stephen Goldfine A Abby Goldsmith Glen Goleburn A Maria L. "Joy" Gonzales Larry Goodman Mark H. Goodman Caroline Goodwin A Cassandra Gordon Marcia Gotlib John Gould A Monica Lee Gourovitch Warren Curry Graham, Ill - i Thomas Gray Cindy Green - Pamela Susan Green xii Dan Greenwald Robert Grubbs Gene Gunn Jerry D. Guss A Psychology A Anthropology A A Biology A Political Science Psychology Marketing Economics Psychology ChemistryfMusic A Psychology Computer Science Psychology Political Science Chemistry English Psychology Accounting Chemistry Economics Psychology Seniors! 197 1 IUYSI-IISIHIIII Anne Guys Angela Hankinson Don Hantula Ron Harf Sandra Heath Dwayne Henderson Ella Jean Hendrickson Michael Henner Nancy Elaine Hodge Alys Holt Wendy Holder Michael Honor Keith Howell Val-Del Hubbard Amy Hubschman Dale R. Hughes Katie Hurley Emran Riaz lmami Kerry lris Carol Ishii 198fSeniors Mathematics Psychology Psychology Psychology Political Science Economics Nursing Chemistry Psychology Nursing Biology Political Science Finance Psychology Psychology Accounting Nursing Chemistry Finance Mathematics Sf I I The most enlightening activity in which I have participated during my four years here is the Emory Cross Country Eagles. Not only has this team helped me to es- tablish myself as an individual here at Emory, but it has also granted me oppor- tunities which I would never have had otherwise. The satisfaction of being a part of such a closeknit and vivavious group is immeasurable. Because of this team, I have come to understand many invaluable lessons that life has to offer. I have learned such essentials as: beware of motel water bags, one does not borrow golf carts at races. bathrobes have class, beware of ET's elbows, Jeff is "the runner's" name, if you don't watch out they,ll kill ya: they'll throw you in the street, how to be uptight and how to chill out, when not to say "Eat Me" to dogs, what it means to have "Jew blood" in me, how not to treat a redneck police offi- cer, how to dance in a moving Trailways, how "horrible" everything really is, what it is like to wear classy socks, what it is like to be lableled brand X, what is the meaning of the noxious mat- ing call of the Woofa bird, when to stay away from the Ivy Hill golf course, how to eat M 8a M's in a van, what it is like to take a chocolate bath in a fungus forest what it is like to sleep on a speed bump how to treat Bobo what it is like to blow smoke up the and much, much more! These past three years truly have been memorable for me. Aside from the enjoy- ment of the comraderie, support, and sense of identity fall of which I have achieved through this teami, I will take with me when I graduate the memories and the values which we have created. I have learned the meaning of persever- 1 K f r 4 SIENIIIUID MKIEMUUIDIIIES leaders shoot, if jf? 'M Q - E 4 Y ance, patience, self-confidance, and con- sistency. For these are the values that we, as cross country runners, have found. Jeff Galin College I,.' ' '13, Q Seniorsf199 IISIIQIEAIII-IKIIIEIIN Michael Israel . , Michele Rachele Jaffe Melissa Job Ken Johnson Kevin R. Johnson Joanne Jones . Lisa Carlyn Kaley . David L. Kaplan Elon F. Kaplan Bruce Alan Kaufman David Keiser Clifford Keljikian Caroline Kelley Maura J. Kelley Gail Kelly Wayne D. Kelly George R. King David L. Kirshenbaum Brett Kistin Risa Klein 200fSeniors . , . Business Psychology Business Economics Philosophy English , English Psychology History Chemistry Accounting . International Studies History Economics Economics Psychology Chemistry Psychology History Chemistry Psychology IKIIIINElIfll2'-IllEIIQNIEID .wytzg 'li il ff if 'K-ff ,- 6 , 'F-31 . -., -Ak 4-1 .K 5 'iiumvga I .- Q 'ff Robert M. Klinger Peter Korman Karen Kress Edward Krukowski Julie Kurzmann Stefan Lampe Randall Landers Robert Landow Susan Laney Gail Lang Wanda Lanham Sara Lash Linda A. Latter Sandra Lattew Susan Laufer David Lauten Donna Carol Lee Vicki Leech . Laura Legett Joanne Lerner Chemistry Philosophy Psychology Chemistry Psychology German Liberal Studies Geology Philosophy Finance Nursing Biology Psychology Nursing Psychology Economics Chemistry Nursing Economics General Business Seniorsf201 llllfSSNIEIIDI-MmXIDll'UMV Cory Lessner Robert Levan Michael Steven Levine Brian Levitz Nanete Levy Vivian Levy Debbi Lickhalter William J. Lieberbaum Brad Lieblein Eunice Lin Marci G. Linder Rhonda Loewenstein Amy Logan Claudia Ludvvigsen Daniel S. Lux Heather Maloy Frances R. Malveaux Psychology Finance Accounting English Nursing Psychology Accounting History Psychology Finance Finance Accounting Marketing Biology Political Science Accounting Psychology Jerome Mandelbaum . Business Finance James Leon Marion, ll ,History Richard Marlow , .History 202fSeniors Throughout my childhood, my main goal in life was to become a veterinarian. As a vet, I dreamed I would befriend and heal defenseless, voiceless patients with care, precision, and love. During my teen- aged years, I sought to develop my knowl- edge of animals by working each summer at a riding stable where I led groups on horseback through trails. Falling off of charging horses, getting bitten, kicked, sunburned, and stepped on made me look like a haggard Marlboro Cowgirl each night as I came home. Yet, every minute seemed challenging and exciting. As years progressed, my knowledge of animals - especially horses - grew so- phisticated. With ease, I recognized ill- nesses ranging from influenza to azoturia to rhinopneumonitis to spasmodic colic. My first aid kit began to resemble Marcus Welby's, and I was heralded as the "Vet- erinarian's assistant" throughout the sta- ble. One day, however, a horse managed to entangle its leg in a barbed wire fence, struggling frantically to free itself, the horse severely ripped its fetlock. Natural- ly, I was summoned to the horse's aid before the vet arrived. In a shady stall, I spoke calmly to the shocked beast and proceeded to wash some coagulated blood from its leg. One look at the drag- ging tendons, the blood pumping steadily and rhymically onto the floor, and the exposed bone, and I felt my own blood rushing from my head as the scene slowly faded away. Though I blacked out only for a few moments, I realized that I could no longer handle the situation. My career as a veterinarian abruptly ended at 16 years of age. SIENIIIOIIQ MKIEMUOIIQIIIES Julie Fershtman as Defense Attorney Stevens in the play "Night of January 16th." The witness is Carol Lempert who portrays Mrs. John Joseph Hutchins. The play was performed in the Oak Park District courtroom 45-B in March, 1982. Thus having learned the importance of first-hand experience with one's chosen career, I turned to my second favorite: law. The next summer, I was hired by a law firm to run errands and manage the file room. Needless to say, lawrelated em- ployment has dominated my summers for the past five years. As my responsibilities have grown, so has my interest in the law. In addition, as the leading actress in a high school courtroom drama, my interest in trial law has been affirmed. And through continuous employment with a variety of law firms specializing in a vast range of legal fields from workmen's compensation to international law, I am finally confident that I have chosen the right profession. Julie Fershtman College President, Benjamin S. Plus Pre-Law Society 203 MKAIIJFIIN'-iM' SS Caryn Jill Martin Michael Anthony Martinez Bryan K. Matanky Lisa Matthews Elizabeth J. Mayhall Catherine West McCall Carol McDaniel Patti McGee Annette McKinstry Nuni Menclelson Anne Meyer Daniel Michaels Loren Scott Michel Lloyd S. Minsky Armando D. Monteiro Elva Julie Moolchan Tim Moore W. Randall B. Moorman Doug Morris Marshall L. Moss 204fSeniors Economics Sociology Economics Accounting History Chemistry History Nursing Business English Economics Anthropology Chemistry Anthropology Chemistry Business Finance Biology Psychology Chemistry Chemistry Mi'Ulfll-IIEIQSIHIEAIDI-lI3AXN1IEllQ f I ,.,7 ,sf 1 i AQ Q.. 4-x ., yi xr ix 5-'Y ik!! Margie Mothershead Don Myers Sonja Narr Janice Nathanson Brenda S. Nelkin Susan Nelson Marshall A. Newman Neal Nicholls Nancy Norris Gay Lynn Nortman Elaine Nussbaum Elka Nutt Erik Nyce Jenifer Oling Laura Gay O'Neal Edward J. Oshrin Lauren Dale Osiason Webster Owen Bonnie Lee Paclwa Sharon Panzer Biology Psychology Nursing Economics Psychology Biology History Psychology Business Biology Economics Biology Economics Psychology Finance Business Nursing Political Science Chemistry Chemistry Seniorsf205 SIENIIUIIQ MKIEMUUIIQIIIES on OU, sale Kll 'ix fzoefse Once the swinging door slams and the envelope disappears, there appears that frustrating helplessness we all exper- ienced sometime in our lives. At this point, the envelope is irretrievably lost, though it rests less that a foot from where we stand. Nothing can stop it from reach- ing its labeled destination, nothing short of waiting for the mailman, who never comes at five o'clock as the sign promises, and begging him to help us find the criminal envelope. This exact emotion flooded my head when my Stanley Kaplan Educational Center check sat precariously on the in- ner lip of the U.S. mail collection bin out- side the Emory P.O. It was late summer, and the tastes of sweat and heat were just beginning to lose their attractiveness. Still, GMAT's and business school were not yet part of my reality. I needed more time. On the other hand, however, the deadline for the GMAT prep series was a week ago. I had received a reprieve on the basis of my promise to pay the balance of the registration fee within ten days. And if I am going to make the GlVIAT's, I thought, I sure as hell am going to need Kaplan. Besides, I told my parents I would . I could hear the enveloped check crash into the pile within the bin just seconds after the creaking door slammed. Yet another type of frustration can re- sult from the mail delivery. This time, I was at my own box outside my second floor apartment. The actual elapsed time since the check incident was three months, that is, four-to-six weeks after the GMAT's. I was gladly horrified t?l to see my scores in the box, sandwiched be- tween the phone bill and the electric bill. Bad omen, I thought, as I snatched the bunch from the box. I went upstairs and carefully, deliberately opened the enve- lope. "Twenty four dollars, past due in ten days." Not bad. Then I hit the phone bill which was down considerably since acquiring ITT Longer Distance services. Then, after going to the bathroom ttwicel, having a piece of cake, going to the bath- room again, I finally opened the envelope containing my scores. The frustration I felt was overwhelm- ing. I wanted to zero in directly on my scores, and yet I was too scared. I had worked too hard to be disappointed by a computer printout, but I had done all I could weeks ago to influence what those numbers would read. Now I was as help- less as I had been when the Kaplan check hit bottom. I wanted to scream. I did, when I finally turned the paper over to reveal a rather high score. "This is really mine?", I wondered as I rechecked and rechecked the name at the top. It was mine. The high score was also mine! The frustration, no longer mine, transformed into ecstasy. Andrew Altman College IIDAIUIII-lI3AlfllNIEIl2 Jonathan Paul Computer Science Elizabeth Anne Pearson Nursing Jennifer Pearson Political Science Bruce Pendley Chemistry Victoria Pepe Psychology Robin Peppers Psychology Evelyn Pesterfield Marketing Richard Pettit , Finance Daphne A. Pierce Nursing Michele Pincus Political Science Janie Plessett Nursing Abbey Plotkin French Angeline M. Prado Biology Win Pratt Chemistry Julia Promisel Biology Joanne Pulles Business Administration Lisa Ann Pulliam Accounting Donald P. Rainone . Chemistry Carlos Rangel Computer Science Randi Ratiner International Studies Seniorsf207 IIDAYI-IIDIIJCIIYIEIIQ V. Ray Frederic A. Reader Charlette Denise Reed Jayne Regester Elizabeth A. Reynolds Pamela Ribak Joanne Rigney Gay Rineberg lan Robbins David F. Roberts John W. Robitscher Lucy W. Rogers Thomas L. Rosenberg Kimrey L. Ross Edward Rossi Bonnie Rubenstein Judy Rubenstein Pam Rubin Todd Rubin Virginia L. Rucker 208fSeniors Chemistry Political Science Psychology Psychology Political Science Political Science Finance Psychology . Finance Spanish Literature English Nursing Psychology English Psychology Marketing Chemistry Finance Accounting , English IIJUIDIINI-SII-lAIDIIlI3'D Bruce Rudin Eric Rustin . . Andrea Sabatini Frank G. Salpietro . Greg S. Savitt Elizabeth M. Schachner Nancy Joy Schiffman James Michael Schulman Todd Schulte Herbert M. Schwartz Lisa I-l. Schwartz Marc Schwartzberg Sue Scruggs Dennis R. Searcy Tali Segal Amy K. Seidenberg Jeannie Sekulow Jack Seidel John Shanley Lori Shapiro Psychology Chemistry Psychology Political Science Psychology English Economics English Chemistry Accounting Marketing Chemistry Nursing Political Science Sociology French Psychology Psychology Finance Accounting Seniorsf209 SIHIEAIIQMKAN-Slfavlllli Robert Shearman Robin Shuler Andrew Shulman Daniel Hal Silcox, III Diane Silverman Howard W. Silverman Lori Sliverstein Mary Silverstein Robert Simons Mark A. Singer Tricia A. Sinoway Penny Skelos Laura Susan Smith Lisa B. Smith Rosemary Smith Clark Smith Noah Spivak Diana Spencer Deborah Sperber Teresa Mary Stack 21OfSeniors Political Science Psychology Business Mathematics Nursing Chemistry Marketing Business History Political Science Chemistry Political Science English Philosophy Political Science Finance Nursing Finance Nursing SIFAMKMM-IIIIIEIIDNAY Michael Stamm Chemistry Stacye S. Steele Spanish Lisa J. Stievater Biology Tom Stitt English Peter Strott International Studies Mary Stubbs Biology Erica R. Stumvoll Economics Isaac Sudit Physics David R. Sutton Chemistry Katherine Ann Suerig Psychology Barbara Susan Sverdlik Nursing Jane Syme . Psychology Azita Takeshian Chemistry Maryann I. Tancsinec French Ronn Tanel Psychology Ruth Tarlow Psychology Amy Thompson Psychology Errington Casdale Thompson Chemistry Robert Charles Threlkeld History Bruce Tiernay Political Science Seniorsf21I WIIDAIUIIBI-MVIEIISS Kenny Traub Roma Trousdale Karen Tucci Joy Turner Dennis Tyrones Beth Vanlandingham Sandee Vijay Andy Wakstein Amelie Wynne Walker Barri Walker D. Elizabeth Walker Fritz P. Walters Mitchell Augustus Waters Porter Watkins Mitchell Watsky Jane Watson Mary Weaks Louis H. Weimer Robert J. Weiner Bonnie Weisman 2l2fSen1ors Psychology Mathematics Nursing Nursing Finance History Chemistry Chemistry Nursing Education History Chemistry Biology English Biology Nursing English Chemistry Political Science Psychology Q! AJ ..-M7' E -s. N S qi! '. Qlll' L-I Illia' f7 , 4 fb 5 A , 1 , ff I I an rl' f X N- 1 Aj i 9- Q I 9 ' A 1.s'Z's-xii i" . l V X' 'L ' W- f it" 11. 2.-I I-A n Log '- - A. 2 1 i if u , v 4 3 - I :l":'nlf"'i"fff3l I was filling out my pre-registration schedule last week, and it occurred to me that I no longer needed to look through the course booklet for classes to take. No more uniform requirements, no more classes for my major, and no more P.E. credits to satisfy. It looks like I can finally say I have a definite direction. Looking back on freshman year, I re- member how many choices I had. Even with uniform requirements to satisfy, there were so many introductory classes being offered. Excluding premeds and those other freshmen who are so very sure of themselves, many students have no logical pattern or direction to the classes they take. Uniform requirements exert the most influence on freshmen. I believe, but courses that look interesting or are offered anytime after 10:00 am weigh just as heavily. I started out with an undecided major, and I felt few limitations in my course choices. I must say I've chosen classes with re- quirements and times in mind. I must also say that I've taken classes because I've liked the professor teaching it, some of my friends were in it, or even because it didn't meet on Fridays. Granted, these seem bizarre methods of narrowing down the choices, but I feel I'm in the majority when I use these crite- ria. I can think of few classes I would consider "mistakes," although Biology 101 definitely fits into this category. I did not enjoy the competition between so many of the students, and I really was not interested in the material. Unless a stu- dent was particularly interested in biol- ogy, I would warn him to avoid this class. One of the advantages of the uniform requirements is that the student gets an overall liberal arts background in addition SIENIIIUIIQ MKIEMUUIIQIIIES to his area of concentration. Although my course choices were seemingly haphaz- ard, I stayed within the framework of those requirements. I can definitely say I've taken an interesting array of courses in my four years here. I think junior year is the year most stu- dents take an inventory of their classes and began to view things with a career- oriented outlook. At least I did. My career plans began dictating my choices at pre- registration. All those English classes I'd been taking are supposed to make me an expert in the field. Senior year is really an awakening. The common joke that college is far removed from reality doesn't seem so funny any- more. The sheltered feeling is quickly giv- ing way to the realization that college is almost over, even for those who plan on going to graduate school right away. Questions concerning which classes to take are pretty well settled, for once, there's no guesswork in the choosing. Problems take on a new dimension however. There's no more time left to choose classes, now I wonder if all those classes I'd been taking these past four years are going to help me get a job. Am I an expert in the field? Just to say that I've enjoyed my classes and learned a great deal these past four years is really not enough. In the next year, l've got to judge for myself if those uniform requirements and random course choices, as well as my major require- ments, are going to be what I need for a career. I do believe that a liberal arts edu- cation has an intrinsic value in itselfg that's why I've so enjoyed my various classes. But back to reality I must have a means to support myself. At graduation I can say that I have a Seniorsf213 SIENIIUIIQ MSI M IUIDIIIES direction, but my main concern is that I have no experience to confront my knowl- edge and prove it sufficient. I think about my reason for coming to college and look at what I've gained, and I think they are the same. I hope they are enough. I take some consolation in the fact that many before me have left Emory with BA's in English, and they've all survived. On the other hand, the past doesn't concern me as much as the present. If I had these four years to do over again, I really don't know what would be different, except that I wouldn't take Biol- ogy. I have taken varied English classes, not really specializing in any one area. Perhaps I would plan on specializing more, although there are obvious limita- tions to this. I don't really believe a student must choose his courses on the basis of either a career or the acquisition of a liberal arts education. I feel I have achieved both, but ,-q.---.mu-ww ufvlnlv' 11 I' -arf-" .-...LW 5,1 s b'-' my career must take precedence right , . - -pp . ,ag .q f . -f 1 ' --K, , ,wg M-.2 gil U . now. And I once thought choosing new - -- . ,- , . l V. -1,-14 LS' fvzkg 1 : , X,vf',, , semester s courses was hard . , , --sri---rf-'sf-' 'H . , . . I ,ws . hw 4 9. . K ,. gf., I 'Tx Z A fi-I-.kI.se - , M5 -N-rr W5 " ' " ..-,f,.'B:s Q-WINS' 'bfiti-,'- .:,-.r rri . I' -I -,Xi Kathy D. Dixon 1 I -- I .. . X , , - its . .Q s, " , -2' - 11-3 .. College . """""w"' ""' . url' l ..-, , .sy - .rg .fiftgigxiiliir-lr - Sw I - "'f"- K , 715: I--4. if-nw-, 3 'Ill - Iff. - ,ffff , is '. ,V 'fff'f.S?'Tl'.:sf?f2islifi::g '-S1 if Q - Q .. 'T' 1"'f!4l:gv'i4:-X-M' A ss. ..i V 11: AE. - ts .Use I Sli.. rx., ,rr-'ihv.-J ' .. ..-was -231 n.. - 4-+1 -1, . , 1 . "" " - pm. "'5'f""' ' 1 . ss ' R .- llrj K V .Y . , K'13.7:z'4.157'!l - . ,f -I - 'f iyifv f. - . Q, . '. Mr 'af' f ' 3 A : 'M 'f1'.:x - 3 -.'+i3'r1 , ' . ' Q. - 'N ,,,3.n f +1 " . ' 'I 35354 'if--2 jr.. ff.. ,, I if ' ' --was --wry ' I. . ' . .I .-' W sspv , , . b I' ' if., ' . 7 - ' . .K11.'-rss: if 1-. -Sift -x ,5, xx. .sf F: .jg f . Clark Smith takes a flying leap into the future and comes u if"5I"'ii5f"sf'A - If ' - ' -f -r ' -r f fu- -f I -its ' N K - p "" .Nui SNS sfsfsi. ,J gft.-'K 'X SY Q5 ' - KEI 5 X X3-rs .S Xxf - f ' at-A iii" .- - ,- ws smiling. , ..1.. .s. s'll':.?ssr f -.f f Y W 214fSenlors Photos by Kelly Wilkinson -J -J' --1 ..,, x x 1.12 MVIEN'-ZIUIIIIAN Terry R. Weiss Ju-Hsin Wen . . , Christine L. Werft Patton White . Sandra White , . Alice Wilkerson , Kelly Wilkinson . Lynne Wilson Doug Winokur Morris A. Wirth Larry Wiseman . . Jimmie David Witherow . Lois J. Woodward Denise Renee Yarnoff Shan Young Barbara Zamost Gail Zila . . , David Zulian L . Economics . . . ,Biology . Management Philosophy . Psychology Political Science Economics English . . History , Chemistry , . Ecomonics English Nursing Psychology History English Nursing Economics Seniorsf215 clllUNII4UIlQS The Class of '84. The year of George Grwell. The first freshman class to use pre-registration. The new gym and Turman Center beckons to them as their playground, a tribute to their reign as the first senior class who has seen the construction through from conception to completion. The only class to experience equal years of Wonderful enjoyment and semestral doldrums. '77 Vincent rs 'DII2'l3ANIl'l2 'CII-IIEMKIISTIIIQY AN 'lDlDlfll'UNAXll NIECIESSIIWY ven if a student is neither pre-med nor a junior, he cannot deny its existence. It is a dreaded contagion that has swept across campus, invading its host and preying on its gray matter. It is a madness that has reached epidemic proportions among students in the junior class. To some, it has been fatal, it has no cureg it eats into the very core of the brain: it is Organic Chemistry! Many junior pre-meds have been diag- nosed as having Mandellitis. The symp- toms begin with a simple "Organic Fe- l V, vjvigifffd-1::?1'Y3. -V , .. 54" 1, A , I , 'ffm' .-:rw QQ .,-33,7 3 ff 1 L., f-5 I ,i T. if 1 he f' V4.7 x ,. " fl ' rf .fj "KH , 2 ,.,: ,. I . A , u . 'ff' . . , ff ' , - L -A i V' 7 if QW" ' 35' ' ' 4' . N . - f. if ff? G I ,- ,Hi ha .-yr,-. Qffyf g y., .LV J: ' V t M W ,4:.:9" K Eff! ., H, 1 - ' 'XJ Morris f T . , . -N Q1 "I 1:2 4- .' -fx - J Q xv . .' . X -g ., ? 4 Morris ver" and rapidly progress to severe "Mandellmania," Some students who have been affected maintain that it is not a sickness at all, but all outsiders are not convinced. Why does the class carry such an infa- mous connotation? The students feel that it is the final weed-out course for pre-med students. Some juniors believe that is the "ultimate" in their college experience. From where does Mandellmania stem? The term has been derived from the first semester professor, Dr. Leon Mandell. ,.... Griffin The students seem to get so caught up in his dynamic personality that they let the class consume too large a part of their time. Their immune system consequently lowers its resistance to infections, and Mandellitis results. According to Flavia Mercado, a junior in the course, "It is a priviledge to be taught by such a great intellectual mind. Dr. Mandell is energetic, loud, and even frightening at times. You will never go to a science class like his!" - Gary Griffin Organic Chemlstryf217 Griffin ANCIDIEIE'-1ClHAIDWxV IEIlll 218fJuniors Virginia Acree Marc Adams Evelyn Asihene Lee Autry Anisa Badarrudin Rebecca Bailey Tom Beckett Don Benson Allison L. Benton Tracy Bishop Helen Bledsoe Jane Bloomfield David T. Blumberg Suzanne Boddie Judy Bowman Martha Bridgman Linda G. Brindley Bobby Brogdon Esther Maris Brown Karen Brumby Daniel A. Burzynski Allen Butts Scott Callahan Kimberley Casey Tracy Chadwell 4-Q, ' ' -:.- XX- nv,- A. ' v A -.xx 1 1 .- - A a -. 'L .-as-Xp J '15 .2 if ' - X ' U" 'WSW --11.:- 4511.1-f.' "' HF' .Z .nv " - 5 anvil ' -- - ,..ox.L.p-izfff " 'CIHAXN''IE'-lES'CAXfMlIIlIlA V? i ,...'.m:....n::i.-:..i.., .., , ...,. 4... ......... iv.. P X1 4 w'v 41' i -A 1 . W Q .. E -LQN:-..:. D X ' K N . 7 H. Pr ' 1:1-qgnzL-f-1!1-.-z:i','--.jg . -, '.'.'1-,x1::'.fif4,-y :ar . 1, xg -Q :ls-X X Q ,,.,-""""Yf -s.-A f - iisvc' A , w:mae:-22,-we-XHEQQmt: Nr: 62:1 fs' .., jf J, -' v V 4 .. .gy -. Z Sylvia Ann Chang Melanie Ange Chastain Larry Cheng Eugene Chiappetta Shawn Coady Kathleen Compton Jane Conner Lisa A, Cooper Kelly Renee Copeland David Cosgrove Kathleen P. Costello Lisa DeAngelis Stephanie Deberry Peter Denatale Daphne Dixon Lauren Dodek Valerie W. Dodson Debbie Docly Andrea Doneff Paul Donnan Susan Donohue Jean Dornhofer Donna Dorough Judi Epstein David Escamilla Juniorsf219 IFAXIDAIIBIEIEI-ll-1lUlFlF'UII3ID 22OfJun1ors Martha Farabee Martha Feller Linda C. Francis Patricia E. Galarza Cynthia B. Galin Lea Gilliam Gary Glasser Sharon Glover Dodie Goodyear Yves Montand Grayer Jeff Green Martha Green Cindy L. Grieves Rick Gross Karen Haber Mary Nell Haley Yuling Han Celia Hemer Susan Henneke Annette Hickham Glen Hollinshed Jennifer Marie Hough Kathryne Howell Greg Huang Arthur Hufford XX-v' IITIS X UIDMKIDIIIEX IIIIWI N4 Vincent Vmcent Vincent .f 'x ,241 n - 4 . N .x'. ,ss gl- I N - I I 0 i A Q mix Gonzales Vincent lt's A Complex Livingf221 II'IlUIIQllIEVI-MKAUUIIINS' N' 222fJuniors Miles P. Hurley Andrew lserson Kathryn Jackson Amy Jacobsen Felipe Jaramillo Thomas Johnson Gladys Kathryn Jones Lori Kadish Steven Kauff Margaret H. Koehn Jill Kotlove , Joshua Ezra Kugler Cl3'fmQX Hyon Ung Kwon Jodie Melinda Land Susan Ellen Lener Michael P. Levine Ann Marie Lewis Susie Lewis Becky Livingston Ron Mancini Deborah Mancoll Suann Mangels Penny Masur Tracy Mathews Pamela L. Mattinson ,1-I C '14 scan gn X lr Q14 I""x .A MSIEIEIIYSI-IlDIl'lAlfII'I3AN QNXRY ' ,ae 5 nA 5 "" if Hs AE! , llllf I X.. I fr, Stephen Meeks Michael Melneck Luigi Meneghini Charles Merlin Joseph A. Miller Kathy Minter John Mitnick Beth Morris Pam Morrison Eric Morrow Mary Elizabeth Murphy Jeffrey V. Nelson Jane Oberwager John M. Oliver Anna C. Parker J. Philip Per-Lee Kerri Perkins Margaret Perkins Gregory Pierce Stephen Pomerantz Jupe Potitong Philip J. Quinn Alan D. Rabb Steve Reiff Jane Rhatigan Juniorsf223 lfll-ll IDI IDIDI Not just a place to park your caboose and fill up but also a place to listen to music other than train whistles. 1 Nickey Nickey 224jThe Depot Vincent Nlflkev Nickey IDIIIEIDVI-SUIIIIIIWAN Kimberley Riedy Reuban Rodriguez Carlyn Kae Rosenberg Steven A. Rudd Terry Sabonis-Chafee Jurirat Ann Satogkit Russell Savrann Steve Scarbrough Lynn Schnitzer Thomas I. Schulman Jo Ann Scott Doug Senderorf Felicia Serpico Steven R. Shields Desideria Shipp Patricia Shoemake Todd Shuster Amy N. Silberman Eva Silbiger Leah Simpson Tom Single David A. Smith Linda Snow Leslie Stewart David Sullivan SIUNIDIEIDIIANID MVIIIIA 'UN Quentin Sunderland Monica Taylor Jim Thomasson Nina Trachtenberg Brad Trevathan Holly Vigodsky Richard J. Wachob Joerg Wekel Minnie B. White Doug Wichman Cathryn Wilbourn Melissa Nina Williams Alice Wilson Marc Adams and Kathy Minter get ready for a night of tricking and treating with a stop at Dooby's Halloween Ball. ' 'UI 71'-N1 I. IIQAIIIIY S-, 11 V I :F Y! St d nt Rallyf227 TfII'IIE Q1 '- NUI! IIQAIIIIV NN- ' EMS If ff -MM U Q1-Na+ if -4- M E We fa old znqgh f QD M9156 ypriqk K .4 Feinstein nt Rall mi-LH TODHFI. 3 'UIDII-ll MUUIIQIES S'UlDlI'l'UfMllDlI3lE AIDWIISIDIIQ3 Most upperclassmen would choose to forget their freshmen year when adjusting to student life at college was a daily or- deal. They are past their very trying first year and are now taking important steps toward planning their futures. Some sophomores, however, have chosen to take a step backward to that time of ad- justment and help others through their own experience adapt more comfortably to college. These students, called Sophomore Ad- visors lSA'sl, volunteer their time to live in freshman dormitories and assist the students living on their halls with any questions or problems that they may en- counter. More than anything, the SA's simply want to be friends with freshmen and allay any anxieties about college. The advisors were chosen, via applica- tions and interviews, by a faculty-staff panel who thought that SA's could devel- op a better one-to-one relationship with the freshmen, than could a single Resi- dent Advisor. When asked what it was like to be a sophomore living in a freshman dormi- tory, SA Fred Zaremby in Longstreet dorm said, "You become friends with the guys and you get involved in a lot of things that go on in freshman dormitories. lt's exciting - more exciting than living in upperclass dorms." This is perhaps one good reason why many sophomore advisors are enjoying their role in the dorms, and many freshmen have stated that they were glad to have experienced upperclassmen on their halls to talk to if they had any questions. - Gary Griffin Sophomore Advisors 229 AIBIBAUFIEI-lBID'UX VNIINIE 23OfSophomores Maureen Abbate Reza Ali Abedi-Darakeh Keith Abney Corey Jan Albert lna Allison David Altman Valisia Andrews Russ Bailey Shary Bailey Michael A. Barkin Fernando Bayo Brian Beasley Tim Bellamy Brenda Joy Bernstein Valerie Bialko Debra Binder Silvio Blanco Theresa L. Blum Jill Bouma Craig Bowen Luri Bower Carol Brisbin Jennifer K. Brown Terry Brown Dan Browning ,Y H 1-.fl , -11. 1, .N ., Q s W? w. sin XX X xwft N 'X - . , , . , x . 'is " X 4'-' ..-.rs N -:gy ,.:,i1..j,3'Q , - X +5 ' ?S-milf "'iG:'-.4 , -' ::w:-wx: in if , 1-.' 4- -' 3:35 Au- ,. 1 aw Nm? - wsifg:-.fm A ,Agp -' I Eigisieziaf , .' A "' ':Vi?'tNiw:?Q -x . : '. A Sui'-L34 Q -rv? 3.1 S-' X -fcgisrm .:-mc' Jil im ,QT 601- -,L 13933.92 'vgyx .3 1 'cf' , . 53 'N V3 ' pg ir- ' 'lv If If 4 .XX 1 ZX l ' X r 1 X Z B XXV, , s x lI3lU'lQlIilI-MXNNAN'-IDAWIIS Page Buckhannan Brian Burns Cammie Caine Quita Callaway John W. Campbell Elizabeth Carmichael Beverley Carnegie Adela Teresa Casas Kathy Chambers Selena Chen Monica Clay Susan Clay Lisa Cohen D'Angello Collier Cathy Connariato Cris Correia Edward C. Crawford Susan Crawford Agnes Csizinszky Julie Culp Philippe D'Adesky Linda Sue Dagle Pam Daiker Robert Daniels Melissa Davis IDAXWIIS--'IEASSAIIDWII-I Miriam Davis Rhonda Davis Greg David Dershowitz Eric Diamond Susan Dinwiddie Rachel Dreyfus Herbert Dubrow Melissa Dunn Balin Annete Durr Angela Edmond Rose Marie Eiland Daphne Priscilla Elliott James Elton Shayne Erenbaum Sara Fedeli Michael Feinstein Robert Jerome Finegan Anne Fishman Steven Flack Laurie Frank Kathy Gaertner Thomas R. Galligan Laura Garber Lawrence I. Garter Donald B. Gassarth I DI IDD I After much delay, the Depot opened in February, 1982. Trains whistle by daily, and the nights fill with entertainment. Just desserts are from The Desert Place, and the menu specials differ from day to day: a delicious alternative to the other eateries on campus. AND they take meal coupons ldinner time only pleasel. f I --J . Vincent V hir, , Y. l as x it Vmcem The Depotf233 lllllfllf IIN IIIIMKIBU 'CAUSE IT'S THE ONLY HOME 1 cor. Gassner Life in limbo at Emory is fondly referred to as temporary housing. The entire process begins in the spring of each year with THE LOT- TERY. No, this is not the same type of lottery that Shirley Jackson wrote about, but it's almost as bad, if not worse. Who ends up in temporary housing, you ask? Poor, unlucky students llike mel who pick numbers such as 935. Yes, believe it fl couldn'tl, 935 out of 1000! So, in the fall I ended up in the Sheraton-Emory lnn: carpet, air conditioning, a double bed, maid service twice a week, full bath to share I! TW " , , . ,. ,5 ' , -vm - ---mf in 3 ' i , . -,wtf ,,,,.gf,,-JY. . :Q 4 1 U' ,KV , Zfifi' g..rx..r:3g! .5 '-su - :Q .4uQ-,ff l' . ' ' . .. v .wif I " " --sri" . r 1 ..,., - v ff-"- - ' - .g .L ff? "fi Q, ' ua .g " if ' .. f 'li -- 95. E-af 4 '- LILQ, y , 4 'Q V . -. . V . 5, 15 :ss 1 if . -- i - rw w - - V - -- f :-1 z..+.-.-ar . ' . - ' "1 3,14 I - H 5 -W ' -if . -2- :A .1-"f:'5f:" -'W 9' -A --' . . ' 0' Lf, 7 " iii ' f 4 .V sf-5 .ff-'m1Qs42f'.' 5 ft. . - -w .-.fef.f-f- 5-1.-f--.Q--.,2, we-.-f,g-122'-ff. , g V ,.,4. E A.,' V ,V V ,, l lv , .. A F. .1 ' ,sp , -. V. ' . V, -,Ak vf . if . ,., .. - . y .-. .f.. aww ggi- , ,f. " ' . s 'f- - 1-Q-1 '-5'f"f -'M"1... A"m'2f:,f. H XW'.,,.,f.' VY- if ' 1 3'-F'l'2 ' A+'-f'fli..,' Tvff-4., 'rfb A M ' In ' l .,,, 'T . 12 ' Q4 4 . 1-,mx rf, " . L.,4,,:S7Qq-wi--4,5-". -: -Q--" ' f , '- .sr ,4,'1' .vw-'Q' ,gf 'Q 1,'v'2.f' . ' - ,q,-vpn, , , . bu A :f if J,-35. , 4 j 41- ' 9? J -. - -' , 3 '., 1.4. gy- 1-:gifs .,. ,, I , ig, , I , 4 :AJ UF. A ,g-1.3, , r 2 A' 5. s.l,,f,Y,fgQgrt .. .JO .sv .., - - .F rm. , Y ,Af ' A "e...,9'u."'W44.f u Fawcett 234fLife ln Limbo Gassner with only one female Knot 30 othersl, and the all important color television. Sounds great, right? Wrong! l don't think that too many people have ever had the dubious privilege of living in a hotel for weeks. However, you must always try to make the best of any situation, and some of us living a life of limbo did just that. We did things like sweet- talking the man who drives the shuttle bus to take us to Sage Hill to do our laundry and shopping. Our funniest antic was making friends with the hotel bartender and getting four or five drinks for the price of one instead of the standard two for one. Life in limbo does have some advantages, l must say. The next stage in limbo is temporary housing on campus, most likely a Harris Hall study room for girls or longstreet for guys. Living in a study room is a definite college experience meant to be shared, espe- cially if you are living with five other females. Have you ever listened to six different alarms sounding off at six different times? What about two or three blow driers? How about this - six irons and only one ironing board? You can find all the latest styles with six racks overflowing with clothes and at least fifty or sixty pairs of shoes. Sounds cozy? Try it, you'll get the idea of life in limbo. Where does life in limbo end? For some, it ends early fall semester when they get permanent housing in a non-study room. For others Uike mel, it still has not ended - life in limbo goes on . . . Kimberly Oliver ..- 'IEIEDIIQ'IEII5-ll-1lI'l3lD'UN NO PHOTO AVAILABLE . ,g 9s Melody Carol George Karen Gheesling Cynthia R. Gibson Amy Ginsberg Gillian Goddard Beth Goldie Michele Goodman Denise Gotsdiner Susan Gouinlock Gina Greco Loris A. Green Barry Greenberg Debbie Haimson Lynda M. Hamby Sheryl Lynn Hancock 'Vine 3 . Lf it X W ,ff Glen Handler Hugh Hansard Susan Anne Harrington Kari Harsel Lynne Harwell gx VSF Robert Heinrich Stephanie L. Henriquez Robert E. Herndon Shari Herzfeld Scott Higdon Sophomoresf235 Il-lIl'IDlflf'-IlANIliAlU 236fSophomores Celeste Hiott Jeanne T. Hoffman Sue Horwitz James H. Hudson, Jr. Bonnie Hughes Monique Huiet R. Hutchinson Hillary Jacobs Michael Jaffe Jeanne James Karen Jordon Linda Jordan Larry J. Kaminsl-cy Stacey Kaplan Alison J. Karis Lori Katz Kaveh Khajavi Margery C. Khaw J. Scott K. Kilpatrick Frank C. Kimsey Larissa Kopps Dori Evan Kordansky Denise Laffiteau Sheila Lamport Lisa Lankau lc. , llAS1ll'U'-fMIIIlIlIElI2 Jennifer Laszlo Sabina Lee Mel Lesada Michael Levy Terry Levy William A. Levy Frederic Beggs Lindsay Amy E. Livingston Diana Llorca Day Ann Logue Dania Long Warren S, Lovett Lynn Lowry Tina Lucariello Melinda Marbes Marcia Matalon Jon E. Mazursky Richard E. McCammon Laura Ann McGahee Sharon McGrady Barbara Lynn Meadows Ken Meindl Julie Merritt Melissa Mesulam David Samuel Miller MKIIIIIIS'-lI2IIIDIDS Robert Mills Daniel Jared Minkin Cindi Monson Paula Mueller Tona Munday Lori Nadler John Noesen Lee M. Oberman Kimberly Oliver Donna Olszowka Jim Orrell Donna Palley Susan R. Panettiere Valerie Parham Lenore Y, Parks John Per-Lee, Jr. Felecia Poree Dusty Porter Karen Rands Joree Redding Ralph Reynolds Sarah Richmond Lillian Riesel Claudia Rihacek Marc Ripps IIQ'Ull3lIN'UMVlIlf1'-SWIEMVAIDWI U i f . Q.-K my-"" Mark Robinowitz Cindi Rogers Joanne Rogers Diane Rosenberg Barbara S. Ross Amy L. Rothstein Valerie Lynne Rudolph Gregg Russell Jim Sanders Lisa Sanford Christopher Schoettle Tom Schrand Tammy Schuster Ava Scott Charlene Scott Stuart Seidman David Seif Alan Shapiro Susan Sirmans David Smoller Julie Solomon Rosalyn Somerville Kurt Staven Peter A. Stephan Celia Stewart Sophomoresf239 A TFIIIIIIIEIIDI-MVIIIIIDIEIIQ Tandy Stiller Tim Strayer Robinette Stuart Nili Suclit Steven A, Sugermann Risa Swell Barbra Swinton Helen Tarver Colette Taylor Martha Fay Taylor Jeff Teplitzky Douglas L. Terrell David Thierry Steven Tishler Sonya Tjepkema Andrew Ivan Tobkes Anne Tomalin Leigh Topping Romy Viera Tony Vincent Julie Vollenweider Ann Walker Patti Westermann Sandra Ann White Edwin Wilder iii + -.t, at ff ,535 4-of I 1:17 X. . . li -N N 'W ' v-. 'X QM! R v. 9' Ju wg--7 MVIllllIillNS'-ZAIDIEMKIBY Wes Wilkins Marlette Williams Carolyn Williamson L W'Il' eanne 1 is Barbara Ann Wilson Wohlleben, Karen Stephanie Yancey W Ch' Y d . ris an ow Fred Zaremby IQ? H K., . P' 1 5 .4 'x 1 ,ph - .L 242fSophomores Gassner Brannon uw , , A? fllg. y wg ,pst "'?.vff fx 34Kl " " 1 . , Y gg 1.- me 'T u.. z K, Xi 4 iw V 54' 7,-rirvzf i. W-wifi, swf . wr' 4 3. 1 4. ".i'1wA , 1 -' f ,H .,,f', 93, '. '. .,.- f f , 'A ' ,, 'Ask' -N , ' if Y f Q- 3 ,Q Q A YK-aglzfr' lid f 'Q Y , E W: YI: - , a.,-L ,gi 1 Q -- fa " ,A j ,. v-'+,nd'lf7U:sf""- .,. ,., I, . 7,f,I. , ' I . L y 4 . QQ, ne.,--V . -n T, ,.-, ,. - W . 1 .- , . f . Jw ,r , .-. A, ' fi' . 7 '-V' ' -' 9 J . , ' . " . F 1 1- , 4 vlfvig F1 ,irq xv: ., ., A gp' -.'A':,-a1"1'-1 f' - I, 4 . 4. gg., , 5 ' ygidv ,lsqgiigfayfq nga- , 2 -"- . ' - ' , - :N ' 9 .-.. ' 1 ,IA , ,,. Vjbzfd tvfgif, fi14!!5.4f7'g,1 , 6.9.19 i 1: . .. x. . .ff av'-'-lu .ff Y , big V ,' .,V gf.,-f" n., V a. , B A ' .-?--4.:ff,:.1v. , .-.mg .4 . f 1-.N l gf' . 52 ' -Egg, wig. .' . 5 -V. f -X" '.' .W-sz, H r -I " Wffzf-571TW"f1??'f-fb M497 Z Q jf +4 ' "ako 'Lu Je - -' - iz- W. , A5 -. Kress X N Kress During the summer, most freshmen-to- be began to envision their collegiate days. All their hopes, fears, dreams, and expec- tations came to the forefront of their imaginations as they awaited the start of orientation. Questions have arisen con- cerning the importance and significance of these pre-fabricated opinions of col- lege. Were the freshmen 's expectations met? Did their best hopes and worst fears come true? Was college all that they had really dreamed of for months? Or were they slightly disappointed? According to most freshmen, Emory was slightly different than they had imag- ined in that it was much smaller in popula- tion and the closeness on campus was much greater than anticipated. Freshmen seemed to be of the opinion that once they set foot on a college campus, their identities would be lost forever! But here, the opposite was true. Freshmen realized that they knew upwards of at least 75 to 100 people at the close of orientation lmaybe not by name but at least they were nodding acquaintancesl. And within two to three weeks, friendships had de- veloped that would last a lifetime. Despite the fear of loss of identity on their minds, most freshmen has more im- portant issues to be concerned about, GRADES. Graduating in the top ten per- cent of their senior high school class, most students enter college expecting a 4.0 GPA to follow their straight A's from high school. Competition blew away this fallacy, and it was tooth and nail right down to finals. As grades were issued, the hopes and dreams of students lparticularly the pre- professionalsl preparing for life after col- lege, especially among the high caliber medical and law schools, began to fade. Enrollment in freshmen biology and chemistry courses dropped as "former" premeds began filling out their applica- tions for business school. The weeding out process was continuing its tradition. IFIDIESIHMKI N A IDIEIIDSIDIECTIIIWIE However, some students, steadfast and determined, refused to abandon their fu- ture goals on the basis of one semester's grades and decided to remain in their pre- professional curriculum. Needless to say, some did change their majors two years early. But all of the class of '86 did not enter college with any major misgivings or pipe dreams. They felt it was best to tackle one obstacle at a time. Accordingly, the first one was applying and getting into college. Once there lor rather, herel, waiting in the laboratories, classrooms, and dormitories were the other imagined obstacles. This way, none of the hopes would be diminished and none of their dreams would fade away. Now the school year had come and gone, and another group of high school graduates await their entrance into Emory. Whether .they arrive full of hang- ups or anticipation, loaded down with the fears and promises of collegiate life, it doesn't matter. All will manage, some- how, to survive one way or another. Den- ise Bradby wisely sums it up: "Every freshman has experienced instances in their eighteen years of life that seemed unbearable and unconquerable. All one has to remember is that college is just another experience. lt too is bearablef' Linda Peacock Lyew Freshmen 243 AIBIIQAMKSI-IBIEIIIISIIIE Amy Abrams Robin Adams Kenneth Adler Susan Agner Debbie Agran Ravi Alagappan Leslie Albin Ronald Allen Paige Ammon George Michael Andrews Philip Arlen Steve Aucamp Gay Loraine Aves Mark Backer Susan Baer Hak-Sun Bak Scott Ballard Diane Bateman Mark Baucom Trish Baughman Catherine Baum Lourdes Bayo Brian K. Beal Kurt Behrend Craig Belisle Y II3lIfII2'l3lIfIIl2'-IIBIIQVANT Roger A. Berger Leslie Berkelhammer David Berman Richard Berman Michelle S.G. Bernhart Pam Beverforden Andrea Binner Meredith Bishop Neyle Black Elicia D. Blackwell Craig Blafer Arlene Blalock Tara Bloom Deborah Blumenthal Nancy L. Bolling Jennifer Bonanno Andrea Boone Crystal Boren Marc E. Bosem Scott Bowerman Denise Bradby Stewart Brann . Patty Brennan Kara Odessa Bryant Sheila Bryant Freshmanf245 IEMUUIIDY 'UlDllIllIf'l5IIf IFIIQIESIHM AN SIEMKIINAIIQ An important aspect of student life for many sophomores is their role in the Emory College Freshman Seminar. Once only existing in Dobbs Hall, it now has expanded to include McTyeire and Trim- ble Halls, also. The purpose of the program is to ac- quaint freshmen with the Emory College Community, to aid in their personal growth, and to assist in their academic advising. The groups that participate in the pro- gram consist of fifteen freshmen, and three group leaders. While two of the leaders include an academic advisor and a resource person usually involved in Campus Life, the third leader of the group is a sophomore. The seminar groups meet each week to discuss topics such as alcohol and drug abuse, racism and anti-semitism, human rights and human sexuality. Brian Beasly, a sophomore leader of a seminar group in Trimble, who is happy with the success of the program, says, "The seminar ses- sions, informal and friendly, often result in animated group discussions of all kinds." These discussions, in turn, result in an educational experience for every- one that broadens the freshmen's person- al horizons in his first year way from home at Emory. - Gary Griffin 246fFreshmen Fawcett Fawcett Fawcett Fawcett I-wx sv' R., '--+ 1 l w ' Q .fl IBIUII--IDIEIKIKIEIIQ Ly Minh Thi Bui Kathryn Burgess Janice Butler Steven Cannon Patrick Carey Edward Joyce Carlton Holland Carney William M. Carr Nancy Ann Carrol Jeffrey M. Collier Shannon Eileen Connor Cassandra Cook Robert Cook John Copenhaver Sharon Coull Chuck Cox Laurie A. Crowe Mike Cudmore Kim Cummings Marietta Cutrone Michele Davenport Ann Day Paul Dean Dennis DeGracia Alex Dekker IDll'l3IIIDUIIAMK'D'-'l3'IDIlIDlI3IIfIIQ'l3 248fFreshman Ann Marie Digirolamo Thithu Nga Do Laura Dobson Sarah Miller Dowdey Jane Downing Simone Dumermuth Kathryn M. Effgen Robert Greg Ettlin Jill Fasulo Monica R. Favre Richard Fawcett Beth Feichtinger Bruce Feigelson Gorm Ferger Pam Finkelstein Adam Fivush Dana Fleischman Lisa Frenkel Jeff Friedman Stacey Funt Cindy Gaertner Bruce Garretson Nancy Lynne Garrison Heather Gay Wendy Goldberg l xl X I5 DIIIDSMKIIWIHI-lH'UIl2NlE Gail Goldsmith Guillermo Gomez, Jr. Armando Gonzalez Juliet Goozh Lisa Gordon Laura J. Gregg Juliet Gridley Charles Jason Grodzin Leslie Guenther Tamra Gunnigle Elise Linda Haberman Lauren Hagendorf Monicha Hamil Colleen Hartsock Gary Hays Cluade Hemphill, Ill Joni Henderson Debbie Herbert Donna Higgs Susan Elizabeth Higgs Marilyn Hoggard Peter Holden Craig C. Holmes Byron Hoover Steve Horne II'l'UlUSlf' N'-IIAXNSIDIEIIII 250fFreshmen Joanne Hoston Tina House John Hudson Gerald Hymanson Beth Jackie Dominic Jaeger John Johnson Camilla A. Jones Kevin Jones Joshua F. Kahn Martine Kaplan Stephanie Katzmann Margaret Kawula Chris Keenan Renata Kendrick Deanna Khosh Sigrid Kimbrough Alan Klasfeld Allison Klein Kory Kopitsky David Kossoff Mary Kathryn Krog Jeanne Kurucz Alisa Kutchera Susan Lansdell -.2 "Pav llASAllIllIf'-MUUSS -wx 'T -0-'P' ki QL21, i, 'v .Q 4 24' Q-P A l1 5 1? +L ef- X 1 L l Tracy Anne LaSalle Todd Leopold Melissa Joy Lerman Lester Lewng Alyson Levy Aaron Lloyd Emily Looney Amy Luker Steven N. Luxenberg David B. Lyle Todd Mack Kenny Maguire Alex Marban Susan Margiloff Donald Martin Connor McBryde Phil McCurdy Tracy J. McKinney Mark Dunstan Meador Marcy Meyers Joe Miller Terrell O. Miller Dorothy Morecraft Michele Morris Stephanie Moss Freshmenf25l MtIUIIQIIDIHY'-IIDIEIITMKAN Ken Murphy Janet Murray Scott Nadler Martin Needle Elizabeth Nickey Kristin Norris Karen M. Ogle Bill Oglo Richard L. Parker Ondma Maria C. Passaniti Linda Peacock Jeff M. Pearlman Travis Pelfrey Sherrie Pettiford Hale Pettit Catherine Poitas Suzanne Potts Frank Potvin Polly Price Mary Quoyeser Daniel Rabb John Rapaport Kelly A. Ray Lee Redvanley Alayne Reitman AIIIDIES WU IDIIDIESIIIDIENT CAXII2 II IEI .'. During this past year, one might have had to take a close look to have noticed the enthusiasm with which the Emory community greeted Jimmy Carter as part of the teaching staff. However, a closer look may have revealed that a select group of students had reason to be espe- cially glad about his affiliation with the college. The groups of students consists of in- terns and volunteer aides that work with Carter, mostly political science majors. Each work for Carter in individual fields, such as politics or economics. Most work for the Carter Policy Center. They were chosen on the basis of applications and interviews and are receiving four hours college credit for their work. The volunteer aides, who receive no credit, were appointed by Dean Bill Fox. The students who have been serving Carter during 1982-83 are Reza Abedi, Lonnie Brown, Wey Camp, Curry Gra- ham, Jennifer Hough, Renata Kendrick, Steve Koval, Beth Morrison, Jenifer Ol- ing, John Robitscher, Tali Segal, and Hal Silcox. Their duties include almost any- thing that Carter needs, from recording his class lectures and doing research for him, to telling the press where to stand and what to do. According to Beth Morri- son, the job is rewarding, "It's a lot of fun, too, you get to meet people you used to only hear about in the news." - Gary Griffin Morris Carter Aidesf253 IDIICIK'-SlfAXNIfIIIlIl 254jFreshmen Eric Rick Stacey Roberts Marla Rohald-Klarman Alan Rosenberg Joy J. Routzahn Andrew Rubenstein Mandy Rubin Roy Saguiguit Shayna Michele Salomon Noelle Rose Scaldara Tracy Schafer Robin Schafler Lisa Schloss Mara Schubert Kira Sekulow Melinda Sheppard Terre Sherrod Helen Shulman Jeffrey D. Silverstein Jay Singh Michael Slaughter Kathy Smith Scott Snedeker Stuart L. Soberman Susan C. Stanfill CJ ef-gg, SlfIl2IIUIKIIANIDI-ZIINN T9 'Ng-19 its-7' Susan Strickland Christene Tolbert Tricia Townes Daniela Tudoran Leslie Turinsky N Lisa Turner Scott Ubillos James Andrew Upshaw Lori Van Roekens Bill Vigrass Parthy J. Walker Karrie Walters Veronica Wan - Sandra M. Warner Litia West 9"'1m Becky Wiencek Noel Williams Nicole Wilson - Stephen Woski Missy Wrenn Allison Zabriskie Scott H. Zale Andrew Evan Zatlin Glenn A. Zazulia Natalie Zinn Freshmenf255 ZVIIAXNUIFIF Dan Zylanoff 256fFreshmen w Katzman .F 3 7 f. Qi, 5 ' ff ffeffi , ' ' - 3 1 "'L .... ' I 4 ,v Y M 4 V, E L-.,.. ,f Q? Bax 5' . -Sash Gassner l3lI3AlDlUAlflE U lUlDIENl A sg V ..,,: Q 'L S ,... . f. , For many people, the schooling does not end at college gradu- ation. They go on to earn masters, PhD's, or professional degrees. Time becomes more limited as more time is devoted to the ad- vanced studies. But this doesn't mean there's no time to relax and play. The Enamel Rods: Seated - Steve Brazel. Kneel- ing - Jackie Feckoury, Brad Greenway, Jeff Brotherton, Tony Nunez, Mike Seligson. Standing - Harwell Palmer, Brett Spielvogel, Mark San- chez, John Harlee, David Pumphrey, Hank Goble, Ed Parker, Jerry Dent, Pete Gutierrez, Scott Ben- stock, Bruce Seidner, Brian Booth, Below:The Psi Omega Dental Frat parties while law students take a breather from studying. Yjfr, iq M 'ww , . ., M 25 lflI'1IE IIBUIIBIIBV JIIDNIES S'l2lI'l'UIlAIIQS Mtention the name "Bobby Jones," and people will comment on the man, the golfer, the legend, and his accomplish- ments off the golf course. But few are aware of the honor that the people of St. Andrews, Scotland bestowed upon the man. They established a scholarship pro- gram that bears his name which enables eight students to study abroad. The eight participants are selected from St. An- drews University and Emory University fthe alma mater of Bobby Jonesl. The four students from each university spend a year of study across the Atlantic Ocean. This year's Bobby Jones Scholars from St. Andrews are four individuals with dis- tinctive personalities. Prior to their selec- tion, the four students were not familiar with one another. Though the program brought them together as close friends, each remained as diverse in their interests as before. Sally Hagessen-Knatchbill is the only female scholar from St. Andrews. She joined the program to broaden her field of study and to expand her interests. Sal- ly became a member of the Women's Chorale, participated in Theatre Emory, and signed up for drama and political science courses that she had never been able to take before. She remarked that she will always cherish her year here for as she so gallantly put it, "lt was good for me to get outside myself. It's been a strengthening experience, living alone in a new environment. But most of all, it is good to be young and a student again." Another scholar, Paul Logan, realized that the chance to study at Emory by this program would fit into his long term plans. Paul was able to finally take classes in educational studies and development so that he could pursue his career choice of becoming a teacher. Throughout the year, Paul helped out at the Hart School 258fThe Bobby Jones Scholars N021 i210 rm l.lf?.flpl5T0UCn for learning disabilities. Not all of his time was spent inside the classroom as he ex- perienced with a wide range of sports such as soccer, golf, and racquetball. He took advantage of every opportunity the program offered because the one aspect that appealed to Paul was its flexibility. He explained, "We are all doing exactly what we want to do. lt gives us our free- dom and for that reason I feel that one can not come across a better scholarship than the Bobby Jones. lt's tailored to suit whatever your own needs are." The most comical and outgoing of all the four scholars is Alan Thomson. He remarked that he came to Atlanta expect- ing it to be a scene right out of "Gone With the Wind" and in fact, actually had hopes of meeting a young Southern heir- ess. But seriously, Alan seemed quite pleased with his year at Emory. He stud- ied toward the completion of a MA de- gree in Economic History. ln his spare time, he improved his handicap by play- ing golf four times a week at Nort Druid Hills. The one aspect of the program that fascinated him was the travel opportunity which he felt more Americans should take advantage of. Or more bluntly said, "lt's simply we QSt. Andrewsl need your money. Since it is a government-support- ed university, St. Andrews can not offer a very diverse program. But with re- sources, anything is possible." The fourth scholar, Hamish Taylor, de- cided to pursue a MBA. He enroled in the Business school and took as many courses as possible since St. Andrews of- fered no business courses whatsoever. Hamish has even done his studies in a practical sense because he has worked as student manager of the AMUC in his spare time. His other activities included playing soccer and rugby, and having Alan teach him to play golf. Hamish cer- tainly investigated the non-academic as- pects of the program as well. He stated, "The scholarship program is more than just an academic exchange. The involve- ment in the community is so much more intense than imaginable. The Bobby current scholars Sally, Paul, Alan, and Hamish will certainly not forget their year in Atlanta. For as Sally so elegantly stat- ed, "lt is like gold-dust - such a rare thing the Bobby Jones Scholarship is. One can use it as a personal enriching experience." And obviously, the four did just that. Linda Peacock Jones program is more than just a cam- pus idea." Even though all four scholars are al- lowed much freedom to do and study their interests, as a distinguished group there were certain added benefits to the program. The scholars spent Christmas break in Florida with Mrs. MacDonnel, the widow of John Henry MacDonnel who began the program. They also at- tended the Masters Southern Open and were guests of the Atlantic Athletic Club. Now the year is completed, and an- other group of scholars will be coming to Emory from St. Andrews. And as for the -- "fic Pictures by Peacock The Bobby Jones Scholarsf259 AIDIKIINSI-IIAIINE Chris I.. Adkins Dentistry Lynne Alley Theology Wendy T. Bailey Dentistry Greg Barfield Dentistry William Charles Bartling Dentistry Ely Eser B. Cesar Theology Elizabeth Diaz Health Records Administration Earl Tucker Dickerson Graduate School Jackie Feckoury Dentistry Thomas Geoghegan Dentistry Marcia Gerber James W. Gordon Mansurul Hasib Steven Mark Held Katheryne M. Hibbitts William N, Hiers, Jr. Ryohei Hoshi Derek Johnson Radiological Sciences Allied Health Political Science MBA Graduate Nursing Law Political Science Law Sally Knatchbull-Hugessen Bobby Jones Scholar June M. Laing Medical Records Administration 26O!Graduates ww iv -Pfvsik ri CJ-'it ,., his Fra' MKAIDlflINlE1'-VAXNCV Beveley F. Martinez Statistics Crissa G. McDole Medical Records Administra- . tion Brian Peabody MBA ' Lea Ann Peterson Health Records Administration I ' Charles Quinn Masters Medical Science Glenn Simensky Law Dawn Sultzer Graduate Nursing Robert Michael Taft Dentistry Asif Taufiq MBA Worasit Uchai Graduate Physics Heiclemarie Watts Allied Health Sherryl Whearry Medical Records Administration Larry Allen Williams MBA Karen Yancy Analitical Chemistry Graduatesf261 IDIENW AI SICIHUUII I ,I , Y A ,. WA w.1AA,,5A, - , - A., ,I ,.f7f , -,,,,,., IA -'sz' gff,.:If : f - , ,A 'ff A A - . MII ' A eff" iz EV A ..,, A4 J' 1 . . :.-f , ' .' 1-3- ' 'Is' -1 ' ' QA., A ' 5 . , IAA - :gf 'fn I A pi . r I I . ff I A f- I . II, f A za I- A A ,J 4' 4--E ' an .- Av- . L ggi. 'P I J . .4 , 'R w. 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I, Q-""' v "' K .' , hr -f wr " ' P351 S' Nj Af" "' - 1 ' ' F' Ty X I ff X 4' Q9 , . . . p DELLINGER DEVITA I:IooLEY DDRFMAN DOZIER DLIEFIN EATON EARRLICIA FLANAGAN ELAx FREIEIERG .g,yII1'AL1f:gA -- - , -- I .V ..'iA,5,-A - - - . fig' 6 N- ' . , -A - -T515 A:I . ':?:QI5,. li 2 .. 1 ' 7 'ifgiflf "Gf'fe ??' 'I '- 'I A, , 15534 - fa V, nf 1 1 : 0: V' .1 , Q. , I f-: 5,5 QA n Q- . IAQ 3 2451 'F-'5 '3 a 3 , -34 A J -I ' :Q fir X93 Af- f '. . , .,. I A ' A - ,RW I "K, - J ,Q , - , q I -' 4 ,I A -V . 'K , f A ,- 1 X . p 'P' - A ' ,. -9 -I , . 4. AAA- I A , : A A A252 , , 4 ,gf fi. , A- . K -I X A --- '. X - A A .. 1 A -L' 'A Xi' I 'iff I A FRIEDMAN GARDNER CARRET1 GILCHRIST GITTELSDN GOLD GOLDEN HABEKOST I-IABER HALICZER HATCH . . ., A 1 - . . - A+:-N 'Av .fr A- A A A . I .rv , - -.1-,ARA , - . ' ' ' I f fs -' -W - ' I Eff - - I -A AI. 1 'vw .. " " E, X Aa ' N- ff. HQ, 15, A. ' ,Q ' K Ig: - ,- ' - A ,,. 44 '7' 2, X" , ' Za. I 'lil A -, , 5- I .A L 1 -A z.. I ' ' -I .A 'J' .- : K J . - X ,I V " W' A I 'ff , 3- ' A 5 ,, A X ,W ,.., ,L .. A 1 HATCHER HEDRICK HENNING HEWETT HILDER HINTON HUDSON HDI JACKSON, D JACKSON, M JOHNSON A-. -- 1: ' ' AEi"' I ' -1- . - A :AI ya, , - 1, '-eg.. - 1 , .- ,,,. X , . A -I . Q V -f. ig, W - L. A ,gy Y ,Q X, 87 , ,- 19 5- , - Q ' L, 'a 7' W' ,A 5- 7: , '2 ., 'g -l',, r . I N- av 1 R Y ,P A, -1' A - , 'Aff' gi' - ' ' . I -T" F v4?a'. - v W- ' .. ' E I .fx rj! '9 ,f 'A f If--A Q1 VX- ' ai, A . A -A I J + '-"Y, , .' , N ' -' , ff? . 1 I A ,' Af, A-Y -I I .-ff if AAMARLIDDIN KEMPTON KLEIN Rooms KRAVITZ LASSITER LEONARD LEWIS LIPHAM LOPEZ MADSEN f . 3 -TTY ' 7. ' 3 "' ,J lv ' 1 ,. A . , ' Sz- I, , I . in , V CM " "ffm ' ' Q l :ff-A , -sy . , 'Ai .A - , Lk .5 ' A 6? 9 , ,R Aw W C? :I A Q ,- - 1. 1 he ,I . '- .X . . C i 5 - - V ' 'xE34'i xy, V - -' 1 'f F wg-H Q- 5, KT? -: fff.. A W H I I " IA ' , I '11 . ' I . - V I V . Q 3 , A' ' K QI 'V E 1 " ' ' - , RYA ' I" . VT- ' X A' 4 W A I Il A Ah, 5 -.PW 'I 'V 'Ax -. L. ,. Nggcg-J! A i LQ , t A Q MALONEY MCDONALD MILLER MITCHELL MIZELL MORCAN MYERS NAVON NEWBERN NISSLEY NoI.EN ,, ' ZR.-If -"" I- 'fI-Ev, , A , eg.1w'ff.f1:-F , . 'V " ' -E, 3 2 iff? ' I 553:-1. ' If5"i:?f5+ ' ' ' NA I , Af' A , :V ,A ,FEW A ig V I ,F A, - 4:1 Q A, k - A .. 1 , V F ,, A ,.,, .K Q , -A ' 'r.iN',I -1- -w. I " " . " A , I I I"1?' . A ff 'Ig . L- "' - f""""'. '2 R1 Lf 7 - ll AI -Z5 - Q ' 6" ' I f' f""qA Agsiv- f .IQ ' '-' ' I-. "ff 'g' 1 ' 1-IA: " I . ' X "P ' I 1--4 .II .. I., if , ,I ,., .5 A 5 .. -, V ' I ' ' , ' I N Y w ' -I f' A ,I I 4 I vs ' - X I ,- A .A M , ' . , If ' . I .- . lik ' , OLSON OXFORD REARCE REETS PERLMAN PERR PERRY PETTERSON PDRR ROEIERTS RODIER ww. 'A I 'W , ,I ff 'I--N: ' ' I ,mea - -.1 V- , -- . .wa-. ,", ' ' 1 '. " - ' 5: F9555 " ifI,iQg1 f 4 an F Eg., ' " ' , . ' L .f . -e. I im, A ,, 53 Q ' 'iw , 'nf 'W I. -4 "' if 'A ' ' ,Q 'I - . ' . ' "2 'Y ' I 4 I 9 Sn . . A Q ' . - l - 1- .' ,L ' x. 5, . ' 4 'i lf., 7 N-1 7 . ,X , . ' - is , - . .f -'AI . I, f II ,Ig ,ff A f A in-,X ,-1 - ' I- 1 ,YI I4 A,-5 A ROSEN ROSENZWEIG SALTZMAN SANDLIN SCHAAP SHULTZ SMITH TAFT TAYLOR TLIRIK U Q . AN.. - , A, I , ,QA in i f -- h i Af 5:-1' ,ive q . ,I 4, AA., A ' 'A I- , , q U22 .f I Ig ,M Y ' ' I , ' ' 1 , , I, I4 vp: ga: ,,i, I , ,:. I - - A .' , , , SENIOR 82-83 ' .4 -1 N. -or . Y' . f v' ' N7 -' ' , 6, I . , , 1 T. 5, I f -7 l . ' . J K A 'f 3' Z . II --xg A , I A ' . """""'x..., 'E' A Q ' - 'I ' A IV, voLLMER WAKASUGI wALLS WEISBRDT wsnss wILDE WILLIAMS YEN 262 f Graduates . . 'X 'Lf A -J'-,N ..'...-Y' ' V - . , :i+.5'i':4 'H 'X NT' ' ', Qian 1 fue' uw' ' - V EMU, 'ik' L V ral- , - , V1 - .M l ., 'Q 1 ' Y ' .4 3, 'r ' Q . wif'-F I 5 ' - fx -2- - '?1 A ., if -L ' ,, .h 'ii' Q33 A A A LII W EJ' II L W I 15' g I ' - rd' 4 . w 4 A , '4' . . Q? , , II 2- J N 3-Agyf-l y QW Yi, N , - . ' if F-2 I......4"""' - J E' .... -fix Z ABRAHAM BENNETT BENSTOCK BERKO BIRCH BLOOM BOOTH BRAZEL Bnoosxv BROII-IEBTON BLILLION Q-,,F,ji'1-" V N :- Y. ., , . R :. 5 K TIE 'Aff A Q4 'IQ A Y , I 'V . , ' "4 42 , we . , - ca ,Q 2' - B. -"' ... I , - , , -,A 1 -+ T L X, N I, "' 0 ' ' . ' X 12-'I " - 4?- Hx., . . X- f E In-.x..L...5 ' ' BURKE Burz CAMPBELL CANCIO COHEN. B COHEN, J covINcToN CRAWFORD cuBLEv IJELOAQEI DENT 1 ff E ' 1 ,- - , 'i ' 9' i 2 3. '13 in " kg , 4 , as V . , E' Q 7' L U5 I B- A I .,- -If W A - Ie r-- - -A I W' . 7 J, . ,fi E - K - I Y, 1 .A ., . I , I ,X .- ,N , I . , .mal I 1'-L . A, DEWEY- , DODSON DRAvIs DUNCAN Fecxounv FELDNIAN FINE FBEEDNIAN GENTBv GEOGHEGAN GOBLE r- ' A - nc ' , ' ,A N ' W 'A ' ,E .A 'bb "'- 'H Q va A I. Ka-rn? ':. 4. A I -W 1 gg' 7' -L. ,Q I v .Nt-1, '- 3 - av 1 E S . il T q -,--.. a - A fy .ri ' I I v I. 1-11, 5, I -' ' I ' A - 1 i' " G J IFN A 1 1 I , I :Li '. a ILM- -.,lL I Y Q' .L .L Lf, ' GRALLNICK GREENE GBEENWAY GBIMM GUTIEFIREZ, K GLITIEBBEZ, P BANKS I-IABLLEE HARPER HARRINGTON HEGEDLIS A-'f' f ggi ' ' 1 ' "PY Tx 4' A ,A , ' AQ' - 2 '61 , 1 I fa I , -.A' , 5 A A E gg. T' ., ,. ff Q I ,-1. V, I 5 w 4s 3 pr -ag, ,Fa 'I , L l -3 -Q-N. fn . X ,QA Q1 ' ' 5,5 -, ', I ' ' ' "' 6 -L 1 Q , 1 '1, Lk I I 9 -f A , f I I .1 f I . -. Lf g -i' K ' A L A I ,, I , 1 I , , , X .ff ' ' " X , . HENNER HIMEL I-IOBNSBY HUBERT HUFF JACKSON AAHLENBEBG AATANCIN KATES IcIBBv KIHSNEFI 2 I 'iid "ru -E f sl E -4 M . if 'wi r Q . , ' .L 13- ' , ,: - 4 4:4 ,- 3 . M .1 1, ,- , L. A A . - E .. I lb - -7 -f - X I I ' , , - - 4 f .cf -g . Q., ,L I -1' 1. ,XL . L N K I L, - f -, X " aff' Y ' IF' 1 X I I - 1 I J . . I f 1 'I ' ,g IQ L ' Ai 5'l4g4.,V ,TB ., ,Qqfjw My-:ey X . LACKEY LAU LEVINE LONG LOOS MACCONNELL MENENDEZ MILLS MOON NIULLIS NUNEZ A ' A f " I -was N 4 f- me 'A '.. -29 'TJ -,. - . 'P -- 5 'P ef- .. L - ,f 3 I - sq ,Rza ., ' ' '! . r A V - ,A , -f - A Lf J! -L L 6 xi' -' 57 ' ' I ' ' "f V' A N9 -A I , . ' , I: L , -- . .1 .r I ," if ' I I I' 1 -,z f 1 1 H Vx , . 1- ff.- .K N I . ' k , osIPcI-IAK PALMER pAnKER p,-,QVIAINEN PHILLIPS PIEBFEDEBICI PODRAV PUMPHFEEY PYRPTZ BEIDHEAD FIEzNIK - . Z4 122 , '1' ' ' '4 :I . X.. I , 1 ' "',- -' 'D' -'iw A 'av F' ' "' ' - Q V -4 . f -I ' I , -. "', 1' .1 sg f 5 V - -vo v- N, , vi, ' - I - -'A --- A 7 - I an I -v - ' I ur , I . I . - '44 . -I . I L - - . Ag..-' A E' .67 AJ ' pf S. l I I I 5 X, -' - mu... - H4 '94 Rf A ,l adm .L ' SABLE SANCHEZ SCHWAFITZ SEIDNEFI SELIGSON SI-IACAELFOFID SHERRY SHIEBLING SHIVERS SMITH soBEL , A if , ' f Q 19 A I-. F- 2 -A " 0 1- lg T T n L "' - NJN. '-I .". .' 1 ..- - ,T -i r 4 X LL Q. Q 'RTF .f,- . I Y ' - . 4 4 ,X - ZW " ' ""- , 'Q , -- lv aim- x , Y Ig ro , . 0 . . A A A - I -.A ' f I A I. A 0 - L 0 x 1 SPA-GNOLI SPECTOQ ss-IELVOGEL , STAMITOLEVSU STECHISHIN STEWART ST PIERRE STBATFOBD SWEETING TSUI UNBERNQFLER fW""" " 3" . Q"- fi 913 . fu - ' , 2 ' N I Y i I1 A r -. -3 a an' 1' ,2 E A A 5 4.1 .12 , -.55 - f-2 7 JUNIOR 82-83 f f ' J I I -A 1 if , . , f I J 5 1 H t 1 L V I L , A- 49... VAUGHN WATERS WEBBER WI-IITEMAN WILCOX WINTER YASMAN Graduatesf263 264fGraduates ,fff ' .ff 2 ,,. , 1 ' ' ' Q2 l - if A T . 'ir ' 'P V 'fm F131 GQ' I I .J-I Inq' 'V g...,m.,, , , -, - . . . 1 ' --" A' ' f ,V , I I A I -. ' VV I J V 2 , W, . ' " ' 1 . sg , ASHMAN BAILEY BARON BARRACK BASKIN BELL BELNAP , an . ,uf 5' ffl V,'.,' E f., up , V ',1,:ViZ, , A I 1' E' 4 I. 1 L , 1 ' ' iff: 'fi ,. " " ' ' ' ' -- '. , V " . 'uv ' 'qu 1 'Z' V I 2 X ' A 4 JVM W 'Y ' .. I ' I: f, L ' Vw A , 5 I LV, , PL BEHMAN , - BLADES ' . V ,,,4:.V, .VMVHV-VV,,'V '5-:I+ . 'Ii C17 1 -I V . 1 V- anim-. , , f 1 DELAVAN DE ROSA BLITMAN DI PACE 2',":? BROCK BRUNO BUSH BUFIACK CHERRY CONGIUNDI COURTNEY , -I Q 4' . AJ: ,." X ,ji - .V DRESCHER W 4 Q, 2 I ' 7 ' Y , ' I Q , ,V .., 1 Z! 5 A f , f W ETTS FALVELLO FRANK GILBERT GOLD GORMAN f fWff" .:'Q ' ' - .- f Q,.E3 wg.:ig,. I Alf ' Egg. ff " L-11,552 2 Vs LY' . '- 1 -1:-A-1 '- '-1.,-1'4'ff:s V, u " ' fn ' . " :J V' V I V' V -' ,I gin 1-:V-. ' I f , I.-fa' . ff" -1' 925, V ' X V T ,I:,Vg,:: If V ., -3 X ., ,... ? 1 GREEN HAMEL HAQDMAI. Mai HEINEMANN HELLER HQES HOBAUGH HUANG '7 . ' . I ff' 9? 'VM - ' ' ' -V xg IZ - - -ff! 3-N ,, 5 ' iff ,, , 1. ' H- 1 V 4 V f F ' A V V , ' 2- ' .: ' Q , - - , V- .V '- , ' f . Vg S VV: - ' 1,1 , QI ' .V , ' I jg H V,-xg f ' .. j- V ' if - . 4. V F ' 1 . '35 f - lg sg ' V' , sb- X ,ff 3 ,ca ' Qui-1411 Q . I .. fr- 3' -,ve V I 5 'A fe 'Li 52 f' ! 'X -E :V IIN -A 'S X I ' 4' I A ' '- ' " ' I . ""' ' 1. JERKINS JURKOVIC HEAWQPA-I5 ,Viva MANUS MAYA MAZUJI MERCHANT MUSE NATERMAN :Z ...,, ' ' 'iff' :Eff M ii .1 . 42-.1 wa? fa!-113 7 '- H".-:wf 21:1 ' , , wi -,. ' , V: 222- V V 41 , F ' I V . ,Q 5. ' ' 'V I I 1 " I ' - "ff r.,.vf ' J"': ' D l I ' V , fel 1- ' ' ff 'D Z' i V:-j ' ' 'Y Ji X c-rf- I fi VV E ff gi I . I T5 x, , ff- '- I E V .,,.,., A ,. . jVL,V. v X . K WEV lc A X , ,. 4, '- - ' lx A A ' NEALE OLSEN OWENS PACHA PAN PETTY PRASKINS PRUSIA FIAGSDQLE RITCHIE " " 1 ' ls ' . if V- xv. T7 ' V V ii 22252522 -: V ,s 1 2' mmf - V. V. -A 21215--:VM .V R: -fi? V' 2, ' I V 2. , '- - wg . I ,yy V 4 ' " ,-sf' JV, . f 'V " ' V : . V p-?..2,- ' peg-5 V: V., V N, V :fi -VZ ia., N V l V ,K 1 15 6, . .,:5.1-.xg ' . F' . as . r 3? If ' -0- ' I " . ' I - I ' - V , V N :V - - V I ,V V' - I .fx MV V, ,V L A 4 I .Q ,. ,Q . I . V. - V 75, V I I 4' n . - '- - , I .I . - V : . 4 I1 I . ' ROBQQNS RODGERS SABATLLLO LEANVOI-.D SCALERA SCHOTTL SCHUBERTH SMITH, C SMITH. D SOLOMON ' ' . f 1? Q, , '1 V11 A-,if Y' V V , I fills,-W f- V K ,. 3 I SOUTHARD SPARKMAN SPEISER STARLING SWOHDS TAYL TOLMIE TOUFIIAL n V . IVV, V,. , Y. h ,V ., ' SEKVREIV.. , f I .:-51' .L I 'V 2 " . . N ' I , -' ff " - '. 'W ni ' ' - :T-'53 I 2 V- , ' 1 , . +4 - .4-5 .4 I Ld. X , . - . V ' - ' 'lx 'V+'-" V J ' ' :VN -I ,JW Ay, . 'I - ..V---'P' - 1" r' -, 11' - Iv I WALL WEINMAN WEISMAN WHATCOTT WHITE WILLIAMS WOLFF WOOD WYGODSKI ZACHMANN SOPHOMORE 82-83 Nui 'Xf- vs 'E ' is ADKINS LW, 65" I COMER AJMO COOK K , , 5 ALLEN BARFIELD CUTLER DARDEN BASS BEULIGMANN 'JS- i. " ' Ang JJ DUKE ECCKEH BIEDEFIMAN BOOTH BFXAVERMAN BRITT EHRLICH ELLIOTT EVANS FEALY FERNANDEZ FINK FFIANKEL FRIEDFIICH GANDY GILBERT GILLIAM GLASSEFI GOWASACK GREENE ,. N V-,,.. ,, , V .i..,,, . V V, 1 . .A,. -..,,i,. . , W.,-Y if E, 'Q ,pw , V ggyai .- I 1, 1- V- , V. ,3-LI. ' ff-A 5 I I 3 1, . H ay-If 1 "--,. :N -I ' LL" - 'E I fc- . 'wail' If I W ' ?7 3 7285 ' "Y . , I " ' I - - va ' " f I 1 v L A ' n ' f VV ' "ff L : V19-4 ' Q ' 'QQ ""'- x7 -I - If ....- I fr- Il I ,.. : .f '- 4-1 .1 , ' ,V I L1 - fgrf'-Eg. , ,. ,. ' , - I 4101 'E ' -1 4 I 1- E. 'A xl I -3. . .ml gb, :Lu-f ' - 41:14. GUFISKY HALBLEIB HAMEFQOFF HARFIINGTON I-IENDIIIICKS IIINTON HODGIN Hoop IWAOKA KLEIN ? I "UM, , ""'- U ' ' ' W' ,iq 'i g 2' 'YQ 3 I ,, . Q F . an V -.1 V 1 V - -...f -9 415' 0 - ,iff V ' 'K 'sr WW f . lit ., ' I , X V .da .A - '- 5 KONDZIELA LANCASTER LEE LERNEF? LESPEFIANCE LINEK LOGAN MADPIAY MAKDY MAFION ' .LFE--IZ, ghfvvfiii - V 1 " "QQ-11 VV :VW -, 'QI-KA V -'FL .f 1V2 wIJ1- -Egg vggf WEN! 5 'M' 'ifa 'E QW' Q , " I . 2 95, . ' ' - Lf ' "- - 2 9 3 . 'S ' ' "' v - 4: . ' ' I ' I , .4 I . - I 'L ' -1 I Q 1 I' gl ' -p", -0 ' 5 53:5 Ll. A ' ' x'-'V' Q47 'E I .--' IT: 'fx ' I If A. nl' ' 'V "' I X ' v -.ff - - -3, . 4 . ll, ,jg E' Q A SELL. , ... gif!" A MARSHALL MCKENZIE MENNA MONGEAU MOPIRISON MORRISON Iwwwv NAGEL NEWSOM NOLAND . V ' 5 Vik Qu. S. ,J I.'fl':::z,.,-yi 'gh V , ., 9591321 im 'Q' ' fl' "A 9 " iw 0 .-K' 5. -AW, I, V E A - 'I A 11, 4 ' I . ' 7 f ' A, '. " ' .3 'N Z Un, VY an V ,nf . V 3. I VV , , ,l V - g.,1'if' wx. P15 -9, ' - -1 I-' ' -H0 L. ' X V ' I .,. I 0' -4 I -..,.' R y ' .' . 1 . ..-I .?' 9X,V ' Ng! ' ggi, gr :.f"2',I gi.. , 'YV ' ': .H -. -..- 7-VV, , , , ,. Q.. II 3 1 V I Q 3 hifi' 4, bl! L -, Q L-, , 9 dia' . ' NORDONE NYCZEPIFI O'DONNELL PETRUCCI POINEAL RAPE FIENEHAW FIOSEN SALVI SATEFI ' A -. F " fpVf1-2.14, , In Vi I 5:3531 1-I-wg' A LQ'-LLP' EV . friw- ' '41 "jf ' I I . vw . , ' " 4, ' V- E , Q-, I A L 1 .4 Y. , 1 i, ,, , --in . I: V- ,E . . V ,I V7 h .. -I .. I I - . vs f , 'I I I? ' V.. ft 1 V ' V , V. 'MV f f ' ca 9 ,- 'P lf!! ' V - Q I I . -4 f J . - I EE ' - ' v ' . ' ga. - 5 T- f K ,IA I " .. ' Q: . " - . s.,,, .-I L, V . A , 1 ' , It J ML-: ' I J .f , YI' .Il . ' ki - I' t 4 . , I . ' 1 ' W I . x " ? X war., . 4 K SCHWEIZEFI SEWARD SIMMONS SIMON SJOBLOM STONE TAWIL TREBILCOCK VAN GALDEFI VAUGHN .1 if S R WASHlNGTON WATKINS FV, WEEMS WEISSMAN WHITE ZINNEV FRESHMAN 82-83 Graduatesf265 Sponso 5 Morris Garter 266 fAds S X X 'Xi W 558 Ns. S "N.. gusset -, - Adsf267 Mr. and Mrs. Patron Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs Mr. and Mrs E.R. Abderholden Lee M. Albin William C. Alford, Jr. Ronald F. Allen Lemard Alpert Berel Altman Lt. Colonel C. Peter Andrews Mr. and Mrs. J. Leo Appel, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Chet Austin Mrs. Shari Balmuth Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Baran Trudy 8: Marvin Barkin Mr. and Mrs. William W. Beckett Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon M. Bendit Mr. Harvey Bergman Mr. Alan S. Berk Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm C. Berman Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Bernstein Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Beverforden Drs. M.L. and B. Bishop Jane Block Dr. and Mrs. M. Larrie Blue Loretta Alpern Bober Mr. and Mrs. Douglass M. Bomeisler Florence Borkan Mr. and Mrs. Jerald Brownstein Mr. John Bucsela Dr. and Mrs. David Cardoso Mr. and Mrs. Jerry S. Carroll , Jr. Carter Mrs. Ruth C. Lynne E. 8: Vincent A. Caruso Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Cassidy Barry S. Chesler Mrs. Walter A. Conlan, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Castex P. Conner Wilson A. Conner Michael M. Conroy, M.D. Mr. and Mrs. Howitt Cook Mr. Robert M. Cook Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Aristides and Mr. Harry B. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. John W. Cooke, Jr. Henry N. Cooper Marion L. Cooper Stella Copulos Crossfield Charles Crumpton Albert E. Culp Elmer F. Davis Mrs. Norma Jean DeAngelis Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. W.B. Elton Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. 268fPatrons Robert Dernberger John Elshoff Richard E. Ernst Lowell Fallick Fatteh Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. George Filak R. Florin Eugene Flynn James G. Forbes Annette Friedman Dr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Milton Gallant Harold M. Gaynor Alan Goldenberg Pedro Gonzales Robert M. Goodyear Howard Guss Jerold Grubman Stanley Hagendorf Richard L. Hardison Albert J. Heinrich Bob Hirschfeld Bernard H. Horowitz William D. Hughes Riaz H. lmami Herbert M. lris Jerome W. Johnson Dr. Donna Franco Jove Dr. 81 Mrs. E. Jeff Justis Dr. and Mrs. lvan J . Kahn Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Katish Dr. and Mrs. Philip L. Kauff Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Keller Drs. John and Mary Khosh Irene and Murray Klein Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Leonard S. Klein John Koenigsberg Al Lackner S.P. Lalli Rudy Langer Linda and Bill Langsam Dr. and Mrs. Dr. Taurin P. Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. James M. Lee Lee Lester Lerner Robert J . Lev Harrison Levy Emil Liebman Ralph Lowenstein Arthur Lux Malcolm N. Luxenberg S. Lyle Mr. Edward S. Madara Jr. Mr. Arnold Malakoff Mr. and Mrs. William H. Marion Robert J. Marquardt Mr. Howard A. Marwin Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. McCann Prof. and Mrs. Kermit E. McKenzie Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. E.W. Miller Mr. and Mrs. James J. Meadows Lawrence Mervis Robert Meyer Jack A. Meyers Gilbert Mintz Dr. Arturo M. Monteiro Dr. and Mrs. . John C. Morrison, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs Dr. Chris G. Mrs. Joseph Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Dr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Moor Melvin Moses Nikias P. OlBrien Ronald Phillips Peter C. Quoyeser Edward Rachlin Beverly Randolph Gerald L. Ray Dr. and Mrs. R. Redvanly Robert S. Reitman Jay H. Robbins Dr. and Mrs. Max Robinowitz Mr. and Mrs. Richard Davis Rogovin Jay U. Rossbach, Jr. Amanda Ann Sauls Beth Scherer Mr. and Mrs. D.L. Schwock Mr. and Mrs. Donald Shanley Mrs. N.A. Sheridan Dr. and Mrs. Reuben Silberman Mr. and Mrs. Herbert R. Silvers Borah S. Simon Mr. and Mrs. L.B. Simpson Betty Smith Mrs. Carole Solomon Mr. and Mrs. Timothy D. Stack William J. and Catherine B. Stanley Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Strong Dr. and Mrs. Wytch Stubbs Ami and Arlene Tanel Mr. and Mrs Dr. and Mrs. M.E. Thorne Mr. and Mrs Mr. and Mrs Dr. and Mrs. William Tarlow Robert Thoburn Paul Tobin Rufus Turner Howard G. Vigrass Joseph W. Wait Beth and Stewart Wald Anderson Walker Jr. Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Watkins, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Wexler Henry Wiener Mr. and Mrs. Ken Wilkins Dr. and Mrs. Jay J. Winokur Mr. and Mrs. B. Winter Eleanor and Joel Wishengrad Dr. and Mrs. Stewart R. Wright Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Yerman Monty Yokel Mr. and Mrs. Robert Zinn ii E Silt Joy Gonzales Editor N5 C? K Lynne Harwell l Assistant Editor 5' 2 . E3 ' . David Altman .5 Ar lg X" Business manager iflgm "' All Gonzales Photography Editors Beth Morris and Tony Vincent Index Editor Richard Parker Dooley's Diary Artist Corey Jan Albert Academics: Lynda Hamby Features: Helen Bledsoe Greeks: Amy Livingston Organizations: Mike Feinstein Sports: D'Angello Collier Student Life: Gary Griffin Student Portraitist: Evelyn Asihene Staff Writers Linda Peacock, Karen Ogle, Allison Campbell, Ginger Rucker, Rick Wachob, Maureen Abbate Staff Photographers Larry Garter, Jeff Gassner, Walter Bland, Elizabeth Nickey, Edward McEachern, Patrick Brennan, Chris Frear, Sibel Oyman, Karen Appel Contributing Photographers Mike Barkin, Steve Pomerantz, Richard Fawcett, Karen Kress, Angela Echols, Eric Bord, Josh Kugler Contributing Writers l would like to thank all the organizational presidents and secretaries for submitting a story on their activities. Staff Joy Routzahn, Silvio Blanco, Bonnie Hughes, Kim Oliver, Scott Zale, John Frenzel, Doug Terrell, Suzi Potts, Felicia Poree ii V1-Qc: ' wait ii ll-, F - ,z at - xl-ll Gonzales staff 1269 Pc scrmzls 2nd Floor Means Thanks for making this year the best. I love you! Always Gaylynn Philly is my home town Fritz, no gumbo Please Beta, Remember to obey the important people R, You're still a malou M Summer Scholars 81 Live! Sandy ' Kory ' John ' Carlotta ' Sherry ' Nicole ' Terry ' Ken ' Missy ' Tracy ' 8z RA: Preston Joann, don't apologize - Nick, "Debbie's here" - Jackie and I must go to our apt. Remember , . Pam Madeana, I-Iere's to cigarettes, aspirin and Tab. I'll miss you. Your Roomie Dear Joy, Thanks for putting up with me for three years Love, Roomie HRB - Looking ahead to the marvelous '9O's , CLA Dear Marci, Thanks for putting up with me and the mess for three years. Love Roomie Dear SYL, Thanks for being the best friend in the world! Love you, Helen 270fPersonals Wendy - I am sorry that we've never worked together. Maybe soon - Dan T. Dwight Thanks for all your help. You're the best friend a guy could have - Josh TRIMBLITES: Win or lose, you,re still the best. Your loyal fan Richard. Sandy - Thanks for being a fantastic roomy and good friend and for putting up wf all my quirks Luv 'ya How bout them cards??!! St. Louis Cardinals 1982 World Series Champions!! Yanksf Mets Maybe 1983 Scott, What would I do without your smile and P.W. You're so special Suzanne Roebaby, Always remember the nights with the XLs, the Aztexs, the openmike nights and I love you, EC Rob - Thanks for all the great times 8: helping me through the rough times. You're a wonderful friend! I Love You! Cynthia Sheila, Stacy, Jen and Jac - Great year, like mellow out and ignore the menches - Love Barb Dearest Cindy, Although these have not been the best of years, we must be thankful for the love we share. D.B. Chris, Thanks for all the good times! Love, H. To a wonderful friend - and then some. Try not to forget your college girlfriend. I Love You. Parting is such sweet sorrow . . , Chelsea and Montana, It's been quite a year! 2 down - 2 to go! Love, Arlene Dear Pooli l'Iere's to our future! It's been a short three years! I Love Ya! BVR Eddie, Congrats Dr. Brock! You will be a great MD someday! Good luck Love Lisa Craigee, Aren't you glad you're not at Vandy? Mickey Flo, I-Iuerta, and Donaldo You guys are the best! I will miss you next year! Thanks for the fun! Lisa Doug, No more poems or letter, Only four words: I love you friend Amy Michael, How can I sum up all we've had for 4 years? May an infinity of Happiness be yours. Liz To my favorite kids! May the memory of "Mom" remain as dear to you as it is to me. Love, Maryann Jamie, If you need a friend, I'm here. Love, Mike CFC, We will be friends forever. I love you. SEL I Love your P.W. Good Luck I'll miss you so much Forever P.W. Doug, Mike, Lenore COPD, Craig, and David CMPI: "Can we talk?", MERDE! "Only the best", Denny's at 2, Chez Waffle, cake fights, weekends in the moun- tains, "l don't tawk funny!", dressing up crazy, tickling matches, dancing to Shoutl, "This is disgusting, Bring me another.", and "the pot calling the fish a taxi" Thanks for the memories! I Lcve You All, Amy A silvery-mailed hand parts the waters of the lake, holding a slender volume of poetry . . . water-proofed of course. Love, Young Werther My Dearest Matthew, Hasn't this year been fun?! I Love You so very much! Love, Lynda Liz, A salute to 2M years of roomieship and to the first 4 years of an ever-growing friendship, B. Elyssa, I will always Love You. Mark Dearest G.R. lt's been fun. - S.A.T. Tanya - from turnip head to loving friends. Thanks for everything. I Love You - Ruth Lester, You're the best Roommate Persona lsf27l ED, Congratulations! Good Luck I'll miss ya, Love, Suzanne Our relationship was envied by all of Emory. Elaine, you'll always be close to me. Love Scott Dear Mr. P. Thanks for the memories! I couldn't have made it through summer physics without our outings?l! Tenn. Waltz - Ours forever Keep Dancin' Love BLH To the men of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Good luck! Terry Stathakis 1983 How do you like your meat, Babe? Let me guess - rraare? I love youll you know who 91225 FE, FT IWIPRI-ll Wilkie 414 Hopkins will live forever, Thanks to your loving level head we miss you already SBLD Dear M.G., l know you'll succeed in whatever you do! I'm going to miss you! I Love You! Always, E.K. Carol Brisbin Susan Harrington 81 Jennifer Bonanno, I Love You Little Sister Love Lisa PBR - You are the BEST - When's the wedding??? Love you, JAKE 272fPersonals Bob, All 4 years we have shared when I look at this book I think of you and how much I love you CI Puppy, l Love You Squatty Remember: Always Live, Love and Laugh! - Karen 8: Mel Scuff, Our friendship is forever and always. You really made the years here special Love Elaine To all my friends, Thanks for a great four years. Love, Victoria Smitty - If you can't seduce your best friend, then who can you seduce? JJ 81 JR - Sorry for calling 8: knocking at all hours, keeping 8: waking you up - stealing food - etc ? 8: ? CT - You taught me how to laugh, love, what itls all about I could love you a long time - BL Dear - Chief and I want to say - your performance has been remarkable, don't we have fun! Love Bob My Pag X v H ,1 P fp. A-fi' '-11, 4' f , 'N , N mi , 1 'X f 'S gs l"'u-,- if ig ' 2+-' ack' S 1: e.- -V-1 :1Xj.... D ' if aff" 4" - , 'X fr E.-E. xr. il 'Q.-..:.,,. kQkb..V f H-Nui , 'Q X ' ll 4 9 Alas and Alackl What to write on the editor's page that I have immodestly headlined "My Page." No theme runs through it, it's in no particular section. It's toward the end of the book, all 320 pages of it. What does an editor write? Actually, at this point, I'm tired of writing and typing. All the stories with no names - that's me. I don't know why I didn 't sign my name. probably because I knew I would be stating on the editor's page that I did them. Seriously, what is this page for? "I would like to take this opportunity to thank all etc . . . " No thanks, but l've already thanked the people who needed to be thanked. I'm also not going to apologize for anything that went in and did not go into the book. If you have any complaints and suggestions, work on the book and improve it. I could write a Senior Memory but l've realized that everytime I look at the book. I'II remember it being my senior year. Does the subject matter have to relate to yearbookish material? Too bad if it does because the page now takes a sentimental turn. Hey roomie-three years! I don 't think Smith 301 will ever be the same, at least the door can breathe now and all the popcorn is off the floor. Happy life on "Sesame Street", Ernie. To the wild Italian who used to live on third floor Smith until she moved out - I never did take a picture of that big chicken in Marietta. What did I get myself into? What if I don't have enough room to mention everyone? I don 't, now that l've used the copyfit. Oh well, I'II have to wing it and say thank you now to everyone who made my years here what they were - memorable. Aargh - if I use that word one more time, I'm going to barf. In the words of my birthplace fPhilippinesj SALAMAT POI to Donna Wendy 's is sure going to miss our businessj, Denise and Stacye fl am actually going to learn Spanish and surprise you twoj, Janira "Goatherders" I for making me Iaughj, Roma I what did you learn about Iovej, the sisters of Chi Omega I for the best and most fun yearsj, Margie I for being a super first roommate freshman year - my popcorn cravings I trace to youj, my secret coed society CHeta Lambda - I'll never forget theej, Beth fdid I carry on the tradition ?Q, Randy Cl needed that dinner celebrating the finished productj, Peter I what can I say - not much in the beginning 2, Frank fthank you for always listeningj, Josh Chow long is it to Clarksvillelj, Steve I you can't have my car and the Corvette does not look like a Camaro - guess when I wrote thisj, Barry and Kim fI'm sorry for the mess from portraitsj, to those on the staff who took up the slack I you saved my sanity Q, Dr. Lineberger I still haven 't decided what my career isj, and the people I didn 't mention but won 't forget. Goodbye Royal Bagle, EI Toro 's, Po' Folks, and all my eateries. Edulor's Pagef273 R flectlons Of It's Summer As You Glance Through This Book. You've survived the first, another, or last school year. As you flip through the pages another time, try to remember more than the pictures and portraits. Read the stories. All of this was meant for you. Emor V fx Q . , g Af .Q i,- -gil' R x 1 ' 'X ' k ' -""i?'f9- , ,.. rxvmgma -+ 1: X , J.s5iL,2I'ff: .. i55':' K ' , A " - - - ' .mv-nv- 1 ,N 4,5 35 1.3 3,,5,,5pQY5: i . K I 1,.,,1,,,.,i:i 83: 1.5. x Q . -. 11 A' H A K tv K. ,A Eg., - -gags - 1:55,-N -, A .. , J ww - : ., :. :X . -4. XX 1 igvvi.-:,f E ,A-, g A Y Y, , 4 x si. 1 .. F. , ,gh , A 1 A 1.93--1 Y . M... , A Q . . -. ' E- , - 5 ki ' L ,g ' 'F Iqreqqx, ff- Q af Qu Sa 5 -- N1 ,l . , y .-QNX--. b k ,fy gf - - " 4 .I - - ATC .fi ' , " i 4 - . . K L ' , .fp b ' S -'-1: fi' 4 f ' ' 1 X33 Y 'X x Morris X. , T X v X .- x , s H ,XXX A X X Gassner Vincent Nickey Gassner 4 Closingf275 x lusively Ours ff ,, ., V, V V '1.VV . V V, .V 1 V :V,,,,v, V, ,-.........,1,- , ., -. V, V V ,V-V, V V 1 . , 1,0-f,.,,, A M . 'fgiific VV 11" ' ,. --VV -V fm? V 0 ,ua .-,hw -ff ' vm' 'V ' ? '-VV . V V' W1 5 ,- V.' -'W ,iff-we' H -, , , , . ., .., , ff, , -,-,gg , Q,-1+-14,--Vg V V , V V V V .V V V- .4 .-.V ...., .,-nm, -"'wasqr-zwffl fu. , -' -1 ,I 0' :V --'Wm-' '4 ,. 'V lag :V-,,V- ' ,, K V , fag-wypge, :nz ,,, gf' ,. .P . 1:-" ' 1' ,gk "M V, V ' M , , ,. A , "'f' " ,. , X "- A "W-aqzilff' '1,,4.1IJ4 ,V ' ', ' ' 2:1 vw , . , - " ' ,itjk """"N'Vf4.' A ,..,f, V V VV V- 2 '4 V -Vf fzv-.,.,-'W . J 4 .. B, . VV X V, L,,?,,M,m7V ,V V, U 1, V VQ:WfrMZz ., . ,, .,.. J -,, . f A -L' 1 I .VV .f',vI':V . , .N " 1 , .- -.U 51 --'ka-A". 7 ",7C":...z"'1 V V:'iV'. 5- fur- A V. , HV' ' '-4325" '12 V V- - -mm 'T -1' ' 'if f .pg ,w?6,5Ch ' YL21i"f1-vrfizgl -Vwfff' ' X gag 1 ,, 'V' any ' ' . n'1,,VV Z3 nwfv ---' Q ,,,4V,,,q,V mf,-f-AV5 AV-9 ,V- - - Y 7- f- ,"V':s,V ' f ,gwfvf wif V D ' 2 -1' Q..1Qf'2V A I R S V x,,,. A V Q , ?i'Ei?4f3 3 I 'T - f - - -"' ' ' ff- ,'wsfV5-'bf Y""2ffaV---VV5. -V m,4,,,,V V- V .V V . jim Z 1 ' ' '5"""'f""'d -V M'W?azw.m-V,V:.mm..V'swaez2z'f .4,3w...V-V- 5 .. ,f1,," ,Q ,Q 1 '- in, 17 ' 3 ' " . , , V .Q , if f W V .V -V VW W fu, VV 57, -ij if :VV , 2 , ,,, V , V V1 ,V V Af V , -V 1 -fV .,,,.V,Vf , ,r V 5321.15 ' ' JV, 1 'A "..VV-?f'jf A 1 1 "' V VV . , Q ' LJ, , , .V V V ,VVV V , VV, , , .4 4 0 'Q J? 0 . , V I X k .,f""" V , " -V . V s jj, -,V-V '1' V914 f 1-f-fv'12,.'N V1 V V . , V. -1,4 2 ,VV -Rig .V I-V ' 1.3 " vw, L 'f VMS 7!'2,'. 2 Vg' , "' . -V '1,V .K f, X,.,4-345' V 'K .f 1 7 ir - A . . ' . A- 7 ,,- V ,V ., ', - , - V, ,gg Vg I V, ... V, - V, 'WA ..'.. 4.,:V:,VVV '-, J-TV. - VN ' 1+--H W M W V, fr f V V' 'V f 2 47 KQV ' "'-1337 A - J f' V f VV--V V U Collier 45 ,abt Earter -Wm. -.ef .L ml. 1 U., .W ,Mag-a Vincent R pw.. 276fClosing Q . Barkin "Emory Enjoys Winning Formula" "Carter Lecture Initiates . . . "Blank Space" The third headline space is blank. lt's up to you to fill in your inside story. Need help? Remember, Emory is more than just you and l. It was we came, and it'll still be here for our reunions. The book turning episode in February symbolizes a disenchant- ment with Emory and, at the same time, expresses confidence that somehow the "non-malicious pro- test" will "make people think." What do they mean? And, did what they mean apply to you? Georgia celebrates her 250th birthday this year. Emory will be celebrating her 150th during the 1985-1986 schoolyear, the gradu- ating year of this year's freshman class. Seems far away? I-low fast did this year go? By that time, how much room will Emory have taken up in your memory space? Memories. That's what an annu- al is all about. lt's about time, our time here - studying, playing, eating . . , lt's about school, the one here in Atlanta. lt's about - Actually, this annual is all about people - who provide the time and memories and go to school. That's why the third headline is missing. It's up to you to provide your inside story. here before cus gf277 I DE Abbate, Maureen ...... 151,181,230 Abbo, Michael Y ..........,... 110,188 Abbot, Mary .......................... 156 Abbott, Kevin C. 131,151,155,188 Abbott, Mary .......,...........,....... 14 Abedi-Darakeh, Reza Ali .230,253 Abernathy, Amy ............,....... 188 Abney, Keith .......................,.. 230 Abraham, Cecil ...................... 263 Abrams, Amy ........................ 244 Abrams, Marc ........... 110,111,149 Academics .........................,..... 66 Acree, Virginia ....,.................. 218 Acres, Maggie ........................ 179 Adams, Chester T. ................ 262 Adams, Marc ........... 134,149,151, 155,218,226 Adams, Robin .................. 181,244 "A Day in front of the AMUC"40 "A Day in the Life of . . . Sally Mowery, a Ph.D student at Emory" .................................... 76 "A Day in the Life of . . . Diana Spencer, Second Year Nursing " 80 Student ......,........................... ADEC .......................r........,..i 132 Adger, Rickey ....... .......... 1 34 Ad Hoc ...,....,................... 130,131 Adkins, Chris Lee .......,.... 260,265 244 Adler, Kenneth ....,.... ....... Adler, Lynne ......... ....... 1 88 Adler, Opie ........ ....... 1 75 Administration ...... ......... 7 9 Ads ....................... ....... 2 90 Aghion, Jacqui .......... ....,.r... 1 81 Agin, Mindy .......... ....... 1 44,179 Agner, Susan ......................... 244 Agran, Debbie .................r..... 244 Aguilar, Rene ......................... 142 Ahrens, Robert Keith ............ 149 "Aides to President Carter" .. 253 AIESEC ................................. 130 Aiken, Debbie ....,.. ....... 1 43,179 Aimo, Jay L. ...... .......... 2 65 Akers, Maggie ....... ............. 1 14 Alagappan, Ravi ..................... 244 Albert, Corey Jan ..... 152,153,230 Albin, Leslie .............. 173,181,244 Alderson, Natalie ..............,.... 177 Alexander, Sarah ................... 154 Alfano, David Paul ................. 262 Alford, Allison ...............,.. 147,188 "A Little Scottish Village" ........ 90 Allden, Andrew .......,........ 106,107 Alen, Andrea ........ .,........... 1 77 Alford, Allison .................. 144,148 Allen, Debbie ..........,.............. 183 Allen, Donna Mariea .............. 262 Allen, Michael T, .,....... ....... 2 65 Allen, Ronald ............ ....... 2 44 Alley, Lynne .......... ....... 2 60 Allied Health ......... ...,..... 83 278 Allison, lna........ 181,230 Allison, John ......... 169 Alper, Russ ........... ....... 1 73 Alpern, Boris ........ ....... 1 71 Alpert, James .......... ....... 1 69 Alpha Chi Omega ....... ....... 1 79 Alpha Delta Pi ......... ....... 1 77 Alpha Epsilon Pi ......... ....... 1 69 Alpha Alpha Alpha Alpha Tau Omega ...... ....... 1 69 Epsilon Phi .................. 177 Kappa Alpha ............... 177 Phi Alpha ......,... ....... 1 69 Altman, Andrew ...... ........... 1 88 Altman, David .................. 154,230 Altmann, Randy ..................... 175 Ambos, Jon .,.........,............... 173 Ammon, Paige .......... 143,179,244 Anderson, Carolyn ................ 177 Anderson, Thomas N. ..... 158,262 Andrews, George Michael ..... 244 Andrews, Valecia ............. 134,230 Angert, Lisa ..................... 132,143 Anlage ....,................ .......... 1 30 Antinezi, Madeana ....... ....... 1 31 Antonoff, Wendy ......... ....... 1 83 Appel, Karen ......................... 188 Appleton, Robert ................... 173 "A Progress Report" .............. 120 Arbiser, Jack ...... 146,149,158,188 Arbiser, Sherri ..,.....,.............. 177 Archon ................................... 131 Arend, Jennifer Anne ...... 183,188 Arias, Carolina ....................... 183 Arlen, Philip ........,............ 173,244 Armitage, Clark ..................... 171 Armstrong, Patricia ...,,.......... 179 Armor, Susan .............. ....... 1 77 Arney, Doug .......................... 175 Arnold, Deborah .............. 141,188 Arnold, Sherri .................. 134,179 Arroyo, Vicky ....... .......... 1 50 Arrillaga, Abe ..,..... ....... 1 69 Arthur, Judy ..........., ....... 1 79 Asbury, Mark ...,.........,.......... 108 Ashman, Douglas C. ............. 264 Asihene, Evelyn ,..,................. 218 Atkinson, Selena .................... 134 Atlanta-Emory Orchestra ...... 131 Aucamp, Steve ...................... 244 Auerbach, Mitch ...... .......... 1 73 Autry, Lee ............................. 218 Aves, Gay Loraine ........... 145,244 A View of 82 ....................... . 58 "A Whirling Legacy" ....,....,...... 52 Bach, Chris ....,......... ....... 1 69 Bachman, Laura ......... ....... 1 81 Bachrach, Judy ........ ....... 1 77 Backer, Mark ......................... 244 Badarrudin, Anisa ....,............. 218 Baer, Susan ..................... 179,244 Bagel, Lee .............. ...,......... 1 73 Bailey, Bailey, Bailey, Bailey, Rebecca ............... 149,218 119,156,230 Shary .......................... 230 Russ .............. Wendy T. ............. 260,264 188 Bain, Russell .......... .......... Baines, Brett .......... ...... 1 71 Bak, Hak-Sun ,....,.. ...... 2 44 Ballard, Scott ......... ...... 2 44 Ballato, Susan ........ ...... 1 81 Balmer, Joe ....... ....,. 1 73 Balsam, Ivan .......... ...... 1 49 Balzekas, Carole ,...... ........ 4 2 Banez, Carina ........ ...... 1 88 Bang, Shinwon .......... ...... 1 37 ......188 Banich, John G. Bannister, Barry ....... ...... 1 30 Baraff, Ramie ......... ...... 1 88 Barbour, John .......... ...... 1 06 Barclay, Gordon ................,... 169 Barfield, Gregory K. ........ 260,265 Barker, Phyllis ....................... 188 Barkin, Michael A. .... 137,144,230 Barlow, George Edward ........ 158 Barn, Billy .............................. 169 Barnes, Brooks ......... ...... 1 19 Barnett, Doug ........... ......... 1 71 Baron, Carlos R ........ ......... 264 Barr, Scott Irwin ........... ...... 2 62 264 Barrack, Kenneth S ........... .... Barret, Sidney R. Jr ............... 158 Barringer, William K. ............. 262 Bartling, William Charles.260,262 Baskin, Steven E. .................. 264 Bass, Bass, Bass, Bass, Alison ..................... 183,188 171 John ................ ......... Kenneth W ................... 265 Mario ............... ...... 1 71 Bast, Kevin Bast ....... ......... 1 88 Bateh, Steven R ........ ......... 2 64 Bateman, Diane ........ ......... 2 44 Batson, Greg ......... ...... 1 42 Baucom, Mark ....... .......,. 2 44 Bauer, Greg ..................... 114,171 Baughman, Trish ............. 181,244 Baum, Catherine ............. 181,244 Bauman, Andy ................. 173,228 Baxter, George William ......... 188 Bayo, Fernando ..................... 230 Bayo, Lourdes ....................... 244 Beal, Brian K. ........................ 244 Beare, Derrick .......... 110,112,113 Beasley, Brian .................. 230,246 Beatus, Richard S. ................. 264 169 Beauchamp, Jerry ........ ...... Beaverforden, Pam ....... ...... 1 81 Becker, Ellen ............ ......... 1 88 Beckett, Tom ......... ......... 2 18 Beckham, Mac ....... ...... 1 71 Bennfield, David ....... ......... 1 73 Behan, John .......... ....... 1 10,111 Behrend, Kurt ........................ 244 Belisle, Craig .......................... 244 Bell, Thomas W. Jr. .............. 264 Bellamy, Tim .............. ........230 Belles, Dale Ralph .................. 149 Bello, Steven Louis ................ 149 Belmuth, Barry ...................... 110 Belnap, Timothy M ................ 264 Benario, Fred ............. ........ 1 37 Bender, Eric ........................... 110 Benezra, Marc ....................... 189 Benfield, Robert Haney Jr. .... 149 Benjamin, Joy ........................ 167 Benjamin S. Pius Pre-Law Society ................................... 134 Bennett, David A ........... ....,... 2 63 143 Bennett, Derek ....... Bennett, Sue ..,.... fffifffi 177 Benson, Don ........... ......... 2 18 Benson, Kathy ........ ......... 1 57 Benson, Ray .......................... 173 Benstock, Scott R. .......... 257,263 Benton, Allison L. ...... .......,. 2 18 Bercaw, Debra ....................... 189 Berger, Scott B ...................... 189 Berger, B.J. ..................... 175,189 Berger, Roger A. ...... . Bergman, Jodi .......... Bergquist, Greg ......... Berk, Charles ............ Berke, Pamela S. ...... . Berkelhammer, Leslie Berkman, Tony ......... Berko, David ............. Berkowitz, Leah ....... Berlin, Ellen .............. Berman Berman Berman Berman Berman Bernath, Bernhart, Bernstein 1 1 Carol S ........ David ....... Lori . ........ Martin ..,...... 183,230 Bernstein, Bernstein, Bernstein, Beron, Herb ........... Mitch ........ Steve ........ Berry, John.., ............ . Beta Theta Pi ............ Beuligmann, Steven A. .......... 265 Beverforden, Pam ...... Bialko, Valerie .........,....,.. 177,230 Bickley, Craig ....,....... Biederrnan, George R. Jr. ..... 265 Billings, Jeffrey .......... Binder, Debra ...... Binner, Andrea ...... Birch, John S ......... Birdman, Alan ........ Birkey, Debbie ..... Bishop, Lori Lowe ..... Bishop, Meredith. Bishop, Tracy ........................ 218 Black, Deborah L. Black, Laura ........ ............245 ......177,189 136 ......175,189 ......181,245 173 .........263 179 181 .........245 177 110 ......169,245 Richard ........ Jay Alan ...... Michelle S. G ......... 245 , Brenda Joy ...... 25,138, 149 Michele ........... 177,189 173 ffffff 169 173 189 171 ............245 110 136,142,189 177,230 ......181,245 .........263 171 189 149,158 177,245 ......146,189 189 Blade, Ricky .............. Black, Neyle H. .......... . ......245 Black, Sheldon ....................... 169 Black Student Alliance .......... 134 Blackburn, Marcia ........... 131,145 Blackwell, Elicia D. ................ 245 Blades, Carl A. ..... . Blafer, Craig ...... Blair, Cindy ........ Blaire, Sloane ......... Blalock, Arlene ......... Blancard, Bob ........ .... 175 ......264 ......245 189 146 ......245 171 Blanco, Sylvio ........ ....... 1 19,230 Blafer, Craig .......... ............. 1 55 Bledsoe, Helen .............. Blitman, Robert S. ......... . ...181,218 257,264, 173 Block, Jeff .............................. Block, Stephen ......... Bloom, Jeff ............ Bloom, Bloom, Bloom, Mike ....... Steven ....... Tara .............. Blum, Amy .....................,....... 181 145,169,179,230 Blumberg, David T. ............... 218 169 173 108 263 .........245 Bloomberg, Jayne ............ 146,189 Bloomfield, Jane ....... Blue, Ken ............... .........218 169 Blum, Theresa L. ............. 181,230 Blumenthal, Deborah ....... 143,245 169 Blumm, Rick .......................... Bobby Jones Scholars ........... 258 Bobon, Ben ................... 175 Boddie, Suzanne .................... 218 Boling, Alan ........................... 171 Bolling, Nancy .... 137,139,145,245 Bonanno, Jennifer ........... 181,245 Bonn, Cecelia ............... Boolbol, Susan ....... .... 177 Boone, Booth, Booth, Booth, Boren, 144 181 Andrea ...... ....... 1 81,245 Alice M. .... . Brian G. ..... Jeff .................... .........265 ...257,263 175 Crystal ....................... 245 Brack, Karen ......... Borland, Raymond Neill ......... 189 Borlans, Raymond Neill Borowka, Steve ............ Borsuk, Lynne Y. ..... Bosem, Marc E. ....... . 149 173 189 245 Boston, Joe ........... ............. 1 69 Bouma, Jill .......... ....... 1 45,230 Bour, Eric .......... ....... 1 47,189 Bowden, Beth ........ Bowen, Craig ......... Bowen, 154 230 Diane ,....... ............. 1 50 Bowen, Elton ......... ....... 1 56,189 Bower, Lauri .................... 179,230 Bowerman, Scott .,............. 51,245 Bowers, Theron C., Jr. Bowman, Judy ................. 189 141,218 181 Boyd, Kim .............................. Boyers, Randi Gale ....... Boyle, Vincent .......... Bradbury, Jane ......... 149 173 116 189 Bradby, Denise ................ 243,245 Bradford, Margaret ................ 177 Brann, Stewart ................ 114,245 Brann, Willard .............,......... 169 Braverman, Richard ............,.. 265 Bravo, Catalina ...................... 139 Brazel, Steven A .............. 257,263 Brennan, Bridget ................... 114 Brennan, Patty .......... 158,183,245 Brennan, Trisha ..................... 156 Bridgman, Martha .................. 218 Brilliant, Margo K. ................. 262 Brindley, Linda G. .... 149,157,218 Brinks, Wynne ....................,.. 150 Brisbin, Carol .................. 181,230 Britt, Paul W .......................... 265 Broadbooks, Kim ................... 173 Brock, Eddie .................... 110,190 Brock, Frances R. .......... . Broda, Russ .............. Brodie, Jeff .........,............ Brodsky, Lisa M. ..... . Brogdon, Bobby ....... Bronnum, Beth ........, Bronstein, Mike ........ Brooke, Haynes ........ Brooks Brooks Brooks B. G. ................. . , Billy .................... , Thomas William, Brookwell, Craig .............. Broome, Robert K. Jr ...... Brothers, Bruce ............ Brotherton, Jeffrey R ...... Brown, David Hunter ...... Brown, Esther Maris ........ Brown, Jennifer K. ......... . Brown, Brown, Brown, Lonnie ................. Michael ................ Robert ....... ....... Brown, Terry ......... Browne, Laura ....... Brovimin, Liz ...... Browning, Dan ....... Brownstein,Lisa ........ Bruce, David G. ............. . Brumby, Karen ................ Brundidge, Phyllis Kaye... Bruno, Todd E ................. Bryant, Kara Odessa .... Bryant, Sheila ...........,...... Bryant, Sherry .......... .... Buch, William P. ...... . Buchalter, Vida ......... Buckhannan, Page ........... Bucsela, Eric .................... Buffa, Salvatore M. ........ .. Bui, Ly Minh Thi ............. Bullion, James F. Jr ......... Bullock, Beth ................... Bumbler, Mike .......... .... Burack, Shari L. ....... Burgess, Catherine .......... Burgess, Claudia ....... .... Burke, William P .......... Burnett, Michael A. .... . Burnette, David M. ..... . Burns, Brian ...... ....... Burrell, Pamela K. .,.... . Burt, Joanna ................ Burwick, Neil ................... Burzynski, Daniel A ......... Buschman, Mike .......... ......264 169 108,169 ......263 .....,218 145 169 113 179 110,111 IV. 190 130 ......262 149 .257,263 149 218 .14, 136, 156,253 156,190 136,156 ......230 183 148 ......230 181 ......262 ......218 190 ......264 ......245 134,245 190 ......264 183,231 149,190 173,190 ......247 ......263 179,190 175 ......264 183,247 116 ......263 ......262 ......262 ......231 190 190 169 ......218 171 Caine, Cammie ................ 181,231 Callahan, Scott ................ 171,218 Callaway, Quita ..................... 231 Cammeyer, Bonnie ................ 177 Cherry, Thomas D. ........ . 257,264 171 Chetkoff, Howard .................. Chiappetta, Eugene ......,.....,.. 219 Chi Omega .................. ....... 1 83 Chonoles, Andy ........... 173 Christmas Festival ................. 159 Camp, Wey .............. 158,190,253 Campbell, Allison ...... 103,156,158 179 Campbell, Beverly ................. Campbell, Donald J ....... ........ 2 63 Campbell, John W ................. 231 Campus ..................... ......... 2 69 ' 263 Cancio, Derry H ..... ............... Candler Coordinating Council .............................,. 136 Ciotti, Chad ........................... Circle K ............... Clack, Leigh ...,...... Clagett, John ......... Clair, Mitchell Claire, Clark, Clark, Clark, 169 137,160 171 106,107,119,175 Jacalyn ....................... 181 Cynthia ................. 136,145 Denver ......,...,...,......... 171 Jeff ........................ Cannon, Ros ........................., 134 Cannon, Shelly ...................... 179 Cannon, Steven ........ 114,143,247 Capabianco, Linda ................. 153 Caplan, Phil ........................... 138 Carahalois, Larry ............. 114,175 136,142 Clark, Joseph Robbin ............ 262 Clark, Mark S .................. 136,142 Clarke, Elizabeth ................... 147 Clay, Monica ......................... 231 Clay, Susan ..................... 179,231 179 Clegg, Grace ......................... de .............. 262 Cardosa, Catherine A. .......... 190 Cardot, Denise ........... 16,183,190 Career Planning and Placement Center ..................................... 45 Close, Dennis Cly Closing ......................... ....... 2 74 Cloud, Kevin ......... Clough, Carol ....... 143 148 Carey, Patrick ....................... 247 Caris, Virginia ........................ 183 Carlton, Edward Joyce .......... 247 Carmichael, Elizabeth ...... 143,231 Coady, Shawn ................. 175,219 Cobbs, Melissa ................ Cochran, Gregg ............... 136,145 147,149 149 Codner, Mark Alan ............... Carnegie, Beverley ................ 231 Carney, Holland .................... 247 Carney, Robin ................. 116,181 262 Carpenter, Bruce M. .,.......... . Carr, Karolyn ........................ 183 Carr, William M. ........ .......... 2 47 Carrier, Harry ........................ 175 Carrillo, Luis ........,................. 190 Cohen , Barry D ....... Cohen, Cheryl ......... Cohen, David ............. Cohen Cohen, Cohen, Lisa .......... Cohen, Cohen, , Jeffrey L ......... .......263 177 169 263 Leon ............ ........... 1 49 132,231 Mike .......................... 169 Neil ........................... 175 Cohn, Peter Scott .... 132,149,169 Carrion, Claudette Helena 183, 190 Carrol, Nancy Ann .......... 181,247 Carter Aides .......................... 253 Carter, Distinguish University Professor Jimmy ............. 24,96 Carter, M. Eloise Brown ........ 158 Carter, Ted ............................ 173 Casas, Adela Teresa .............. 231 Casey, Kimberley .................. 218 Casey, Susan ................... 167,181 Cassidy, Jayne ........ ............ 1 77 Caswell, Sandy ....... ......... 1 90 Cater, Ted .......... ......... 1 30 Cato, Gary ......... ............ 1 90 Cavanagh, Jim ................. 139,190 ' 179 Cavanaugh, Shari .................. Cavitch, Kathy ........ ......... 1 69 Cazarou, Steven ........ ......... 1 73 Cecchini, Todd ....... ......... 1 56 Cecil, Todd ............. ,........ 1 54 Cerel, Sylvia Lee ....... ......... 1 49 Cervent, John ............ ........ 1 47 Cesar, Ely Eser S. ..... ........ 2 60 Chadwell, Tracy ........ ........ 2 18 Chadwick, Sharon ................. 190 Cohn, Rich ............................ 173 Coke, John Frederick ........... 262 Colbert, Anna Lisa ................ 116 Colbert, Deanna .................... 116 Cole, Andy ...................... 110,169 Cole, Peter Alexander .......... 148, 149,157,158 Coleman, Carol Ann ....... 106,107 Collee, Missy ......................... 183 College Bowl ............ 137 College Council ..................... 138 Collier, D'Angello ............ 169,231 Collier, Jeffrey M. ......... . 143,247 Collins, Paula ........ 136, 142, 183 Combs, Bill ................. ......... 2 4 Comer, Barry Lee ................. 262 Comer, Julia R. ..................... 265 Compton, Ann ................. 145,181 Compton, Kathleen ........ 181,219 Cone, Sarah .................... Congiundi, Peter J ........... Conklin, Sarajane ........ . Connariato, Cathy ....... . Bush, Jennifer ........................ 179 Business School ....................... 78 Business School Council ....... 135 Butler, David ................... 134,142 Butler, Janice ................... 181,247 Butts, Alan ................ .......... 1 71 Butts, Allen .................. ...... 2 18 Butz, George W. lll ......... Byron, Marc ............,... Byrwa, Bucky ........... ......263 169 171 Chaet, Mark .............. Chafian, Hope ........ 114 177 Chamber Singers ................... 136 Chambers, Kathy .................. 231 Chang, Sylvia Ann .... 141,156,219 Charboneau, Cris .................. 190 Chastain, Melanie Ange... 179,219 Cheek, Jeff ............................ 139 Chen, Selena ................... 181,231 Chener, David ........ Cheng, Larry .......... Cherry, Jim257 173 219 Connell Connor, Connor, Conrad Conrad , Patty .................. Jane ................... Shannon Eileen . , Roger ................. , Susan ................. Consalo, Tony ......... Convocation .. ........ .. Cook, Cook, Cook, Cook, Cook, Anthony M. ...... . Beth .............. .... Cassandra ............. Chris ............. .... Robert ........ 130,155, 177 ......264 179 ......231 116 141,219 ......247 147 181 171 ........34 ......262 145 181,247 131 ......247 279 Cook, Robert F. ...... ........ 2 65 Cook, Wilson ....... ........ 1 56 Cooksey, Karen ..................... 141 Cooney, Jane ...,.................... 179 Cooper, Lisa A. ........ 149,177,219 Cooper, Sheldon ................... 150 Cooperstein, Suzanne ........... 130 Copeland, Becky ,.......,........., 116 Copeland, Kelly Renee .......... 219 Copenhaver, John ...... ....... 2 47 Copulos, Tom .......... ....... 1 75 Cornell, Ann ........ ....... 1 41 Cornett, Cathy .,...,.. ....... 1 67 Correia, Chris .,........ ....... 2 31 Corwin, Andy .......... ........... Davis, Angela ........ ....... 1 93 Davis, Ellen ....... Davis, Jane ....... Davis, John ........... Davis, Melissa ....... 177 179 193 ..........231 Davis, Mike ............................ 134 Davis, Miriam C. ............. 137,232 Davis, Mitch ......... .......... 1 69 Davis, Rhonda ......... .......... 2 32 Day, Ann ..,...................... 183,247 Day, John .............................. 169 Dean, Howard B .......... ....... 2 62 Dean, Paul ............................. 247 De Angelus, Lisa ............... 177,219 Deariso, Gary ...., 136,142,151,193 Cosgrove, David ............. 137 .142,219 Costello, Kathleen P. ............. 219 Cotter, Michael ................ 110,151 Couch, Cathy ............,........... 193 Debenedett, John .,................ 193 Deberry, Stephanie ................ 219 Debop, Scott ....,.,.................. 169 DeFranks, Anne J. ......... 167,183, Dobson, Laura ....,.................. 248 Dodek, Lauren ......... 141,179,219 Dodson, Valerie W. ............... 219 Dody, Debbie .................. 141,219 Doerhoefer, Mary .................. 179 Dolgin, Gary ............. ...... 1 46 Dolin, James F. ........ ......... 1 93 Donaldson, Chase ........... 169,193 Donaldson, James F. ............. 193 Doneff, Andrea ...................... 219 Doneff, Valerie W. ................. 219 Donnan, Andy ....................... 110 Donnan, Paul ............ 110,111,219 Donohue, Susan ....... 141,179,219 Dooley, James T. ........... 8,24,176 Dooley, John K. ....... ............ 2 62 Dooley's Diary .......... Dooley's Week ........................ 18 Doppelt, Howard ............. 169,193 Elliott, Daphne Priscilla .......... 232 Elliott, Marci .......................... 179 Elliott, Sarah ............. 148,183,194 Elliott, Shana G. .................... 265 Ellner, Sue ............................. 177 Elsom, Dianne ................. 167,179 Elton, James ........ ............ 2 32 Emanuel, Julian ..................... 194 Emery, Karen ........................ 179 139 Emory Christian Fellowship... Emory College Freshman Seminar ................................. 246 Emory Colege Toxic Text ....... 70 Emory Go Club ..................... 140 Emory Gospel Choir ............. 158 Emory Hunger Awareness ..... 140 Emory Keyhole ...................... 141 Emory Men's Rugby Club ..... 110 Coull, Sharon .................. 181,247 Courtney, Edward T .............. 264 Covington, John M. Jr. ......... 263 Cox, Chuck ..................... 143,247 Cox, Kip ................................ 110 Cox, Connie Michelle Rene... 158 Cox, Roxanne ....................... 181 Cranston, Crawford Crawford 169,231l Crawford Crawford Crawford Crawford a v v v r Luanne .................. 141 Dean Lelia ............ 149 Edward C. ..... 106,107, Gwenyth Margaret 149 Rick ...................... 110 Susan ...,.......... 181,231 Thomas W ............ 263 Creager, Robert H ,................ 262 Creigh, Joanie .......... 147,179,193 Crenshaw, Nesba Alane ........ 149 Crenshaw, Steve ................... 110 Cronin, Chris .....................,... 169 Cross Country ....................... 106 Crowe, Laurie A. ............. 181,247 Crowley, Jeff ........... ........... 1 10 Crumpton, Bret ....... ....... 1 71 Csizinszky, Agnes ...... ....... 2 31 Cudmore, Mike ....... ........... 2 47 192,193 DeGracia, Dennis ..... 142,173,247 Dekker, Alex ......................... 247 De la Cruz, Andres .. 118,119,173 264 Delavan, Joseph P. ...,........... . Dell, George .............,............ 169 Dellinger, William H. Jr. ........ 262 156 Delmon, Peter ....................... DeLoach, Allan L. ....... ....... 2 63 Delta Delta Delta ,,....... ....... 1 79 Delta Phi Epsilon .......,........... 181 Delta Tau Delta ..................... 171 Del Vecchio, David L. ........... 193 Demarest, Desiree ........... Deming, Leslie ................. Denatale, Peter ................ Dennis, Renata ........ .... Dent, Eric B ............. . Dent, Jeffrey J. ........ . 177 177 155,219 193 193 263 Dent, Jerry ........... ...... 2 57 Depot ............,.................. 224,233 Dern, Lupie ........................... 169 De Rosa, Alan A .................... 264 Dershowitz, Craig ............ 173 Dershowitz, Greg David ........ 232 Desenberg, Roger ..........,....... 173 Eccker, Ronald D. ..... ....... T 65 Dieserhouse, Chuck .............. 169 Culp, Julie ............. Cummings, Kelly Cummings, Kim ..... ..........179,231 193 143,247 263 Curley, Susan Jane ,.............. Curtis, Tom ........... Custer, Bill ......,...... Cutler, Catherine... 171 193 141 Cutler, Christopher W. ....,.,.. 265 Cutrone, Marietta ..... D'Adesky, Philippe 247 .......169,231 Daffin, Dean Julianne .........,.... 68 Dagle, Linda Sue ...... Daiker, Pam .............. 231 179,231 171 Devereaux, Melissa .....,......,.. 181 Devidson, Delynn .................. 179 DeVita, Richard N. ................ 262 DeVoney, Mike ................ 119,143 ' 150 Dew, Katie ............... .......... Dew, Laura .................. ....... 1 79 Dewey, Brian Curtis .............. 263 Diamond, Ellen ...................... 181 Diamond, Eric ........................ 232 Diamond, Fred 144,145,154,169 Diamond, Phil ........................ 171 Diaz, Elizabeth ....................... 260 Diaz, Pedro ............................ 193 Dickerson, Earl Tucker ......... 260 Dickman, Ray ...........,............ 177 Diehl, Mike ...................... 152,153 Faulbaum, Don ......,... Dallas, Bill ................. Dallas, Lucinda Fay ............... 158 Dalton, Carol ................... 177,193 Dalzekas, Carol ....................... 42 D'Amelio, Andrew R .............. 262 Dance Alive ............,... ....... 1 46 Daniels, Robert ........... ....... 2 31 Danoff, Sonja ......................... 146 Dietrich, Lynn .......... 136,145,147, 167,183 Digirelamo, Ann Marie .... 181,248 Dill, Gretchen ........................ 181 Dinwiddle, Susan ...... 136,145,232 Dopplewell, Georgia .............. 150 Dorfman, Alan Reid ............... 262 Dornhofer, Jean ......... 32,138,219 Dorough, Donna .............. 141,219 Dow, Karen ........................... 181 Dowdy, Sarah Miller .............. 248 Downing, Jane .........,... ...... 2 48 Dozier, Daniel C ....... ...... 2 62 Drachman, Count ......... ...... 1 71 Drado, Arthur ........................ 179 Dravis, Mark .................... 257,263 Drescher, Stephan G. ........... 264 Dreyfus, Rachel ........ 130,145,232 130 Drobner, Jeff ...............,......... Dubrow, Herbert ................... 232 Duffel, Carol Anne ...... ...... 1 77 Duffey, Turner .......... ...... 1 19 Duffin, Steven R. ...... ...... 2 62 Duhig, Susan ............ ...... 1 39 Duke, David L. ...................... 265 Dumermuth, Simone ....... 177,248 Dunbar, Debbie ........ 156,181,194 Duncan, Carolyn ................... 194 Duncan, Dale Ray ................. 263 Dunham, Kim ........................ 173 Dunn, Dennis Robert ............ 158 Dunn, Melissa ........................ 232 Durr, Balin Annete ................ 232 Durrance, Douglas M. ........... 194 Durudogan, Hasrun ............... 113 Dworkin, Rande ........... ...... 1 79 Dyer, Mary K. .......... ...... 1 7' Eades, Linda ......... ....,. 1 79 Eagle, David A ...... .......... 4 94 Eames, Chris ........ ....... 1 6" 194 Early, Linwood .......... ..... 1 43 Eaton, Brooke .......... . . 179 Eaton, David ..........., ..... . 262 Edinger, Jacquelir ............. . 194 Edmond, Angela .,.. .. 145,153,232 Effgen, Kathryn M ............. 248 Ehrlich, Melvin A. .. .. .... .. 265 Ehudin, Rob .... . ..... 169 Eichler, Craig ........... 175 Eickhoff, Ls s . .... ..,............ 1 75 Eiland, Rise Magic .... 134,163,232 Eisner, Jordana ..... .. ........... 179 Emory Student Nurses Association ............................ 140 Emory University Jazz Ensemble ............................ 143 Emory University Sym phonic 143 Band ...................................... Emory Wheel ......................... 144 Emory Women's Assembly .... 144 Emory Women's Chorale ....... ??? Emory's Honors Program ........ 94 Engel, Marc ........................... 119 Engel, Valerie ......................... 177 England, Andrea ...,.......... 106,107 ' 194 England, Terri ........................ English, Roseanne .................. 194 Ennever, Peter Robert ........... 149 Eno, Bob ..,............................. 171 Epperson, Tom ...................... 173 Epstein, Judi .......................... 219 Erenbaum, Shayne ................ Ernst, Christie ........ 21,70, Errickson, Dwight J ......... 232 192,194 143,194 143 Erwin, Ken..., .................... Escamilla, David ........ Escamilla, Paul ....... Esposito, Tom ........... .........219 136 171 Ettlin, Robert Greg ................ 248 Etts, Craig H. .........,. . Euster, Mark .......... . Evans, Anne .......... . Evans, Brian T. .... .. Evans, Craig .......... . Everett, Anthony ....... "Exclusively Ours' .... .. Falek, James I. ..... . 194 106,107 .........265 .....142,194 171 276 194 Fallick, Dave .......................... 169 Fallis, Lori .............................. 177 Falvello, Christopher J. ......... 264 Fandrich, Laura ............... 145,179 Fanslow, Jane E. ................... 194 Fanslow, Mary Francis .......... 143 Farabee, Martha .............. 183,220 Farmer, Rebecca Nell ..... 138,149, 158,167,176,181,194 Farrugia, Christopher ............ 262 Fasulo, Jill ........................ 183,248 195 Fater, Jo Beth ....................... Fathi, Yahyi ........ 140 110 Darden, James M. Jr ............. 265 Darling, Bryan Keith ...,... 158,193 142, 148, Darling, Tara ......................... 116 Davenport, Michele ......... 143,247 280 DiSanto, Michael ................... 139 Disher, Dawn ............ 106,107,193 DiPace, Michael ..................... 264 Division of Allied Health .......... 82 Dix, Bob ................................ 175 Dixon, Daphne ...................... 219 Dixon, Kathy Deleda ....... 179,193 Do, Thithu Nga ..................... 248 Elayan, Jamil Khalid .............. 158 El Elemento Espanol .............. 139 Elias, Mary Susan ........ ...... 1 94 Elkind, Chet .............. ...... 1 94 Ellington, Jan ......... 177 248 Favre, Monica R. ...... . Fawcett, Richard ....... 248 Fazio, Cheryl ......................... 132 Fealy, Lawrence E. ................ 265 Feckoury, Jackie ...... 257,260,263 Gourovitch, Monica Lee ......,. Fishman, Anne ........ Gold, Mary Lee ............... 181,196 Goldsmith, Abby .................,. 197 Garrison, Nancy Lynne ......... 248 173 Gritz, Lloyd ..................... Fedeli, Sara .............. Federman, Robin ..... Feichtinger, Beth ..... Fein, Sharon ............ Feinberg, Sue ....... Feinstein, Lewis ....... Feinstein, Michael .... Feige, Kyra .............. Feigelson, Bruce ...... Feinber Caryn 177 ........145,218 181 miiiiiii177 .......169 .......232 181 .......248 177 g, ....... Feldman, Wendy ......... ....... Feldman, William Cy 177 263 181 Feldmesser, Suzan ................ Fell, Donna Cyd ........ Feller, Martha ........... Ferger, Gorm ........... Ferguson, Ron ........... Fern, Craig M. .......... . 149 140,150,220 .,....169,248 ......148,169 149 Fernandez, Annando ............. 195 Fernandez, Marc ................... 108 Fernandez, Maria C. Ferrara, Anthony ...... Ferrara, Susan ......... Fershtman,Julie I. .... . 149,155,195,203 Fieldhouse, Lucy ...... Fields, Jill .,................ Fillingim, Amy L. ..... . Fine, Andrew D. ...... . 265 .......113,173 179 ......134,144, 195 181,195 .......181,195 263 Fine, Debra J ................... 177,195 Fine, Steven .............. 106,107,195 Finegan, Jerry ........................ 143 Finegan, Robert Jerome ......., 232 Fink, Jeffrey A ....... ................ 2 65 Finkelstein, Pam ..........,.......,. 248 Finkle, Miriam .......... Finklea, Bonnie ........ Finley, Dan ........... Finley, Chandler ...... Fireman, Randi ........ Firestone, Scott ....... Fischer, Bernie ........ 139 195 143 143 179 195 151 Fischler, Adam ....,................. 195 Fish, Lary ...........,. ........ 1 53,169 Fishbein, Sue ........ Fisher, Cheryl ....... Fisher, Mara ......... 179 195 181 Fisher, Matt ..................... 148,169 Fishman, Anne ........ Fiskhler, Adam ........ ..........232 .......232 148 Fivish, Adam ......... ........ 1 55,248 232 Flack, Steven ........... Flacker, Jon ........................... 142 Flanagan, Thomas C. ............ 262 262 Flax, Hugh Douglas ............... Fleischman, Dana .................. 248 Flint, Russell .................... 149,195 181 Florin, Jane ........... Flynn, Grace ................ ....... 1 79 Foley, Steve .................,......... 143 Follman, Joe .......................... 136 195 Fong, Karen Elizabeth ........... Fong-Yee, Donna J. ........ 179,195 ' 171 Fontain, Lee .......................... Forbes, Jeffery .,..................... 195 Foreman, Todd ...................... 138 Forman, Alan ......................... 195 Fort, Mary Buford .... 154,157,195 173 Fowble, Terry ........................ Fowler, Donald L ................... 195 Fowler, J. David ...... 151 Fox, James ............................ 169 Fox, Linda ............................. 181 France Summer Abroad ......... Franch, Dina .................... 131,157 Francis, Linda C. ................... 220 Frank, Kevin ............ ....... 2 64 Frank, Laurie ......,. ....... 2 32 Frankel, Marc H. ..... ....... 2 65 Franz, Courtney .................... 177 Frawley, Katheen ................... 183 Freedman, Michael S ............. 263 Freeman, Scott ......... 114,175,195 Freiberg, Carmen Mara ......... 262 Gentry, Jack H. Jr. ............... 263 Geoghegan, Thomas E. .....,.. 149, 257,260,263 George, Margo Ruth ............. 149 George, Melody Carol .... 235 171,181, Gerber, Marcia ...................... 260 Gerkin, Rachel ................. 145,183 Gerkin, Rebecca L. ...........,... 196 Frenkel, Lisa .................... Frenzel, John ........ Freshmen ........... Freund, Sig ........... Fried, Pamela ........ 137,248 151 243 171 177,196 156 Friedberg, Eric ......... .......... Friedfeld, Liz ............ ....... 1 81 169 Friedlander, Andy ........ ....... F riedlander, Gary ........ ....... 1 96 262 Friedman, Friedman, Friedman Friedman Friedman Friedman Friedman Friedrich, Fred Z. ....... ...... . Ira M ........... ..,.... 1 96 Jeff .,...................... 248 Michelle A. ........... 196 Mike ......,.............. 143 Nicholas ................ 196 Sarah .......... ....... 1 83 Ryan M ,....... ....... 2 65 Frostbaum, Lane ................... 169 Fry, Connie ...............,...., 167,179 Fuchter, David ..................,.... 175 Fugate, Donna ................. 179,196 Fuller, Carson .................. 142,196 Funt, Stacey ....... 132,146,181,248 Furman, Mark .......... 146,149,196 Fwall, Jeff .....,.....,.................. 171 Gaertner, Cindy ....... .......... 2 48 Gaertner, Kathy .............. 136,232 Galarza, Patricia E ........... 167,220 Galin, Cynthia B. .....,............. 220 Galin, Jeffrey R ........ 106,107,119, 148,196 Galin, Scott ...,................. 175,196 Gallagher, Susan VanZanten. 149 Gallagher, Terry .............. 157,181 Gallagher, Theresa ................ 173 Galligan, Thomas R. .............. 232 Gandy, Daivd B .... ...............,, 2 65 Garber, Laura .................. 145,232 183 Garbrick, Kathy ....... .......... Garden, Dave ......,....... ....... 1 75 Gardner, Jerome I. ...... ....... 2 62 Gardner, Sandy ........ ....... 1 79 Garner, Barney ........ ....... 1 75 Garretson, Bruce ......... ....... 2 48 Garrett, John M. ..... .......... 2 62 Garrison, Anne ................ 181,196 Garrison, Mark ........,............. 175 Germain, Roi ......,............ 141,196 Gevisenheit, Sam ..........,........ 175 Gheesling, Karen ............. 183,235 Gibson, Cynthia R. ................ 235 Gilbert, Aaron ................. 153,173 Gilbert, Kenneth A. ..,...... 171,265 Gilbert, William D. ll. ............ 264 Gilbreth, Carrie ..................... 179 Gilchrist, Edgar H .................. 262 Gilder, Mark .................... 138,196 Gillespie, Elizabeth ................ 116 Gillespie, Suzanne ........... 137,196 Gilliam, Charles M ....,............ 265 Gilliam, Joe ..........................., 175 Gilliam, Lea ........ 136,145,181,220 Gillis, Sterling ........................ 139 Ginsberg, Amy ................ 179,235 Ginzburg, Miriam ...... ......... 1 77 Ginzburg, Marlene ................. 177 Gittelson, Glenn L ................. 262 Glasser, Gary .................. 169,220 265 Glasser, Steven D. ....,.......... . Glassman, Fred ......,.. ......... 1 69 Glauber, Diane ...,.. Glaws, Reid ........ Glee Club .............. 175 142 Gleicher, Karen ......... ......... 1 69 Gleiter, John .,............ ..,...... 1 96 Glick, Brad Peter ....... ...,..... 1 96 Glick, Debbie ............. ......... 1 81 Glick, Gary Lewis ..............,... 149 Glover, Sharon ................ 177,220 Goar, Susan .....,..........,......... 175 Goble, Henry Grady ....... .257,263 Goddard, Gillian .............. 157,235 Goodwin, Caroline ....,.........,. 197 Goodyear, Dodie ...... 106,107,220 Goozh, Juliet ................,........ 249 Gordon, Cassandra ........ .179,197 171 Gordon, Geoff ....,.................. Gordon, James W. ................ 260 Gordon, Lisa ......................... 249 Gorman, James A. ................ 264 Goss, Jeff ................... ........ 1 73 Gothard, Andy ..,.... , ....... 143 Gotlib, Marcia ........................ 197 Gotsdiner, Denise ............ 177,235 Gottesman, Jay .,...... 106,107,169 Gottfried, Dave ...................... 169 Gouinlock, Susan .... 167,176,183, 235 Gould, John ........................... 197 Goulden, Neil ........................ 119 197 265 and Gowasack, Brian J. W. ........ . Graduate School of Arts Sciences ......,.........................,.. 77 Graduate Student Council .... 146 Graduate Students ................ 257 Graham, Warren Curry III ............................,........ 197,253 Grallnick, Richard L. ............. 262 Granade, Lars ............,.......... 110 Granet, Aynne ....................... 179 Gray, Thomas .......... 137,151,197 Grayer, Yves Montand .... 134,220 Greeks .............,.....,............... 164 Greek Week ........,........... 176,178 Greco, Green, Green, Green, Green, Green, Green, Green, Green, Green, Green, Gina .....,... .,....... 1 81,235 Cathy ......, ,.....,.. 1 43,183 Cindy ....... ............ 1 97 David ......................... 173 Howard ................ 108,169 Jeff ....,.......,.,....,......... 220 Loris A. .. 144,145,155,235 181 Maggie .....,........,........ Martha ....................... 220 Pamela Susan ............ 197 Thomas M. .....,.......... 264 Go Greek! ............................. 166 Going, Robert Ernest Jr. ....... 149 Gold, Janellen ........................ 262 Gold, Jeffrey S. .....,............... 264 Greenberg, Barry ...... ........ 2 35 Greenberger, Lee .,.... ........ 1 43 Greene, Bubbles ........ ........ 1 69 Greene, Greggory I. .............. 265 263 Greene, Steven B. ................ . Garrison, Lynne .................... 177 Goldberg, Carl ....... 197 Goldberg, Suzy ...................... 181 Goldberg, Wendy ..... 114,181,248 Golden, Lilly ....,......,.............. 181 Golden, Richard E. Jr ............ 262 Golden, Rob ..... , .................... 119 Golderberg, Craig .................. 175 Goldfine, Stephen ............ 147,197 Goldie, Beth .................... 181,235 Goldin, Tammi .......,... ..,...... 1 81 Goldrayer, Nancy .................,.. 86 Goldrich, Laura ..................... 177 .88 Garson, Sharon ..................... 181 Gartor, Lawrence l. ............... 232 Gary, Mike .....,................ 136,142 Gary, Susan ..................... 136,145 232 Gassarth, Donald B. ......,...... . Gaszola, Meg ............... ....... 1 96 Gazzola, Elizabeth ....... ,...... 1 58 Gay, Heather ........... ....... 2 48 Geist, Anthony ........ ....... 1 96 Gellen, Sue .............. ....... 1 77 Genck, Lauren ........ ....... 1 79 Gendel, Elaine ...... ....... 1 81 Goldsmith, Gail ........ 144,177,249 Goldstein, Barbara Jane ........ 149 Goldstein, Brian ..................... 156 Goldstein, Marc ..................... 173 Goleburn, Glen .............,........ 197 Gomez, Guillemwo Jr ............. 249 Gonzalez, Armando ........ 173,249 Gonzales, Maria L. lJoyl ....................... 16,141,149, 154,155,158, 192,197 Goodman, Larry .............. 173,197 Goodman, Mark H. ......... 169,197 Goodman, Michele ................ 235 Greenfield, Lori ..............,...... 181 Greenwald, Don .............. 169,197 Greenway, Bradley K. ..... 257,263 Greenwood, Bill ..................... 156 Greenwood, William H. ......... 130 Greer, Ginger .................. 116,181 Gregg, Laura J . ..................... 249 Gridley, Juliet ..,...................,, 249 Grieves, Cindy L. ..... 116,177,220 171 Griffith, Doug ........................ Grillich, Jim ......................,.... 173 Grimm, Susan Carol ............. 263 Grindle, Robin ....................... 116 Grodberg, Harold ............ 138,169 Grodzin, Charles Jason ......... 249 Gross, Rick ...... , ............... 110,220 177 Gross, Stephanie .......,........... Grossed, Ira ............ Groves, Janet .....,... Grub, Diana ......... Grubbs, Robert ...... Guenther, Leslie .............. 175 114 181 197 181,249 Gullatt, Ted ............,.............. 169 Gunn, Gene ..................... 145,197 Gunnigle, Tamra ...............,.... 249 281 Hendricks, John R ................. 265 Gura, Steve ........... ...... I 75 Gurland, Jon ............, ...... 1 75 Gursky, Ronald T. ................. 265 Gurwin, Scott ......,..... ...... 1 73 197 Guss, Jerry D. ..,... . Gussin, Laura ........ ...... 1 55,181 Gutierrez, K. ......................... 263 Gutierrez, Pedro M. ........ 257,263 Guys, Anne ........................... 198 Gvay, Louis ........... ......... 1 73 120 Gym Progress ........ Habekost, Charles F. ............ 262 Haber, Karen ......................... 220 Haber, Nathan ....................... 262 Haberman, Elise Linda ......... 131, 144,249 Hagan, Kenny ...........,...... 110,111 Hagendorf, Lauren .......... 181,249 ' ' 177 Haiback, Kim ......................... Haimson, Debbie ....... A I ........ 235 Hansel, Kari ............. ......... 1 50 Haisten, Cathy ........ Halbleib, Jesse A. ..... . Haley, Mary Nell ........ Haliczer, Arthur F. ......,......... 262 143 ........265 ........220 Hall, Anne B. ............. ........ 1 46 Hall, Julie ................... ........ 1 77 Hall, Thomas Dale ................. 158 177 Hallazgo, Janet .......... Hallman, Carol ....... 11111111183 Halloween ............ .......... 4 6 Halpern, Jay ........ Halpern, Lisa ....... 169 181 Hamby, Leigh ...,........ ........ 1 43 Hamby, Lynda M ................... 235 Hamel, John H. III. ................ 264 Hameroff, Jeffrey A. .............. 265 Hamil, Monicha ......,.. ........ 2 49 Hamilton, Bob ........... ........ 1 49 Hamilton, Chuck ................... 113 Hamilton, Ellen ...................... 141 Hasib, Mansurul ...... ....... 2 60 Hastings, Gayle ....... ....... 1 81 Hatch, Harry W ..................... 262 Hatcher, Alan Barry .............. 262 Hawkins, Bill .......................... 150 Hayes, John Mosely. 106,107,119 Hayes, Melinda ......,............... 116 Haynes, Daryl ..,......, ....... 1 69 Hays, Gary .................. ....... 2 49 Heath, Sandra ....................... 198 Hedrick, Randall T. ............... 262 Hegedus, Gabor .......... ....... 2 63 Hehman, Mike ....................... 171 Heilbrun, Mark ................ 112,113 Heinemann, Paul A .......,........ 264 Heinrich, Robert .......... ....... 2 35 Heintz, Heather ........... ...,.,. 1 77 Held, Steven Mark ................ 260 Heldennan, Catherine ...,....... 181 Heller, Dennis M. .................. 264 Heller, Emily ................ ....... 1 83 Hellstrom, Mike ....... .......... 173 Hemer, Celia ................... 183,220 Hemphill, Claude III. ........ 163,249 Henderson, Dwayne .............. 198 Henderson, Jeni .................... 249 Hendrickson, Ella Jean .... Henneke, Susan ....,......... Henner, Robert E. .......... . 141,198 220 263 Hennessey, Patrick ..............,. 130 Henning, Randolph H. ........... 262 Holcomb, Elizabeth ............... 177 Holden, Peter ............. ........ 2 49 Hollingshed, Glen .................. 220 Holmes, Craig C ,............. 134,249 Holt, Alys ............,..... 141,181,198 Holder, Wendy ...................... 198 Homes, Linda Lee ................. 158 Honor, Michael ......... 140,169,198 Hood, Steve ........................... 134 Hoop, George A. III ............... 265 Hoover, Byron .... 136,137,142,249 Horne, Steve ......................... 249 Hornsby, Kimbrough M ......... 263 Hornsby, Torri ....................... 134 Horwitz, Steve .....,................. 169 Horwitz, Sue ........ ........ 2 36 Hoshi, Ryohei ............. ........ 2 60 Hoston, Joanne ..................... 250 Hough, Jennifer Marie ..... 220,253 House, Mary .......................... 177 House, Tina ...........,.... ........ 2 50 Houston, Shaun .......... ........ 1 73 Hovdesven, Eric .................... 173 Howe, Daniel Stephen ........... 149 Howe, Lisa ............................. 183 Howell, Brad .................... 142,169 Howell, Kathryne ...... 145,179,220 Howell, Keith ......................... 198 Howett, Meghan Anne ...... 74,158 Huang, George ...................... 264 Ishii, Carol ............................. 198 Israel, Michael .................. 156,200 221 It's A Complex Living ............ lwaoka, Michael K. ................ 265 Jackie, Beth ........................... 250 Jackman, Jen-nifer .,............... 181 Jackson, Jackson, David S ....... ......... 2 62 Jeff ........... Jackson, Jerry ........ Jackson, Jackson, Jackson, Jackson, Kathryn ............ 151 171 183,222 Marlon B. ............... 262 Ralph L. Jr. ............ 263 Waunelle ................. 264 Jacobs, Hillary ........... ......... 2 36 Jacobsen, Amy ...... Jacobson, Daniel R ................ 130 179,222 Jaeger, Dominic ..................... 250 Jaffe, Michael ............ 136,148,169 Jaffe, Michele Rachele ........... 200 James, Jeff ....................... 136,142 James, Jeanne ................. 181,236 Jaramillo, Felipe .......... 22,139,222 Jefferson, Jeff ........................ 106 Jenci, Maureen ................ 145,183 Jennings, Jennifer .................. 181 Jerkins, Forrest R .................. 264 Job, Melissa ........................... 200 Johananoff, Pam .................... Hamilton, Holly .......,........ 167,177 145 Hamilton, Lee ........................ Hammerman, Ira D. .......,...... 149 Hammonds, Connie ........,...... 179 Han, Yuling ............................ 220 Hancock, Sheryl Lynn ........... 235 Handler, Glen .................. 169,235 Hankinson, Angela .......... 177,198 Hanks, David M. ................... 263 Hansard, Hugh ...................... 235 Hansen, RoseAnn .................. 181 Hanson, Mark Christopher 149 Hantula, Don ................... 155,198 Hardison, Leigh ........ 136,145,181 Hardman, Debra G. .............. 264 Henriquez, Stephanie L. .. 137,235 Henry, David ......................... 137 Henry, Karen ......................... 179 Henry, Tom .......... 169 Herbert, Debbie .,............. 177,249 Heritage Week ..............,.......... 50 Hernandez, Julio ................... 173 Herndon, Robert E. ......... 153,235 145 Hersh, Judith .......,..... Hershey, Dave ......... Herzfeld, Shari ...... Hess, Roger A. .... . Hessla, Thor ............ 175 235 264 110 Hewett, Steven C. ....... ....... 2 62 Heyl, Barbara ............ ............116 Hibbitts, Katheryne M. ....,..... 260 Hickerson, Susan ...... 177 Hickham, Annette ........... 181,220 Hiers, William N. .... . ...........260 Higdon, Scott ........,,.............. 235 Higgs, Donna ................... 181,249 Higgs, Susan Elizabeth .... 183,249 Hilder, Ronald R. ................... 262 Hillel ..........................,............ 146 Hilton, Heather ................ 146,158 263 Huang, Greg .......................... 220 Hubbard, Val-Del ........ ...,.... 1 98 Hubby, Amy ............... ........ 1 75 Hubert, Scott D ..................... 263 Hubschman, Amy .................. 198 Hudson, James H. Jr. ........... 236 Hudson, John ........................ 250 Hudson, Vivian J. ....... ........ 2 62 Heubner, Kristen ........ ........ 1 77 Huff, Andrew F ....... ........ 2 63 Hufford, Arthur ......,.........,.... 220 Hughes, Bonnie ................,.... 236 Hughes, R. Dale ....... 154,158,198 Hughes, Ruth ................... 149,181 179 Johnson, Alexander III. ......... 262 260 Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Johnson, Derek ..................... Georgette ............... John ................. 132 175,250 Kelly ....................... 181 Ken ............ 14,138,143, 149,158,200 Johnson, Kevin R. .......... . 149,200 Johnson Polly ..,..... ......... 1 81 Johnson Randy ......... ......... 1 71 Johnson Robin .......... ......... 1 37 Hui, William Kim ................... 262 Huiet, Monique ................ 179,236 Humble, Mary Hart ............... 171 Huntington, Dan .............. 106,107 Hurley, Erin .....,....,................ 179 Hurley, Katie ................... 177,198 Hurley, Miles P. ..................... 220 Hutchins, Michael, Edward .... 149 Hutchinson, R ......................., 236 Hyer, Shelly ................ ......,. 1 83 Hyland, Bill ..........................., 131 Hymanson, Gerald ................ 250 Johnson, Thomas ............ 171,222 Johnson Vince .......... ......... 1 42 Jolly, Gwen ............. ......... 1 83 Jones, Bob .............. ......... 1 08 Jones, Camilla A. ...... ......... 2 50 Jones, Deryk .......... ..,... 1 13,175 Jones, Eleanor ........ ......... 1 79 Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones Jones Jorda Ellen .....,..................... 171 Evan ........................... 171 Gladys Kathryn .... 177,222 200 Joanne ........................ Kevin ....... ........ . 250 Laurie ...... ......... 136 Powell ...... ......... 1 71 183 n, Judy ...... Jordan, Linda .... Jordon, Karen ................, Harf, Ron ................... Harrington, Susan ..... ............198 171 Harllee, John B ................ 257,263 Harper, Akiba fDonna Sullivani ................. 149 Harper, Wayne C, ................. 263 Harrington, Charles C ....,...... 265 Harrington, John F. Jr. ......... 263 Harrington, Susan Anne.. 181,235 ' 179 Harris, Ann ................ Harsel, Kari ............... Harsen, Ken ........... Hart, Thomas C. ...... . Harton, Sarah ............ Hartsock, Colleen ...... Harwell, Lynne .......,. 282 235 175 264 181 179,249 154,155,235 Himel, Donald S. .................. . Hinson, Howard Doug ........... 149 Hinson, Sherri ..........,......,..... 181 Hinton, Brock E. ........ ....... 2 65 Hinton, David M. ........ ....... 2 62 .......236 Hiott, Celeste .......... Hirshfeld, Paul ......... 169 Hixon, Rindi .,........... ....... 1 79 .......157 Hoagland, Laura ......... Hobaugh, Douglas E .............. 264 Hodge, Nancy Elaine ...... 148,157, 183,198 Hodgin, Rosemary C. ............ 265 Hoffman, Barbara .................. 177 Hoffman, Jeanne T... 106,107,236 Hogan, Joan .......................... 183 Hoggard, Marilyn ................... 249 Hoggard, Renne ....... ....... 1 43 lckes, Allison ................... 152,153 lerardi, Ralph ............ 110,111,173 198 Imam, Riaz ............................. Index ...............,...................... 278 Individual Sports .................... 122 Ingram, Nancy Randolph ....... 149 lnterfraternity Council ........... 167 Intramurals ............ Irby, Ken .,...... Iris, Kerry ...... Irom, Bruce ...... Irvin, John ........ Irvine, Laurie ......... Irwin, Dave . ......... .. 124 136 181,198 119 171 173,179 175 Isaac, Lisa Michelle .....,.......... 149 lserson, Andrew .... 173,222 134,179 151,236 Jordon, Linda ........................ 236 Josephson, Walter Scott ....... 149 Joslin, Tia ........................ 151,183 177 Jove, Jackie ............... ......... Joyce, Marycarol ....... ......... 1 79 JUNIORS .................. ......... 2 16 Jurkovic, Mary S. ...... ......... 2 64 Jurnavey, Stevie ........ ......... 1 73 Just for Fun ........ ......... 1 22 Justis, Louisa ...... ......... 1 81 Kabram, Karen .......... ........ 177 Kadish, Lori ........................... 222 263 Kahlenberg, Cara L. ............. . Kahn, John ............. ......... 1 73 Kahn, Joshua F. ........ ......... 2 50 Kahn, Lisa .............. ............ 1 81 Kajheni, Kevah .....,................ 173 Kaley, Lisa Carlyn ........... 181,200 Kalter, Craig ............. 150,155,175 Kamaruddin, Hussam A. ....... 262 Kaminsky, Larry J. ................ 236 Kane, Jennifer ....................... 149 Kaplan, Crash ........................ 169 Kaplan, David L ............... 149,200 Kaplan, Elon F. ....... ............ 2 O0 Kaplan, Martine .......,. ......... 2 50 Kaplan, Philip ............. ......... 1 73 Kaplan, Richard ..................... 130 Kaplan, Stacey ........ ...... 1 77,236 Kappa Alpha .............. ......... 1 71 Kappa Alpha Theta ............... 181 Kappa Delta ........................... 181 Kappa Kappa Gamma ........... 183 Karis, Alison J. ......... 143,157,236 177 Karpel, Beth .......................... Kasman, Mark .....,..... ......... 1 46 Kassels, Mark ........................ 114 Katancik, James A. .....,......... 263 Kates, Jeffrey J .......... ......... 2 63 Katz, Katz, Katz, Katz, Katz, Kyle ............... ...... 1 38,173 Lori ...................... ..181,236 181 Mindy ........................... Mitch. ............,.............. 173 Theodore Michael ........ 149 Katzman, Sam ....................,.. 173 Katzmann, Stephanie ............ 250 Kauf, Kauff, Steve ................... 110 Steven ......................... 222 Kaufman, Allan Hal ............... 149 Kaufman, Bruce Alan ............ 200 Kaufman, Elaine ..................... Kawula, Margaret ............ 177 181,250 264 Keawopas, Ramaiphorn ......... Loeb, Debbie ......................... 177 Keen, Stan ............................. 137 Keenan, Chris ........................ 250 141 Keeve r, Kathy ........................ Keirholtz, David ..................... 169 Keiser, David ................... 171,200 Keljikian, Clifford ................... 200 Keller, Jeanne ......... ........ 1 79 Keller, Kristen ......... ............ 1 41 Kelley, Kelley Kelley Kelley , Jay ........... ......... , Maura J. ............. . Caroline ..................... 200 156,171 139,200 181 , Nina ..... ....... Kelly, Caroline ........ ........ 1 30 Kelly, Gail .................. ........ 2 00 Kelly, Kathleen Ann ............... 149 Kelly, Mara ............................ 130 Kelly, Wayne D. .................... 200 Kempton, Christopher W. .... 148, 262 Kendrick, Renata ...... 143,250,253 ' 139 Kennedy, Caroline ................. Kesser, Sheri ......................... 181 Kessler, Bonnie ....... ........ 1 81 Kestin, Wendy ....................... 177 Khajavi, Kaveh ....................... 236 Khaw, Margery C. .... 116,144,236 Khosh, Deanna ...................... 250 Kiel, Lisa ................................ 146 Kilpatrick, J. Scott K. .... . .173,236 Kilty, Jay D ............................ 169 Kimbrough, Sigrid ............ 181,250 Kimsey, Frank C. .................. 236 Kind, Dorle ............................ 177 King, George R ............... .149,200 Kinne, Dave ...,..... ............ 1 50 Kirby, John M. .......... . ...........263 Kirshenbaum, David L ..... 149,200 Kirsner, Susan D. ...... . Kistin, Brett ............. Klar, Howard ........ Klarman, Marla ........ . ....... 263 .......200 173 177 Klasfeld, Alan ........ ........ 1 75,250 Klee, Marty ........ . .............. 142 Kleiman, Scott ...... ........ 1 19,173 Klein, Alison ...... ....... 1 77,250 Klein, Debbie ........ Klein, Eric S ....... 181 265 Klein, Ira .............,. .......... 1 07 Klein, Jeff l. ........................... 106 Klein, Jeff Todd ............... 106,107 Klein, Jeffrey C ......... .......... 2 62 Klein, Laura .......... ....... 1 77 Klein, Risa ............. ............. 2 00 Klein, Steve .............,............. 175 Kleinkopf, Mark ..................... 119 Klinger, Robert M. .... 132,148,201 Klinghoffer, Lori ..................... 177 Kloosterboer, Steve ............... 175 Knatchbull-Hugessen, Sally .. 258, 260 Kochensparger, Cindy 181 Kodsi, Rob ............................. 175 Koenn, Margaret W ....... ........ 2 22 Kohn, Diane ..........,..... ....... 1 77 Kohn, Gary Paul ....... ....... 1 58 Kohn, Janet .......... Kois, Debbie ...... Kolb, Kathryn ........... 179 155 155 Kohn, Elyssa ................ ....... 1 81 Kolligan, Mark ....................... 173 Kondziela, Michael J. ............ 265 Kopitsky, Kory ................ 177,250 Kopps, Larissa ................. 177,236 169 Korchak, Tom ...,................... Kordansky, Dori Evan ........... 236 Korman, Peter ....................... 201 Kors, Debbie ............... ....... 1 48 Koseoff, David ...... Kosh, Deanna ....... Kosow, Rick ...... Kosser, Kelly ........ Kossoff, David ...... .......250 181 169 177 173 Kotlove, Jill ...................... 181,222 Kouris, Mark Allen ................ 262 Koval, Steven Howard .......... 149, 158,253 Kramer, Sophie ........... ....... 1 30 Kratzer, Roland ........... ....... 1 73 Kravitz, Eugene B ........ ....... 2 62 Kravtin, Billy ............. .......... 1 43 Kress, Karen .................... 181,201 Kritchman, Tracy .................. 114 Krog, Mary Kathryn ........ 179,250 177 Kronthal, Sherri ..................... Krug, Rob .............................. 173 Krukowski, Edward ............... 201 Krus, Cindy ................. ....... 1 79 Kuck, Mary ............................ 116 Kudler, Jodi ..................... 144,177 Kugler, Joshua Ezra. 154,155,222 Kunter, Josh .......................... 169 Kurland, Al ............................ 169 Kurucz, Jeanne ..................... 250 Kurzmann, Julie .............. 173,201 Kusiel, Dave ......... Kutchera, Alisa ......... 169 250 Kwon, Hyon Ung ......... ....... 2 22 Lackey, Donald W ................. 263 Lackner, Jeff ............... ........ 1 73 108 Laffiteau, Denise .............. Lacrosse .................. LaGreca, Ann ...... Laing, June M ....... Lakind, Lydia ........ Lalli, Paul ................. 152,236 143 ifffffzeo 181 173 Lamb, Bruce Elliot ...... ........ 1 58 Lambda Alpha ....................... Lampe, Stefan ...,............. 147 149,201 Lamport, Sheila ..................... 236 Lancaster, Peter J. ..... ........ 2 65 Land, Jodie Melinda .............. 222 Landers, Randall .............. 151,201 Landon, Rob .......................... 148 Landsdell, Susan ......... ........ 1 77 Landow, Robert ..................... 201 Landrum, Berke .................... 142 Laney, Susan 138,149,157,158,201 Lanford, Becky ...................... 177 Lang, Gail ........................ 181,201 Lange, Kurt ..................... 134,157 Langenhennig, Sheila ....... 150,154 Lanham, Wanda .............. 141,201 Lanier, Vance ........................ 136 Lankau, Lisa ........ ........ 1 77,236 Lanport, Sheila ........ Lansdell, Susan ........ 148 . ....... 250 Larkin, Kiki ............................ 179 Lark1nd,Karen ...........,.............. 25 LaSalle, Tracy Anne. 116,251 Lash, Sara ............................. 201 Lassiter, John L ....... Laszlo, Jennifer ............... Latiff, Alfonso .......... 262 146,237 130 LaTour, Maria ....................... 179 Latter, Linda A. ............... 146,201 Lattew, Sandra ...................... 201 Lau, Joseph Sui Fat .............. 263 Laufer, Susan ........................ 201 Lauten, David .................. 138,201 Law School ....... Lawson, Dave ...... Lazarou, Steve ................ Leach, Amy ......... Leager, Larry ....... Leahy, Fred ............. 74,75 173 110,111 181 Uffffff 175 175 Lebersfeld, Kenny ....... ........ 1 73 Le Cercle Francais ................ 147 Lee Lee Lee Lee, Lee, Lee Andy .............................. Donna Carol ............ 169 149,201 265 , John Robert ................... Paul .................. Sabina ....... Wayne ...... Leech, Vicki ......... Leeds, Debbie .......... Leff, Geri ............. Legett, Laura .................. Lehrman, Melissa .................. 179 Leifman, Faith .......... 108 237 74 201 179 177 .134,201 181 Lerman, Nora .............. ........ 1 81 Lener, Susan Ellen ................. 222 Leonard, Gary C. ........... . Leopold, Todd ................. Lerman, Melissa Joy ........ Lerner, lan M. ................ . 171,262 137,251 145,251 146,265 201 Lerner, Joanne . ......,.............. Lesada, Mel ........................... 237 Lesperance, Lawrence M. ..... 265 Less, Cory ............................. 175 Lessner, Cory ........................ 202 Leung, Lester ........... 142,173,251 Levan, Robert ........................ 202 Levenstein, Jon ..................... 173 Levine, Gary D. ..........,.......... 263 Levine, Michael P. ........... 137,222 Levine, Michael Steven .......... 202 Levine, Robin ......................... 179 Levitt, Mark ........................... 169 Levitz, Brian .................... 142,202 Levy, Alyson ............. 167,181,251 ' ' 149 Levy, Vivian Beth ...........,...... Levy, Dave .......... Levy, Ken ............ Levy, Michael ...... Levy, Mike ........ 175 173 237 173 Levy, Nanete ....... ........... 2 02 Levy, Terry ....... ........ 1 77,237 Levy, Vivian ,... ................. 1 81,202 Levy, William A. .............. 137,237 ' 222 Lewis, Ann Marie .................. Lewis, Jonny ..........,. 169 Lewis, Patricia ....................... 136 Lewis, Susie ................... ........222 Lewis, Walter Glenn .............. 262 Libit, William Michael .....,...... 149 Lickhalter, Debbi ................... 202 181 Lleb, Debbie ............... Lieberbaum, Bruce ................ 146 Lieberbaum, William J. .... 156,202 Lieblein, Brad ........................ 202 Liebman, Jeanne ............. 114,177 Liebowitz, Rich ........ ........... 1 75 Life in Limbo .......... ........ 2 34 Liggett, Beverly ....... ........ 1 79 Light, Mark .......... ............... 1 69 Lin, Eunice ....................,........ 202 Linder, Marci G. ....... 146,192,202 173 Lindquist, Mahlie ................... Lindsay, Frederic Beggs ........ 237 Linek, Peter J. ....................... 265 Lines .............................. Linz, Walt ............ Lipham, John J ....... .......36 143 262 Lipton, Cathy .............,.,........ 130 ' ' 173 Little, Ramie .................. Little, Thomas Goree Jr. ...... . Litwin, Mark S ....................,.. Livingston, Amy E. ......... . Livingston, Becky .......... Llorca, Diana ................... 158 130 183,237 222 181,237 Lloyd, Aaron ................,......... 251 Loewenstein, Rhonda ............ 202 Logan, Amy ........ 149, 157,179,202 Logan, Bruce A. .................... 265 Logan, Paul ..................... .......258 Logue, Day Ann .................... 237 Long, Dania ..................... 179,237 Long, William G. ................... 263 Looney, Emily .................. 181,251 Loos, Arthur S. ..................... 263 Lopez, Gloriana M. ......... 158,262 Lott, Anna ............................. 143 Louthan, Howard .................. 142 Lover, Laura .................... 167,181 Lovett, Warren S ..............,.... 237 Lowenstein, Joey ........ 181 Lowrey, Gerald ...................... 175 Lowry, Lynn ........ Lucariello, Tina ........ ...... Lucks, Lauren ....... .. Ludwigsen, Claudia ,......... Luker, Amy ............. ...... Lullwater Day .......... ...... Lusk, Florence ......... 181,237 .....237 .....181 .....202 .....251 .. 10,11 157 283 173,238 Mazursky, Jon E. ............ 169,237 Mortar Board ......... Lustig, Craig ......... ....... 1 69 Lustig, Marnie ....... ...,...... 1 77 Lux, Daniel S ................... 169,202 Lux, Spike ............................. 169 Luxenberg, Steven N. ..... 137,251 Lyew, Raymond C. ..........,..... 264 Lyle, David B. .............. ....... 2 51 Lynn, Harry .,......................... 143 Lyons, Paula Renee ............... 149 MacConnell, Andrew M. ...,... 263 Mack, Renalda Eugenia ...,.... 138, 149,154,158 Mack, Todd ,............,....... 175,251 Mackey, Bill ....... ....... 1 06,107 Mackler, Jill ................. ....... 1 77 Madara, Ted .......................... 113 Madray, Gregory A. ........,..... 265 Madsen, William C. ..... ....... 2 62 MaGahee, Laura ....... ...... 1 36 Maguire, Jeanne ....... ...... 1 79 Maguire, Kenny ........ ...... 2 51 Maher, Marianne ...... ....... 1 40 Mahtani, Andy ....... ....... 1 71 Maidy, Bryan K. ....... ...,... 2 65 "Majoritis" .........,... ......... 9 5 Malakoff, Phil ........ ....... 1 73 Malavet, Pedro ......... ..,.... 1 19 Mallison, Jim ..........,..... ....... 1 43 Maloney, Jonathan S. ,........... 262 Maloy, Heather ...................... 202 Malveaux, Frances R .,........... 202 Mancini, Ron ...... 131,153,155,222 Mancoll, Deborah ............ 177,222 Mandala, Larry .......,..........,... 154 Mandelbaum, Jerome ............ 202 Mangels, Suann ............... 141,222 Mann, Mike ........................... 169 Manning, Kathy ..................... 116 Mannix, Dan ............. 112,113,171 Mansour, Destiny .................. 156 Mantzaris, Stacy .................... 148 Manus, Page E ...... .......... 2 64 Matthews, Granvette ............... 74 Matthews, Helen Beaudry ..... 149 Matthews, Lisa ................ 181,204 Mattinson, Pamela L ........ 183,222 Miller, Myra Lynn ............ 158,262 Miller, Randy ............. ......... 1 36 Miller, Terrell O .... ........... Millison, Ted .......... Mills, Laura Jane ...... 143,251 173 ......263 Mills, Robert .......................... 238 Minkin, Daniel Jared ....... Nadler, Lori ..................... 181,238 Nadler, Scott ................... 173,252 Nagel, Laurie Ann ................. 265 Naiman, Karen ...................... 143 Narr, Sonja ................. 80,141,205 Maxman, Peter ...................... 173 May, John Marvin ................, 146 Maya, Victor .......................... 264 Mayer, Leslie ................... 106,107 Mayerson, Laurie ................... 181 Mayhall, Elizabeth J ........... .... 2 04 Mazuji, Nasrin ....................... 264 McAllister, Grant ...... 106,107,119 McAlvany, Bill ........................ 169 McBryde, Connor .................. 251 McCall, Catherine West .. 181,204 McCammon, Richard E. .. 137,237 Minsky, Lloyd S ........ 147,153,204 Minter, Kathy ..... 148,155,223,226 Mitchell, Carl S. Jr. .........,..... 262 Mitnick, John ................... 156,223 Mizell, Griffin E. Jr. ............... 262 Mogelnicki, Melissa ..,....... Mondzac, Willie ............... Mongeau, Susan W. ....... . Monnet, Irene .................. Monson, Cindi ................. 171,181 106,107 ......265 181 181,238 McCartney, Jeff ............... 108,173 McClymonds, E. T. ............... 171 McCrary, Kate ............ ........ 1 77 McCullen, Karla ..................... 183 MCCurdy, Phil ................. 171,251 McDaniel, Carol ............. .181,204 McDole, Crissa G ............,..... 261 Monteiro, Annando D. .......... 204 Moolchan, Elva Julie. 130,183,204 Moon, Marty George ............. 263 Moon, Rachel Youngjon ........ 149 Moon, Taegun ................. 111,142 Moor, Tim ............................. 204 Moore, Sheila ........................ 116 Naterman, David W. ,..... ....... 2 64 Nathanson, Janice .... Natovitz, Kim ............ Navon, Jeffrey L ........ Neale, William D ....... Needle, Dave ......... . Needle, Martin ....... Neft, Stewart ............ Nelkin, Brenda S. .... . Nelson, Jeffrey V ....... Nelson, Lou ............... Nelson, Susan ...,........ 138,149,205 132,177 ............262 ......108,169 ..........252 108 ..........205 ......108,223 169 ......205,116 Neuberger, Debbie ................ 177 Nevarez, Angie ............ 139 Newbern, Jeanne R. .............. 262 Newman, Marshall A. ...... 155,205 Newsom William J, lll ............ 265 McDonald, Roy Almer ........... 262 McDonell, Sharon .................. 181 McEachern, John Edward154,158 Moorman, W. Randall B.. Morecraft, Dorothy ......... Morelock, Lynn ............... 204 251 Nicholls, Neal ........,............... 205 Nickey, Elizabeth ............. 179,252 Nissley, Susan M. .................. 262 McFann, Kim ............ 144,157,183 McGahee, Laura Ann .... McGean, Jim ................. McGee, Patti .............,.,. McGill, Sallie ........,.. McGrady, Sharon .......... McKenzie, J. David ....... McKinney, Tracy J. ...... . McKinnon, Sarah ........... McKinstry, Annette ....... McKuen, Michele .........., McLendon, Kennon ....... McMahon, James ,......... McMillon, Kathy ............ McReynolds, Sean ......... Meador, Mark Dunstan. Meadows, Barbara Lynn Medical School ...,.......... 145,237 113,173 157,204 ........181 145,237 265 181,251 179 204 177 136,142 169 177 171 ........251 .145,237 137 Moreno, Jerry .................. 143,175 Morgan, Courtney ................. 111 Morgan, Grant C ...... ...... 262 Morgan, Susan ......... ...... 1 39 173 Morganstein, Steve ....... ...... Morley, Robert ...... Morris, Beth ....... 169 139,223 Morris, Doug ......... .....,.... 2 04 Morris, Emilie ........ ...... 1 77 Morris, Fran .......... ...... 1 77 Morris, Michele ...................... 251 Morrison, Beth ................ 183,253 Morrison, Gregory S. ............ 265 Morrison, Pam .......... 141,183,223 Morrison, Thomas W. lll. ....,. 265 Morrow, Eric ............ 134,169,223 183 Morss, Jennifer ...................... 148 ......263 Marban, Alex ........ .......139,251 237 Marbes, Melinda ........,. ....... Marcadis, Debbie ......... ....... 1 81 Marcus, Mitchell ....... Margiloff, Susan ........ 173 251 Margolis, Randi ...................... 141 Marion, James Leon ..,.... 154,155, 158,202 72,73 Meek, Toby ........,.................. 119 Meeks, Stephen ...... ........ 2 23 Moseman, David ....... Moses, Melissa ...... Moskohips, Ken ............... Moss, Marshall L. .... . Moss, Stephanie ....... Mothershead, Margie ....... Move ......................... Moving In .................. Mowery, Sally ........ Mudd, Shannon ........ 171 181 171 149,204 251 181,205 148,149 ........31 ........70 110,111 Mueller, Paula ........... 145,179,238 Mullins, Kathy .................. Mullis, Lynn Baxter ......... Martine, Eleni ........,............... 173 145,204 Marks, Lenny ........... ......, 1 71 Marlow, Richard .................... 202 Maron, Glenn ........................ 265 Marion, Jim .............. 144,148,150 Marquardt, Paul ..................... 169 Mars, Rick ....,....... ............. 1 73 Marsh, Dwight .......... ....... 1 41 Marshall, Robert C. ..... .....,. 2 65 Martin, Caryn Jill ....,.............. 204 Martin, Donald ......,....,.... 142,251 Martinez, Beverley F. ............ 261 Martinez, Michael Anthony 204 Mason, Dave ...................... 42,43 Mason, Leanne ...................... 179 Masur, Penny .................. 177,222 Matalon, Marcia ........ 167,181,237 Matanky, Bryan K. ,,.......... 25,204 ' 183 Match, Debbie .......... ....... Mathews, Tracy ........ ....... 2 22 Mattenson, Abra ....... ....... 1 81 Mattes, Bari Jane ........ ....... 1 49 284 Meindl, Ken ................ ......,. 2 37 Melneck, Michael ........ ........ 2 23 Meltzer, Jeff ............ ........ 1 73 Mendelson, Nuni ................... 204 Meneghini, Luigi .................... 223 Menendez, Anthony R .....,..,.. 263 Menna, David J. .................... 265 Mercado, Flavia ..................... 217 Mercado, Marian ................... 177 Merchant, Kenneth W. .......... 264 Merlin, Charles ...................... 223 Merritt, Julie .................... 181,237 Meskauskas, Ruta ........... 183 Mesulam, Melissa ............ Messmer, Tracy ...... 106,107 177,231 Metzger, Jed .......................... 171 Meyer, Anne .....,.............. Meyer, Wendy .... 144,150,154,155 Meyers, Marcy ................. 141,251 Michaels, Daniel ....... 147,148,204 Michel, Loren Scott ............... 204 Middlemas, Mary ................... 181 Mikity, Janette ............ ........ 1 56 Miles, Elizabeth ...................... 183 Miller, David Samuel ............. 237 Miller, Jane ............................ 177 Miller, Joe .........,...,.......... 169,251 Miller, Joseph A. ................... 223 Munday, Tona ................. Muntean, John ......... Murphy, David A. Murphy, Eddie ................. Murphy, Ken ....,.............. Murphy, Mary Elizabeth.. 145,223 Murray, Janet .................. Murray, Karen .......... Murtaugh, Tom ........ Muse, John H. ....,. . Mycek, Dave ...... Myers, Don ................... Myers, William D. .......... .. Myrianthopoulos, Evan .... 181 177,238 171 265 169 175,252 136, ,.....252 106 173 ......264 169 ......205 ......262 169 Noesen, John .................. 171,238 108 Nolan, Mark .......................... Noland, Edward A. ...... ....... 2 65 Nolen, Connor B. .,...... ....... 2 62 Noll, Mary ................. ....... 1 77 Noonberg, Erika .................... 179 Nordone, Albert P. ................ 265 Norenberg, Eric ..................... 119 Norris, Brent ...... 112,113,173,176 Norris, Kristin ........... 153,179,252 Norris, Nancy .................. 177,205 Northrop, Lucy ...................... 150 Nortman, Gay Lynn ........ 177,205 Norwood, Samuel Lorenza .... 149 Nunez, Antonio, Jr .......... 257,263 Nursing School ........................ 81 Nussbaum, Elaine ........... 134,149, 181,205 Nussbaum, Robert Alan ........ 149 Nutt, Elka .............................. 205 Nyce, Erik ........,........... ....... 2 05 Nyczepir, David J. ....... ....... 2 65 Oakes, David ......................... 171 Oakes, Joanne ....................... 173 Oberman, Lee M. ..... 138,146,238 Obermayer, Adele ................. 181 Oberwager, Jane ............. 181,223 Ochs, Diane ........................... 183 Odierna, Lisa .......... 167,179 O'Donnell, Robert J. ............. 265 ' ' 181 Oei, Miko ................ Ogle, Karen M. ..... .. Oglo, Bill ................. O'Keefe, Chris ........ Oken, Phylanne ...... Oling, Jenifer .......... 106,107,252 139,142,252 113 177 ......205,253 Oliver, Michele K .... ............ 1 49 Oliver, John M. ...... ............ 2 23 Oliver, Kimberly ..... ...... 1 77,238 Olling, Jennifer ...... Olsen, Fred K. ....... . Olson Olson Olszo 1 , Eric Martin.. lzzy ............. ka Donna w , Omega, Cherry ....... 14 264 .........169,262 171 .........177,238 116 Omicron Delta Kappa ........... 149 O'Neal, Laura,Gay .......... 181,205 O'Neal, Randy ................. 106,107 Ordover, Andy ......... 152,153,175 Organic Chemistry ................ 217 Organizations ........................ 128 Orlando, Roger ....... ............ 1 75 Orrell, Jim ....................... 142,238 Oshrin, Edward J. ................. 205 Osiason, Lauren Dale ............ 205 Osipchak, Mark E. ................ 263 Ostrow, Ozzie ........... ........ 1 69 Osvath, Kathleen ....... ........ 1 79 Ovard, Tracy ......................... 183 Owen, Webster ............... 119,205 Owens, Charles E. Jr. ........... 264 Owens, Wanda ...................... 177 Oxford, Gregory E. ............... 262 Pacha, Jeffrey K. ....... ......... 2 64 Padgett, Susie ...,..... ......... 1 81 Padua, Jeff ..................,.......... 108 Padwa, Bonnie Lee .....,.... 181,205 Palder, Amy ........................... 179 Palley, Donna ........... 143,177,238 Palmer, Eugene H. lll. ..... 257,263 Pan, Nelson ...........,............... 264 Panettiere, Susan R. ......,....... 238 Panhellenic Council ............... 167 Panzer, Sharon ...................... 205 Papleacos, Julie ..................... 181 Papontones, Melissa .............. 156 Pappas, Gigi ............. 147,156,158 Pardini, David ........................ 111 Parham, Valerie ..................... 238 Parker, Anna C. .............. 141,223 Parker, David ..................... 43,44 Parker, Edward M. Jr. ..... 257,263 Parker, Richard L. .......,.. 132,137, 143,252 Parkinson, Sherlee ................. 179 Parks, Lenore Y. ............. 151,238 Parness, Barry ........... ......... 1 75 Parsons, Ann ......................... 179 Parviainen, Kaarina E. ........... 263 Passaniti, Ondina Maria C ...............................,...... 137,252 Patrons .................................. 268 Paty, Breay ...... ..........., 1 73 Paul, Andrea ....,......,.............. 177 Paul, Jonathan .......... 169,171,207 Pauldine, Ron .................. 143,175 Paulus, Greg ............. 149,171,228 136 Payne, Bill ........... ............... Peabody, Bian ......... ...,.....261 Peace, Sue .............. Peacock, Linda .......... Pearce, David R ......... 179 .........252 262 Pearlman, Jeff M. .................. 252 Pearlstein, Rob ................ 138,173 207 Pearson, Elizabeth Anne ...,... Pearson, Helen Ruth ............. 149 Pearson, Jennifer ..,................ 207 Pecarsky, Judy .......... 173 Peck, Paul ..................... ...... 1 69 Pedersen, John ...................... 140 Peets, Nomian D. lll. ............ 262 Peirce, Greg ................. ...... 1 42 Pelfrey, Travis .........,.. ......... 2 52 Pendley, Bruce ................ 139,207 Penly, Teresa ......................... 179 Pennybacker, Mark ...,........... 143 Pepe, Victoria .................. 181,207 Peppers, Robin ......,........ Perchik, Joel ......... Perella, Angie ........ .181,207 173 Perelman, Julie ........ Perkins, Kerri .......... 179 181 .......223 Perkins, Margaret .................. 223 Per-Lee, J. Philip ............. 143,223 Per-Lee, John Jr, ................... 238 Perlman, Gary David ............. 262 Permenter, Kathy ............ 114,145 Perr, Geoffrey S. .................., 262 Perry, Lewis ....................,...... 148 Perry, Mark Clawson ............ 262 Personals ............- ...... 2 70,271,272 207 Pesterfield, Evelyn ................. Peters, John ......... 130 Peters, Mac ............. Peterson, Jan .............. 153 116 Peterson, Lea Ann ................. 261 Petrucci, Michael J. .............. . Petterson, Catherin eM. ....... . Pettiford, Sherrie ......,...,.. Pettit, Hale ............... ..... Pettit, Richard ............. Petty, Charlotte C. Pfeifer, Barry ........... 265 262 134,252 .. 252 ..,....207 .......264 173 Phi Beta Kappa ....................,. 149 Phi Gamma Delta .................. 175 Phi Sigma Honorary Biological ' 150 Society .,........................,........ Phillips, William J ....,.............. 263 Phoenix ....................... 150 Picon, David Alan ........ ....... 1 49 Pieppert, Jeff ......................... Pierce, Daphne A. .......... . 143 179,207 223 263 Pierce, Gregory ............,........ la A Pierfederici, Pame P1 Kappa Alpha ...................... 173 Pincus, Michele ........... Pirkle, Jennifer ......... Pittman, Nancy ........ Plasker, Jordy ....... .......207 177 177 169 Platt, Teri ........... .............. 1 81 Plessett, Janie ....... ........ 1 79,207 Plotkin, Abbey ..........,....,....... 207 Plow, Richard ........................ Podray, George A. 175 lV ............ 263 265 Poineal, Ralf F. ..................... . Poitas, Catherine ................... 252 Pomerantz, Laurie Susan ...... 149 Pomerantz, Stephen ....... 132,149, 155,223 Poodolsky, Phil ........ 175 Pope, Carla .................. ......, 1 79 Popp, Thomas W. ................. 262 Poree, Felecia .................. 134,238 Porges, Stefanie ....... Porten, Scott ........ Porter, Dusty ........ Postem, David ...... 181 173 .......238 ..........173 Potitong, Jupe ...... ....,... 1 37,223 Potts, Suzanne ........ 252 Potvin, Frank ........ Powell, Tom .......... Powers, Manan ........ 5:55252 173 173 Prado, Angeline M. ................ 207 Praskins, Patricia ................... 264 Prather, Elizabeth Annette .... 149 Pratt,Win ............................... 207 Pre4Vet Society .......,.............. 151 Price, Polly ............ ........ 1 16,252 Priest, Mary ........................... 145 Prince, Libby ................... 116,144 Prior, Betty169 Probst, John 171 Professions ...............,.............. 83 "Professor Jimmy" ...... ........ 1 00 Promisel, Julia ..,..... Prough, Judith ........ Proust, Cynthia ...... Pruett, Barbara ....... Pruitt, Barbara ........ Prunty, Randy ......,.. ........207 177 153 179 175 106 Prusia, Dirk G. .......... ......., 2 64 Psi Phi .................................... 151 Publications Council .............. 154 Puhalovich, Frank .................. 175 Pulles, Joanne ........., 138,149,157, 158,207 Pulliam, Lisa Ann ................... 207 Pumerants, Steve .................. 228 Pumphrey, David W. ....... 257,263 Putter, Lauren. .... . Pyle, Susan ........... Pyritz, Thomas H. Quattrini, Joe ...... 181 ........181 ........263 143 Quinn, Charles ........ ....,... 2 61 Quinn, Philip J ......... ........... 2 23 Quoyeser, Mary ............... 181,252 Rabb, Alan D. ..... . .........114,223 Rabb, Daniel .................... 171,252 Rabinowitz, Mark ,................. 148 Rachlin, John .........,.... ........ 1 39 Radillo, Rebecca M. ............... 158 Ragsdale, Kevin L. ................. 264 Rainone, Donald P .... Ramos, Debbie .......... Rand, Lora ................. Rands, Karen ....... Rangel, Carlos ........... Rap, Jay .......,..,........,, Rappaport, John ....... Rape, William G. ...... . Rasch, Diana ....... Rathskellar ................. Ratiner, Randi ........... Ratno, Cordell ........... Raukind, Lauren ........ Ray, Kelly A ............... Ray, Vashti ................ Read, Cindy ............... Reader, Frederic A Redding, Joree ............ 131,154,207 181 116 ........238 ............207 169 100,138,252 ............265 145 ......152,153 134,139,207 175 181 ......179,252 ......177,208 181 . ............... 208 238 Redvanley, Lee ...............,...... 252 Redvanley, Rich ..................... 173 Reed, Charlette Denise ...177,208 Reemer, Dave ................,....... 108 Reese, Sarah .................... 163,183 ' 274 "Reflections of . . Regester, Jayne .......... "'ffIffffI2os Reidhead, Joseph S. ...,.......... 263 Reiff, Steve .....,.,..........,......... 223 Reiner, John Eugene ............. 149 Reisman, John ....................... 173 Reiss, Joathan ............ Relaxation ................... ..,.....150 Renbaum, Judi ,...................... 177 Renbaum, Stephanie .............. 167 Renshaw, Melvin S. ..........,.... 265 Reynolds, Elizabeth A ............ 208 Reynolds, Ralph ............... 134,238 Reznik, David A. ,.................. 263 Rhatigan, Jane .........,.. ........ 2 23 Rhomberg, Leah ......... ........ 1 79 Ribak, Pamela ........, ........208 Richard, Steve ........... ........ 1 40 Richardson, Mark ...... ........ 1 42 Richman, Debbie ....... Richmond, Sarah ....... Rick, Eric ............. Ridell, Adam ..........,... Rieder, Ricky ............. Riedy, Kimberley ...... Riesel, Lillian ............., Rigby, Nan ................. Rigney, Joanne .,........ Rihacek, Claudia ........ ............177 ......143,238 254 175 108 141,145,225 179,238 179 ......169,208 ............208 Rimler, Rick ............ ............ 1 75 Rineberg, Gay .................. 181,208 Rio, Lauren .......... ............... 1 81 Ripps, Marc ..................... 169,238 Ritchie, Peter A. ..... ............ 2 64 Rites of Spring .....,.. ......... 8 ,9 Roam, Scott ......... ........ 1 08 Roaman, Rico ......... ...,.... 1 71 Robbing, Jeff .......,...... Robbins Robbins , Rosalie R ................. 264 Roberts, Roberts, ........175 , lan .......................,... 208 David F. ...... ........ 2 08 Mark E. ....... ........ 2 62 Roberts, Stacey ..................... 254 Robertson, Shelley ................. 134 Robinowitz, Mark ............ 155,239 Robitscher, John W .......... 86,119, 138, 158,208,253 Rock, Karen .......................... 177 Rockwell, Robert ........,.... 141,150 Rodgers, Richard L. ll. .......... 264 Rodier, Paul M ....................... 262 Rodriquez, Dave ........ 173 Rodriguez, Reuban ................ 225 Rogers, Rogers, Rogers, Rogers, Rogers, Rogers, Cindi ............. ......... 2 39 239 Joanne .,..... ......,..... Lucy W ............... 141,208 Michelle .................... 179 Philip ...........,...,.,....... 137 Raleigh ...,..... 106,107,119 132 Rogers, Sharon ...................... Rogosin, Steve ....................... 156 Rogovin, Leslie ...................... 181 Rohald-Karman, Marla ........... 254 Rome, Scott ........................... 173 Root, Tom ............,................ 173 Rose, Elizabeth ....... ,........ 1 57 Rosen, Alex .,.......... ......... 1 51 Rosen, Donna E. ....... ......... 2 65 Rosen, Larry .............. ........ 1 08 Rosen, Michael T ..........,........ 262 Rosenberg, Alan .................... 254 Rosenberg, Carlyn Kae ...150,225 Rosenberg, Diane ..... 152,153,239 Rosenberg, Thomas L. .,........ 208 Rosenblatt, Lisa ..,.................. 177 Rosenstein, Evan ................... 175 Rosenzweig, Lawrence .......... 262 Ross, Barbara S ...............,..,.. 239 Ross, Dave ...........,.......... 150,175 Ross, Jill ...............,................ 148 Ross, Kimrey L. ............... 181,208 Rosser, Mary ....... ............177 Rossi, Edward ....................,.,. 208 Roth, Rick .............................. 175 Rothberg, Barbara ........... 132,157 Rothenberg, Roni ................... 177 Rothman, Lee ......... ...,.,..173 Rotholz, Craig ,...................... 175 Rothstein, Amy L. ................. 239 Roughton, Barbara Alison ..... 149 Routzahn, Joy J. .....,....... 181,254 285 Royal, Lisa ............................. 179 Rowell, Amanda ...... ....... .183 Rubenstein, Andrew ....,......,.. 254 Rubenstein, Bonnie. Rubenstein, Judy .... Rubenstern, Bonnie . ........208 Rubin, Glen ........................... 169 Rubin, Mandy .................. 177,254 Rubin, Pam ............. ............ 2 08 Rubin, Todd ............... ........ 2 08 Rucker, Virginia L. ................ 208 Rudd, Steven A. .............. 175,225 Rudin, Bruce ...................,...... 209 Rudolph, Valerie Lynne... Rugby ................,............ 177,239 .110,116 Rushing, Mark ,.,...........,,....... 136 Russell, Gregg ...,............. Rustin, Eric ,......... Ruth, Dave ....... 156,239 ............209 ........175 SAA Preview Day .................. 162 Sabatello, Paul T. Sabatini, Andrea ....... 143,157,209 ' 72 Sabin, Bruce ........... Sabin, Ellen ...................... Sable, Robert E. ............. . Sabonis-Chafee, Terry ..... Sack, Alexandra ........,..... Saguiguit, Roy .................. Salamar, Michael .r........... Saliter, Donna ,...,............. ......177 ......263 ......225 ......177 ......254 ......108 148 Salomon, Shayna Michele ...i. 254 Salpietro, Frank G ........... Saltz, Albert ......,,............. Saltzman, Lawrence M. Shackelford, Robert H. Salvi, Alan J ..........,.......... ......209 ......169 ......262 ......265 Samuels, Jeff .......................,. 119 Samuels, Sammy ................... 169 Sanchez, Mark S. ............ 257,263 Sanders, Jim ....................,..... 119 Sanders, Stephanie .......... 167,181 Sandlin, James R. ......,........... 262 Sandoff, Doug .....,... Sands, Allison ......... Sanford, Lisa ................... ........169 ............181 145,239 Sanford, Rhonda A ..... ........... 2 64 Santiesteban, Hector ............. 111 Sartin, Jeff .......................... 43,44 Sater, Craig A. .......... ........ 2 65 Satlof, Risa ............................. 181 Satogkit, Jurirat Ann ....... 141,225 177 Sausner, Randi ...................... Savage, Dave ........... Savelle, Janet ....... .. ........ 169 177 Savitt, Greg ............... ........ 1 42 Savrann, Russell ..............,..... 225 Scaldara, Noelle Rose ...... 179,254 Scalera, Joel C. ..................... 264 Schaap, Alex H. .................... 262 Schachner, Elizabeth M ......... 209 Schafer, Tracy .....,............,.... 254 Schafler, Robin ...................... 254 Scheckner, Matt .............. 144,145 Scheel, Deva J ........ ............ 1 49 Scherer, Beth ............ ........ 1 45 Scherlis, Wendy ..................... 183 Schiff, Andrew Robert ........... 158 Schiff, Stu .......,...................... 169 Schiffman, Nancy Joy ...... 177,209 Schlessinger, Paul .................. 169 Schloss, Lisa .............. ........ 2 54 Schneider, Andrea ................. 181 Schneider, Bill ............ ........ 1 31 286 Schneider, Jason ........ Schnitzer, Lynn .......... 150 225 Schoen, Ken .................... 138,173 Schoettle, Christopher .......... 239 Schottl, Ranier W. ................. 264 Schrand, Tom .................. 143,239 Schrigi, Paul .............. .......... 1 75 Schubert, Mara ...................... 254 Schuberth, Gary H. ............... 264 Schulman, James Michael ..... 209 Schulman, Helen ................... 177 Schulman, Thomas l ........ 146,225 183 Schulte, Kathy ....................... Schulte, Todd ...................,.... 209 Schultz, Mark Joel ................ 262 Schulwolf, Neal E. ................. 173 Schuster, Tammy .... 144,155, 177, 239 Schwab, David .......... ....... 1 56 Schwartz, Andy ........ ....... 1 73 Schwartz, Kathy .......... ....... 1 73 Schwartz, David A. ............... 263 Schwartz, Herbert M ............. 209 Schwartz, Kathy .................... 181 Schwartz, Randy ................... 169 Schwartzberg, Marc ........ 149,209 Schwartzmann, Anne ............ 177 Schweizer, Kenneth M. ......... 265 Schwob, Jan ................ ....... 1 77 Schwock, Kathy .......... ....... 1 16 Schwomm, Craig ......... ......... 4 8 Sciarrino, Nick .......... .......148 Shierling, William G. ...... .. Shipp, Desideria .......... . Shivers, Myra ............. . Shoemake, Patricia .......... Shorr, Sara ...................... Short, Jeff ........................ Shortages .............. Shuler, Robin ........... Shulman, Andrew ....... . Shulman, Brett ........ Shulman, Helen ....... Shuster, Todd ....... Siefil, Chuchi ........ Siegil, Slinky ......... Sigma Chi ............. Sigma Nu ................. Sigma Tau Delta .............. Silberman, Amy N. ........ . 154,225 Silberman, Gail ................ Silbiger, Eva ..................... Silcox, Daniel Hal Ill ........ Silfin, Andy ...................... Silfin, Lance ............. Silver, Esther ........ Silver, Jay ................ ......263 225 263 ......225 ........80 154,171 ........22 210 ......210 181 254 225 169 169 173 8,173 154 137,141, 181 141,225 210,253 175 175 106,107 169 Silverberg, Silverman, Silverman, Silverman, Silverstein s Heidi .................... 177 Diane ................... 210 Howard W. 71,175,210 Leslie .................... 146 Jeffrey D. ............ 254 Scollard, Kevin ......... Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott, Ava ................. Charlene ........ Jo Ann ....... Joanne ....... Scott, Paul ............ Scruggs, Sue ............... Searcy, Dennis R ........ 169 .......239 .......239 .......225 .......181 .......171 ..........209 ..........209 Segal, Tali ................. 158,209,253 ' 209 Seidel, Jack ........... Seidenberg, Amy,K Seidman, Stuart ..... Seidner, Bruce M. . Seif, David ............. Sekulow, Jeannie... Sekulow, Kira ........ Self, David ............. Seligson, Michael B. Sellers, Jill .....,........ Semet, Dana .......... Semla, Adam ......... Senderdorf, Doug.. Senior Memories Seniors. ............. Senior Weekend .... Serpico, Felicia ...... Sevalas, Bill ............ Seward, Mark T. ..........209 ..........239 ....257,263 ..........239 .......209 .......254 130 ....257,263 181 177 175 ....132,225 ..........214 186 ....169,225 173 ..........265 Sexton, Joe ........ 144,145,150,155 263 Shaffer, Frank .............. Shanley, John ....... Shapiro, Alan ........ Shapiro, Julie ........ Shapiro, Lori ............. Shearman, Robert ....... Shepard, Scott ............. Sheppard, Billy ............ Sheppard, Melinda ....... Sherrod, Terre .......... Sherry, Jeffrey S ....... Shevrin, Dave .............. Shields, Steven R ......... 169 .......209 .......239 155 .......209 .......21O 169 ....112,113 ....181,254 254 263 144 225 Silverstein, Lori ........... ....... 2 10 Silverstein, Mary ......... ....... 2 10 Simensky, Glenn ........ ....... 2 61 Simmons, Kent C. ...... ....... 2 65 Simon, David S ........ Simon, Margo ....... Simons, Robert ................ 265 181 173,210 Simpson, Leah ................. 181,225 Singer, Mark A. ....... ........... 2 10 Singh, Jay ............. .............. 2 54 Single, Tom ........................... 225 Sinoway, Tricia A. .... 149,158,210 Sirmans, Susan ................ 181,239 Sjoblom, Richard J. Jr ........... 265 Skelos, Penny ........................ 210 Sklar, Howard ............ ....... 1 69 Slaughter, Michael ...... ....... 2 54 Slove, Small, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Karen .......................... 181 Gail ............................. 177 Ben ....................... 149,173 Clark ....... 110,111,169,214 Craig E. ...................... 264 David A. ........ 112,113,225 Debbie ..... 136,145,158,183 264 Dennis R. ..... . Smith, Jeffrey S. ...... . Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith Kathy ............. Laura Susan.. Lisa B. .......... . Michael G ...... Neil ................ Pam .............. 262 .. ....... 254 210 210 108,169 116 Socolow, Dave ....................... 169 Sokoloff, Bruce Howard ........ 149 Solem, Jeff ............................. 112 Soloff, Peter ........................... 173 Solomon, Amy ............. 132,177 Solomon, David ........... Solomon, Julie ................. 106,107 181,239 Solomon, Lauren M ............... 264 Solomon, Pat .............. 114 Solomon, Ricky ..................... 171 Somerville, Rosalyn ............... 239 Sonin, Amy ........................ 21,181 229 Sophomores ............ Sorenson, Susan ......... Southard, Steve D. ..... . 177 264 Spagnoli, Jan Laun .......... 263 Sparkman, Thomas K. Speakers ........................ .......54 Speigelman, Michelle ............. 181 Speir, Tom ............................. 173 Spencer, Diana ........... Spinelli, Sheryl ......... Spitznagel, Paul ....... Spivak, Noah ........... Spector, David M. ..... . 141 179 171 210 ........263 Speiser, Bruce ........ ........... 2 64 Spencer, Diana ........ ....... 8 0,210 Spenger, Debbie ......... Sperber, Deborah ....... 179 210 Sperry, Misty ......................... 183 Spielvogel, Brett ............. .257,263 175 Splatt, lra ................. ........... Spoke .................. Sports ............... Spoto, Vince ............... 155 104 175 Spring Calendar ....................... 20 Springer, Donna Lynn ........... 149 Springer, John ....................... 169 Stack, Teresa Mary ............... 210 Stack, Theresa ...................... 183 Stamitoles, Charles E. ........... 263 Stamm, Michael ..................... 211 Standard, Cheryl ........ Stanfill, Susan C. ....... . .......80 ........254 Stanley, Laurie .............,......... 181 Stanley, Melanie .................... Stark, Michelle ................. 136 173,179 Starling, Kenneth E. Jr. ......... 264 Stathan, George .................... 140 Statland, Stu .......................... 173 Staven, Kurt ............. 106,107,239 Stechishin, Mallory A. ........... 263 Steele, Stacye S ............... 183,211 Stein, Debbie ......................... 181 Stein, Joanne ......................... 181 Steinberg, Jamie .................... 181 Steinberg, Rick ........... 27,108,173 Steine, Marty ......................... 175 Steinman, Jamie .................... 173 Steinthal, Mary Jane .............. 181 Steele, Stacye ........................ 139 Stephan, Peter A. ........... . Stephens, Vicki ....... ..... Smith, Rosemary ........ ....... 2 10 Smith, Tricia ............ ....... 1 79 Smoller, David ......... ....... 2 39 Snedeker, Scott ....... ....... 2 54 Snow Biz .............. ...... 8 4 Snow, Linda ....... . ....... 225 Snyder, Lisa ................ ....... 177 Sobel, Robert L. .................... 263 Soberman, Stuart L. .............. 254 Soccer ................................... 112 Society for Collegiate Journalists ............................. 155 Sterner, Stevens, Stevens, Stevens, Stewart, Stewart, Stewart, Michael I .... Stievater, Lisa J. ..... . Susan ......... Carol ............ Chandra ....... Vickie ........ .. Celia ...... Leslie ................. Stiller, Tandy ....... Stitt, Tom ......... Stone, Cindy ........ Stone, David ........ 143,239 143 144 157 134 116 177,239 139,225 263 177,240 155,211 140 ........265 Student Activities Fair 240 262 171 Stone, Johnny ................. 112,113 Storkenstein, Dave ................ 175 Stoumen, Larry .......... ........ 1 73 St. Pierre, Valerie ................. 263 Stratford, Michael E. ............. 263 Strayer, Tim ....... 152,153,175,240 Strickland, Susan ..... Strickler, Lewis ........ Strong, Willie ........ Strott, Peter ...........,. Stuart, Beth ....,........ Stuart, Robinette ..... Stubbs, Mary ........... Stubenbord, Beth .... 145,255 136 134,143 ........157,211 ........240 ........211 181 Student Government Association ........... 156 Student Legal Services .......r.... 74 ' 143 Stull, Bill .................. Stumvoll, Erica,R. ..... 167,181,211 173 Subin, Herb .........,... Sudit, Isaac .............. Sudit, Nili ................. Sugerman, Steven A Sullivan, David ..,,..... Sultzer, Dawn .......... Sumertime and the Missing ........,............ Sunderland, Quentin Sundheim, Sara ....... Sutton, Daivd,R. ..... . 240 240 225 ........141,261 People Are 226 181 211 211 Suerig, Katherine Ann ........... Sverdlik, Barbara Susan.. Swartz, Anne Flora . Swartz, Debbie ........ Sweeting, Larry A .... Swell, Risa .......,,.,.... Swimming ................ Swinton, Barbra ....... Swords, Edwin l. III. Syme, Jane .............. Szabo, Suzanne ....... 141,211 149 181 .,......183,240 114,115 240 .......211 .......179 Taft, Robert Michael ........ 261,262 Taggett, Becky ........ 114 Takamoto, Richard .......... 143,171 211 Takeshian, Azita .................... Tancsinec, Maryann I. .......... , 211 211 Tanel, Ronn ....,...................... 211 Tarlow, Ruth .......................... Tarver, Helen ....... Tatarsky, Sandy ...... Taufiq, Asif ........... 263 Tawil, Nabil ........ 179,240 181 261 265 Taylor Bam .......... .............. 1 57 Taylor Colette ................ 153,240 Taylor Hamish ....,.... 112,113,259 Taylor, John B ....................... 264 Taylor Kathy ,.................... .... 1 81 Taylor, Kyle W. .......,... ....... 2 62 Taylor, Martha Fay ................ 240 Taylor, Monica ........,............. 226 Teltsher, Linda ................,..... 181 Teplitzky, Jeff ....... ........ 1 69,240 Tepper, Ken ..... Teres, Alese .......... Terr, Sharon ............ Terrell, Douglas L .... Terry, Deborah ........ The Depot ............... 108 181 179 240 106,107 ........224,233 The M.B.A. Program at Emory78 The 21-No! Rally ...... 228 Theofilosm, Charles Stephen 149 There's No Place Like Home .................................. Thierry, David ....................... 26,27 240 This is College? ......... ........ 2 1 Thoburn, Kelly .............. ...... 1 79 Thomas, Katherine ................ 181 Thomasson, Jim ........ ......... 2 26 Thompson, Amy .......1....1..,.... 211 Thompson, Errington Casdale ..............1.. 156,158,211 262 Thompson, Geoffrey A .......... Thomson, Alan ...................... Threlkeld, Robert Charles ..... 259 211 Thurston, William A. ............. 158 Tieman, Hope ..,.................,... 181 Tiernay, Bruce ....... ............ 2 11 Tigges, Stefan ........ ...... 1 10,111 Tilcman, Steve ....... ......... 1 75 Tishler, Steven ....... ......... 2 40 Tison, Ty ............... ...... 1 71 Tjepkema, Sonya ....... ......... 2 40 Tobin, Kathy ................,.,......... 14 Tobkes, Andrew Ivan ............ 240 Tolbert, Christene .......,......... 255 Tolmie, Paul N ....................... 264 Tomalin, Anne .......... 139,144,240 Tomasik, Coleen ................... 179 Tomback, Roniv ,... Tookes, Darryl ...... 157 ,........156 Topping, Leigh ................. 177,240 Tornay, Stephen S. ..........,.... 264 Torosick, Heidi .....,.... ...... 1 77 Toubin, Mark ......................... 138 Tourial, Samuel E. ................. 264 Towers, Randy .......... ......... 171 Townes, Tricia ................, 143,255 Town Hall Meeting ............. 24,25 To Your Honor ,.,...... ........... 9 4 Trachtenberg, Nina ............... 226 Track and Field ......... ...... 1 18 Traub, Kenny ........................ 212 Trauffer, Lewis ........,............. 119 Trebilcock, Peggy J . .............. 265 Trevathan, Brad .................... 226 Trousdale, Roma ........ 70,143,212 Tsi, Michael Meng-Chiao ....... 263 Tucci, Karen .......................... 212 Tucker, Maryann ................... 144 Tudoran, Daniela ....... ......... 255 Tupler, Dave .......... ...... 1 69 Turik, Scott Alan .,...,............. 262 Turinsky, Leslie .,............. 181,255 Turner, Gay ........... ......... 1 77 Turner, Joy ......... .........212 Weems, John R. .............,...... 265 Weill, Steve .......................t.... 169 Weimer, Louis H. .... . Weinberg, Andrea Weinberger, Mark Vasquez, Nancy ...............,..., 179 Vaughn, Douglas W. ............. 263 Vaughn, Michael E. ..... ...... 2 65 Vaughn, Rick ....,....... ..,... 1 73 Verdery, Catherine ................ 148 Vickery, Randy ...........,.... 138,173 Viera, Romy ...............,..... 145,240 Vigodsky, Holly ....... 152,153,167, 177,226 Vigrass, Bill .......,. ............. 2 55 Vijay, Sandee ......... ....... 1 77,212 Vincent, Tony ........ .......... 2 40 Vinson, Leah ...... ...... 1 45 Virginia, Craig ....,,.. ...... 1 75 Volcheck, Kris A. ..... ,..... 2 64 Volgavec, Ingrid ..................... 179 Vollenweizder, Julie.. Vollmer, Richard H... Volmer, Volunteer Emory ...... ......... Vroon, Bryan ...,..... 137 157 106,107 Mark ........... ...... Wachob, Richard J ....... ...... 2 26 Waddell, Jennifer .,.... ...... 1 79 Waging Peace .............. ...... 1 57 Wagner, Elizabeth ................. Wakasugi, Candace M. ....,... . 181 262 Wakstein, Andy ............... 119,212 Wald, Erica ............................ 177 Waldorff, Eric .............. ...... 1 69 Walin, Johny ...............,,......... 175 Walker, Amelie Wynne ,......... 212 Walker, Ann ............. 143,183,240 ' 212 Walker, Barri ......................... Walker, Bruce F. ..,................ 130 Walker, David .............. ...... 1 71 Walker, Elizabeth D. ............. 212 Walker, Lalla ......................... 179 Walker, Margaret .................. 179 Walker, Parthy J. IP.J.l...145,255 Walker, Tami ....,......,............. 139 144,149,212 179 173 Weineek, Becky ....,................ 181 Weiner, Adina ........................ 181 Weiner, Ian Mark ..... 149,158,176 Weiner, Robert J. .................. 212 Weinman, Rebecca C. ........... 264 Weinstein, Jeff ....................... 169 Weinstock, Rachel ....... ....... 1 81 Weiser, Dave ............ ....... 1 75 Weiss, Robert ........... ....... 1 14 Weisbrot, Bruce S. ...... ....... 2 62 Weisinger, Janet ...........,........ 181 Weisman, Bonnie ............. 181,212 Weisman, Marc L. ................. 264 Weiss, Pam .........,..... .,,.... 1 77 Weiss, Rob ..,............ ....... 1 10 Weiss, Rory Alan ......... ....... 2 62 Weiss, Terry R. .....,. ....... 2 12 Weissman, Jeffrey ....... ....... 2 65 Weissman, Seth ....... ....... 1 69 Wekel, Joerg ........ ....... 2 26 Welch, Margaret ...... ....... 1 83 Wells, Judy ........... ....... 1 41 Wells, Sara ........ ....... 1 79 Welsh, Ellene ........ ....... 1 83 Wen, Ju-Hein ........ ....... 2 15 Wer, Ju-Hsin ..........,.............. 179 Werft, Christine L. .......... 183,215 Werner, David ....................... 140 Weslowski, Chuck ................. 143 Wesowlowski, Charles ........... 155 West, John ....,....................... 143 West, Litia ............,...,...,........ 255 Westem1ann, Patti ........... 181,240 108 Westie, Phil ............................ Whaley, Carole ...................... Whatcott, Stephen Whearry, Sherryl ................... R. ........... . 179 264 261 When Leaves Turn Brown ...... 38 Whiffs, Dave .......................... Turner, Lisa ........ ...... 1 34,255 Twitty, Frank ......... ......,.. 1 42 Tyler, Sally ...,.....,... ...... 1 37 Tyrones, Dennis ....... ...... 2 12 Ubillos, Scott ......................... 255 Uchai, Norasit ......,................ 261 Underkofler, Robert J. Jr. .... . University Center Board ....... Upshaw, James Andrew ........ 156 255 Vallette, Joe ..................... 143,171 Van Galder, Thomas L .......... 265 Vanlandingham, Beth VanOrden, Bob ............ ....,. Van. Roekens, Lori ........ ...... Vasiloff, Jimi ............. 212 171 255 171 Wall, Constance A. .. Wallace, Beth ........... Wallace, Myles ....... Wallach, Steve ....... Walls, Kevin W. ....... . Walters, Karrie ......... Walters, Fritz P. ...... . 42,44 114 169 ..........262 ,,.....179,255 .......149,212 149 Walters, Mayola Cecilia ......... Waltzer, Adam ......... Wan, Veronica A ...... Warech, Seth ......,..... Warner, Sandra M .... Warshaw, Evelyn ...... Washburn, Laurie Anne ........ Washington, Joseph G. ........ . 169 255 171 255 l:iii:l:liiii..48 149 265 Wasserman, Jim ......... 14,137,156 Wasserman, Nancy .. Waters,Mickey ........,. Waters, Mitchell Augustus .... Waters, Paul Keith Watkins, Porter ........ Watkins, Richard A. Watsky, Mitchell ,...... Watson, Jane ............ Watts, Heidemarie .... Weaks, Mary ............ Weaver, Karen ......... Weaver, Tom ............ Webber, Caroline M. Weber, Carolyn ........ Webster, Karen ....,... Weeks, Laura ........ 171 212 263 212 265 212 141,212 .......183,212 179 130 146 183 183 183 Whistler, Ann ........................ White, Cathy ......................... 264 White, Frank H. III ................ 265 White, Minnie ...............,........ White, White, White, White, White, Patton .....,..... 226 136,142,215 Powell .....,................... 183 Randall Francis .......... 149 Sandra .........,. Sandra Ann... 215 240 White, Scott M. ............... 106,107 White, Winnie ....,................... 179 Whiteman, Rex Allen ............. 263 Who's Who ............................ 158 Wichman, Doug ............... 119,226 Wickstrom, Liz ................ 173,183 Wiencek, Becky ,........,........... 255 Wilber, Martha Mary ............. 130 Wilbourn, Cathryn ........... 183,226 Wilcov, Beth .......................... 181 Wilcox, Ronald C. ....... ....... 2 63 Wilde, Mark Irwin ........ ....... 2 62 Wilder, Edwin .......... ....... 2 40 Wilkenson, Kelly ...... .......... 1 50 Wilkerson, Alice .................... 215 Wilkins, Wes ......... . Wilkinson, Craig ...... Wilkinson, Kelly ........ Williams, Carl F. Ill... Williams, David R. Williams, Donald ....... Williams, Larry Allen .......171,241 ....,.....110 ...... .215 106,107,175 287 Williams, Williams, Williams, Williams, Williams, Marlette ..... 145,183,241 Melissa Nina ..... 179,226 Noel ........................ 255 Ritchie ..........,......... 171 Sherrie ...........,.. 173,177 Williamson, Carolyn ........ 181,241 Willis, Leanne ........................ 241 Wilmont, Chip ,................ 150,175 Wilson, Alice .................... 141,226 Wilson, Barbara Ann 148,181,241 Wilson, Cherie ....................... 177 Wilson, Jeanne ...................... 179 Wilson, Leanne ......... ....... 1 79 Wilson, Lynne ....... ......,...... 2 15 Wilson, Nicole ...... ..,..,. 1 81,255 Wilson, R Wimmer, andy ...... .......... 1 75 Linda ...................... 144 Winch, Steve ......................... 171 Wingate, Jeff ....,........ Winokur, Doug .......... Winter, Marvin R. ..... . Winter, Steve ............ Wipple, David Jr ....... Wirth, Morris A. ...... . Wiseman, Larry ......... Wisnieff, Tom ............ 106,107,171 169,215 263 173 .......171 ..........215 ....,.......215 ............110 Witherow, Jimmie,David ....... 215 Wobeck, Bruce ...................... 173 Wohlleben, Karen ............ 183,241 175 Wolitz, Jay ............ .......... Wolf, Mike ................... ....... 1 69 Wolff, Carol M ....................... 264 Women's Rugby Club ............ 116 Wood, Brian .......................... 173 Wood, Max Sidney 264 Wood, Woody ............. ....... 1 13 Woods, Bryan ........... Woodyvard, Lois J. 171 .. ....... 215 Woski, Stephen ...........,......... 255 Wrenn, Missy ......, ....... 1 77,255 Wright, Jack ...........,.............. 142 Wright, Max ....................,..... 113 Wygodski, Charlene Wynn, Bruce ......... O. ......... 264 ..........136,142 Yancey, Stephanie ........... 143,241 Yancy, Karen ......... Yandow, W. Chris ........... 119,241 Yarnoff, Denise Renee ......,.... 215 Yasman, Jeffrey M. ............... 263 Year in Review ............ ......... 6 0 Yen, Chung-Kwan ................. 262 Yerman, Bill ....................... 24,169 Yohe, Kris ............ .......... 1 81 Young, Bob' P. ..... . 175 Young, Eddie .....,...,............... 143 Young, Kate ............................ 74 Young, Shan ...... 148,149,156,158, 163,215 Youngentob, Stuart ............,.. 130 Younglove, Melody ......,......... 181 Yowell, Susan K. .....,... ....... 1 49 Yungert, Deborah ........ ......... 7 4 Zabriskie, Allison ................... 255 Zachmann, Kenneth L ........... 264 Zalanoff, Dan ......................... 114 Zale, Scott H. ........................ 255 Zamost, Barbara ....... 131,155,215 Zaremby, Fred ................. 229,241 Zatlin, Andrew Evan .,............ 255 288 Zazulia, Glenn A ......... Zefft, Nancy ................... Zeiler, Tom .................... Zeimer, Penny Benson .. Zevine, Debbie ..,............ Zierav, Christina ............ Zila, Gail .................. Zinney, William B. ..... . Zinn, Natalie .................. Zitta, Sara ........,............. Zone, Douglas Davidson Zuckerman, Linda .,....... Zulian, David ......... Zylanoff, Dan ........ Hygfl, , . -ni, I a,1 4-,xv L guy -.V ., ff fl. .,,. f - MJT, Ti' TTU?-1 5 44 34- s. I J fi- 1-, .-- f 1 vI""-"E, , Smyrna Hospital... A Distinct Difference Smyrna Hospital is located in beautiful Cobb County, only 20 minutes from dovvn town Atlanta. Unique in its personal approach to health care, the hospital also provides the latest in technology tncludrng one of the most modern emergency centers rn the metropolltan Atlanta area 3949 South Cobb Drive Smyrna Georgia 30081 14045 434 0710 A Seventh day Adventist Medical Institution Dedicated to Excellence in Health Care 3321 IOHN H HARLAND COMPANY LENOX RD NORTHSIDE PARKWAY POST OFFICE BOX 105250 ATLANTA GEORGIA 30348 AT WEST PACES FERRY RD We re your dealer for LEVOLOR Blinds ds Gy BMO wutxgtgfa BW35 W-. Cndx-ezoxof 4 f""+Q D-Y P IA obo I VENHIAN BLIND SERVICE C0 IN Fulton Supply Company lndustrialSupplies Equipment Machinery Atlanta Georgia 1712 Third Ave 105 Enterprise Ave C Columbus Ga Carrollton Ga 1 1 1 ' I I I . I , 1' , Q 1 1 bv v ' ' ' 4 I gr-A" Aviv ' , , by 1. ua.,-nr .. -A V 1' it ' it rt . M. l 1' gil A ' - ' . a ' , . rf'-"'nz f 1, M..r-malut-ima. T4 . iozhum. rom lltllrmllvauvctt-rain., -ImynL..oloc . ISnclwlulllmoclullwrnduwnqqunn ' at ulow proluuunulruuamr I urn, V. Wo handle npcnn and zlmmnq lllllltnllll illllllh Al.n,n.,a.l'l1 I . I I n.-rr-I -:ua an rwa - - 290fAds Q9 QQQRQQESQ A tlanta Classzc Cars 'lf' Iszc nd amralot Inn CINCINNATI S RESTAURANT 84 LOUNGE 999999 1706 Clarrmont Road Decatur Georgia 30033 l404I 644 JJII 2951313 296 I377 QQ QQ Q The Lofus Garden Chinese Restaurant Best Chmese Food an Town Closed Mondays :ues Fr: II30 nm 1030 p.m Sat B Sun 2pm l0'30pm Bt ln fab 0w 321 5262 soar some Hoy NL WIA Qs' Q'39 Sheraton Emor Inn lCourtesy Van Servrce to nearby snopplng Emory Un versrty and Emory Hospltal lNewly Ftedecoraled Guest Rooms llvleet ng Rooms I RESTAURANT 8, LOUNGE 1641 Clifton Road Atlanta, Georgia 30329 404 633 4111 T F Q - Ig x 1 Q9 ' ' 5 Seco to None I I I ' . Q . ......'-"'f1.:.',.-.. I -' ' I - Q Q I Ty ill!! Q---F--' I ,..aqLnl1lunl 4- x3 f44?" .2"- H. I ConsistoneyOQuoIily0Ta:to . v - ' n - n WHITE Er.EcrmcAL Consrnu C . 0' 1730 CH UAHOOCHEE A , , O - , W , 4 A i i 9 "A taste ol elegance lor the Emory Comrnumtyu i A , I i I Adsf291 NGRA TULATIONS 8m C0 WISHES BEST FROM FOR TH ING C x I9844 SIOTIO0 N 355 3980 E FUTURE PO BO ie.f4O-ij T 5IOVon Heusen Blvd ,N W I AIlonIo,Georqro 30325, Area Con H CAS U HOUSE MOVERS I GEonGrA's oI.DEsT AND LARGES O 00 orsrnrauron os runs AND cnounos MAINTENANCEEQUIPMENT, IRRIGATION AND SUPPLIES FOR ANSLER GOLF COURSES 0 CEMETERIES SCHOOLS 0 PARKS 0 LANDSCAPES 0 INDUSTRY W N 8I T U R F I N C. ONYERS, GEORGIA as-4143 AL Presrden I 4041766 1453 0700 40 41768 3455 Emprre Boulevard Atlanta Georgra 30354 Buy Sell Move UE HOMES GIN ANTIQ LIZIN SPECIA WW . NBULATION IIIB, NC. QCO I SUVICI INNIS ON OF NATIXNA O BOX 252 0301 NVISI P . ANTA. GEORGIA S I I INF BATSCN COOK COMPANY IN AILANIA 8oIson-Cook Company 6666 Powers Ferry Road N W Surle 300 AIICIOIO Ge-orgro 30339 4041 955 1051 11104114 uuldrrrrrfrny proplr lurzrlrnq lIL1lflflllQA fmuay burlf urzln H0 OURUF HA HOOL R D ATL mplzments of C0 . A1 ' . 1 -IQ-l!L.. ATLANTA oeoncun 'I ' my I SI. NW 680 Founeenth AIIanta, Georgia 30318 404-892-1688 X LENC ' I ' c 4004 ' I QR S If .QA ci. 4 ' L? 0f ' . I . I , ' 1 ,I WQ fr A 'I O I IN AILANIA, oronom H0 fAnIrIrrISIRAII0N BUILDING RE BILIIAIION CENIER,If RY SC or LAN IHUIIY LIB ARI ron AUVANCIII sru IES 292 fAds RICHARDS' CUSTOM AUTO AINTING AND BODY REPAIR 873-4071 Even perfecnonrsts have conhoence rn our mehculous care We're an Arlama Iradmon to owners ot Mercedes. Rolls Royce, BMW. Jag- uar and other luxury cars Over 5,000 sans- heo cusromers durmg the past 13 years. The One Stop Shop for Your Photographic Supplies 3408 Clanrmont Road N E PlllIfIllI'3DlliI2S,lIlll. 2321 Cheshire Bridge Rd., Atlanta GA 30324 325-7676 N Lanler Ramada Inn Central Th J clcnko System' Droducts Drograms Deoplc designed to serve the dental profess on and craft ln the tradition of excellence you have come to expect from Jelenko l l l , ! -Y 4 'E I ' r 8' , n .W 7 J . . , I i I .1 , , ' 5, i lv I' I , l - - 'X 1 ,.. , O I l - E lUEmwu.TJELENKD , I mmm Hmm pnooums 'MA 'N RIISINYNS PAR! URW! ARMUNK NY lUfrO4 USA 0- , ' l I I I , 1 . A . -,wx -.Q'9:' I ' 1 xr .5 A Q, 999' ur, A - r' I 3025 ruirl lli -a ., ' ' All.n1l.n, G:-nrgin Plmnv '52I 5677 HAL R 294fAds SINCE 1955 DHAPEHY SPECIALISTS WINDOW COVERINGS OF ALL KINDS S 9 rv 1 UQ Today S SERVING ENTIRE METRO AREA FOR INFORMATION CALL Health Care Industry SHARIAN INC Decal C Rug And Carpet Cleannng O mental Rugs 404 373 2274 N D ll Rd 30320 I INSTANT il?.,,t,,., RESEARCH CF-IYOGENIC WELDING GASES EQUIPMENT SUPPLIES PYE wmmmc surru' ooamemr 871Wheele Street NW Atlanta Georga 30318 ROGER LUMSDEN WELDING 875 7561 DDU 'S ara-4a2a 6-S 'eil-Wax DEKALB SERVICE CENTER INC 527 E COLLEGE AVE DECATUR GA 30330 SPECIALIZING IN VOLKSWAGEN REPAIRS G REBUILDING ALL WOFIK GUARANTEED JOHN W BLALOCK AAMCO LICENSED DEALER World Q L IIULSI Transrnrssron Specialists 223 I Ponce De Leon Decatur Georgxa 30030 1404, 377 5577 fi JOperatIonaI SSCUYITY Systems lI'IC 1231 DCollIer Rd N W Atlanta GA 30318 C4045 352 OO25 I fnxcxsolws :Nc 1 ISTABI IJHII I AILKNIA NEW YORK 2290 MARIETTA BOULEVARD N ATLANTA GEORGIA 30318 CARY I. DICKSON 494 352 3113 Y TlI'I INJEATIIGJINWVHEJE wmoow cLunIuo co Inc IDNLIDDELLDII N E e ATLANTA GA 30324 Sfalalloklaeoaaculdllzuldadal Win-looeleaadsg HY BOYAR PHONE 14041 8731901 CHEMICAL M Nou TRIES DIVISION or NATIONAL srnvrcz INDUSTRIES ma. P D BOX 413105 ATLANTA GA 30335 PHONE 325 833I Icl l Ilerol ld I L11 BUITU' em BRIAR VISTA SHOPPING CENTER ATLANTA GEORGIA 30329 Charles 8 Margaret bdwyers File Insurance Qnrporolion DECATUR BRANCH OFFICE SUITE 100 I -I zoo SWANTON wAv I L DECATUR GEORGIA 30030 AREA CODE 4011373 3378 41" Compllments of a Frlend GLADNEY 81 HEMRICK P C CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 2250 N DRUID HILLS ROAD N E SUITE 228 ATLANTA GA 30029 ATLANTA 81 MCDONOUGH HUNGRY HOWIE S PlZZA8r SUB S DINE ouT . CARRY ouT . DELIVERY CLARKSTON VILLAGE COMPLEX INDRTH INDIAN CREEK DR 1 LIMITED DELIVERY AREA MON THRU I1A.M 12 MID FRIGSAT 11A.M ISOAM SUNDAY 4 PM 12 MID aI1tOIl.R'eSS INCORPORATED CommercIaI PrInt1ng Quuck Pnnt Publlcahons Computer SBFVICBS Since 1900 I404I 267 2596 Monroe, GEOFQI8 30655 Met Atlanta 523 2264 , R l ' , . , I I Q r , . ,- , I n PR C .. , ' ' ,' I A - - A L- .. ...H ' f. , . - 1 Y , ' jx ',1.,"i PRINTERS - LITHOCRAPHERS - ENCILAVERS , . , .W, C . ' 'T .'1.L " UT I -N- RI . . I. c ' I .' . o S rg, . , . , . 5 l DEF? FIA IOII Su I0 "if I' 1 If 'I - Adsf295 55 T1ppetT ond ASSOCIOTGS fAfCl'1I19CTS 14Ul WEST FALL PLRFJY HOAO NW ATLANTA LJEUFIGIA 30427 4114! 61 7921 TRAYCO INC. PLUMBING SPECIALTIES bl O .ISU EI-me Av 2950.3 SERVICE QUALIYY mI:I.IIu nmut ,,,,, "1.1:.'::a,::" Ifmnf and Iol:l3s1:tPl " um- Ix-an an 71 sruuu nnnr crmru CHAN!! 4 CONVENIENV LUCA TIONS SUIIY SIIVICI DIN! I IME! IUCN C LLITMII Dlhfllili IIDVNUDS UUIQIV SIIVII I Iiun lull l IHI1 IH!! IIIILLDOV IYIIS IIDXQ GOIN! ALYIIAIQIS 1? METRO REFRIGERATION SUPPLY INC WHOLESALE ONLY 992 0190 992 5389 998 8362 nas- eq us-In un.-n uc un, mg. our C 0. Nl Clllllll 1 noun-nlq lu I dill! 3901 Green lndustnal Way Chamblee CA 30341 Phone 14941 45a 9514 AI! Condmomng 0 Refngerahon OVERTON GOODWIN 96 DENTAL LABORATORY 3231 ACAINS HILL PLACE N W I BOX NO 12332 0 ATLANT PHONE 261-4896 VERNON OVERTON C D T Inc ' Heatrng 0 Accessones flfmfa oilcavraitoxf' nov1 A GA 30305 DOVER ELEVATCR COMPANYISUBSIDIARY or oovea compo P 0 ebx 2177 MVMPHIS m amm RATION ME MCSSIBDIC Congregauon Frrday Sabbath Servrce at 8 00 p m Tuesday Buble Studues at 7 30 p m 4763 Buford Hwy Surte 107 Atlanta Georgua 30341 Robert Israel Solomon 14041455 7417 SpIrItua1 Leader ATLANTA PROSTHETICS INC 555 Ralph MCGIII Huuluvurd Atlanta Georg u 30.712 522 7955 14041 524 4822 H GRANT RICE CP Sem rerary Treasurer Member of Amer C.Jr1OrlIurcs Ind Prutrml ts Alun 1 Best Wrshes FREEMAN 8: HAWKINS JOHN VILECE D D C General Dentlstry I2 EXECUTIVE PA Lf E N ATLANTA GEL A O" 6331853 H G Pmes Drck DIrksen DARNELL S 76 SERVICE Mechamcal and TransmIssIon RepaIrs 2154 BrIarcIIff Rd N E 636 9611 Atlanta Georgua 30329 99" RINGSG 3931 A 1 A DRXIXLES NC R119 668 11th St N W 875 9305 - 1 - K N I - I I Pr: nrIt,I B...- FLOH' ' buurrt C 11.11 In.. ' 1 5 f ' ' A 2 f' , xnxx f . I- L., XX 1 -Nil I- I' . 1 I A ' I - ' Z - 7 : 1 alumni- ' :vu I . . , , u u u s . I I I-I I .lm II....II u rr-I 1 wr tunln I UluuIrqnIrn nu urn: I fu-mv 1 I 11:-N11 lil I N IU. I.. I ' K . . . . . , . K shBellevenGFfknds P Bzfrtvv , uw guna., urn! Huw lzlkuaunl il is f1.v'I !1lzll1'urI I ' lu dually' lugzlgzi UI unilqcxvcxwx- V71-11111 '44 ' , r - ' 1 I 1 . ' 1 1.1 Inn '- .. "THANKS F011 Y"'1R SUPPURIH ,. FW . N , ' .J -25 - Y ' 'F I . - - - - - - - 296 mas JIfI6fTallQalfld 9 fgall Next to M 1834 Johnson Happy Hour oonshadow 872 7993 Rd 27 f"EQ MC S' Q 4. Val.. FTW Ra FRI? ATL OPC1' IUNS IWW ' VWRLR "IDF DICK TIMMONS llll LAVISTA IOAD N I ATLANTA GIOIGIA IIC 'llll 404 034 4051 owef stpthovr, 1411 I Jil IJ M113 rgad ll lla 0 II lull l404I 634 4477 ZF in Illl Pyng Ho Restaurant 'A' Cocktall i' Luncheon t Dlnner 'A' Banquet t Take Out IDanleIJ Dah Yeou Jou 13,17 Clalrmont Rd Presldenl Decatur Ga 30033 Towlng R oad SEIVICC Gun Burns Servlce Statlon complete automotlve SCFVICC 'Iv 1605 North Decatur Rd ak Y! Atlanta Ga 30307 N! H K Vlckery TTI I Owner bus phone 14043 378 5481 HALL NORRIS 8: MARSH INC ARCHITECTS 3 RHODES CENTER NORTH 0 875 7982 ATLANTA GEORGIA 30309 Technical NORBERT D THOMPSON Products, Inc 4 30035 Ph I404I9BI84,iI 'FM snvms LWHKINSON mc ARCHIIECIURI ENGINEERING INTERIOR DESIGN IO0 I E NL HIRII SI! EEI NVN XII NNIA GIOI I IA 30043 OHOI IIIII HUNE -104 527 882-IH Compliments JOHNSON 8: HIGGINS I7TH FLOOR 25 PAR TRUST COMF-'ANV OI- GEORGIA TOWER KPLACL Nh PO BOXIII ATLANTA GA 3037! ORB REFRIGERATION 676 Highland Ave N E. ATLANTA GA 30312 BILLY Jos ADAMS R WESLEY RED SnEl.1oN AVOlld3IL Bodv Shop CO PHONE 373 2747 MFLETE AUTO REPAIR AND PA NT PHONE 373 NTD Emory Standard l57O N DECATUR ROAD ATLANTA CA IIITI MECHANIC ON DUTY ROAD SERVICE 2753 COLLEGE AVE DECATUR GEOR A - - - I 9 O u ll w Ji, ,V I IJII l . lglllrglll J' ffl! tlIIllA .lr lllrru lm l ll -FN2 I 'QL' , qw.- 7 . I ' RTT' f' , 5' . ' nl- L 1,7 J I .147 x 51' ' . x - ' ,v i .., . l. , I , . .!'Lo ' . . 'gli N 4" - - - TJK 1- .' - ' ' , '- s 'f ' 0 , ' f'S, 1, ' 0 :.' H . .L jx .X I xc X. .4-I T ' 1 o JV. Sq:-E Q ' 1 ' aw A n a I 1. . I -I -it . 2 RT TNI: I l,lt'5lLI1'IlI A ' f Y Q . ' 2502 ,.lllIr.u CKILITI Dvl.lIur,G.'or5l.a f UIIU 1 'A , I V Q ' I of .. . I I . - I ' , I l I ,r Adsf297 Comphments of PHONE 766 8931 WAYNE E LEACH SAND 81 GRAVEL INC SAND GRAVEL MASONRY PRODUCTS SPECIALIZING IN 410 LEE S MILL RD LARGE OR SMALL ORDERS COLLEGE PARK GA 30349 19110 linux' Elmzxritnuztng 3823 No Druld Hulls Road N E Decatur Georgra 30033 1290 Colller Road N W Atlanta, Georgla 30318 I404l 352 3791 I800l 282 2368 Owners JIMMY 8. SANDY WHEELER 325 8197 Blll Sanford 0 fs Fl RENT ALL mc 4 A N I 7 41 f 57 ao Decatur Georgla 30033 bus 14045633 4571 IlIIcKenney's 'Q'-CQ'-'-I SM lhC Mechanlcal Contractors I 85 Monroe Dr Commerclal 8. Industrlal HB0 AND ESPN FREE To GUEST EMORY UNIVERSITY 5 MILES Energy Management 0 Service P DQHNIQWN 3 M11-55 W-UMA Plombrng o Heallng a Ventllatlng o Arr Condltnonlng :SWA LENOX SQUARE 3 MILES 1056 Moreland lndustrual Boulevard TI 1941+ PIEDMONT CIRCLE N I: Atlanta oeorgla 30316 3296 14010 875 3571 44041 622 5963 Waste Systems BROWNINGFERRLS INDUSTRIES JIM RED HOGGATT Vnce President 920 Marretta Blvd , N W Atlanta, Ga. 30318114041 792-2660 FEATURES THE GREENERY RESTAURANT LOUNGE PARLORS 253 ROOMS MTGS T0 200 Mellon Stuart Company Contractrng Engrneers Constructron Managers 1835 South Cobb lndustraal Boulevard Sulte 101 Smyrna Georgua 30080 Malling Address P O Box 723546 Atlanta Georgra 30339 404!434 5701 , . 0 . ' V142 I I-L 4 AW E! . 3 'V ? ' ' .m' 1! 'I R 7. 'A Qiwblg lg I 2147 North Decatur Road -43.5. l ' ' -.- A Q F N , E I ' C9 . - , . I . : I EI , P E : .-.. . ' ' ' 7 I I 1 I - I n I A A 298 Mas IlE7flfE ?lEG0LE!O77lLSTlWfH l!IElIUST7lI1iU?7,4'V7 PAIWTO QQRCWT Bn KE 2220 LAWRENCEVILLE HWY DECATUR GEORGIA 30033 633 5754 IIAJOR CREDIT OPEN ALL CARDS ACCEPTED SATURDAY Egfllaef .IJOCIUEQJ 2050- CCARROLL AVENUEOSUITE 2 P O BOX 80523 CHAMBLEE GEORGIA 30341 ll! HDRIIWDIPF 1n 2133 Roswell Rd Marlena Ga 30062 404 973 3636 1248 W Paces Ferr Rd 501 E y College Avenue Atlanta Ga 30327 DQCBU-If Ga 30030 404 2615000 404 3733301 ,LW67 CICRYMY! 34777757 GUUI' 2765 Brzfdmrzi Ave. Aumfa, gamgm 30313 696-5975 9515 IIS NEH 8 USED V E STE 373 2767 SMITH TELEVISION SERVICE 910 CHURCH ST DAN MUNDY DECATUR GA 30030 713314 PERRY CROHE A New IDEA IN LAR REPAIRS WE CALI IT CUSTOMER SATISFALTION DECATUR EXXON SERVICE CENTER 307 CLAIRMONT RL AD DECATUR CEORGIA J RALPH SKILLERN 373 0258 IJWNEH MANA IR ,573 6259 A JJ' .QI-I ICLUWB Hormng TOCOHILLSHOPPING CENTER 3025 N DRUID HILLS ROAD N E ATLANTA GEORGIA 30329 PHONE 404!32S 1288 SALLY O WOOD 'LLQ."LCl7L ffazflllfla fl'ZLC, A e ca A al HDSDIBI Assoc alo MEMBER HOSPITAL 1850 JOHNSON ROAD N E AT BRIARCLIFF INTEFISECTION ATLANTA GEORGIA 30306 PHONE 874 6393 SEEDS TYPESET 25. LrZf2e0'z. Lbcaizuz QJIZQLII 3w30 377-CD30 HAWS GARDEN LUNCH DINNER TAKE OUT SERVICE 3 I404I237 8086 2615PIEDMO'NIT no N e IL-4 ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30324 Tucker Travel, Inc 3400 OAKCLIFF RD SUITE A 3 ATLANTA GEORGIA 458 2460 'aff iF:'T' Y r. F .unrIf il lim Defalm GLASS s. MIRROR co 'I 711 IAN! I llllil I AVINIII IIIIAIIIII I IIII4l,IA ILIIIIII 378 A574 I Mefhanlcal Irzdustrws CouncIl .120 I I " - X T " -fy, fer ,jj ,LQIIL . , ., A E I 1 , .e"f,"v I , I I DAY - I G ' ' 'I ' I 'Wo Q CIIYIIIID S 'E - f 2,9 ,5 I. . Rsos 42: , If - Q f L ' " --- 'f':4.f.2'i:.'ifE Ytfiw-'.-.'.i' Li4.viti.-J-.-.-if?-105:12 . EI? 5 .I:E -I-0' III Ffa A A D I3 '4 l--'- if I . I ' cuewov Q QQ-Iyvouknplgv B ' ' Z7 C Z ' gnc. ITT fl I7 I'IIfI'1 I I I F1 . . 3 ' I l B :I - .. , . 55:5-32 if "f Q' I 'II Ar-T Li - . - I I Q 'ir -E I :T Y ' 1' C:.Iy5.I1 , 5-,Ie IL AI-.I..I., CI: JL.:-In QI Adsf299 SPREEN to I EI ' I El!!! ' ' S-' ' we DELIVER Mons THAN ' JUST A CARI Sales 0 Servnce 0 Parts Body SNOD RENTALS LEASING N USED CARS TRUCKS Parts G Service Open Saturday 458-8601 4856 BuIcrd Hwy Chamblee If Mules lnsrde I 285 9253 . 2. 5 The Women's Specialty Shop QQ' K if 'X ?9fl5fZzf1 Buckhead XX N., MAX c CANNON ar AssocrA1Es :Nc ARCHITECTS a244CmokedCr9ekRood NosclouG00l0I03009I 40414479345 RICHARDS PRINTING CO ugrulls K I II r 875 DREWRY ST N E ATLANTA 30305 W FRANK RICHARDS 873 2707 STAT! IAI INIUIANCI R A. RICHARDSON Agent Auto Lrfa Health Homeand Busrness 2099 North Decatur Road Decatur Georgra 30033 Phone Off 325 3915 or 939 3780 HEARING AIDS BATTERIES ACCESSORIES REPAIRS DEALERS LIC IS4 D DISP LIC I4 DECATUR HEARING AID SERVICE SUITE 211 235 E PONCE DE LEON AVE DECATUR GEORGIA 30030 Bus 373-9521 ROBERT H BAKER R85 627 N40 AMERICAN STANDARD PLUMBING FIXTURES R W DOWNS PLUMBING INC Repazrs Rr modelrng New lnstallatrons Com mercral Resrden tml Water Heater and Se wer Replacements Ffff Emmmes 2832 A North Decatur Rd 14041 299 3451 Dec 3 tur Georg1a 30033 Bi I 'Lg 6 LULLWATER SCHOOL Z A COURSE OF STUDY GEARED T0 YOUR CI'lII.D'S CAPABILIIIES NOT HIS AGE K Sth GRADES OPEN 7 30 6 30 Decatur Georg1a 30030 378 6643 ATLANTA PHOTO SUPPLY CO 522 4562 P O Box 1084 7 79 WALTON nun N w 7 ATLANTA CEORClA3030l 2nd Location Buckhead 237 7604 3203 Maple Drive N E Dark Room Equipment 8 Supplies Frlm Processing open 6 AM 9 PM FINE rooms Home Cook ng Servxng Breakfast Lunch Dunne: 2137 N Decatur Road Spyros Kontoes Pete Costa: des ecatur GEOYQIB 321 9556 Fulton Roofing C0 I P d d H 4237 Qv WINDOW FIX IT COMPANY INC 4748 MEMORIAL DR 292-4560 DECATUR GEORGIA 30032 1 ' 0 . - F - ' f - A a A , K I .. ' b - I4 - . 4 - U Lill rl' 1 rv' A" ,r' 4' prawns 0 , 9 - I , , . I , f I,-A. ofa W n ,- N- "7i'fEq.---. . ' 5, -L N lu . K Nc I ' , , A n ' 1 TM ' h Q 5 '. 0 N . Ii ' I f' I A ' ' 705 s. Candler st. Zi -gn., 1- .li . ' 'ii-. -Q 7 -. 'L , - Q hy- r - , . -1-+1 d O . . ' I I , 9 1 - . A D , - ' J ci- 9O7 re mont Rod ,N.E. - , I P O ox I37lf ' 1 AlIanta,Ceor5xa 30324 X5 ' I 0-If' 2-2Z9l 'VI Co'l'r1IrIrm:rr! In laalil' " 3oofAd5 If ou're about to be ' our career in ntusin , make it re arding right rom the start Emory Unis erstty Hospttal IS lookmg for nurses who vvant to make the most of the1r abllt tres Our medrcme surglcal cardtovascular and rehablhtatlon unlts offer a varlety of chal lenges As well as a vanety of rewards We value your trarnrng Your startlng salary will be competmve vuth that of any hospttal IH the area And you ll have the opportunrty for ad vancement through our Staff Nurse Levels program whrch recogntzes clmrcal evperttse We offer more than lust a salary We provlde ttutlon FCIIH bursement courtesy scholar And we offer prlmary nursmg We also have an tnnov attve scheduhng program vvhlch allovts you to work part trme weekend SlllflS and earn a very hrgh salary dtfferenttal You'll keep learmng And keep growing When you tom our staff you recetse a four vteelt course IH hospttal and umt orlentatton Whrch IS supported hy chmeal nurse speclaltsm And you ll he able to apply your trammg to a wtde range of needs at one of the natlon s most progresslve hospltals Its an excellent oppor tumty Qo call us to fmd out hov satrsfy mg and reuatdrng your neu Career tn nursrng can be Yiflepbone 40-1 329-1900 Out Slffl offlikznfa cr1llc0Hec'f 01 writ 1364 Cly'i011R0rzd VF Afmnia Geozgzrz 30322 ll! Emo Unlverstly Hospital 3 In tclms hx ltstlf -I O l 7 n u V I u V Y ' . , , . . - , wa J , 0 s ' . . vii' gy., . . Q . . . 7 , . . , ' ' 25,1 if 1 . V . v , l .A ss.x-.vm 7 - . V I . I shtps and excellent benefrts. 3 I, , V2 ,W,, ' ' e .. . 7 . . . , . 7 1- I V 7 N J A V - I L - - . . . . ' y ' v '. L L ' n I 0 .1 o l V 1 I I ' . L o . ' , 1 1 , f f f ' 0 0 I 1 I . I I ' J 0 , f, . n I - 1 ' If . I K a 1 v . n n u 4 1 I , . , . , 0 0 0 , , . t V ' W 3 L C n 1 . liquid tlpportunm Xfhnu.luw tcuon linployur 1 l J Adsf301 FP O E 476-1663 jwzsi f :nz I 'I - DENTAL LABORATORY MALLORY 8: EVANS INC MEC N C L CO TR CTOR5 - ENG NEER5 DEAN JONES CDT O 446 30136 ATLANTA PFIOSTHETICS INC H1822 BRENDA R GREEN WALKERS 8I PATIENT AIDS CRUTCHES CANES ARL C DE 4 4 292 O7I7 646 KENTUCKY STREET P O BOX 447 DECATUR GA 3003I A, do GUNS IQ A 'A 0 eww 6 xp Q9 I46 099 Q I 'L IIWUG X9 C 6 HODGE ARMY 62 NA VY STOREIS HOMF OI' IOOD DEA! S MILLION AND I ITFMb FOR OVFR 0 TEARS Q1 0 CAMPING EQUIPMENT CI OTHING GX' FOOTWEAR OFFICE FURN MMO TOOLLS TARP.b ROPI' HARDWARE MAIN -Imm- 477 9331 I Inna P MARll'l"IA III N :Hz ID HIII5 mm H111-. 948 9049 111 UAMHLAIJ mu mum rofv I8 890i ll WAII 57' CAHTPH IIIIII' IIWI KA Fnpps SurgIcaI Supply Company 733 Lambert Drlve N E K HWS Atlanta Georgna 30324 ?atChe'OiA an Klruball mc ngmeers ec aIIII.a OIIIIBLIOIS DesI nets SURGICAL 14045 874 5734 Q SUPPLY PQSI omce Box 70 LIIIIOII a Geo gIa 30058 1400482 2000 LO INC H N ' .J L 'Ill ll 1 . HA I A N A I P. O. B X OWNEI: DULUTH, GA. LAB TECHNICIAN 'A O O I , . 'I.'I'IlII11I".IfIvI'1II1I', NI XIll,1flI,1, fIl'llllfI.I ,'ffl.,I'I2 Q 1 ' f'lf2fJ ffl' ' l1'I'I11I'xI-III.1lIvI' I I Mulrrhuf III AIIII-nI.I1I fffffllllll I. Il PIIIIIIII-1105 Annual: -4 , ' 1 f H J In , '7 T 1 ' J Y 'Y Y 1 U 1 ' 0 '55 - ' - I - '23 I 25- . 2 X " Q '90 -' f 6 e' L - .'.' .117 ' ' 8 ' Hx 6 .'12I,:1526 J' ' , I 51. 1' ' - 0 .I 6,1 fb Q, .,. 5 n 20 X .. ' ' 'i 5' ..: , . . . V . , l I , I - I , . 0 302fAds 'S TAV Vw Em BEER-s0UP sANnwlcHEs GAME ROOM PIEDMONT AT AIQANTA we UNUBERGU CONGRATULATIONS ATLANTA LIONS' 0 Peach Bowl Q Ll0I'lS UQhtl10US6 f0I' the Blind 0 Uons Eye Bank 0 Leader Dog School 0 Montgomery Youth Camp O Atlanta Memorial Boys Club E R Pn nr n n U G E ft URPURRTED .ww -f l 1 WN AW' Uolonw Poo Z L p 'V E LT I Q F Nlvgnsnv K , GUEST V' WV 'Q l743 4 ff 1 HOUSE ' W7 TRU ty gpg DAVTD KEMP 577-3888 ,Z 'I he 5.3 Lighting Cotnpony Atlanta s Vantage Lighting Company M 299 Mor l d A . NE!Atl ta C-A 30307 . 1- ' X U09 ooo bozegge We Copy 03' 'QA O? Resumes X5 NVEIQSAT PESTAUIQANT NNE IWETUIXX1 Ll Tow Nrlwc -X. I ll. l J.. 373K7I THEWNAWA MATH Atlanta s famous shopptnl, ctnttr IS btnng rtstored Shop spaoc .1vatIablcfPoncc dt Leon and Hsbhland GRIFFITH 81 ASSOCIATES 9551503 THE COLQNNADE RESTAURANT Fresh Vegetables and Baked Goods BREAKFAST LUNCH 0 DINNER Tuesday Saturday Ha 7am lO30am Lunch l100am 230 m Dnner 500pm 900pm Sunday Breakfast 8 OOa m 10 00a m 1767ND 1 R a AU l G gl 30307 Dinner 1100am ggopm 4041634 7327 1879 Cheshire Bndge Rd 874 5642 Ads X303 A century of investment service. Stocks, Bonds, Tax Shelters, Commodities, Options, Financial Planning 4 Piedmont Center Suite 200 Atlanta. Georgia 30305 V Prudential-Bache t4O4l 261-4811 Secunttes WE RE HERE I THE CITIZENS SSOUTHERN BANKS IN GEORGIA MEMBERS FDIC BENT' LEASE A CAR WHDSE TECHHOLDGICAL UPERIDRITY WOH'T EXPIRE BEFDRE ITS LEASE BMW 528e THE ULTIMATE DIIIVIHG MACHIHE 'V IRHAN vv N Tl mv It Chrls Motors 1606 CHURCH ST DECATUR NEAR N DEKALB HALL 292 1l+0O 2685 IIILSCOTT DR DECATUR 292 5881 , NEXT DAY Sunshme 1' WDELIVERY ,4,Fumxture Rental Co TOP QUALITY nu WIDE SELECTION TO CHOOSE FROM uqnlhauus bl! A Y ll! IGH Ibcrglua 8: Repair 'rel' r' BUFDRD HIGHWAY 30 DAY MINIMUM RENTAL COMPARE OUR PRICES SHORT OR LONG TERM LEASING FREE PICKUP RENT BY THE PIECE ALL RENT APPLIES TOWARD PURCHASE WEEKLY OR MONTHLY RENTALS ON TELEVISION 8 STEREOS BODY SHOP E sv mf--L II1 COIB R W 5 li RREII UI I MILE OIT OF T HZMYC IITEII I-lil IIIOADVEVI PLAZA Bl FIEDBOITRD 'ruuteu.uu.Lam nerr oncnoss I 4317 DUFORD HIGHWAY CHAMILEE I 955 5553 447 8888 233 6505 I I A HMI Mlrrllt H 1, I v 1C- WSL' ISM til 41tIIlAtllt'lt1.1 lrtt tw 'lWt1.ldr-11,11 andlogtmrv11-gtstwrtltitmt11f11l.1rk:ul H.1yt-r1-,1'l1t- Mtittlvtvn Wet te All . . If--fa .4 .. - T -p-TL" ' ' z-. wrt Q , J" 7 A '21 K 9 ,Q , I 1 I n.. - ...a-l ap ' X-A 'A' out oi chap - P'f'y7..:-2 X 1.- 6 lllvl ll illllOll Ill Ill ' Y . -un lnqutppn anna Q4 I gi' lcrlvuul ua, aunt- I ,W 'E Annu.. . 6 o hurry :ll 0 lun mann . UHCNCXUFKIIU il . ' ali wt , ' ululunlnulo ' X All n , " ' ' V ' - ::... - , if rn-u-A-nu I N I. , 'IT' . X - U .. I ' ft . . . , . N 1,,- ' . . x fa S . - ' -,,,-' I .- . '.-'I ...- f .NO "' n T, Itdflfxl 1 t I W A 1 PA I AV . UA - 1 N M I-ZISA A A HA t A u ' I I I S - I 304fAd5 F9-t9iQi1990 CONSULTING SINCE 1959 ANTHONY ADVERTISING INCORPORATED SPECIALISTS IN UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE YEARBOOK AND HANDBOOK ADVERTISING bl I pblh 1517 LAVISTA ROAD NORTHEAST ATLANTA GEORGIA 30329 44041 329-OOI6 A few pages of selected advertising will help defray soaring Representatives are welcome to call us for further information. Our staff of professionals will work closely wi h you and your u IS er. 3o6fAds PHYSIOIANS 81 SURGEONS HOSPITAL J.C.A.H. ACCREDITED 2355 Bolton Road, N.W. Atlanta, Georgia 30381-1501 352-1200 A FULL SERVICE HOSPITAL enensencv noon 'WS TITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL - 24 Hour Certllled Phyalclan Coverage ' 0l'l-010'-F05 INIUNOU Physician Race rala Pro-amnlvvmvnlfknnu I Phyelcal Aueaamonta 355 5761 355 0344 PROFESSIONAL REDRUITER Empheell Quality Patlant Ca e IO ma Cm 1 800 241 4123 IINSIDE GM 1 800 282 2022 ADOLESOENT ALDOIIOL 8: DRUG 24 Hour Crlala lnterventlon lnpatlent A Outpatlant 352 3734 ADULT ALCOHOL G DRUG 24 Hour Crlala lnterventlon Deto lnpatlent Outpatlent 351 3351 STfId!SSef?:El.ILE 2050 Cheshire brg rd 0 636 7833 O happy hour 0 Sh 2for1 4tiI8 K MON SAT lln NLAK Alpha Enterprises Inc ly IIVII dl- WOOD FLOORS SB-6641 Qjiwililliliil-SIBOELIEEEQ G nduo Gmauue . itchen L aynle ROYAL TIRE COMPANY INC better people make the difference lh I if QKR' gi y l k I I-l04l934 088 LRQLELU ' SFINICE SINC 634 5122 a f ' I 1 I e - I' I u a I ' l. . - . - I I Q D I Z . ' ' E i Lural Ownn i i . . R d t I i Over 25 Yrun Lxprnrmr hi cn la . Commercial UIATOOIII G f Hume Ifntiinutcs Custom XVno 'Iuors 0 3 ' ' 0 New Homes Q Q Ol-lxiarin llnmc: ' 0 Sanding - Refinishing I I-IS Z B Mmhln-Tue dClurn - 4 I 'I' Vl Th F S 1 u a a I I I llllwllli Ilillll "- a -- I . W . , V , 612 MEDLOCK OAD ' ECA U, A.- . - Q' NX 5 . ' xx, Dependable QuOllll600l'1C1eIliCler'll Q fix' our people moke eclifterencenn ou I Q v C ,'- f Dusinessoncl voursIForprole I noi I --t'3-- O ' 9" , lem ro elo orcomplete I0 f' . I FCCII 095 O mg ' rinse v O I . , , o seen-luricx a stun L, -gl -. 'O etpimxeclcrkxab k"p'. . IX Q a d' ' ' ry opcr' . t a survcy workers o h ,t- ' - 0 ligli industrial , . last cLAinMoNr noun . necrrun, GA, aooaa ' ' Nur hI'k' iinnnsis '- Q, L. NEAL SMITH. JR. Puon-z 404 - 875-0256 1084 Howxu. lirm. Rorm, N.W. A-rl.4nv'rA. Gloxoun 30318 2 O N, v000 A The Bryant Reading Clinic A - B 4277 MEMORIAL DRIVE, SVITIH N V X . , . , UK 1, fl',XPf'LlllVP bquarvb vt' I 73 C DI'Il'ATl'R,Gl-IURGIA300212 'L B, , Ph.ll. U' Y KEWAUNEE SCIENTIFIC L EQUIPMENT CORPORATION P ETE BEC K MAN SALES REPRESENTATIVE LARRY IVIEINDERS SALES REPRESENTATIVE 3822 ROSWELL RD., N.E. SUITE B MARIETTA. GA 30062 PHONE: 1404? 973-6357 j 75 ,F ' I '27 V! . I 3 Z ! J!!! ,fC?67 l7!l! ff ff ff J The Health Professions Publusher of HARPER 81 ROW, Inc. CLINICAL DENTISTRY.. James W. Clark, D,D,S, RICHARD C. DANIELS DIVISION Manager 3400 Lrberty Lane Marreha, GA 30062 4041973-9390 IF APPLEBY INC Suppluer lnoustrual Contractor P O Bo 18902 JIM APPLEBY Leno Square Stat o 1404! 873 2180 Atlanta Georg a 30326 ndrews Plumbmg I Heatmg !AIr 925-1335 216 Lankford Road Tucker GA 30084 ServIn9YouInCobbCounty otthe 8Ig Blue Trust Company Bank of Cobb County TE LEPHONE 432 7771 BEARDEN 8: SMITH PC CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 0 BOX 5058 B05 E BROAD ATHENS GA 30004 1404, 640 8300 ,fb llhlfohsier B'df0b"" ' o o , 0 . J' . X I X I n r I I I I P. . . - ST. ' I 9 ' rms III .XIII--II-.I III: HIIr'I.IlIfIIIs IHIII I- - HrIIIllIr'.IsI Hvglr ll llI'I'I l,lIrIr'IIIx Hlxrl , Slllll' II , xXlI.IIII.I. lL.'X -Ul'H'9 Av,...r can-pan' un- -1- I..m,,.. ,A - ,E- UOYWDllfDIC Adsf307 A Hilton Head Tradition... A Legend in Atlanta! Capitol Materials, Inc. COMPLETE ACOUSTICAL AND DRYWALL SERVICE I404I 35 I -3746 464 BISHOP STREET. N.W ATLANTA. GA 303l8 A D SMITH DMD DR MED DENT W W OIIR DOCTORS BUILDING SUITE 580-C 490 PEACHTREE STREET NE Fulvlo 5 ....... ..... . FINE CONTINENTAL DINING 3525 Piedmont RcLAtJanta Ga 14043 237 7557 I2 New Orieans Rd Halton Head SC 18033 785 5008 AUDIO-VISUAL I VIDEO EQUIPMENT E SYSTEMS l TECHNICAL INDUSTRIES. 8000 PEACHTREE ROAD N E WILLIAM M CASON ATLANTA GEORGIA 3034I VIDEO SALES CONSULTANT I404I 455-76I0 Iggvyers 'IIIIe Insurance Corporation Box 27561 Richmond Vuginla 23261' JAMES E3 IJIIVI7 FALLAIZE INC 2 6 4 mu IZIZI Cleaners and Laundry 1620 lJVIsta Rd N E Atlanta G0 30329 I404I 636 1442 Odorless Cleamng Custom Hand Cleanmg 2074 N DECATUR FID 6 6 1348 B Sz D SALVAGE SALES GHOCER ES TOYS WINDOW SHADES GIFT ITEMS HOUSEWAHES CLOTHING CANDY NUTS BATTERIES WE BUY SELL 5 TRADE Umm 1I'Iuur .I'I'Iaxrtuuzmq No D r1Hll R ad Dec! q 30033 5 100 OF WITH ANY S5 00 ORDER OWNER SANDY WHEELER 325 B197 , . . I , . . ' I . , l . I, ' I . I N C. I T I O 0 O Ywf,-,fff,. ., . . , . .' K N I I , , NC ' ., 6 3 . ' . . . , - s 3823 run I C. rm N E A ur, Go-'71 1.1 , . . I . 308 mas ITYPATS 11 1 l Wuthmrys fe t - I- gf AllanIu'x l.un-lrmuh Ilvrlunravll I l1l.n-1.r'. Um: Ibn., R 3109 Pledmonl Road, NE W 25 llllblfldllllhd WN x D0 ul Ill-Illhl 3 f - l mm , NW wmown UPTO h me 7379 S' 5258228 Laurie Kennedy Admlnlalralrvs Duec or Publlc Flelallons and Calenng Manage: EIOCUIIVB Olllces: 3109 Pledmont Fld, NE lAllama 303051404 262-7379 938-3676 .ale ,- Weed's Upholstery Co, FREE ESTIMATES - PICK UP A DELIVERY "Fon YOUR FURNITURE NEEDS. CALL ED WEEDH 2308 FELLOWSHIP RD. TUCKER. GA. 30084 SINCE I917 sas-nn TUCKER MATTRESS COMPANY MANUFACTURERS 5 RENOVATORS OF FINE BEDDING 3926 LAWFIENCEVILLE HWY TUCKER GEORGIA 3184 JAMES HEWATT MGI. N CCDLO HOTEL W How to enjoy every byte of an Apple II gnpple computer Computerland of Atlanta X Gxfurh Bunk Qtu I-fx Georgla s Largest 75 000 Extensive Coverage ln All Categories Hardcover Paperback Magazines Newspapers Somiol Al Phong pl 909 PM Gum Baum Camps: I' T We specxal order 81 locate out of prmt books Vlslt the Cup 8: Chaucer Coffee Shop on o balcony 577 2449 Open 7 days a week 84 evemngs Frl 81 Sat tll X mndmght Q 2345 Peachtree Road N E 262 3332 3224 Peachtree Rd ln the Peachtree Battle Shoppmg Center Atlanta Georgla 30305 UI' B ntles l X . . . l ,-E 4 .. ' p 1 U I au. ms l l. ...., .W 0 1, I le ry ' Anlnl. l. . M P I I- g A 0 Lrlualurr I I Ian-Lx M I U I Y..-nu I. .1-I I u NNW, v 1 -. l. P ny 0 5 I llnllr H.-hgron . 0 Pwghglqy 0 II-um, 0 Vhrlnyophy 0 gg I Wrm.-VI, N ..l . Vo apr I g u nn 0 Sn 5 M.u.a.,. 0 hrhn-ul O . I . . ' 5 I . . I' -Iulhullfrll llrulrl q- ' u- ' ' I -NX XA ll . . . . I , ,. Adsf309 305-447.2944 MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS auhney managemenf co., inc. Ibl MADEIRA CORAL GABLES. FL 33I34 E. M. GAULTNEY, JR. Buckhead Glass Company 3175 ROSWELL ROAD, N E ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30305 PHONE 237-4672 Howmedrcu ual ls S5 stem Orthopaedics of Georgia Inc DICK HANIBRICE 5 DUNWOODY PARK SUITE 106 ATLANTA GA 30338 OFFICE 404!394 5230 RES 955 5482 Dedicated to Serving the Dental Profession Merchandise v Equipment ' Teeth v Office Design 0 Practice Location 0 Equipment Leasing 0 Equipment Repair ' Annual Purchase Program ' Practice Management Counsel EQPQI-I-lealthco MARK G HASKINS CDT Owner President RESIDENCE C9121 477 7892 ENTAL ROSTHETICS mc 250 HOLT AVENUE MACON GEORGIA 31201 PHONE C9121 742 0983 T LEE DENTAL CENTER 2996 g Taylor Anderson GICLIIIBCIS os ge g osos 14041237-4725 Carlos E Taylor Jr AIA Egauffzfamf Mwia gon: au 4 DIX I I L ON DRIVL IAIRUUHN KEORGIA 30213 ATLANTA GEORGIA 30303 Compliments Of 404!522 5642 WRIGHT CATLIN 8: DILLARD 30' Jah EIIIIE 670601 Z-'xpedfmg ri Markenng L'z7mpany GEMM P O Box 611 Avondale ESIBIBS GA 30002 f IMBIFO AIIBIIIHI 114041 296 2839 I T9l9 804342 lllv IIL QIIIL Ill. ll A nu dllll 'ut llllll JI X K1 I I ,ff BUCKHEAD HOUSE OF TRAVEL 3340 PEACIITREE ROAD PLAZA LEVEL BUILDING 'II00 DIBIA IIAVE MISSION WILL TRAVEL ATLANTA GEORGIA 30020 CIRCLE 75 PARKWAY 341 PONCE OE LEON AVENUE 404 266 ATLANTA GEORGIA 30335 ATLANTA GEORGIA 30065 404 952 6555 404 873 1531 Amencmsomry ofTro eIAgerus Business Vacation r ' Riff: cj Q I I Irv . SALES REPnEsENrATivE I I D randviow avenue. ne suite 2 orlanlo, or ro 3 - , . . . 1 1 5 . Y I 1,1 , Z -- - - E- gf 75 MARIEITA STREET, N.w. "" , . - I 9 A A 7-LII: 'I vin- , . . i -.bl E:,,,f . r. .. '5 E .r-14.1- ' I '11 ""'fVA- ri . . , , - x: . 5 'QI-"I I 15,3 xswwvryzfv - l A I V 1 310fAds Jill! C Lenturv Center Hotel S smzwuon moms A ms woruowioe Zim Cent ry Bo le a d N E 1 Atlanta Geo gin 10145 EAST couRT SQUARE 325-0000 Decatur , Georg1a 30030 Phone 378 1688 mv our usori ciiorcs nm srirrourciirs HOMEMADE SOUPS CHILI OUICHE CAKES SALADS ETC FREE HITH COUPON BUY ANY SANDWICH AND GET REG SIZE DRINK OR DELI SALAD Good Food and Drink 3321 Lenox Fld Atlanta Ga 30326 Ja Dc:-wnlmam , .. ur rr xuburhwr jtuk lrkr wrmg I iiirry drrwntriwnr rarr n a s lb urban park like setting The Irs nl like Sheraton Century Center Hotel teatures a health club heated pool tennis Sauna loqqing loursr two restaurants three lounges 24 hour lood se-rvire nightly entertainment and plentiful tree- parking Shaping Your Future At Piedmont Hospital I' Year after year, patients claim that there is a s cial feeling about our 491-bed non-profit hospital, hat's because at Piedmont we are not only concerned about delivering quality health care, but we also pride our- selves in creating an environment of mutual support and respect. Just ask any number of health care professionals who work at our progressive facility in Atlanta. As graduates of Emory University, you will want to pursue a career direction that respects your training and your talents At Piedmont Hospital, we are enthusiastic about finding the right individuals to loin our staff We believe in your future and plan to ensure your professional growth at Piedmont. ln addition to a one-month orientation and on-going Critical Care course, Piedmont Hospital initiated the first one year nurse internship program in the Atlanta area Before you make your first career decisions consider Piedmont! Our ultra-modern facility is conveniently located in Buckhead. and we offer excel- lent starting salaries and a generous benefits package Find out more about us today' Vou're invited to send your resume to Personnel Otflco PIEDMONT EFEIFIF HOSPITAL I' 19G8 Peachtree Rd., NW Atllnll, GA 30309 Equal Opportunity Employer MKF i Serving Atlanta and the South for 55 Years Painting and Wallcoverlng by Goodman I 2335 ADAMS DR.. N.w. ATLANTA. GA 30318 . N , , 404 351-8922 ' nl: 'W . I 4 edical isposables COMPANY, INC 1165 HAYES INDUSTRIAL DRIVE o P. O. BOX 1181 I MARIETTA IATLANTAI, GEORGIA 3051 Q TELEPHONE I404I 4223036 f N tr 'gr , he . if 127 rAcross from Old Court I-Iouseb Hours-Mon.-Fri. 8:00-4:30 - Q J X J N .J ." I Adsf311 312fAds iff, ,,... ,,. ..... "- U' - "' - -TI. ' '-', .. " " ' - ' "--' , 4 5 ' T 1 ' 'ff!T':":"s L. - X N -ff,-.-,.,,. - 14223.-2n.1f.I,r1fw 1 , 'gqfy:f,.'if1g,-"- ,. N V H- . . ,,.:'1..,:A ,,., . T Lg. -' ,, , J H , 1 'wr 'i..'. ..-'lcvgf aasiih- -,U arf -:gi-Lg:ff.,,,, 4,92 :Sift f r D 9 'Q 11. if - II IL I F I f Q' " w 4 I I J I J Yu.. 1 :I ' Ii C. I . ,... , -5- . EI? H-M -Ifff--- azs-8454 I nl' A . Pnecmon cIrr wus ,,,,.,,,,,,,,c,,,,,,,,,,,, -.11 1' 4 1 f L ' X- .. : - ., iz I L. 4 L . ., New York Style Pizu - Served with Southern Hospitality Made with ALL FRESH ingredients PAUL M. MCLARTY JR. 1186-B NORTH HIGHLAND AVE. ATTORNEY In' LAW LAW OPPICBB PAUL M. MCLABTY, Jn., P C. 600 Pins? NATIONAL Bun Buxmmo D005-00300000 00000 CHARLIE MIZELL.. OWNER DON ADLER, MANAGER 4041377-0291 548 CHURCH STREET DECATUR GEORGIA 30030 14041378 4231 QJUlCBfalIQavId 9 CQUIII Happy Hour 2 7 My W Next to Moonshadow 872 7993 1834 Johnson Rd xv CHPJN OF pf .CT lv lb IL N 5 0 3 N39 9 3.1 KM MW PRINTING 5 We re for YOU Milli :fu WMM Qmtdadla Qld .MS Q0 HIM 15149 any 6.164.177 S 5 Q XSGGQGN 3 QXXOG get .elalamza fda. 101.23 dau .mr erm' w 1 Duc Inq 1222 MENLO DR N W ATLANTA GA 30318 14041 351 8600 1231UCO1IIUHd N W All ml I GA 30.518 14041552 OO25 GA WATS NO B00 282 4061 Q I OTHER STATES BOO 241 6365 1121 SPRING ST N W ATLANTA GA 30309 TEL 404 873 lil! ROBERT T GUNTER Pn:sIozNT CARL V1-.XERRA Pu IIE T Nllflllli VIII! l'eSt8UI'antS Smce 956 LENOX Roomigo L E ylcli 173 GROVE PLACE DECATUR GEORGIA 30030 MOBLEY R llionl NOBLE LIN IILLRILII H55 Lmmx R AD NE ATLANTA LIL mam 30326 404237 5924 PRESHDENT OFFICE 373 3388 z -v-- lifviyxv. . 3 If if, V . . Q ' AL, . : I , 2 -I , 2 " :U . 2 F ' . I 7: , 5 C - I -I .1 - ', : " pt 2 5 4 ' 4 +- .. 2-1 L I fi ug I I jr ' 1 . . 1 . . O ' I, m v - 1 - Q Q U ' I ' C, ' ' "" E . T' Z sys. V 9 may FRANK WHITTINCZTUN, SN 7"'4 l"'I'1 Ulf 7' CER MICS - CROWN A BR DC l. PRECISION ATTACHMENT PARTIALS CDL CASCADE DENTAL LABORATORY JAMES M BARNES' C U T 0112 MURPHY AVIENIII, X W Ll M K WINKI Hi. 1.11.1 ATI ANTA l,lHRI.IA ioilli H I I 'MUNI Ph 2 451-1 oo I 451-2735 ix' McConnell Drum Service, Inc. MANUFACTURERS AND RECONDITIONERS OF STEEL CONTAINERS 5880 NEW PEACHTREE RD MARY M CONNELL DORAVILLE GA 30362 Ell3'L0ill4l Frnest Flowers for over Half a Century T143 P NELL 81 BUDDY IVIERRITT 30.5 8764321 il' Fulton Supply Company Industrial Supplies - Equipment Machinery ' f 342 Nelson St., S.W. Atlanta, Georgia 1712 Third Ave. 105 Enterprise Ave. Columbus, Ga. Carrollton, Ga. SERVICE ENGINEERING ASSOCIATES, INC. 3960 PEACHTHEE ROADXATLANTA GEORGIA 30319 1 MCI Free Long Dlstance Call As a special thank you for savlng through us as a Residential user your first 5 rrunutes of MCI calling w1ll be ABSOLUTELY FREE' And that FREE 5 minutes can be a call to any lnterstate number ln the contmental U S from Atlanta lAsk about other c1t1esJ To Save 54, 451, PLUS 5 Free MIHUTCS call ln Atlanta 257 0039 in state 1 800 222 0657 or out of state 1 800 241 5371 397' KK 19: The Ball s In Our Court A SERVANTXCHURCH TO NORTHEAST ATLANT DRUID HILLS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 1200 Ponce de Leon at Brtarcliff A PH 292 0373 sr KE arms. MEDLOCK AUTO PARTS INC 1554 CHURCH STREET DECATUR GEORGIA 30033 lMlllllSIllIllI IAALKSEARCH SSOC ESIC 2J2COL IE G 302MB I mice di-Ltfori Avi: Atlanta, Georgia 'OC o - r - I 1 l - 9 . ' ' ' ' 1 , 9 KThe nation's long distance phone company, ' "' ' L 'RD "W " ' Adsf3l3 314fAds CLARKE EQUIPMENT CLEANING SUPPLIES MAINTENANCE CONSULTANTS MAINTENANCE EQUIPMENT CO. 2110 TUCKER IND, RO. TUCKER, GEORGIA 30084 JOHN H. PLANT GENERAL MANAGER OFFICE 1400 939 1970 HOME 14041 325 1970 Telephone 981 6100 24 hr emergency 898 0467 NATHANIELA LOPEY Nl S Nl INTERNAL MEDICINE Mon Tues Thur FII 5040SnapfIngerWoods 903 SUIIE 107 Wed Sai 900 100 Decatur Ga 30035 PCJHSQ-IE 'M L, FOREIGN CAR SALES SERVICE 16 YEARS EXPERIENCE EUROPEAN TRAINED MECHANICS ALL REPAIRS GUARANTEED 4767 COVINGTON HWY DECATUR GA 30035 284 1481 VIOREL MALEA Georgia Our Home of Quality Hospital Services Charter Medical Corporation the only major hospital manage mom company headquartered In Gwfgli, has seven facllltles ln Its nomo :tate dedicated to hlqh standards ol quality oa- tlant CRIB. Qhydslamc Hoaolhla A'l'LAl'l'l Pexhloru Hddhl IADON Chlrlnf LII! Hmplll SAVANNAH BIDIB Oilldblhl Llddlrdva Dlaoaaa Hoanltll 31' SIONSISLAIIII Chanor By KNO-SX loam-an Amucan Hannah ATLANTA Shallounovu Community Hospital MouopoIIwI Eye ana Eu I-Ioaonu Isddlalty Sumam MACD N Mlddll Gaomla Hoaohu For mon Information contact: CUDUID Hbllllblll ghanezlwlodlcal Corporation o 'os Gunn mean GOOIUII 3183 "'n'W- ma 142 1161 I ms ,t GGOTQIH Army NatIonal ,Ir Guard IIIL Cuard hae openlngs for Icidnrsf Several plograms to complete your CdLlC3t1OIl V1s1t your loc I1 tumory or call 1104 656 6754 State RCLlUltlIlg 'Ind Retontlon Offleo lIeoIgIa Army Nauonal Luard PU Box 17065 'Itl IIIt.,1 Ccorgli 30 RIVER VALLEY HOME HEALTH AGENCY Albany GeorgIa TrIoIn..Islon GOOYQIB Cordele Georgia Phone 439 8078 Phone 647 8911 Phone 273 6015 IMMEDIATE FULL TIME POSITIONS FOR PHYSICAL THEAPISTS 'I le are a gronnng clmnlcal laboratory always zn need of qualxfxed applxcants le offer excellent salary scales and benefxts package lledxcal Technologists Iledxcal Laboratory lechnxcnns Lab Asslstants lIda1n1strat1ve Full and part tue pos1t1ons are open perxodmally Contact the Personnel UFFICC at B52 1590 PSPA A Sa1l:h Klxne Cllnxcal Lab 177 Montreal Cmr Tucker Gerogn 30081. I 4 ' l 'v DA 2 25:00, S' l A ' A - V E . - K Q iq: I . 'B 'L . - I I-A,,.,'i, ?-'LLrL. W" 'if " All It."-'dizzy' I - y I I f -fiifi. ' ' ' ' 1? I 'l'l ,I , , Q . y I I PSPII Y 1 A U I Y: Y a I - . . . I 4 ' , ' fa 316 - , , , , VIKINGIMIDTOWN SEAFOOD 1393 N Hnghland Avenue Atlanta Georgla 30306 14041875 3474 SPECIALIZING IN HHOLESALE T0 PUBLIC Steve Robinson Manager Bus 404 938 2006 Res 404 923 4841 Defvoe Paint Devoe 8- Raynolds Co 1841 Mountaln Ind Blvd Duvusuon of Grow Group Inc Tucker GA 30084 939-4700 939-4101 om mq BLINDS WALLPAPER CARPET VINYL HARDWOOD FLOORS 2253 IDLEWOOD RD SANDING REFINISHING TUCKER GA 30084 Jnm Cagle Vlce Presldent 195671172718 Wanted A solid commumcatlons Sales Pro for a solid communications company Culorlt I5 n owlrn uslry Ar wt uc row wa sown prt ullnc oplportu TO adyrlurrlm Crfiallvz ptr on wuln IC ve Io lllnlmt lt url veto bl llllXl 1 you do nuvc to be abit TOCUIIITIIUTTICTJIL Lxpertly W ltxcfulono youll ln lnlnlng a Ong' Sl ll If IINH1 org aruxu t al om lll ng y ornc And you ll Lt! c ltr lCCl1r1lCll Support lr urn OU It l C url L L mom In E to XLCU m 1468 MBCBSI n Street N W Atlanta Georgia 30309 14041 874 8632 PHONE OR WRITE BILL BECUTELLJ First Methodist Church of Atlanta 360 Peachtree St N E Atlanta, Ga 30308 521. 6614 home care amer ca .19lHC6 STAFF RELIEF I Lpnls ,Mrs HOME OR HOSPITAL PRIVATE DUTY 2 to 21+ HOUR COVERAGE 233 9636 MMD S AY l' Cl' Ola Lull 1615231 l 85 81 'ahullowford Rd Chamblee Georgia 'Fife S T0 I1 2 ,ummm Phone 289 8390 Flrestone Stores 3518 Memorsal Dr Furestone Store Hours Acrossfrom MF 730am 8pm Belvedere Shoppnng Ctr Saturday 8 a m 5 p m CONVCIVYCIV7' I0 UWM CAMPUS AND CENTER fOR 0756456 CONT ROL EMORY PINES INN 1650 Cllfton Rd. N.E. Atlanta, Georgla 30329 M063 636 5152 l-lbs ELECTRICA ETESNPQWGCTION P.0. BOX 93007 I ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30318 845 MARIETTA ST., N W l 1404! 881 1199 I I I . I I I Q I I I n ' , IXC ' . il e"',l.llm1r'.lllnl ll-.ull-r lrl ll1C - U fu5lg1r If lf'Il'llT'lOllr' lllll rl nllllwil 3 ' - - and . :tl -'lc TOUTKIIIQQ lor u '..lln-5 ' wg 'ut-rltflllvv vvllo vvlllllu Io px H102 Thu A A angry 'EA'llIM - nlly . I ., 1 ' " 2 lf' dr: -- " ' tang You tlorft rlarfvai ly 6 , ha , 1. 1 llqrt an c.ornrnuruc.tal ollz, I :Il I -, ' 1 1' I Str ,, . Q ',TTl1TlO I l- qt 'llon flyll' lllul'5 l.fHTIllllTlf'fI lo Sul 1 ul tlu' lul 'l I 'l1LlL,lrlr".'. YOL' r-lljrmy wal l'TIl'lll I Q- cor 1l'll',.lllUll, wllll no ci:-llulp on our ' - UIC ' ' " llli' lm' T-.llllj JI 1 QCJI "1" lfy Y' -'nl -rc-Stoll1ra.l'.ollllrLllwl-r rn I . leltg 'llllL'!C,OlllIL'i,l lull l,Lunnl-t lth . I I I I . L - LIVE - INS 0 llllluond 'IUOUQ lo fl' 'OR - PRI Il I 1 Q . , 1 1 n' A I , . .' . . ll " - ff II1 10151315 HERETH RR84lONES INC or ATLAN A INVESTME T KERS Specralrsts and Natronal Dealers rn Tax Free Munrcpal Bond Underwrrtrngs Sales and Frnancral Advrsrng Also Provrdlng Servnoes In Drscount Stock Commrssrons U S Government Bonds Corporate Bonds Tax Shelters Dave May Vlce Presroent Sales. HERETH ORF! 8- JONFS INC NORTH RIDGE POINTL 500 NORTHRIDGL ROAD ATLANTA GEORGIA 30535 EIGHTH FLOOR l-800-241 l47l M041 567-4888 I 800 282-4157 tGal Hcreth Orr L Jones lnc holds rnemberblnp rn NASD pubhc Secufmes M50c,dl,0,, Natronal Assoclatron ot Secuntles Investor Secuntres Dealers Inc Protectron Corporauon I I ' I ., . I lor Career or lnvcbtrnent lutorrn.rlrorr Contact I , 1 ' I '-""'-'- 0' t I G - 1 - 316fAds THE VERDICT WOODROW WILSON COLLEGE OF LAW 830 West Peachtree St.. NW Atlanta. Georgia 30328 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Jim Hodge Manaqer Phone 329 6074 6075 6076 Room I I2 lst floor Admin Bldq Color Printing Brochures Pamphlets Carbonless Fomts X I7 Posters Quick Copy Resumes Typesetting Executive Park Amoco 2289 N. Druid Hills Rd. Atlanta, Ga 325-7821 321-9580 R.L, Sims, Dealer Mechanic on Duty 8 AM. to 5 P.M. 5 days a week Our Service Guaranteed T,H.P. Printing 1187 West Ave. Conyers, Georgia 30207 L83 5973 Ilmmarulatv divert uf illllarg Qlhurrh Ph0'0C0PY"'9 :ess BRtARcilrr ROAD N E Dlssemuonsmmeses ATLANTA GEORGIA 30329 Complete Supplies 404f636 l4l8 LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN SHARE IN THE PRECIOUS DIFFERENCE OF CErf7rii'f,'If..h,r'f',Ii'.l'.'frIT'Zt.tT PEDIATRIC NURSING 4465 Hugh Ho ell Rd Tucker Ga 30084 I404I 938 0286 Egleibq Ilvvgtll Henrietta Egleston Hospital for Children is a 165 bed private tertiary facility located on the campus of Emory University Speclaltles include cardtac and neonatal ICU hematologyloncology neurosurgery and open heart Enjoy excellent salary comprehensive benefits package clinical career advancement and tuition reimbursement Most importantly work with some of America s finest specialists and nursing professionals who ll help make the difference a very precious experience for you Call Gen Moreland at C4049 325 6170 or write for more information Henrietta Egleston Hospital for Children 1405 Clifton Road N E Atlanta Georgia 30322 ly ploye' K J 0m Stuffed P1223 land ravmgl 'Dee be liwdllll ipBll'uAr'hIhllhtlbp1' lrllludmr 'I'h'LIpgCrl-I hnndrgr 'Mmm hld thepnlgddlldlyl WMQAAAJ fn-nningfdimra Around Lenox Atlanta Shopprng Center Galleria 14041 266-3663 M00 953-GSW 7 ' . . , . . I I t r tht, E ' w . I ' - O I I l l I ' lib I ' Il I ll - , - U ' islam A7 Sl v I min M3111 ' . ' DIY .. ,, fr . Yi ki , . . 7 5 I , X' 7 . K ,ltr1-qlnilrrppgrltlrtl em r J Adsf317 IHLAQHFQFEID HUSUJU Hzfnu 2151 PEACHFORD ROAD ' ATLANTA GEORGIA 30338 ,ACCEPT T CI-IALLFIIINTGEA H0 P I r:-lpn pad Il Idd M do Chlld I Ad nn- III sau BFCOME A PART OF Oua Pnonssromu 'DAM AUDIO VISUAL I VIDEO EQUIPMENT Br SYSTEMS l TECHNICAL INDUSTRIES 60113 PEACHTREE ROAD N E ATLANTA GEORGIA 30341 I404I 455 76IO ATHENS PIZZA HOU 3 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU I369 CIAIIIONT RDIDEC 452-8282 261 -3660 5550 I-'EALIITIEE 3330 PISDIDNT ID Nl IND BLVD CHAI urlllzrr IIIIIIQ WED E TUES GOLDEN OLDIE NIGHT PJ Haley s Pub Sage Hall Shopprng Center 1799 Brrarclrff Rd ,N am, happy hour Weekdays 2 7 p rn and Saturdays ll 7 p m Thursday nrghts Special pnces on beer FIAG-AN MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS PLUMBING AND HEATING INC 989 Dall Avenue S W 01047755 7766 Atlanta Georgia 30310 UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CARRIER BUILDING SERVICES 5775 Pzdunree Dunwv. ody Ro ad Uunldmg U Suite 400 Allante Georgra 30342 404 52 8885 XY Plumbers 8. Sleumlrtlers local Unron No 72 Busrness Manager Tom C Payne O .Ll-A-r a PRESIDENT BOB TIDWELL FINANCIAL SECRETARY TREASURER DOUG WILLIAMS 374 MAYNARD TERRACE SE ATLANTA GEORGIA 30316 Olfrce Phones 373 577890 MI LIS! IRST TUISIIAY Nlhllfl XIII MUN ru 7 ro I'Nl Busmess Agent Busmess Agent Steamhttevs Plumbers Bob Coker Charlie Cox r l - , C . fx . . X D. i.J A . LJ ,- X I V I , rl , J - - f I' Llx ' I N 9 C. A PIA hford 5 nal. I! Involved In lvuy loc!! . I u L. Pu p I I q cup. hm I1 d f - I ue p I hi d Iy roullno. ll II 0 l Q ICQ I ly YI d l 8 lhlflpiulll' I I I I -- d . , Ion and uccupu mnal. I dlvxdunl. llll ll placid o y peuarul 5 d pr I lonal growth. Act In an al n rd lol num our proqran Dy lnruncllng -nn pnuu al p 1. f , X, zreaumnm. Clnrucnl nupcrvnlon xl pro to :II fl ff .Imran Dy www msn -, .na use-rn. Lorusd In nzuopnl lan Arlunlo, Pwnc old Il I II- jf - - , pnycnu heap I io: rruunnn ol nmouonal d 4 4 l "" 'I an lla q an p . Tho 204-una In rl ur I n- -' ,r -.. lpe Ilnd d I 1 q dull, A has-un! d 1 ' ' ' ' P ycnuur: P q a Adu 1 errno P 9 . ' 1 1 vucr-Ima p mplllyll enjoy y I -rr Irrngc bonulul I tl - ' 'r Mull! nln LIOI ' 1 ru n Inna-alumni ' rd n muon lr Ava anal I .y ' ,fra 1 runmluy me r- ' II Id 4 I n ' D f s P qu. - ' I S I d 5 YI al I' ' ' I 7 5 d I ld d B I I I 11 -- I I p I ., I . ..- . . ,.., I . . nr-nnrnrmlrsu-:mul ' . , ' . . Ill' " '-' rnrultllll K :W-1 '- ' r...,.,..ru......... , l A "" ' ' " rv-nu mt J J - I. I O I I I , . I I 4 . W . ' em. , I4 9 -w 'Ho . A . . -' ' , . . V . ' " 'R 'I u X . rl ', "- . . Adsf318 .1 of if So Long. Emory. 320fThe End Always. Joy J' U H A-nl T' 'qi ff! .Q Li- p I""' L my , n 1 1 W - .1 5 sin., gif: 1 ff, .NA " X ':.. 'W nf - -- .. g.M.,4Q,. t r, fi- il-gf 6. 'LF-'ij--9 3 v ,W . E, .- .nf gf --N '1 mxl. -' ' , ' , Q P ' ' r xi-1""-'M - -- "H:- . -. v- , ax.-'-' -.v ..?. ,, 3f,fp,',' . ki,-.. '-fa '. l'-gg L34 5. .37 .r , I, .g: Aft' . hknv N . . - -s. Vi 'A S-E.i:A"E,m. .. --"-'Q-"7 ,Q Lf-1 I, ',f--.--ff: , -if Y 5 4 53s'f3Qi" -- -. L-fha-14 , -. n "',3.p.'- 4 ,c 1. . - s -v Y, .. .h1.':- 1 . Hg flax ,,'lA 1 .x . . 451- ' '- Q .rv I., v A - Y, . -. A-,-5 'SP' 3' , : -1- : N ' 1- .34 I -X ., xx ' N If ,HRD V9 AC ffiff' . J.. x . vi' Y Qf' 1' I ff! 5 - v .Wy Q I 1 u x . ,:- s -1 . my x v X1 I XJ 51 sa X X., -'ls 'Rst The 1983 CAMPUS ls the official yearbook of Emory Unlverslty. lt was printed by Jos- ten's American Yearbook Company in Clarks- vllle, Tennessee. The press run for the 1983 edition was 2300 copies with a 9 x 12 trim size on 80 pound gloss paper. Body copy is set in 10 point souvenir with captions in 8 point souve- nlr. Student portraits were taken by Wendy Oberstein from Yearbook Associates of Mill- ers Falls, Massachusetts. Our publications consultant from Josten's ls Dan Troy. The 1983 CAMPUS is copyrighted by the Publica- tions Council of Emory University and Joy Gonzales, editor in chief of the yearbook. ff -V , ' HERITAGE ROOM no Nor REMOVE We new ATHENS CLARKE Xycoumv LIBRARY CUl0I3HCNi


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