Emory University - Campus Yearbook (Atlanta, GA)

 - Class of 1943

Page 1 of 183

 

Emory University - Campus Yearbook (Atlanta, GA) online yearbook collection, 1943 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 183 of the 1943 volume:

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" 5' .. . af if an ' 'V ' A' in un . . 1 V W , , aaa? i::..., we R ' f , iii , f ,4 e GEORGE ofsArts,4a,edue, v v ' ,g Q fl y Qs V pt , A' nf nfr,Vtlc JOHN g. wssrmoaemuo, sms, M,,n.,m, E'Z1"dC3HEi' Uirlieijgggggjgfgirg, March, 1945 To the Emory Student Body: , n v With the hope that it will portray for you one ef the l most eventful years of your life, we present to you the 1945 Emory Campus. The year that has brought with it a ehange in the American 'way of life' that we have always known brings M you an unchanged annual. A year that has shown a proud ' people of a great nation cheerfully and willingly-glee up the little comforts of life without grumbling does net hring a war-theme to your yearbook. ' One of the perennial criticisms of an educational institution--that students live in oblivion to the ncutside world'--has proved itself partially true. As yet Emory has not changed. Oh, of course, hhere has been a speeded schedule and the addition of special Wwar coursesn that , soon disappeared. Our parents are still sending the cheeks l so we can go to shows, dinner on Saturday nights, and those datesyeven if we ride the trolley because gas and tires are scarce. We saw quite a hustle to join the reserves, and we noticed the empty niches of those who had been drafteda We , have it pretty soft, though. While men die in the ?hilipplnes,l Bataan, Guadalcanal, and the world over, we are allowed good food, a pleasant abode, and the right to absorb culture and te , train for professions at will. But a farmsighted administration has made us realize shy 'n v we have been given this opportunity. Colleges are aetaallypw at war, arming the youth of the nation with a meet potent weapon to be directed at the Axlsmeintelligenee. Because j Emory has not yet been put under esvaesmssa central, year r Gampus has not gone to war eitherr It shows a dermal Feeyff ' at Emory and strives to emulate the spirit underlying it alle, r I deed Lassie - l 1 ,,f, The Editors ' ' . ' :ge -vw.-.1:w:f-., ' 'X X X ' k if + wi-1-gq.9wQ. f3,.,'Q' ' I ,W .e'iS5Q1ig:ifNi?'1??3 ' ?J ' ,.s'f-Q mf .mm .K 4 1'3- ., Y '.- Q1 Q 'TEN -fy . I.-f,"-A' 1 ,, A 3' W , 2 C . . , mimi. f :KM .,:9r if Qglijisiwg ' ' g,,:'.-TQ", ,vrpfi dwg' "' xv-f'4 k 5, . -3 .-fn 1 15 'PEL kgyx, ,ggggqkxgdv-hg5M,,x., , mv V xg -. 'hh' ' ,r-'vb . 'FY-"'+f3zr Q., f f- .V .www X Q.. - -21, M -N-1 - 'lp J ' - 7" "?K"'55" in 1 . in tau' MK"""'i? YYY ' :J " H1-T' " 7, . ,L ' ' - W N ., ..ws'w'.ss f 1.4 . 1 1- -1 . , . ff-... '2 .-.tsl . vi' , l. 'Wax - ff . 'Aw ...- J.-v-. . m.H.,.agpgqp-s+::vfQwufdv?v?4'v37'- ,V I - H , , . ,M Www 4 .Qefffaul -ufQSvf1'f Zhu. , w. . :- , . , -'SQ' w . -K nw: '-M -' , . ,963 w:,.WQiSXFr - -W sv A mnnun '- .fa mszmwd 'x","' X . Ra, -... 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H07 gf Li F Ij"' v, . yr -.. L 4. i J. -P., ,ff Reazfivzg clock-wise: Qur Deans DEAN OF MEN E. H. RECE MEDICINE SCI-IOOL,S DEAN R. H. OPPENHEIMER ASSOCIATE DEAN OF UNDERGRADUATE DIVISION A. HOLLIS EDENS I BUSINESS ScHOOL's ACTING DEAN R. C. MIZELL ASSOCIATE DEAN OP THE COLLEGE H. PRENTICE MILLER THEOLOGY,S DEAN H. B. TRIMBLE LAW SCI-IOOL'S DEAN CHARLES J. HILIQEY DEAN OF THE COLLEGE AND ACTING DEAN OF GRAD- UATE SCHOOL J. HARRIS PURKS 1-X Rerzrling c01L1zte-lf-clockwise: ASSISTANT DEAN OF MEN L. L. CLEGG TREASURER GEORGE I-I. MEW ALUMNI,S BOE F. WHITAKER joURNAL1sM's DR. RAYMOND B. NIXON 6 U r POLITICAL SCIENCE,S W. B. STUBBS REGISTRAR J. GORDON STIPE CHEMISTRY,S DR. J. SAM GUY Soc1oL0GY's DR. H. N. FULLER Faculty I .. V ,,,, , ,,,,,7 , ...H - .aff I, 224' 1 Reading clockwise: BIOLOGY,S DR. H. M. PHILLIPS ENGINEERING,S J. B. PEEBLES CHEIviISTRY,S DR. O. R. QUAYLE PI-IYSIC,S DR. D. R. MCMILLAN ECONOlvIIC,S ALBERT GRIFFIN GEOLOGY,S DR. J. G. LESTER GLEE CLUB,S DR. MALCOLM I-I. DEWEY ENGLISH,S DR. T. H. ENGLISH NS Emory, its students, and its faculty felt the impact of the second year of War more vigorous- ly during the academic year 1942-43 than they did during the first months after Pearl Harbor. Exigencies of War made most students spend their "vacation" months doing regular classroom ,Work in a summer session marked by an all-time summer enrollment of more than 1,300. The regular summer session Was only one of many "speed-up" modifications in the University,s war-geared curriculum. Students during the present school year Were Working for or towards their degrees before en- tering the services. Many of them will get their sheepskins at a pushed up graduation in March. Others already have been called to join their more than 1,000 fellow Emory men already in service. The men who stayed in school Were taking 8 large doses of science and mathematics courses with an eye on the military. The University met the trend by providing adequate instruction in physics, chemistry, engineering, and trigo- nometry. Not Willing to be caught unprepared, the ad- ministration during the period of uncertainty, has quietly Worked out a revised curriculum that could go into effect overnight should the military take over the University for special training purposes. In line with this program, many professorsare going out of their fields to prepare to teach army-directed courses. In this Way, the University will be ready with a corps of instructors in English, mathematics, history, and the sciences. ' i Despite the loss of men to the service, enroll- ment remained relatively high With more than 1,200 in the fall quarter and more than 1,100 in the Winter quarter. CDI I I-GP QI? ARTS D SCIENCES SENIOIQS ADAMS, V. EMORY, JR. . BABB, HERBERT E. . BARROXV, JAMES H. . BASINSKI, EUGENE R. BATTLE, ROBERT W. . BENNETT, IVAN L., JR. ' BEROMARK, ROBERT E. BLACKWELL, D. EDWIN BREGMABI, LARRY . . BROOKS, CARLTON P. BUCHANAN, LESLIE C. BURKHALTER, JAMES H. . CASON, FRANK A. . CLARK, EMORY F. . . CLEAVELAND, J. PEARCE CONLEY, JOSEPH M. CORDES, PHILIP B. . CORVETTE, THEO. R. . CUMBAA, BILL . . . DAVENPORT, DENNIS D. . DICKENS, CHARLES H. . DICKSON, WARREN C. DOREMUS, OGDEN DUNAGAN, BILL . ELAM, WILLIAM C., JR. . FARRIS, J. JACKSON 4 l9l Atlanta . Atlanta West Point Buffalo, N. Y. Atlanta . Raleigh, N. C. . Charlton City, Mass. . Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta . Atlanta . Rome . Fitzgerald . . Windsor, Conn. . LaGrange College Park Atlanta . Atlanta . Columbus Dial Madison Hephzibah . Atlanta . Washington . Gulfport, Miss. . Bartow CO! I PGI: GF ARTS ff., A . A +1 "se . :ff l 42.1, I I 'I 1 YZ ,Q , 4- mi1x.,,Vf.. l WT' AND SCIENCES SENIORS FORTNEY, AUSTIN ...... Hapeville Q FUNDERBURK, W. CORNELIUS, JR., Tallahassee, Fla. GAMBLE, JOHN R., JR. . . Lincolnton, N. C. GOLDSMITI-I, ROBERT H. . . . . Atlanta GQTTLIEB, FREDERICK I. . GOWER, W. JUsTUs . GRIFFIN, ERNEST L. . GUDE, A. VALDEMAR HALF, MORRIS S., JR. . HARBOUR, CLIFF B. . . HARDEMAN, R. RHODES HARDIN, HENRY C. . HOSCH, WALTER E. . HOWE, EUGENE H: . HUBERT, JACK XV. . HUIE, WADE P., JR. HUNTER, SAM R. . . INGRAM, MERCER B. . JENNINGS, ERWIN R, JOHNSON, THOMAS L KARP, HERBERT R. . KAY, JAMES B., JR. . KAY, JAY .... KNOX, RICHARD G. . LERNER, ERNEST N. . LEWIS, JIM B. . ll0l Miami Beach, Fla. . . . . Atlanta . Tampa, Fl. . . Atlanta . Orlando, Fla. . Memphis, Tenn. . . . . Louisville . Gainesville, Fla. . Gainesville . Tuskegee, Ala. . . Thomasville . Elberton . Quitman . Bainbridge . Milledgeville . . . . Atlanta . Atlanta .1 . Byron . Lakeland, Fla. . Vicksburg, Miss. . Fitzgerald . . . Camilla CQIl.I-GI- QI- ARTS AND SCIEN SENIORS LINEBACK, CARL M. . . LIGHTFOOT, R. MALCOLM . LOWRY, WILEY P. . . MATHEWS, W. HUGH MCARTHUR, JOHN D. . MONEELY, HENRY H. 1 MOPHERSON, TOMMY C. MOORE, ADAIR . . . MOORE, L'oUIs S. . . MURRAY, HAMIL . . . NALLEY, W. BENJAMIN NEWBERRY, DANIEL O. NORTON, JOHN H., JR. . O,DELL, PAUL H. . PARKER, DANIEL P. . PAXTON, THOMAS R. PECRTAL, JACK . . . . PERKINSON, NEIL G. . PLUNKETT, RAY F. Atlanta . Shorter, Ala., . Jackson, Miss. . Jacksonville, Fla. Vidalia . Toccoa . Macon . Culverton . Thomasville Danielsville Gainesville . . Atlanta . Cave Spring . Gainesville . Atlanta . Atlanta Kingsport, Tenn. POATS, RUTHERFORD M. . POLSTEIN, LEON L .... POWELL, E. CARLETON, JR. RAMSEY, RALPH L., JR. Marietta . Atlanta . Decatur Albany Savannah . Atlanta RAPOPORT, STANLEY M. . . New York, N. Y. RENSHAW, PARRE . . . Whitehaven, Tenn. REPASS, ROBERT P. ..... College Park fill 10 ll-GP CDI4 ARTS R3 OPT . -Q- AND SCIENCES SENIO RILEY, ROBERT A., JR. . . RIMER, HARRY B. . . ROCHE, PAT . . . ROGERS, HENRY T. . SMART, ALLAN E. . SNEED, WILSON W. . SPECK, WILLIAM R. . . STANFORD, F. DEWITT . STIPE, CARL E., JR. . . . . STRICKLAND, THOMAS H. . TANNER, JAMEs C., JR. . TINKLER, SAM A. . TODD, J. RUCKER, III . . TURNER, T. J. . ' . . . VANSAANT, CLAUDE V., JR. VARNER, JAMES E. . WALL, THOMAS A. . WALLER, ROY M., JR. . . WALTON, J. LEEROY, JR. WEINKLE, STANLEY . RS Cincinnati, Ohio Miami Beach, Fla. . . . Dublin . 'Atlanta . Valdosta . Gainesville . . . Dalton . Phenix City, Ala. Avondale Estates . . . Atlanta . Atlanta . Atlanta Kingsport, Tenn. . . . Hampton . . Douglasville . Atlanta . Blue Ridge . . Dalton . . . Thomasville . Miami Beach, Fla. WHITE, CECIL A ..... . Waycross WILLEFORD, BENNETT R., JR. . . Atlanta WILLSON, JAMES V. . . . Atlanta WILSO-N, ARTHUR I-I., JR. . . Decatur WITKIND, ELLIOT . . l l2l ' Brooklyn, N. Y. CQIII-GI4 CDI- ARTS AND SCIEN JUNICDIQS ADAMS, CHARLES P. . . ALEXANDER, LOUIs M. . ANDERSON, WILLIAM R. . ANDREWS, AGNEW, JR. ARNOLD, C. JACKSON, JR. . ATKINS, ERNEST C. . . BEAM, FORREST . . . BECRHAM, CHARLES ,M. BENNETT, JAMES W. . . BENNETT, WILLIAM C. . BERGMAN, BURTON B. . BERRY, ROY E. . BLOCK, JEROME G. . . BOWIE, CARROLL W. . . BROWN, LEDLEY N. . . BURNS, E. C., JR. . CARTER, W. JULIAN, JR. . CATO, ROBERT E. . . CHENTOFF, EDWIN F. . COBURN, JOSEPH D., JR. COLLIDCE, C. WALTER . . CRANK, JOHN C. . . . . CRUMBLEY, THORNTON A. DANIELS, P. EDEA . . DEAN, HAL L .... DEMOS, ANTHONY N. . DENHAM, SAMAW. . . DOMINCOS, ANGUS B., JR DOUGLAS, WILLIAM . . DUNCAN, JOE D. . ELLIS, MATHEW M. . . FABIAN, LEONARD M. . FANCHER, JAMES K., JR. . . . . Royston . Dublin . Atlanta . . Tifton . Elberton . Marietta . Sandersville . Miami, Fla. . LaGrange . . Columbus Jacksonville, Fla. . . . Atlanta . Atlanta . Starr, S. C. . Tallahassee, Fla. . Lake Wales, Fla. . East Point . . Americus Miami Beach, Fla. - . Eagle Lake, Fla. . Savannah . Orlando, Fla. . . Atlanta . Mobile, Ala. . Atlanta . A Atlanta . Atlanta . Macon Weirsdale, Fla. . Tavares, Fla. . . Calhoun . Atlanta . . Atlanta FLETCHER, JACK W. . . Tarpon Springs, Fla. FOLCER, J. KENNETH . .... Carrollton FOUNTAIN, T. GRAY . ll3l . . Butler CES Q1 , 0. 45 , , . X Aff , M fix Aa Ll I-GP Qi- ARTS A :gqv ND SCIENCES JUNIORS FRANKLIN, BEN T. . ., . . Metter FREEMAN, JAMES C. . . . . Sylvania FULTON, THOMAS L., JR. . . . . Columbus FUNK, DAVE C. . . . Wilmington, Del. Goss, A. SIDNEY ....... Atlanta GRANT, WILLARD H. . . West Hartford, Conn. GREEN, GEORGE H. ..... Union City HACKNEY, H. SPEER . . Wheeling, W. Va. HAMNER, HERMAN N. . . Phenix City, Ala. HANSON, H. STANLEY . . HARRELL, L. LAMAR, JR. HARRELL, WILLIAM A. HARRISON, ANDREW J. . HARROD, J. PRICE, JR. . . HART, J. FRASER . . HAWKES, A. KENNETH HAYES, JOHN R. . HICKS, W. LYNN . . PLINTON, JIMMY . . HOLT, WILLIAM M. . HORTMAN, HOBART C. . . HORTON, THAD E. . HUDSON, JAMES F. . . HUGHES, SHERMAN . HUIE, RALPH A. . . JACKSON, ED . . JAHN, PAUL H. . . . JOHNSON, J. EDGAR . . . Senoia . Fitzgerald i . . Valdosta . Milledgeville . Townsend . Atlanta . Goulds, Fla. Dothan, Ala. Copperhill, Tenn. . . . Oxford . Atlanta . Cuthbert . . . Atlanta Crystal River, Fla. . . . Gainesville . Atlanta . . Columbus Winter Haven, Fla. . . . Columbus JOHNSON, MALCOLM K. . . . Hartsville, S. C. JOHNSTON, M. HARLAN . Green Cove Springs, Fla. KAEKA, RICHARD M. ..... Tampa, Fla. KIRKLAND, WILLIAM H. . -. Columbus KIRKLEY, FLOYD R. . . KIRKLEY, WILLIAM H. . . KRAVTIN, A. J. . . LANE, DAVID E. . 114.1 . Douglasville . . Fitzgerald . Columbus . Miami, Fla. CQLI I-GP QI- ARTS AND SCIEN JUNIOQS LANE, GEORGE M. . . . Lincolnton LATHEM, WILLOUGHBY ..... Atlanta LAWSON, CARLTON W. . Winter Garden, Fla. LEE, G. C .... MANRIN, JAMES W. . . MANNING, JAMES H. . . MARR, WEAVER M., JR. . MARSHALL, JACK A, MARTINEZ, HECTOR A. . . MCCORD, T. ASHBY . . MCDERMID, HOXVARD C., MCELREATH, FARRIS T. MCQUOWN, JIMMY A. . . MEDLOCR, EMMETT P. . MILLER, WILLIAM B., JR. . . MITCHELL, ROBERT B. MOORE, ROBERT B. . . MORGAN, FRANK E., JR. . MORRISON, BILL D. . . MUNCR, HAROLD P. . NEEL, FRED H. . . . NOEL, MALCOLM E. . NORTON, W. L., JR. . NOVAR, MAX . . PARARO, LUTHER L., JR. . . PARRISH, J. GID . . PATE, THOMAS H. . . ... . . Dupont . Alexandria, Va. . . . Alpharetta . . Atlanta . Perry Ceiba, Puerto Rico Fort Valley JR .... Vidalia . . . Wadley . Decatur . Atlanta . Atlanta . . Atlanta . Madison . Atlanta Milledgeville . Winter Haven, Fla. . Thomasville . . Atlanta . Gainesville . . Atlanta Crawfordville, Fla. Ocala, Fla. . . . Montezuma PATTERSON, WILLIAM C., JR. . . . Adel PAYNE, HAMMOND R. . POLLITZER, WILLIAM S. . PORTER, JOSEPH A. . . RAYMOND, THOMAS W. RAYNER, HUGH S. . . RAWLS, O. GREY, JR. . REEVE, JAMES- J. . RENTZ, THOMAS E. . ll5l . . Atlanta . Greenville, S. C. . Talladega, Ala. .A . Lakeland, Fla. . Meridian, Miss. . . Williamson . . Calhoun . Columbus f .5 S .K 'Z 'v wif, 4 . T. . f j af JM? Aa , CJOIII-GP QI- ARTS AND SCIENCES . 'F . --'TQ JUNIGIQS RITCH, THOMAS G. . . . Starke, Fla. ROBERDS, ELMO M., JR. .... Villa Rica RODDENBERY, JULIEN B., JR. . . . Cairo ROZIER, JAKE R. . . . . Leesburg, Fla. RUSS, ZAGK, JR .... . Leesburg, Fla. RUTHERFOIRD, ROBERT E. . . Oakland, Fla. SEARS, GORDON M. . . . . Atlanta SECORD, ALAN J. . Atlanta SHINALL, ROBERT P., JR. . . Cartersville SIMS, STUART E. . . . . . . Atlanta SINGLETON, C. KENNETH . . Valdosta SMITH, BENJAMIN H., JR. . . Atlanta SNIDER, JACK E. . . . Jacksonville, Fla. SOLOMON, GERALD ...... Atlanta SPENCER, ERNEST A., JR. . . Alachua, Fla. SPIER, R. EUGENE . . . . LaGrange STARR, JOHN W., JR. . . . Albany STOCKARD, CECIL R. . . . Dunwoody STOWE, CHARLES W. . . Alpharetta STRAUSS, WALTER A. . . Atlanta TAYLOR, T. EARL . . . Columbus TRIMBLE, H. BURTON . . Emory WALKER, EDWIN M. . . Bainbridge WALKER, J. EDWIN . . . Louisville WANNAMAKER, LEWIS W. . St. Matthews, S. C. WATSON, L. CHANDLER, JR. . . Anniston, Ala. WEEMS, HOWARD V., JR. . . . Sebring, Ela. WELLS, JOHN C., JR. . . St. Petersburg, Fla. WHATLEY, EDWARDS C. . .... Reynolds WHITE, E. BORDEN, JR. . . Jacksonville, Pla. WILKINSON, THOMAS B., III . Greensboro, N. C. WILLIAMS, LOUIS L., III .... - . Atlanta WRIGHT, J. CARTER . . Tallapoosa WYNNE, ROBERT M. . . . Macon YARBROUGH, CAESAR A. . . . Macon YOUNG, ROBERT G. . . College Park ll6l CQ! I I-GI- QI- ARTS AND SCIENCES SGP!-IOMCDQES ANDERSON, DANIEL C. . Atlanta BAILEY, CARROLL F. . Newnan BARONOVITZ, JACK . . Atlanta BIOELOW, JERRY R. . . . Decatur BRADLEY, HOMER H., II . . Decatur SRANTLEY, MAX E. . . Troy, Ala. BROWARD, J. ALDEN . Miami, Fla. BYRD, JACK E. . . Waycross BYRD, ROBERT B. . . . Atlanta BRUCE, GEORGE A. . Atlanta BRYAN, FRANK M .... Fort Myers, Fla. BRYAN, GEORGE W., JR. . .... Adel CALLAHAN, DAN . . . Rupert CARTER, HAL B. . . . Cleveland, Tenn. CHAPMAN, JOHN C. . . . . Atlanta CHESHIRE, HERBERT W. . Atlanta CLARK, BOB A. . . Atlanta COFFER, BOB H. . . Atlanta COGGINS, ROBERT P. Marietta COHEN, GILBERT . . Atlanta CONE, JOHN F. Decatur COX, PAUL E. . . . Atlanta CRENSHAW, JOHN W. . . . Atlanta J DARDEN, MORRIS A., JR. . West Point DELLINGER, O. D. . . Atlanta DENNIS, DAVID . . Valdosta DIETRICHS, DONALD Atlanta Doss, NOBLE C. . . . . LaGrange DOUGHERTY, JOHN E. . . Newark, N. J. DUNCAN, ROY G. . . . Rome BIRTH, WARREN A. . FITTERMAN, ISRAEL . FORBES, G. LESTER, JR. . FREDERICK, WILBUR W., JR. FULLER, R. M. . GARNER, ROBERT A. . GELLMAN, SIDNEY Z. . . GILLESPIE, S. DEWEY, JR. . GLASS, R. NEIL . . GOLDHAGEN, JERRY Landover, Md. . Atlanta . Atlanta . . . Atlanta Greenwood, S. C. Atlanta . Atlanta . Decatur . . LaGrange Miami Beach, Fla. r Q Mi .:.5'f'. L:ni.l'I. f ' ' -'-- ' 32.1255 -,JPZZ 'fi- U W: ' ' 'V ., " Q . . fa.. -a-.a ra ., A Q' ",s13if f ,. I- A f me .mg : ' , 2 A W I a ,-at .- 'A - -wg .E 'A .. .a , ff ,pair ., 5 ,21 , f ,,.f 'W'-M5191 1- -V :rr 1' f , -Rvsmfa .- a ., . . .. 1. :2.aeg,.,-,E ay. I7 -.M A R JAJ4:-R . . , Q-1,'...,. . .4 ,f.. ..,',vaaI.-1.Ifa. -.y,.-.X OEM-A .. .aa . 2-'Y' 1: ' afrraff' -,U W A-.,w.yI,.4,.1,,a.. ,Mya-.f,, A . 4.1 -, X V-1 an--4. 1. . ,gf ,f,,,.,,,.,,,,,,.,.4,.,. ,.,,.44.,,,.,,.,, . 1 -. - 4 1,1 V.-as A' 4 I . ,fi- -' . " ' ., I J V 7 . 'Fw , . Yffi' . ' FW ' "2 , ' :ar . 05 1 W- , rf, 0 fy " t fa --:ai -, '4 0 f I Q if .., MW 4 1 'f -1 'Vw' 1. Z-2-fa., f' .6 f , 7.11 of 4 f 1 I yi N., Z1 ' ll' I 11:12 .gf M x ' 5 ' ,. '. :A- H if za W .. - - Q, .5 Q.. , - . - I A , - A - . .. if .ia 5. A V 4 . J I G liz' 4 4 meta-if-,gl ,- E :R .Q f vw +A' . g 5 1. f5+g:g.,., .... . AR kk . .. .,., .,,: S 1. .. ' N. N xx: SN Q- 5 x f .1 ' .,,j' U V, 'Nm ,Q V ,gi " ij, ...intl ' . zsgviva. - . I ,L?g2.2'1v-iff" f': .--" . .-545,353-3 2.-,, :Inq-'-TI' T.: 4- .- -rg-1.1, --:z:,L':f- L - - :Wuxi - f.I7J CJOIII-G+ Cl- ARTS AND SCIENCES 4 - 'v 1. .. we-" 1 , . i 1 I -3 -L, yu' , ,,, -,gp RR.. K . Y A I C2 I . K . . ff . , V, gf- as- , 355' we if. 'amz Q 1:12-.V 21' gg.. 1:1-Tw". 1 i W iq, ,WI . Qe11":' A:- , R V. V fagigiifga-'1,,I V, . -,Wy ana , - f - -a'l.Za?If.fs.J f SCDPI-IOMGQES GOLDSTEIN, NORMAN . . Miami Beach, Fla. GROVE, GRAHAM ...... Atlanta GUERRANT, HORACE H. . . Atlanta GUFFIN, T. NEWTON . . . Atlanta HAMBY, QUILLIAN P., JR. . . . Atlanta HANCOCK, GEORGE B. . . HARDEE, CHARLES V. . HARDING, DON E. . HENDRIX, PAUL C. HOBBS, JEssE H. HOGAN, WILLIAM D. . . HOOTON, JOHN A. . HOWARD, JIM W. . . . . Atlanta Chiefland, Fla. . Gadsden, Ala. . Cartersville . Hampton, Va. Augustine, Fla. . Dadeville, Ala. A . . Cochran JAMISON, PYOTT B. . . . . . Atlanta KIMBELL, WILLIAM L. . . Tallahassee, Fla. LAMAR, HOWARD R .... Tuskegee, Ala. LANDHAM, JACKSON W., JR. . . . Atlanta LANE, JOHN G. .... Jacksonville, Fla. LEVITAS, THEODORE C ..... Atlanta LAY, JOSEPH E. . , Jacksonville, Fla. LONGINO, GRADY'E. . . . . Atlanta LOVITZ, HAROLD . . Jacksonville, Fla. MCBRYDE, R. Ross ..... Troy, Ala. MCCLUNG, JIM O. . ..... Albany MCEACHERN, A. OLIVER . St. Petersburg, Fla. MCNULTY, CARRELL S. . MAYS, JOSEPH L. . . MENDEL, JAMES H., JR. . MINOR, HENRY W. MOORE, LEWIS W. MOORE, W. ROBERT . . MORROW, J. GORDON, JR. NESS, ROBERT E. . NICKELSON, JAY V. PEAVY, JACK . . PHILIPS, RABURN D. . . PINKSTON, J. WILLIAM POWELL, W. HARRY PROFFITT, JACK . RENTZ, BILLY P. . Decatur . . . Jackson Coral Gables, Pla. . . . . Atlanta . Atlanta . Oteen, N. C. . . . Hahira . . Winter Park, Fla. . . . . Atlanta . Fort Lauderdale, Fla. x . Atlanta . Valdosta . Hazlehurst . Columbus . Miami, Fla. CGI I l-Gl- CDI- AIQTS AND SCIENCES SOP!-ICDMCDTQES REYNALTD, LOUIS F. . . . Chicago, Ill. RICHARDSON, W. EDWARD . . Abbeville, Ala. R :I ROGERS, HARRISON L., J .... Atlanta ROPER, BERT E. . . . Winter Garden, Fla. ROTI-IMAN, P. PAUL .... Biloxi, Miss. RUSSELL, H. WARREN . . . Atlanta RUTLAND, R. EUGENE, JR. . Ocala, Fla. RUTLAND, WALTER B. . . Ocala, Fla. SCI-INVARZ, ALFRED Atlanta SCHXVARZ, ROBERT . . Atlanta SESSLER, WILLIARD M. Tampa, Fla. SMITHLOEE, MILTON . . . Atlanta STALEY, ALBERT E., JR. . . Decatur STALLINGS, HENRY A., JR. . Savannah STANLEY, W. PAUL . . Hartford, Ala. STEELE, C. EDWARD . . Savannah STEWART, GEORGE C. . . Atlanta STRANVN, ROBERT A. . . . McDonough STURGESS, WILLIAM K. . . Atlanta SUTCLIFFE, WILLIAM H., JR. Miami, Fla. SWINK, ROBERT L. . . Miami, Fla. TAYLOR, W. FORREST . . Quincy, Fla. TEPLIS, PAUL . . . Atlanta' TEPPER, BERNARD . . Cordele TI-IORNTON, H. A., JR. . Decatur TODD, CHARLES E. . . Atlanta TOLBERT, LOUIS E. . . . Atlanta TRIPP, WILLIAM H. . Monticello, Fla. VINCENT, ROBERT H. . . . Rome ,A I I I M 1 , . f is L W . ' ' Ma '7' M .,,. , ,I ,az X I, I if - ' -' ff...-6 'J I X Ti, I :iq Q. , 2-1. 4. I -' I . -. - ' 4.2 qw I4mg,g14yI?. ffavy, , -ag'.,5,..4, , I V . , . may Q' ' . ' , 11, X1 -I f f 'vi I if ' 'I I igggjlz f 64'-1.11 ' ,faiizsf ea-H L- V ' : .5,. V3.- f. was . . ,ay-Q 'f 'WW' 4 12. 1 ra V. .. , .. .W Q.. Wav 'viz' , f ., ,,,. W,.,, ,, I W., , 335, -. tw gf-1' ?' f :Si f M f a , f 1 .. , H ,E 4. ..,. -. . V. ,,I,,M,,, , , Z fy ., ,I J .A Q: I A . .-W '-1.19.2 I f af: ' aw. , W 1k,"'i 'ff .ii-. A. ,ami ea 'famiw' ' I . ww .. Pswflef ":'fZ-f- .. a . . 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'I n -H . j.. cg., -I 5 Zia ,f.,A4g. . I .I .- 4. , ,mf ,QA-. If, . Tv . I KA' ', 'gl I 'ZJII are . ejffir. 5 we , sv tw .M ' R 1. Q N 'vi' ' ' . AGS " ' ..,.:.,,..,I.,,,.,.fI.:I- ,I 5,5-,... ,aj Wm I ,fm-.I.,f5R,,2.,,.:.-.-A. -, .,q75:rg:,ax::,Iw:..:-'5 .G'ZSf5,filS.0 ' :SI 5' Yfwa .em-I I 03.-54: WARD, WILLIAM Q. Albany I ,, ' ? 'X J' Q ' '4--' ' A- I ' " '-fi' I ..I. . . . WATKINS, MALTBY F. . West Palm Beach, Fla. 1 -:ff ' Q WEAVER, ROBERT L. . . Ducktown, Tenn. WEBB, JOHN H- - - - - Orlando: Fla- i ff . -' ' . . , A WEINKLE, MILTON L. . . M1amI Beach, Fla. if , XVILLIAM5, ALLISON F. . . . Atlanta as , , 'WV - files ' 1 . - .SI. . I . , W., 5 V. I:I,I.,,L -I . I , I, WILSON-, JOSEPH S. . . Savannah Iv? , . S7233-I, WINDSOR, JAMES T. . . McRae I 4 ... , f WOODRUFFI JACK D- - - Sanford, Fla- A """ I - -"' ' YONKS, IRVING M. . - Red Bank, N- J- U91 CGI gf ARTS AND SCIFNCFS PRES!-IMEN ACKERLY, ERNEST . ,. Atlanta ADAMS, OSCAR S. . .... . Butler ALDENDEREER, FRANKLIN W. . . Miami, Fla. ALEXANDER, PAUL B. . . . Atlanta ALLEN, J. NORMAN . . . Tampa, Fla. ALLEN, J. REYNOLDS . . Milledgeville ANDERSON, CLYDE F. . . . .Atlanta ATKINS, J. THOMAS . . Atlanta BAILEY, RICHARD .' . . Atlanta BAKER, ROY M. . . Jacksonville, Fla. BAKER, WARREN D. . . Atlanta BASS, EMORY P. . . '. .Valdosta BERMAN, JEROME D. J . . . Atlanta BLAKE, J. WITHERS . . Lakeland, Fla. BLISS, FRANK W., JR. . . . Athens BLOODWORTH, J. M. BARTOW, JR. . Atlanta BOATRIGHT, CLEM A. I . Jacksonville, Fla. BOWERS, FRANK A ...... Albany BOYNTON, M. T., JR. . . Atlanta BRANAN, WILLIAM C. . .... Atlanta BRANNON, FRED R. . New Smyrna Beach, Fla. BRAZZEAL, RICHARD T. . BROCK, ALVA M. . . BROOKMAN, CHARLES J. . BURGAMY, CLYDE A. CARMICHAEL, CHELSEA W. . CARSON, ERNEST H. . . CARTLEDGE, ANDREW C. CHILDS, G. BURKE, JR. , CHISNELL, ROBERT E. CHRISTIAN, GILMER A., JR. . CLINE, PETER J .... COLEMAN, BILL E. . . COLLINS, J. FRANK . COOK, GEORGE P. . CRAWFORD, JOE M. . . . CURTIS, E. L. . . . DANIEL, WILLIAM R. . DANIEIIS, EB, III . DEAN, AUSTIN F. . . Brookhaven . . .ROmeA . Decatur . . . .Irwinton . Cuthbert . Dunwoody . . Columbus Winter Haven, Fla. . . . . Decatur . Atlanta . Atlanta . . Atlanta . Brooksville, Fla. . . . . Atlanta . Atlanta . Douglas . Atlanta . Decatur . Atlanta DEAN, BILL J. . . . . St. Petersburg, Fla. DORTOH, FRANK E. . . . Hawkinsville DOWDA, F. WILLIAM, II . . . Smyrna l20l CQIIMEE EIQESI-I DREIZIN, ISAAC . . . DURDEN, ROBERT F. . . FINCH, GEOIKGE G., JR. . FLEMMING, SYDNEY W. FLETCHER, CLIFFORD J. . FOSTER, RALPH H. . FREEDMAN, JACK D. . FREEIVIAN, OLEN I. .- GAY, EDNVARD S., JR. . GILBERT, JOE W., JR. GILBREATH, ROBERT L. . GLASS, JOE W. . . . . GOLDBERG, L. FREDERICK . GORDON, THOMAS E., JR. GREER, WILLIAM E., JR. . GRESHAM, WYLIE O. . GRIFFIN, REESE E. . . I-IANLIN, H. CAREY, JR. . HARKINS, DONALD N. . HARRELL, BILL H. . HARRIS, RICHARD M. . HARTLEY, BILL C. . . . , HEINZ, WILLIAM L., JR. . MEN . Butler . Graymont . Atlanta . . Thomasville . . Fitzgerald . Bluffton . Atlanta . Mobile, Ala. . . . Atlanta . . Jacksonville, Fla. Atlanta . Atlanta . . Augusta . . Orlando, Fla. . . Buford Waynesboro . . . Macon Chattanooga, Tenn. . . . . Atlanta . Vero Beach, Fla. . . Decatur Hollywood, Fla. . Columbia, S. C. HELLAMS, JOHN R. ...... Decatur HERRING, WILLIAM C. . . Atlanta HODGES, THOMAS L., JR. . . Decatur HOLLIS, CHARLES D., JR. . . Forsyth HOLLIS, JIMMY P. . . . , Newman HORVICK, PETER V. . HOWARD, JAMES M. HOWE, HENRY B. . . HOWELL, CLARK, JR. . HOWELL, W. HARVEY . . HUBBARD, ROY M. . . HUGHES, DONALD L. INGRAM, PORTER W. . . INGRAM, WALTER W. J . JACKSON, HIRAM M. . JAMES, ALBERT S., JR . . Scranton, Pa. Signal Mountain, Tenn. . Decatur . Atlanta . Cartersville . . Atlanta Cleveland, Tenn. . Decatur . Jasper, Fla. . . Eastman . . . Reynolds JEANS, P. CHALMERS, JR. . Greenwood, S. C. l2'l CE ARTS A SCIENCES 13 li 'Q 'fi 'I' I I2 .sz-J, f , -3 A X tt? if, 1, ' Z". - -.1 Ii' fi? Tay 3 , .-- I . K' X I JEZTLQ. '. . , ww .. ,- R Vl.::-- 'R ia5':.z::F:, I 'sei' l'+l,g 'M R' fs- 'zf' '- 52-I.-2 'T Aa- . A - 1.5:2 ffP.. ix , I f I , f 'I I . . Q, . V . X. .O I rx, I 5:52 f Qe:aR4i:::5::'s: I I2.,.a:.,1-.,..g'f' , , fm - ' YWA 'f-,. - ff, . ff Ef its-. IE-fI?':,. ' ' .A ':.+-f-'RM'-.f3I::"-.' . 1 V.,. WM' , ag., , .. ., ,... , .. .. ,...a..,.,..,.,. , .. , , .,.,,, - . - .17 .Q-: -IA-1,,fd.E3,: a. 4165: .fa -, mu:-4. - 4,1-.:, -1.1 .,:-Sf, 'Ii' gm. N- 9" B .R --.ap-: :..-: V- ---- :Q-5, -. :-.-w I .fs-:aw .1 ,, , , i .-,,,' I ,LQ . . I . , . , . , .. ,,, .., wi V a f A 1, :Vx 'z a W 'f ,yef , I ,ra 5. fi xg 2 X, . . N CJ . ' :5 . . - 'fy , M2 'Ga . . ' . ,-,M 7 '- I I , , ' . - - 'f wif..-gs ,f ' A . .-I 1m.1mwm..,f. w. y?q.5..,g,Q .S . 1 WPI.-wrfm. -.1 rf- ,a. .4,a...1w1: ., I 1 1 . . ' , -- ' -. ' x?n:'ei"5fiIR."' F-12 R I -- ,, ., , I I """" -1 .. " '4'if :" ' I-'s' fifa 2.-' "ne, .- ' , .,, , , , g-g.,z,5g5fI.- 1 I f W, ' ' Y-A .4 1 ri- A ,. :..l :. Ji l. ' . 1' if . v . ' ' I' ' . , A .sf " R' ..:::..:..Sg.,' I. :':sfL:I.5as:.:.-I'- .-'f:::- -Hi.. ' - . Sf:-I: 3.1.1-"1-1.-1-." .aaa ,. I I I I I .ww CGI I PGI- QI- ARTS AND SCIENCES IIIQESI-IIVIEIXI JOHNSON, THOMAS D. . . JOHNSON, WILLIAM B, . . Hawthorne, Fla. . . Ellaville JOHNSTON, FREDERICK S., JR. . Tampa, Pla. JONES, BARRIE L. . KAPLAN, MARVIN . KELLEY, GEORGE F. KELLEY, BILLY . .I . KNIGHT, DEXTER, L. . . KNOWLES, GEORGE T. KOBLEY, DONALD E. LANE, WILLIAM S. . LESLIE, PELIX W. . . LIEGHITZ, GERALD H. . LINDGREN, GRAY M. LIPTON, JOSEPH J. LOVVORN, ROBERT L. . LUMSDEN, TOM N. . . MOCLURE, W. WILSON MCDOUGALD, W. WORTH . . MCGRADY, CHARLES W., JR. MAGNON, WEST B. . . MALONEY, RICHARD H., JR MARTINEZ, ERNEST J. . MEADOWS, CARTER L. METTS, DAN L. . MEYER, CHARLES F., JR. . MISGALLY, ARTHUR E. . MORGAN, JOHN J. . . MURPHY, RALPH A. NELSON, GID E. . NEWSOM, BRUCE C. . NICHOLS, P. JOHN NORMAN, JOHN P. . NORRIS, JACK C. . . . Alma Atlanta . Lawrenceville . . Carlton . Bunnell, Fla. . . . Broxton . . Miami Beach, Fla. . Roanoke, Ala. . Troy, Ala. . Atlanta . Atlanta . Beaufort, S. C. . Bremen . Nacoochee . . Atlanta . Statesboro . Macon . Tampa, Fla. . . . Atlanta . Atlanta . Vidalia . Bristol, Va. . Atlanta Atlanta . Atlanta . . Atlanta . Clearwater, Fla. . Columbus Apalachicola, Fla. . . . Columbus . Atlanta OLIVER, CARL S. . l Atlanta PARKS, JAMES B. . . PARRIGIN, I. FRANK . . Cleveland, Tenn. . . . Atlanta PATTERSON, OLIN W., JR. . . Lumpkin POOLE, SAMUEL . . Americus POPE, JAMES S., JR. . Louisville, Ky. I22 I CQ! I I-GP QI- ARTS AND SCIENCES PRES!-IMEN POU, LEO H., JR. . . . . Atlanta PRITCHETT, JOSEPH H., JR. . . Atlanta RECE, DON A. . . . . Atlanta REILLY, ENOS J. . . . Atlanta RICHARDSON, BOB D. . Atlanta RICKS, WATSON S., JR. . . Lumber City RIGHTS, CLYDE S. . . . . Tampa, Fla. ROBINSON, STANLEY.M. . . Savannah RODDENBERY, RALPH J. . . . Cairo RUSSELL, ROBERT L. Winder SCRUGGS, JACK H. . . Sweetwater, Tenn. SEALY, HUGH K., JR. . Reynolds SEALY, O. FRED, JR. . . Atlanta SEBRING, ROBERT E. . Atlanta SEWELL, ROY B. . Atlanta SHOENFELT, MARION J. . . Atlanta SHUMATE, ROBERT E. L. . Sea Island SMITH, HAROLD R. . . . Atlanta SMITH, RICHARD B., JR. . . Hawkinsville STAFFORD, W. ALVIS . . Thomaston STEINBORG, BOB J. . . . Atlanta STONE, HUGH F., JR. . Fernandina, Fla. STORY, STACY H., JR. . . . . Atlanta STROZIER, WILLIAM A. . Atlanta STUENBING, LOUIS A. . . Decatur TENENBAUM, RAYMOND .... Atlanta THOMAS, RUSSELL D. . West Palm Beach, Fla. TIDWELL, EARL V., JR .... 4. Atlanta TODD, WILLIAM S. . . Kingsport, Tenn. TWIGGS, L. MARVIN . . . . Augusta WALKER, CHARLES C. . . Cleveland, Tenn. WATKINS, WILLIAM M. . . Hollywood, Fla. WHIDDON, ROBERT E. . . . . Tifton WHITE, L. COMER . . . . Atlanta WILKINSON, PETER B. . Atlanta WILLINGHAM, ROBERT T., JR. . Marietta WISE, E. JEAN .... . Americus WOODSON, GRATTAN C. . . Middlesboro, Ky. WRIGHT, GEORGE W. . West Palm Beach, Fla. ZUMWINKEL, JOHN H ..... Decatur I221 wwf , 'V ,W .f5'1l1'2?f'1-f. 49 . , . '1..Q..'3? 5? ., W 'f A S .131 f -. , g g, A , V . ww , If , A I kv . . I 'V-im -N. NWN' I . v.. 4. Y? .f-an T. I 'W 49, ' IQ, l' . "Business as usualf, This isn't printed on the front door of Fishburne, but the phrase in some way symbolizes the staunchness of the School of Business Administration. The all-inclusive war effort has found places - valuable places - for those students majoring in Business Administra- tion, Industrial Management, Accounting, and various other fields. The school is training them by speeding up the assembly lines of a complete college education. The courses are modernized each year, new courses are added to give the student a better understanding of business prob- lems in war time. s This year the Student Council after much lengthy discussion and debate, gave the "tired businessmen" a place to rest-a lounge, After the issue was declared unconstitutional and tabled, the appropriation was finally granted and the furniture and fixtures for the room selected by a business school committee and Louise Kilpatrick. Tastefully furnished, the lounge affords students a pleasant atmosphere in 24 which to utilize their off-periods. Students study, talk, and read here-glad for the chance to vacate the usually congested halls. Bob Mizell, the Dean, who is also Director of University Development, furnished the school with an irreplaceable source of advice and knowledge. Both sympathetic and firm in his beliefs, he calmly guides with the asset of ex- perience. A small but excellent faculty effi- ciently carries its heavy load by teaching dif- ferent courses each quarter. Miss Kilpatrick, the Dean,s secretary, is invaluable in making out new schedules and programs besides doing many other jobs. Working on the principle of concentration in one of the various fields of business, the Bus Ad school first gives its students a thorough Liberal Arts education during the lower division train- ing. Students are then put through a series of business foundation courses and finally the field of concentration is opened up for students, specialization. BUSINESS SCI-IQQI SIZNICDRS ATKINSON, WADE . . . BRASELTON, JOHN O., JR. . BROWN, WILLIAM H. . BURDETTE, H. SPEER, JR. BURNETTE, JOHN M. CRAVEN, LEON J. DANIEL, C. AMOND . . FORREST, CARROLL T. . GOLDBERG, JOE . GROOVER, EDWARD L. . GURLEY, KENNETH R. . HOGG, HENDERSON H., J JACOBS, SINCLAIR S., JR. . KARTOS, JOHN LEVITT, JACOB . . NICHOLS, ROBERT A. . NIKAS, ANGELO G. . SHELL, L. DONALD, JR. . SMITH, CHARLES A. . THOMAS, HARRY G. . XVHITENTON, JOE B. . WILLIAMS, R. WENDELL . P YORK, JOE C .... ZIMMERMAN, JEROME R. . . Atlanta . Braselton . Brunswick . LaGrange Tampa, Fla. . Atlanta Plant City, Fla. . Messick, Va. Waynesboro . Marietta . Atlanta Ceclartown Atlanta . Atlanta . . Atlanta Hempstead, N. Y. Atlanta Miami, Fla. . Barnesville . Metcalf Atlanta Atlanta . Luthersville . Atlanta ., ..,- . . l E if I qc I .W ,. .,., . I . ,- A W - ' . , T 'yi 41' l"'f ,122 - za: -fr fa. ' fa f. ,- -,- ., 1 3 . , , . ff' if " -'t' ,A . ..,,. Z as S1 .:.'z,:12-1v.i:- . A- 'fzsffzvfir -Mig. :Mix v-grim-".:f-11.42 A f?4"'kff"'-'lfl ' 1 I 9" If -5 , .V 1 a.5.,4' A ' 25 'Dt L -new BUSINESS SC!-IOCDI. JUNIQQS Hg ULF' 13 , I Q ','!f?' 1 1 I K I ! 4 A- . ..-wr 6 J I-rw A Mi .' ' Jfr' gf ' ,,I1!1f.g,. ff ' gf! .x-. hy, X, i A D67 f?35'3Gf A ., .3 . :'!'r?fE5-:Wil V .,, My f.-we "Lf -' A ' ff' ' , ff' E5 1 .f I A fa! 'P 5 ya . n i S W al is 'ic ,,y irq ' Xi r R ,t I 1 sf- ALJ- . S fifha Xe:.-::':I::'f,. ' , tw, ok A X 1 7 N 0 1 ' -6'-A ' sr N X .5 . Rt f mx . is ' , K . ifgtyf .4 'A '77 1 , ADAIR, IRVING . . . ADAMS, HAMMOND . BARRON, LINDSEY H. . . BATES, GEORGE D., JR. . BIRDSONG, RALPH H. BISHOP, HAROLD A. . BLACK, JAMES G. . BRUMBY, WILLIAM E. COLBERT, RALPH . GERLAND, LOUIS A., JR. . HOOK, ED . . . . JOHNSTON, RICHARD . LEVINE, MANUEL . . LOWENDICK, KARL R. PAYNE, DOYLE H. . PERRY, R. SAVILLE . POWELL, T. JACKSON, JR. . RINOOLD, E. HARRELL . SCOTT, WILLIAM H., JR. . SIEGEL, HAROLD . STARR, TRAMMELL . SUBER, C. EDWIN . TILLY, WILLIAM H. . TOLOHARD, ALLEN S. WATSON, THERON E. . . WESTMORELAND, JOHN L. . WHITE, DELOS H., JR. . U61 Atlanta . Eatonton Newman' . Quincy, Fla. . Atlanta . Starke, Fla. Jasper, Fla. . Marietta . Columbus Atlanta . Atlanta . Woodstock . Atlanta . Flint, Mich. . Atlanta . Dawson Plant City, Fla. . Decatur . West Point . Atlanta Dalton . Ben Hill . Atlanta . Atlanta . Lithonia . Atlanta- . Atlanta BUSINESS SCI-IOGI. SGP!-IGMORE ANDRENVS, ROBERT J. . Decatur A-UERBACH, SAM . . . Atlanta BAREIELD, THOMAS J. . . Atlanta BOWEN, JAMES L., JR. . . Tifton BOYLE, JOHN J. . . Atlanta BURDETT, LEE H. . . . Sandy Springs CORLEY, WILLIAM H .... . Marietta DICKSON, MARMADLIRE N., II . Marianna, Fla. DUGGIXN, FRANCIS A. . I-Iawkinsville EBY, GEORGE W. Winter Garden, Fla. FEDLY, O. FLOYD, JR. . . Atlanta FLONVERS, F. ASBURY . Dothan, Ala. FULLER, ROBERT H. . . Decatur HOOD, FOY L. . . . Atlanta JOHNS, WILLIAM S. . . Atlanta KAPLAN, ELI . . Wrightsville KEY, WILLIAM P. . . . . Atlanta O,NEAL, ROBERT L., JR. . . . Uvalda PHILLIPS, JAMES M. . . Emory University RANDALL, LUTHER H., JR. . . Atlanta ROWOLD, JOHN C., JR. . . Atlanta SHLIESTETT, THOMAS W. . .Cedartown SCHOENBERG, MELVIN . . Beaufort, S. C. SMITH, JACK C. . . Moultrie SMITH, W. SAM . . . Atlanta SPIELBERG, NATHAN . . . . Atlanta STOCKMAN, EARLEE., JR. . Greenwood, S. C. STRIPLING, DAVID C. . . . Newnan WILLIAMSON, E. RUSSELL . . Decatur 27 Ill ffm in 2? BUSINESS SCI-ICDCDL PRES!-IMEN 'I ., A ,-N , ' ,-3.5 wx IQ. -fi rm 9 at l 'Stk ' I ' 5- QQP'-L -7' Q21 ' . :Fifi - . ill 1: -'-i -Q.: 1 J AKINS, CHARLES L. . BARNES, DUELL B. . . . CALDWELL, H. EUGENE CARLTON, JAMES C. COLEMAN, T. HENRY, JR. . DOMINGOS, RICHARD B. . EPSTEIN, JERRY B. . FRANCO, ARON R. . FRANCO, DAVID M. . GOLDSTEIN, LEON C. . HOEHL, JOHN R. . . . Statesboro . Columbus . Atlanta . Atlanta Jacksonville, Fla. . . . .Macon Mount Vernon, N. Y. . . . . Atlanta . Atlanta . . Atlanta . Coral Gables, Fla. JACKSON, H. COLEMAN, JR. . Greenville, S. C. JACOBSON, BURTON H. . JORDAN, LEE A. . H KARP, HERBERT . LUPO, JAMES W. . MAROVER, STANFORD I. . MAY, JOE M., JR. . . . MICHALOVE, LEONARD T. MILLER, JOHN M. . . SAUL, MILTON L. . . SHEATS, F. BREWSTER . SMITH, RANKIN M. . SPECTOR, MAURIOE W. STEIN, SIDNEY A. . l.28l . Atlanta . Atlanta . Atlanta . Dalton . Atlanta . Atlanta . . Atlanta . Atlanta . Atlanta . Atlanta . Atlanta s . . Atlanta . Atlanta vo Alumni HeIPaEm0"Y Men and News I BUY Admifs T 'C' X4 1 , Bring S-lslooollketurn on Gripsholm IV Gruduafes lgqflq . 'TWO EMORY MEN and news of a thirflr OF Q1 f V of BH Plant T9 Sour re' ' '- --Ln unsmfl Srazes August 26. li ' X -Jlwfy law alum' fi if IE' ,O EMORY ALUMNI Jun U 'acukares .and two seniorsl . . ff lie Iarmichael '33-'34L, Qobb 3" 'WJ evaminafirwl . 1 ' ' 0,7 ii-nay, and Leon fRipJ -A ' 11719 fwjflilfiltismigiliifJe Gecfenefd 4014! Z! G' ko .ffrflffif Q . . , ' 1- f Q07 J'5li1lanCimwi6Tl. breiill . 'TU E ' I Ln 1 foq- Q H s th 'i .ELU -. . Bfsfff, 6 I vfiou 'IJTHFEM R" 1 -" 6 0 and Ml .J ALUMV' t Univcffn' ' 78- 8 0 ho work World Wf- . 0 , i f, was o A 0' 8' -1"i' A r ' LW Xku-' W l' ul TTYL se Have AITET00 9a flaw" ...... w..........i..... 'L J" .,-4-1" Ti, -Nfl Ig 1, -. Now x?,moY5' T Riitavi' Tliilnlj V fisk lllelfif-iiliilyar .fe ' 7fw , ' . ted to TTT Quiet in 'Q If- lim Sh,-J i A ' 'Xe dedwaakre goon' Q umm' E -JVVUCDT QP WI" fHfSz.5.WfY r?.sELiaf.rs33r si MEMBERS OFlheClassofl90S1X During Dr ,, naar , rpm rx . , .- , . -sr, .... - - , ' E. me QFNGITIG Bryan "' H699 o'L"wdsA""'9 . .H iv lwvll Digi. lifllll, Choo' SWE IXLVVLVLL . . . . Emory University is people-many people, working together to do a job of education. Some are professors, many are students, some are the "administrative staff," several are the Board of Trustees, and a very great number are former students called alumni. They have a campus, buildings, some endowment fcapital, like any sound business undertakingj, but above all they have a will to do a job, a determina- tion to operate a first class university which will be of genuine service to people and will perform a necessary service for the nation. 4 Therefore we naturally have an Alumni Association-representing the organized effort of the alumni to do their portion of the job and to get their share of the good and the proht from the university. The Alumni Oflice, on the campus, is the headquarters of the alumni. This office, first of all, keeps up with the alumni-keeps the Emory family together. Since the accomplishments of Emory are largely measured through the accomplishments of the former students, the Alumni Office actually tries to compile the life history of each alumnus. The alumni publish a magazine for themselves. This magazine, called THE EMORY ALUMNUS, makes it possible for the family to know all that is happening in the University-on among the individuals working all over the world. zine goes to many peo le outside the Emor famil P Y Ya the good works of Emory, the good work of Emory -and justifies the pride that Emory folks take in in each other. the campus and And this maga- and shows them men and women their school and The Alumni Oflice has a very personal interest in every former student of Emory. There is a mass of continuous correspondence be- tween the ofiice and the individual alumni. This office works for the alumni and for Emory. And the alumni have long since learned that if they want to keep up the contacts with the friends they knew in college, if they want to hold closer to their fraternity and other college associations, if they expect to need a recommendation for a job or to establish a credit rat- ing, if they wish to draw dividends from their university throughout their lives, they can get much aid by active membership in their Alumni Association. Universities are one of the most permanent creations of man, and Emory folks know that by linking their names and their efforts with this great undying institution they can attain a sort of earthly im- mortality. Their names will live forever. l29l DxfN,w5hELN. xuxal il rifnsafri E K at ft' T V I in 'lr'-ff YT' Ufci TY. Lhiyfgihis 5,e3f.Nl"4 .N iXiwl'.1m,,.V I -funi. 5O'1St1fU, N ' DVSTUTT- ilo"il"i'll 'f'W.sf-1 as HCI .or ' 'fff' ,- D Y 0 Hill' sn- 'dmf'd Ii ., 511 ' ,W mf 1W'egNij'san sa S G. 111 0 ,M Nofabg imcs Draw 14-5 Ho Tongh 5Chglllfw egicykl, ,016 Ygqlifqsh in Esehiqwns Win-scaly K e of sfr5i"df1e'1"itfv'ffX- bi' irrrr een AR 1 ,.,-in Y Y I .. FS all young m- 'NIU imc ,Vi ri-'A' "" 'FU 1.1 Over tlzmds . Emow I al 0 . ? me is sms , 'fl ,ma Ga sffen' N. BANKS '03 CQXIG qenciile .few D Service Y R S n S0011 nlummdfi ' ' s' T lr.. ' ' im' 11 tE f W deaf '- Ofiifwfx' Coil A4 .23 , mory Doctor I. -4- Irrl 0 cj I 15 iiii1s'DENr1VTi!'ii DY aomviigssse H. BRESSE5 Alufl Book of L6Studen'1'5 smo.-y Dbctor lXoN's BOOT ' . . - IS SEL ' Philippines Q ' ECTED TNE OF THE w,.Ji.iiri.f.i"- Y- Pusiisfil Emory Mobilizes' In March of this year a reception sponsored by the MSAC will be the beginning of the most important part of the lives of many young men. The illustrious Emory Medical School faculty will be there to greet and, at the same time, look over the incoming crop of potential medicos. The Juniors and Seniors will be there with a blase' air acquired after having successfully completed the hardest years of their medical training. The Sopho- mores will be there, with a singular smuggness at having "lived to tell the tale" of their Hrst year. They do tell it, too. They scare the hell out of a group of new men at the reception, warilv hope- ful, uncertainly conident that they will come out all right. The first day they go to the Anatomy Building, staring at the grotesque brain diagrams and the charts of the nervous system and intestines. They meet Dr. Blincoe, who smiles at them. They aren't sure whether it is a smile or a smirk. He tells them that their equipment is waiting for them in the laboratory. Up the winding flights of stairs to the third floor lab they go, with mingled feelings of apprehension, dread and fear showing plainly on their faces. Their footsteps are the only audible sounds. They file through the green door on which is the doleful greeting, "Sight- seekers or those seeking satisfaction of idle or morbid curiosity are NOT WELCOME.', The bodies are shaved the first day by young men with weak stomachs who as yet have not become accustomed to the stench of human flesh pickled in pungent formaldehyde, the sickly sweet odor of phenol, and later the acrid smell of fat. It lurks on their hands, their clothes, and in their hair. It is the smell of the Freshmen Med. They buy the books, so heavy they must be carried in a satchel. They come to the realization that they must learn a new set of ABC's. Anatomy, Blincoe, Cadavers, Dissecting, Effort, Fatigue- and a myriad other terms, new and fascinating that will demand their entire time. Their days are full. They scarcely find time to eat and sleep. Six days a week they rise, attend class at 8:30 to be lectured about Histology, Bacteriology, Physiology, and the otheriologysj so mys- terious to the layman. After lunch each day, they climb the stairs to the Anatomy lab to dissect various parts of the body, to find and label every bone, muscle, tissue and fiber, to discover the functions of every organism and neuron. When they leave the lab about 5:30 and eat a good supper, they settle down to the laborious hours of study, mulling over their heavy books, their tin boxes of human bones, and their charts and diagrams. At a very l30l late hour, they fall in bed, exhausted, to sleep soundly. The fresh- men say the med school routine is in reality easier on them than the harum-scarum life of the college. Each day the procedure is the same, and the regularity is in itself healthful. The freshmen are given tests. When they finish studying some part of the body in Anatomy, they are given a "lab practical" in which they hav-e a minute and a half to identify a certain struc- ture which is tied with a red string. They have "quiz sections" which are usually oral, and are met with dread. They never know whether they are making A or F, purely because this lack of knowledge will keep them doing their best. As they enter a quiz section in the third quarter of their studies, their attitude is one of a more nonchalant confidence than they have ever shown before. Various members of the faculty hold, quiz sections. Q'Big John" Venable, affable red-headed giant, called the "holy terror" of quiz sections, shuffles in, hurling his first ques- tion as he enters the door. Dr, "Happy" House, subtly sarcastic, incessantly grinning, grunts as a student points out the attach- ments of the gluteus medius muscle on the skeleton at the front of the room-interrupting the explanation with his inevitable Q'Are you kiddin'?', or 'gVery interesting." 'His sections are often a riotous burlesque. Mr. Fitzpatrick,s sections are more formal and orderly. But when the door slowly opens, and Dr. Homer Blincoe walks in, a hushed silence falls like a hammer. He hooks his fingers in his lab coat, crosses his hands across his chest and begins to speak-softly, almost in a murmur. He has short-cropped white hair, and a large bony head. He looks like Toscanini. The striking feature about him is his eyes-large black eyes made larger by thick-lensed glasses. They are compelling, magnetic. They inspired the song, "The eyes of Blincoe are upon you, you cannot get away . . .', Students often quake under his most amiable gaze. He is both feared and revered. His students say, "There is much about Anatomy that only Dr. Blincoe and God know, and there are some things Dr. Blincoe doesn't even tell God." Fresh- men meds have been taught to be afraid of him from preceding classes who revel in the terrorization of the novices. He is softly sarcastic, and makes them feel that they should know all the things they don't. Late at night a passerby will notice one window lin uo in the darkness. t'Butch,' as he is called by all his stud-ents, will be there, remaining the enigma of the Medical School. He also re- mains an indelible fond memory for those who graduate, take their two-year interneship, and scatter to foreign parts to become good doctors . . . country practitioners, diagnosticians, surgeons. x MEDICAL SCI-IDOL SENICDIQS AINSWORTI-I, WILLIAM L. . Bay Springs, Miss. ARMSTRONG, C. PRESTON . Fountain Inn, S. C. BENSON, W. HONVARD, JR. . . BIXLER, THOMAS J. . BRADLEY, PAUL L. . BRANNEN, EDMUND A. . BROWN, CHARLES E. BURGE, CHARLES D. . BURSON, E. NAPIER, JR. . CHILDS, EDXVARD -A. . . COOK, E. RICHARDS, III . CORDES, JOHN H., JR. . DAVIS, JAMES E. . . . FLETCHER, T. BERT, JR. . . 'HOOD, DOUGLAS W. . Marietta Live Oak, Fla. . . . Dalton . Millen Barnesville . Atlanta . . Decatur Montgomery, Ala. Newman . Atlanta Tupelo, Miss. Greensboro, Fla. St. Petersburg, Fla. JACOB, PEYTON, JR. . Americus JONES, GERALD W. . . . Orlando, Fla. JORDAN, WILLIS P., JR. . . Columbus MCLEOD, J. WILLIAM, J . Moultrie MARKS, EDXVARD S. . . Toccoa MASHBURN, MARCUS, JR. . . Cumming NEWMAN, J. HAROLD . . Jacksonville, Fla. PARKS, JOSEPH W ...... Newnan PAULLIN, WILLIAM L. . . . . Pelham PENDERGRAST, WILLIAM J. . Atlanta RODGERS, RICHARD C. . . . Tampa, Fla. ROREBECK, CURTIS G. . . . . Tampa, Fla. SHAFFERMAN, SAMUEL L. . . . Atlanta SIMMONS, M. FREEMAN . Decatur STAMPS, EDXVARD R., III . . Norfolk, Va. STURDEVANT, CLINTON E. . Atlanta SUTRER, HAROLD . . . Savannah, I TI-IOMAS, BENJAMIN F., J Auburn, Ala. I TRULOCK, ALBERT S., JR .... Waycross TURNER, H. HAYXVOOD, II . . Atlanta WAGNON, GEORGE N. . . Atlanta WALDREP, JACK M. . . . Leesburg, Fla. WALL, HILTON F. . . . . Atlanta WEAVER, JAMES M. . . . Leesburg, Fla. WILLIS, W. RUSSELL . . Barnesville MEDICAL SCI-ICDOI. JUNIORS 3 :-477 Q1 'E A fa.. AQ. , Zn 'C' '. If' 1- 4: A , A E'--A - , -Zwii'-A at gf' " '1-'s 'za " t he " 5-5 ff , - , ,,,, ,.,. , , . A A , ---- "Y ' 'gil-ff! fiiiiifmi .. A 1 . ' , mv X ' ' Z ,gl Q , 'B' Q 9. , Iv I . t x " 1 . .4 wwfffv ,AA-5 asa-::w:4a.,:... ADAMS, GUY H. . . ALLGOOD, I-I. PIERCE . ANDERSON, HORACE M. BARROW, J. GORDON BELL, J. MAC, JR. . BRAY, DOLPH, JR. . BREININ, GOODWIN M. ERWIN, GOODLOE Y. FLORENCE, TOM J. . . FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN FREEMAN, TOM R. . GEHEBER, DEAN W. HOLMES, EDGAR C. . HUIE, ROBERT E., JR. . MCDONALD, JAMES J. MAY, ALBERT L., JR. NEEL, JULIAN B. . PASCHAL, J. DEAN . POXVELL, FINCHER C. ROGERS, GEORGE W. SKIPPER, W. GROOVER . East Point . Marietta . Atlanta . Atlanta Mobile, Ala. . . Dalton Miami Beach, Fla. . Athens Douglasville . Atlanta . Brunswick . Moultrie . Moultrie . Albany . . Athens . Perkinston, Miss. Thomasville Dawson . Atlanta Gulfport, Miss Lakeland, Fla. STEAD, WILLIAM W. . . DCCHUJI' TURRENTINE, PAUL E. . . Douglas WILLIAMS, HOWARD V. . M2000 AWOOD, ARTHUR W. . Miami, F12 l32l MEDICAL SCI-ICQ! SOP!-IOMCDIQES BAGGS, WADE H., JR. . BELL, H. VINCENT . BIOKERS, DONALD S. . BRYANT, HENRY H., III CAUBLE, GEORGE C. CLARY, W. UPTON . . COFFEE, AROHIE T. . DENNISON, DAVID B. . DRIVER, L. ROWE, JR. EDGERTON, MILTON T. FACKLER, WILLIAM B., JR. . GARVIN, WILLIAM H., JR. GIBSON, COUNT D., JR. GIBSON, FRANK L., JR. GREGORY, HUGH H. GRIZZARD, VERNON T., JR. . GUNTER, A. RHETT . . HENDRIX, J. WAYNE . . Camilla . Ratner, Ala. - Brookhaven . Miami, Fla. . . . . Clarkdale . Macon . Eastman . . Atlanta . Bristol, Tenn. . . . Atlanta Wadley, Ala. . . Atlanta St. Simons Island . . Thomasville . . Dalton Dallas, Tex. . Spartanburg . Cartersville HODGES, WILLIAM A., JR. . . . . Atlanta HOPPE, RUDOLPH A. . . Chattanooga, Tenn. HORTON, CLINTON C. . . Pendleton, S. C. JOHNSON, CHARLES A., JR. . . . Elberton KELLER, A. PAUL, JR. . . . . Atlanta KENNEDY, ALPHEUS T. . . Pensacola, Fla. MCCRUM, BARTON A. . . . Decatur MCDUPFIE, ROBERT S. . .... Atlanta MONCRIEF, WILLIAM H., JR. . State Park, S. C. MOORE, WILLIAM W., JR. . . . Biloxi, Miss. MORGAN, JAMES C., JR .... ' West Point MURPHY, MICHAEL V., JR .... Atlanta POWELL, JOHN E., JR. . . . Villa Rica PRICE, MORRIS A. . . . St. Augustine, Fla. RAYLE, ALBERT A. . ..... Atlanta REEVE, THOMAS ELLIS, JR. . . Calhoun REISMAN, EDWARD D. . . Atlanta SCHEINBERG, PERITZ . . Miami, Fla. SILVER, MAX .... . . Douglas WILSON, FRANK A., III . . - Leslie WINSLOW, JAMES A., JR. . . Cuthbert WORTH, JACK J., JR. . . Atlanta ff' 9 , . I V3 ff'-fda ..,,. ...G- , . .- sw- r ii I 9 " li A 1562- Mr A .rw i331 MEDICAL SCI-IGCDI. FRESHMEN 5' '. ' 4-9- N .It assi: 4? . 'Fi riff! rim- .ia- I 4, ' 5 d u- A I . H5911 -grae Li , J. . . Q Y, S A ug-.get ,. -' .L -As- ,. 12? -U? ANTHONY, SAYGE H., JR. . . Greenville, S. C. ARNOLD, HERBERT L. . . Meridian, Miss. BAREIELD, WILLIAM E. . . . Jacksonville, Fla. BENTON, CURTIS D., JR. . . . . Atlanta CALLAWAY, E. JORDAN . . Covington DAVIDSON, JACK K. . . Lithonia DEESE, E. FRANK . . , Dublin DURE, XVHATLEY . , Helena FOSTER, G. ROBERT . . . McDonough GAY, BRINTON B., JR. . . . Atlanta GLASS, LAMAR F. . . Atlanta GUY, J. CANDLER . . . Atlanta INMAN, JOHN S., JR. . . . . Albany . JENKINS, VALENTINE E. . . . Miami, Fla. JENNINGS, HENRY S., JR. . . . Dawson JONES, CARL C., JR. . . Decatur KING, J. LON .... . . . Macon MCCALLISTER, ARCHIE . . . Tallahassee, Fla. MCGARITY, VVILLIAM C ...... Jersey MERLIN, HYMAN . . . Miami, Fla. PATZ, ARNALL . . . Elberton PULTS, CARL M. .... Lake Worth, Fla. RICHARD'SON, A. CULLEN, JR. . . Montezuma RUMBLE, LESTER, JR. . . . Atlanta SESSIONS, JOHN T .... . . Atlanta SKINNER, RICHARD G., JR. . Jacksonville, Fla. SMITH, MARTIN H .... . Gainesville STRICKLAND, HUBERT B., JR. . . Hartford, Ala. STRJCKLAND, JOHN E. . . Chattanooga, Tenn. TEATE, H. LUTEN ..... Thomasville WARREN, WILLIAM S. . . Mobile, Ala. WILCOX, HUGH B. . . . Jacksonville, Fla. l34l ,ge TI-IECDLCDGY SCI-ICDOI. IN NATICDNAI. CRISIS The Candler School of Theology has for many years been a leading contributor to the religious life and thought of the Eastern and Southern portion of the United States. Today We find the Candler School of Theology making its contribution to the nation's armed forces in the realm of chaplains. A large percentage of the present Junior and Senior classes are making plans to join the already large number of Emory Alumni now serving their country and their Church in all quarters of the earth during this emergency. T Theology is making its contribution in this national crisis in still another way. Many of the men, in addition to their regular seminary work, are filling vacancies throughout Georgia and parts of other states created by .I35I the entrance of ordained ministers into the chaplaincy. The School of Theology has gained much this year from the outstanding speakers and leaders of religion who have visited our campus. Bishop William T. Watkins and Dr. Edwin P. Booth, the principal speakers for the Annual Ministers' Week, along with Dr. John R. Mott, Chaplain Merritt Williams, Mrs. Grace Sloan Overton, and Gaither Warfield made definite contributions this past year to the knowledge and thought of our student body. Another highlight of the past year Was the participation of this school in the intramural football schedule. Al- though Theology's first football team did not set the league afire with victories, it was a further step toward Theology's goal of participation in total University life. Tl-IEQLGGY SCI-4001. SENICDRS V2 fx' l. I i I BEAMAN, CHARLES G., JR5 . BOONE, NORMAN U. . BOYE, LEE O .... CONN, WORTH B. . CONNER, JAMES S., JR. . CORBITT, CHARLES A. . CURRY, JOSEPH . . FRYOA, MICHAEL B. . HOLBROOK, TIM W. . HOPE, HOLLAND . . . LANCASTER, LAWRENCE T. LANMAN, HAROLD R. . . MCDONNELL, C. DURWARD . . . . Troy, N. C. . Meridian, Miss. . Appalachia, Va. . Lancaster, Ky. . Hattiesburg, Miss. . . Hartford, Ala. . . Burnsville, Va. . Warren Point, N. . . . . Williamson . Sweetwater, Tex. . . . Wildwood . . . Halethorpe, Md. . . High Springs, Fla. WINEFORDNER, C. HARRY 36 MCWHIRTER, EDGAR P. MITCHELL, T. GLENN MOORE, JAMES M., JR. MORGAN, HOMER L. OLIVER, ALGIE M. . ROBBINS, WILMER B. ROBERTS, Q. C., JR. SHEFFIBLD, JOHN C. STANLEY, WILSON . SUMMEY, THOMAS A., TEILIVIANN, GUNNAR J., JR. . . WHITE, ROSCOE M., JR. . . . WILLIS, WARREN W. . . . Gadsden, Ala. l JR. . . . Powder Springs . Homeland, Fla. . . Forsyth . . Doraville . Meridian, Miss. . . Keokee, Va. Ocean Springs, Miss. . . Wilson, Va. Rocky Mount, Va. . . . Valdosta Johnson City, Tenn. . Richmond, Va. St. Petersburg, Fla. THEOLOGY SCI-IOOI. JUIXIIOFQS ' 1 ,K , . BAILEY, J. LEO . . . BLACKBURN, BOB . . CARRUTH, EDWARD H. CARRUTH, W. CARLTON DICKENS, NEWTON B. . DUCK, DAVID A. . . GUY, HENRY A. . HUNT, EARL G. . . Vardaman, Miss. . Orlando, Fla. . . Statesboro . . . Statesboro . Chattanooga, Tenn. . . College Park . . . Starke, Fla. Johnson City, Tenn. SMITH, R. STEXVART JANZEN, O. WESLEY . . LUNDY, ROBERT F. . LYONS, WILLIAM A. . MCDAN'ID, JOEL D. . . MERCHANT, JAMES A. . . PETERSON, ARTHUR T., JR. . . PEYTON, ROBERT L. '. . SECKINGER, ERNEST W. . . . Memphis, Tenn. . Reedley, Calif. Sweetwater, Tenn. . Berryville, Va. . . . Atlanta Greensville, S. C. Knoxville, Tenn. Hattiesburg, Miss. . . Springield Tl-IEOLOGY SCI-IOOI. PRES!-IMEINI ADAMS, CHARLES P. . . . . BARBER, W. HUGH . BENTON, STANLEY T. . BOZEMAN, W. SCOTT . DAVIS, PAUL E. . . FELTY, BEVERLY . . . GILES, JOE W. . . . LACREY, J. ELBERT, JR. . East Gadsden, Ala MIDDLEBROOKS, CHARLES L. . .... Dalton . . Langdale, Ala. RANEY, WILLIAM N. . . . . Morgan Hill, Calif. . . Roanoke, Va SHELNUTT, DUMAs B. . . . . Austell . Live Oak, Fla. SMITH, CHARLES L., JR. . . . . LaGrange . Pattersville, Mo. STANLEY, SAMUEL A., JR. . . . . Roanoke, Va. . Roanoke, Va. STEFFNER, ED B. . . . . . Chattanooga, Tenn. . . Pelzer, S. C. WAITE, ALVIS A., JR. . . . . Shellman . Fort Lawn, S. C. 37 Moved by the critical situation presented when it found its student body rapidly waning in numbers as more and more of the younger mem- bers joined the armed forces of the nation, the Lamar School of Law, at the beginning of the current school year, abandoned its traditional Monday through Saturday day-time classes, and decided to rely upon its newly accredited night school to tide it over this crucial moment. With the majority of its score of remaining stu- dents employed in positions of benefit to the na- tion in its effort at total war, and with Profes- sors Culp, Quillian, and Pearce serving as judges and administrators of emergency legislation un- der the Ofhce of Price Administration and Dean Hilliey rendering decisions for the War Produc- tion Board, the school promises to survive the 38 dimculties which have sealed the doom of many less stable law schools. Appropriate to the needs of the country for lawyers with a thorough knowledge of up-to- minute legislation and court decisions, the law school is offering courses in War Labor Law, Taxation, New Things in the Law, and Admin- istrative Law, and has fully equipped its library with the latest government supplemental pub- lications in the war law field. Highlights of the year for the school were its acquisition of a charming new first lady when its bachelor dean married in the Spring, and the able performance of Professor Bryan in his of- fice of acting-dean while Dean I-Iilkey was tem- porarily serving as visiting professor at the Uni- versity of Georgia Law School. LAW SCI-ICDOI. S IE N I 0 IQ MOYE, CHARLES A., JR. . JUNICDIQS CRANFORD, CLIFFORD A. . . Newnan DAVIS, JAMES W., IH . . . Atlanta HUMPHREY, BURWELL W. . . Atlanta KELLEY, ASA D. . . . . Albany NIBLACK, THOMAS M. . . Atlanta SLADE, TOM B. . . . Columbus DANIEL, WILLIAM W. . . Eastman GOLDTHWAITE, J. RANDALL, JR. . Dothan, Ala Hoes, JOHN E. . . . Atlanta LAGERQUIST, WALTER G. . San Antonio, Tex 39 5 ff GRADUATE SCHCDGI. Important trend in development of adequate graduate work at Emory during recent years has been the constant- ly increasing interest in research and subsequently the increasing amount of productive research work actually being conducted. Since the War, this tendency has proved beneficial especially in scientific fields. The trend is consistent with the University's policy of moving steadily persistently toward the development of a cen- ter of advanced graduate teaching and research. 1 'IQ' mv fiog fe ,WA 40 The Emory University Graduate school has consistently maintained high standards. It admits no one for a de- gree who has not satisfactorily completed the courses of a completely accredited college, it requires almost a straight-B average for graduation, it refuses to all of its training to go stale by limiting the time in which its work must be completed. While exacting, its work is often informal-with class meetings in professor'S oflices, re- search projects, and irregular schedules. BATES, JOHN W .... . Quincy, Fla. BURKHART, DOROTHY H. . . Corsicana, Tex. CAMPBELL, DECATUR B., JR. Savannah CANDLER, MARGUERITE L. . . Atlanta CLARKE, ELIZABETH B. Nashville, Tenn. EVANS, MINNIE LEE ' Chattanooga, Tenn. HARPER, ARAMINTA . Troy, Ala. HOLT, HELEN M. . . Jackson, Miss. RICHARDSON, A. MARIE . . Atlanta ROHRER, E. RICHARD . Atlanta SALE, LAURA W. . . . Atlanta SANDERS, PAUL S. . Montgomery, Ala. SEGURA, GONZALO, JR. . Miranda, Oriente, Cuba WILDER, PELHAM, JR ....... Savannah Zlffqrqei, ZUNWZZ, ancf eaade slump. Eecline in .fzldfzavbq Safran! gnaolfmenl' Q-,S,s--,vgp-m:--- ...... ..,. -, ,, Q U I K -suit. .t ,. ,W - - . -4-H-mf. 1- ,- .Www api - .May- .y I-Q 4-iff-W.: ,-4 ' . .i.::2:: Q 'wmaivswfs N -a w me -4.1, .o5hW1gaM. W- 1 - 'li 'P' ef' '-451 ' X 3 : .rtgzywgf-arf A 'nf' V af. . 1- L ' Q, y 'K - . ca, 4 5' ff QE- i. ' . "W: ' '4"' .. ' fi ' .1 '52 ' 'W J' z ' ig, f W Z ,.,: . .,,. , LW 1 ., X f X t git-1 5- M-5 et- uns. -e. . First row from left to right Allen DuBose Jones Raisin Clalg . . Second row from left to right: Carmichael, :- fi , I I I Sowell Hariison lfllis. 1 EMORY UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SCI-IQCDI.---IQLLQ-143 The Library School has added a new fea- ture to its curriculum this year in its oifer- ings of urefreshern courses for librarians who are already in service. These courses are intended to present the recent developments and trends in various fields of library work. Librarians who have been too busy on the job to keep in touch with newer activities can bring themselves up-to-date by attend- ing these courses. Three courses are being offered in the current academic year: one in the fall quarter on Current Library Trends, and two in the winter quarter on Adult Reading Guidance and Subject Bibli- ography. Twenty-four librarians are regis- tered in the course on Current Library Trends, sixteen for Adult Reading Guid- ance and ive for Subject Bibliography. The war has had its effect on enrollment in the Library School, the current class showing a decrease of about one-fourth as compared with last year,s enrollment. Im- mediate employment without further train- ing in war activities and occupations con- nected with the war has lured away many, who, in normal times, would be preparing for a profession. Cn the other hand, there has been a large demand for librarians both in civil life and to service the various library units for the armed services. The records of the School show that thirty-two of its graduates are serving as librarians at army camps, naval stations, air bases or other branches of the armed services. Nwzfiei' 7 Spucfecf Wp fa Med Week of 744017 ans! fVau4f The Emory University Hospital School of Nursing was originally Wfesley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing. NVesley Memorial Hospital was founded in 1905. In 1922 it was moved to the Emory University Campus, and since this time it has been known as Emory University Hospital. During the past ten years, the facilities for training student nurses have increased greatly. The students have increased greatly. The students have access to the Uni- versity laboratories and libraries and are taught by Uni- versity professors. Many lectures are presented by the Hospital Staff doctors. The nursing course may be completed in three years. Three months of these three years are spent aHiliating at Bellevue Hospital, New York, in pediatrics. Nurses' lnnersancium we-1 Mn- ,N-....t,...,f, S i W. This year, the student body has doubled its enrollment of last year. Three classes, each class consisting of thirty or forty girls, have been taken in sinc-e last March. Pre- viously only one class has been taken in each year. This great increase is due, of course, to the acute need for nurses in the service. Many of the newly graduated students are now in the Army, Navy, or Emory Univer- sity Hospital Unit. The Nursing School has its own Student Body Or- ganization. This organization is represented on the Stu- dent Council of Emory University, and in this way the nurses are made a part of the University's activities. The social life of the student nurses is not neglected. They have access to the University swimming pool, ten- nis courts, and gymnasium. Dances are held annually in the nurses' home. ge. m , ff , X I t.,1,gA, N Rafi, , .M- NURSING SCI-ICDCDI. H.-. .30 .f R m f-SSR Y ,:, ,,3, ,J , , T9 f 2Y'- 's iv WWC 'f"' Rfk L GQ? i ll:il?lA?IPlfq:J L..- iffffililial.. ,E E . - S .Q . X if t 'A Q 1.,.: G fi A ,. J V 7 l 'N E, ,Y ,A I l " 13 .4 M f mm , ,, sk 7 I 'M 1: Q . . ,,,,A . R A . - S561 --33. R fs. Q ' Riff" , V: , fr , iff. , ff ' ' Ef X c, . fl' fl' ii - Bl ' :.. :55r1. Megs Awami .Ti , Rm " ' 'fqlif . 93" F25 X ,a9f2.f.'.Q3'fI3'-'. . 'V . 5- i C I ww N 1 of , .f , .,,,.1 , W 1 ,iff ni, ll T 7 Q I Class GODWIN, MARY . GR1GG, DORIS . JOHNSON, EDNA KING, ALYCE MANGPIAM, PAY . POPE, KATHRYN . ROSE, MARY . SMITH, EVELYN XVADDELL, JEAN Class OF lQ4LL OFIQM3 . Social Circle . Decatur . . St. Cloud, Fla. Covington . Zebulon . Senoia . . Decatur . . Atlanta . Atlanta EVATT, AGNES . . Dorchester OWENS, HARRIET . . Palm Beach, Fla. W ADSWORTH, ELOISE . . . . Haines City, Fla. WIDENHOUSE, MARGARET . . Concord, N. C. in NURSING PRELININARIES Sitting, left to right: Daniel, Parrish, Tatom, Lewis, Slade, Sheffield, Thomas, Ligon, Chambers, Clark, Cady .... Standing, left to right: Cobb, Prescott, Michael, Crigler, Singleton, Gilliland, Hardie, Durling, Hunter, Bland, Tait, Mayo, Cook, Speer, Cody, Osterlund, Methvin, Treadway. NURSING PIQELININAIQIES Sitting, left to right: Fiveash, Stephens, Augustine, lsom, McKenzie, Hackney, Hudgins, Wamble, Keith, Atkinson, Plow, Thomas, Moore, Carmichael, Phillips, Keefer, Bowden, Yancy .... Standing, left to right: McNeill, Sanderson, Dowe, Epperson, McGibony, Sturdivant, Murphy, Hendry, Ellis, Farnsworth, Starr, Vickers, Estes, Cogburn, Henderson, Taylor, Woods, McCay, Jennings, Lyon, Ward, Davis, DeLoach, Aiken, Tomilson. l44l E 1' COAST GUARD ARMY NAVY MARINE CORPS This CAMPUS, The 1943 CAMPUS, is a product of a period of great unrest, a period in which Emory students leave the familiar surroundings of the campus to join the various branches of the Armed Forces and Emor alumni are to be found servin the - . n u - Y a g nation in whatever capacities are available to them. This CAMPUS has not been dedicated to one erson because the services of one man are not as reat as the services P . n s u I g that Emor 's men and women are renderm this nation in its War effort. The 1943 .ly - g n CAMPUS 1S dedicated to Emory men and Women in the Armed Forces who are now giving their minds, their bodies, and their lives to the United States of America and the ideals for which it stands. Ja -1 J CM -smite' ,-, wa z,' 1 Q 9 ll If Ame dl! 4 x M132 l L HIIIMJ qwuw, ,,,,1Jwq '. E A ...,,.....,.,-.A.......,..,..4.L,..-...1--.-4.w.ur.M..V.f-- V - MA -W,,'.+,WLAw.,,.. Wx... va. we, Us mwwbiwu X K , N Q 'pi . ' SA E' J-lllluaaq Cl: AN ERA This is the last chapter of the story of an era of student activities at Emory. It might appropriately be their obituary: activities, like Hmm jellying and the blushing maid, are on their way out. And extracurriculars aren't just a war casualty-the re- action started when war still meant headlines over foreign news-but December 7, .and now Government Contract, were needed to finish them off. The story goes back to LEEROY WALTON last year's chapter, when the Summer and fall queffw- draft and threat of it caught a few seniors and sent others running to draft-deferred training courses at other schools. Then a new C-average scholarship rule cleaned out the activities ranks of many of the mainstays who had been majoring in activities and study- ing on the side. A bunch of juniors stepped in and kept the show running through the spring and fall of '42. All the while the ranks became thinner: debate forums brought out just enough to provide something besides the four walls at which to orate. Dr. Dewey dug deep into the freshman ranks to keep his Glee Club up to normal size. The Plaoezzix faced the facts and, for one quarter, abandoned the attempt to come out in full size. The Wheel begged for staff mem- bers as juniors and sophomores worked overtime to maintain its standards. The players mired up in fraternity politics, lost their director, and closed up shop until a Student Coun- cil imbued with the Christmas spirit authorized their revival last December. But an appropriation wasn't enough to meet the real need for capable players and a director, and the players went down for the count. The novelty and uncertainty of regular enrollment during the summer was enough to scare most activities into calling off the effort from June to September. The Wheel ventured out with two issues, losing money on both. Rushing fresh- men and Coeds replaced the routine of debating, publish- ing, drammering, etc., as time-consuming extracurricular activities. Tolbert and Poats rolled out two Wheefs during the sum- mer, then turned it over to Polstein, after Editor Bill Morris resigned. The fast turnover didn't pull down standards, however: The Wfoeel of Poats' regime was named Pace- maker-tops in the country-in a national contest announced in September. Polstein, then Junior Thad Horton kept it up. Able and energetic president for New president, assumes duties in 45 Fall brought another minor revolution. Activities went on a ,bialf-year basis under President Walton's capable supervision, with politicking scheduled for December and April. Elections, budgeting and entire reorganization were required by five constitutional amendments. Meanwhile the de-emphasis on gwlorification of activities and key-men popped up in Student Coun- cil, where extracurricular has-beens and near has-beens BILLY KIRKLAND started thinking about the "great masses of just plain students" who don't get their money's worth out of their critical period. activities fees. The council came through with lounges for everybody - one for the Boys across the Creek, one for the ECA and anybody else who drifted into the basement of the Cafeteria Building, and one for the ENO boys in Winship. The money started run- ning low at this point, so they called a halt. Elections caught the campus by surprise, but the novelty of December politicking wasnit as great as the results: Two underclassmen-Billie Kirkland, a last-quarter sophomore, and Thad Horton, a junior-won the student body presidency and the Wheel editorship. Dick Knox was retained to make one last effort to redeem the fallen prestige of the Phoenix. An inexperienced Student Council replaced the lounge-builders, while the Campus carried on with the old staff. The expected Winter Quarter collapse of normal activities was belated in coming. Debating kept alive, the Wheel and Camllms seemed about as active as ever. The Glee Club planned a tour of army camps, using the morale-for-the- boys-in-uniform angle to get transportation clearance. Some- body rumored that the Orchestra was going to put on a con- cert, perhaps this quarter. First casualty was the resurrected Phoenix, whose Editor Knox left for the Marines late in January. Nobody else had the nerve to try it, so the old bird went to the ashes, until Oxford's Robert Rutherford took over. The Government stepped in to do the rest. The boys in uniform weren't expected to be activities men on the side, and the remaining freshmen, lame, deaf and blind upperclass- men, med students and theologs didn't seem to have the extracurricular spirit. Without solemn ceremony, the sys- tem was laid to rest. But already the talk was: "After the war, they oughta build a big activities building . . ." SSW, 'T I ' -A-N In long and heated sessions featured by the free cigarettes distributed daily by President Walton, the dron- ing voice of Poats as the report of the finance committee appeared, and I-fale's hurried questions to Bennett in regard to constitutional interpretation, the work of the Stu- dent Councilground through an- other term and an appalling amount of work. The first action taken by the council was a reorganization of gov- ernment on a basis of six months general election, and the members sighed contentedly as they cut three months from their term of office. Meeting in an unofficial status during the summer the council authorized the publication of two issues of the Wheel after a statement of expenses by Battle. The Wheel con- tained nothing but cost a great deal more. With tightened lips the council agreed to pay, let Bat- tle escape with a warning. T After the success with the Wheel an appropria- tion for the basketball shell was made, but as the council left office the amount had not been spent by the administration. With appropriations inthe air, Walton explained the situation. "The reserve fund has been established for a rainy day," he said, Hand gentlemen, today it is raining? The council entered into the spirit ofthe storm, and the lounges were born. After spending S400 in furnishing a meeting room-senatorial cham- bers perhaps-congress was unable to deny any request, and the rain beat pretty insistently. New equipment for the activities offices, a lounge for the boys across the creek in Fishburne, a lounge for Simian! Gauncfll Uhlllaiaud in eanopqa Knacki, Sleofu 044 46 Winship Hall, a heater for the basketball shell, and -yes, a lounge for the ECA office. As the meetings grew longer and the air denser Poats rose with budget reports. Motions to abolish every organization from the once well-kicked Phoenix to the loved-only-when-threatened Campus crept to and from the floor. When the smoke cleared and Poats fell asleep, lulled by the sweet monotony of his own voice, nothing had been changed. All in all the council presented the same pat- tern with a few men doing all the work and an- other select group doing most of the talking. Beau- tiful innovations were a library representative with the asset of a voice and Jahn, who, thorough- ly impressed with his responsibility, said ponder- ously in the course of one discussion, "We are making Emory history." The student council did this year what has been done by every student council-practically noth- ing. But this council performed that task with a greater devotion to duty, an increased sense of his- toricity, and much longer deliberations. COUNCIL ASSUMES WAQTIME DICTATGQSHIP Z ' of ca 7q,fzical eauncfll flffeeling The Student Council met, as it often does, one pleasant night during the summer quarter for the purpose of select- ing a new Wheel editor. Mr. Bill Morris had resigned. All the councilmen were there as was Dean Rece, Mr. Stubbs, Dr. John Lee, and Leon Polstein, who was merely interested in whom they would select. President Walton formally opened the meeting, ostentatiously displaying Philip Morris cigarettes before him. Secretary Todd read the minutes so fast that nobody understood a single word. He muttered and all feared for the safety of his tongue. He was reprimanded, and said he was sorry but he really wasn't. In the discussion of summer issues of the Wheel Mr. Poats moved that Mr. Tolbert and Mr. Poats be co- editors of the summer Wheel. This carried amid the snickers that "XVucky" expected. Mr. Battle asserted that he would put pressure on both Talmadge and Arnall to put full-page ads in the Wheel. The business of the day got under way with the nomination of Mr. Polstein for editor of the Wloeel, Mr. Polstein beamed. The motion carried, and Mr. Polstein said, "Mi: Poats and I have decided to elect Mr. Poats Tl-IE DICTATORS LEEROY XVALTON . . . Cbairzmm IVAN BENNETT . Vice-Chai-rmmz RUCKER TODD . . . Secretary E. H. RECE . . . T1'eas1u'er LYLE E. CAMPBELL . . Azzcliior MEMBERS GEORGE BATES BOB BATTLE BOB BLAOKBURN DEAN GEHEBER MARGARET GLOVER MORRIS HALE WADE HUIE PAUL JAHN BILL MONCRIEE CHARLES MOYE RUTHERFORD POATS PAUL SANDERS EVELYN SMITH MR. W. B. STUBBS MR. XV. G. WORKMAN associate editor." This carried. Mr. Bennett, always ready to insert a stumbling block, suggested a managing editor. This was discussed pro and con for a considerable length of time before new-editor Polstein chirps, "But I've al- ready appointed Mr. Tolbert this afternoon to be my man- aging editorf' This hacked the council no end and they haggled for hours over who would have the most work to do--the editor or the managing editor. Mr. Hale got up from time to time to question the constitutionality of various statements. The issue was discarded with no fur- ther motions made. Dean Rece arose to explain the problems and functions of ENO to a group of bored fraternity men and Miss Smith of the Nursing School who really didn't care what happened. The discussion swung to inter-collegiate ath- letics. Mr. Jahn, a la "E" jacket, saw his time to rise and shine. In a lengthy dissertation on the lack of school spirit due to the lack of inter-collegiate activities, Mr. Jahn succeeded in putting the entire council to sleep. All of a sudden, Mr. Waltoii adjourn-ed the meeting, and some- body woke up Mr. Bates who said, "Oh, is it time to start?" Mr. Stubbs left as quietly as he came. Top row: Bates, Battle, Bennett .... Second row: Blackburn, Geheber, Hale .... Third row: Huie, Jahn, Moncrizf .... Fourth row: Moye, Poats, Sanders .... Bottom row: Smith, Todd. . -.-asa.. . 11 Lisle 5227 , . I ,, V, ,,.,.,. . I I . . , gli- Lim-W , ew- F, ., ' I shiffl- ' 'X' I 41. , MJ ? ' . - -AII .e w . ,G -piggy! 9 :.' 2-I., - jg 5 ' Lf:s:.:-.. . 'I'-'ff,',,,:.. ...self ffm w..1v.- . .1 .f 4 3.5, 3 i.,., ,V,.. . . . f. ri- 1 A, A syn., 1 . M : :I .yt H s -., -fi? f V 'f f - rue V " -' Q. .Z " 5' as ., A f?fwf,,, :z.".1..a fl-av--1 f: .z:::1' "'f"f'-w w- f A I f--'+I-ff fn .,.. i . ,. .,, . .,,.. 5 if ""??!iBf'. sf: - . i i iff' sf if jx , s s 2 lf , K ' 'SSE 'i ...asa wwe: 'CJ- .1 , ra.: it - ff V RR 333' , rf f , , ZZ , A .,,,,.,..". Wave '3 : f ff , , X f., 4 V , 4-,-',.:.1.v:-g.w1.:2-f- f I 4 ..eLi:e,a.fff Mw'-rf '- Liarf-,f M.,-:f ez: ,fx ga-fyag, 5-'rn efe I ' . ,W .fe . , +32-v 2- ' ' F1 , .5 . , ., -I .-4 ,1-,T . .ff . . so "'f- ' HW 4122552-jf'ff'i:l.? S 'L ,i-., . . ' 'E :f y V 'fu f f, sr.. " " 2 .,.. , I- ::---1-,:1f.., . -' 132:14 1-4 5 f3,':1,:j:a: 75,4353 .- 1 .5-:, X A "5 "5 .?f9.1T5i7 f ga, .. .'.':'f:f:i:V. 'i' sfifiii ?'Vr'. :W 225'-f'4T'f-It -I? 1, Eeuwzrwaa' ,, V MEDIQAI STUDENTS ACTIVITIES CQLJNCII The inauguration last year of a Medical Student Activities Council sided in the solution of one of the University's oldest student dilemmas. For years the activities program of the Medical School had little relation to that of the college and other university branches. Establishment of MSAC brought about better correla- tion and understanding of all university activities and re- vitalized the idea of Emory as a community. The en- thusiastic participation Of medical students in frolics for the past several years was brought about largely through the efforts of the MSAC, which has also established a well-conducted system of activities for their division. OFFICERS DICKIE COOK . . . , , Pygsiflgmf BILL AINSXVORTH . Vice-President GEORGE STUBBS . . Sefrefm-3, GOODLOE ERWIN , Treasure,- MEMBERS REPRESENTATIVES TO COUNCIL SENIORS SOPHOMORAE BILL AINSXYIORTH DIGKIE COOK UPTON CLARY I-IOYT CRENSHAXV GEORGE STUBBs BILLY I-IODGES JUNIORS PRES:-:MEN JIM ANDERSON LON KING GOODLOE ERXVIN BILL WARREN PINKY KING WILLIE WILCOX STUDENT COUNCIL MEMBERS DEAN GEHEBER BILL MONCRIEF I .14 .., v..,.-fI4,,,. .-I A 341 I ,,.,I , , ,C gy-mf ,724 '. L 'Q I at fa . -.3 :'?5fi.. '.'l AINSWORTH CLARY COOK ERWIN GEHEBER HODGES KING MONCRIEF WARREN WILCOX 48 IEIVICDIQY CI-IIQISTIAN ASSCDCIATIGN Students who seek Christian fellowship among de- nominations look to the Emory Christian Associa- tion, a federation of all religious Organizations on the campus. The ECA includes the Canterbury Club Presbyterian Student Association, Baptist Student Union, Emory University Conference, Freshman Council, the Young Peoples Department of Glenn Memorial Church, and the Jewish Student Forum. Collective aim of the group is to coordinate pro- grams and activities of the various religious organ- izations on the campusg and, in Fields of mutual in- terest, to provide opportunity for all the groups to work collectively. The ECA also provides oppor- tunity for Christian Service and leadership training under the able Edward Mattinglyg and it is con- stantly striving to provide for the religious life of all students on the campus. WADE HUIE President WADE HUIE . . . MATTHEW HAZELRIG A. J. KRAK7TIN . . MORRIS HALE . CARLTON PONVELL JIMMY NIENDEL . DAVID FUNK . . OFFICERS . President . . Vice-President . Secretary . Treasurer COUNCIL . Rep. Methodist Student Movement . Rejlresentattive Canterbury Club Rep, Presbyterian Sturlenit Association RUSSELL WILLIAMSON . . Representative Newman Club JOE GOLDBERG . BEN WILLEFORD . . . . . Representative Iefufisla Forum Rejzresenttztiue Baptist Sturlent Union JOI-IN BRASELTON . . . Chfzirnmn Conference Committee BILLIE KIRKLAND . GRAY FOUNTAIN . . CARROLL FORREST . Clbairvnrm Formal Forums Committee Cbeirnzen Informal Forums Committee . Chairman Deputdtions Committee BILLY BENNETT . Chairmen World Fellowship Committee IVAN BENNETT . CARLISLE PHILLIPS BOB BATTLE . XWYARREN FIRTH . JIMMY IIVIOORE . . . . Chairman Freslamrzn Wo'rk . . Rep. Fellowship of Reconeiliatzon . Chairman Publicity Committee . . Chatrnmn VVOTSIGHJ Committee . Representative School of Theology Top row: Battle, B, Bennett, I. Bennett, Braselton, Firth, Forrest, Fountein, Funk,.G'oIdberg .... Bottom row: ' Hale, Kirkland, Kravtin, Mendel, Moore, Powell, Willeford, Williamson. 491 EMGRY GLEE CLUB ,iii- CARROLL FORREST President CARROLL FORREST TOM FEW . SAM DENHAM . OFFICERS DOYLE PAYNE AND DONALD SPICER . . . . LEEROY WALTON JOE WILSON . . BILL TRIPP . . . DR. MALCOLM H. DEWEY . HERMAN ALLISON RICHARD FELDER TENORS WILLIAM ANDERSON EMORY BASS BOB BATTLE ERNEST BEASLEY WITI-IERS BLAKE JAMES BOWEN CHARLES BROCKIMAN WILLIAM DEAN SAM DENHAM TOM FEW WARREN FIRTH OLIN FREEMAN JESSEE HOBBS GENE HOWE A ROY HUBBARD ALBERT JAMES KARL LOWENDICIQ POWERS MCLEOD FARRIS MCELREATH LUTHER PARARO , NED STEELE WILLIAM SUTCLIFFE BURTON TRIMBLE BASS ES ROY BERRY EUGENE CALDXVELL RICHARD CAMPBELL CARLTON CARRUTH EDWARD CARRUTH BUSINESS STAFF MEMBERS ISO! LEEROY WALTON Business Manager . . P'l'6SiL'lI67Zf . Vice-Presitlent . . Secretary . Librarians . . . Manager Assistant Manager Assistant Manager . . . Director . Pianist . Or ganist JOSEPH CONLEY- EDFA DANIELS CARROLL FORREST TOM GORDON A KENNETH GURLEY CAREY HANDLIN HAROLD HERRIN WILLIAM HINSON CLARKE HOWELL DONALD HUGHES WILLIAM JOHNSON JAMES MERCHANT CHARLES MIDDLEBROOKS ROBERT NESS JOHN NORMAN ROBERT O,NEILL WILLIAM ORR JAMES PARKS DOYLE PAYNE EUGENE PEACOCK BEN PETTY JOSEPH PORTER JACR REEVE STANLEY ROBINSON WALTER RUTLAND ROBERT SHUMATE JAMES SILVER ERNEST SPENCER DONALD SPICER ALVIS STAFFORD TOM STRICRLAND MARVIN TWIGGS GCDLDIEN VQICIIS GI: EMGRY This year sees the Emory Glee Club through its twenty-seventh year of service to Emory. The club originated as a little singing group at old Emory College at Oxford, Ga. Through the past twenty-seven years it has risen, step by step, to its present place of importance in American music circles. The club gained impetus in 1920 when Dr. M81- colm H. Dewey assumed directorship. Dr. Dewey has remained with the Glee Club since that time and is in no small way responsible for the organization's continued success. ' The Glee Club, like most other student activities, has been hurt considerably by the drafting of its members and by the scholastic ineligibility of some of its members, but it has held the quality of its performances as high this year as it has in the years of peace. The truthfulness of this statement is evidenced by the great success of its two presentations of the Christmas Carol concert in Glenn Memorial Auditorium. Many of the audience comm-ented that it was the best carol concert that the Glee Club has ever given. l5ll f Lx ORATOQS BLOW OFF STEAM N DEBATE mmm Forensics this past year had to fight against great impediment and curtailment. The war with an accelerated program here at Emory has held back progress in all forms of public -dis- cussion and expression. However, with the able guidance of a Debate Council, chairmaned by Professor Floyd K. Baskette, debating has been able to buck the tide. Complying with activities in general, the University De- bate Forum and the Debate Council also went on a quarterly basis. Much was done to keep up student interest in debat- ing and public forum speaking. The Council adopted a new policy in coordination with the University Morale Commit- tee of sponsoring open forum discussions on various political, economic, and social issues. These discussions have proven informative and valuable to many students and have been an able substitute for debating. Emory is one of the few colleges in the country to adopt this type of forums. We are proud of this system. The Sigma Chi's came through again in capturing the Fall Inter-organizational Debate trophy in the tournament during the week of November 9-13. Considering the times, fraternities showed remarkable cooperation in the tourna- ment. The few faculty members who participated as judges expressed interest in this question of Indiais compl-ete and im- mediate independence. The Town Meeting program in the Glenn Memorial Church was one of the biggest features of the entire roster of Coun- cil activities and sponsorships. Many people here and around, although not many students, received a good estimate of "What Price Victory?" from H. Carl Wolf, Dean Raimundo deOvies, Professor Glenn Rainey, and Ivan Bennett. Student l52l attendance, participation, and interest was lacking per usual. Emory needs such stimulating, informative and thought-pro- voking programs, and the sooner the student comes to real- iz-e this necessity, the sooner the student acquires an interest in public welfare, and the sooner the student is aroused to thought ab-out peace and post-war reconstruction, the better it will be for these United States. If the youth of America, which does include you, dear Emory student, does not take an interest in the world to come, in the world he is to help build, and in the world in which he is to seek happiness and prosperity, then we might as well not bring this war to an end but continue to live in chaos the rest of our generation. The only intercollegiate forensic encounter was with the University of Georgia which was swept aside with ease by Emory's brilliant representatives. With .1 sliced budget and with curtailment of all trans- portation, the Council found it next to impossible to go on a debate trip. To bring matters nearer home, it decided to make history and sponsor a tournament of its own. To assure some participation only Georgia Colleges and Junior Colleges were invited to enter. The week-end proved very successful and an exicting one for Emory and by this time Fm sure Georgia students have a solution for post-war,pros- perity and peace. This big feature concluded the Council's outstanding activity for the school year. Let us hope that the coming year will bring not a further curtailment and lack of in- terest in public expression but a furtherance of an expres- sion of our ideals and ideas so that we may play our thought- ful role as youth of America in the world after the war.- GAIQIQULGUS STATESIVIEN, VQI UBI I3 POI ITICIANS AIQE PIQQDLICTS CDI? IZCDIQEIXISICS OFFICERS RUCKER TODD . . . .' . Cbazrman A- J- KRAVTIN . . . Debate Manager CHANDLER WATSON . . Vice Chapman DEBATE COUNCIL PROP PROF. PROE PROF. FLOYD K. BASKETT CHRISTIAN F. HA JACK TILEORD W. G. WORKMAN MEMBER BILLY BENNETT IX'AN BENNETT ALDEN BROWARD WARREN FIRTI-I NORMAN GOLDSTEIN GRAHAM GROVE MFE S, VARSITY FORUM BILLY KIRRLAND A. J. KRAVTIN DAN PARKER RUCKER TODD QUILLIAN HAMBY BILL HOLT BILLY KIRKLAND DAN PARKER NED STEELE BOB YOUNG RUCKER TODD A. J. KRAVTIN CHAND-LER WATSON IVAN BENNETT Chairman Debate Manager Vice-Chairman 4Year Debater I53I Tl-IE CAM PUS The 1943 CAMPUS is dedicated to the Emory men pre- paring to go into the Armed Forces and to those al- ready serving. Although the war has taken much from Emory, it has brought much to it. During the past year a sense of responsibility has arisen-responsibility to our coun- try and to each other. Many of us have been called to active duty, but most have been left behind to pre-' pare ourselves for positions of intelligence and integrity in the Army and Navy and in industry, both during the war and in a post-war world. With this in View the editors of the Campus have designed the 1943 issue to achieve two main objectives, both in the name of accurate reporting. The first is to publish a book which, should it come into the hands Business Manager Johnny Westmoreland 'found Atlanta businessmen fairly eager to advertise as he contracts for more advertisements than THE CAMPUS has had for several years. 1541 Editor George Bates fought the difficulties of a smaller staff shortages of photographic supplies as he edits the 1943 CAMPUS in less than six months. of an Emory man on active duty, would in some meas- ure help to prove to him that we who remain have not broken faith with him. Many far-reaching changes have appeared at Emory in the' momentous year of 1942-43, and the presentation of these changes has been the earnest endeavor of the CAMPUS staff. Some of these changes, like the improvements in the Athletic program, have been brought about by the warg others have been the outgrowth of needs, long expressed, but only realized now. The second objective is the more usual one and aims at the production of a memory book-the momento of one phase of a transi- tional period which is seeing the extinctionxof a way of life! War priorities on photographic materials caused changed plans, but the CAMPUS pictures are the best in years. Every year the annual editor 'qstreamlines by giving you a new modern type facef' but We have given you a clear readable type and have modernized the make-up instead. Handicapped by a much smaller staff than in previous years, the CAMPUS had to meet a deadline three months earlier than usual. A few hard-working staff members worked through the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays to give the seniors their annuals before they graduated. Here it is, and we hope it means to you what the staff has tried to make it mean! Cartoonist Lea Richmond confers with Managing Editor Allen Tolchard and Christmas Holidays Staff Assistants Alan Secord and Jimmy Hinton Spent Cartoonist Bobby Byrd. many hours at work during the holidays. l 'Tm' S ii .4 lr 'X W nib .-.rs ,r:. 5 fy X 5, fc A? , F, I, aff Photographer Ed McDowell StaFf Assistants Bill Morrison and Grady Longino worked hard to make I943 CAMPUS supervised the "dirty" work. a success. CAMPUS STAFF GEORGE BATES .... Editor JOI-INNY WESTMORELAND Business M rrmrger ALLEN TOLCI-IARD . Mamrgirrg Editor JIM LEWIS . . . . Associate Editor EARLE STOCKMAN . . Copy Editor WADE ATKINSON . . Aizmmzrs Advisor' ED MCDONVELL . . Szfrrj Photographer' JIMMY HINTON, GRADY LONGINO, BILL MORRISON, JIMMY MENDEL, HENRY STALLINGS, HOXVAIKD LAMAR, ALAN SECORD, NORMAN ALLEN, HUGH SEALY, LEO POU, RUSSELL TI-IOMAS, FRANK COLLINS, RHO'DES I-IARDEMAN Stajf Assistrmts RUCKER TODD, BOBBY BYRD, LEON POLSTEIN, TEDDY LEVITAS, RUTHER- FORD POATS, LEA RICHMOND, RANDY GOLDTHXVAITE . Special Corztrib-zrtions Sta'FF Assistants Jimmy Mendel and Leo Pou assisted with some of the writing Staff Assistants Russell Thomas, Howard Lamar, and Hugh Sealy did the for THE 1943 CAMPUS- gruelling task of "picture pulling". 55 TEE Eiuoev WWHEEL Founded in l9l9 by Ernest Rogers WHEEL. Publi e very Thursday during: the academic year by the Student Council of Emory Unlversit at 01-103-105 Cafeteria Building. Member of the Associated Collegiate Press and of t rpia Collegiate Press Association. Subscriptions are received at S2 DE year. Ad ng rates pre furnished on application. National advertising is receive through I tional Advertising Service. 420 Madison Avenue, New York. Thad Horton .. ,,,. ...,..., .. ..Y..., ..,...... . ,..... .... . . ..,....,, . . Edito Bob Battle . ,.., Business Monog 3'-'CICIY SSGVS E-,--- - -v'-' -- A------ --,- -A,-r--E-E- - - - MGHGQWQ Edlf HURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1943 Dick Knox . .l,, v.....,.... .Y.....,. .,..,,.. . . . . .. ...,..........,...,,...,..... Associate Edit Tom Fulton, news editor: Saville Perry and Robert Rutherford, assistant managing edi Carol Mason, society editor: Teddy Levitas, sports editor: Burke Childs, assi sports editor: Ed McDowell, photographic editor: Borden "Skipper" White, circu manager. V Editorial Assistants: Marson Dunaway, Bill Holt, Jimmie Pope, Tommy Bclrfie Macfie, Bob Durden, Marvin Twiggs, Bill Todd, Jerry Berman, Parks, Harold Herrin, Werner Wortsman, Mary Liyse.-Du.Eae,f', Horton Wins Race for I943 WHEEL Editor. ln accordance with the amendment to the Constitution of the student body election was held in December for the editorship of the Wheel. Two juniors, Thad Horton and Buddy Sears, who had been working on the Wheel staff for several years were candidates for the position of Wheel Huh. Wfhen the hnal tabulation came through, Thad Horton was named by the student body as editor for the Winter and Spring Quarters of 1943. Thad Horton found that putting out the Wheel was not as easy a job as getting his copy in as Sports Editor, his posi- tion on the Wheel last year. The War has had its influence on the Wheel as it has on every other student activity. The influence does not show itself, but it is always there. The decreased interest of the students in activities and the in- creased unr-est of the students is all that is apparent. lt has caused the staff of the Wheel to be much smaller this year and has also caused those on the staff to care less about get- ting their copy in on time. The -edit-or has faced a job of putting out a Wheel and holding his staff together at the same time. The success of the editor can be measured by the promptness with which he has placed the Wheel before the students and by the approval that has been given the Wheel under his editorship. Business Manager Bob Battle does excellently in handling WHEEL finances. I 5-6 POLSTEIN, EDITOR PHOENIX MERGES WITH WHEEL, GETS SUSPENDED The Phoenix has also had its difficulties this year. Editor Dick Knox put out one issue of the Phoenix in its form as a supplement to the ll7hrfel, did not get around to putting it out again during the Fall Quarter, and was called to the Marines in January before hc could do any more Work on it. The Phocfnix was called up for review by the Student Council again during the Fall Quarter, and it was decided by straw vote that the Phorwzix had no place on the list of campus publications until the war ended. At the next meeting it was decided that the Phoenix should be allowed to come out once more. This issue was slated to come out during the Wiiiter Quarter and be in the old Phoenix form, but Editor Knox received his orders from the Marine Corps. The new Student Council appointed Robert Rutherford as editor to publish the Hnal edition for thc duration. Editor Rutherford, with the help of Wheel staff, stated that the Phoenix would be published by the first of March. COUNCIL MAKES POLSTEIN WHEEL HUB AS MORRIS RESIGNS For the past two years the Emory Wheel has been shifting its editorial staffs continually because of resignations. This year was no exception. Bill Morris was made editor in the spring elections of last year. During the summer he resigned because of a heavy scholastic schedule and the presidency of ENO which took much of his time. The Student Council unanimously selected the Associate Editor to take over the post vacated by Morris. Hardworliing, excitable Leon Polstein guided the Wheel through a difficult year, Working hand in hand with his small but excellent staff. His modest affability inspired coopera- tion that succeeded in winning the Wheel the Pacemaker Award for the consecutive year. New WHEEL Editor Thad Horton finds publication a ditficult job. PHOENIX Editor and WHEEL Managing Editor Dick Knox copy desk. spends many hours at vi ,znz-'fp .V . , ' ! 1 95' ff ffs Editorial Assistant Robert Rutherford supervises Saville Editorial Assistant Tom Fulton tries his hand at Cartoonist Bobby Byrd enlivens Perry's work. feature stories. WHEEL. Sports Editork Teddy Levitas and Assistant Managing Editor Buddy Sears find Assistant' Jerry Epstein, Circulation Manager Harold Eiegel, and Assistantylke something amusing in old issue o l 57 l f WHEEL. Dreizln 'Find circulation of WHEEL none too easy with shortage of gasoline. STUDENT LECTURE ASSOCIATION T"T WT il Nu- JUSTUS GOWER President JUsTUs GOWER . A. J. KRAVTIN . ALAN SECORD . GEORGE BATES . JAMES BOWEN PHILIP CORDES DONALD DIETRICHS ANGUS DOMINGOS Az FLOWERS The Emory Student Lecture Association is one of the recognized student activi- ties. It was organized to give students the opportunity to hear speakers of high calibre and musicians celebrated the world over. Under the able guidance of Professor Ross H. McLean the Student Lecture Association has been able in the past to secure the best musicians and lec- turers in the nation to 'entertain the stu- dent body. OFFICERS . . . . . President . Vice-President . . Secretary . Bnsiness Manager MEMBERS WEAVER MARR JAMES MENDEL ADAIR MOORE LEON POLSTEIN HERBERT STEWART DR. Ross H. MCLEAN, Faculty Advisor I942-43 SERIES October 16, 1942- 'MARGARET SPEAKS December 7, 1942 REAR ADMIRAL YATES STERLING, JR., "American Sea Power in the Atlantic and Pacific" l February 1, 1943- H. R. KNICIQERBOCRER, "With the U. S. Armed Forces Around the Wor'ld." February 11, 1943- SIR NORMAN ANGELL, "The Problem of India." T591 BATES BOWEN CORDES DIETRICHS DOMINGOS FLOWERS KRAVTIN MARR MENDEL MOORE POLSTEIN SECORD UTTLE SYMPHCNVY Loyal Emory music lovers are members of the Little Symphony Orchestra. Directed by the Glee Club's famed Dr, Malcolm H. Dewey, the orchestra presents a concert of classical arrangements three times a year. Guest artists are frequently invited to perform with the Orchestra, and concerts starring outstanding southern musicians are sponsored. The orchestra offers students interested in classical music the Oppor- tunity to learn the finer points from Director Malcolm H. Dewey and from the guest performers of the orchestra. OFFICERS TOM PAXTON . . . . President HERBERT KARP . . MELVIN SCHOENBERG . DR. MALCOLM H. DEWEY . VIOLINS OSCAR ADAMS BECKWITH ARCHER THOMAS GORDON EVELYN HOGUE CARL LINEBACK JOE MANDESE RALPH MURPHY WILLIAM PHOENIX FLORENCE SMITH MARY TORRENCE MILDRED WADE MEMBERS AN CONTRABASS C. L. FOX FLUTE LINDSEY HOLLAND ELLA MURRELL TOM PAXTON OBOE DWIGHT GOOLSBY VERNA WEEMS D THEIR E591 . Vice-Presirleni . Lib1'd1'fd7l . Conchzcto-r INSTRU M ENTS CLARIN ET DONALD KOBLEY ED MCDOWALD JACK ZUMWEINRLE BASSOON MELVIN SCHOENBERO TRUMPET C. H. BURKHALTER PYOTT JAMISON BOB ROHRER BEN SMITH ORCHESTRA TOM PAXTON President FRENCH HORN PHILIP CORDES JOE LAY TROM BON E HERBERT KARP PIANO HERMAN ALLISON DICK FELDER BOB WEAVER PERCUSSION J. S. RUTAN CAMPUS CLUB , L, 2 'I ' QR -IQ! T ...F ' A., -if I 'F N, I I Asif -A Iv 13" NIEQ, ,Qt E - 60 ADAMS BASINSKI BROOKS BURGAMY CAMPBELL CLARK CON LEY FREEMAN HANSON HOWARD KARTOS LANE MCARTHUR MCD-ONALD REEVE, J. REEVE, T. E. ROGERS SESSIONS SMART SMITH SPECK STRICKLAND SUMMEY VARNER DICK ROHRER President MEMBERS CHARLES ADAMS GLENN ALLEN GENE BASINSKI BILL BLACKMON CARLTON BROOKS CLYDE BURGAMY DECATUR CAMPBELL ROBERT CHANCEY EMORY CLARK JOE CONLEY P. K. DIXON RICHARD FETZ JAMES FREEMAN STANLEY HANSON GEORGE HENRY JAMES HOWARD JOHN KARTOS GEORGE LANE JOHN MCARTHUR WALTER MCCLESKY DURWOOD MCDONALD JACK REEVE TOM ELLIS REEVE HENRY ROGERS DICK ROHRER JOHN SEssIONs ALAN SMART CHARLES SMITH BILL SPECK TOM STRICKLAND CAREY SULLIVAN T. A. SUMMEY- GEORGE TOOTLE JAMES VARNER Emory's only exclusive social organization among non-fra- ternity men is the twenty-three old Campus Club, Whose aim is to give the independent man an organized, definite social life and to aid him in his campus activities. Member- ship into the club is by invitation only, and its ritual stresses friendship and brotherhood. A revolving fund was begun several years ago to provide appropriations for the construction of a Campus Club House. This fund is maintained by voluntary contributions. At the present meetings of the club are held in th-e Druid Hills clubhouse adjoining the Emory campus. On the social calendar for this year have been numerous informal dances, hay rides, and other types of parties. The club this year was under the able leadership of Dick Rohrer, and through the cooperation of all the members it has had a very successful year. The Campus Club has been noted for its achievements in scholarship. For the past sev- eral quarters it has had the highest scholastic average of any of the social organizations on the campus. Last year the club had six men elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and it is continuing to keep its scholastic average high. im KATHRYN DOZIER Campus Club Sponsor 41 fb 4.-1" V f ENG Am R0 62 BAILEY DUNAGAN FIRTH INGRAM KAFKA KIMBELL LUMSDEN MERCHANT NICHOLS RAINEY ' RENSHAW RITCH SEGU RA STANLEY STEFFENER WINDSOR T JOE PORTER President MEMBERS DALE ALLEN LEO BAILEY A SAM BERRY RICHARD BINFORD BILL DUNAGAN DICK FINCHELL WARREN FIRTH GENE HINSON A. L. HORTON MERCER INGRAM RICHARD KAFKA BILL KIMBELL HOWARD LOVE TOM LUMSDEN JIMMY MERCHANT BILL MORRIS CLAUDE NELSON BOB NICHOLS CARLISLE PHILLIPS. JOE PORTER GLENN POWER BILL RAINEY PARKE RENSHANV TOMMY RITCH GONZALO SEGURA PAUL STANLEY ED STEEEENER JAMES WINDSOR EMCDIQY NGN-FRATERINITY OIQGANIZATICDN For a number of years, one of Emoryis greater problems was the non-fraternity man. He had no enthusiasm for campus activities. He had no interest in athletics. He had no organized social life. In 1938 a group of students recognized this problem and organized the Emory non-fraternity Organization to create interest in extra- curricula and social activities, athletics, scholarship, and to provide a medium for non-fraternity men's acquaintance with the four gen- eral phases of campus life. The academic year of 1940-41 saw the realization of these aims. ENO had members in almost every activity on the campus. It had equal participation in organizational athletics. Its scholarship was always above all-men averageg it planned a well-balanced social calendar. Mainly as a result of the organization's progress under its former president, Bill Morris, ENO' has been designated as headquarters for the Southeastern Region by the National Independent Students Association. ENO continued to improve through 1941-42, and last fall, through the untiring eHorts of Bill Morris and other members, it realized another goal that it has been striving toward. It was granted funds by the Student Council to furnish a lounge in Win- ship Hall for independent students, and the University granted them the right to separate this lounge by a petition from the rest of the dormitory. Miss Margaret Killam of Atlanta, a sophomore at Agnes Scott College, is ENO sponsor through the spring quarter. Officers elected at the close of the Fall quarter are Joe Porter, President, Parke Renshaw, vice-president, Dale Allen, secretary, Paul Stanley, treasurerg and Tommy Rich, member-at-large. W,-as ,.,. I-IGNOR CGUNCIL Function of Emory's Honor Council is to administer the Honor Code and foster a spirit of honesty among students and faculty. Recent years have seen great emphasis on the prevention of dishonesty by the elevation of Emory's standards of honor and manhood. Usually the calibre of council members is conspicuously high. Although the honor- system is not perfect in its operation, it has become recognized as an integral factor in the growth of a greater Emory. The greatest measure of its success is noted in the change in student attitude toward honesty in college Work. Membership is composed of four seniors and one junior selected by the outgoing council to serve for VAN BENNETT the following year. A faculty member serves as ad- viser. This year Prof. W. A. Strozier served in that capacity. SPEER BURDETT WADE HUIE . MORRIS HALE BILLY KIRKLAND Chairman l64l HHNHHHHHS . . . SENIOR 1-IOINIOIQ SOCIETY Each vear Seven men in the Junior Class are elected to D. V. S., recognition being based primarily upon service to Emory. Its members strive to promote the highest ideals of Emory, and election to membership is one of the greatest honors that can be conferred upon 21 Student I 902 1.7L'NCAN. JOHN LEROY SMITH, GUY TRIMBLE HIGHTOWER, J. D., JR- NIYERS, GUY ARTHUR MARTIN, H. NVARNER RUSH, FLETCHER GRAY CONNALLY, THOMAS XV. 1903 LEONARD, LOUIS L. ARMSTEAD, THOMAS M BOYD, MONTAGUE L. CAVANAUGH, THOMAS B. DOZIER, NATHAN B. LEE, J. WIDEMAN OSBORNE, HUBERT E. 1904 CROVATT, ALFRED H. BOYD, DARWIN H. CRABB. UDSON N J . HATCHER, WALDON L. HENTZ, HAL L. LAMKIN, ROBERT W. RICHARDSON, CHARLES H. 1905 PARKER, ROBERT S. BARRON, GEORGE A. BONNELL, WILLIAM G. LEWIS, WILLIAM H. in his Junior year. 1912 CLARK, SEYMOUR G. HOLLAND, SPESSARD L. JOHNSON. XVILLIAM P. LEE, THOMAS L. PITTMAN, CLAUDE P. ROCKXVELL, TURNER TOWSON, HATTON DUNNICA 1913 CARLTON, WILBUR A. KIMBALL, TED C. MALLETT, JOEL B. MATHEWS, JOHN E. PEARCE, HAYWOOD J. PERRYMAN, EMMETT K. RICHARDSON, JOHN W. 1914 PATTILLO, FRANK A. RIVERS, FRANK P. ROGERS, THOMAS C. SAXON, JOHN H. SOWELL, HOMER C. STROZIER, EDMOND W. WRIGHT, GEORGE W. 1915 BOWIE, J. CLIFTON ETHRIDGE, ROY P, MATI-IEWS, G. WILLIAM, JR. MEGAHEE, PERCY A. NEAL, TURNER B. RUMBLE, LESTER STOKES, ROBERT N. RAYNE, OLIVER ERNVIN SCANLAND, WILLIAM H. 1916 1930 1909 1940 STROZIER, HARRY S. 1906 MCCAMY, THOMAS S. BALDWIN, JOHN R. BULLARD, HARRY E. WIGHTMAN, COX P. GIRARDEAU, RUFUS M.' KING, EARL MABBETT, HENRY F. 1907 JOHNSON, WILLIAM H. ADAMS, GEORGE G. ALMAND, HENRY G. BURT, WILLIAM T. CANDLER. WALTER T- HEARD, BENJAMIN S. MCGREGOR, KENNETH 1908 ARNOLD, ROBERT M. BLAIR, LESLIE L. SMITH, WILLIAM C. STONE, BONNELL I-I. STOVALL, CARL T. STRICKLAND, WILLIAM WHITE, GOODRICH C. BRYAN, WALTER S. HEATH, EVANS V. LAMBERT, JACOB F. MARSHALL, THOMAS O. ROBERTS. JAMES NV. HILL, ALEXANDER H., JR. BRYAN, JOSEPH M. 1910 FOX, CHARLES R. HENDERSON, IRBY JENKINS. STEPHEN E. KENYON, EDGAR D. MACKAY, EDXVARD G. MUNRO, PAUL M. WIGHT, WARD 1911 BENTON, JAMES F. CRANE, BENSON B. FULLER, HUGH N. GIRARDEAU, JAMES L. HOWELL, HUGH H. MIZELL, ROBERT C. ROACH, GEORGE S. CANDLER. SAMUEL C. CLINE, PIERCE HARRIS, ROBERT M. KING, EDWARD L. RUMBLE, BERT SEALY, OLIN F. WILSON, JAMES H, 1917 BOYD, GEORGE H. GAINES, FLORENCE M. GARLAND, HALSEY S. LANE, FOUNT R. LOFTIS, XVARREN T. SHAW, JUDSON B. WEEMS, HOXVARD V. 1918 ALLEN, WINSTON S. CROSS, EASON HAMILTON, WILBUR H. INGRAM, JOHN J. KERR, BRAMWELL C. LESTER, JAMES G. RAST, JOHN M, 1919 BIVINGS, CHARLES K. HUMPHREY, ROBERT H. MATHEWS, SAMUEL M. MELTON, KELLER F. MULLINS, F. B. K. SANDERS, XVILEY B. STUBBS, WILLIAM B. 1920 DUNAWAY, JOHN A. FLOXVERS, ROBERT GREENE, MYLES L. MACKAY, ROLAND P. ROGERS, ERNEST WIGHT, ALVIN B. WIGHT, EDWARD A. 1921 ARNAU, ROBERT E. GREEN, FLETCHER M. HUTCHINSON, ALVA ROY JONES, WILLIAM P. MCFADDEN, JOHN H. PADGETT, LOUIE L. WALTERS, SIM D. 1922 BLITCH, LEE W. COOKE, DON A. DANIEL, CHARLES H. MILLICAN CHARLES B. ROCHELLE, WYLIE L. WATKINS, WILLIAM P. WHITAKER, LORENZO R. 66 1923 ANTHONY, MACK DETERLY, CHARLES H. HANCOCK, HERMAN D. HARPER, MARVIN H. MULLINAX, PERRY F. PURKS, JAMES H. TALLEY, CLARENCE L. 1924 CLEMENT, HUNT, JR. EDMONDSON, FRANCIS L. FITZHUGI-I, MILLSAPS HOWELL, JAMES H. MITCHELL, JAMES N. OSTEEN, ALTON T. TILLY, EBEN F. 1925 COLLINS, EMMETT B. EDMONDSON, ROBERT A. PETERSON, WILLIAM M. SCOTT, HENRY B. SPURLIN, PAUL M. WARNELL, WILLIS B. XVIGGINS, MARSHALL T. 1926 FAGAN, ROBERT L. HILL, GEORGE M. LOGAN, ARTHUR G. MAXWELL, JAMES Q. MILLER, HENRY J. SMITH, GEORGE K. STOVALL, HAMILTON H. 1927 CLEVELAND, JACK Q. CLOWER, EMIL J. CRAWFORD, ROBERT D. CROXV, WILLIAM A. HOLMES, JOSEPH C. SEWELL, STEPHEN H. THERRELL, JAMES H, 1928 CARPENTER, FRANCIS XV. CHAMBERS, EDGAR, JR. HENDRIX, XVALTER C., JR. KENDRICK, DOUGLAS B., JR MCCORD, CLINTON D. PATTERSON, GEORGE D., JR. STOCKMAN, JOHN M. 1929 BATES, LOUIS T. CUMBEE, ALFORD Z. GRAHAM, DUNCAN S. LEE, AUGUSTUS L. LOGAN, ALLEN M. STROZIER, R. M. TULLER, NV. H. AJAX, FRED W. CANNON, JOE W. FORD, ALAN B. HARRIS, JOHN L. PARKER, EARLE N. RIVERS, WILLIAM R. SMITH, GRAVES 1931 CARTLEDGE, EMMET B. HAYGOOD, W. C. HITCH, SIMON H. LANGE, JOHN H. SMITH, P. L. TIGNER, EMMET T. VALLOTTON, JOSEPH R. 1932 BOWDEN, HENRY L. HALL, MAXCY R., JR. PATTERSON, JOSEPH W. QUILLIAN, CLAUDE B. TIDMORE, JOSEPH C. WILLIAMS, W. E. WILSON, JOHN E. 1933 ASHLEY, ALBERT R. BRIDGES, SAMUEL R. CANDLER, ROBERT W. JORDON, WELCH O. MAY, JAMES W. STEPHENS, EDGAR WALTER WORTHY, WILLIAM S. 1934 ANDERSON, CHARLES B. JONES, BOISFEUILLET LOGUE, ROBERT B. PERDUE, XVILLIAM R. STUBBS, ALBERT XV, THROWER, RANDOLPH W. TURMAN, JOHN P. 1935 BLUMBERG, RICHARD W. BRADY, WILLIAM L. KIDD, JOHN W. NUNN, GEORGE E' QUILLIAN, WILLIAM F. TOLBERT, JAMES M. WILSON, JAMES F. 1936 BADING, OTTO F. BARLOW, EMMETT L. HOLLOXVAY, MURPHY M. MCCONNELL, REMINGTON XV REICHERT, ALBERT P. SLEDD, JAMES H. WIGGINS, ROBERT S. 1937 COMER, HUGH M. ELEAZER, FRANK F. GOILSON, GRAHAM E. PENDLETON, WILLIAM E. ROBERTSON, WILLIAM C. SOWELL, ANGUS W. WILLIAMS, WARREN W. 1938 ABERNATHY, HERMAN CLAY, GRADY E. DUFFEE, WARREN S. DUKES, WILLIAM F. HOPKINS, SAMUEL B. JENKINS, ALFRED L. S. MITCHELL, XVI-IARTON 1939 BARTLETT, MARCUS BECK, LINWOOD BRANNEN, EDMUND HUBBELL, XVOODROW HUMBER, JAMES ROBERTSON, FRANK ROLLESTON, MORETON BALLARD, SPEIGHTS BOOZER, JACK HALL, JOE MACKAY, JAMES CUMBAA, JAY HARWELL, ERNIE WILSON, JAMES 1941 ALLGOOD, PIERCE BECKHAM, WALTER PAIN, JIM ED HARDIN, JAMES KYTLE, CALVIN MCLEOD, POWERS WILDER, JAMES . 1942 BARNES, THOMAS G., II EMMET, ROY N. HARRIS, CHARLES A. MATHEWS, JOHN E., JR. SMITH, CHARLES O., JR. STURGESS, A. HENLEY, JR. WHITING, TOM A. .mf ' wp' ai. I ff f ' 6 X' lf T' I I Q " Q I ' V . 4 if C. V,33 'EE?'5 ' Zi' ff N 5 I , 4 -.. sf ,f :fl 1 gf 4 1 ' iz ,L 0 mf . IVAN L. BENNETT, JR. L. .2515 ' -1: 21Jiis1":2' ' I 'I ,:::1.i V: ",5'i',,iy S2353 .5IflQ5fl35t.. gif? .F-fa-2s.1' ..: I BILL P. CUMBAA MWQM, MORRIS S. HALE, JR. , , , . 'i ' "Wig-15 I I -Tfzaf' . ,. ,,1 .,,. I 'f 'f-1. .J .:,. - 11,4 4 ., AHA, ...L ,,- 'W ' MTX!-5'?.?i'flk l'L-E514 .. .M . .,. 4 we-A--.f hw-4,-1 -4-me I I, , 0 M 1 f ', lv I A , fi 1 A f s f ' f if ,SW 0 X -, 0' I Qi ,f 1 V, 1 i,...,...? ..,. N 7 ,,2,..,, ..,,, . ...,..,, f f 35" v , f Z f 1 ' 1 1 RUTHERFORD M. POATS LEON L. POLSTEIN I V X Ai , 5 ' - A X . . ws., 456 Y , N , A f :Cm . ' fd s?.:v5w,c:35:z. f -: ' msaw:5:a5:2:ef:xg:1:e3?ivf:. .,v1A'C7x P5 4,14 J. RUCKER TODD, Ill. J- I-EEROY WALTON, JR- I67I FACULTY MEMBERS . Pl-Il BETA KAPPA m N R new -A -T15"S'W- mm- ' H' I P 'I j j' T . ,A J J' -ew. '1 ,' . J N - 13, In ' I 3 . S , Q ,- . 'J . .,'...a,,.' . BENNETT BLACKWELL BRANNEN BREGMAN BROWN EDGERTON ERWIN FACKLER FLORENCE GIBSON,C. D. GIBSON, F. L. GREGORY GUDE HALE I-IODGES KELLER POATS POLSTEIN ROHRER SANDERS SCHEINBERG STAMPS WANNAMAKER WILDER WILLEFORD WILLIAMS WILSON OFFICERS R. H. MGLEAN . . . Presideut H. P. MILLER . Secretary P. E. BRYAN . .... Vice-President S. G. BRINKLEY .... . Treasurer . J. H. PURKS, JR .... Member of Executive Council GEORGE BACI-IMANN W. B. BAKER HOMER BLINCOE L. W. BLITGI-I F. K. BOLAND C. E. BOYD S. G. BRINKLIEY I. W. BROCK P. E. BRYAN A. H. BUNGE F. P. CALHOUN J. L. CAMPBELL G. E. CLAY H. W. COX M. S. CULT' R. A. DAY M. H. DEXVEX' I. L. BENNETT D. E. BLACKNVELL E. A. BRANNEN LARRY BREGMAN C. E. BROWN G. M. BROWN I. A. CORET, G. T. COXVART M. T. EDGERTON W. B. FACKLER, JR. VIRGINIA FEIIER L. H. FELIJER H. N. FULLER C. B. GOSNELL J. S. GUY H. H. HARRIS C. R. HART W. R. HOLMES W. H. JONES R. R. KRACKE C. T. LESTER J. G. LESTER G. T. LEXVIS R. H. MCLEAN H. W. MARTIN J. F. MESSICK H. P. MILLER R. C. MIZELL R. B. NIKON MEMBERS IN COURSE T. J. FLORENCE C. D. GIBSON, JR. F. L. GIBSON, JR. H. H. GREGORY A. GUDE M. S. HALE, JR. W. A. HODGES, JR. G. H. HOLSENBECK A. P. KELLER, JR. B. A. PETTY W. M. PIGRARIJ E. A. PLUNKETT J. A. PAIT EVANGELINE PAPAGEORGE J. H. PURKS, JR. W. B. REDMO-NI: DOUGLAS RUMBLE J. C. SEIBERT W. A. SMART J. G. STIPE C. W. STRICRLER W. B. STUBBS XV. D. THOMSON J. H. VENABLE R. E. WAGER G. C. WHITE R. B. WILSON J. H. YOUNG W. W. YOUNG L. P. .POLSTEIN E. R. ROHRER P. S. SANDERS PERITZ Sc!-IEINBERG C. M. SILVERSTEIN E. R. STAMPS L. XV. WANNAMAKER J. A. WETI-IINGTON PELHAM WILIJER, JR. B. R. WILLEFORD F. A. WILSON H. V. XVILLIAMS, JR. R. M. POATS Phi Beta Kappa, organized in 1776, is the oldest college "Greek Letter" society. Increasingly, during a century and a half, election to membership has meant recognition of outstanding mental capacity well employed, particularly in the acquisition of a liberal-cultural or general-education. The Emory chapter is known as the Gamma Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society in the State of Georgia. There are three classes of members: CIJ Members in Course Qstuclentsjg QZJ Alumni Members, QSJ Honorary Members. In the case of students, election to membership is based upon scholarship, breadth of culture, and general promise. i681 CDMICRGN DELTA KAPPA Omicron Delta Kappa, national college activities and leadership honor society, was founded in 1914 at Washington and Lee and has circles in forty-three American colleges and universities. Mu Circle was established here at Emory in 1925. The fraternity each year elects to membership a limited number of students Who have attained a high standard of efh- ciency in collegiate activities and who have contributed conspicuous service to the University, recognizing attainment in the fields of scholarship, publications, athletics, forensics, and campus leadership. Mu Circle is active in campus affairs. It has sponsored Freshmen Day for several years and again did this service to the students last fall. It has also sought through the Various media available to increase student respect for Emory Traditions. ' OFFICERS IVAN BENNETT . . . . . . President RLTCKER TODD . Vice-President R. F. WHITAKER . . . Secretary WADE P. HUIE . GEORGE BATES IVAN BENNETT EDMUND BRANNEN MORRIS HALE XVADE HUIE W. B. BAKER R. B. NIXON " f' " " ' . " ' ' J' g, STUDENTS A. J. KRAVTIN A. L. MAY RUTHERFORD POATS LEON POLSTEIN FACULTY L. E. CAMPBELL R. H. MCLEAN ALUMNI J. H. PURKS, JR. . Assistant Secretary PERITZ SCHEINBERG MARVIN SILVERSTEIN THOMAS STEVENSON RUCKER TODD JEROME ZIMMERMAN W. B. STUBBS R. F. WHITAKER ..-wx ,E 15,39 BATES BENNETT BRANNEN HALE Hula KRAVTIN MAY POATS POLSTEIN SCHEINBERG TODD ZIMMERMAN l69l If . ALP!-IA EPSILGN UPSILON ZA . T5 'J be Ku R . A 1- ,E 1 nf' .3 T. - - 9 fl 'R A - ,ffm -ar' V '3i"i" l70 ADAMS, H. ANDERSON, D. BAILEY, c. BATES, cs. BENNETT, L slRDsoNG, R. BLACKWELL, E. BREGMAN, L. BROWARD, A. EEELY, E. GOLDSTEIN, N. GRIFFIN, E. GUDE, A. v. HALE, M. HAWKES, K. HOOTEN, J. HUIE, R. HulE, w. JAHN, P. KIRKLAND, B. KRAVTIN, A. LAMAR, H. LANE, D. LINEBACK, c. MEBRYDE, R. J. MARSHALL, J. MENDEL, J. MORRISON, B. RAxToN, T. PoATs, R. POLSTEIN, L. RoPER, B, RuTLAND, W. SCHWARZ, A. SCHWARZ, R. SOLOMON, cs. SPIELBERG, N sTRAuss, w. TEPLIS, P. WANNAMAKE WEAVER, R. ww-IATLEY, E. WILSON, J. ZIMMERMAN, R, L. J. HOBART HORTMAN President Alpha Epsilon Upsilon is a Junior College scholastic honor society. Men in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Business School who have maintained a scholastic average of 25 .00 quality points per major of work taken through three quarters, or 22.50 quality points through four quarters are eligible for election. A In addition to the required scholastic standing, the range and nature of the courses selected, .the moral character of the student, and the general promise of a student to the world of scholarship and society enter in as a basis of election. The annual scholarship trophy awarded to the outstanding fresh- man this year Went to Alfred Schwarz. COGGINS COX DUGGAN GROVE ETA SIGMA Dsl OFFICERS MEMBERS JOE WILSON . . President BOBBY COGGINS JAMES HOWARD GRAHAM GROVE . Vice-President PAUL COX A TEDDY LEVITAS 15 JIMMY MENDEL . . . Serrefairy ARTHUR DUGGAN BERT ROPER JOE WILSON President Eta Sigma Psi, Sophomore honor society, was organized on the Atlanta campus in the spring of 1928 by several members of the sophomore class. The society, first known as the Toreadors, adopted its present name in 1930, and in that year established chapters on the campuses at Oxford and Valdosta. The founders expressed the purpose of the organization as follows: "To create Within the members of the freshmen class an interest in extracurricular activities which are of value to the University, to recognize character and leadership among members of the freshman classg to be of service to the college or university by promoting, en- couraging, and recognizing service, character, and leadershipf' Eta Sigma Psi, continuing its practice of last year, attempted to enforce the freshmen rules and to instill in the freshmen respect for the traditions of Emory. The most outstanding of its many services to the students this year was lending the guiding hand to the sopho- more in giving the 'tFreshman-Sophomore Push B-all." HOWARD MEN DEI- LEVITAS RQPER l7ll if .5-3?-4 BROWN J 'vf , MARKS , 1e,Ls'fAJ.,,'q, ' -eg as: Q RODGERS .- I -'15 Q . I STAMPS . I A,,A 5 at -.1552 X' 3 V.. .rfxrp '4" 1..fnE.,iE2' f-: gag., ,,.. ,K I-1:51:21-'.2-JfQ.l:',, ss. ' '35 ':2Z-, I. 25.8" J':-1'I-I"C5i'EfE2-5F.:?Sv'f,.'.,ig,j, 'L ' "' Ii. jf' ,,,. ffl. .. ,,,,,,,,' WILLIS g '- if.. 1- fri' - 'Fig .5 .iii - -' ' . I ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA STUDENT MEMBERS CHARLES E. BROW'N RICHARD S. CAUBLE DOUGLAS HOOD EDWARD MARKS RICHARD C. RODGERS ED ROE STAMPS HILTON WALL RUSSELL WILLIS DOUGLAS HOOD President FACULTY MEMBERS ROY KRACKE J. R. MCCORD OscAR MILLER R. I-I. OPPENHEIMER J. E. PAULLIN C. W. STRICK-LER J. D. MARTIN, JR. I. A. FERGUSON E. F, FINCHER GLENVILLE GIDDINGS GEORGE BACHMAN W. T. BIVINGS PI-IINIZY CALHOUN J. LEROY CAMPBELL STERLING CLAIBORNE JOHN CROSS DAN ELKIN WALTER HOLMES LEWIS D. I-IOPPE Alpha Omega Alpha, highest honorary medical society, supplanted the twenty-two-year-old Aslrlepios, local honorary society at Emory, in 1940. The society, saidto be the only order of its kind in medi- cal Schools on this continent, was welcomed with high praise by the administration and by the faculty. Alpha Omega Alpha is to medi- cine What Phi Beta Kappa is to the college of arts and sciences and Sigma Xi is to graduate work. The establishment of this organiza- tion Was thought to be a great Step forward in the establishment of a Super medical center in Atlanta. Membership in Alpha Omega Alpha is based purely upon scholar- ship, provided that the candidates' moral qualifications are satisfac- tory. Its aims, as stated by th-e constitution of the society, are "the promotion of scholarship and research in medical schools, the encour- agement of a high standard of character and conduct among medical students and graduates, andthe recognition of high attainment in medical Science in practice and related fields." The society was organized at the College of Medicine in the Uni- versity of Illinois, Chicago, on August 25, 1902. It is not primarily a social organization, chapter meetings are devoted to the presentation and discussion of clinical cases and scientific papers. Public ad- dresses are given -by distinguished physicians under chapter auspices. I72l INTEIQNATICDNAL RELATIONS CLUB CARL STIPE President Emory's Chapter of the International Relations Club has had the long- est continuous existence of any of the non-social clubs on the At- lanta campus. It remains today one of the most exclusive of the extra- curricular activities. Under the direction of Dr. Ross H. McLean, professor of history, the club meets on the first Wednesday of each month for intelligently-conducted discussions in the field of interna- tional affairs. The purpose of the International Relations Club is to instruct and enlighten public opinion. It is not to support exclusively one view as to how best to treat the conditions, which now prevail through- out the world, but to fix the attention of the students on those under- lying principles of human conduct, of international law, and of in- ternational organization Which must be agreed upon and put into action if a peaceful civilization is to continue. OFFICERS CARL STIPE . . . . . Presidenzf HERBERT KARP . . Vice-P-resident ADAIR MOORE . Secretarqf DAN PARKER . . . . . Treaszareer DR. Ross H. MCLEAN . . Faculty Adviser MEMBERS ALBERT CRENSHAW ' CARLTON POWELL JACK FLETCHER ELMo RoBERDs CARL LINEBACK ROBERT SCI-IXVARZ E731 FLETCHER KARP LINEBACK M OORE PARKER POWELL ROBERDS SCHWARZ , 2 , 1 " 'Q 7 W, L ' 4, f L V- -W-. -.-.HL ,., v pi M4 ' 5" , :ae--:f+.:Rf?' 4 f f E I x 55 9. 'J' of 5 .,.-1 V I I I we ATKINSON BATES BIRDSONG BLACKWELL BRASELTON BURDETTE DUGGAN FORREST JOHNSTON KARTOS KEY LOWENDICK STOCKMAN THOMAS TOLCHARD ALPHA KAPPA PSI Alpha Kappa Psi commercial fraternity was founded at New York University in 1904. Since that time it has grown into an international organization, with a membership of over 12,000. It is the oldest -commerce fraternity and one of the largest of the college fraternities. From the beginning the objects and ideals of this fraternity have been to fur- ther the individual Welfare of its members, to foster scientific research in the fields of business, and to promote courses leading to degrees in business administration in institutions of collegiate rank. Alpha Chi chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi has been active in the affairs of the Business School, and this year it has sponsored several forums led by some of the leading business men of Atlanta to give the business students a chance to End out as much as possible about the problems facing companies in various fields of business. I I I I OFFICERS WILLIAM H. BROWN . . . President WADE ATKINSON . . Vice-President i F. ARTHUR DUOGAN . . Secrezfary EDWIN BLACKWELL . Treaszz1'e1' I MEMBERS l GEORGE D. BATES HAROLD BECKER RALPH BIRDSONG JOHN O. BRASELTON H. SPEER BURDETTE CARROLL T. FORREST RICHARD JOHNSTON JOHN KARTOS WILLIAM KEY KARL LOWENDIOK EARLE E. STOCKMAINT HARRY G. THOMAS ALLEN TOLCHARD WILLIAM H. BROWN President i741 RUTHERFORD POATS President SIGMA DELTA CHI Class-room journalists come into contact with branches of the journalistic profession through Chi, national journalistic fraternity. Through its professional members in newspaper and radio members, Sigma Delta Chi's student journalists top-flight men in the various the activities of Sigma Delta informal forum sessions with work, as well as with faculty get a more complete picture of their future profession and make valuable personal contacts. The Emory chapter assists the department of journalism in conducting the University's annual high school newspaper contest, maintains a plaque for recognizing the best writing done by students, and renders other occasional service. This year the Emory chapter won two writing awards offered by the national fraternity. During the year the organization recognized nine students for membership. OFFICERS PROFESSIONAL AND FACULTY MEMBERS RUTHERFORD POATS . BILL CUMBAA . . BILL MORRIS . . . . President . Vice-Presirlenf . Secretavfy-Treasurcw' MEMBERS ALEXANDER BROWNE PAUL COX GRAHAM GROVE THAD HORTON DICK KNOX ALLEN COX MOORE TEDDY LEVITAS ADAIR MOORE LEON POLSTEIN GORDON SEARS WILLIAM STURGESS TOLCHARD CU M BAA GROVE CHESS ABERNATHY MARCUS BARTLETT FLOYD K. BASRETTE WRIGHT BRYAN DOUG EDWARDS ODOM FANNING WILLIAM GOOD LUKE GREENE WILLIAM HOWLAND HORTON WILLIAM KEY JOHN MARTIN FRED MOON CLAUD NELSON R. B. NIXON A. RICHARDSON ERNEST ROGERS J. C. SEYMOUR GEORGE VANCE KNOX LEVITAS POLSTEIN SEARS STURGESS TOLCHARD 75 TI-I Q, I . ' is If CECIL STOCKARD President I CHARLES ADAMS DAN ANDERSON ROY BERRY E NGINIZFRS CILIB The Engineers Club is founded on two basic principles and purposes: the promotion of the department of engineering, both at Emo-ry and abroadg and the acquaintance of the students with conditions and developments in the industrial Held. In line with this objective, the club's program of activities regularly includes field trips, speakers, and motion pictures. The membership of the Engineers Club who are interested in engineering and who are followin study at Emory. is 'open to those students g that course of OFFICERS CECIL STOCKARD . . President CARLTON BROOKS . . Vice-P1'esia'e111f BILL SPECK . . . Secretary MALCOLM JOHNSON . . T1'6dSZL7'CI' MEMBERS WITHERS BLAKE SAM HUNTER DICK ROHRER V. T. CHEN BILL MILLER JACK SCRUGGS OGDEN DOREMUS JACK REEVE BOB SEBRING ADAMS ANDERSON BERRY BLAKE BROOKS DOREMUS HUNTER JOHNSON MILLER REEVE ROHRER S R c uses SEBRING sPEcK I 76l PI-II SIGMA ICDTA Phi Sigma Iota, national honorary Romance language fraternity, Was founded at Allegheny College in 1922. Members are elected for outstanding work in the study of Romance languages. The Sigma chapter of Phi Sigma Iota was established at Emory University in 1922. The society endeavors to promote a feeling of brotherhood between the United States and the countries Where the romance languages are spoken. It fosters the study of the Romances by lectures and the reading of papers at its regular meetings, as well as sponsoring the presentation of plays in a Romance language. Other programs of interest include the presentation of outside speakers and social functions through which the members get better acquainted with each other. 11 I ,I,.k, .::.. F -.Ill I GONZALO SEC-BU RA, JR. President OFFICERS GONZALO SEGURA, JR. . . . P1'exide11t PROE. N. A. GOODYEAR . . Vice-President PROP. W. A. STROZIER . Secretm-y MEMBERS JOHN W. BATES PICKETT HYNES ANTHONY DEMOS FRANK LOWENSTEIN TROY ELLIS, JR. ERNEST NOEL COUNT D. GIBSON, JR. PARKE RENSHAW SPEER HACKNEX' EDWIN TURNER FACULTY MEMBERS DR. I. W. BROCK PROF. N. A. GOODYEAR PROF. W. A. STROZIER .IB I77l 9.7514-an ,. 5. f - 'I 41,5-I:-' 'fagfi . ' .W Muswe- - -. J J- " 5 " .' -.1 - ' 5:25. BAT E5 '- fic. "" 1 . f P - Q My :am- .-if. f.,4vvv f I,-. -J ' ' . I DEMOS GIBSON 511.21555 -iam 3 :s:'Qgf','f ' 'fl' . 'TSX R I-IACKN ev .. NOEL RENSHAW if ' -1 .- r -- . - -. , . . A . L. , V 1 ,- gs . ' 1 . Yr., E. .fs-...pr GONZALO SEGURA, JR. President OFFICERS GONZALO SEGURA, JR. . HARVEY L. PARRY . . RICHARD FETZ . .I PELHAM WILDER, JR. . FACULTY MEMBERS DR. LEE BLITCH DR. R. A. DAY DR. J. SAM GUY DR. W. H. JONES DR. CHARLES LESTER DR. G. T. LEWIS DR. NORMAN MATHEWS DR. O. R. QUAYLE MEMBERS IAN BELL GEORGE BROWN DECATUR CAMPBELL EMORY CLARK LOUIS FELDER i CORNELIUS FUNDERBURK LAMAR HARRELL THOMAS R. PAXTON RAY PLUNKETT MARY KATHERINE REISER BILL SEWELL BEN SMITH WILLIAM TRUETT JOHN WETHINGTON BEN WILLEFORD PI ALP!-IA Pi Alpha is an honorary local fraternity for the recognition of Outstand- ing men in the department of chemistry. Membership is extended to those who intend to make chemistry their lifework and who have already shown marked ability in this field. Pi Alpha each spring sponsors an open house of all the science depart- ments to which are invited high school students from the surrounding ter- ritory who are interested in these fields. Increased attendance each year has made these open houses a real aid in bringing more Students to Emory. The fraternity also presents a series of other Worthwhile programs for chemistry students throughout the year. . P1'esia'e1zt Vice-President CAMPBELL . Sec1'efm'y CLARK . Treaswfer FUNDERBURK HARRELL PAXTON PLUNKETT SMITH WILDER WILLEFORD. l79l Pl-II SIGMA The object of Phi Sigma is to promote interest in research in the biological sciences. Each year Phi Sigma elects to active membership those biological concentration students who have shown a marked ability for research work. Founded at Ohio State University in 1915, Phi Sigma was originally designed as an honorary biological research society. It is now considered as a working guild of biologists interested In research. Election to Phi Sigma means an opportunity for better Work, rather than merely election to an honorary society. At commencement a scholarship medal for excellence in biological research is awarded to a student, not necessarily a member of the society. FACULTY MEMBERS OFFICERS BOB PRATHER . . . Presirlent BAKER DR LEADINGHAM ZAcI-I ARNOLD . . Vice-Presicleint BLINCOE DR LESTER EUGENE BASINSKI . . Racordinff Secrefar 0 3' BROWN DR MARTIN RUTH LINEBACK . Correxromlinff Secrezfarf I 0 3 FATTIG DR MUNYAN RALPH RAMSEY . . . Treas1u'eI' GAMBRELL DR PHILLIPS MEMBERS J. H. BARRONV GENE BLAKE JORDAN CALLAXVAY CAROLYN DANIEL DENNIS DAVENPORT CHARLES DIcI4ENs MARY N. GREEN STANLEY GENE HoxvE HERBERT KARP ELIZABETH KORST EMMA L. LIPPS CECIL MCGARITY MARX' ESTILL MARTIN LEXVIS XVANNAMAICER WEINKLE DR RHODES X 3' ,sm , 4 BASINSKI CALLAWAY DAVENPORT DICKENS H aARRow . I KARP McGARlTY RAMSEY WANNAMAKER WEINKLE 79 OWE PI SIGMA ALP!-IA Pi Sigma Alpha is a national honorary political science fraternity. Alpha Epsilon Chapter was established on this campus in May, 1938, as an out- growth of the Political Science Club. The fraternity was founded to stimulate productive scholarship and intel- ligent interest in the subject of government. Its members, classified as stu- dent, faculty and honorary, are interested in local, state, and national politics as a means to good government. Honorary members include: Miss Josephine Wilkins, Mayor William B. Hartsfield, Dean J. Thomas Askew, Ralph McGill, Kendall Wisiger, Thomas C. Law, and Rush Burton. WQ3Eid':rH'E OFFICERS WADE I-IUIE . Preszdent BILL COYLE . . Vzce Preszdent HERBERT BABB . . . Secretary Treasurer BABB DICKSON GOLDSMITH MOORE PARKER POLSTEIN SOLOMON STIPE WILSON l80l FACU LTY M EM BERS CULLEN B. GOSNELL WILLIAM B. STUBBS MEMBERS LEE DAVIDSON WARREN DICKSON BOB GOLDSMITH ADAIR MooRE DAN PARKER LEON POLSTEIN JERRY SOLOMON CARL STIPE ARTHUR WILSON nstallation Ceremony: Dr. Harvey W. Cox as Chancellor and Dr. Goodrich C. White as President. 'arent's Day: Many parents attending and enjoying themselves, concluded with the banquet pictured above. Fall Politics: New feature here added as supplement to Spring Politics. Pictured above are presidential candidates. P EVENTS IN RETQOSPECT Religious Emphasis Week: Dr. G. Bromley Oxnam led many interesting student forums. Nw" 3 Push Ball Game and "Push Ball!" Traditional game with dance, added last year, and Queen, added this year. Christmas Carol Concert: Annual a'FFair with proceeds going to Red Cross. Pic- tured above is Dr. Malcolm H. Dewey with some of his outstanding singers. l9'l TWQ RUSI-l WEEKS . . . Play l-levee With lzroternitres Instead of having only one hectic rush week about which to talk the rest of the year, Emory fraternity men plodded and flew, lived and died, through tw-o bigger than ever and dirtier than ever rush weeks. The Hrst was preceded by six weeks of undercover rushing, interspersed by University-approved func- tions all of which bewildered freshmen and fra- ternity men alike. The lnterfraternity Council also suffered a perpetual headache, each week mak- ing new rules only to find them not 'iapplicable to the situation." Nobody knew when they were dirty rushing and cared less, because they weren't going to sit around and let other fraternity men do the same things in front of their suspicuous eyes. By the time the first rush week came, at the end of July, the freshmen were practically pledged to the various fraternities. The three-day rush week, with four dates a day and no meals, was merely to finish up last minute business. The SAE's, by fair means or foul as the rumors goes, pledged 21, and led the campus in a huge Phi Alpha yell. The Chi Phis didnit feel like yelling because their cannon went off so few times. The KA's got the "best class we've had in a long time." ATO got 20 from somewhere, and Phi Delt didn't do bad and didn't do good. -The rest of them did as usual. The trash wagon was kept on campus, which caused embarrassing fish in the face this time predicaments. In the Fall a new and tremendous body of freshmen got the old-type rush week thrown at them with no preliminary warning. r 4 .on 42 ' W,.3'.2y1'.:'. 5.-3125 ' -' "vii: 77-7 . wr . 'V , ' - , W, .,,, , ...,., 2' 57421. 3 . if ityefzf f ff! W sf? di 4' S 2, ,ff i i Staff? iffy ,f we f si'-- - ,M aff, ewes, ' j,if: f 'lr .enigma new h . r :.12:1:f+ ?Eexf22.f.:fa'sf1frf efzif- 5'V41'9fQi5717 .1975 ii ai 6 - V. . 51:-I-:'. .- 'a . f' -' -eww r- r V. N President Bill Cumbaa faced two rush weeks. Frat men had to rake medicine and re-read the ritual in order to muster enough fraternity spirit to "go through the mess again so soon." The trash wagon, large for some and small for others, did prove em- barrassing this time. The bandwagon rolled all the way around to the Phi Delt house who kept pledging men after the rush week was over, swell- ing their ranks to fit the house. The KA's got the and ended up with three pledges and a curse on their lips. Everyone else just had another rush week. Vile practices were supposedly curtailed this year by an En- forcement Committee. Most all the frats, except those of the committee memb.ers, lost money-one nearly all. The ban on pleasure-driving failed to have much affect on fraternity formal dinner-dances. Street cars and buses found themselves boarded by brightly-clad students Adviser Quayle, Secretary Kirkland, Treasurer Lewis, President Cumbaa, Vice President Goldthwaite, Adviser Rece, and Auditor Campbell see troubled waters ahead for fraternities. and their dates en route to the dances. AEPi, TEPhi, Sigma Nu, SAE, KA, Delta Tau Delta, and ATO had formals, the Sigs used .the cafeteria, while Phi Delta Theta, PiKA, and Sigma Pi sacrificed because of the war. Athletics found the unbeaten SAE,s becoming frightened of the ATO's, Phi Delt and SX not as power- ful as expected, and AEPi keeping ahead of the Campus Club in their league. Politics reared its ugly head in the Fall instead of Spring this year with ATO shoving T. Horton in as Wheel Hub and Councilman. Their boy, Billy Kirk- land, made a clean sweep in the presidential election. Queer tie-ups saw underdogs Chi Phi and KA, hereto- fore bitter rival, putting each otheris men in office, as far as they could. Phi Delt and SAE were big buddies, but couldn't do much without any other support. The Inter-fraternity Council switched presidents in the Winter Quarter when Cumbaa left, and George Bates took over. This year, probably the last for fraternities, has not been dull. Early in January, with the threat of fraternity mem- bers being called to service in the near future, the Inter- frat-ernity Council passed the recommendation of a com- mittee with Rucker Todd at its head that stated "fra- ternities may initiate second quarter freshmen who make two C,s and a D at mid-term and other men, regardless of grades, who expect to be called to service in less than four weeks. At least the fraternities will have full quotas of men at the end of the Winter Quarter of 1945. At least the fraternities hope so. i82l L lnter-Icraternity Council Quns Gauntlet as Many problems Arise BARRON, LINDSEY - BATES, GEoRcE - COGGIN5, Bonisxf - - DANIEL, AMOND - GOLDBERG, JOE - GOWER, IUSTUS - GROVE, GRAHAM - HALE, MORRIS - - HOLT, BILLY - - HORTON, THAD - HOWE, GENE - KRAVTIN, A. J. - - LEvI-IAS, TEDDY . LOWENDICK, KARL - - MCCORD, ASI-IBY - MOORE, ADAIR - PAXTON, THOMAS . SIEOEL, HAROLD - f SMITH, BEN - - TODD, RUCKER - - WEAVER, BOE - - WILKINSON, ToM . WILLIAMS, WENDELL WILSON, JOE - - . - - - - Sigma Chi - - Phi Delta Theta Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . . . .Sigma Nu - -Tau Epsilon Phi - - Delta Tau Delta - - - -Chi Phi - - Kappa Alpha . . Pi Kappa Alpha - Alpha Tau Omega Sigma Alpha Epsilon . . Alpha Epsilon Pi - - Tau Epsilon Phi - - - - Sigma Chi - -Phi Delta Theta - -Delta Tau Delta - - - Sigma Nu - - Alpha Epsilon Pi - Alpha Tau Omega - - - - Chi Phi - - Pi Kappa Alpha - - - Sigma. Pi - - - Sigma Pi - -Kappa Alpha ,ac 1 ,. 'fam 5 , -Y 6""'X -W, ,. I . A . HQ ga ,Q R ,..v ji' A we 'ff . 5 , ' ia 4.7. N. V -gh f ' f . bi' v.AiHlg,. - -D., Ls' 1, E Y V-til Aff imp- R o - -bf E fi rn -ix ltgfizz f",,.N:. N4 wh- f f 1 Ff o , ' N D ' 'Y r' P I I f Y ' -xg K - 53442 Fi - F . Q. if 5 - ' I" , 12: . if i 'K .P-. ' . F 1 r' 'F F is. ii L fi fi A ' 'ru' ii Il ni 1 I x 5 74124. E , f i I 5 I '-'W L' i ' . E I A ' ' 'f?f'j'-7.-f- ug- 'J lf . A - .- i ffflmw T-gli-..,u: V' P - . 45121 . l ' ' -:Q :Q 2 ff: .gf-rf. i Organized l92O Alpha Epsilon pi Founded at New York University in l9I3 HARRIET KUNIANSKY A E H Sponsor 84 ADAIIK, IRVING - AUERBACH, SAM BERMAN, JERRY CI-IENTOEE, ED - CO1-IEN, GILBERT - DREIZIN, ISAAC - EPSTEIN, JERRY . - FITTERMAN, ISRAEL FREEDMAN, JACK - GOLDSTEIN, LEON - GoLDsTEIN,' NORMAN JACOBSON, BURTON KAPLAN, MARVIN - KARP, HERBERT - KOBLEY, DONALD - KRAVTIN, A. J. - LERNER, ERNEST . LEVINE, MANUEL - LEVITT, JACOB - No-VAR, MAX - POLSTEIN, LEON - RAPOPORT, STANLEY REISMAN, EDWARD RIMER, HARRY - - SAUL, MILTON - SCHOENBERG, MELVIN SIEGEL, HAROLD - SILVER, MAX . . . SMITHLOFF, MILTON STEIN, SIDNEY . - SUTKER, HAROLD . WEINKLE, MILTON . NVEINKLE, STANLEY ZIMMERMAN, JEROMF Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Miami Beach, Fla. - - ' - -Atlanta . . . . . . Butler Mt., Vernon, N. Y. - - - - Atlanta - Atlanta - Atlanta - Miami Beach, Fla. - - - - - Atlanta . - Atlanta - . - - - Atlanta Miami Beach, Fla. - Columbus - Fitzgerald - - Atlanta - - Atlanta - - Atlanta - - - - - Albany New York, N. Y. - - - - - Atlanta - - Miami Beach, Fla. - - - - -Atlanta - Beaufort, S. C. - - - Atlanta - Douglas - - Atlanta - . Atlanta - Savannah Miami Beach, Pla. Miami Beach, Fla. - - - - -Atlanta EPSILCDN CI-IAPTEQ IWW 85 Alpha Tau Qmega Founded af Richmond University in I865 Organized IBB! MARIE COLBERT H361 A T Q Sponsor BARFIELD, TOMMY . BOATXVRIGHT, CLIEM - BOWIE, CARROLL - - BOYNTON, M. T. - BRANNEN, ED. - BROXVN, LEDLEY . - CARLTON, JIM - CARTER, HAL - - CHILDS, BURKE - . - CHRISTIAN, GILMER . COLBERT, RALPH "BRO CRANK, JOHNNY - - DANIEL, BILL - - - DOUGLAS, BILL - - DUKE, XVHATLEY - ELAM, BILL - - - GLASS, LAMAR - GLASS, PETE - - Goss, SIDNEY . f GREEK, BILL - GUEEIN, NEWT - HANLIN, CAREY - HEINZ, BILLY . - HOBBS, JESSE . - HODOES, BILLY - HODOES, TOMMY . HORTON, THAD - HOXVARD, JIM - HOWELL, HARVEX' . INMAN, JOHN - JACKSON, ED - - KELLY, ASA - - KIRKLAND, BILLY - KIRKLEY, FLOYD A LANDHAM, JACK - LANE, BILL - LANE, JOHN . - LEWIS, JIMMY - LAY, JOE ...... MARSHALL, JACK - - MCCALLISTER, ARCHIE MCDERMID, H. C. - - MCELREAT1-t, FARRIS - METTS, DAN ---- MINOR, HENRY - - MOORE, BOB - - - MOORE, WILLIAM . MUNCK, HAROLD . POPE, JIMMY - - RENTZ, EUGENE - RICHARDSON, BOB - ROTHMAN, PAUL - ROWOLD, JACK - ROZIER, JAKE - - - Russ, ZACH .- - - - SCHLIESTETT, TOMMY SKINNER, DICK - - SMITH, BEN ---- STANFORD, DEWITT - STARR, J. W. ---- TODD, CHARLES . XIANSANT, CLAUDE - WALKER, EDWIN M. - WALKER, J. EDWIN . WRIGHT, CARTER . . YOUNG, BOB - - - ZUMWINKEL, JACK - l n 87 ALP!-IA TI-IETA CHAPTER - - - - - Atlanta - Jacksonville, Fla. - - - Starr, S. C. - - - - Albany - - - - - Millen - - Tallahassee, Fla. - - - - - Atlanta - Cleveland, Tenn. Winter Haven, Fla. - - - - -Atlanta . - - - Columbus - - Orlando, Fla. - - - - Atlanta - - Wicrsdale, Fla. . - - - McRae - -Gulfport, Miss. - - - - Atlanta - - ' Atlanta - - Atlanta - - Buford - - Atlanta Chattanooga, Tenn. - - Columbia, S. C. - - Hampton, Va. . - - - Atlanta - - - Atlanta - - Atlanta - - Cochran - ' Cartersville - - -Albany - - Columbus - - - Albany - - Columbus A - Douglasville - - - Atlanta - - Roanoke, Ala. - Jacksonville, Fla. - - - - - Camilla - Jacksonville, Fla. . . . . . .Perry - -Tallahassee, Fla. - - - - -Vidalia - - - - -Wadley - - Bristol, Va.-Tenn. - - - - - Atlanta - - - - - Madison - - Oteen, N. C. Winter Haven, Fla. - - Louisville, Ky. - - Columbus - - . Atlanta - - Biloxi, Miss. - - - Atlanta - -Orlando, Fla. . -Leesburg, Pla. - - - Cedartown - Jacksonville, Fla. - - - . - Atlanta - - - Columbus - - Albany - - - Atlanta - - Douglasville - . Bainbridge - - Louisville - - Tallapoosa - - College Park - - - Decatur 58' -vw Chi Phi ff L-, -3 ., ,-M., W , , -6. ..,, Wi, ,f....s+.-..z-m.fQL,fL ff ' ' - 4 Organized I 869 MOYTIS COYTIS X 'P Sponsor Founded at Princeton in I824 1881 ALLEN, REYNOLDS - ANDREWS, AGNEXV - BATTLE, ROBERT W. BENNETT, WILLIAM C. - BOYLE, JOI-IN J. - - BRADLEY, PAUL L. - BYRD, ROBERT B. - - CLARR, ROBERT A., JR. - DOREMUS, OGDON FRANCIS DOWDA, XVILLIAM - - - EDGERTON, MILTON THOMAS - FACRLER, WILLIAM B., JR. FORBES, G. LESTER, JR. - GAY, ED ...... GERLAND, LOUIS A., JR. - GIBSON, COUNT D., JR. - GROVE, GRAHAM - - - GUDE, A. X7ALDEMAR . HOOD, FOY - - HOOK, ED ----- HOWELL, CLARK, JR. - HUIE, RALPH A. - - HUNTER, SAM - -JAMISON, PYOTT . JOHNSON, J. EDGAR - LONGINO, GRADY - NEEL, -JULIAN B. - NORMAN, JOI-IN - NORRIS, JACK . - PENDERGRAST, BILL - PERKINSON, NEIL . . - POATS, RUTI-IEREORD M. PROFFIT, JACK R .-.- RANDALL, LUTHER - ROGERS, HARRISON - - - SHUMATE, ROBERT E. LEE SMITH, HAROLD - SMITH, RANKIN . STAFFORD, ALVIS --.- STALLINGS, HENRY A., JR. STAMPS, ED ROE .--. STARR, TRAMMELL, JR. - STEELE, CHARLES EDWARD STONE, H. F .----- STRIPLING, DAVID . . . STURGESS, WILLIAM K. TAYLOR, T. EARL - . . TILLY, BILL - . TODD, J. RUCKER, III - TODD, WILLIAM S. . TWIGGS, MARVIN - - - WATSON, L. CHANDLER . WEEMS, HO'XVARD V., JR. WESTMORELAND, JOHN - WILLIAMS, H. V. . . WILLSON, JAMES V. - - Milledgeville - - - Tifton - -Atlanta - Columbus - - Atlanta - Dalton - Atlanta - Atlanta - Atlanta - -Marietta - - - Atlanta -Wfadley, Ala. - Atlanta - Atlanta - - Atlanta - St. Simons - - Atlanta - Atlanta - Atlanta - Atlanta - Atlanta - Atlanta - Quitman - Atlanta - - Columbus - - - Atlanta - Thomasville - - Columbus - - Atlanta - Atlanta . - Marietta - - Decatur - - Columbus - - Atlanta - . Atlanta - Sea Island - Atlanta - - ' Atlanta - - Thomaston - - Savannah - Norfolk, Va. . - - Dalton - -'-- Savannah - - Fernandina, Fla. - - - Newnan - - Atlanta - - Columbus - Atlanta - Kingsport, Tenn. - Kingsport, Tenn. - - - Gainesville - Anniston, Ala. - Sebring, Fla. - - - Atlanta - -Macon - Atlanta GAMMA CHAPTER Aw. "lib nh 1 v- 89 'TM L," V .V "ig, ef '53 .E,,l, fx V +13-1. 2 5 3: ,..,, , , A fi ..,. fe ,f A Q., My 15.3, -. -- 1,5 . :c f ' . ' ."...- "ix, 414.5 ,Y 1, Q.. A Delta Tau Delta Founded at Bethany College in l859 I " -M-1 2 3 A . .Q , 7 -Q ' Lf' 'rf 4f--m?a Jfw+MEWwAH?aV,QgwaVV-? ,gn-' -V cg .-'- - , 'f '- ic. V -if 'V 'i Jef -Q .HZ-5."""-'Vg'W ' ' -1 X- K3 i l L gg - 5, we . f gg4v:5:g,1?f3-VM-' 9, V 35, V, - M. 1,4 4... , gg ., ,A ,-4.2. :,, ,mf 1:-1-ff,:--KV. 5 .,., 7 i.. . . , ...Q ,..,2wgQi,,J,7,,,,.,L, , it . . . ...Q ' Z , , Q? , J., ,g.w,z,4Q ,..4 'GQ 40 , 4' W?,j'4f?f,, f ,tw f ff ff 1 A-W fcf A . -sa f af ., , fn bV.x,g:gJgf..,,,. 14,00 h 33? A mwigfg ef-fa m 9 M383 ' W. J 4 VM . ,, mam , M ' " - " 4 wiv 5 1 az., If 46 M L4 gonna 4,:e,J :JV .,...,:Q 1: A mga fwwwmwy MM ' mph-' 21,6-2-xjvwvff f V f ,, V , , u 1 ,o f K Q f f ' X , Q fm k 4 1 l 1 W , g , ,V a ,we Q ' V,.' ' -Aw 1 - '5,'f"Z11'4"g1-,.. ,. "Y ' ' l., . ' y V1 .mf , , . 1 -may. :wx ,V 5. , ff :av -4 -- :.V.V,,.-,g- ' ' W 3.1.1-,:',.-,my-wi,.f,f:s5f4:.-41 I , :ef-1. V - V ., ,V .,,,V,- , . . .V ,: -V ,. 47,-., -' 5- , gr. V:-:Aff ,, " JV, ' - V ' -5' i"'.f ., -2 kiwi jlT"'f -. ff' 6'Y2'f' VP' .. 5261: v Q - 5:-.V.f:Q,:V.::.e.:A . Fl .M-if V44 gfug ,...,4 1.1: '-.2 M 4-V5.9 .y11.,,'., mpg 1.4.-Vf .. -, V. , ,, . 41 . d m ' -. 11 1' 5152 3. .za-7 -"- ' 15 - - ' , ' "1-7 'J 'I 1 :'--G "JH: 6:42 . ' ', UP-:2:-5... my . -- -'gg ' ' '. .1 .V - . -f-w- -bw -- 1,'f.?,':' aw- - 1-."' '--.iiiiif-.V--.131 . 'WG-:m.,. fW.' .J l Organized I882 CAROLYN WILLIAMS Delia Darling 90 ADAMS, OSCAR S. - BARRONV, J. GORDON BLISS, FRANK - - - BRAZZEAL, RICHARD - BURDETT, LEE HUGH - COLEMAN, THOIMAS H. CORDES, PHILIP B. . DIETRICI-Is, DONALD DOMINGOS, ANGUS B. FOLGER, Joi-IN - . FOUNTAIN, GRAY - GOWER, Jusrus, JR. - HARRISON, ANDREW- JAMES, ALBERT S. - JEANS, P. CHALMERS . MooRE, ADAIR . . MOYE, CHARLES - - POLLITZER, WILLIAM S. - POWELL, E. CARLETON RAWLS, O. GREY - - STIPE, CARL E., JR. - STROZIER, WILLIAM A., J TIDWELL, EARL . . . WHATLEY, EDXVARDS WILDER, PELHAM - R. .l9ll BETA EPSILCDN CI-IAPTIER - Butler - .Atlanta - 'Athens - . Brookhaven - - Sandy Springs - Jacksonville, Fla. - - - -Atlanta - -Atlanta - - Macon - - Carrollton - - Butler - - Atlanta - - Milledgeville ' - - -Reynolds Greenwood, S. C. - - - Culverton - - - - -Atlanta Greenville, S. C. - - Savannah - . Williamson - Avondale - Atlanta - Atlanta - Reynolds - Savannah S . I - 5.'1'.2i'? ' 5:53 I Mil., S I , 1 S RWE! A A R - ., N sfivf .433 -v-- .: fri: V5 ,M :di 49 Kappa Alpina Founded at Washington and Lee University in I865 DOTTI E LOWE KA Sponsor Organized IS69 92 EPSILCDN Cl-IAPTEIQ ARNOLD, JACK - BAOGS, WADE . BROXVN, CHARLES CATO, BOE - - ' CLINE, PETE - - COOK, DICK - DORTCI-I, FRANK - Doss, NOBLE - - DUGGAN, ARTHUR DURDEN, BOB . FANCI-IER, JIMMY FUNK, DAVE - - GAMBLE, JOHN . GIBSON, LESLIE . GUY, CANDLER . HALE, MORRIS - - HARBOUR, CLIFF HICKS, LYNN - - HOLLIS, CHARLES HOLLIS, JIMMIE - HOLMES, EDGAR C. HOSCH, EDDIE - - HUIE, WADE . - JOHNS, BILL - JOHNSON, BILLY JOHNSTON, FRED JORDAN, WILLIS KEY, BILLY - . KING, LON - - . LATHEM, WILLOUGHBY - MAGNON, WEST - MARKS, EDWARD S. MCBRYDE, Ross - MOORE, BILL - - MOORE, JIMMY - MORRISON, BILL MURPHY, MIKE - NESS, BOB - - - PAULLIN, WILLIAM RAYNER, HUGH - RECE, DON . . REILLY, ENDS . ROCHE, PAT . . L.. . ROREEECK, CURTIS G. - SEALY, FRED . . SEALY, HUGH - - SEARS, GORDON l'BUDDY" SHEATS, BREWSTER SKIPPER, GROO-vER SMITH, DICK . SMITH, JACK - TEATE, LUTEN - THOMAS, HARRY TRIPP, BILL . . - WALTON, LEEROY WHITENTO'N, JOE WILLIS, RUSSELL WILSON, JOE - - WOODSON, GRATTAN - - - - Elberton - - - Camilla - - Barnesville - - Americus - - Atlanta - - Newnan - - Hawkinsville - - LaGrange - - Hawkinsville - - ' - Graymont - - - - - Atlanta - NVilmingtOn, Del. Lincolnton, N. C. - - -Thomasville - - - - -Atlanta - - Orlando, Fla. - Memphis, Tenn. Copperhill, Tenn. - - Forsyth - - Newnan - - Moultrie . - Gainesville . - Elberton - - Atlanta - - - Ellaville - - Tampa, Fla. - - Columbus - . Atlanta - - Macon - - Atlanta - - Tampa, Fla. - - - Toccoa - - Troy, Ala. - - Biloxi, Miss. - - - Forsyth - - Milledgeville - - - - - Atlanta Winter Park, Fla. - - - - - Pelham - Meridian, Miss. - - - - - Atlanta ' - Atlanta - - - Dublin - - Tampa, Fla. - - -Atlanta - - Reynolds - - Atlanta - - Atlanta - - Lakeland, Fla. - - Hawkinsville - - - - Moultrie - - Thomasville - - - - - Metcalf - Monticello, Fla. - - Thomasville - - - Atlanta - - - - Barnesville - - - - Savannah - Middlesboro, Ky. N. l93l Phi Delta Theta Founded at Miami University in l848 organized len SARAH COBB JOHNSON if A 9 Sponsor 5 A 4 i i i i i i i94i AnAMs, V1RcIL . . ALDENDEREER, FRANK . ARNOLD, HERBERT BAKER, XVARREN . BATES, GEORGE BATES, JOHN . BIGELOW, JERRY BISI-IOP, BUDDY BIXLER, TOMMY . BowEN, JAMES . BURNS, E, C. . BURsoN, NAPIER . CALnxvEI.I., EUGENE CALLAWAY, JORIJON . CARTLEDGE, ANDKENV . CHAPMAN, JOHN CoIaURN, JosErI-I COEEEE, ARGHIE COLEMAN, BILL CoLI.INs, FRANK CRAWFORD, JOE M. DANIEL, BILL . . DICKENS, CHARLES DRIvER, RowE . FLOWERS, ASBURY . . FRANKLIN, BEN GOLDTHWAITE, RANDALL HARDEE, CHARLES . . HARDE1s1AN, RHODES . HARDING, DON . . HARRELL, WILLIAM . HARRIS, DICK . . WILLIAM HARTLEY, HAYES, JOHN . HINTON, HoRToN, HUosoN, JACKSON, IOHNSON, LAGERQUIST, W. G. JAMES CLINTON . JAMES . HIRAM . T. L, . LUPO, JAMES . . MCCORD, T. As!-IBY M'ENDEI., JAMES . MORGAN, JAMES C. MURPHY, RALPH NEEL, FRED . BRUCE . Gm . NExvsoM, PARRISH, PATE, TOM . . JAMES PHILLIPS, PooLE, SAM . Pou, LEO . RENTZ, BILLY . RICKS, WATSON . . RODDENBERY, JULIEN RODDENEERY, RALPH . SEcoRo, ALAN . . SIMMONS, FREEMAN SLADE, ToM . . SMITI-I, SAM . STOCKMAN, EARLE . STRAWN, Bonny SWINK, ROBERT . TAYLOR, FORREST- TI-IQMAS, RUSSELL TRIMBLE, BURTON . TURNER, Hmrwooo . WALLER, Roy . WATKINS, BILL . NVEBB, JOHN WHIDDON, BOB . WI-IITE, CECIL WILKINSON, PETER B. WOOD, ARTHUR . . WRIGHT, GEORGE W. . . Atlanta . Miami, Fla. . Meridian, Miss. . . . Atlanta . Quincy, Fla. . Quincy, Fla. . . Decatur . Starke, Fla. . Live Oak, Fla. . . . Tifron Miami, Fla. . . Atlanta . Atlanta . Covington . Columbus . Atlanta . Eagle Lake, Fla. . . . Eastman . . . Atlanta . Brooksville, Fla. . . . Atlanta . Eastman . Madison . Bristol, Va. . Dothan, Ala. . . Mcttcr . Dothan, Ala. . Cliicfland, Fla. . . Louisville . Gadsden, Ala. . Vero Beach, Fla. . . . Decatur . Hollywood, Fla. . Dothan, Ala. . . . Covington . Pendleton, S. C. . Crystal River, Fla. . . . Eastman . . Atlanta . Dallas, Texas Dalton Fort Valley Gables, Fla. West Point . . Atlanta . Thomasville . Columbus . Ocala, Fla. . Coral . Montezuma . Atlanta . Americus . . Atlanta . Miami, Fla. . Lumber City . . Cairo . Cairo Atlanta . Decatur . Columbus . . . . Atlanta . Greenwood, S. C. , . McDonough . Miami, Fla. . Quincy, Fla. West Palm Beach, Fla. . . . . . Atlanta . . . Atlanta . . . Dalton . Hollywood, Fla. . Orlando, Fla. . . Tifton . Waycross . . . . . Atlanta . . . Miami, Fla. West Palm Beach, Fla. 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Q ,,,, , ,,..,..-,. , K ,... .U . ,, - ,gf ., 2 3- ' ,Ni . "rg-3. 95? ', f. A 'Q' - . - ' ' l ' ' . . "'5'Z'lf:. 4!f-62 " ' ?iL-:g,I,.Q- W. - .""?:i,QF f,-1.5 7 A E - 4 ' A - '.-'1':2'-x- - ', f -':'a'7?:'- . ' - :R " , "- - 1 1 ' 3 - -1 5 14-'ITLEP -f ". .f. . 4 'Wf' if 'VV , ' '-" ' 1,-. www -, -491 -, ,, -. -' . f , .V ':-as-,-fvfam - f 1 7 ':1-ff: A . f .ff - - ' 5 -1 , I -,il 1:15, .,:.,r-1 -4 f -fm- A f--4 , 1 I V .-,--A-:e..g..ef5 , - 5Lg,.,,, ' 'f l ,,,,.::5.e1-f "" - ' ' . Z " 'Q ' -, ' -AW: ' QW..-. :WS aiilifi' :fs -rg: 4 1,-. JIWR- --.-11151. I' 3 ' f e, ,. 'M l95l - ' an .117 ' "K, ,rg 1.517 Y '- -'L-ff." ' ,H 5- -4. ,J 3, 3 an fr Q -W ' 1 '- , "' J 'ii' --, -fb 5 "S+ 1' Q"f,f"' ' "- ',-fir QA fi arf' ff' ,W ' ' Q -- a '- ' v,,,:.Y ' - 'N Q ' f-.T-'Bl 225-4 .r i. A 'L'?f'.- -'Li gm :X .lr ,M . .. - , 2 -fa, ' ,L .F ' 1 LS -1 QFIEE: 1 , r 3 . V, ,., ,ff 2-:. - 5:3 'X 1 1 . L 15 J' N Q " l n Jr 4 2" fa 1 ' F .f ' - '-A123111-5 " , - V if .-Z5i?1fEi'fi25.i 3 ff 17-as P +V- 45 15 f.::Q."f J 2,25 -ffif-'fa-L 1-2 ES, . 3,515 ,. fn-.-4 ,lf 1- .,, ini ,, E f- ,L M. A ,M if if-I lf',g3fQ "J . L 2"r Pu-1 ' t ' 3 ' 32274-,"i1ii' rm. -iw -W-.-.1 :A-naw' as - . 2 sg:-52 . fx ,C 'S , ' EQ- 'J 1-' fa . ,fi My Organized 1919 pl Kappa Alpha Founded at Universiiy of Virginia in l868 DOROTHY ANN GRIFFIN H K A Sponsor AINsxVoRTH, XVILLIAM L. . ANDERSON, CLYDE ATKINS, TOMMY - BOXVERS, FRANK . CHISNELL, ROBERT DICKSON, WARREN DUNCAN, JOSEPI-I EBY, GEORGE . ELLIS, MATHEXV - FLETCHER, JACK W FREEMAN, OLEN - HAMEY, QUILLIAN HART, JOHN - - HOGAN, WILLIAM - HOLT, WILLIAM HUBBARD, ROY . LAWSON, CARLTON LEE, G. C. - - - MARTINEZ, ERNEST MAY, ALBERT . . MGCRUM, BARTON MCNEELY, HENRY MILLER, JOHN - - MISCALLY, ARTHUR NOEL, MALCOLM E., JR. - OLIVER, A. M. - OLIVER, CARL - PARRIGIN, FRANK - PHILLIPS, RABURN D. RICHARDSON, EDWAR ROGERS, GEORGE W. RUSSELL, HENRY . SEssLER, WILLIARD WALL, THOMAS A. WEAVER, ROBERT - - WOODRUFF, JOHN D. - D . - Bay Springs - -Atlanta - Atlanta - Albany - - Decatur - - Hephzibalm - - -Tavares, Fla. Wfinter Garden, Fla. - - - - -Calhoun Tarpon Springs, Fla. - - Atlanta - - Atlanta - . - - - Atlanta - St. Augustine, Fla. - - - - - Atlanta -- - - - -Atlanta Winter Garden, Fla. - ---- Dupont - - - - Atlanta - - Perkinson, Miss. - Decatur - - Toccoa - - Atlanta - - Atlanta - - Atlanta - Olive, Miss. - - Atlanta - - Atlanta . - - Atlanta - Abbeville, Ala. - -Gulfport, Miss. - - - - Atlanta - - Tampa, Fla. - - - Blue Ridge - Ducktown, Tenn. - - Sanford, Pla. . .EFQ ,Q BETA KAPPA CHAPTER A 4. At.- JWZJ W' f"'i r A, wg ':- ". -, .,, Nfl, I, 1.5.5 A'-. ." -kfl' --n 24- 'A igjf : ' .fijf ,wf,- wwf 12' ' 'fi " .-ff ,"' f' TZ-fha" L ' o '1f+i.fff' Y , ,., .. 7 " 'Z' -if 7.-L nf : ' "'-li-1 rx wifi. ' I ' I - f , I 'ruin s-J" lgma plwa Epsilon fx' Q1 , .T.,:--1 ' - ' Founded at University of Alabama in I856 ffm:-.1 .--fb -.,...- ,': 7 -V--f " 'fa-f'kTf-T-.4 "' rf' i .-Q-.-,..,, .-. 14, xx, ' J 'N s' ' N' is "+R 4' ' -", 1- HA "Lf 'T . A, J., 4, . ,,. 7' mg, "' 2- S-51: 5 N 4. ' If if I Iv " "' xii ', q 'thx J if, o . ' W ' 4' I " r " 'Mx' '-f J 5-ff feaxfn 'I ii an Y., R , .A ,MQ 9 1 , J 1 ' 1 1 x tr- H - .. Q' ,g Q , vi ' 1 x' 1 19 3 . ' P 'I VL' 4 xl " 55' gr I I a is Y S' 1 I ' , -1 . .Q 1 r , 1 ' L ....4.,L..L,, '," ,.w?ff ' D '11, "tw!13' u - 221112 f 5 1 r Organized 1 t . ... .J I88I PATTY BARBOUR E A E Sponsor 98 ALLEN, JAMES NORMAN ATKINSON, XVADE . . BARNES, DUELL B. . . BELL, .l. MAO, JR. . BENNETT, JAMES . BRANTLEY, MAR . . . BRASELTON, JOHN O., JR. BRUMET, XVILLIAM E. . BRYAN, FRANK M. . . BRYAN, GEORGE W. . BURDETT, H. SPEER, JR. BYRD, JACR . . . . . CLARY, UPTON . . . . CLEAVELAND, J. PEAIKCE, JR. . COEEER, ROBERT . . . COGOINS, ROBERT POWELL COOLIUGE, C. WALTER . DARDEN, MORRIS A., JR. DAVIDSON, JOHN . . . DEAN, WILLIAM J. . DENNISON, DAVID . DOMINGOS, RIcI-IARI: DUNCAN, Rox' G. . ERNWIN, GOODLOE FORREST, CARROLL T. FOSTER, RALPH . . FREEMAN, TOM R. . . GILBREATH, ROBERT L. GREGORY, HUGH . . GRESHAM, XVIYLIE OSCAR . GUNTER, RHETT HARRELL, LEON L., JR. HARRELL, WILLIAM A. HERRING, WILLIAM . Hocc, HENDERSON . . Hows, EUGENE H. . . JACKSON, H. COLEMAN, JR. JAHN, PAUL H. . . . . JENNINGS, HENRX' . JOHNSTON, RICHARD JORDAN, LEE .... KAY, JANIES BENJAMIN, JR. KELLY, BILLY .... IJESLIE, FELIX, JR. . LIGHTFOOT, MALCOLM . LINDOREN, GRAY M. LovvoRN, ROBERT . . LOWRY, XVILEY POTTER MALONEY, RICHARD MAY, JOE . . . MCDOUGALD, XVORTI-I , , MCGRADY, CHARLES XVINFRED MITCH'ELL, ROBERT B. . . MONCRIEE, XVILLIAM H. NALLEY, W. BENJAMIN . NORTON, W. L. . , OlNEAL, ROBERJT . . PARARO, LUTHER L., JR. PASCHAL, J, DEAN , PEAVY, JACK . . . . . PINKSTON, J. WILLIAM RAYLE, ALBERT . . . RICHARDSON, CULLEN RIGHTS, CLYDE S. . ROPER, BERT . . , RUSSELL, ROBERT LEE, JR. SHINAU-. ROIIERT P., JR. SINGLETON, KENNETH SMITH, MARTIN . SPIERA EUGENE . STALEY, ALEERT . STEINEORG, ROBERT STORY, STAOY HAMMOND, JR THORNTON, H. A. . . . FOLCHARD, ALLEN . . WATKINS, MALTEI' . . W XVILLIANIS, ALLISON . WISE, JEAN . . . . Tampa, Fla. . . Atlanta . Columbus . Mobile, Ala. . LaGrange . Troy, Ala. . Braselton . Marietta . Fort Myers, Fla. . . . . Adel . LaGrange . Nlifnycross . . v . Macon . LaGrange . . Atlanta . . Marietta . Savannah . . XVOSL Point . . . . Lavonia St. Petersburg, Fla. . . . . . Atlanta . . . lvlacon . Rome . Atlmcns . Messick, Va. . . Bluffton . Brunswick . Atlanta . . . Dalton . . . Waynesboro Spartanburg. S. C. . . . Fitzgerald . Valdosta . . Atlanta . . Cedartown . . Tuskegee, Ala. . Greenville, S. C. XY'inter Haven, Fla. . . . . Dawson . XVoOdstock Atlanta . . Byron . I Carlton . Troy, Ala. . Slwrters, Ala, . . Atlanta . . . Bremen . Jackson, Miss. . Atlanta . Atlanta . . Statesboro . .. . . Macon . . . . Atlanta . State Park, S. C. . . Gainesville . Gainesville . . Uvalda . . Crawforclville . . . . Dawson Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. . . . . Valdosta . . Atlanta . Montezuma . Tampa, Fla. Winter Garden, Fla. . . . . Winder . Cartersville . Valdosta . Gainesville . LaGrange . Decatur . Atlanta . . Atlanta . . . . Decatur . . . . Atlanta est Palm Beach, Fla. . . . . Atlanta . . Amerlcus GEORGIA EPSILON CHAPTER Y l99l Y ' ' -1.- 5 , gn, :..,. 1, 1 J Af L, , .,,,, I V N 5 Q , 'ZE.' g,l.'i if ' ' 1 V ' i. -'if ' 79? Q Q' 3 . IQI I IG I , i ' ig :Lg-l 5'-f".-,f , 'H :J ' 1 .1 lifft' f 'f1"r, " J. "i'IL,, j, , 1, f'7ff'i .'f 'fits-ri . . . . . -- I 1 , Q Qi ,X i'i,g55145 Founded at Miami Unlversrky in I855 - T'-if Q 5 LIE g-- ' fgi f-fi -1 . t I: -r .X ic .- r 1,4 I, qi - N 'Ti-.gl , W f fm 1' ii V ai 223-f jig:-5.3 gg, ,ii gfaxge 1 V 9 .1 4, ' hfigw h 'iE"-f5i'9.:- qxffiffiifl Q- j 3' ' if ' ""' N ' 9 1 p ',- 1' ' "-J.i'f:.-" ' "V, 2 . ' Wzfw- "' " L ,, .: Y,h,.v1 ,-,.....,,g, . ,L,-, -X - Q, K 1 ,- 41.4 we--ai 1 14 --1---. .,,. . , 47,-J V Q- -1 -. vw, . - ,,LN,r:, 4' -f A, v Q K. ,ig . -f:f1-.,,,k w , L l i v- N "- '0g.J3l-T,t-- .L--V ,Y """f'x:,, :-- :.wf-.,,,x4-3'ux-- Organized l92l mr-2 O BETTY GRIEVE Sweeiheari of Sigma Chi ADAMS, J. HAMMOND - ALEXANDER, LOUIS M. - ANDERSO'N, DAN C. - - ANDERSON, NVILLIAM R. BARRON, LINDSEY H. - BEAM, FORREST - - BECRHAM, CHARLES M. BENNET, IvAN L. - - BLAKE, WITI-IERS - BRYANT, HENRX' . BURNETTE, JACK - CARSON, HOXVARD - CONE, JO1-IN - - CORVETTE, THEO . CRAVEN, J. LEON CUMBAA, BILL ---- DENHAM, SAM W. - - DICKSON, IVIARNIADUKE N. - IJOUGI-IERTY, JACK E. - FEELY, O. FLOYD - - - FUNDEREURR, CORNELIUS GARNER, BOB A. - - - GEHEBER, DEAN . GORDON, TOM - GREEN, GEORGE . GROOVER, ED - - - GURLEY, KENNETPI - HARDIN, HENIKX' C. . HOEHL, JACK - - - HORTMAN, HOBART - HUBERT, JACK - HUGHES, DON - - JOHNSON, CHARLES JOHNSTON, HARLAN . KAY, JAY ---- KNOX, RICHARD - LINEBAEK, CARL . LOWENDICK, KARL - - MCDONALD, JAMES J. MCDUFFIE, BOB - - MCPHERSON, TOM - - MAT1-IEWS, NW. HUGI-I - MOORE, LOUIS S. - MORROW, GORDON . PARKS, JIM - - - PATTERSON, OLIN - RILEY, BOE .... ROBINSON, STANLEY - SCRUGGS, JACK - SEBRING, BOB . SEWELL, ROY - - SNEED, WILSON . STOCKHARD, C. R. WALKER, CHARLIE - WINSLO-W, JIM . BETA CI-II CHAPTER - Eatonton - - Dublin - Atlanta - Atlanta - -Newnan - - Sandersville - - -Miami, Fla. Emory University - - Lakeland, Fla. Coral Gables, Fla. - -Tampa, Fla. - - -Atlanta 4 - Decatur - Atlanta - - Atlanta - - Columbus - - Atlanta - Marianna - - Newark, N. J. - - - -Atlanta - Tallahassee, Fla. - - - -Atlanta -'- - Moultrie - Orlando, Fla. - Union City - - Marietta - - - - -Atlanta - Gainesville, Fla. Coral Gables, Fla. - - - -Cuthbert - Emory University - Cleveland, Tenn. - - - - -Elberton Green Cove, Fla. - - Lakeland, Fla. - Vicksburg, Miss. - - - - -Decatur - - Flint River, Mich. - - - - - Athens - - Atlanta . . . . . Macon - Jacksonville, Fla. - - - Thomasville - - - - - Haliira -Cleveland, Tenn. - - - - Lumpkin - Cincinnati, Ohio - - - - Savannah Sweetwater, Tenn. - - - - - Atlanta - - Atlanta - Gainesville - - - - - Atlanta - Cleveland, Tenn. - Cuthbert fwez ' it 4 71-l f 'lm 702- , . W4 Sigma Nu Founded at V. M. I. in l869 MARTHA LEE BU RGESS E N Sponsor Organized l884 llozl ALExANDER, PAUL - ANDREXVS, ROBERT J. ATKINS, ERNEST . - BLACK, JAMES - - - BLOODWORTH, BARTOXV BROXVARD, ALDEN - COOK, PHIL - - - CORLEY, WILLIAM . CRENSHAXV, JOHN - DANIEL, AMOND - DEAN, HAL - - FINCH, GEORGE - . FREDERICK, W. WOOD FULLER, ROBERT H. FULLER, R. M. - - I-IARROD, PRICE - . HoRvIcR, PETER V. HUGHES, SHERMAN INGRAM, PORTER - - KENNEDY, ALPHEUS . MCCLURE, WILSON . MCEACHERN, OLIVER MCNUL-rv, CARROLL MCQUOWN, JIMMY - MARR, WEAVER - . MAYS, LAMAR --.- MILLER, XVILLIAM B. MORGAN, JOHN . . PAXTON, THOMAS - PAYNE, HAMMOND - POWELL, FINCHER - POWELL, HARRY . POWELL, JACK - - . RINGGOLD, HARRELL SHELL, DONALD - - SI-IOENEELT, MARION SUBER, C. EDWIN - SUTCLIFEE, WILLIAM TOLBERT, LOUIS . WHITE, COMER - WILLIAMSON, RUSSELL YAREOROUGH, C. A. - - Atlanta - - Decatur ' - - Marietta - - Jasper, Fla. - - - Atlanta - - Miami, Fla. - - - Atlanta - Marietta - - - - - Atlanta -' Plant City, Fla. - Atlanta - Atlanta - Atlanta - - - -Decatur Greenwood, S. C. - - Townsend - Scranton, Pa. - - Gainesville - - - Decatur - Pensacola, Fla. - - - - - -Atlanta - - St. Petersburg, Fla. - - - - Decatur - - Decatur - Atlanta - Jackson - Atlanta - Atlanta - Atlanta - Atlanta - - Atlanta - . -Hazlelaurst - Plant City, Fla. - - - - Decatur - Miami, Fla. - - Atlanta - - Ben Hill - Miami, Fla. - - Atlanta - Atlanta - - Decatur - - Macon XI CHAPTER " ., ,JSM g any! ff: 2.52, 9 ' .35-f1f'252': : - ,. V ,M f f I 'Wt ' c J 1 W 4 .,.,. y f W! 1 1 f. K cl ,I W 3. A 'ikfaa "ff ' 'Ml . Jef? ' fa! 49 1 4 I A " . . 1 "f"1,,2-1. I' 5 :17. , 4 , .sr , -' 'gif 1,g,:u I, 'I ' . V " " W"' f'5'.. . ' " 2 isa, 'way ffff., " , , , ,fa ,Ai ,,,.. , ,. ,, -y w,,f,Z.tf . , - Wage Azmwfz' -. , mg a, 'Wi,2?P' ' ,gn , " ' .-of ,iz , 'ri , "Me 12" ' , at . , Y ' , H .. X , -' 43' I " 'V .I-'43 Q1.,:x.j, f AI I :zgz ' il 'Ez - V" . -Z .gal ' -tq:.gf:-'akyqtgfy E ,, -4.1-.fa rn,-14-A 4W.:ffw.gZ14 f. ' ' mv - 1 'ff " V , f a 4 ,Q i" L, ?, pi 541 . - I if: '3 ' ' ' S- : ' Q. .I , 5 QT . 1, , zz .En - M5 ,,- ,E R-vzz, '- if '. 4-7223 ,S Ig .M '. .C .,, I., f,' A -wwf-1.2. gy: q. - 1 '59 -,391 ,jp 1 1, .. - J ' W.. " 's , . vi ,, I I. Sig me pl Founded at Vincennes University in l897 JEWEL HENDRIX 2 H Sponsor 4 ofganizea' 1924 CARTER, JULIAN - - - East Point GILLESPIE, Dxaxvzv S. - - - - Decatur GRIZZAIQD, VERNON T. - -Dallas, Tex. KNIGHT, DEXTER - - - - - Bunnell, Fla. NIIDDLEBROOKS, CHARLES - - - Dalton MOORE, LEXVIS W. - - - - Atlanta MORGAN, FRANK E. - - - Atlanta STUEBING, L. A. - - Decatur TINKLER, SAM A. - - - Atlanta WILKINSON, TOM B. - - Atlanta WILLIAMS, LOUIS L. . - - Atlanta WILLIAMS, WENDELL R. - - - Atlanta llosl PSI CHAPTER M, 'Amt .H-ysg?f3gzf if:,gLy.f4 ,W -' Nia Why . , , ,W .... 45 W f ' a'I gg. 43- fm, I 4 f"7iZ.,kSf ,La 4' 1 .Ag Ya ..., L Tau Epsilon Piii Founded at Columbia University in I9l0 V Organized l9l9 BARBARA KAPLAN T E 4' Sponsor 6 C. .E f is I BAKER, ROY - - BERGMAN, BURTON BLOCK, JERRY - BREGMAN, LARRY BREINEN, GOODNVIN GOLDBERG, FRED . GOLDBERG, JOE - GOLDHAGEN, JERRY GOLDSMITH, BOE - GO-TTLIEB, FRED - KAPLAN, ELI - - LEVITAS, TEDDY - LIFCHITZ, GERALD Lovrrz, HAROLD - MERLIN, HYMAN - SCHEINBERG, PERITZ SNIDER, JACK - SOLOMON, JERRY - SPECTOR, MAURICE M., JR. - TENENBAUM, RAYMOND - TEPPER, BERNARD WITKIND, ELLIOT . YONKS, IRVING - - . Jacksonville, Fla. - Jacksonville, Fla. - - - - Atlanta - - Atlanta - - Miami, Fla. - -Augusta - - -Waynesboro Miami Beach, Fla. - - Atlanta A - Miami, Fla. - - Wriglitsville - - - Atlanta - - . - - Atlanta .Jacksonville, Fla. - . - Miami, Fla. - - Miami, Fla. Jacksonville, Fla. - - - - -Atlanta - - Atlanta - - Atlanta - - Cordele - - - - Atlanta - Red Bank, N. J. MU CI-IAPTER llO7J Alpha Kappa Kappa Medical Fraternity .F A if . A, l v A Sim D S' ,x :Q igtx., . 4... . Ax..-TM ag , xx . BAGGS, XVADE H. - BRANNEN, ED - BRAY, DOLPH - - BRYANT, HENRY - BURGE, C. DAN - CHILDS, EDXVARD A. - - - Cooic, E. R. ---- GARVIN, XVILLIAM H. - GAY, BRINTON B. - - - GIBSON, F. LESLIE, JR. - GLASS, LAMAR F. - GUY, CANDLER - - HOLMES, EDGAR C. - HUIE, Bon E. - INMAN, JOHN S. - Joi-INSON, CHARLES A. - JORDON, WILLIS - . - KING, J. LON - - MARRS, EDXVAIKD S. MCCALLISTER, ARCHXE - - MCDUEFIE, RO'BERT S. - MCLEOD, JOHN - . MOORE, WILLIAM W. - MURPHEY, MIKE - PAULLIN, WILLIAM L RAYLE, ALBERT A. RODGERS, RICHARD C ROREBECK, CURTIS RUMBLE, LESTER - SKINNER, RICHARD TEATE, H. LUTEN - TRULOCK, ALBERT S WALL, HILTON F. WILLIS, RUSSELL . WILSON, FRANK A. WINSLOXV, JAMES A., JR. - - - Camilla - Y Atlanta - - - Dalton - - Miami, Fla. - - - Atlanta Montgomery, Ala. - - - - Newman - - Atlanta - - - Atlanta - - Thomasville . - Atlanta - - Atlanta - - Moultrie - - Albany - - Albany - - Elberton - - Columbus - - Macon - - - . Toccoa - Tallahassee, Fla. - - Atlanta . . -1M5iltrie - - Biloxi, - - - Atlanta - - Pelham - - - Atlanta - - Tampa, Fla. - -Tampa, Pla. - - - - - Atlanta - Jacksonville, Fla. - - Thomasville - - Waycross - - Atlanta - Barnesville - - Leslie - - Cuthbert 2 ,iff - 31 1, 1.7 3 :C , ..:.,, ,ya 41 3 V .., gp figp. x f 1 i f 1 ,- .L in 45?-G , Q4 . """'.1- ' 4 -ga ...er plii Clwi ivleclical Fraternity p- rv AINSWORTI-I, BILL - ALLGOOD, PIERCE - - - ARMSTRONG, CHARLTON ARNOLD, HERBERT - - BELL, MAC - - BELL, VINCENT - BENTON, CURTIS - BIXLER, TOMMY . BRADLEY, PAUL . BURSON, NAPIER - CALLAWAY, JORDAN . CLARY, UPTON - COFFEE, ARCHIE T. CORDES, JOHN - - DAVIDSON, JACK - DENNISON, DAVID - DRIVER, ROWE - EDGERTON, MILTON - ERWIN, GOODLOE - FACKLER, BILL . FREEMAN, TOM - GEHEBER, DEAN - GIBSON, COUNT - GREGORY, HUGH - GUNTER, RHETT - HORTON, CLINTON - JENKINS, VAL - - JENNINGS, HENRY - JONES, CARL - - - KELLER, PAUL . KENNEDY, ALPHEUS - MCGARITY, CECIL - MAY, AL - - - MONCRIEF, BILL - MORGAN, JAMES C. - NEEL, JULIAN - - PASCAL, DEAN - PENDERGRAST, BILL - RICHARDSON, CULLEN ROGERS, GEORGE - - SIMMONS, FREEMAN - SKIPPER, GROOVER - SMITH, MARTIN - STAMPS, ED ROE - TURNER, HAYWOOD - TURRENTINE, PAUL - WII.LIAMS, HOWARD - WOOD, ARTHUR - - Bay Springs, Miss. - - - - -Marietta Fountain Inn, S. C. - - Meridian, Miss. -Mobile, Ala. - -Rama, Ala. - - - -Atlanta - - Live Oak, Fla. - - - - Dalton - Decatur - - Covington - - Macon - - Eastman - Atlanta - Lithonia - - - -Atlanta - - Bristol, Tenn. - -Atlanta - - - - Athens - Wadley, Ala. - - Brunswick - - - Moultrie - St. Simons Island - - - - Dalton - Spartanburg, S. C. -Pendleton, S. C. ,3LMi..mi, Ela. - - ,- Dawson - -fi- Decatur - - Atlanta . Pensacola, Fla. - - -Decatur - -Jackson, Miss. -State Park, S. C. - - -West Point - - Thomasville - - Dawson - - Atlanta - - Montezuma - Gulfport, Miss. - - - - Atlanta - - Lakeland, Fla. - -Gainesville - - Norfolk, Va. - - -Atlanta - - Douglas - - -Macon - - Miami, Fla. Founded af University of Virginia in I889 Sigma Chapter , 4, X 'F if , :.L, - -v , 5, . V ix in Q -fi A Q, Nvffw A is i4.rx,ff .- if , A-111 5 i, Yf,,.AA , . , I-r W. ,G5-L., R-Q, ., ,, QQ, W A, ,X B.: , ,, L 5 A fu' '- ' A -Q: F4,5K"'i'7N--if - , V 'S :fr-Af ' X 'r . , , V. Ye' , V ..:,. .,,. t Q , is mf: Egffm N-n 1 kg- .raise M ,, , , 7fKf1f'u,.. U 3:11 ,Q dim: ' VJ1'-his-M. " fi? ff tqvgsw H N. ,, ,C ,,,WViQ.,,W,. 6m,,, i...X,.. .A 1 ,9 , M f -'if '-iisif fr , xw "' ' 2 , ,I .,.ff ,,x,,,. .1 ' 4 ..' 'Aff f - . ". " ' ' 'Si-, o Sk' - ' f-i f Sn , -' ., 1- Q.: " 'f am, sf' RS. ' -fig?" Sv' ' .'t.k"- ' ""'7"i'3 . 'F W.. f .XV .. i. m i . . - x V . ei ' ., +::v - Hag "fail N-Q f I ' f - fgiwiiixf H. '1I.-.Fw-' w.qQ:wg,.3.-,z1f.J . A ., - ., W: .4453 , 413,-.., g-agwgg-,152 . V -- A . gvmfi. A X mgmig .. . Q A,,.,.Q5Q57ifVM:1'Wx,5,rQQi,4 A,rw 1 waz:-'1"':s,av',,P:f, ' 1 . "'--+.A:4.,'3:-..-V-Www -' Fr.-fn ",:1m:pg1:.' '. . f .f-,Q-,x1T'L'. -.fl--:'f'.?, 4' - 3, - -fi , - Sui. ,ii -. .', ,q?':g,-.,6x'-,grsaht rg 1 x ..f.:Z3,5zQ2qig' g --J .. .4nvc'W Q . Organized I905 NAN PAXTON C15 X Sponsor Tbeta Kappa Psi Medical Fraternity J F5 r I fi? it 1'-.55'.v: W sf ,mg.:QR2f:x.2g5: A " ' www IIIZJ BARROW, J. GORDON, JR. . BICKERS, DONALD S. . DAVIS, J. EDMUND . FLETCHER, T. BERT . HENDRIX, J. WAYNE . I-IODGES, WILLIAM A., JR. . HOOD, DOUGLAS W. . . JACOBS, PEYTON, JR. . JONES, GERALD W. . MASHBURN, MARCUS, JR. . POWELL, FINCI-IER C. . POWELL, JOHN E., JR. . THOMAS, BENJAMIN F., JR. XVAGNON, GEORGE N. . . WALDREP, JACK M. WORTH, JACKSON, JR. . l tl I. . Atlanta .I . Brookhaven . Tupelo, Miss. N I T I . Greensboro, Fla. - . Atlanta . Atlanta St. Petersburg, Pla. . . . Americus . Orlando, Fla. ' .4 , J. . Covmgton . Xl . Atlanta . . Villa Rica . Auburn, Ala. . . Atlanta . Leesburg, Fla. . Atlanta ff: 7 l879 . ,g',, H. W.: .1 ff 'N ' I "GTM W Aki' ,4 , V! mu. ,.. K +A' , .. 7i5WwPf?iF9i?52f, . 'DEQ X W ,Lis - 'M X-ff-W.. . Mm ' ,Q LQ ' .J ' " , ' , V. w,.1 far.'J ' 1 ' ' ' A ..-5' wwf, f ,. -1 , : . - i f V L, f ' . -- ' .55 ,ap si -q yea, .,., 2,1 1 ., Vi , , ,Q H 'H "QQ ' " H 41223-mf , L w W if . f ' , ,,4,.1f, f .vu -' f:e.J'.'fJ,vfa.,'11"1'f1:f"' ni?-fig:-im V. Kam '.. :ff '- f -Y ,- +1 .1124 3 iv: 3,1:f.s:1w,.,,,-nswmz ,nw Amp LEW, fi?Q,,,u3, , ,fem .- ,gg-pmft, '. ,,'E15ff"l MA , ,4.f5f1'f.pf ll ,Fc'J.qf.!1'w ' F- . -'mf -, ' N , ,wx-:1.gam,1g:+.. wmntai- gf -.1 I V gy., I . ff , ' U :wig-1z+1ne13"L+a'f-?'4-'HQ-+L-Bug. F .. V. " w,:-f--f121M.-L4'iWFH:1Nw:- - 1' 'Vwg11gi:,EV?H5 -"'M'- X X 1 3 ,y'fk2W'- V , X -- , ,2.:vwwQ PW,H"'. "1:'1m? I 1: 1 -, s . .w2,...:L, ' m vu 2, "Ji, :'Y,'k 4:':1-1-, .5 - " ' N, -J, , N ..fm,N ,,,,, ,V - X mexvr4MiW?fQ"'r'5Wx:"r-Mask 4 Ogg '..,feeg1g.e'fy3lQ?7E5?:f1Skg2-:WMWQSQV' ,W , '.a.ffA" ' .W " Organized I908 l3lIi Delta Epsilon lvledical Fraternity BREININ, GODWIN . FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN PRICE, MORRIS A. . Founded at Cornell University Beta Nu Chapter Organized in I932 L II41 NEXVMAN, JEROME H. . Miami, Fla. . . . Atlanta Jacksonville, Fla. St. Augustine, Fla. REISMAN, EDWARD . . . . Atlanta SHAFFERMAN, SAM . . Atlanta SILVER, MAX V. .K . Douglas SUTKER, HAROLD . . . Savannah lgfl l. . WN I 4? 76 I ref! , 2 rg I , J , , ,ii QQ 5 K1 -1 ' Q ' sgma SENIOR ATHLETIC MANAGERS Qevised Athletic System Increases Student Interest 5 , pn' y 9' 0 THOMAS E. MCDONOUGH JEFF D. MCCORD ED SHEA One of the major changes that has been made in the Emory set-up has b-een the completely new athletic association. Last spring it was announced that the University had made contracts with several new fulletirne coaches. Little did the student body realize at the time what a great change this announcement was going to have on the athletic situation in the near future. During the fall quarter sports were run off pretty much in the same manner in which they had been in the past, with the exception of required athletics. Freshmen and sophomores were both required to attend athletic classes. Thes-e classes 'met as scheduled whether the sun was shining or not. Y In the latter part of the fall quarter, however, it became evident that some additional anddrastic changes were going to be made. Coach Jeff D. McCord, who had been in charge of the athletic program of the University for many years announced that he was leaving the services of the University and that henceforth, as it had been during theepast quarter, Coach Thomas E. McDonough would be in full charge of the athletic departm-ent. Coach McDonough has aiumed a very difficult task, that of arousing the Q'Rip Van Winkle,' student body to active interest in athletics here on the campus. He has already be- gun this task by doing his best to please everyone in the manner in which he runs off the sports and the sports which are selected to be run. The athletic department for the first time has a swimming coach that knows 'his onionsf, Coach Ed Sh-ea, formerly of the Atlanta Athletic Club, has his swimming team work out regularly, and in addition he has many of the freshmen and sopho- mores enrolled in regular athletic classes. The Athletic Department has the able assistance of several student coaches who assist in whatever way there are able to make the Intramural and inter-fraternity athletic programs run smoothly. The Athletic Department also has the services of five student managers who were selected on the basis of work done last year and the servic-es of many students who are work- ing toward managerships. The revised Emory Athletic Association faces a diflicult task, but it has started on the right road to its solution. Students are beginning to take more interest in athletics. The games played represent greater skill, and students show more interest than they have in years. The problem of getting students interested in athletics again will take time, but the first step has been made successfully. . ' -.-'I'-J -x., - .--s-"'.2?i7t .. s - .,,a.a,.a-1. pw A . ,v ' efaze., 2-samilal. K e 'Q ' F. i -5 - erw: f si f ' - milf We .s-we I. ' ' ' iii- I ,, . ' i- ' - ' X ., we . ..,. r, sv K . .- - Q xQ:vs.w es v.e?'ma1" - 'Q ' .. ,N - af .- W . .gf , :euiy .wp:.-,ga , N x. V., Q. .i 4' - a n ,, ,. W.. .W-:,.,.,:,:., V aw- . -:,a4m.s,,,,ax,g , ua, .a,2- 5 .Q , 3.54.1 gh.: ,I ..s.....c..e..i.., 1 .... 2 'A ..., . -. "am iga .W af. :Q-:'.,f,+.:,, ..:,z.:g-,: - ..,, -.,Ss::::1:,f:ff-::fs-1 -1--s:5:gsrt?z:.:.,1-.,.z,.4:.y:r:.:' 5 ,ii-,,g.,.ag...,, sawn , GEORGE BATES BILL BRUMBY CLIFF HARBOUR I nel JIM LEWIS ASHBY MCCORD I "E" Club Promotes Sportsmanship ond Qecognizes Qutstonding Athletes The UE" Club is an organization composed of members elected from the letter- men on the Emory Campus. The aims and ideals of the club are best ex- pressed in the "ED Club Code, which reads as follows: "We believe in Em-ory, her Ideals, her Athletics, her Sportsmanship. We have pledged ourselves to do all in our power to raise the Standard of Athletics, to stimulate interest therein, and thus benefit our Student Body. To keep our Sportsmanship at all times above the slightest reproach, and to be Men worthy of our Alma Mater. We believ-e in Emory." The need for such an organization has become more important since the war began and since moreiemphasis has been placed on the physical education of the students. The club recognizes outstanding athletes and elects to member- ship only those students who have obtained two or more letters, except in special instances, in which the club may extend membership to meritorious students. The emphasis of the Armed Forces is upon both physical as well as mental education, and the "E" Club, through its ideals and recognition, has been able to improve the athletics to a great extent. OFFICERS STANLEY WEINKLE . . President PAUL JAHN . . . Vice-P1'esia'e1zt LOUIS I-IARLAN . Sec1'efary-Treuszzifer' BIXLER ERWIN FREEMAN X: , W! fffz , .ffm f f f f Mi , e ' Q4 W gg Ko ,J ff 'f f I '6fZi5I3c.,f..'y . f 2 2' 'ah 4Zm? , .,,,f, .,,.-1, W ' fran,-gf., ff tl-Q? 5- 17 1, '::5,gM,5-up .4,' f fwff ffjff , 1, i fzyaha ' ffZf was -f 4 0 EW, , ,V., .: ' , fs.-' agen gs ' 4725 X rf- ., , M , , f , ,121 f 'V I, ::Lw.,'Z 'r a f W wtf 'fa-.-'.JQ"w,':11f .. I 425,-W ' Z 7 if V' 'f-I-' '2-fam 2 ifif H JZ :J F245 X5 f4f5if'f'v'f"ff'f f 'fa f 4 ff fe Afrfnffafzf ,f f Q 'ff X, is 2 7 ofzfff-M114 , ,A . ,f ff,,,-513.32321 f 4 19 2 1 ff! ,. , .351 ,,,A,-,E,,..-we f Q, f 1 X "gif W' f 0 f fn Y . 1 1. - f 1 President FACULTY MEMBERS L. E. CAMPBELL J. G. LESTER J. D. MGCORD J. B. PEEBLES J. I-I. PURKS O. R. QUAYLE JOHN VENABLE MEMBERS RALPH ATKINSON TOMMY BIXLER CHARLES BUTsGH GOODLOE ERWIN TOM FREEMAN MORRIS HALE COLEMAN KING BILLY KIRKLAND SAM LAIRD JOHN MORGAN GEORGE ROACH JOHN STEGMAN BOBBY SWINK HALE JAHN KIRKLAND SWINK fll7l Six i-lard playing Teams Increase Student Interest in Intramural lzootball just as life throughout the country Was changed during the year 1942, so was football at Emory. There was a noticeable absence of the usual scoreless ties and an abun- dance of lop-sided scores. The only thing that remained the same was the typical Emory spirit of clean play and sportsmanship. The outstanding differences between the past season and other years were an abbreviated schedule and the rear- rangement of the teams. For lo these many years, four class teams have played six games, apiece during the three month season. 194-2, however, saw the juniors and seniors combine forces and form one Upper Division squad While the Meds and Theologs became football minded and en- tered elevens. A total of ten games was played. Championship honors Went to a late starting Medical school eleven, coached by Dr. John Venable, With four marks in the "Wins" column, none in the "Losses" The sophomore squad Wound up the season holding down the number two spot with three Wins and one defeat. The junior-senior combination split even, 2-2, and closed out the year as the third team. No victories, three defeats, and one tie were ehalked up for the freshman and Theologs who were tied for the cellar spot. "Venable's Varsityn was paced by Johnny Morgan, Bob McDufHe, Upton Clary, Hugh Gregory, and Dave Den- nison. Backs Johnny Webb and Billy Rentz led the at- tack of the sophomores While Bobby Swink, Jack Peavy, Bert Roper, and Joe Wilson stood out in the forward wall. it IJ ix Jarnng Jake" Rozier leads hard running Upper Division back Upper Division All Emory Earl Taylor and Soph All Emory Bobby Swinlc look on as lille W. L. Norton interference. Soph line piles up an off-'tackle play. Meds and Sophs Battle For Scintillating Carlton Lawson and "jarring jake" Rozier bore the brunt of the burden in th-e Upper Division back- field. Excellent support was given the call carriers by lin-emen Buddy Bishop, Earl Taylor, and Bob Cato. For the first-year men, center Burke Childs and back Dexter Knight stood out like sore thumbs. The Theolog eleven lacked any individual stars. An inexperienced team played its hardest in every game. Getting off to a late start, the season opened the second Week in October as the Upper Division team took a 7-0 decision from the Theologs. Sophomore backs had a field Football Championship day in the second contest as they rolled up 40 points to 0 for the freshmen. The third meeting on th-e gridiron saw the second year men trim the footballers of the Upper Division, 13-0. Making an unimpressive beginning, the Meds edged the Theologs 6-0 in the fourth battle. One tally was all the blue-shirted sophomores needed to stop the ministers in the fifth game. Instead., they rang up three markers for 21 points while holding the preachers scoreless. The "old men" of the Upper Division team tripped the frosh 12-0 in the first game of the second half. The K' h ' t lr Ab : U p D' 's' Back Jack Hightower is caught from behind with a high tackle Freshman All Emory Deiiigenrg receives Pass O ma Z iB:iow:pHEid riilririiiing Frosh scat-back Nat McGehee surveys handiwork of teammate Venobleis powerful Med -l-earn Wins lntramural lzootball seventh and eight battles saw the Docs humble the league leading sophs 20-O and trip the lowly freshmen 7-0. XVith the last week of play at hand, the Medicos wound up a perfect season as they rolled over the junior-senior aggregation, 13-2. Final game of the year was a score- less tie between the freshmen and the Theologs. The season complete, Coaches Johnny Shefheld, Ralph Atkinson, Sam Laird, Dr. V-enable, and Dr. Henry John- son submitted their choices for the mythical All-Emory team. Selected each year at the end of the grid schedule, the team is composed of men "who have played the best ball and contributed most to their respective teams." When the votes were counted, Upton Clary, Dave Den- nison, Hugh Gregory, Johnny Morgan, and Bob Mc- Dufhe of the Meds, Earl Taylor, Buddy Bishop, Carlton Lawson, and Jake Rozier from the Upper Division squad, Bert Roper, Bob Swink, and Billy Rentz of the sopho- mores, Burke Childs and Dexter Knight of the freshman team, and Th-eolog A. T. Peterson composed the 1942 All-Emory team. Letters only were awarded in View of the national emergency. Theolog ball carrier trapped by two hard hitting tacklers. Ball' carrier gets loose for long gain. Above: Defensive backs close in on pass receiver. Below: "After the H201 game is over." Push Ball Game Ends In RIOL as Freshmen Mob Qfficials Year after year on one day set aside in the fall quar- ter the freshmen have their opportunity to even the score with their sophomore rivals. This opportunity comes in the annual PUSH BALL gam-e in which no holds are barred. The freshmen have their chance, but as yet they have not made it good. The sopho- mores win every year. This y-ear's contest was held on Freshanan Day, sponsored by ODK. The freshmen had to bow and scrape to the upper-classmen until after lunch. They had to wear their clothing backwards and had to eat soup and peas with their knives, but they made up for everything between three o,clock and four-thirty that afternoon. Sponsored this year under the new' athletic regime, the battle was supposed to have been toned down considerably from what the students have been ac- customed to in the past. It turned out just the op- posite, though, being one of the toughest in recent years. Shortly after the half the freshmen lost all thought of reason, and the whole freshman class be- gan a ri-ot on the PUSH BALL Held, but all to no avail. The sophomores Won this year's battle of the giants with a score of 3-O. After the game was over, just to show that they were still in a good humor, the freshmen set about to removing the trousers from all of the ofiicials of the game. Two of ODK's prize "big - wigs," Rutherford Poats and Ivan Bennett, were running around the field clad modestly in only their shorts. Long-legged Rucker Todd made a rapid exit from the scene of the battle to keep from giving his trousers to the freshman class. In the midst of all this Cliff Harbour immodestly removed both trousers and shorts to the amusement of the freshmen and two candidates for the crown of the "Push Ball." The game is all in fun, though, and the boys for- get the slugs they received from their best friends and the feet that trampled their faces into the mud on the battle field. If all is the way we would have it to be, the freshmen-sophomore PUSH BALL game will be played with just as much interest next year by boys who face a world at peace. Top The ball sfarts rolling Center Both teams struggle to get control of he ball Sophomcres in control with the ball in 'che air start for a goal. Winter Finds Basketball Center ol Sports lnterest Wfar or no war, basketball will continue to be one of the most popular sports of the Emory athletic calendar. The hard playing class teams continue to draw a good crowd of spectators, and the fraternity games are fol- lowed with much interest and spirit. As the CAMPUS goes to press, the court teams are right smack in the middle -of their season. This year':s class league is made up of teams representing the fresh- men, sophomores, juniors, seniors, theologs, and meds. The graduate and law school teams were dropped from the league this year because of decreased enrollment in these two schools. From the looks of things now, chances are that the battle for campus honors will finally be won by the Juniors, sparked by stars like Billy Kirkland, P. K. Dixon, Jack Hightower, and numerous oth-ers. The Seniors are holding down second place at this moment, MT x ii ew-i Above: Juniors and Seniors jump for ball off of back-board .... Below: Meds Dean Geheber jumps with Frosh Jean Wise and Bruce Newsome 'co Meds and Freshmen look expectantly for ball to fall in basket. I 122 retrieve ball. Students Show Active Interest in Basketball and there is every indication that they will finish the season in this position. The Sophomores, Meds, and Theologs are scrapping for third place, and the Fresh- men are in the last spot without much hope of raising their position. The fraternity teams played equally as good games and attracted as much attention. The attitude of the campus athletes seems to be that the more exercise they get in now the easier the exercises they must take in the Armed Forces will be later on. The ATO's, us- ing a zone defense, baffled the Gold League teams to win that league championship easily. The AEPi's with Stan Wfeinkle won the Blue League championship after a close game with the Campus Club. As the CAMPUS goes to press no Green League games have been played, but the Phi Chi's, with the first string Med team in their chapter, will be hard to beat, ' ' Th l B'll L . Ab : S ' Si: n W inkle and Junior Jack Hightower find ball hard 'CO Soph Bobby Swmk :mes to deal ban from eo og I Y Yong hancdlg. . .el-ilolielovi: Maids and Freshmen battle rt out rn the reconditioned I 123 barn inter-Qrganizational Athletics: Tennis and Touch Football SAE Jack Peavy led his 'team to Campus Championship. Toucn Footer-itt Touch football was unquestionably the high point of interest in inter-group athletic competition during the fall quarter. Each of the three l-eagues had its exciting, low-scoring contests, each team of each league displayed Emory spirit in the highest s-ense of the word. Sigma Alpha Epsilon held onto its Gold league title while Alpha Epsilon Pi replaced Sigma Pi as touch champions of the Blue league. The "doctors-to-be" of Phi Chi took hold of the foot- ball title in th-e newly organized Green league. SAE retained its title in the Gold division by edging the Phi Delta Theta's, 7-6, in an overtime period in the semi-finals and nosed ATO, 1-O, in the finals in another overtime session. AEPi stopped Sigma Nu, 6-0, in th-e second round tilt, and tripped Campus Club, 12-6, in the deciding game of the Blue league. nis title. TENNIS First inter-organizational competition of the year was on the Uni- versity tennis courts. After vanquishing all other Gold league competitors and sub- duing Campus Club, Blu-e league champs, the SAE netmen, paced by Sophomore Jack Peavy, retained their hold on the campus ten- The SAE's earned their position in the school finals only after topping the KA, Chi Phi, and ATO net teams. Campus Club's "racket menv stepped into the Hnal match following defeats handed to AEPi, ENO, and DTD. The Inde- pendents' victory replaced AEPi as Blue league tennis champions. l i i l Campus Club's Decatur Campbell aided his team in winning Blue League Championship. Phi Chi earned its right to enter the All-Campus round robin to decide the school champion by decisively rolling over Theta Kappa Psi, 34-0, and stopping AKK, 6-0, in the Green league finals. AEPi and Phi Chi met in the first game of the round robin. The meds came out on top by the score of 12-6. SAE en countered AEPi in the second of the three game series. Forced to play its third overtime contest of the season, the Lions emerged victorious, 1-0. Phi Chi and SAE battled it out for the campus title in the third and final game. H241 CRQSS-CCDLJNTRY Campus honors in cross-country this year went to the Alpha Tau Omega distance men who replaced Campus Club, last year's winners, as tops in "over hill, over dale" running. Paced by freshman Jack Zum- winkle, the ATO's captured four out of the first five positions plus the seventh spot. This low total of 17 points was the closest any team has ever come to making the lowest pos- sible score of 15 points. Zumwinkle crossed the finish line exactly five minutes and fifty-ive seconds after he started. Jimmy Winslow, AKK, paced his m-edical fraternity to win the Green League crown and, at the same time, set a record for the new one and three-quarters miles course. Winslow's time was 5:49. Sigma Nu edged AEPi to take first place in the Blue league running. Gold League cross country sprinters begin the ordeal. VCI-LEV BALL CAE Gold League Championship 'seam waits expectantly for return of the ball by the KA team. H251 Volleyball proved to be a much more popular fall sport this year than in past years. The games were much closer and followed with much more inter-est. The tournament started off with a bang with the SAE-KA game which was the closest and the hard- est fought of the season. The SAE's finally Won after three hard fought games and went on after this victory to win the Gold League champion- ship by defeating the Sigma Chi's and the Phi Delts. The Blue League proved to be a pushover for the Stan Weinkle paced AEPi team. Weinlile's team walked over Sigma Nu, TEPhi, and the Campus Club to take the Blue League championship. The Theologs spiked the ball right through the hands of the other Green League teams to win the championship. Theologs Hrst victory was over the favored Phi Chi's. They played the AKK's in the finals, which they won with little trouble. Campus championship honors went to the AEPi's who followed the able leadership of left-handed spiker Stan Weinlcle to beat the SAE's'3 to 0 in a three out of five match and to win from the Theologs just as easily. Excerpts from the l.ovver Division Athletic program . . . Calisthenics Calisthenics, the usual .Emory athletics for freshmen? No, the Athletic Depart- ment emphatically stated that the calis- thenics and the other lower division re- quired athletics were meant for busi- ness this year and every year thereafter. The Athletic Department realized that the nation is at war, and it has impressed this on the minds of the lower division students with its rigorous calisthenic program. Students entered the athletic classes with the same idea that many freshmen have had in years gone by, but they Athletic Department succeeded in chang- ing this opinion. Students now realize that they are exercising for a purpose, "Beat the Axis," and that they must be in the best physical shape possible to accomplish this purpose. This year, instead of having a choice of fencing, boxing, golf, basketball, or one of many other sports required athletic, students were faced with Coach Thomas McDonough and his ideas of preparation for physical fitness. Students attended the classes twice a week for two hours a class and really caught the works. Running the track, doing push-ups, Indian wrest- ling, and touching ground with fingers without bending knees are a few of the milder forms of exercise that lazy juniors and seniors saw the lower division students doing as they walked by the athletic fields. 'V At first the idea of the freshmen and sophomores was to get by as easily as possible, but the situation is changed some- what. Each day someone is called to the Armed Forces, and those who are left realize that they may be next. They want to get in training for what they will have to face soon in one branch of the service or another. The war is terrible, but it is having a stimulating influence on the athletic program and students' interest therein. i iizsi Lower Division Students Learn tlme Meaning ol tlwe Word Exercise Coaches McDonough, Shea, and McCord, along witl-r a group of sfudents view the routine exercises of the well known afhletic classes. I: l271 lntercollegiate Swimming Team ls Revived, But Required Swimming C losses Under Direction oi Coach Ed Shea Spotlight Pool Activities Although last year's swimming team was to have been the last for the duration, permission was re-granted to con- tinue intercollegiate tank competition. Under the capable hands of Coach Ed Shea, the aquamen have been undergo- ing rigorous workouts for the past three months. Ap- proximately 20 candidates have been reporting regularly and, as Coach Shea puts it, UThey're as conscientious and hard-working bunch of boys as you'll find anywheref' Dave Funk, Lou Harlan, Lou Tolbert, and Don Spicer are "hand-me-downs" from last year. A large part of the burden will fall on the shoulders of these boys. In addition to the ones mentioned, Shea is priming several prospective tankmen. Competition for this year began February 13 when the splashers splash-ed their way to a 44 to 31 victory over Clemson. Following the team from South Carolina will be Duke, Tennessee, and Georgia Tech. From the looks of things, the Blue and Gold should earn a better than even break when they go up against these schools. University swimming is not confined to interscholastic competition. All freshmen and sophomores are required to take three weeks instruction out of every quarter in swim- ming. At present the lower division men are receiving "training which will prepare them for war." Interfraternity swimming competition has not been left out. Shea had the annual inter--organizational swim meet on February 3, 4, and 5. Sigma Nu and ATO swam to easy victories in the Blue and Gold League, respectively. Students CUSS and Discuss Commando Course Which Many l-lave To Struggle Through Under Directions ol Coach Shea With so much emphasis by all nations in this World War II on Commandos and Commando training the Athletic Department, mainly on the part of swimming Coach Ed Shea, inaugurated a Commando swimming course for the mutual benefit of the freshmen and sophomores. This course is meant to prepare the students to some ex- tent for the swimming training that will be given them in the Armed Forces and also training that they will find invaluable in whatever branch of the service that they may enter. The course is somewhat as follows: climbing twenty feet on rope ladder, jumping from there into water, swim- ming 25 yards under water after the jump, swimming fully clothed and carrying a 20-pound pack, and going over different obstacles that are placed in the water to hinder passage. The course is very difficult, but the stu- dents have joined whole-heartedly in taking the instruction and going over the course. They have realized that the time has come for physical training along with their studying and their horse-play. 1943 Dooleyls Diary PASSED BYTHECENSOR- 1 lwho is blind and takes bribesl Liao SUNDAY, JUNE 14-Dooley came back from his little business venture between quarters Cliquidationj expecting a rest, planned to plague first-year Medicos and show them what they'll soon look like. But Gad, look at all the people. Thousands of drowsey drips in Wfinship and frowsey flips in Alabama. This ought to be a sexy sum- mer which won't be hard to take, but why do so many goons pick Emory? MONDAY, JUNE 15-Mass registration of goons and gals. Treas- urer's office filled to overflowing with boys and girls of all descrip- tions. Dooley flits mysteriously about taking in all the sights. TUESDAY, JUNE 16-Was I hung-over? Even my marrow is alcoholic. Alabama Hall's "Recll' is quite a chick. It took Dooley two minutes to meet her and two days to get away from her. NVEDNESDAY, JUNE I7-Dooley laughs as John Boyle giggles incessantly at all the freshmen, carries their books, and licks their booties clean. Dooley little realizes at this moment what a hectic time he is going to have during the summer months, and what a gay time is going to be had by all at dear old Emory. THURSDAY, JUNE 18-Mass reunion at the Health Farm. Fra- ternity members of all description forget their various grievances as they sip the 'lsudsn on the beautiful veranda of the Oak Grove Inn. Freshmen Wonder where all the wonderful boys have gone, little realizing that Emory students are not just tea sippers. FRIDAY, JUNE 19-Don't these hot days fly by? "Red!' is still hot too. The Interfraternity Council hasnlt made up its mind about the rushing rules-for the summer, and the fraternity men continue to knife each other in the back. The Cafeteria is the scene of the first campus dance of the summer, and the co-eds make a great hit with everybody KI am only jokingj. Cumbaa invites every new man to come over to meet the Sigs. Most of them do while the other frats moan. The KA's donlt worry because they still have "Baldy.', . SATURDAY, JUNE 20-The Pig Shop is illed with SAE's who just happened to run into a few rushees and took 'em down to dinner, a show and the Lord only knows what else! The Phi Delts plot to turn in every frat on the row for violating the rules. J. Boyle wonders why the fresh freshmen keep their shoes so dirty- it doesn't taste good! The harder you rush, John, the better off the other frats will be. SUNDAY, JUNE 21-Nat Long goes into a tissy as there is a full house. What wnn't these fraternity men do to impress fresh- men? Phi Delts and Chi Phi's, conspicuous by their absence, are only people awake on the campus as Nat draws his sermon to a close. The Delt's sic their glamour-boys, Gower, Fountain, Moore, and Wliatley, on the freshmen at Haynie's joint. MONDAY, JUNE 22-New rules! The Council decides that things will get too involved if they go on this way. The week-end was much too costly and all during the week some drip would be snagged from one frat hot-box to another. Everybody happy as they have only week-ends open, one off-campus University-approved function and a three-day rush week. TUESDAY, JUNE 23-Independents have a very restful time of it this summer, what with courses only 6 and M times harder than ever before. Frat men plot at the various and disgusting chapter meetings to make Wfinship and Dobbs Halls the scenes of many bull sessions, important bull sessions. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24-Campus bemoans the loss of such noise makers as XVally Stewart, Leslie Youngblood fall except Dr. Ivanj, and Charlie CMarineJ Harris. "Pawn Shopv Wfalton and Morris Halo wear coats and DVS pins often, wish to hell Huie was here to smile for the greenies, who are getting less green every year, blast their hides! Dooley begins to notice that for a change there are a few cute co-eds, but not many. The Sigma Nus are eating with the Chi Phis, who have finally gotten rid of that ghastly Mrs. Hyde. THURSDAY, JUNE 25-"Tex,' and Bledsoe begin to make them- selves known on the campus-and how! What luck fraternity is going to win their favor. The Phi Delts signed up all the SAE's to eat with them "until their stoves are installed," while the more business-like KA's, sure of their friendship of long standing, send a letter of invitation. Result-SAE's eat with Phi Delts, KA's cuss. Dooley invites his dear friends the SAE's over for an arsenic dinner with him. Greedy Greeks smile in their sleep, take Carter's Little Liver pills for what ails them. Famous Skeleton Brings Qthers Gut ol Closet Former Student Body President 'Walton smokes a P. M. with fast talking Secretary Todd. FRIDAY, JUNE 26-The "convertible conscious" Chi Phi's get ready for their big shindig, drag pinks, alumni, rushees, and 17 activc brothers out to East Lake for a swim. Head back to the house for a supper in the Arkwright Gardens and a house dance. Chi Phi's think party a great success and know that the freshmen "just can't keep away from the beautiful Chi Phi house come pledge day." The whole Anatomy Building shakes as Dooley hears of these pleasant thoughts and cracks his ribs with laughter. SATURDAY, JUNE 27--Congressman Coggins is conspicuous, an hour before allotted hour of departure of the KA rushing function, in the back of the Sig Alph house praying for rain to ruin the KA hay-ride to the Marietta Country Club. It rains, but not enough for Coggins. KA's make the dismal trip any way. LecRoy gets hacked when the brothers run off on the golf course with the rushees dates. There wasn't enough food, and females were conspicuously lacking-but that's KA. KA's have wonderful time, Baldy tears out remain- ing hairg rushees feel neglected, other fraternities breath a sigh -of relief. SUNDAY, JUNE 28-Number of frosh put to sleep by Rev. Long takes a sharp decrease as number of frosh attending Glenn Memorial decreases propor- tionately. Wiser and more experienced men on the campus go elsewhere to church-Junior Stewards wish they could join the wayward crew. Pinks de- lighted to begin eating away from home on Sunday. MONDAY, JUNE 29--Everybody on dawn patrol sleeps through eight o'clock, feels like hell at nines. Mondays should be abolished. Dooleyis new wards, the Med School freshmen, take time out from ripping black boys up the back to have a little fued. The AKK's announce that Curran Easley will be the president of freshmen class, but Phi Chi's donit care so much for the ex-KA and would rather have ex-lion Henry Jennings. So quick like a flash they get lots of votes someway or another and Jennings wakes up from dreaming of cadavers and Elizabeth Martin to End himself president. Simple? TUESDAY, JUNE 30-Interfraternity Council ala Poats, who sits back look- ing smug, but never failing to submit his 2 cents worth which isn't worth that much, flips new rules onto the already gaggediand bound frosh. N0 fratmen in Wfinship so the brats can study, etc. The "Rook" discovers a little bundle of joy on the library steps saying, "Yeaah, Ruckah, heah Ah am -goin' tu Ernreh, roof, It's his little Pentecost. Touching? No, mauling! Chi Phi house gets its Hrst sex since Pearl left. WEDNESDAY, JULY 1-SAE's begin oiling vocal cords in preparation for function and rushweekg KA's 'do terrific follow-up rushing in the library CMarclla faints as she sees KA pins in the libraryjg ATO's send Jack Rowold and Jimmy Lewis to the cafeteria--well, that cinches that! The Phi Delts run up to Winship en masse after supper to haunt George XVright and Maltby Watkins and the Junior College mob in Dobbs. Rumor has it that sad little Tommy Atkins has promised Sigma Chi-so sorry. Delt glamour boys give Oscar Adams the works, whoever he is. No word heard from the Pikes, Sigma Pi's or Talmadgites. T.E.Phi's and A.E.Pi's search anxiously for one of their nine mutual rushees-Gottlieb and Zimmerman glare at each other. The Chi Phils, of course, are still rushing the little children with umoneybagsv under their eyes!', THURSDAY, JULY 2-Students sleep blissfully through Dr. Nixon's Public Opinion, wish to hell he knew how to teach. He should take some lessons in pcppy courses from Mr. Baskette or Spicy Detective. Loemker misses Archie Tolbert's excellent stooging. Nobody else does, though. "Graveyard" still shut- tles back and forth on the campus with that ter- rible face-I mean, look on that face. Dr. Blincoe explains to awed Frosh Meds why the left side of the room is right and vice versa depending on where you sit. Someone looks bored, and Blincoe looks scalpels through him. FRIDAY, JULY 3-Campus hears that Wheel is to be published twice during the summer, wonders why. Student Council must have more money than it knows what to do with because it surely knows that Booboo Battle can't sell adds. Dooley smiles at the lack of brains on the campus-Battle is on the Student Council. SATURDAY, JULY 4-Fireworks on the campus are limited today. Everybody had a dull time in- cluding the freshmen who went to the Sigma Nu function at Druid Hills. Bill Morris hopes all the boys don't pledge so there will be some left to join ENO. The 'ldirty-rushin' AEPi's" and the 'Tup- start TEPhi's" clutch at each other's throats for the nine Bible boys. AEPi,s give more functions than ,the University approved-get reamed a new one by their rivals. Polstein screaches, iiWl12E have we done that everybody doesn't do?" You just act natural, Leon. SUNDAY, JULY S-The Reverend Nat G. Long cusses fervently as students noticeably absent from Glenn Memorial. Students cuss too-say all things, in- cluding Rev. Long, must end sooner or later. ECA boys and Theologs in church, simple pinks being chased by passionless playboys, etc. MONDAY, JULY 6-The eaters down at Number 8 gaped tonight as Med's Bill Moncrief walked into the Phi Delt mansion with Alabama Hall's prize and Agnes Scott's queen, "Texas,' Friarson. Guest SAE's wonder at the gall of Brother Moncrief in bringing such a delicate creature into the Phi Delt "den of iniquity"-Dooley squealed with amusement. She ain't delicate! TUESDAY, JULY 7-Georgia KA Harry Richardson swears that Al Griffin is the dullest professor on the campus. Many business students agree as they have to sleep through Money and Banking at 12:00 with Gri5n's monotone in- terrupting their pleasant dreams. Freshmen hear Dooley is coming for lunch on Freshman Day. 2 N HYU- vw' X D1 F. ima A bf' UD L75 TER ,RWE inivfsr 5051 QW OF YDR -Z -1 ME N BG HOT BOX .come iN HND nnvt , H soot cavmcs JJHG WITH us! WEDNESDAY, JULY 8-Fairly popular Miriam Jester sets her eyes on "Peaches" Neel's little brother Fred-"what a thrill for bothf' thinks Dooley. Student Council meets in Law Building to hear the KA-Chi Phi student lead- ers and also council members bump their gums, but Paul Jahn manages to steal most of their thunder by arguing every point until President "Pawn Shopv Walton and "kitchen cabinet" member Hale decide it is bed time. THURSDAY, July 9-Genial Gene Askew and popular wife Louie with the help of Ed Steffner have made the life of Dooley and the other dormitory residents much more cheerful with the traveling eating wagon. University oih- cials and Co-op Stovall don't appreciate their efforts to make Emory life bearable and advise Big Gene to close his business immediately. Cliff Harbour swears he isn't married, but Dooley thinks he is fibbing. No man could stand the company of one woman as much as he does that nurse unless tied by closer bonds than friendship. FRIDAY, JULY 10-The Delt,s at the Shelta have a fine time entertaining the few freshmen who didn't rate the Sigma Chi function. The Sigs hid brothers Lineback, Craven, Anderson, Dickson, etc., in the cellar. Told fresh- men that Cumbaa was a good boy even if he did look frightening-freshman didn't believe it. The memories of Jack Mathews werenit memorable enough to sway anyone but Jack Hightower. SATURDAY, JULY 11-ATO's trek to the rushing ground, Marietta, and try to keep things going. At 7:30 the rushees are too weak from hunger to eat, so collapse on the golf course with dates. Collier Espy and Bro. Colbert vainly try to lead the singing which hurts Dooley's ears. Jimmy Lewis, ATO XVorthy Master, talks to most of the freshmen, and receives thanks from fraternities up and down the row when the word gets around. SUNDAY, JULY 12-ATO rushing still going on in Marietta. A brother gets his name in the paper and on the police record, and wishes he'd never seen a red convertible. Jimmy Corley condemns fraternities for just such in- cidents as this. Jimmy hopes his little brother won't get mixed up with them, but the little brother is nice so he'll probably get a bid, Jimmy. MONDAY, JULY 13-Vitamin-tablet Todd is still using up his 850 gallons of gas on Pentecost. They breeze around the country just as though the tires on his car weren't wearing down to a nub. The little one looks with yearn- ing eyes at the Packard. No good, son. The Chi Phi chapter meets to put out the Wfbrel, which once was a good paper. Polstein wonders what he is doing there, so do Poats, Battle, and S. Tolbert. H321 KA ill ll 599 .H ii. TUESDAY, JULY 14-Dooley attending the Interfrat farce tonight decided that theulnter-fraternity Council' is made up of the biggest bunch of crap on the campus. Justus Gower, the big fish in the little pond, sets the food at houses during rush week as punch, cookies, cakes and similar dainties. Dooley wondered for a long time if Bates had a mind of his own because he continued to ask for Goldthwaite's opinion before he would cast the Phi Delt vote at in- terfrat Council meetings. Tonight Bates eased Dooley's mind by actually defying Goldthwaite and voting opposite to directions. - WEDNESDAY, JULY 15-George Green, Oxfordite, found that Veronica Lake Bledsoe forgets friends quickly. Xvitll head high she passed George on the campus not returning his polite, ':Good morning, Pattyf' Dooley fell in con- vulsions when George followed her with some terms that indicated he thought she was no lady and Patty turned and said, 'lWhy, good morning, George, how are you?" THURSDAY, JULY 16-Blackout tonight. University, for the irst time in its history, approves of couples running around and hiding from the officials in the dark. Dean Rece calls for co-operation from the students, male and fe- male, to help the civilian defense and the air-raid wardens get practice in handling saboteurs. XVhole campus co-operates and has excellent time in the dark. The marrow in Dooley's bones is frozen by the sights he sees. FRIDAY, JULY 17-Phi Diddly Theta takes trucks, hay, Mia Hecht, George Wriglit, and various others out to Lake Moore and score a big hit by having the hash on time. Also had an excellent opportunity for rushing by seating every one at tables-that is, if they had any rushers. Rushees came back impressed, which dehydrated everyone else. Bates gives Swann and Callaway a vote of thanks for appearing. The lVbeel, done up brown by the Chi Phi's, is done up. Boyle is on the front, showing how the well-versed Chi Phi acts in public. The founders roll over in their respective graves. Hank Morrow writes a stupid but interesting column and slams everyone but the KA's. SATURDAY, JULY 18-The Coggins family of Marietta throws shindig for the Standing Army of Ethiopia and its rushees at the infamous Marietta Coun- try Clubs. The lion pack comes back to the campus with self-glorifying taleS of bidding 17 and getting 14 promises. The whole campus laughs, but it laughed too soon. The number of bids is certainly wrong, but the promisees rings true. Enforcement Committee chairman, Baldy Hale, sees red, hunts for infraction of the rules, but finds only the expense angle, all the evidence of which has long ago been destroyed. SUNDAY, JULY 19-Rumor has it that J. Sam Guy is working on an experi- ment that will revolutionize the current national problem-a plan to con- vert burps, etc., into the gaseous form and then into liquid for use in auto- mobiles. "Rube Goldberg" Guy is on the ball. Dooley hopes he never reverts to second childhood. MONDAY, JULY 20-Somebody noticed in Fridayis Wfbcel that the TEPhi,s led their brethren in the scholarship list-which is a good rushing point, which is what they'll have to stress since they ain't got no more Scheinbergs or Silver- steins. AEPi's ain't got nuthin. Monday is just as blue as ever and finds many empty seats in the dawn patrol classes. TUESDAY, JULY 21-Chapter meetings with the Hnal plans being laid for the murder which begins on Friday for the fraternity men as well as the rushees. Many last into the middle of the night with the most mysterious of plans, but Dooley laughs at the efforts of the fraternity men to trick the rushees because they have all been tried before without much success. NVEDNESDAY, JULY 22-The PiKA's begin typing the list of dates they will ask for. Since they ask everyones' who's name they haven't heard be- fore, it will take them sometime. The Co-op is the scene of frantic punching below the belt, Chi Phi's finally realize they are desperate and must get off their dead cans, but too late, Dooley fears. Hank Morrow finds that the Chi Phi's aren't speaking to him since he said they were polishing their con- vertibles to get Sophie t'Towell." They know that he's been telling everyone that he hates snobbery and vulgar display of money, and don't know how to rush him. THURSDAY, JULY 23-New men cringe as they receive date cards-not the ones they want. PiKA's send date cards to two ATO transfersg Horton laughs because now he can use that against the Pikes in rushing. SAE rush magazines seen in all trash-cans. Billy Johnson and Morris Hale 'ifind each other" in XVin- ship Lobby. Morris says, 'KYou've still got that pledge button, havenlt you?" Billy gurgles, "You know I have." FRIDAY, JULY 24-Damnation, judgment day is here. Dooley hides as fran- tic Greeks snag autos out of atmosphere and cut each other dead with those looks on the athletic field. Delt's find they have many rest periods as do thc -s , eosetft Chi Phi's. Rucker Todd, "I bet we donit get more than S." Dooley, "That will be damn lucky." Similar dainties are served all up and down the row. The ATO's aren't sure of anything-but Pep, Bishop and Moose are fired with determination-of some sort. Enforcement Committee busy with last minute date changing and breaking before the ordeal begins. Phi Delts are seen in back yard as first date begins hurriedly trying to change a drive-way into aplay- ground, they don't succeed. SATURDAY, JULY ZS-KA balls Duell Barnes and Bob Russell just to show their friendship for the Lions. Jimmy Hollis plots with George Wriglit to pledge whole dormitory for Phi Delts after last date on Sunday. Sigs bolt cellar door as Jack I-Iightower, prize Oxfordite, walks in, but make serious mistake of singing congratulations for Hightower, Beam, and H. Johnston at same time. Sigs make a clean steal of George Green from the Phi Delts by telling him that his brother and former Sig president, Ed Green, will be able to fly his plane for the Army much better if George pledges Sigma Chi. SUNDAY, JULY 26-Day of rest and religion, but fraternity men and rushees find no rest or religion in this day. Night watchman calls Druid Hills Fire Department to put out fire at KA House when the house ain't on fire. Iris the proverbial KA hot-box burning exceedingly hot. Jimmy Hollis fails to meet George Wfright for the after midnight session in XVinship as he falls for Robert E. Lee. Sophie gets his orders from home, and Chi Phi's breath sigh of relief. Gottlieb and Zimmerman have it out after last date. Coggins Hnishes his attack on other UQ BMOC'c by calling them "petty politicians." Campus laughs hysterically, and Poats jangles his keys with a wry smile. All hell breaks loose in XVinship and Dobbs. Uncertain fresh- men are seen running from promisees at S A. M. Fraternity men all out get- ting properly stewed in attempt to forget coming afternoon with its walkers-by. MONDAY, JULY 27-Mass jag day for the rushees. Fraternity men tear hair until the First one pledges, KA's do fairly well, get Don Rece, our Dean's son. SAE's mass bidding pays off with 22 dull looking future Lions. ATO,s pledge 20 out of thin air. Phi Delts ain't too happy, but they Won fight over George Xlllright. Sophie Howell ended KAJS chances of running the Constitution by dashing tearfully into the waiting arms of the Chee Phees. Junior College boys fool everyone by splitting up for a change and go to five fraternities instead of two. BRUMBY MHMH SHYS IM JUST Fl WOW WDTH TH' lfJlMlVllN ETC- -NO-N O PHI DELTB THETR .. fp, . DID lT IN NOT!-llN'Fl. NE some 1-ALM PFIUL RNY OF Sf- xlfllttt. GND I Fl SODR FN-VLL Jussi 1. ii: You PLeDGE C EEEEEE WELL PUBLICITY FIT PRKLE l -. .BRGNTLE Y Xl llllffrt xiilffzt, 'ci LZKXX 1 D akamowa-L-0 t 2 Miziws' g,27"7f 2 2' lI33J ff if w - nkKa445 f af , 17 l ! X A, Ui f"'Ei?iE WOME WITH THIS ,Q SWT-NNN IW .X muh comma Kim. GHLLTOOD MQ CORD X .ff THERE FIRE Fl oy: FQCSHMHN OVCRQT us l-wuse FIND ? wl:l.v. PUNCH TMNT DID BUT fx xl! ij! X X If DOWDEQ rQx4ES Fl 5 PQWDER' H STINBL ' LDUST Tv-HNS TUESDAY, JULY 28-Tommy McLain, Oxfordite, slips Minerva's lads a limber after conversing with a dark co-ed who "likes the Lions just lots, but feels sorry for the Chi Phi's and thinks they are sweet." Tolbert frowns, Dooley lays odds they,ll get him next fall and also that the campus ain't seen the end of this pledge breaking and knife throwing yet, WEDNESDAY, JULY 29-From here on out it looks to Dooley like the wettest quarter Emory's ever seen, Dooley sneaks back to Anatomy Building for his bottle Qgrain alcoholj while the whole campus, co-eds included, ambles out to the spots, Ma Beatties, Anchorage, Pig Shop, with the same purpose in mind. THURSDAY, JULY 30-Battle hears that friend and rushee Fred Neel tried to steal "Ju-Fru's" Chi Phi pin that Bob worked so hard to get to give her and shouts bloody murder. Fred quakes in his boots and fails to notice Battle any more. John Boyle, when accused of his fraternity's money-loving tendencies, spits out, "You have to be plenty good to get the mon, hon," 'KTruth is stranger than fiction and confession is good for the soul," thinks Dooley. FRIDAY, JULY 31-LeeRoy Walton keeps his promise, makes Freshman Dickie Smith Assistant Business Manager of the Emory Glee Club for pledging Kappa Alpha. Isn't it wonderful what you can do if you have influence? Dickie is still trying to get the salt off his clothes from the crying jag that was gushed on him during the last KA hot-box. ' SATURDAY, AUGUST 1-Pretty Bob Coffer finds Co-ed Mia Hecht very interesting and swears off studying for the rest of the summer. Goldthwaite and Georgia Brother Richard Horsey find the Pig Shop much better than the Oak Grove Inn to cool off in on a hot summer afternoon. Tex and Bledsoe cease to interest the most versatile students, but not Dooley. Tenn., to SUNDAY, AUGUST 2-Dooley writes Mrs. Todd in Kingsport, find out what in the name of creation she feeds her children. Campus is shocked as Billions turns up worse than Rucker. SAE's felt brunt of his wit as he leads his couple of pledge brothers, some ATO's and SN's down to the Lions Den of Iniquity with iron bars to have final rites for poor Leo. MONDAY, AUGUST 3-Wliile the Freshmen Meds stay home to mull over Anatomy and their roommates bones, the rest of the student body raises the LI3 f f Nou WE ORN RPFORDTU INDEPE-NDEN fx 've aTz:S 'PRRRK BIC, 'LEO PDU ,ug N62 x Q, X f XV If XXV 4l sd? rukas. Pledges of fraternities are made happy-hootch-happy. Nobody hears about the ENO's except that Bill Morris, the humorist, has resigned his post as Wheel hub because of the heavy duties of prexying his organization. Kitsy Collier flits around with everybody from Stokes Tolbert to Charlie Milwain-from the wit to the shi-ftless. TUESDAY, AUGUST 4-Campus wonders where all the big BMOC's are hiding themselves-LeeRoy's out of the hospital now, but he hides out with Jean Barron, who must be hard up. Rucker has his gasoline and his little Pen- tecost. Poison Ivan is still walking down the Rhodes. Cumbaa just stays at the house with his brothers. Dooley finds Polstein in AEPi cellar, ostracized by his brothers for poor showing of AEPi in rushing. XVEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5-Talmadge scared Dooley out of his pants yester- day by threatening to pound his bones into dust if he did not stop all of his foolish writing. Dooley agreed with the man from Sugar Creek and threw away his pen. Dooley likewise scared hell out of Cadaver Joe, and he CI at leastj had to write that Dooley will take his pen in hand again when Talmadge gets his red suspenders beaten off in the governor's race. XVEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16-Fraternity men come back for another rush week or pay tremendous fines. Last-minute initiations round out chapters to decent sizes, but it's close. Poor Morris Hale. Everyone stands around clap- ping as he carries six trunks up to the third floor of Alabama Hall, and then collapses on the grass. Surprise of the year is Dooley's first visit to the Co-op. It actually looks like people can walk in without committing suicide. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17-Quiet day sees Alabama Hall filled with fraternity men. Freshman Reception is the usual horror with fraternity men hounding freshmen. Everyone exhausted by the time the annual date con- firmation orgy comes 05. Just as last year the prizes and T. XV.'s squirm to- gether on the floor as the mercenaries inflate their still-growing egos. Ashby MC- Cord, later, to take much credit for a large pledge class, attempts to make dates with all the freshmen as he should have done before, but didn't! Noble freshmen refuse to break all the dates they have made, which infuriates the big-shots no end. After a year at Emory the boys Won't be so noble. Look at 1:he rest of them. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18-Street cars loads of pinks come to Emory. Fresh- men cannot understand the great sea of skirts that floats by Alabama Hall, but rush week ainlt over yet. The bloated Chi Phi,s, shocked back to sen- sibility by the prick of the poison dart they caught this summer and under the leadership of new, upset Cquick election after last rush weekj President Todd, finally start rushing, but hard. Weiadell Willianas and his Sigma Pi's try to make up for the ace that the freshmen served them this summer by working all the harder. Good luck. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19-Alabama Hall secs little men with frat pins on their hollow chests smiling at each other so the freshmen can see how well-liked they are. Wlien they're not looking curve balls are thrown fran- tically. Rip Duggan, whose face froze that way last year when he was trying to get bids, lfinds it advantageous in rushing and politieing. SAE's and KA,s, still fighting furiously, swap blows over Gray Lindgren, soon to cause a battle royal. Ralph Roddenbery and Leo Pou decide to go Phi Delt. glittery Rucker Todd and Smiley Rutherford Poats stick their DVS pins at the freshmen what you get if you pledge Chi Phi." Morris Hale hides KA and say, "See pin and under guise of Enforcement Committee Chairman mana es to tell fresh men that the the ghost of tg . ' - only way to be a true SOUTHERN GENTLEMAN is to join Robert E. Lee at the KA House. SAE,s over confident, they know the law of averages will give them two out of twelve. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2O+Usual number Cfor rush weekj of freshmen wander over to hear Nat Long. Few hypocritical Greeks do same. Most fra- ternity men have long since decided that it ain't worth the effort. Bids start pouring out of the fraternity houses. Fraternity row looks like a forest fire when hot-boxes begin to function properly. Fraternities act the hypocrites, have mock church services to hide the dirty rushing. Rankin Smith has cn- joyable time spending the night with Library Wlolf John Boyle. Sigma Pi's are revived, a rushee promises. NIONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21-Theologs begin to return from summer VZlCZl- tion, and Dobbs Hall receives much needed spirits. Tolchard cries for help from SAE cellar, but Brumby quickly silenees the disturbance in the usual man- ner. KA's decide, after many rushees decline to be SOUTHERN GENTLE- MEN, that quality is more desirable than quantity. XVhat price face? Sigma Pi and Delta Tau Delta join KA spirit. After the last date, Leo Pou gets out his list of Phi Delt biddees, gets ten other freshmen to help him carry THE FITLHNTFI COI RO L THE POWER CO BROS. CORL CO. WHFIT :DOES YOUR POP DO? it, and begins his infamous escapade, which was the best rushing done all year. Got Sammy Poole and Frank Aldenderfer and everybody else in between their sizes. Sigma Chils haven't got anybody worried but are blissfully happy as usual. TUESDAY, Oh I-IORRIBLE DAY, SEPTEMBER 22-At five p. m. the death knoll knells. Phi Delts keep counting and in their enthusiasm completely out- do themselves, and on taking a recount and rclook moan, but it's the best theylve done in years. SAE's brand '18 emaciated looking cattle as they plod wearily up the drive. The ATO's get jimmy "My daddy's managing editor of the Louisville Courier-Journaln Pope. Chi Phi's get Ranking Smith, pledge-breaker Tommy McLain, and a few others. KA's run the Delts a close race, both get four. Violet Lover Betty Dorman rushes to KA house to tell Gray Lindgren that she'll not be a Kappa Alpha Rose. Baldy utters unutterables and dedicates Gray to Robert E. Lee's memory. The Marietta boys split, but not enough. XVEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23-Polstein wakes up to the fact that he must put out a lVb1'c'1. Begs for staff members without much success. Campus filled to overflowing as independents return to the old grind. Pre-Theolog Billy Kirkland named to the exclusive and elusive Honor Council. University realizes that it must furnish the students with some let-up from the stiffened schedule, re-instates intercollegiate tennis and swimming. KA's swarm around Gray Lindgren making him "happy" but not happy enough because some SAE's, still not content, ooze in under the door and do their dirty work. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24-Freshmen and Dooley wake early to find that school has begun. Fraternity men think that rush week is still going on, sleep to twelve. Chi Phi gets reamed in the posterior as Lee jordan, one of their faithful Atlanta crew, says "Sorry, boys, I cawn't take it," and flips his pledge pin back. Gray Lindgren ditto to KA. At each household the stench of SAE is wafted under their nostrils, causing extreme nausea, and the little boys, now free, go running off to join their buddies who arenit aware that rush week is over. Big shots decide in Student Council that campus does not have enough big shots. Vote to have spring elections twice a year. FRIDAY, SEPTIZMBER 25-The XVAPUI rolls with its habitual reek. Polstein sighs in relief. Professor Basliette joins the bull-shooters of the campus as Chairman of the Debate Council to succeed popular Ed Martin. Freshmen start the year rightg spend Friday afternoon in the pinks' company. 5 sie . as-'Wo e"'u+1, 'Nz -"E W..-f 5'-.5 T104 elimb TSE Exif 'SMH Aer. msg 2:59 was r ,rg :.. , Lf ,I , . .. "' 1. x , t sl i5'Lt-ids! 3174401 JVW5' muy .2f'1.g"'E WILEY: WSW v'i':l'J5 'l"""+ wud, Aww M0006 - I wagon sew xxlifqqtv 496+ CSOWBUOB if e 1 5 rife? r o tif? ee,- , ,J 00 ra N4 rl eff O? ,Lim GOD H351 CB-y'-9" It must have been funny Dean Rece. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26-Campus headache, the Emory Phoenix, has started plaguing the students and Dooifey. Editor Knox sends out urgent appeal for staff members to students, who find campus activities somewhat of a bore. Dooley shudders when he thinks of this year's possibilities of the Phoenix. Students think of Koestline and shudder too. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27-Chi Phi's receive a new pledge today, banana and onion eater too. Ed Allen's close friend, Monk the Monkey, has joined the band of Greeks known as the Tom Connally crew and is now a very popular member. Dooley thinks, "It's about time they admitted it." Sigma Nu's try to make up for their absence in church by having reception for their new house-mother. They're good at cards, I hope Mrs. Bunnell doesn't try a hand. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28-Dooley laughs. You ought to see the mess some of the Business School boys are going through. Five professors in seven days. Business Law ain't that hard. Those Bus.Ad. boys must really be gruesome at eight A. M., and that ain't all. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29-Curiosity got the best of Dooley, and he attended his Hrst chapter meeting with Robert E. Lee. If Dooley had ears then, he Wouldn't now. Baldy called for aid in getting back ex-pledge Lindgren. Called SAE's everything in the book and several new ones. Chapter agrees to get the poor, wayward lad back into the folds, and all cuss the Sig Alphis. Such terms have never been heard before. Dooley blushed his way back to Anatomy Building. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30-Campus Editor Bates calls staff meeting. Makes foolish promises about -getting annual out in time for March gradua- tion. Editors have promised before to get it out before June. June, no an- nuals. "Some people don't know what they're asking forf' thinks Dooley. THURSDAY, OCTOBER I-Week-end begins. Students trek to Health Farm. Mother Bedc informs that soon Oak Grove Inn will not be gathering place for Emory student big shots, little shots, and just shots. Students moan, "There goes another tradition." FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2-Students wake up to fact that Coach Ralph Atkin- son did not come to Emory alone this fall. Dooley was first to realize that he had an eye-opener for a wife. Knox fails in all his .publicity stunts. Decides to grow beard as last resort. y SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3-President XValton lays down gavel for the week- end to make one of his many trips to Rome. Wliole KA chapter and two rushees go along to make sure that no one harms the poor fellow. Lewell Akin and Emory Bass enjoy pleasant week-end in Alabama Qnot the statej. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4-Dooley's desires were long for sleep and short for Long. Scott skirts brightened Glenn Memorial's drab pews. Junior Stewards in evidence everywhere, but there ain't enough of them. Campus politicians End church going little help at election time, so sleep late and enjoy no Long. 6 DOOLEV SPRAWLS MONDAY, OCTOBER 5-Sophomore Kirkland continues to pick up odd jobs to give him those necessary points. This time it is Chairman of Religious Emphasis XVeek. SAE lion almost received the final blow when workmen from Office of Civilian Defense answered a call by some friendly soul Qcould it be the KA'sj to come to Number 7 Fraternity Row to take away a cast iron lion for the scrap drive. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6-Dooley sympathizes with V. T. Chen lying crippled in the hospital as he thinks of the old Confucius saying "Man should not let vehicle run over him but should run vehicle." To hell with those nasty chapter meetings. It's Dooley's night of pleasure and relaxation, and he's got a date with "Redn from summer school. XVEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7-Dooley just remembered what happened at Student Council meeting two nights ago. Confound that hypocritical Rucker Todd! He looks so much like Dooley that must have the same feelings of the famous writer. Dooley needs soft, easy chairs to rest his spine on. Wliy canlt that imitation Dooley keep his mouth shut about the lounges. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8-Dooley spent a boring morning with Crzvnpnx staif photographer Ed McDowell having his picture taken for that infamous publication. lVbc'eI comes out giving Phoenix Editor Knox his reward for growing a beard, a little campus-wide publicity. Those nasty Players stuck their head out again when the last one, Business Manager Jack Daugherty, begged for another chance for the defunct Players. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9-It seems as if Dooley will never cease hearing of big men getting new positions of importance in the campus activities. ATO's prize and possible leader, Thad Horton, got named managing editor of the Wheel. Smiley Poats increased the importance of his journalistic name in yesterdayis issue of the Wheel by informing a certain obnoxious sophomore politician Qcould it be our friend Hooker Cogginsj that he would not make ODK or DVS if he continued to talk about the campus Big-Shots. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10-Phi Delt prize, Bill Dowda, tells the boys at Number 8 that he is afraid that he is out of place, but he likes all of the boys. Dooley wonders, smells darkey in the underbrush, and sees Bill Todd, in- famous freshmen, leaving Dowda's room. Ashby McCord and Bobby Swink swear that some Chi Phi blood will be spilt Qcould it be Todd's and Shu- mate's?J before the affair is over. Big brother Rucker knows his brother, but tells Phi Delts that little Billious had done no wrong. Dooley is driven to his bottle. - SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11-Wliole Chi Phi chapter, except Bruiser Taylor, attend church to atone for their hypocritical attitude regarding the breaking of pledges. Look at Tommy McLain and Bill Dowda, and then look at the stink raised by the Arkwright boys about Atlanta's gift to the ladies, Lee Jordan. Nat G. is on his last leg at Glenn Memorial, but Dooley hasnit a leg to stand on. Gad, what a headache!! - MONDAY, OCTOBER 12-Walton's stooges in the Student Council aren,t as stupid as Dooley once thought. They have finally started getting bored with the tirades of certain council members. The Med School representatives failed to show themselves, and four others attending left as Rutherford Poats started his long inancial report. Business was postponed for lack of a quorum. Those remaining cussed those who left vehemently. Dooley just laughed. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13-The farce of farces met tonight, decided to get all fraternity men to give a pint of blood to blood bank. Cumbaa's Inter- fraternity Council has finally done something beside discuss rushing. Polstein, almost lynched by students last week for letting such Uhigh schooll' columns go in the lVlJeel as the one last week by Poats, afraid to defy Poats lets him write another one, but he'll regret it is the opinion of the school's most famous writer, Dooley. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14-Dan Parker starts thinking of fall elections. Students. start thinking of Parker, and propose to run Dooley for Student Body President. Parker thinks he has the edge because he was a candidate last year, but he ain't seen Dooley politic yet. Dooley has the advantage of no ethics, plenty of drinking buddies, and the skeleton's advantage of being able to scare hell out of everybody. All Parker has is an old fashioned mustache and the personality that goes with it. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15-Eta Sigma Psi receives the hatchet from non Eta Sig Poats in his infamous column. Students shout uSour grapes." Eta Sig's threaten to make Poats honorary member. Polstein leaves town for the week-end with lynch threats growing. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16-Students see Emory history made as Dr. Cox is installed Chancellor and Dr. White as President. Musically minded students trek to Glenn Memorial to revel in Student Lecture Association's first presentation of the year, Margaret Speaks, while fun-loving students head for the well- known haunts for a spot of Emory tea served from the bottle. All have wonderful time, but the funlovers wonder late in the night if they should not have attended the Margaret Speaks' program. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17-Campus buzzes with preparation for the first Inter-fraternity Council Dance. Dance Chairman Gower sweats profusely and profanes fraternities for not helping him decorate the Emory dance hall. KA's plan to show Gray Lindgren and Betty Dorman how wonderful Kappa Alpha really is. Phi Delts-and SAE's plan to show Gray and Betty where the KA's are wrong. Lee Jordan and Bill Dowda wander around helplessly looking for AT EMORV BRAWLS someone to show them how good they are, but they leave the dance dis- appointed. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18-Students find supplement to the Wheel, the Phoenix, and decide that church can wait a week for their presence. Cumbaa committed suicide Thursday, but Students just realize why. Dooley laughs to himself in the Anatomy Building. Cumbaa's anonymous article on rush week was publisl ed as "Cumbaa on Rush Week." It is Dooley's opinion that Cum- baa should ihave killed Editor Knox for such a dastardly trick instead of himself. MONDAY, OCTOBER 19-Justus Gower meets the requirements of ECA for Chairman of Parentis Day, begins to try to make himself known to ODK members. Thinks of his fraternity brother, Waxlly Stewart, of last year, and goes back to the Delta Shelta in disgust. Dooley joins him, but finds the com- pany not to his liking, leaves soon after his arrival. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20-Goodrich C. Dooley, famous editor of Dooley's Diary, famous for many years for his wit, was honored along with 25 other students with the coveted membership to "XVho's XVho in College Aniericafl Eta Sigma Psi fooled Poats and had its annual fall tapping in spite of his Wbm-I article. The sophomore honor boys marched yesterday in their mystical black robes, but the two, Bert Roper and Rip Duggan, failed to inspire or awe the freshmen. NVEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 214Draft pursued students haunt the foot- steps of popular Dean Luke Clegg. The Dean swears that the students have nothing to worry about because the reserves will not be closed, but the breath of the draft boards is too hot behind many of the students for them to take heed. Luke cusses as he walks into the ofhce, filled with worried students. Dooley ain't worried 'cause he canlt pass the physical. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22-Students receive word via the lVbc'el that Student Council finally decided to let the students have a place to rest their weary bones and appropriated funds for a student lounge. Campus big-wigs tear hair, Wfbeel columnist Buddy Sears proposes lounges to be placed in every room on the campus, the sarcastic hypocrit. Professors jubilant, maybe students will catch up on sleep in lounges and won't sleep in classes. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23-Theologs leave city to travel their week-end cir- cuits of churches. Phi Delts enter the city to travel their week-end circuit of the bars and politely invite the SAE's to join them. SAEis decline invitation, sgying that rush week is not over. How well the campus realizes this!! SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24-Saturday night finds the same gang, Jim Black and a few,others, at the Sigma Nu house having a friendly game of cards in the attic, Dooley lost five dollars and his pelvis bone. Some strange souls head for Ellis St. to see friends who ain't home, end up getting properly stewed at Samoan Room on Shorty's long drinks. No one thinks that Sunday will come tomorrow. W SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25-'But Sunday did come and what Cl mess it found the campus in. Sigma Nu's snatch mail-order halos from Junior Stewards' heads and walk into one of Rev. Long's financial dictations, decide that atone- ment is too costly and walk out. Waynfard students gaul their gaul, strain every muscle to get to Glenn Memorial, only to go blissfully asleep as the i'Story for Boys and Girls" is begun. MONDAY, OCTOBER 26-Students find much in Prof. Pafford-that they would like to stomp on. English 101 students find him worse than the dreaded Dr. G. Smith whose fame is wide-spread. Sarcastic remarks and low grades are in evidence on 9955 of the papers turned in. uInhuman,,' moan the would be scholars and plan to go to church next Sunday to make amends for their unkind thoughts. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27-Jim Lewis makes his treasurer's report to Inter- fraternity Council, "I have not collected any money since I took olhce, and I have not paid any bills. We have accounts payable of S50 and accounts receivable of 5300. I will try to have a better report next meeting." Dooley won- ders how in this great world he expected to put out an annual or manage the Glee Club if he can't do a good job of such a simple task as this. Maybe the answer is that he didn't expect to. XVEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28-Alumni's Chessery Abernathy leaves the great campus for the army. Dooley strangely wishes that the draft had caught him before now, and the Business School's future vice-presidents, fondly known as the Hebrew Engineers, pray that Lloyd 'tUtah, Harvard, I know it allf' Alkema will be blown away by that same draft soon. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29-"Bull Shooter" Kravtin begs aspiring young politicians to attend Debate Forum, wonders why in the hell his pleas aren't answered. Dooley could answer that one, "People get tired of shooting the bull with that filthy crew at the Forum." Phi Delts begin grooming Brother "SAE Lover" Goldthwaite for the coming ODK tapping, but he knows he ain't got a chance without a Sig Alph in the gold key conscious crowd. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30-Baldy Hale Ends that football is rough game as he loses tooth. Everyone, including the KA'S, wonder why he could not have broken his neck and saved the students the trouble. Rumor has it that Ministers' Vfeek is coming in January. XVhole campus hopes that it will be drafted. Dooley doesn't mind. He doesn't have to go to chapel. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31-Football games, the usual accompanying liquids, and beautiful girls tempt the poor Emory gentlemen. Jounching Jim Phillips helps poor Auburn freshmen out of a fight, ends up hurtin his knuckles on H371 Former Inter-fraternity Council President Cumbaa enjoys no-break with Martha Rhodes. Bennett smirks in some corner. Tech Brother's head. Phi Chi's announce they are having a 'lleft-liandedu party during Thanksgiving Holidays as they enjoy everything at their house. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER I-Bill Brumby seen passing Glenn Memorial be- fore dawn, no need to wonder where he has been. Theologs seen struggling wearily out of bed after a hard night to make good impression on professors by attending Glenn Memorial. Professors had a hard night too, miss the pleasures of Nat Long. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2-Pre-Meds lulled to sleep tonight by the sweet voice of Dr. J. Sam Guy telling them all the ins and outs of getting accepted to med school at Emory. Dooley thinks they are going to a hell of a lot of trouble to get in that blasted hole. He got in without a bit of trouble. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3-'Pledge-breakers' pledge day. Chi Phi's happy as Bill Dowda walks into the house browning Billious Todd and asks for the firey red button. SAE's jubilant as the KA's cuss when Gray Lindgren joins the lion crew, as does Lee Jordan. Inter-fraternity Council members tense as Broadass Howe announces the good news for the Sig Alphs. Dooley hopes they enjoy the friendships they have made with their never ending rush week. NVEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4-lBus.Ad. boys jubilant, campus tight-wads disgusted, as Student Council donates the junior vice-presidents S375 for the lounge made famous several years ago by Senator L. C. Burch, famous council member from Bus.Ad. school. AEPi's discover several of their valuable cups are missing and point accusing finger at Joe Goldberg and his Tepers. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER S-Emory shows Georgia that it has some real athletes on the campus. The Terrible Ivan and the Emaeiated Rucker lead Emory to victory as they win a debate with the University of Georgia. Campus realizes Parents, Day comes off tomorrow. Fraternity houses go through an early, hurried spring cleaning. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6-Campus flooded with 200 parents. James S. Pope, Sr., and james S. Pope, Jr., warm hearts of everyone attending banquet. Chairman Gower is seen everywhere AKing ODK's for coming tapping and his parents for coming touching. Rev. Pierce Harris makes hit with parents and students with his fire-ball talk in chapel. Everyone, except uncooperative Phi Delts and fi few others, put on skits for parents' benefit, everyone shouldn't have put on a skit. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7-A few parents are seen wandering about the campus with sons who have not had the nerve to touch the 'money strings in the family yet. Rhodes Hardeman forgets Randolph-Macon, goes to North Georgia, and finds a gold nugget in uthem that hills." TEPhi's forget tire and gasoline rationing and have formal. President Goldberg turns violent pink as he lays a good one on sponsor. i I i l ,fi -X New student body vice-president and president Carrol Forrest and Billy Kirkland, respectively, get a laugh from Secretary Bob Battle. God knows why! ODK Prexy lvan Bennett loses trousers as freshmen lose Push Ball Game. Dooley almost died of convulsions. Neophytes Bert Roper and "Rip" Duggan receive their "glory robes" from Eta Sigma Psis Teddy Levitas and .lim Howard. ll38l ooottv tttts at FALL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER S-One or two remaining parents attend church with their lovely offsprings. Others had enough sense to leave yesterday. Students squirm, look forward to the day of no more Long. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9-Billious Todd finds that AKing the campus has helped him some when he is elected president of Freshman Debate Forum by his Chi Phi freshmen. Open politicing declared in order by Student Council as it sets election day. Todd and Bull Forrest declare intentions to run for stu- dent body presidency, and Dan Parker is always around. Dooley wonders what the campus is coming to. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10-Cumbaa's bull shooters decided to follow example of Student Council and have elections every six months. Jim Lewis, beaten out of every other office, decides to throw his hat in the ring. Dooley wagers he'll not get it. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11-Freshmen learn that ODK's Freshmen Day is coming off December 4. Long for the Push Ball game and the chance for sweet revenge on upper-classmen. ODK expectees fervently wish ODK would end the suspense and get its fall tapping over with. Those big rough med students walked over Junior-Senior team to take campus football title. Every- one thankful meds did not take everyone's life during their rough football season. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12-No lVbec'l today. Is ODK actually going to tap or is Polstein busy getting out a report of some sort? XValton still not satisied with his publicity, starts tooting his own horn. He informs everyone that he has begun writing letters to the lvdlffl for publication. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13-Chapel filled with coats and ties. Everyone ,is trying to fool the laurel leaf gentlemen on the platform. Poison Ivan is in charge of program as Mu Circle of ODK takes over. Students fail to hear excellent talk made by Dr. XVhite as they try to guess the ODK's for the day. The tapping boys with the gold keys surprise everyone by tapping Anatomy's own Dr. John Venable, but med school is one up on everyone and sing won- derful AKing songs to Dr. John. Other handshakers and smile boys named were Morris Hale, George Bates, and A. J. Kravtin. Students think that XVal- ton and Goldthwaite must have been absent or failed to wear a tie. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14-Dooley Went to a med dance last night, but had such a good time that he could not finish his words of yesterday. Izza Bell and Wazza Bell and many other beautiful girls were led astray by those mean med students. Dooley flitted by Hrst tee at Druid Hills and saw all. ,fPhi-sChi's forget dance is over and continue to party all day. .-L, i SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15-Nat Long thinks that those damnable students ought to roast in the fires of hell as he views the many empty pews. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16-Students attend chapel weighted down with many books, plan to study, Bishop Oxnam has other plans, starts out with a bang. Students drop books and listen to chapel speaker for first time in months. Forget they're being hypocritical and plan to attend every Oxnam meeting. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17-Gone and forgotten are all the vows of yes- terday. Co-op is filled to overflowing and cuss when they are run out at 10:30. All head for the Post Office and Dr. Ivey's, forget they ever heard of a minister named Bishop Oxnam. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18-Last minute Kirkland announces his in- tentions of running for student body presidencyu Dooley wonders how in hell a Pre-Theolog plans to get elected with the med school still functioning. Nat Long is long gone. Dr. J. A. Smith takes over the revered post of the be- loved business man of Glenn Memorial, and Dooley hopes that economics will cease to be the topic of sermons in the campus church. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19-W'beel carries news that ten future ODK'S received the Phi Beta key. Dooley wishes that they would let ODK elect good, dumb politicians like Wialton, for instance, as they did in the past. Bull Forrest seen leaving Nurses' Home with twentieth nurse in four days. XVhat price victory, only he ain't won yet. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20-Alabama Hall and campus as zz whole is scene of many dagger throwing contests. BooBoo Battle offers candidate Billy Kirk- land a word of advice, '1Billy, my advice to you is to withdraw from the race because Rucker is too popular on the campus for you to have a chance in the race this time." Other words of advice are spoken to everyone, but the dopes don't realize what they are getting into and stay in their respective races. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21-Candidates try to make good impression and stay home. Everyone else forgets coming primary and celebrates the com- ing of another week-end. Phi Delts paint SAE lion again, point accusing fingers at the KA's and say "XVe'rc your friends and are too broke to buy paint, but those KA's don't like the first thing about you and have the paint." SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 22-New preacher ain't here yet, and students stay at home waiting for him. Maybe he'll be here by next Sunday, and students wonit have the old excuse to keep them from attending Glenn Memorial. TAPPING AND BMOCS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23-Presidential hopeful Disgustin, Parker lost his har and a-h trousers as Kirkland, Pre-Theolog with no chance, carries primary in landslide. Bull Forrest, popular Bus.Ad. boy, failed to carry Bus.Ad. School, but managed to make some headway with nurses to come in second. Sure-ber Todd ran back to Chi Phi house with his tail between his legs, declares he doesn't Want the presidency and just wants his little Pentecost. TUESDAK, NOVEMBER 24-Half the campus packed its bags and left this glorious place for the Thanksgiving days of pleasure. Pudgey Joe Porter takes over reins of ENO from dynamic Bill Morris. Dooley thinks of Fanning and the like and thanks God for Porter. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25-'To hell with it all. Dooley drips with alcoholic nectar. Emory drips with drips and shudders with thoughts of Emory Gentlemen Cpolite for queersl. The men leave for Thanksgiving at home, the gentlemen decide to have pleasant time with themselves on the campus during holidays. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30-Dooley's hangover hangs over the whole campus as many cuts are marked down by shaped-eyed professors. Phi Chi's still weak from "Left-Handed" Party manage to struggle back to the Anatomy Build- ing. Pat Riley gives Dooley Bromo Seltzer and consoles freshmen meds whose foreheads don't feel so very good. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1-Everyone finds pop-quizzes waiting for them. Cuss professors long and loud. Lucky Earle Stockman found his quota to be three in three successive hours in the same seat in L'Fish House," gives up in dis- gust. Dooley disgusted too as Jerome Zimmerman takes AEPi gavel in hand. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2-KA's try to swap votes with their old friends the SAE's, but find that Broadass and his boys don't like Halo and his boys any more. Thad Horton seen with big box of cigars in his hand, swears he ain't politieing. Dooley thinks that if hc ain't politicing it's high time he did. Anybody with that personality will have to give live cigars for each vote. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3-Wfalton continues his horn tooting with another letter to the ll7berl editor, this time his presidential epitaph. Dooley learns that his old friend Ashby McCord, campus blow-hard, dropped out of school. Woiiders if he died on his own hot air and thanks God that he can Wear his trousers once again. FRIDAY, DECEIVLBER 4-Freshmen find Push Ballgame not to be all push. Several End upper-classmen to be good men. Ivan the Terrible lost his trousers to the freshmen. Cliff Harbour strips to the raw for the benefit of threaten- ing freshmen as Margo Bennett and Gloria Darden look on gleefully. Fresh- men break rules, lose game 4-0. SATURDAY, DECEMBER S-Sophomores win everything. Gloria Darden crowned queen of Push Ball. Dance turns out swell, no freshmen show up. Student Council sees and enjoys its S40 appropriation to the Eta Sigma Psi dance. W'alton pats his back and says that the Council has done a real service to Emory. l , SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6-New preacher arrives, thank heaven! No more longs for Long's leaving. Attending students End the church a nice place to be on Sunday morning, tell friends. All students ain't Infidels. Preacher Smith thankful first day ends without boomerang. DMONDAY, DECEMBER 7-How well we remember this day, those little yella' bass todds. Dooley's bones shake with rage as Tojo snakes through his mind, Wishes he could get his boney fingers around that yella' neck. Admiral Yates Stirling, under auspices of Dr. McLean and Lecture Assoc. boys, wakes students to the fact that we have been at war a year. Bates seen grooming his freshmen Russell Thomas for Lecture Assoc. Business Manager. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8-Jim Lewis phones every fraternity in effort to succeed Cumbaa as gavel beater of Inter-fraternity Council and make it ATO political UM" Day as Kirkland and Horton are elected. Knox holds on to the Phoenix with its clipped wings. Hale nominates Lewis for Interfrat presi- dency. Goldberg names Bates. Bates gets it, and Lewis has a perfect poli- tical record, no hits, no runs, no Qthis is a liel errors. Chi Phi's, KA's mourn as they see their hold on the Enforcement Committee broken. XVEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9-Economics' Ed Blackwell seen coming out of Professor A1 Griffmis odice with nose dripping. Dooley's wondered for long time how he grew such a long, pointed nose. ECA Prexy Huie and Freshman Council Adviser Bennett decide to end politics in Freshman ECA by making nominations themselves. Proceed to nominate a KA and a Sigma Chi for each ofhce. Freshmen thank them for giving them a lesson in true Emory politics. Lesson, "Don't politic but knife all your friends in the back and win without oppositionf, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10-Freshmen scour Atlanta looking for the His- tory 101 Saboteur, that confounded woman who grades Dr. Young's papers with- out attending lectures, and plan to wring her sweet little neck, if it's sweet and little, or break her contemptable body into if she's old and haggy. Professor Stubbs, not satisied with reaming the boys a new one in Bible and Political Science, drools with the thought of the coming Math 99 exam and the prospects of a small class in Math 100 next quarter. FRIDAY, DECEMBER ll-Dooley laughs hysterically as he pours another drink. Itis funny that a famous writer is the only person on the campus who has the gaul to take a drink in the face of coming examinations. Students take salts, croton oil, Sal Hepatica to remove evils from their systems to keep from getting marked down on their finals for shooting too much bull and crap. Phi Beta Kappa's fall election brought 'Forth this group of supposedly serious- minded students. Dr. John Venable mugs professionally for the camera, as neophyses Kravtinf Bates and Hale sing "At Last." Med School's Dean Geheber, Faculty's W. G. Workman, and Med's Bill Mon- crief sleep as Student Council hears lpunige proposals from ECA and Business Sc' oo . 'il DOOLEV AND STUDENTS CUT RUSS AT "PUSH Margo Bennett and Gloria Darden, freshman and sophomore candidates for "Push Ball' throne, give Dooley their best personalify smiles. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12-Students cram, Dooley takes week-end trip to Samoan Room via Pine St. Dooley enjoys himself, students worried as hell as professors settle down to making out finals. Dooley ain't worried, he hasn't taken a Hnal in 40 years. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13-Glenn Memorial turns students away from the doors. Student body attends church en masse to make amends for one hellova good quarter. MONDAY, DECEMBER 14-Damn those finals. Everyone is running around pulling out his hair and saying that he,s flunked an exam and will be in the Armed Forces before Christmas. No Christmas carols are to be heard on the campus, only the nasal laugh of Al Grifiin as he slips the well-known to the Economic boys and the curses of students who think of what is to come. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18-Exams end. Everyone gets blissfully stewed while waiting for their trains. Dooleyis so drunk that he caught a gray horse and tried to drink it for Scotch. Campus deserted except for a few fairies who play in the grass. NVEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30-Somebody is spreading the rumor that school has started this early. Dooley knows better than to fall for this kind of enemy propaganda. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 31-Drooled in along with a few others and settled down in the job of resting up from the holidays. Poats, Todd and Bennett thank Polstein for their gift subscription to Life-Polstein, who is as drunk as when he ordered them, stutters his way out of it. Then goes berserk as he gets another bill from Esquire. Most everybody back, except a few jellies like Jack Rowold and Luther Randall, who joined the Smart Setis own Signal Corps. QNightJ Too broke to celebrate. FRIDAY, JANUARY 1-Alkema pulls a quiz, which proves all we've thought about him. Campus spends afternoon by the radio, pulling for somebody else's team as usual. Too broke to bet, thank the Stars. Ed Gay, who lost SS and Dick Johnston, who lost two bits, wish they had been in Dooley's fix. SATURDAY, JANUARY 2-Weill wait till Monday to start on that study- ing resolution. Library still deserted, except for Arthur Wilson, Lee Davidson and Rucker Todd. Dooley stays in bed with a hot toddy. SUNDAY, JANUARY 3-The Rev. Smith, Glenn Memorial's new broom, sweeps clean on the first Sunday of the quarter with a full house. Those New Year's leaves still turned over. MONDAY, JANUARY 4-Empty seats in classes fill up. Debate Forum meets with crowd of three on hand. Wheel holds first meeting, with ATO Horton and Puddin' Sears looking important with new titles. Student Council manages to round up a quorum, with Preacher Kirkland taking over the gavel from oily-tongued Walton and dynamic BooBoo Battle replacing Rapid-fire Rucker. TUESDAY, JANUARY S-Tom Fulton conscientiously starts covering his H401 beat in the Deans' oiices, finds BeBe Moore very helpful, decides to cover his beat every day. Fulton finds out nearly everything, but only Dooley knows that BeBe really stands for Bertha Belle. XVEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6-Still the weirdies fpolite for queersj. Dooley wonders why the Student Council doesnit start an investigation of why so many males of the opposite sex come to Emoree. And while on the subject, Dooley wants to make it clear that he is in no way related to Allen Tolchard. THURSDAY, JANUARY 7-Somebody says Uncle Bud McCord has taken the hint and gone fishing, which is certainly going to wreck the athletic depart- ment. Other great losses are Lang and Pait. Siegel and his AEPi,s pull a Hollywood publicity stunt with Dona Drake, who obviously doesn't know Siegel and his AEPi's. FRIDAY, JANUARY 8-Sigma Nu's prove they aren't broke as they go broke pitching a formal at the Driving Club. Jim Black celebrates by staying sober a few minutes past sundown. Tommy McLain acts the perfect guest by trying to snake the date of the prexy of the snake charmers-Tim Paxton. Little Tim, who just hit a bottle of Coca-Cola, is too tight to protest. Dooley didn't get an invite. SATURDAY, JANUARY 9-Looks like all last year's patriotism is off, as AEPi's follow up with a formal, and others announce. Believing, as usual, in "safety in numbers," SAE sends out dance bids to everybody on the campus but Dooley, who's beginning to miss those Frolics publicity stunts. The Chi Phi's wax patriotic again, say they'll just go to everybody else's formal and cut theirs out. Dooley will lay two to one they'l1 pull a 'tFathers' Clubn this year. SUNDAY, JANUARY 10-Gad, Sunday again. It's the Lord's day and He can have it. MONDAY, JANUARY 11-Baldy Halo loses a little of his pious fedora as he quits the ECA, but his little footsteps Bobby Durden follows the holy example as he takes over the Freshmen saints. Mr. Mew urges everybody to use the new parking lot instead of the road back of the Chemistry building. Says hot things near all those chemicals might start something. Student Coun- cil almost musters a quorum for its second meeting. TUESDAY, JANUARY 12-The Constitution Qthe one that has Smilin' Jack inxitj says Emory is selected for government service, which Purks- says aixffso, Jthough he wishes 'twere. Betty Baskin, hearing about all the Navy men who might be sent here, decides to slack up on the job hunt. Then, too, she says Maudie ain't been acting the old witch lately. XVEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13-Bates comes out of his week-end stupor, hopefully announces date of Campus publication as March 12, which will probably be like all other Cnmlfms publication dates. Alice Tolchard, who ad- mits she has to do all Bates' work, says he does "so wish there weren't so many of those repu-ulsivc Q's at Emory." Dooley hopes she doesn't plan suicide. THURSDAY, JANUARY 14-Goose Gosnellflthe friend of youth," comes out for lowering thc voting age to 18, but itill take more than that bouquet to get people to take his course. Calumnist Todd, who's sure he's not the only one, calls for compulsory Wasserman tests. Bill Greer, typical dumb fresh- man, wants to know how to study for them. TEPl1is Teddy Levites and Joe Goldberg chat with their sponsor, Barbara Kaplan at the inter-fraternity Formal. BALLI' AND INTER-FRATEIQNITV FORMAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 15-Sam Hunter, the Chi Phi ice man, offers instruc- tions in the new rough-tough game of Nspeedballf' which Hunter says is really very pieceful. Campus gets a look at the Wfbvcl, which is dated Thurs- day, wonders how it happened than the picture series on night life contains nothing but Wbt'ei staff members. Mob turns out for the formal staged by the boys from the Tombs of Tiberius, then hall overflows as members of other fraternities aiprive. SATURDAY, JANUARY 16-Two-bit formal turns out better than ex- pected. The Secret Seven shows up en masse, looking like they just swallowed the canary. Cumbaa, Bennett admits, has just swallowed his pride and pinned some home town babe from Phenix City. XValton looks dejected, as Mrs. Tongue failed to make it. SUNDAY, JANUARY 17-The Rev. Smith, rants on the Wages of sin to the choir, the baldheaded corner and the Theologs. Hog-Pen Doremus wakes up at noon, asks what happened to Friday and Saturday. Campus, stranded by rationing, sticks at home, gets out the pin-up girls and thinks of what Sunday night used to be. . MONDAY, JANUARY 18-The place is swarming with more strange-looking males than ever-somebody says its Ministers' Wcelc, which is a dirty thing to say about the preachers of the gospel. Bates appeals for pictures of babes to run in the beauty section, threatens to run his choice cuts of other years if somebody doesn't come through. TUESDAY, JANUARY 19-Greeks get scared as war begins taking big bites out of chapter rolls, pass a rule in the Every-Other-Tuesday-Night-Eating- Club which permits anybody with the dough to be initiated into the various lodges if he: Q12 thinks he might have to go to war within a month, or C21 if he manages to keep up his grades for half a quarter. Realistic Rucker tells the Council that if they don't get those initiation fees pretty soon, the draft might beat 'em on the draw. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20-Joe Porter, successor to the Youngblood- Morris domain, denies that ENO is dead, announces that the independents are not 'very active under his dynamic leadership. Dooley yawns, remembers the great days of Fanning, Koestline, Stenhouse, et al, then looks at Porter . . . THURSDAY, JANUARY 21-Thad fXVho-Else-NVill-Toot-Your-Horn-For Youj Horton and Tom Cdittoj Fulton spread themselves all over the front page of their little sheet this week, modestly picturing themselves dragging Bertha Bell Moore around on a hose cart in the interests of Civilian Defense. Nursing School advertises that the Clifton Road co-eds are coming out faster than ever these days. Todd puts on rosy-colored glasses, meditates 20 seconds, and columns that there is no longer anything to gripe about. Readers turn away in disgust, FRIDAY, JANUARY 22-KA's pitch a big 'un at the Driving Club. Oozing with patriotism, Anything-for-Publicity Baldy makes a brief 30-minute speech and presents Adviser Guy with a S500 war bond. Guy wonders, with the rest of the crowd, why Hale should hand it to him in front of everybody. Dooley ain't so dumb. Patriotic KA's drive to their house afterwards in U-Drive- Its, then to take dates home, while the proletariat rides the trolley. SATURDAY, JANUARY 23-Buddy Sears announces that he has crushed all opposition for the fair head of "Moonbeam,' Mason, as he calls her. Dooley thinks 'iTotem Pole" would be more appropriate. Phi Delts remember the mort- gage and announce they'll do without a formal. Dooley's waiting to see them pull a Chi Phi stunt. SUNDAY, JANUARY 24-Billed as a Umarriage expert,', Madam Overton packs 'em in Glenn Memorial. Somebody says even a PiKA turned up in the congregation. Push ball, seen in the background, overshaclows the couples dancing at the ' "Push Ball" in the Little Auditorium. Emory's music makers, the Emory Aces, beat out a lively tune for the 'Fra ternities at the lnterfrat. Formal. . MONDAY, JANUARY ZS-Mrs. Overton still talking, today on men- Women relationships, shooting straight and making no bones about it. Dooley sees no problems here in this street-car age. Johnny Wfestmoreland, seeing tap- ping days not far off and eyeing the Chi Phi legacy, begins AKing Poats and Todd, Dooley thinks he's wasting his time-they won't let old Chee Phee down when the little triangles are passed out anyway. TUESDAY, JANUARY 26-Wliatever happened to the Student Council? Dooley can remember when it used to raise a big stink every week. Ain't the Phoenix, Players, and Orchestra still around to be abolished and re-instated? Chi Phi's break down and admit they're gonna throw a formal, on their own. Wl1at's the matter with the Mothers' Club, boys? WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27-The Co-op janitor hears what they're saying about him, denies he's kin to Cliff Harbour. But Dooley's been through too many years of med school to be bluffed that easily. Polstein figures thereis a' dirty plot between Oppenheimer and "the other fraternity" against his AEPi,s, as Block, Gottlieb, etc., get med school acceptances while Kravtin continues to be left out. THURSDAY, JANUARY 28-Everybody who never reads the Wheel any- way cusses loud and long when the Wheel futhat I paid my good money for"j doesn't come out this Week. Staff took week off in futile attempt to pass mid- terms. Horton prays nobody will start checking his staffs eligibility. FRIDAY, JANUARY 29-Delts make a gallant effort at the Little Auditorium, but everybody's tired of spending the night on street cars and stays away in droves. SATURDAY, JANUARY 30-Alarm rings at 8:15, turn it off, turn over, and spend the most enjoyable morning in bed imagining cutting classes under "Cupie" McLean and "Goose" Gosnell. Afternoon in the library with 'Tzaldyi' Hale footnoting a 2,500 word term paper for ''You-gotta-get-it-in-on-time-or- elsei' Stubbs. Wuckie Poats and Count uMr. Webster himselfn Gibson found at the Rollerdrome skating with a couple of babes. Poats and Gibson have stand- ing dates with each other almost every Saturday night. SUNDAY, JANUARY 31-Eat dinner in the cafeteria with hundreds of Druid Hills folks whose presence caused Mrs. Haynie's regular-starved custom- ers to stand in line two hours.. They donit appreciate the blessings of home- cooked food. Feel a pang of conscience and go to Vesper services or chance that rumors about Scott girls being there were true. Leave early, however, to go study for comprehensives. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1-Here it is February. A great month it is, too. Washington, Lincoln, Dooley, Cliff Harbour, Fred Gottlieb, and Gene Howe were born in it. If the last three weren,t, they should have been as they are the biggest 'tones' the campus has seen in many a moon. Debate forum to- night features four debaters talking to the four walls. Kravtin says Presi- dent Qin name onlyj Todd hasn't shown his face in months. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2-Busy day. Classes, lab, chapter meeting. Donald Kobley almost blows up the frosh chemistry lab when he thinks the manual is just kidding about not mixing water and phosphorous. The SAE's break up their meeting at midnight as they decide to call the roll of'All the brothers and Coggins. Dooley wonders what's up with Joo Froo that week. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3--Attend the banquet the KA,s, ,Chi Phi's, and ATO,s gave the Sigma Chi's after the Sigs downed the SAE's in basketball. So that,s why the SAE's objected to the new ruling preventing graduate students from playing. lI4IJ CAMRUS SROOI4 LAYS PEN THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4-Only two more days of school this week. Graham Grove walks into editing class 30 minutes late and apologetically tells Prof. Baskette he knows editing is no crip. CAIIIIPIIS anxiously expects ODK tu tap when llvburl doesn't come out. It all happened when freshmen Bill Greer slept through XY'edncsd.1y morning and thought it would be all right to take copy down in the morning. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5-Tom Fulton, Thad Horton, Billy Pollitzer, Car- roll Forrest, and freshmen Bill Todd walk out of chapel broken hearted, ODK forgot to tap. Instead of ODK tapping, Dr. Sherwood Eddy tapped. He seemed to have tapped half the stud-:nt body with a sledge hammer the way they reacted to his liberal views. Dooley doesn't believe such liberal, free thinkers as Emory men really objected to his talk. Most of campus rained in, missed Sig shindig. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6-Finding few good Christians in the junior class, ECA's nominating committee piles the presidentis job on overloaded Kirkland, who hasn't learned when to say uno." Dooley remembers when half a dozen activities men fought over the job-back in the gold key days, Night and ranked up again are Chandler Wfatson, Earl Taylor, Randy Goldthwaite and about 50 other Phi Delts. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 7-Sharp-tongued XValton works all day on a hot letter to Horton, who dared suggest that maybe the Glee Club would do better to forget its "morale-building tour" and stay home and study. Glee Club's Battle agrees with Horton, sub rosa. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9-KA's look under all the tables but can't ind a junior to wear the halo of Hale. Finally give up and elect sophomore Joe Wfilson. Even SAE's flinch as they look at choice of Coggins or Roper. Other lodges shudder at their own prospects, pray for the government to move in. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10-Wheel gets jump on the administration as it gets Congressman Vinson's telegraphed word that Emory will get 800 Navy pre-meds, but still nothing from the Navy, no orders. Dr. Wfhite fhe's the prcsidentj tries to keep calm, Dean Purks takes to the hospital. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11-Fulton gets jump on Horton in their pub- licity race, when Wfbeel appears with FuIton's name on the Vinson telegram. Horton promises ATO publicity chairman a full-page spread on Horton next week. Bob Rutherford, Marine Dick Knoxis successor on the Phoenix whom Dooley hadn't heard of either, says he'll keep the old bird flapping through its last grasp this march. Dooley wonders who gives a damn. - DOWN FOR ANOTHER YEAR ATO presents a musical Featuring Bob Moore on 'the trumpet, Lindsey Hollanc on 'che flute, and Ralph Meeks on -the trombone for the benefit of the parents FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12-ATO's pitch everybody else a low ball when they hand out orchids to the gals at their blowout. Proud Chi Phi's, next on schedule, shudder at thought of keeping up with the Joneses. Players now say their trouble is censorship-they could put on a show everybody would like but the Glenn Memorial powers-that-be wouldnt SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13-'Dooley condemns Chessery Abernathy for losing those damnable fraternity house cuts for CAMPUS. Bates does, too G. Bates starts shouting deadline on CAMPUS copy. Dooley's not worried he knows the editors do that every year and still students don't get Annuals until just before graduation. Anyhow, Dooley's tired and his confounded pen is broken. See you in December, 1943, I hope. 7"-'X-N 'fn J INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 4 Kingsport Press . - - 165 Lane Bros. ---- ' - 162 Lipscomb-Ellis Co. . . . . 145 Matthews Ed and Al - - - 164 Melba Cafeteria . . . . . 155 Mellen Battery Co. --'----.- - - 143 Montag Brothers ----------- - - 164 Mutual Benefit Health Bt Accident Assoc. - - - 162 Mutual Supply Co. .----.. . . . - - 163 Nehi Corporation - - ---- 5 - - - 154 Northwestern Mutual . - - - 144 Orkin Exterminating Co. - - -143 Parks-Chambers -----' - - 158 Penn Mutual Life Ins. Co. - - - 155 Rambo, R. K. ----- - v 156 Rauschenberg, C. A. - - - . - 160 Atlanta Laundries, Inc. . . . 150 Atlanta Linen Service . . . 159 American Bible Society - . . 144 Ansley Hotel ------ - - 168 Ballard Optical Company - - ' - 158 Biltmore Hotel ..... . .143 Campbell Coal Company - - -163 Capitol Fish Company . . . 159 Carson and Dobbins - . . 168 Coca-Cola Company . . . . . 147 Consolidated Quarries, Inc. - . . 166 Criswell's Baking Company . . .165 Daniel, John B. ------ . . 153 Dickey-Mangham Co .... . . 166 Dobbs, Harry F., Inc. - . .167 Dodson, NV. H. . . . . .165 Dunlap and Company - - . .150 Eastman Kodak Stores, Inc. . . 149 Emory University .... . . 169 Evans Clothing Co. . . . . .144 Federated Hardware Mutuals . .156 Foote 86 Davies, Inc .... . . 172 Foremost Dairies ---- . . 163 Fulton County Federal . . . 148 Fulton Supply Company . . .156 Garden Hill Cleaners - - . . 163 Garlington-Hardwick - . . 149 Gay Clothing Co. - - . .155 Harrison Company - - . . 152 Hillcrest Florist, Inc. - - . . 160 Hirsch, N, ...... , , 160 Horne Desk St Fixture Co. . . 162 Hubbard Pants Co. --.- . . 151 Hurt and Quin, Inc. - . . 149 lveyis Drug Store . ,167 1 142 "Red" Vogt Auto Service Rogers Stores ----- Schwartz's - ----- 167 159 146 Schwobilt - - 160 Selig Company - - - 148 Sewell Clothes ---- 146 Sewell Clothing Co. - 157 Sewell Mfg. Co. - - - Shafts Men's Shops - - Southern Dairies - - Stewart-Farr Co. - - - 161 153 149 146 Superior Laundry . . . 156 Tennessee Egg Company - - 153 Thomson, NV. D. -------- 150 Tull, J. M., Metal 86 Suppl XValthour and Hood - - XVheeler's Pharmacy - - Whitehall Studios - - - Wrigley Engraving Co. - Yancey Brothers - - - yCo,- 163 145 166 170 171 164 Scenes We See . , .:,,, X, . Theology Building as viewed from corner of Library Unique view of the rear of the Chemistry Building ORKIN EXTERMINATING CO. Incorporated Q PEST CONTROL AND TERMITE SERVICE O WA. 1050 315 PEACI-ITREE STREET compzfmim Of M E L L E N B A T T E R Y COMPANY The Hotel With a Garden Located just outside the city's center of noise . . . 600 outside rooms, each with bath . . . Courteous and efHcient service . . . Ample parking space . . . Popular prices in dining room and coffee shop. RATES FROM S3 One Service for All-The Best ATLANTA BILTMORE Complinzezzfs of NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 202 PEACHTREE ARcADE Luther E. Allen and Associat AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 85 WALTON ST., N. W. ATLANTA, GA. Bibles, Testaments and Portions of Scriptures at cost of production. We handle the Scriptures in 1055 languages and dialects Prized shrine of the campus, Glenn Memoriai Church Il44I SeIcIom taken Emory University Hospital EVANS CLGTHING COMPANY 2 PORSYTH STREET ATLANTA, GA. O C. T. EVANS , X Q A gl ' 'Ti A f X 4 uf TX J I xl I I lm l l 4' 17 I f Q fb N ff, 'I i f if l Ei fl lb 'llll SWING Info the Season WITH GOOD EQUIPMENT If you're an athlete you'll appreciate the advantage of beginning the season in good physical shape . . . you'll also recognize thc value of using d epend a b 1 e equipment. Let TIS 176111 you! FOOTBALL 1 BASKETBALL f WALTHOUR 81 HOOD CO. "Sj201'L's111c'1z's Hczm'q1m1'1fers" BASEBALL AUBURN AND Prwon STREETS MA. 7137-38 TENNIS 1 GOLF 1 BICYCLES LOANS RENTS INSURANCE REAL ESTATE LIPSCOMB-ELLIS COMPANY 88 WALTON ST., N. W. -uf . I N Z?2'f"7"3!f ff' , TS ,ff mf A The remodeled Co-op, scene of many bull sessions and many pleasani hours Along the way 'co ihe Church School Building we see 'Ehis view II451 For Pipes and ' E ' Tobaccos GO TO CLOTHES SCHWARTZ'S 48 FORSYTH ST. Corner Walton 40 MARIETTA STREET D. W. STEWART HARRY L. FARR WHOLESALE COMMISSION MERCHANTS FRUITS cmd PRODUCE ATLANTA, GA GEORGIA STATE MARKET Phones RA. 2103-4-5 f-fi Big Shotsfw Show OFF . i STEWART-FARR CO. Q 1 3 4 i i i Siudeni council's 'Finance commiiiee chairman, Rutherford Poats, does Pasi: siudeni: body president, LeeRoy Walfon, gives Freshman Ed good job of planning and reading budge-ts for Winier Quarter. McDowell a 'Few poinfers about the campus H461 ' 5 I:l471 People: Famous and lnlanubus.. xx ,Sf AKK ,lim Winslow gives forth with a smile after breaking new cross ATO Jack Zumweinkle led his team to set an all-time record for country record and winning a Thanksgiving turkey cross country race THESEUG COMPANY swggigwwggs . DALLAS NEW ORLEANS .. ,... 'iizf . . : E Z E E5E5fiQif?55".-:.:' . ' ,, 5252 55, A 555555. .5ff'f.:, :5? MAN UFACTURER5 i iiiiliiififffziif iilii If :i::::':'i i --"'-- 5:ii:3E 35fiif5f3 i z iifffi . . I ' f552512:fiffiilifi f?Iffif,if2i2?52i?E 1 fig? Floor Fmishes 532 'Qf:f5iffI:gr'3: 4 . , . ' 2355 Cleansers :y-"Az: I :,, Qc::Ti?4y3",'.4 '-.f Waxes EDUCATED THROUGH SAFE, PLANNED SAV- - INGS-Because they save regularly where safety is as- Disinfectants sured and a good return is certain. Accounts insured up to 55,000 by U. S. Govt. Agency. Soaps I . DIRECTORS Insectlcldes Roar. G. LosE JOSEPH DAVIDSON GRANGER 'HANSELL WM. A. HANsELI. C. P. GOREE WILLIAM M. SCURRY HARVEY W. Cox HoI.coMBE T. GREEN ' FULTON COUNTY FEDERAL Savings 8: Loan Association "IN YOUR SERVICE SINCE 1896,' TRUST CO- OF GA- BLDG- Wfrite for Free Booklet N481 Bring us your Kodak Elm for expert developing 8t CORRECT DEVELOPING MEANS BETTER PICTURES ' ' Insurance XEASTMAN KODAK STORES . E7JL'I'jlfbi71g Phozfogmjzbic 183 PEACHTREE ATLANTA 9TI-I FLOOR, STANDARD BLDG. ATLANTA GEORGIA Garlingion-Hardwick Co. ' Il Southern I' A INSURANCE REAL ESTATE Dairigg Z IRE! EAM ' M l. Q 200 Peachtree Arcade Bldg. BONDS LOANS TELEPHONE VERNON 0711 593 GLENN IRIS DRIVE, N. E. ATLANTA GEORGIA ATLANTA GEORGIA Preffy Imogene "Mac" McGibbony makes a hir wifh everyone and Coach Francis Garreii bellows forth some exercise for 'che poor 'fresh especially the meds men and sophomores to do H491 WILLIAM D. THOMSON ATTORNEY AT LAW' CLASS OF 1 895 Suite 1430 Candler Building ATLANTA GEORGIA DUNLAP and COMPANY INSURANCE SINCE 1895 Asa G. Candler, Jr. . . . '99 Henry C. Heinz . . '00 Walter T. Candler. . . '07 Madison S. Massey . . . '24 CANDLER BUILDING ATLANTA GEORGIA QIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIg E E 5 mmm E E I 5 E I 'RPS -63' 5 sa , Xlfiiiil' E E - E E1 E E LEDGED to fine E E cleaning and Iaun- E 2 dry in Atlanta for 2 E more Than half a E E Century . . . E PIEDMONT ....... WA. 7651 5 E CAPITAL CITY ..., .vE. 4711 E 5 TROY ..... ...II-IE. 2766 2 AMERICAN ...... .MA. 1016 2 E GUTHMAN .. ...wA. 8661 2 5 DECATUR DE. 1606 E 2 MAY's HE. 5300 Z 2 EXCELSIOR ....... WA. 2454 E 2 TRIO ,......., vis. 4721 5 ailllllillIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllIllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIE I'Ii3ITIi3hts . Seniors and faculty members make an impressive sight as they line up for Convocation Howard Candler, President Goodrich C. White, and CI1anceIIor Harvey W. Cox pause a moment by the puIpit at Convocation Students and their dates gather around Margaret Speaks, popuIar singer, who made a hit here on one ofwthe Student Lecture Asso- ciation's programs IISOI Complimenzir W HUBBARD PANTS COMPANY BREMEN, GEORGIA Q Manufacturers of MENS AND BOYS PANTS I I BUILDING THE LAWYERS LIBRARY The practice of law is a complicated profession and requires the most exacting of tools. It is the laWyer's business to know the general principles of law fitting any case that might be brought to him. It is the law book publisher,s business to present the tools that will enable the lawyer to apply the general principles in the finest detail. Books of primary importance are the Local Books of the State in which you will practice. THE MOST IMPORTANT GEORGIA LAW BOOKS Code of Georgia Annotated, Georgia Supreme Court Reports, Georgia Court ot Appeals Reports, Digest of the State Reports, p Ingram 81 ParI1am's Georgia Legal Forms, Anno., Redtearn on Wills and Administration of Estates in Georgia, etc. CSold on Convenient Termsj Complete list of Georgia Law Books and prospectus of Code of Georgia Annotated mailed on request. OUR LONG EXPERIENCE IS YOURS EOR TI-IE ASKING THE HARRISON COMPANY L A W B O O K S PRYOR 81 HUNTER STS. ATLANTA, GEORGIA SERVING THE LEGAL PROFESSION FOR MORE THAN THIRTY-FIVE YEARS IIEZI TENNESSEE EGG CO. Wholesale POULTRY - EGGS - BUTTER WALNUT 6775 189 SPRING STREET, S. XV. c R Y s T A L B A T H THE PERFECT ALCOHOL RUB PREFERRED BY NURSES EVERYXVHERE JNO. B. DANIEL, INC. ATLANTA GEORGIA C ach Thomas McDonough has given the aihletic department some much-needed energy LI531 Jimmy Funk finds thai: wrestling with Cliff Harbour is t h 'Fun as he Thought SHAFTS MENS SHOP 20 DECATUR ST. ATLANTA, GA. C. H. SHAFT X . ., f.'.?' 5-IQ! xx. 9 . , 1i.q w, 'X EULA TIME OUT FOR A QUICK-UP! Everybody has to call "time outn on himself once in a while and get a bit of relaxation. When you call -"time outv . . . then's the time to enjoy a quick-up with a big frosty bottle of Royal Crown Cola! You get two glasses full for only five cents-full of the cola that's Best by Taste-Test. So when you take time out for a quick-up reach for a frosty bottle of . . . Q ALQROW EULA N nest nv TASTE-Test IIS-41 Penn Mutual Life Insurance Com pany G A Y C L O T H I N G HURD J. CRAIN X Agency CCM PANY 1510 RHODES-HAVERTY BLDG. ATLANTA GEORGIA 130 WHITEHALL ST. Collzjnlimerzis of ATLANTA, GA. MELBA CAFETERIA Volunteer Bldg. LUCKIE 86 FORSYTH STS. C. C, GUINN ATLANTA GEORGIA on Shell Sigma Nus Buffer Ball beais out some rhyihm for his broihers 'iii Y 5 5 S A i ii A iz Siucleni: body Presiclenf Billy Kirkland among his many 'Easks has a sei G. Bromley Oxnam furnished 'lzhe skudents with much "food for thoughi of books to keep in balance, and Professor Lyle Campbell makes him during his talks for Religious Emphasis Week, keep 'Erack of every penny ' H551 R. K. RAMBO COMPANY 210-211 Walton Building l NVQ. 4492 XVHOLESALE Hofcl and H ospifrzl Limfrzs DIRECT NIILL SI-IIPPERS ATLANTA GEORGIA FULTON SUPPLY COMPANY INDUSTRIAL, TEXTILE, CONTRACTORS SUPPLIES AND MACHINERY MAin 3400 342 Nelson Street, S. W. ATLANTA GEORGIA Freshmen Are Qrientecl . . . Freshmen squirm as fraterniiy men corner ihem to fall: of the "besi 'Fraierniiy in 'che world." V T-ff:-fy I . . f' 9'5' 4""frff.fz--fm., . ' a A2 ,. , V A -43:2 ' f ye '.zw.r- " f - V ' A - V " ," . r' . ' 3 I , my M- - J . v, fm ' 'P' APY'-if 11 . Q TE av' at .43 5 63 ,. . . .fn .:'ff11-.A f ' -'-N , if-'fz .-zsiifilifhxw ,. aVZ"f?r:-11,1 -rr"-'R'-Z? 2 " 11 Q 'M W5 X, ., Ms ff' :as f"'lf:asifff V " ,lf " - WI 1. . V :U 1- 2:-A .Ir f-Y 12 V, .I V sz-42 ' 2. -A , :,:.,3,x.,5f - ,, if 4--4, f -f:1,. VZ, ,yy-,V,r.f - 2, 1: ,:vf..GQ :yf vu' - A. . , ' . 1 ini' -5:2 "4 LE-'2 A -is QW? 11 :T -ff' 'E :xfflfig - ' :mal A- ,Yr t 5 .M 7 V, ,II . Hg : ' . gi . . ,1 : ii fi. " " we' ., -1 V. .- .Am -4:9 - - -- wa- -' .:. 9 M V.:::H frxfffe-5 .:'V:-.,:::.-..-.m .-1-ww .V .. -.,-ge, : dv 1- f V 52: I.-,q.: :.:f:1:V-V-'51,-1--.I..:f,f 'L ff -, .34 in ,' ' V, -' v, - pw' - V .. Wllzvvxsz-W,-,wsffMw,,-0-.1-I, .,w gmvifpf .f -1 .Q-1175.11.9111.-:va-4?.SwYy:+ 'gg-:Ina ' A f . . .. Q-1.44-ref'.f5f ....:!rf.:VP . 'zz 'fir .3 ,T l ' -, Fraiernities seitle clown to re ular life and lf g , reshmen go through 'lzhe misery of Freshman Day. 6 f-xnxx ,N .XIII SUPERIOR LAUNDRY HB7L77CilC'S of Srzzfisfc1c1fi0n', DRY CLEANING HEMLOCK 2296 664 W. PEACHTREE STREET, N. W. l FEDERATED HARDWARE MUTUALS 1600 HEALEY BLDG. LEE D. DAVIS, Mgr. WAlnut 8 2 3 7 .-, 'Silo After the last day freshmen see a change in the front of Alabama Hall. Work begins for the freshmen. Down al: ihe Sig Alph house They must keep far and feathers off of the oft-painied and misfreaied lion. I gedll 91154601 ir SEWELL CLOTHING COMPANY I I I WHITEHALL STREET I 98 BROAD STREET ATLANTA, GEORGIA 'PAUL SEWELLH Around the Quadrangle . .. Established 1896 2 2252- Qgsm we s 'obs' Q X x QNX xx X A . X stirs-Qsxx NN MXN Q X XSXXEL X v-SZSXQX Xxx 9 x 1 9 N x . .. . . fr- Q :-:-. . ,,.,.g.,,f,: , .5- ..: 'E:Er?i:L1:2-R' .-:'s:.s:4'r::s3-F5325rex-. :-:-1-:-:ass ,g!g:g.g'-:g- -'+.. 225:- -,1.1.g,f,4-,'Xy.-.-.-.V:- +:- '+-.'.-- K.-. -. 5:I:3:f2T:3SQ:7"5E5-'51-5713.9.-:W v :-:-:-:f::- New-I-'vz-'-:-' :'?'-'-. ' '-1 '-"Z'a'N Q-.-.-.-r.-:-.--,-.:. t .:.::-: ,gm -.:.:-'-rg:-s3'.f-...:,,,:.1. 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"'f'1 . - -is qu- 'fsif izixi 'QQ C For Slylc, Qualify and Corrr'ct11c's.v A ARKS-CHAMBERS V .ax i The librarys Miss Jemison hands student a book at the main desk in the library. Your Eyesight is Your Most Precious Gift . Consult Z1 competent Eye Physician QOculistj for a thorough eye examination .... When he gives you your prescription for glasses ask him about our reliability and dependable service. WALTER BALLARD OPTICAL co. Dis pe11.si11 g O pzficifms O THREE LOCATIONS 105 Peachtree St. Medical Arts Bldg. W. W. Orr Doctors' Building I l 1 8 Carol Mason, society editor of The WHEEL, pays little attention to Buddy Sears, managing editor. C071Zpli77Z87ZfS of I ATLANTA LINEN SERVICE COMPLIMENTS OF Jack Frost Frosted Foods Distribzrfcrf by CAPITOL FISH CO. WHITEHALL ST., S. W. WA. 2770 C07l1Pli11267ZfS Of P. A. WEBB QW. G. TURNER, Former Manager Now in Servicej Manager ROGERS CHCEIVIORY Supplying Emory Fraternities With Quality Foods PHONE DE. 1663 VMS I I Students find the Physics Iab worIr under Dr. Denny, Dr. McMillan, and Dr. Craven both interesting and difficult. Harvey Parry spends many weary hours in the graduate chemistry Iab. I59 FIoyd KirIcIey gets a Iot of pIeasure when his "quant." experiments work. I A siglni familiar fo many studenis is This one 'of 'che docior and nurse preparing to draw blood 'from a sfudeni free donor. J .A N. HIRSCH Establixberl 1899 WHOLESALE CIGARS, TOBACCO, PIPES, CANDIES AND COCA-COLA 144 MARIETTA ST., N. W. JA. 2976 Artistic Flowers for All Occasions HILLCREST FLORIST, INC. 1003 VIRGINIA AVE., N. E. HEm1ock 3734-5 ATLANTA, GA. ,Ii 01 C. A. RAUSCHENBERG, INC. 0 SURE INSURANCE SINCE 1904 0 15 AUBURN AVE. ATLANTA The Best Dresser! Men Weaif ALBANY COLUMBUS ATHENS LAGRANGE ATLANTA MACON SAVANNAH Marietta girl and Dean Miller's secretary is aitracfive Bebe Moore C pl Of SEWIH MHNIHHEIHHINH EUMPHNY Wh Y ThkfClhg ThkfS zz Phone XVAlnut 146 3 HORNE DESK and FIXTURE COMPANY Good Oflice Furniture 47 PRYOR STREET, N. E. ATLANTA, GA. Fond Memories . . . who is, a a a i m aa, i e i rar a ver easan ace Vi T S S J Y K ytonjagcli :Jn thiir:d"Jlia!i11ll lsliioohngf' Y pl t Pl 15 , ,,., J? 24 Years Expericfzce as Newspaper Staff Phozfogmpbers . . . "lik Krzozuivzg How That Makes the Dijie1'e11ce', 4,,V,, ,. Parents enjoyed meals at 'Fraternity houses up and clown the row on Par . . ents' Da ." H -,-- - . Y ' :iii 'Ii:sIg.::: ,..,. , A. ii i' -1 5' Q-'Y- -15.1, , ,.,.. . .,2.1:g1f1gg:..5g" 'gafrw-FW-'1fzf-s+2"'1-if'af :gg Q' 1 -V-.,, 5 4. ,,, -iw - , - 'f flm ,,..,: pc. 1 . --1 ,s ,,e:.,'-f' ff 1-e fs- ,-A . , , , . . iwegu we ., 551. Y ,., .,.,, . ,,,, ,fQ,.,f ,,,, .4 .,,, ' - A . . A . COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS MAin 25 13 311-313 Peachtree Arcade Building ATLANTA, GA. J. H. LANE W. C. LANE Res-, CR. 1510 Res., MA. 5436 2 The library steps is the scene of many blissful hours spent in the sunshine ancl many conversations over that "Lucky" or Chesterfield. I Q fi llirector of religious life on the campus is Ed Mattingly, who Glee Club songster Jimmy Bowen leads Active and popular Professor W. A. Strozier IS shown a, a friend of everyone on the campus and who has clone a group singing on the campus. here with Carolyn Williams, the Delta Darling wonders in increasing campus interest in religion. Eljer Fine Plzmzbing Fixtures MUTUAL SUPPLY COMPANY Plzmzbivzg :mtl Heating Supplies 144-148 HOUSTON STREET, N. E. N. L. BEALL WA. 3151-3152 Emory Graduates and Undergraduates . . . We join you in acclaiming A GREAT UNIVERSITY FOREMOST DAIRIES, INC. ATLANTA-COLUMABUS-SAVANNAH VALDOSTA Proclucers of PASTEURIZED MILIQ and ICE CREAM 3 GOOD COAL SINCE 1884 CAMPBELL COAL CO. Q 1 0 Yardsj O JACKSON 5 0 0 0 ATLANTA GEORGIA J. M. TULL METAL 81 SUPPLY CO., INC. GENERAL MILL SUPPLIES CORBIN BUILDERS HARDWARE Monel Metal . . . Nickel . . . Aluminum . . . "Shelby" Seamless Tubing . . . Copper .. . Bronze . . . Brass . .. Lead . . . Steel Sheets 285 MARIETTA STREET, N. W. ATLANTA GEORGIA "CATERPILLAR" DIESEL TRACTORS CONTRACTORS' EQUIPMENT ROAD BUILDING MACHINERY YANCEY BROS. INC. 634 Whitehall Street, S. W. PHONE MAIN 3962 ATLANTA, GA- MONTAG'S Fashionable Writing Papers and BLUE HORSE Paper School Goods MONTAG BROS., INC. ATLANTA, GA. QUALITY FURNITURE LOW PRICES EASY TERMS Two Great Stores O ED 84 AL MATTHEWS, INC. 168 EDGEXVOOD AVE., N. E. WA. 2245 O MATTHEWS FURNITURE CO. 86 ALABAMA ST., S. W. JA. 4423 Dr. Ivey shakes up something for students in his drug store, famous for bull sessions, letter reading, and wasting time between classes. Geology student surveys handiwork of Dr. Lester as he studies globe ot the world made by geology department. H641 Students leave Winship on way to post office. fll3ilRillSM7iIB9illQili99S Xp T H E I 9 4 3 128 PINE STREET WALNUT 6453 C A M P U S IS B 0 U N D ' I N A Complete line of WATCHES AND DIAMONDS K I N G S K R A 5: 'I' Exjferzf Rejmiiiiizg W. H. Doosorsi C 0 V E R fcwcfler PEACHREE ARCADE WA1nut 915 6 We Specialize in Repairing 'ur Guiding Liglits . . i Dr. L. W. Bliich has made a hit with slzudents on Dr. R. A. Day, Jr., quiei and unassuming insirucfor Emory's minisier-psychologist is W. Gaiewood his first year up from Emory Junior 'College al: in Chemistry, gives 'Freshmen much help in ele- Workman, who 'reaches difficult courses in boih Valdosta. menlcary cl1emis'cry courses. Bible and psychology. H651 CONSOLIDATED OUARRIES CORPORATION BLAIR BUILDING DECATUR, GA. TELEPHONE DEARBORN 1661 Granite Products CRUSHED STONE All Commercial Sizes GRANITE CONCRETE BRICK U. S. Standard Size Double 8 X 8 Triple 8 X 12 GRANITE CONCRETE BLOCK 8 X 8 X 16 Plant: LITHONIA, GEORGIA Some Popular . DICKEY-MANGHAM CO. INSURANCE - MORTGAGE LOANS - SURETY BONDS 725 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING WA1nut 1541-2-3 WHEELER'S PHARMACY Where Emory Men MEET and EAT PRESCRIPTIONS LUNCHES SODAS DRUGS We Deliver CR. 3811 1238 S. Oxford Rd., N. E 1" X DY- C- E- BOYCII PFOCIUCY of Old EFUOYY af-ward, Dr.-Joseph C. Seibert teaches some olme most Dr. John D. Lee, Jr., smiling and good naturecl AS teaches Greek for the benefit of those who are interesting business courses. sistant Professor of Church History classically inclin ed. 6 Some Tough . . . Dr. W. G. Baker teaches biology the way students like it. Often he keeps labs a half hour overtime, but he keeps students interested. "RED" VOGT Q4 Hour Automobile Service S65 SPRING STREET, N. W. l'lEmloclc 5653 ATLANTA, GA. 7 HARRY F. DOBBS, INC. Hotel SZlfJfIliUS . . . RCSfdZl1'd71f Eqzzijmzmzf WA. 445 1 240-44 Ivy Street, N. E. ATLANTA GEORGIA For Years . . . Wfhere Emory men meet Emory men lVEY'S DRUG STORE Soda - School Supplies - Tobaccos R. C. Rhodes is a ranking, Southern biologist and is v popular with all the biology students. Uizziszuzl facilities for FRATERNITY BANQUETS . . . and . . . OTHER GATHERINGS, plus excepzfioizczl service. Please look over our facilities before deciding Where to stage your next affair. ANSLEY HOTEL L. L. TUCKER, JR., MANAGER A Diizkler H oiel Some Pop Quiz liienols. C0llIp1i'l7lC"77fS of GARDEN HILL CLEANERS 2817 PEACHTREE ROAD CI-Ierokee 1727 SAM M. PAUL H CARSON 81 DOBBINS Geizerill Agemfs Aetna Life Insurance Co. 8 01-11 William-Oliver Bldg. Dr. W. H. Jones, lanky Associate Professor of Psychology's own Dr. H. W. Martin, fondly known The Business School's Lloyd C. Alkema IS noted 'For Chemistry, teaches hard courses and does research as "Silva," makes his courses very popular among his hard courses. Friendly and good natured h I work. the students. wants his students to become good business men 8 iititiiiitiitiittiiktikiikitiiiiiittititi ERT ' f S 'IJ -' Q v 5 i W2 , li EMORY UNIVERSITY ATLANTA, GEORGIA HARVEY W. Cox, Ph.D., LL.D., L.H.D., Cbimcellozf GOODRICH C. WHITE, Ph.D., Presiclezzzf EIVIORY UNIVERSITY iziclzizles flue following clivisions: 1. THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES CEITIOFY Collegej, founded in 1836 I. I-Irzrris Pizrlzs, Ir., Pb.D., Deniz, Hollis Ezlcns, M.A., Associate Demi.. The Col lege offers exceptional opportunities for specialization in the Liberal Arts and 1n such professional fields as Education, Engineering, and Public Affairs Qjournalism and Public Servicej. 2 THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, organized in 1919. Robeit I C. Mizell, B.Pb., Acfiug Deniz, I-IollisAEalr'ns, M.A., Associafe Demi. 3 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL, organized in 1919. I. Harris Pzirks, jr., PAD I A cling Dean. 4. THE SCHOOL OE TI-IEOLOGY QThe Candler School of Theologyj, organized in 1914. Henry B. Trimlrlc, B.D., D.D., LL.D., Dean. 5. THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE CThe Atlanta Medical Collegej, founded in 1854 Russell H. Oj1,l1erzbci11zc'1', M.D., Dean. 6. THE SCHOOL OE LAW fThe Lamar School of Lawj, organized in 1916 Charles Hilkey, Pb.D., j.D., j.S.D., Dean. 7. THE LIBRARY SCHOOL, organized in 1905 as the Library School, Carnegie Library of Atlanta, afhliated with Emory University in 1925. Tommie Dom Bczrkcfr, Liff.D., Donn. .... ' 8. THE EMORY UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL CWesley Memorial Hospitalj, on the main campus in Atlanta, with a training school for nurses. Robert S. Hurlgens M.A., S1ipe1'i11femle1zzf. 9. EMORY AT OXFORD, offering the first two years of college Work and college preparatory courses in the modernized plant of old Emory College at Oxford, forty miles east of Atlanta. George S. Roach, A.B., Division Executive. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ADDRESS J. G. STIPE, Dizfeczfor of ACI17ZISSI0lZS EMORY UNIVERSITY, GEORGIA tiititttiiiitttiiiittiitttiiiiiWkttititit H691 WAollofzaVyaA4 foe Me . . . 1943 EHIHPUS ff ,if 6 THE UIHUITEHHLL STUDIOS ,I--N., "5 M az:-M , . . .- 'fwfr-A -..Q ,, I I - H X . .WS A X I f QllICL R!W D f av 1 . X In .Xxx . , lv XX xfwa 'xi ,. Q VA , X ., ,Q w-,M ""-fm, ., .. h WM .N , ,N If . If I l A SUCCESSFUL ANNUALS Require the services of experienced and expert craftsmen, trained in every detail of the processes of creating'planning layout and design - typesetting-printing lithographing and binding . . . Through- out llalf a century this company has pioneered h1the producHon ofthe highest type of printing...Uur services include a special college annual sales and service organization . . . Abundant equhnnentqnodern and conqMete.H Prices representing maximlun in value SK FUUTE 8: DAVIES PRINTING 0 LITHU GHAPHINH ' ENGHAVING A T L A N T A H721 Activitgs . Advertising . Alumni . . Athletics Business School . 'iCAMPUS,,' The 1943 College, The . . Dooleyis Diary . Events in Retrospect TABLE CDF CCDNTENTS PAGE 45-64 . 143-FF . 29 . 115-129 . 24-28 . 54-55 . 8-23 . 130-142 . 81 Graduate School I-lonoraries Law School . . . Letter from the Editor Library School . Medical School . Nursing School . PAGE . 40 65-80 38-39 . 1 . 41 30-34 42-44 Fl.'3tCl.'111t1CSi Our. Deans ' ' 5 Medical . . 108-114 0'-if FHCUIW - - 6-7 Social . 82-107 Theology School . 35-37 Ackrrly, Ernest .... ...YY.,.YYYV,..v..VV,Y...V 2 0 Beam, lfurrcst , ,.,,..,....,.,,,.,i.,... ..,,.. 1 3, 101 Brown, jack N. ., ,.,,,,.,,,,,. Clary, ,Iamcs C. .,.. r......,.. - Adair, Irving ..,....... -, ......VYA. A ..V..YY.... 26, NT Human, Charles G., jr. .....,. ..,,., ,,., 3 6 Brown, Kathleen ,.,..., , .....,..ie.,........ Clary. W. Upron ................ 33, 43, 99, 110 Ad3mS,'Cl12flCS P. ..,. .....Y,,. I 3, 37, 60, 76 liuaslcy, Erncsr William, jr. , ,,,,A,,,,,,,,r Brown, Lcdlcy N. ,r.. .,..,,, 1 3, H7 Clayton, M. Dexrcr ,,,,,,,,,,,A,,,,Y ,A,,, 4 , Qvlw Y Adams, G. Walter . .........,... rw- ,...,....... llcckcr, Harold Leigh, jr. ,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,, B r own, Leelloy ....,,,,..,.... i.......,,.,,.,, C lunvcland, john Pearce ,WH ,,,,,,, ,,9, 99 Adams, Hammond .... ....,.i, 3 6 70, lOl Beckham, Charles M, Mm ,i,, ,,,,, , 15, 101 Brown, Piorponr If, mow, ,i,,,,,,..,1.. - Cline, Peter j. ,,,,,1,,,,,,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 777720, 95 Adams, Guy H. ....... ,..,... - ..,....Y 32 Bell, I-l. Vincent, jr. ,,.,.,,,,, 33, 110 Brown, William Hadley ...,. ......, 2 S, 74 Cobb, Cloud Pope, jr. .,,, -,,,,,M,,,,,,,,, Adams, Oscar S. ,.c....,..........,. ,,..... 2 0, 91 Bull, Inn G. ,W ,.,,,,,,., , ,,,,.,,,.,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,, .,1..,. . Browne, R. Alexander ,,,i,,... , .......,,.,,....,...... Cobb, Peggy ,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,, 4, ,,,, Adams, V. Emory, Jr. .- .........,i,,,,,..,. 9, 95 Bull. J. Mac, jr. ,....,....,..,...,,,,. 52, 99, 110 Bruce, George A. ,,,,,, ,. .,................,,..,, 17 Coburn, joseph D. ..... - ,,,,,.,,. - ...,,,.. -13, 95 Aiken, Frances ..., - .,.i..,.... ....,. - .........,.....,.Y,., l Sunnctt, Edmund Dcllcrry , ..,, ,.,, - Brumby, William E. ,,,,, ,,,,.... 2 6, 99, 116 Coburn, Nclle ,,,,,, , .,,.,, -,,,.,,.,,,,,,,,,,, Ainsworth, W'illinm L. ,,,, ,,., 3 l -IS 97, llll Bennett, lv.m L., jr, Brunggn, G, Eugcnu , ,,,,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Cochran, Bob ,,,,,,, ,,,,m,, A-MH.,-,, Akins, Charles L. ,,,., - ..........,,,,,,., C ,...,,,, 2s 9, 47, 49, 55, 64, 67, ss, 69, 70, .Ol Bryan, Fi-ink M, ,,,,,,,,,,, V- ....,. -.l7, 99 Cody, Peggy ,,,,.,.i..,,.,,,,,,, ,,,,,,, M -,,,,,,,, Aldcmlcrfcr, Franklin NV. , ...,,, 20, 95 Bennett, james William ,,,,,,, ,. ,,,, , .,,,, 13, 99 Bryan, George W. ,,.,.,,, , ,,............... 17, 99 Cofcr, Harland E., jr. -..N ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, W Alexander, Ben ...,..,- ...., .,.,,. - ,,,.,...,.,.,, B cnnctt, XVillinm C, ,,,,,,,,,,,, -1.,,,l3, -19, S9 Bryant, Henry I-I., III ,,,,,,,,,, 33, 101, 108 Coffee, Archie Thomas , ,,,,,,,, 33, 95, 110 Alexander, Louis M, ,... .,.,.,l3, lOl Benson, XViIliam H., -Ir. ,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,, 3 I Buchanan, L, C, .,.,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,,..,. 9 Coicr, Bob ,,,,,,,,, - ,,,,,,, ,, ,,,,,,, ,, ,,,,,, ,,,,,,,17, 99 Alexander, Paul B. ..... ........ 2 0, 103 Benton, Curtis D., jr. .,,,,,.,,,.,,,,..... 34, 110 Burden, Lee I-Iugli ...,,.,,,.,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 27, 91 Cogburn, Lucy ....,.,.,. - ..,,,.., ,. ,,,,,..,,,, WSW, Alexander, Tom S. V- .,,..., ,.,.r,. B cnton. Stanley Theodore ........... - ...,... - 37 Burdette, H. Spinr ., ...,.-,2S, 64, 74, 99 Coggins, Reber: P. C ...... A .... 17, 71, S3, E9 Allen, Dale ..-. ......... ....,,....,.. B crgmnn, Burton B. ,,..... f, ,..... I3, 107 Burdervc, Margaret ..,......, -WC ,,,,,,..,,,..... Cohen, Gilbert ....,... .......-,,,,,.-,,,,,.117, 85 Allen, Dorothy M. ,. licrgmnrk, Robert E. ,,,........,.,.,.......... -,. 9 Burgzimy, Clyde A. ,,,,.,. .......,,,, 2 O, 60 Colbert, Ralph ......,,... gh .... -....,.-,.,26, S7 Allen, Edwin XV. ... .... ..... Berman, Jerome David ..- ....,,. ..,, ..., 20, 25 Burge, Dan C. N ,.,,,,.,.,,,,,, ,,,..... J I, IOS Coleman, Bill Edgar ,.,.-,,,,d,,,-.20, 95 Allen, Glenn C, ..... ........,.......... B crry, Roy E. ....,..................,..........., 13, 76 Burgess, Lula MM, ,,,,,, C ,,,..,, - ,.......,..,,,,... , Coleman, Thomas Henry, jr. M., ,,,, 23, 91 Allen, J. Norman ..... ......., 2 0, 99 Berry, Sam XV., jr. ,.... -C,..,..,..., .,,.. ..,. B urgmnn, Burton B. ,,,, .... ....,..,,,., C ollcy, Lnurcttc .,,... ..,,,..w ,,,.,. , 1.,,, Allen, J. Reynolds .- , ...,.,,. ,20, S9 Betlacri, Fred ....,...... ........ Burkhalter, james H, ,,,,,,, , ,,,, ........,.,...,, C ollins, J. Frank , ,.,,,,,... - ,,,,,,,, ---,20, 95 Allen, Tom S. ...................... C..- ......,....... , Biclicrs, Donald S. .........,............ -.-.35, 112 Burkhart, Dorothy H. .... , ....,.,..,.,.... 9, 40 Colquitt, XVilmer ......-,.,..,-.,,,,...,,..,,-,,- Allgood, H. Pierce .. ,..,., -..... ..., .32, 110 Bigelow, jerry R. ,... .. ,...,.. - ............ 17, 95 Burnerre, jack ,.,,.,,.,.,,,,,. W, 101 Cone, john Fletcher ,,.. ..,,,,, ..,.,, , ,17, 101 Allison, j. Hcrmon, jr. - ......,. - .....,... ..... - .... B iggcrs, Bascom Hill, Ill Mi..- ...... Burnctrc, john M., Jr. ,.,. ,,,,,,,,, . ,...... . Conley, joseph Morgan ,,,, .,,,, ,,,,,,9, 60 Anderson, Clyde F., jr. ..., ..-.- .,,, 20, 97 Birdsong, Ralph Harrison -......,26, 70, 74 Burns, E. C, .,,..,,..,.......,.... 95 Conn, W. B. .C .... ..,---......-,-,,-...w-,. Anderson, Dan C. .....,... - ,.... 17, 70 76, 101 Bishop, Harold Arthur, jr. .,,.,,,,,,.. 26, 95 Burson, E. Napier, jr, .. ...., -. 110 Connell, Mrs. Lamar L. ..,....... ,.,..,....,i, Anderson, E. Catherine .,,...- ........, , .......... Bixlcr, Thomas jenkins .,.. 31, 95, 110, 117 Butler, Patricia ,,,,... -.- .. .....,..,,,...,,,, Conner, James S., jr. .. ...... ,.,.- ...... -.,.-..,,, Anderson, Horace Morgan ... ........ W... 32 Black, james G., Jr. ..... M, ..... .....,26, 103 Butscli, Charles XV, W, ,,,, - .... ,,....,.....,..,.... C onnolly, Wfilliam Sullivan - ..,.. -...,,., Anderson, J. Thomas .,...,,, , .,.,... ,..,... - ...... B lncli, Lassie G. .......... --M.,-.. ..,.,..,. -,,..-.. Burtr.-im, XVilliam R, ,,,,...,....,,,. - ...........,,.,,,. Cook, Anita - ,...... -..... ...... ..--........-..--.,.. Anderson, james Leland, jr ........... - ........,... Blackburn, Robert M. ..,... -.-.- ......., 37, 47 Byrd, jack E. .,.-.,.- ,..,. -Wo ............. 17, 99 Cook, E. Richards ...- .... .31, 48, 93, 108 Anderson, XVilliarn R. ....,.,. - ............., 13, 101 Blackman, William P. .-,.,- .... - ........... -W Byrd, Robert B. ,...,.. W ..,.. -W17 S9 Cook, George Philip ,,-,-,,,,-.,....20, 103 Andrews, Agnew, jr. ..,......... - ...... ..13, 89 Blackwell, Edwin ... .,....... --,,,9, 68, 70, 74 Cook, jacob Hoover ..... ,,....-..-,..-..-,..- Andrews, Robert james .... - ..., ..,....27, 103 Blnis, Michael R. .., ....,... ..- ,.....,....,,...,.,...,.,. Cady, Annie Belle ........ ,.... .......,,,,,,...,.,...... C 0 Ok, Thomas McBride, Jr. ,....--... ., Anthony, Sarge H. ....-,..- .... - ...... - ....,. 34 Blake, j. NVicl1crs, Jr. ..... .....-20, 76, 101 Caldwell, H. Eugene - ,..... .. ...,....,.. 28, 95 Coolidge, C. XVnlter ..-....-,,....--,,13, 99 Archer, Roy Beckwith ,,,,,,,,,.,,.. - .... ....- ...... .. Blake, Watson ...-... ...,. C.. .... .. .... - ..., , ...... - Callahan, Dan ,,,,. - ,,,.. ........- ........... I7 Corbin, Charles A. .-.....,.........-,,-...,.... Armstrong, Charlton Preston, Jr. 31, 110 Bland. Minnie Lee - ,...,. - ,..... - .................. - Callaway, E. jordan ,.........,... 34, 79, 110 Cordcs, john H., jr. ......-- .... -.31, 110 Armstrong, Arthur M. ....- .... - .... - ....,...,,., Bliss, Frank Walker, jr. .,,............ .20, 91 Calloway, jane - .... - ....,,,,.. - ,.,........................ Cordes, Philip B. ..- ..... -...-- ...., 9, SB, 91 Arnold, Carl Jackson, Jr......,....,....13, 95 Block, Jerome G. ..,,-.-..- ,... A- ,.,.,,, 13, 107 Campbell, Decatur B., jr. .... ,,40, 7S Coret, Irving Allen ,... -..-..-- .... ,...... Arnold, Herbert L. w,.,.,,..-.-34, 95, 110 Blood, Arthur McCary ,W ,,,,,. WH..- ,,,,.. - .... - Campbell, Elmer B., jr. W ..........,... - ,,.,........ Corley, NVilliam C-.- .....,, --.- ..... -..Z7, 103 Arnold, Zack M. ---...- ...., WM..- ......,. - ........ Blooclworth, J. M. Burrow, jr ..,,, 20, 103 Campbell, j. Edward ,..... - Corvette, T. T. - .........,.,,, --,.-..--9, 101 Ashcndorf, William -...,,..-.--- ....,.,...,...... Boatright, Clem ..... - .... - ........ -..,- ........ 20, 87 Cnmpbcll, Richard ......,,.. Cownrt, G. Thomas .... --....-...-....-.---... Ascers, Constantine A. ......-.-.- ..,,,....... Boller, Ann jones - ....... -,. -. ....... - ...,... - Campbell, Roy E. .. ,.,.. 2. ...... Cox, Paul E. -M ........ -mm ....... 17, 71, 75 Atkins, Ernest C. -,....-......-.v...13, 103 Boney, Madeline -..,,- .... -...--. ........ -..- Campbell, Clifton - ..,.., ,,.H-... ....... Cox. Roy Linton, jr. ..-.-...,..........-....--- Atkins, james T. .....,.....- ..... --.20, 97 Boone, Norman U. ....,.... -,.- ........... 2 .... 36 Candler, M. Louisa ..,,,....... 40 Craig, Ora H. .22 ............. ,............-.,.-., Atkinson, Harrie: .-,....,- ..... ..-...-,,H.,- .... Bowden, Betty R. .... .. .,.... A ....,..........,... ........ C arlton, james C. ..... 2 ...... ,. ,....,..... 87 Cramforcl, Clifford ...-.-..- ...... -......--.-- 39 Atkinson, Ralph W. ,.,.,...,-.-,,... ............ Bowen, James L. ....,.- .... ,......27, SS, 95 Carmichael, Chelsea W. ...,..... 2 . 20 Crank, john C. .......... 2 ..... -....--H,.i3, 87 Atkinson, Wade .-...,.,..,....,..25, 74, 99 Bowers, Frank A. ........ 2 ............ 20, 97 Carmichael, Florence Clayton ....... Craven, Leon J. .,....... ..,,- .... --.-....25, 101 Avcrbach, Sam M.- ..... -mm ......... 1 .... 27, SS Bowie, Carroll Wendell ..... .............,. 1 3 Carr, Adeline .,.,...,. ............... 2 .... . .-,. Crawford, Joe Myrick ...-,, -.-20, 95 Aucrcmann, Charles Emile ,, ....................... Boynton, M. T., jr. ....- ..... 2 .20, 87 Carruth, Edward H. ........ .... 2 Crenshaw, Albert D. ..---.-.-.....-.,--- Augustine, LaVerne M1- .... -..-...- .... Boye, Lee Olin ..... M .... 2 ..... , ......... ........ 3 6 Carruch, W. Carlton ...... .................... C Lcnslmw, Andrew Hoyt ,,-...- ...... Avery, William G. -,.,..,.--.-..n..- .... -.. Boykin, Fred .... NW..- .... - - .... .... . .2 ....... Carson, E. Howard 2 ...... 101 Crenshaw, ,lolm W. ........ ...... . ...-,..-17, 10' Boyle, john j. ....,.. - .......... ..,. , .,27, 89 Carter, Hal B. ........., ,. .,,. ., 87 Crigler, Mary S. ........ 2222 ..... Babb, Herbert E, --,d,t,,,,,..,,.9, 80 Bozeman, W. Scott ---W W. .......... . 37 Carter, NV. julian ................ 105 Cronemiller, George R. ...... -..........-..- Baggs, Wade H., Jr, -..-.1..,33, 93, 108 Bradley, Homer H., II 2 ......... .............. 1 7 Cartledge, Andrew Cosby ..... 95 Crumblcy, Thornton Avkcw ...... ...- 13 Bailey, Carrol F. ,,..,.. ...M.-.-- .... - ...,... 17, 70 Bradley, Patil L. ....... 2.2 .......... 31, 89, 110 Cason, Christine M. 22 ....... .... Crowder, joseph Scott ..- ....... HW ..--.- Bailcy, Charles D. ......,.. ,- .... 2 .... - .............. Branan, 'William Clarnnce ........... 2 ....... 20 Cnson, Frank A. ................ 9 Crumbley, Carolyn ,,.-.-... 2222 ....-....--- Bailey, j. Leo ..- .,,, -,,,,.,, ,... 2 .........,... 37, 62 Brannon, Edmund A ..... 31, 68, 69, 87, 108 Caro, Robert E. ...... - .,.,....., 93 Culpepper, Caughcy .......... ,- .... 2 .... ---.-.. Bailey, Richard 2 2.,. 22 ,.,. .,....... 2 0 Brannon, Fred R. ...... - ................. -...-... 20 Cauble, George C, ,.- ...... 2 ..... 33 Cumbnn, Bill P. .......... 9, 67, 75, 52, 101 Baker, A. Melron, Jr. .2 ......................,........ Branliam, Lee, Jr. ....... 2 ..... 2 ............ 2 ............ Caudle, Rochnrd Sporgcon ...-. .... Curry, joseph ..... 2 ........ --..-.......---.-.---- Bakcr, joseph Edwin, Jr, 2 .................,. - ..... Brantley, Max E. .... .-.,-...- ......... 2 ..., 17, 99 Chambers, George E. --.M Curtis, E. L. ...... .....r - D-----Y-.- 20 Baker, Roy M. ...--..- ........... 2 ....... 20, 107 Braselton, john O., Jr. .... 25, 49, 74, 99 Chambers, Twila 2 ....... Custer, Ruth S. - ..... -...-1-...-Y--- Bukcr, Warren D. .... .... 2 ..... 2 ......... 2220, 95 Brawley, William G. .-..-.... ...... 2 ...... - .... 2 Chancey, Robert ..,.. .-. .... Barbcr, XVilliam Hugh - ....... - ............... 37 Braurier, Darnell L. ......... 22 ................. 2 ..... Chapman, Cy Miller . ..... .... D aniel, C. Amond -.- ..... --Wulf, 83, 103 Barlicld, Tommy .,-,.,,,, .... 2 C .,,,.,.. 27, S7 Bray, Dolph, jr. ...... -.... M.- .... 2 ,... 32, 108 Chapman, john C. .... 2 ........... 95 Daniel, Nancy ........ -..-..-.i--..--...--- Barficld, William E. 2 ..... W, .....,.,.... 34 Brazzcnl, Richard T. ....................... 20, 91 Chapman, NVilliam Edwin ....... ....... ........ D n nicl, William R. ......... M ........ -----29, 57 Barker, XV. J., jr ...... 2 ........ 2...,,................ B regman, Larry ...,,..,,,.......... 9, 68, 70, 107 Chen, Vung Tsung .... ......., ...........,........ D n niel, Xvilliflm Wright ..-.- ------ -59, 95 Barnes, Duell B. .... 22 ..... 22 ....... .... 2 S, 99 Breinin, Goodwin M. ............. -,32, 107, 114 Chentoff, Edwin F. .......... S5 Daniels, Eb, HI ,-.---..-..- ..-..... 20 Baronovitz, Jack ..- ........ 2 ........,....... 2 ...... '17 Bridges, Carolyn ...... .......... 2 .................. C herry, Francis Lamar .... Daniels, Edffi H .... .... A ...-...f-W.----in 13 Barron, Lindsey H. -- ...,...... -.26, 83, 101 Brock, Alva M. ........ -.. ............. 2... 20 Cheshire, Herbert W. ........ l7 Darden, M0rriS .........----------- -- ---- ---17, 99 Barrow, J. Gordon ........ -.-.-...32, 91, 112 Brockman, Charles J. .............,.... - ........ 20 Chesky, Kenneth ..- ...... .M ........ ...... ...... . . Davenport, D. Dcnby ----------,W--Y-J', 79 Barrow, james Howell, Jr. --...-. ...... 9, 79 Brooks, Betty ..., ,,....,,..........Y.... - ...................... Childs, Edward Ainsworth ......... 108 Davidson. John K. M- --.--.-- --.34 99, 110 Bnsinski, Eugene R. ..- ,,,.,.,..,,..,.. 9 60, 79 Brooks, Carlton P. ..- ,..... - ..... - ..... 9, 60, 76 Childs, G. Burke, Jr. ............ . ....... 20, S7 Davidson, LCG .....--.- -A-----W ---- -------1----W Baskin, Betty ......... - ..,.... -- ....,.. - ......,,.....,,...... Brooks, Courtney C. -,.- .... - .... - ,... --N ....... Chisnell, Robert Emmett ..... 97 Davidson. Roy, Jr- .--- --.-i----- Bass, Emory P. ..-...........- .,.,..,.......,,., -.. 20 Brooks, Martha ...........,.. -...-...- .............. - .... Christian, Gilmer G,, jr. 87 Davis, lumen Jr- ----,.------- -------------N Bates, George D., Jr. Brooks, Otis C. ......... Cm-.- ....... - .... - .,....... Clark, Bob A. ....... - ........,..... 39 Dnvif, J- Edmund --..- ---A----t-31, UZ 26, 47, 54, SS, 69, 70, 74, 83, 95, 116 Broyles, Katherine ...- ..... - ,.......,. .. ........... -,.. Clark, Elizabeth Bcird ......l.......... 40 Davis, 1311125 W- ----- -------- - ------ 39 Bates, John ....... - ....,,......... - ,.... -...40, 77, 95 Broward, Alden ...............,........,, 17, 70, 103 Clark, Emory F. ........ - .,... ........ 9 , 60, 78 Davis, Lucy -,--- Y f-----, - ------ ------ f------- Battlc, Irwin C.- ..................,.......,..,,.........,.,..,. Brown, Charles E. ..,- ...,... 31, 68, 72, 93 Clark, Marie ....,, , ........... -..- D avis, Pillll fi------ M ---- ----------- Battle, Robert W. .- ..... 9, 47, 49, 56, S9 Brown, George M. .. ....... - ...,,,. - ,.................,. Clarke, James W. ..- -- Day, D. KCi!l1 -4------- H731 CAMPUS DIRECTORY Dean, Austin l. .. .. .. 10 om, Bill 1. ,, J ,,,,, 1.1. as Dean, Hal L. .. . ... .. vv.V 15, 105 Deesc. E. lirank ., ., ..,, 5-i dc Garis, Irving, Jr. ,. .-,.. DcLamotu:, Roy C. L., .. Dcllinger, O. D. 17 DcLoach. Jeanc ...L ,,,, L .,.,,,. ..--.---H Demos, Anthony N. ....l3, 77 Denham, Sam VY. .- ....... ..., , ...l3, 101 Dennis, David v..,, - ..,,.........vV.V .. ....- 17 Dennison, David B. ..-,... ii...,.. 53, 99, U0 Dennison, Jean E. ..L.L-..-W .YYVVVV. -.-.-.-W-- Dickens, Charles H. - ......Y L YYY,,Y YYYY..V . 77, 95 Dickens. Newton B. .....-YY---- fm- ----f-'--v A---- Dicltsun, Duke N. .....L-.,...-.. ........ 27, 101 Dickson. Warren C. cfm..- ....A-.- 9, 30, 97 Dietrichs, Donald .......... ..-..l7, 73, 91 Dimmock, Avary, Jr. L ,.........-... - .....-. -.--- Dixon, P. K. .L ,.,.. -..-..........Y.,..- ...--. --------- Dodys, Angelo ............ Y., ..... - ..........-.--- --- Doggett, William Edward, Jr. .... --.-.- Domingos, Angus B., Jr. L ,..,,. 13, 58, 91 Domingos, Richard Burden .... - .......... 23, 99 Doremus, Ogden .. ....... -...- ............ 9, 76, S9 Dortch, Frank E. Vw-- ...........-.-..-.-- 20, 93 Doss, Noble Camp ,.-..-- ...... - ........-. 17, 93 Dougherty, John E. of ..... ... ...A..-- 17, 101 Douglas, William .-.- .............----.--.- 13, 27 Dowda, F. NV. .... - ...... .. ....... .... ..----.--- 2 0 , S9 Dowc, Irene ............... ...-.... .... 7 ..-.--.. - --..-------- - Drcizin, Isaac -.,.-.... ........ A ..... 21, 57, 35 Driver, B. C. wc-- ..-........ Y, .--1 - ------f-.---- ---- Driver, L. Rowe, Jr. ..- ......... -.35, 95, 110 DuBose, Anne .L .... ...... W ...A -.-----.-- - --,,- A--M Duck, David Alfred ....,........... ....... ..... . . .- Duggan, Arthur .... -..- .......... 71- 74, 93 Duggan, Francis R. .... ..- ........ ....-....-.--- 2 7 Duke, Whatley .- ........... .. ...... .r... ..... 3 4 , F7 Dunagan, Wiilliam G. ...... ------- 9 , 62 Dunaway, Matson .......... - ....... ..........-..---.- Dunbar, Walter Soler ..,.. ............ - .... ...- Duncan, Joe D. ...- ,,........ r.... - .I3, 97 Duncan, Roy G. .... ....... .-4----- l 7, 99 Dunn, Ben M. ................. ----------------- - Durden, John Gresham .... ....-.-------- . -- Durdcn, Robert F. ....,,,,,.. ,..,,... 2 1, 93 Durham, Mary B. ........... -1------.-------- - Durham, W. Fay ...-,.... ..... Durling, Dorothy ........ - ...r.. Dunn, Benjamin Meeks .. ...,,.. Easley, Curran S. ..... - .............. -. ....1-....-- - Eaves, Robert F. ....-...-........ ................. Eby, George W. ..A.................A................. 27 Edgerton, Milton Thomas-..33 68, 89, 110 Eiseman, Margaret ..- ,....... .. ........................... . Elam, William C., Jr. ...... ........ 9 , 57 Elliot, Bill .......... -..-...- ......... . ........ Elliot, Julia ...... .....:..- ....... Ellis, Mathew NV. ..... .... .... . ..... I 5 Ellis, Mildred M. .. -..V Ellis, Minnie A. .... Ellis, Troy, Jr. ..L .... . ....... . .. Ellmore, Emory S. ........... ..................... Eppcrson, Georgia ... ..,... .. ........ - ................ Epstein, Jerry B. .... ..-- ........ --..28, 57, S5 Erwin, Goodloe, ..... ....... 32, 48, 63, 99, 110 Erseman, Margaret ...-- ............ ..... - .- ........ Estes, Gloria ........... - ........ - ......... ..... Eychleshimcr, Thelma .,...... ...... . . ........ .. Evans, Minnie Lee -...-..- ......... - ...... .. 40 Evatt, Agnes ..... .. ..,.............. - ....... ...A. 4 3 Ewing, Oliver Newton, Jr. ............ . .... .. Ezell, Luther McCord ........ . -..- Fabian, Leonard M. ...... - ........ . ..... I3 Fackler, XV. Byron, Jr, 33, 68, 89, 110 Fancher, James K., Jr. ..... - ............. 13, 93 Farrill, Gene ...... - ...... -.-..- ........................... . Farris, John Jackson ....... .......... . ............... . Feder, Virginia ....... ... .... - ............. . .......... Feely, Oscar Floyd, Jr ......... 27, 70, 101 Fcldcr, Louis H. ....... -.-..-. ...... .. ................ .. Felty, Beverly .... ............... -. ....... ..... . .. 37 Few, Tom P. ..................... ........ Fetz, R, H. ,.,,,,,, ,..,,.,,.,. ,.,. ,..... . . ...,.... ...,... Finch, George G., Jr. .......... - ....... -,.21, 103 Finchell, Allen Richard .,..........,...,............. Firth, Warren A. ........................ 17, 49, 62 Fitterman, Israel ,.,,...... ............ 17, 85 Pitts, Howard F. ....,. ...................... Fitzpatrick, NVilliam ..... ............... Fleming, Sydney ...........,.... .................. 2 I Fletcher, Clifford Jack ............................ 21 Fletcher, Jack XV. .. ...................... 13, 73, 97 Fletcher, Thomas Bert, Jr. .....,.. 31, 112 Florence, Donald C. ............. - ................ ..... . Florence, Thomas James .... ...- .... 32, 68 Floyd, XVilliam Person .... ................. L ...... Flowers, Az ...L ........... - ............... 27, YS, 95 Flowers, G. Roderick ................. Floyd, W. P. ,, ,,.,.,,..,......... ....... .. ....,. Flurry, R. C. ....................... ................. . Folger, John Kenneth ... .................. 13, 91 Forbes, G. Lester -.- ...,................... ..17, S9 Forrest, Carroll T. , ....... 25, 49, 50, 74, 99 Fortinberry, Sheldon B. ....,......................... - Fortncy, Austin Powell ,.,................. .- 10 Foster, G. Robert ......... ..... ......... . - 4 Foster, Ralph H. ,.,, .. ........ .. .......2l, 99 Fotts, Howard T. ...- ................................. Fountain, T. Gray ...,.. M..- ....... 13, 49, 91 Fourtney, Austin ......... ....... -..N ............... Fowler, XVallace F. ...,.. .. ....... -.. ............ .. Francis, Geraldine .... ...,.... ........... . Franco, Aron ........... -..- .... ..... 2 S lClass and Fraternity Sections Franco. David ll. .... -....- ................ ....- ZS Franklin, Ben T. .,..-,- .......... -..--l-1-, 95 Franklin. Benjamin ...--...., ....... .3Z, 114 Frederick XV, XY'ood, Jr. .... --.17, 103 Freedman Jack D. ..-....- ..... .. .... -,Z1, S5 Freedman, Sidney .... .....- ..,. L. ..... -...... Freeman, Edward Rutledge LLL., .... L..L.- Freeman, James C. .,,,-,...........1-4, 60 Freeman, Olen I. ......- .................. -.21, 97 Freeman, Tom R. ..--..32, 99, 110, 117 Fritter, Albert N, .... A-.-..-..- ..... -...... Fryga, Michael B. ... ...... .. ....... .... .L :6 Fuller, Bob ...c-.....- ...... ....-.......27, 103 Fuller, James Robinson .L..L .... ..- .-.L ....... .. Fuller, R. M., Jr. .....- .... -.-.. .... 17, 103 Fulton, Thomas S., Jr. ,......-...-l-4, 57 Funderburk, NV. Cornelius, Jr. 10, 78, 101 Punk, David C. -..L ....... .....14, 49, 93 Funk, F. James .... L ...... MALL- ...... .. ......... .- Galloway, Olive .....,.. L..L.-- ...... -.. .......... .. Gamble, John R., Jr. .-.-..- ......... 10, 93 Gandy, Lucille .... ....... -..... ......... ....... L ..... . Gardner, Ann ........ ...- ..... L ......... ..... L ........ Garner, Gladys L .... -..- ..... -..- .......... -......--- Garner, Robert Athel ....-..- .......... 17, 101 Garrett, Francis Leonard ....,.,,. ......., ,,......,. Gary, Henry Hamilton ..- ............ . ..... ..... . . Garvin, William Herbert, Jr, ...... 33, IOS Gates, Marjorie ..L,W ,.... -.,,. .....,.., W ........... N-.. Gay, Brinton B., Jr. ,. ,... ,, ....,...... 34, 108 Gay, Edward, Jr. ,........ ..-, ..,.... - ,.....L 21, S9 Gay, Grace ..- ...... L ...... ,- ,..,...........,.,.,,.,...L,,L ,, Gedney, Leigh M. ..,.,... ,. ,................,,,, , ,,...., , Geheber, Dean .... - ...... 32, 47, 43, 101, 110 Gcllerstedt, Ann M. ..... ,, L.,...,, W ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , Gelbert, Monroe ,.-.,,,,.,,,..-, ,,,, ,W ,-,,,,,, -,,,,,, Gellman, Sidney LL ......,...,,... -1, ,,L,,,,L,,,,,,,, 17 George, Marian .... L .............,., - ......,.,..,,.,.,,,,,,,L Gerland, Louis August, Jr, .,.,,.. -.,.26, 89 Gibson, Count D., Jr. 33, 68, 77, 89, 110 Gibson, Frank Leslie, Jr. 33, 63, 93, 108 Giddings, Glenville Arkwright ,,,,,LL,,,, M ,,,,,,, Gilbert, Dick R. ,.,... L .....,,. L .,,,,,,, ,,,,, M ,L,,,,, , Gilbert, Joe XV. ,....., L ..,. 1 .....,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,L 2 1 Gilbreath, Robert Lee V, , ,,,,,,,,,,,, 21, 99 Giles, Gene .,,,,,,,,,,,L,L,,,,,,, ,L-,,L,,,,,,-,-,--,-,n wvrqhu Giles, Joe Woodrow ,,,, M ,,,,,,,,,,,, 37 Gillespie, Margaret ,,,,,,,,, ,L,,LLL ,,,,,,,,,,',-,-, - Gillespie S. Dewey, Jr. M ,,,, W ,,,,,,,, 17, 105 Gilliland, Annie Will ..,, ,,,,,, -,N ,,,,,,,,,L-,,,, U Glass, Joe Wfendell ,L,,L im- ,,,L,L,---,, 21, 37 Glass, Lamar Frederick ..., .... .... 34, 87, 108 Glass, Neil ....,,,,,,,,L,,,,,L,,L,, -,,,,,-, ,J -W ----V- N-17 Glenn, Raymond L., Jr, ,,,L,,,, MW, ,-,,--, M ,--,,L u Glover, D. H. ......... , ..,......... E.,-,,-,,,,,,,m Glover, Gilford ....,............ - ,,,, ,-M ,,L,,,,,,,, , Glover, Margaret Love .,,.,, M ,,,, -M- ,L,, -ww, Godwin, Mary .,L,,,L, L L,,LL-,,,,,--,L,,,- ---HJ.-U 43 Goldberg, Joe .- ...... ...... - ..2f, 49, ss, 107 Goldberg, Lee Frederick ..-,..- ,,,,,,,, 21, 107 Goldhagen, Jerry .,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,, L ,,,,,,, ----17, 107 Goldsmith, Robert H. - .... -..10, 80, 107 Goldsmith, Jacob I-1, ,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,, ,LL,L, Goldstein, Loon C, ,,,,,,L,,L,,,,,,,,, -mv-28, gg Goldstein, Norman .....,,,,,L, ,,,,,1g, 70, gg Goldthwaite, J. Randall, Jr..-...39, 95 Goodwin, Hugh A. .,........ ,,,,,,,-,,,,,E,-,mm- Gordon, Thomas Edwin, Jr. .-..-21, 101 Goss, A. Sidney ...,,.....,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,14, 57 Goss, Z. Lucille LLLLL Bm, ,,,L, ,- wh-H Gottlieb, Frederick L,,,L,,,,,,,,,,,, 1. wvw, 10, 107 Gower, W'illiam Justus ...... -10, 58, 83, 91 Graf, Russell E, ,M ,,,,, -wmv ------ F-A-A-1 Grant, Willard H, ,,,,,,, W,-M ,,,, Num 14 Green, George ,..,.,,,,,,, ,,,,,m- ,,,,,,, 14, 101 Greer, William E. .........,,,,, -MWMHQ1, S7 Gregory, Hugh Hyden .... 33, 68, 99, 110 Gresham, Wylie O, ,'LL,,,,-LL -4- -L---- -21, 99 Griiiin, Ernest Lyle ,,,,,,, ,M ,,,, --W-10, 70 Grilfm, Reese E, L,,L,,-,LL-L-, -,A WQQL, M---.M ,AAI 21 Grigg, Doris .. ,..,.L.,,,,,, L ,,,LL,,, M,-H---M 43 Grizzard, Vernon T, ,,,,,,,,L,,,,,,, -H33, 105 Groover, E. L. .,.,.,.,...,. E ,,,,,, - ,,,,, ,2s, '101 Grove, Graham .,....,,,,.. 18, 71, 75, 33, 89 Gude, Valdemar ..,,.. , .... , ,,,, 10, 68, 70, 39 Guerrant, Horace H, M,-,,,,, --,L A---w-mm 13 Guhin, Newt T. .......,.,L L ,,,,,L,,,, L ,,,L,,L, 1S, 37 Guillot, CMrs.J Martha T. ,, ,,,,,,,,,L,,,L,,L L Gunter, Arthur Rhett ........ 33, 99, 110 Gunter, Eugene O. ,L,L,,,L,,,, J L',L,LL,L,,,,,L W ',-,-,- A Gurlcy, Kenneth Rich ..,L... L ,,,,,,,,,,, 25, 101 Guy, H. A. ...... .,,,.,,,... , -, ,,,,L,,, L L,,,,, 37 Guy, John Candler ,,... ..,,,,,,, 3 4, 93, 103 Habib, Morris ..- ,.,...... ,,,,,,,,,, W L,,L,LL,,,, , Hackney, Speer ,.,. L ....,.,..,.,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, 1 4, 77 Hagood, Larry T. ,..........,L,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,L,,,L , Halden, Harry Edward, III ,L,,L,, km ----L,-,L J, Hale, Morris S., Jr. ....,,,,,, L ,,,,,L, ,Y-,10, 47, 49, 64, 57, 53, 69, 70, 83, 93, 117 Hallstrand, David E, L,,,L,L,,,,, ,dw L-,,,,,,,LLL, Hamby, Quillian P. ,....,.....,.L , ,,,,,,, 18, 97 Hamner, Herman N, ,,,L,,,,, m,,,,--,mm 14 Hancock, George B, -mm ,LLL,,,L-,,,,,,,,,,,,, IS Hanlin, Hugh Carey, Jr, .,,,,,,, ,,,21, 87 Hanson, Hiram Stanley ..-W ,,,,,,,,,,,, 14, 50 Harbour, Cliff B. L ....... W,-,,,,1o, 53, 115 Harkins, Donald Neal cu..- ,....,.....,.,,,,,. Z1 Hardee, Charles V. L.L.....,,,L,L,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 18, 95 Hardeman, R. Rhodes .. .................. 10, 95 Hardie, Rosalie -,,, .,.....L ,, ,,L,,,,L,,,,,,,,,,,,,L,,,,,LLL,L Hardin, Henry C. .....- .... - ............. 10, 101 Harding, Don .....L ,.,,,...,,,,, ,,,, L ,L,,,,,L,, 18, 95 Hardwick, Richard H., Jr, ,,,,,,,,L,,,L,L,,L,L,,, , Hargraves, Ray L ..,. -.- ..,....,.,.,.,,.. 1 ,,,.. -W ,,,.,,, Harkins, Donald N. .,..,. .....,.. L ..,, um Harlan, Louis R. .,.,.,,.--.- ..... Harper, Araminta ..... - ,..,.... LLL 40 Harper, Bron F, L.,,,.,,........,..,,,.. ,,.,,,,,,,,,,-H, Harr, George D., Jr. ..,. ,...,. ..... ,.,,,.,-Nu, Harrell, Bill ........ --......- ,,,.,.,. W... ...... 21, 95 Harrell, Leon Lamar, Jr ...... .....l-4, 78, 99 Harrell, Nvilliam Asbury .............,.. 1-1, 99 Harris, Richard LL .,.,......,........... , ....... ,. 95 Harris, Thomas A. .......... nc, .,,.,............ ,. Harrison, Andrew J, ...... ..-.,.l4, 91 Harrison, Mary Virginia L...................,,L,,L,, Harrod, John P., Jr. ...-...-.- ..... -..l-1, 103 Harris, Richard M. .... ..... L ....... . ....- 21 Harris, Thomas A. ...-..-.......,.,..,., Hart, J. Fraser .,,..,,,,.. LL .... ,,..- 14 Hartley, XY'illian-1 C. ....,.,. 21, 95 Harwell, Richard B. L .....,,.....,.,,., Hawkes, Kenneth ........ ...... ...... L 1 4, 70 Hawkins, A. L. ...................... ....... ,.,..,...,... . Hayes, John Randall ...L ............... -14, 95 Hayes, Randy ...r.......,............... L .,,.... ., LL..L,,1,,L, Haygood, Larry ...... L ..,,,,.. L ........, ,,.,...,,..,,,..- Haynie, McDonald ..,. ............,...L ,.,,, Hazelrig, Matthew L .L....L.. --,.,,,,.. Heinz, Billy ..........................r........, -21, 87 Hellams, John R, W., ,.... L ..,. L ................ ., 21 Henderson, Ann ....... L ......, ,,. ,...., ,...,..,.. Hendrix, John NVayne .,.. .....,,. 3 3, 112 Hendrix, Paul ............... ,,..,.. . ..-,...., 18 Hendry, Carolyn L ....... ,,,.-.,,... Henry, George T. ., Henschen, Hal ........... Herrin, Harold M. .....,................ ..... L ..- ..... .. Herring, XVilliam C. .,.. ,,- .... ..-.--21, 99 Hicks, W. Lynn ........... L ................ 14, 93 Hightower, Jack A. .......,.,..,., ,,,-...,,, Hill, Mildred ............ ...- .,.. ....... . -. Hinson, Gene L. ,... - .,,,,...... L..- ,,,.., ., Hinson, Louis ........ ..... ..,.,...,.,, - ,... ,,.. Hinton, James ...- ..,..,,.,. ...,..... 1 4, 55, 95 Hobbs, Jesse H,, Jr. ,,,,,. .,., ,,,...,, ...1S, 37 Hodges, Thomas L., Jr. ,,,,,.. - ,..,.,,. ,.Zl, 87 Hodges, Wfilliam A., Jr. 33, 4s, ss, 37, 112 Hoehl, John R. ....... , ,,,,..,,..,,.,.,..,,.,. 28, 101 Hogan, NVilliam D. ................. -...l8, 97 Hoggi Henderson Hurst, Jr. ...-..,25, 99 Hogg, John E. ...... -..L ....,. - ...... - ...,.., -.. 99 Holbrook, Tim NV. ..- ...,...... .. ...,... -..-.. 36 Holden, George Russell ...,....... -M .....,,.,,,,..., Holland, Bernard C. .,..,....,.. - ,..,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, - Holland, S. Lindsey ..,...,,,.,.,. ,., .,.. A...-,H ,.,,, , Hollis, Charles D., Jr. ..- .,,., ..L,21, 93 Hollis: Jimmie .......,.,...,..,, L ,,,,,, L ,,,,,,,, 21, 93 Llflolman, Charles XVilliam .,,,,,,...,,,,. E ,,,,. ,. ,,., iliolmes, Edgar Cashion .,...... ..32, 93, 108 Holmes, Hal H. ..- ..............,,,...,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, - Holsenbcck, George Hammond ,,,,,,,,,,,,,., -,., Holt, Helen May ..,,,,,,.....,,,.,,. W ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, - ,,,,,, Holt, William M. ...............,..,. 14, ss, 97 Hood, Douglas W. .L ,,,,,,,,,,,,,1,, 31, 72, 112 Hood, F. L. .,,.,,,,,.,,,.,..,, ,, ,,,,,,,,, ,,,..,27, 89 Hook, E. B., Jr. .... -...,- ,,,,..,,,,,,., ,26, 89 Hooten, John A. ..,. . ,.,, - ,,,,,,,,, - ,,,. 18, 70 Hope, Holland ....,,,,,. ,. .,,,,,.. ,.- ,,,,,, -,, 36 Hoppe, Rudolph A, ....,.,,,,,,,,,,,,, , ,,,, , ,.,,-,, 33 Hortman, Hobart C. ...... -,,,c,,14, 70, 101 Horton, A. L., Jr. ....,,,,,.. - ,,,,, ,,, ,,,, -.-.H Horton, Cline C. .,.,.. -..- ........ 33, 95, 110 Horton, Leonard ...,,- ,,,,,.,. ,.,,.-,,.,.,,-N., Horton, Thad E. .-...14, 57, 75, ss, S7 Horvick, Peter ,.-,..-...,,. ,,,,,,,,,,, ,,.,21, 103 Hosch, Wfalter Edward ,,,,,- ,,,,, ,, ,,,, 10, 93 House, Thomas H. .- ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,1,,, E.- ,,,,,, , Howard, Dorothy ,www ,,,,,, L ,,,,,,,, K,,,,-,.,,,, Howard, James M. ,..- ,,,,, , ,,,,,,, -,,m,,,,, 21 Howard, Jim XV. .-...- .,......,... 13, 71, 87 Howe, Eugene H. ...,.. .. .... 10, 79, SJ, 99 Howe, Henry Branch .,.,.. - ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,. 21 Howell, Clark, Jr. ,,,,. ...M ,,,,,,,,,,,1 ,,,21, S9 Howell, W. Harvey ,. ..,,,,,1,,,,,,,,,,,,, 21, 87 Howington, Arthur Fletcher ,,,,,,, ,-,,,.,,, Hubbard, Roy M. ..-L ,,,,,,, M, ,,,,,,,,,, 21, 97 Hubert, Jack William ..L..-L ,..., L1o, 101 Hudgins, Dorothy ..,,,,-,,,, ,,,, ,-,,,,.,,,,,-,,- Hudson, James F. .M ,,,, ,,,,,,,,,--,,14, 95 Hughes, Sherman R. ,,,,,,,,.. , ,,,., ,,.,,14, 103 Hughes, Donald L. ,,,,,,,, -,.,-,,.,,,.21, 101 Huie, Ralph A. W..- .... - ..,,, -..-14, 70, 89 Huie, Robert Elliott, Jr. ... ..... --,32, 108 Huie, NVade P., Jr. 10, 47, 49, 64, 69, 70, 80, 93 Hume, Hampton L. ,,,,,,, -..W ,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,, 95 Humphrey, Burwell ..,, ..L...MM ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , 39 Humphries, Joe , ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, M ,,,-,,,,,,,---,--,,,,-- Hunnicutt, Jack Gregory ,.. .u,-, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Hunt, Earl G. ,,,,,,, N,-,M ,,,,, W,--W ,,,,-,-, K 37 Hunter, Mary Kate ,,,,,,,,, H ,,,--- mm, -,,, M ,,,-,,, v Hunter, Sam R. .M ,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 10, 76, S9 Hunter, Robert Roy, Jr, ,,,,.,. ,,,,,,,, ,.-,,,,,m Hutchinson, William Lane ,-.,-,..,, ,,,, ,..- Hydrick, Peter ,. ,.,.,,.,,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,, -,M ,,,,--, Hynes, Pickett .,.,. .,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, M M ,,,,,,,-,,,, - , Ingram, Mercer .....,.,.. -..- ,,,,,, -- ,,,, -10, 62 Ingram, Porter XV. ...- .,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,, 2 1, 103 Ingram, Wfalter W. .,.. - .........,. . ... ...., .. ...... 21 Inman, John S., Jr. .--..... ...... 34, 87, 108 Ison, Mary ............,.,,,,., L ...,..,.,,,, -,,.,,,,,,,, Jackson, Ed .....,....... - .,.. ,.... ,. .,,-.,.-,.-14, S7 Jackson, Henry Jackson, Hiram Jackson, Lamar M. ............ -.-. Coleman, Jr. ,..-..-..2S, 99 95' ......-.21, C. ................ ---L ............. .. 112 25 85 Jackson, fMrs.j Willathea G. ,,,,,,,,, ,, ,,,,,,, - Jacob, Joseph S. .... ..,.- ,,.. H ,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,.,,, ,- Jacob, Peyton Jr. ,...,,,,.......,,,,,,,,,,,,, 31, Jacobs, Sinclair S., Jr, ,,,,,,, , ,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,, ,, Jacobson, Burton .,,.....,. M, ,.,..,., ,,,,.2S, lI74J OnlyJ John, Paul H- ... ........ 14, 47, 70, 98, 117 James, Albert ,- .,,,...,... , ..,.,,,.,.,,,, , ,,,, ,21, 91 Jamison, Pyott B. ,.,.,.,. ....- ,,,...,.,,,,,, 1S, S9 Janzen, XVesley ,.......,. -1 ,.,,,, M ,,,,, ,ma ,--,,, 37 Jarvis, James Luther .,, , ,.,,,, , ,,,.,,,,,.,,.,,,, Jeans, Park Chalmers ..,,,,,,,.,. W, ,,,, 21, 91 Jenkins, Val E. ,.,.., , ,,,,.,,,, , ,,,,,,,,,, 54, 110 Jennings, Erwin Reeves ,,,.,,, , ,,,,.,,,,,,,, W 10 Jennings, Henry Smith, Jr. .... 34, 99, 110 Jernigan, Cleo ............ - .... -, ...,,., - ,,,.,,,,,, -,,,, Jinks, Clyde ..-.-- .......,. ,,.,,.,,., ,,,,,,,,,, ,, ,,,, Johns, Bill ...,.....,,... u ,,,,,,,,.,,.. , ,,,.,,, ,,.,27, 93 Johnson, Charles A., Jr ......... 33, 101, 108 Johnson, Edna ............ - ........................ L... 45 Johnson, James Edgar ,,.,,, W., ,,,,,,,,,, 14, S9 Johnson, Lois ....,. ...-..,, ..........,,,., , ,,,, W ,,,, ,, ,,,, Johnson, Malcolm K, , ........ - ....,,... 14, 76 Johnson, Thomas DeVann .....- ,...,.,....... 22 Johnson, Thomas L. ..L,.-L .,,,,.,..,. 10, 95 Johnson, NVilliam B. .. ......., -.- .,...., -22, 93 Johnston, Frederick Swain L..L-- .... ZZ, 93 Johnston, Harlan ..-...- .,..... -M ..,,,.. 14, 101 Johnston, Richard ......,,,.....,..,.. 26, 74, 99 Jones, Barrie Lamarr .,.. L.. ......... - ,..., 22 Jones, Carl Candler ..... -..- ,,,,..,.... 34, 110 Jones, Gerald W. .............. - .......,.. - ..., 31, 112 Jones, John Alford ..- ......... - .... - ...,.... - ....... . Jones, J. Melvin ..... - ,....... - ....... ......, - ...,,... Jones, Mallory ..... - ......... .....,..,... ,. ..,... Jones, Paul ,.-.... ....... ..,.,. - ....,.. . Jones, Paul S. ........... .......... , ,. ......... Jones, Sarah Frances ..........., -., ...... ,. ,u,. ,..., Jordan, Henry S. ........ -....- ........ - ...,.... Jordan, Lee Augustus .....,....,...,.,....... 28, 99 Jordan, Willis Pope .......... - .... 31, 95, 108 Jowers, Lawrence Victor ...,......,..,, ,,,.,.,.. Joyce, Leslie XVebb ..,....... -..- ,,.. -,.,....,,,......, Kafka, Richard M. ........ -- .............. L14, 62 Kaplan, Eli ........ ........ .... L.. .... L..- ..... 27, 107 Kaplan, Marvin .. ...... - .... .. ........ - .... -..22, 85 Karp, Herbert R. ...... -.... .... ..-10, 73, 79 Karp, Herbert .... .......... .. ................. -..28, 85 Kartos, John L. .........-....-..25, 60, 74 Kay, James Benjamin, Jr. ............ 10, 99 Kay, Jay ........... .. ............... -.. .... ...... .... 10, 101 Keefer, Evelyn .................... c ............ ..........,. Keith, Carolyn ... ......... -..--L ..... ...,. ............ .. Keller, A. Paul, Jr. .... 33, 39, 68, 87, 110 Kelley, George F. ...... -....L ......... L. ..... 22 Kelly, Billy ........... -.....--... ....... -...22, 99 Kendrick, Odis G., Jr. .. ..... ...,.. ..... ........ Kennedy, Alpheus Thomas .... 53, 103, 110 Key, XVilliam P. .-...-...,. ....,. 27, 74, 93 Kiker, John E. ..,.....-.......- ............ -...,..,.. Kimbell, Bill Laurence .... ........ - .... 18, 62 Kimmell, Loyd H. .... -.....- .......... King, Alice ...... --...- .... -.-- ...... -.... .... .. 43 King, Coleman ........ .... .. ....... -..-... .... -.- .... King, Jarry Crawford ......... - .,...... .....- ....... . King, James Lon ......... -....34 48, 93, IOS Kirby, Joseph L. .............. -....- .... .-...-.. Kirklcy, Floyd .. .... -------.-.........- Kiroy, Joseph ......... .......-...... ................... . Kinnaird, David XValker ..- ...... -.................. Kirkland, William H. 14, 45, 49, 64, 70, 87, I17 Kirkland, Doris .....,...........-...,.. .... ..-... Kirkley, Floyd R. -.......-.... .... ..14, S7 Kirkley, William H, ........ -.......- .... -.... 14 Knight, Dexter L. .-..-.- ........ ...-2Z, 105 Knowles, G. Thomas ......... -...-.- .... - 22 Knox, Richard G. .- ..... -10, 57, 75, 101 Kravtin, A. J. 14, 49, ss, ss, ss, 70, ss, as Kurtz, Annie Laurie .... ...- ..... - .......... ..-..... Kobley, Donald E. -...-.- .... -W ..... .2Z, 85 Laird, Sam L., Jr. .-....,..-.. .... , ,... .. .... ...... Lackey, Jacob Elbert, Jr. ..... -......,-.. 37 Laguerquist, W. C., Jr. ...-.......-.39, 95 Lamar, Howard R. ......,. -.L .... 13, 55, 70 Lancaster, Lawrence T. ... .,,. ...... ,,,. .... 36 Landham, Jack NV. .....................l8, 87 Lane, David E. ......... -....-..,.-...-14, 70 Lane, George Mitchell ,--...L.15, 60 Lane, John G. ........ .....1.....-.....18, 87 Lane, William Steiner .-,.,..-......2Z, 87 Lang, N. F. - .......,,..... ....-.,.u... ..,....... . Lanhan, Harold R. .....-.-.------..,. 36 Lathem, Willoughby .-.--............-15, 93 Lawson, Bonnelle ............-....i-..l.... Lawson, Carlton W. .... ....----.-15, 97 Lay, Joseph E. ............ --.....-.,..1S, 87 Leavitt, Mary Elizabeth ..,- .... --.....- ...., . Lee, Grover C. ..u,,,.......,.L,..-,,,-1S, 97 Lee, Robert Moseley .-.....-..-.--.........-.... Leonard, George B., Jr. ........ -..-- ..... Lerner, Ernest N. ....,.... ,.-N.-.-10, 85 Leslie, Felix XV., Jr. ..-- .... -i.2Z, 99 Lester, Lucy ..... -- ......... -.--.--....---- Lester, William Marvin .,u..-,a,-.--.... Lewis, Jacquelin ............ -.....,....,.,..,.,,,,.....,.,. Lewis, Jim B. ..- .... - ..,... ---.-10, 87, 116 Levett, Jacob - ....... - ........ ......----25 , S5 Levine, Manuel ...,.... ..,.....-...,.,.....26, 85 Levitas, Theodore Clinton 1S, 71, 75, 83 Lifchitz, Gerald H. ,.,. L..- .... - ..., ..22, 105 Lightfoot, Robert Malcolm ..... -,. .... 11, 99 Ligon, Rowanna ..,.,... ,.- ...,.. - ....,. ,.-M,.-,,-,... Lingren, Gray M. M., ..... - .... .,.-,.22, 99 Lineback, Carl .... .....- .,..,....,... -,.,11, 101 Li pps , Lewis .,.,,,.., ..,...,.,, M ,,,.,,...-,.-........ Lipton, Joseph ...-...,, ...,.. M.,--,-.- 22 Long, Margaret ..... .....- .... -.,...E-H,M,,..,,, Longino, Grady E, .... - .....,.. -,,,1S, 55, 89 Love, Howard ........ ...--...,,...-,..,,......... CAMPUS DIRECTORY- Lovitz, Harold ....,,...........Y. .. ....... 0713, 105 Lovvorn, Robert L. ........,..,..Y......... 22, 99 Lowcndick, Carl Raymond 26, 70, 71, 74, 33, 101 Lowcnstein, Frank E. ....,....... - ....,............... . Lowry, Wiley Potter .,...... .,........ 1 1, 99 Luke, Chester ...- ,........... ..... - ..- -...... Lumsdcn, Tom N. ......... .....Y.-. - ..22. 62 Lundy, Robert Fielden ....., -.......-... J7 Lunsford, Ernest, Jr. .... ..... ,...............- - Lupe, James NV., Jr. ,..., --.,Z8, 95 Lyon, Lula , ,....,..... .. ........ ......... -. -..- A.f.- --., - Lyons, william A. ..... ,................., .... 3 7 McArthur, John D. ....... ... ..... -.,.1l, 50 McBrydc, R. Ross .................... 18, 70, 93 McCall, Blanche Taylor .,,..... -..W .......... McCnIlisrer, Arcllic ........... -...34, 37, 103 McCleod, Jolm William ..- ............ 31, 103 McClesky, Walter .............. - ........A...........---4.- McClung, Charles T. ........ - ......................... . McClung, fMrs.j Florence A, - ................ McClung, Jim ........... -...- ........... - ...A...- -13 McClure, 'Wilson NV. ................ 22, 103 Mccord, Ashby ...- ,........., 15, ss, 95, 116 McCrum, Barron Allan .................... 33, 97 McD:lvicl, Joel ...................... .-.-.-..-- ------- 3 7 McDermicl, H. C., -Ir. ., .... 15, S7 McDonald, Ford ,..,................ ...........,. .....- McDonald, james jackson ............ 32. 101 McDonell, C. Durwnrd ,,.,...... - ..... -.36, 60 McDoug:nld, XVilll:am XVor:lx ,....... 22, 99 McDowell, Edwin ...................... .. ....---..-.. 55 McDuEc, Robert S. ..... - ......... 53, 101, 103 McE:1chcrn, Andrew Oliver ....,.,. 18, 103 McElrearh, Farris T. ...-..,.....-fl.-15, 37 McElroy, Lucille ..... - ............. -.- .... - ....... -... Mclllvcry, C. N., Jr. ......... -Y,... .... ...- ..... McGnrlty, NV. Cecil ....1..... -..-34, 79, 110 McGel1ec, Nat T,, jr, ..... .mr ......... McGibony, Emngcnc ................... -.-..- ....... . McGibony, Margaret ........... --.. ..............-. McGrady, Charles XV., jr. ........ HWHZZ, 99 McGowan, Thomas Raymond Wm..- ...... McKay, Efie Mae .......... - .,.. ...-... ...... - ........ McKee, John M. .,.- ............. -. - .... McKenzie, Dorothy .......... --- ..... McLain, Thomas Milton, Jr. .............. -.... McLell:md, joe ...... - .............. .. ...... --..- .... .- McLeod, John William, Jr. ..-N - ...... McLeod, L. Powers -..,-...-..-...-. ....... McMahon, Alice ...... .. .... -.-..-.-.- ........ - .... McNeely, Henry H. ...... ,............ -.....ll, 97 McNeill, Dorothy - .,........,....... .......- .... - ....... McNulty, Carrell S,, jr. M- .... -..1S, 103 McQuown, james M... ....... ...-...uk ..... McQuown, Jimmy A. ..-..-,Y- .... ....lF. 105 McPherson, Tommy C. ....,..-A..,-....ll, 101 McWhirtcr, E. Paul ......... -.-.-.- ...... - 36 Macfie, George B. ......,-,........,....-............ Magnon, Vlest B. ...., ...,.....,... ..-..2Z, 93 Mnkover, Stanford ... ..,. .. .... -.-..---..- 28 Malone, John McMillan ..... , ........ ....., ...... -.. Maloney, Richard H., jr. ....,-.-,..2Z, 99 Mnndese, joe ....,..................,.. -......,- ............ .. Manglmnm, Fay ,...., ...--.-..-,.f,-Y,,-.,...... 45 Mankin, James W. .-...-.....-..-,............. 15 Manning, James Hunt ...- ..... ....-........... 15 Mau-ctr, Dorothy ....... - .... -.- .... ... .............. Marks, Edward Schaefer .-3l, 72, 93, IOS Marr, Weaver ... ........ ........--.I5, 58, 10.1 Marshall, Jack H. .. ....... ...-.....--15, 70, 37 Martin, Alexander B. --.......,.. ..... -......- Marcin, Dam Allen Marcin, Lina ...-......,....,-l..,....,.- Martinez, Ernest J. -..-............22, 97 Martinez, Hector A. -.-.-,--.. ....... .. 15 Masluburn, Jim ......-...-.d..........-,.-....... Mashburn, Marcus ...,.......-.....-,31, 112 Mathews, W.-Hugh ,...v,.......-.1I, 101 May, joseph McKinster ..---...- .... .. Z8 Mayer, Bernard ........-.....,......,.-..-....- Mayo, Tommy Lee -.....-...-......-......-..., Mays, Lamar ,...,.......- ...... ..18, 99, 103 May, Albert Louis, Jr. 32, 69, 97, 110 Meadows, Carter L. ...... -- ....,... --...-- 22 Medlin, John Harold ...... .... .. ..,... ............. Medlock, Emmett P. -.-.....,-.-,...-- IS Meeks, Ralph, jr. .. ........ .. ..... .. ...... ,, ........ .. Meigs, William L. .. ............ .... ......... .,..,..,. . Meister, Eloise .,,..,-,,, .... ,. .... ..... , ,......,,... Mendel, James Harold, Jr. ls, 49, 55, ss, 70, 71, 9K Merchant, james A. ...., -... .,.,,.. ,...37, 62 Merlin, Hyman ..... --.,.....-,.-.- ..34, 107 Methvin, Charlotte ....,, -..-,..,...,., ..... Mens, Dan L, .,.. .... -...,,..-.,d ....,,. ..22, 87 Meyer, Charles F., jr. ....... ,..-..-.. 22 Michalove, Leonard T. --.,- ..,.. .......... 2 S Mickel, Carey A. -,,.-,.,, .... -..- ,,.. ....,,.. Middlebrooks, Charles Lerin ........ 37, 105 Miller, Jolm Hamilton ..... ,.,. -.,. ..,-...... Miller, John M. ..... ....,..,,,-... ...... 28, 97 Miller, Walter Ed ....... --...-,,,- ,,.. -.,,...-.., Miller, William B., Jr. ........ 15, rs, 103 Mims, Maude ......,.,. .......... - .... M ..........,.. .. Minor, Henry ..-,..- .... -...-..--N.-..-18, 87 Miscally, Arthur Eugene - ..., - .... 22, 97 Mitchell, Robert B. -- ....... -..- ...... 15, 99 Mitchell, Roxana .,.. ,......-- ..... - ........ ,.--,. Mitchell, Sujetce .... ...-, ...... -......-.....,..,..- Mitchell, Thomas Glenn ...... - ,.... -..... 36 Mize , Christopher C. ..,..,.- .... - ..... .. Moffett, james Denny, Jr. ....- ...... -- Moncrief, William H., Jr. 33, Moody, Hamilton 47, 48 y 99, 110 Moody, Harmick M. ............. -- ....... ........ lClass and Fraiernity Secfions Onlyl Moore, Adair .... 11, 58, 73, 7K, 80, SJ, 91 Moore, Arthur J. ........,...,...,.......,.,,.... , ,.,,,, Moore, Edward Thomas, Ir. -. ..., Moore, Grace Ruth ,. ,.,.. - .,.......,.,,.. ..,.., ,..., , , Moore, Henry Mclncosh, Jr. ............,,.,,,,,,,, , Moore, james M., jr. ................ 36, 49, 93 Moore, Lewis W. ,... ........ 1 8, IOS Moore, Louis S. ...... ........ 1 1, 101 Moore, Marlc ........... .................,. Moore, Robert B. .... ......1S, 87 Moore, Tommy ............,,............................ 3 Moore, Wlillinm R. .......................... 18, S7 Moore, William XVoodlxull, jr. 33,93, 108 Moraguc, Mable ....,, .,..,........ ....................... Morgan, Frank E., Jr. ..................,, 15, 105 Morgan, .Homer L. .........................,.... . 36 Morgan, James Calvin, Jr. 33, 95, 110 Morgan, john J. .........,,.......,......... 22, 103 Morgan, John M. ......,.. ......... .... ........,....... . Morris, Bill ...... ...... ....................................... . Morrison, Bill D. ....,....... 15, 55, 70, 93 Morrison, Florence Atrnn .......... H .............. Morrow, J. Gordon, Jr. ..... ........ 1 8, l0l Mortimer, Gcorgc L. ..................................... . Moyc, Charles A. .................... 39, 47, 91 Mullen, Perry NV. Jr. .-...-,..- ........... Munk, Harold .,...,........... .,..,........... I X, 87 Murpl-ly, ,lane .................................................. Murphy, Michael Vincent, Jr. 33, 93, 1048 Murphy, Ralph A. ........ H .................. 22, 95 Murray, Eugenia ..........,. ,...............,,.,......... Murray, Hnmll, Il ....... ......... .. ..................... Myers, Boyce Slxumnn .W ...,- ..... ..... .......... .. Nnlley, W. B. ............, ............ l I, 99 Neel, Fred .,............,.......,.................,.. lf, 97 Neel, Julian Blackburn .. ...... 32, 89, 110 Nelson, Gidd ......................... .. ....... ...... 22 Nelson, XVilliam A., Jr. ....................... . Ness, Robert Edward ..., ........... ....1S, 93 Newberry, Daniel Oliver ................ ..... l l Newman, -I. l-l. ................... .....31, 114 Newsom, Bruce Cameron .... ZZ, 95 Niblack, Thomas M. ........ .... ..... 3 9 Nichols, Phoris J. .. ,..,..... ...... 2 2 Nichols, Pomeroy ......... , ...... ..... ..,.. . . Nichols, Robert A. .,...... ....... 2 T, FZ Nlckclson, jay Victor .. ................ IS Nikns, A. G. ,............ ......... ............. - . .- 25 Noel, Malcolmc ........... .,,- ........ lf, 77, 97 Norman, .Iol1n P. ,.,...,,...................... 22, 89 Norman, julia ...... Y .... .. .................... .. .... . Norman, Trcsilc ...,. ..... - ..-,,, ........ - ..... . Norris, jack C. .,............... .. ..... ,..2Z, S9 Norton, John Harvey, Jr. . ,,, 11 Norton, XV. L., Alr, ........... ,..,.. I T, 99 Norvcll, Lauren G. WH- ..L... .. .. Novak, Max ................ .,............. 1 5, 85 O'Dcll, Paul Horton ,,-....-... ..... 11 Oldford, Nelson H, .... .... .......... . Oliver, Algic M. .... .... ..... 3 6. 97 Oliver, Carl ,L,............... ,.LL...,. 2 2, 97 O'Nen1, Peggy ...L......... .. .... -. .. ........... O'Ncal, Robert Lcsrcr, Jr. .. ...,,. 27, 99 Osrerlund. Connie g- ..... L .L...... L..... L Orr, XVillinm Wood ..- LL.. L. ..... - ..... .-.,.... Owens, Harrier , ....... ,. ........ A ........ ....L. 4 3 Oxford, Robert XV.' .... . ..,.. . Palmer, jelfrcss Gary ..... ....... ...,...... . . . Pamphylis, George S. LLL. ...... . -, L...L.. -...... Pnrnro, Luther L., Jr. ...L ..... - -...15, 99 Parker, Daniel ..... L ....... .A ........ ll, 73, 80 Parks, jim ......,....................,.. ,-,.-..zz, 101 Parks, joe ....,..... - .... L ...... ..,.,- ........ - ........ .ll Parrigin, Frank I. .., .L...... .. ........ ZZ. 97 Parrish, Gidd J, ...L --..-... .L.... .15, 9V Parroh, fMrs.j Emily .., ....-..,,.,. Parry, Harvey L. .L................ ........L.. , .-..- Pnschall, James E. L .... ..- .............. ....... .... . . .. Paschal, Jarvis Dean M-, ....... 32, 99, 110 Parc, Tom ........................ ..... W .-.IL 95 Patterson, Olin ...L... L ........ ....... 2 2, 101 Pattersqn, W. C. .... .. ..,....... .......... L ..-15 Patz, Arnall .......... L ........................ ....,.-. 34 Paullln, William Lewis, jr. 31, 93, 103 Paxton, Thomas R. I1, 59, 70, 78, 83, 103 Payne, Doyle H,, Jr. ............L..... ....... ..... ,. 26 Payne, Hammond ......... ,. .... L .... 15, 103 Peacock, Eugene ..... L ........ ...,... L .............. Peavy, Jack ....- ...... .. ....... ,.-13, 99 Peccal, Jack .......... L .....,.... .................... 1 1 Parkinson, Neil G. ..........L........ .....11, 89 Pendergrast, William .... -.,31, 89, 110 Perry, Robert Saville ..... -..- ......... -,..Z6, 57 Peterson, Arthur T. ....,.. ., ............... -,.,.- 37 Petty, Benjamin Aby ..-...-,,, ..... -..- ...,. Peyton, Robert Lee ..........., LL 37 Phillips, Bobby ...-..-,.- ............ ,..... , ..... Phillips, James Carlisle, Jr. . -... Phillips, James McGee LL ...... ,. ....... 27, 95 Phillips, Rnburn D. .............. ....... l S, 97 Phipps, Dorothea R. .............. .. -.., ,,.,,.. Phoenix, William Carmichael L... ............, Pickard, William Marshall, Jr. ........ ........ . Pinkston, Billy .. ..,. ..,.. ......,. - ..........L 18, 99 Plow, Ruth LL ....,, ,..,. ,..,........L..... ..,..,,,,..,.,., Plunkerc, Ray F. ,,,.... ,M .,,.,.,,,,,,...... xl, 73 Pours, Rutherford M. 11, 47, 67, 68, 69, 70, 75, 89 Pollitzer, William S. ,,- ,,,.,,,,,, - ,,,., 15, 91 Polstein, Leon ll, 56, 58, 57, 63, 69, 70, 77, S5 Poole, Samuel Ourlcr ...,.. L ...,,,., ,.-,,,-,,,22, 95 Pope James S., jr. .... - ...... .- ,.,. 22, 87 Pope, Katlmeryn ,L,..., ,,,,,,,,,. 4 3 Pope. Thelma ....... Porter, Joe A, L..,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,-,,, 1 5, 62 Pou, Leo I-I., jr. ,.,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 23, 53, 95 Powell, Eugene Carleton, Jr. 11, 49, 73, 91 Powell, Fincher Carlton ........ 32, 103, 112 Powell, jack I-I. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, nm--.--ww Powell, John Ernest, Jr. ,,..,........... 33, 112 Powell, Thomas jackson, Jr. ..,..... 26, 103 Powell, W. H. ............,,,,..,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,, 7 3, 103 Power, J. Glenn ,..... ,,,,,,,,,,,, Prescott, Evelyn .,...... ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,, Price, Morris Aaron ,,,,,,,,,,,, ,, ,,,,,,, 33, 114 Prince Frank H, ..,.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, A ,,,,,,, ,,,,, W Pritchett, Joseph l-lcnry, jr. .,,,,,,,,,,,,, 23 Proctor, Clifford F. ,.., , .,.,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, , Proliitc, Jack R, .,.,.,..,,........., ,.,,, .... 1 8 , 89 Pulrs, Carl M. ................ . ............ 34 Purvinncc, Albert lfclwln ,. ....... .... . Rainey, Elizabeth ............. ....... ..... Raisin, Rachel M. ........ Ramsey, Ralph L., Jr. ., ,........ ll, 79 Randall, Luther H., lr. ..,. ..L... . 27, 89 Rnncy, Willinnm Neil .,,.,... ,,,,,, . ,.37, 62 Rankin, Susy .................... ..,-.- ...L Rapaport, Stanley M. ,, ,.... ....... l 1, 85 Rawls, Otis Gray ...... ..... L . .......... 15, 91 Rnyle, Albert .,.......................... 33, 99, 108 Raymond, Thomas W. .... .........,... . LL 15 Rayner, I-luglx Semmcs ...... ............. 1 5, 93 Rayney, William .,.......... ................. L -. Recc, Don A. .- ........ L ................... -.,23, 93 Reeve, Jack ................................ 15, 60, 76 Reeve, Thomas Ellis, Jr. ................ 33, 60 Reilly, Enos j. .................... ..........,.. 2 3, 93 Reismnn, Edward Daniel ............ 33, BS, 114 Renslxaw, J. Parke ........,. ....... I l, 62, 77 Renrz, Billy ................... .,... L ...... l B, 95 Rcnrz, T. Eugene ,L...... ......... 1 5, 87 Rcpass, Robert P. ........... ..... ...... l 1 Reynnud, Louis Fnvrot ....... ....... .. 19 Reynolds, Roger ...M ...................... ...... . Y, Richardson A. Cullen, Jr. 34, 99, 110 Richardson Alice Marie LL... .... 40 Richardson j. M. .......... ..... . .. ....,.. .... . Richardson Robert D. ............ , .... 23, 57 Riclmrdson, Sterling Houston .................... Richardson XV. Ed ..... L ....,...... ...... I 9, 97 Rickcnlmkcr, Hugh K. .... ............ . Richmond, Lea ... .......... ...... ..... . . . S5 Ricks, XV:xrson Sibley ...............,..... 23, 95 Rights, Clyde S. .............. L ...... .... 1 3, 99 Riley, Robert A. , ........ L ................. 12. 101 Rimer, Harry Benjamin L... , ...L, 12, SS Ringgold, Harrell .-.,,, ..L.,.. ....... 2 6, I03 Riser, Arthur Franklin N. ,.,. .... Ritclx, Tom G. ....................... . ..... 16, 60 Roach, George Samuel LL .L...... ......... L .... . Robcrds, Elmo Mostcllar, Jr. ,L.......... 16, 73 Roberts, Frank S., Jr. ...... ....... L ......... . Roberts, C., Jr. ,.. ........ ... ...... L ..... .... 36 Roberts, Robert N. ............... ......... . L ..... . Robbins, Wlllmer Bradley .... -...- 36 Robinson, Frank, lll ..,-.... ..L.... ..........,.. , ,. Robinson, Jesse Mack L... L ....L......... ................ Robinson, Stanley McCarty ...... .23, 101 Robinsnn, Walter Wade ..,...,... L ........ -...... Robinson, William B. ........ ,. .... .. ........ -....... Roche, Pat ........ ...- L... -. LLLLL ....--..12. 93 Roddenbery, Julien WY- ................ ..-16, 95 Roddenbery, Ralph ..- .,......... .......23, 95 Rodgers, Richard Cox .L .........., -3l, 72, 108 Rodgers, Wfillinm ...,....,....- ...,....,. L ,.......... ...L Rogers, George William ........ 32, 97, 110 Rogers, Henry Thomas ,.....,...- ...... ,1Z, 60 Rogers, Harrison L., Jr. ........ -......19, S9 Rogers, james Virgil, jr. .... ........... L ...... -.,. Rogers, Lloyd Q. ................ ..,,,..,,--,,....-...... Rohrer, E. Richard .... ........... ,...40, 68, 76 Roper, Bert E. ...L ............... 19, 70, 71, 99 Rorebcck, Curtis Gantt A.. .,., -.31, 95, 108 Rose, Mary Elizabeth .L .... -,..-......-... 43 Rothman, Phifcr Paul ..... L ............. 19, 87 Rowdcn, Paul Dennis, Jr. .. ..,.-,.-....-. Rows-ld, John .....-,...... ....... ....... L ..... 2 7, 87 Roy, Charles Edward L ......... -- .... -......,..,,- Rozier, Jake R. L ........... L ..... .. ...,... 16, 87 Rumble, Lester, Jr. ............. - .... -..34, 108 Russ, Zack, Jr. ............ N..- .... --...16, S7 Russell, David Augustine ...... .....--. ....... .,.. Russell, Henry Wfnrren ............ L ...... 19, 97 Russell, Robert ......... -..d..,- ......... M23, 99 Rustin, Willard Royal ...... ..,.,....- .......... Rutherford, Robert ..- ........... LLLL . ...16, S7 Rutland, R. Eugene, Jr. ,.. ....... ....,..... 19 Rutland, Winner B. W-, L... L ...... L .... -19, 70 Sale, Laura Wood ..... L .... L ............... .. 40 Sams, Fcrrol A. .,,- ......... ..... L .............. L ... Sanders, Paul Samuel .... ........ 4 0, 47, 68 Sanderson, Lucille .................. ..., A ............... Sandlin, John Lewis ......................,................. Saul, Milton L. .......... .. -.. ........ .....28, 85 Snuls, T. Wfnrd ...................... ..................,.... Schnrfschwerdc, Harry ...........,.,.............. - .... Sclmeinberg, Perirz ........,... 33 68, 69, 107 Schcr, Ernest ........ L ....... L ........., ,,.,....,......-.,,, Schliesrerc, Thomas XV. ..,. -W ........... 27, S7 Schoenberg, Melvin ................... ,.,..,.-27, 85 Schwarz, Alfred V- .... .. ............ -....-.,19, 70 Schwarz, Robert .......... L ..... L .... -..19, 70, 73 Scott, XVilliam Henry ........... L ....... mu..- 26 Scruggs, jack H. ....,........ .... .... 23, 76, 101 Sealy, Hugh K. as ................. L ....... ..2'5, 93 Sealy, Olin Fred, Jr. L ....... L ........ -,..23, 93 Sears, Gordon Mortimer .,...... 16, 57, 75, 93 lI75l Scbrgng, Reber: ....................... .23, 76, 10 Scckxngcr, Ernest W. , ,,,,,,,,,,,, - ,,,, -nl, Secord, Scgura, Seifert, Sessions, John Turner, Alan J. .................,. ....l6, 55, ss, Gonzalo ....... L ........... 40, 62, 77, Kcnn etlz ..,,,,,.,-,,,, Jf'f"I:1IEZfM Scsslcr, William mm, ,,,,,,, -,,',N,H,.--U19 , Sewell, Blll ,,,,,,L,,,,,,,,,,,, ,A ,,,,-,,,,---,,-, -.M ,,'n- nn Sewell, James A. ,,,, ,. ,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,n,-...WWF 21, Sewell, Rqy Brown ,,,,,.,,,,,,,,,, M- ,,,,,,, Sewell, Vxcwr Hugh ,,,,, W-,md ,,,,,,-, -H Sluffcrman, Sam ,.,,..,,,,,,,,, n ,,,,,,,,, h, ,,,, Sharrcrly, William E. .... L Slmuks. Doris P, ,,,,,,,,,,,, , Sharp. Homer F. ,L,,,,,,,,, ,,,,, 31, Slmw, Thurmond ., .,,, -,-,M ,,,,,,,,, Shea, hdward J. .,,, N- ,,,, , Shcnrdusc, H. G, ....... ,...,,,, LLLL W. ,,,,, Shearer, CMrs.J Rutl-A S. Shcnts, Fred Brewster, Jr. ............W..zs, Slmciilcld, Beth . ,.,,,,,,.. , ,,,,, -,-,,A,,,,,,v,,-A Shclhcld , j, Courtney ,,,,,L,,, , ,,,,,,, ,wu- Shfelnurt, Dumas B, ,,,,-,,,-,,,,. Slnnixll, Robert P. .....,.,,,,L,L,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 15, Shell, Louis Donald, Jr. L .... .... ..... 25, Slmlrnknwa, Tatsumnsa U., ,LLL Shipp, Clanton Carlton ....... Shocnfclt, Marlon J, , .,,..,,,,,,L,L,,,L ,, 23, Shumate, Robert E. Lee L ,,,,,,,,,, -,,,23 a Shupc, N. Vrcn ....... -......, ..,,., L ,.,,L,,,,,,,L ,.- Sxegcl, Harold ..................... -16, 57, 83, Silver, james ......, . ........ ,.-.-..,,, ,,,,,,,,,L,, M,-A l 114 Sllvcr, Max I. ,,.,..., ,- ,,,,,,,, ,,,.,35, 35, Silverstein, Charles Marvin -,H--M... Simmons, Malcolm Freeman 31, 95, S 1 m pson , jack ..,,,,.,,,,,,d,,-,,,,,,,,-,-hm Sxmpson, XV. G. ... ,LL,..,,L,..,,,, L ,,,,,,,, ,, ,,,, ,W Sims, Edwin H. ...-,.... Sims, Mary Sue ......... Sums, S. Eugene .,..,. ,,, ,, ,, , ,,,,-,,,, Singleton, Kenneth .... -..Q Singleton, Margaret ..- .... -.. Skinner, Richard ...,H..-...16, Greene, Jr. 34, 87, Skipper, William Groover .... 32, 93, Slade, Jean ..........................,L - ,,,,,L, ,,,,,,L L ,, Slade, Tom ......................... --.M ...... 39, Smart, Allan E. .,..,..,-.. .,.,,,,.,., ,,,,.,12, Smith, Benjamin H. ........ 16, 78, 83, Smith, C. Leon, Jr. .... ...... ,...,,,,L,,,, L , ,, Smith, Charles A. ..- .......... ..,,...,.-,.2S , Smith, Evelyn . ......... ......... - ,-43, Smith, jack C, ..... ,. .,.,,,., ,,,,, Smith, Harold -..- .................. -..W .... 23, Smith, Harriett ...... L ........ -...-,.,. .,L,, Smith, jack Cuccs ............ - ............ 27, Smith, James Willis, Jr. -.. ...... L L... L Smith, Margaret ... ...... L... L .....,. ..... ....-,. Smith, Martin .L ....... L ............. J4, 99, Smith, Miriam .... L .......... L ,.,... L .....,.......... Smith, Moody ............ ....- ...... L ........ , ..... . Smith, R. Paul .... ...--,. ..... L ..... ,, ,..,.,.,,,L ,,, Smith, Ruby .................... -w..... .... Smith, Randolph Stewart ...... - ..... L .,... Smith, Rankin Mclinchern ..L.L ....... 28, Smith, R, Stewart .,,-....,.. ......, L ...... ......,... Smith, Richard B., Jr. LLL ......... ,23, Smith, Sam W. ..... L .... --- .... L ......... .27, Smith, Stanley Holmes ,-..- .... L ......... L Smichloif, Milton .... L .... --,....W.k ,... ,19, Snead, Wilson West .L ......... ...,,,12, Snell, I.. Donald .......... L .......... ...,.. ...... LL Snider, Jack Englcr ............ ...-.....l6, Solomon, jerry LL .... -.,-,,-16, 70, 80, Sowell, Wilma Louise .-.,..........-......., Speck, Bill ........ .....-,--......-.12, 60, Spector, Maurice ..... ............ ,.-,.....28, Spencer, Ernest A., Jr. .... ...-..-..-...... Spicer, Donald W. , ....... - .... ...,... .,.. L .... ,.., Spielberg, Nathan .L .,....... -.,---..-.-27, Spier, Raymond Eugene .... -.,.,.-..16, Srochi, Morton H. ........ L ........ L .... ...... . Stafford, W. Alvis ............ L ............ -..23, Staley, Albert E., jr. ..-..-.....-..19, Stallings, Henry A. .... ...... -- .... ......l9, Stamntinder, Andrew Emmanuel Stamps, Edward Roe, HI 31, 68, 72, Stanford, Freeman DeWitt ---.,..l2, Sranley, Samuel Avcrn, Jr. ...W ..... LL 89, Stanley, Willie Paul .A ....... L ........ -..19, Stanley, Wilson ........ -...-...-.. LLLL ......- Starke, Harriett .........,.... L ...... .....,--.,...- Starr, John W., Jr. ..- ........ -.. -..16, Starr, Oneida .................. ..-- ............... ,M Starr, Trammell ........................ .. ...... 26, Scaclmm, George Wickcs ... ........... W.-. Stand, Joyce G. . ..,....... .....- ..... L ...... ....-.. Scand, William XV. .. L ............. -...-.... Steele, Charles E. .... ........... L ...L L... .19, Steele, Harold C. .................... L ............... L Steffner, Ed ..................... .. .... ...- ...... 37, Sregmnn, John Foster ........ L ...... --...-.- Stcin, Sidney A. .......... .... ............... 28, Steinberg, Robert John ,-...-.... ...... -23, Stewart, George C., jr. L ................. -.,- Still, William Clark ....-...- ........ Stipc, Carl E., Jr. ..- ........ 12, 73, 80, Stockard, Cecil R. L .... .........-.16, 76, Scockmnn, Earle Eugene, Jr.,Z7, 74, Stone, Hugh F. ............. L ........ L ..... L .... 23, Story, S. H. ........... . ..... -.., LLLL ........Z3, Stowe, Charles .,..,., F .,,......,,.,............ f......... Stowe, C. William .,..,,........ - ......,.,,.... -.. Strange, Alice M. ,,....,. ..- ........... .. ..,......... Strauss, Walter Adolf ..,- ,...... ....,.16, Strawn, Robert A. .,....,.,,,.A............... 19, Strickland , Hubert Bernard ...., 101 114 103 103 110 Strickland, James C. -... Strickland, John Ed'-vin, Jr. CAMPUS DIRECTORY-lClass and Fraternity Sections Strickland. Maurice A. ,,,,,,,,,.,, .--L-..-. Striekland. Thomas Howard L.- ...., 12, 3-1 60 Strickland, Vfarren Candler .....- .,,... --.. Stripling, Dawid C. -C.,-.--L,--Z7 S9 Stmzier, George Clabourn ,-L,-.-.Am- Strulier, Vfilliam A., Jr. ,A ,...... 23, 91 Stubbs, George Middleton - ,,...... - ...... ---.- Stuebing, Louis Andrew -..- ,..,,, --33, 106 Sturdevant, Clinton --- .... --.-L---- 31 Sturgcss, Bill K. .,,,, -.- .,.Y,, --19, 75 S9 Subcr, Charles E. .-,.,.....-,,, .... 26, 103 Sullivan, Cary i,..,,,,,.,.. L.. .,... .. .... ..,...-...,...-.-. Summey, Thomas Alston ..-...-.- ....,., 36 60 Sutcliffe, XV. H., Jr. -... ...... -... .,... 19, 103 Sutker. Harold ,-.- .....,...... -...-31. XS, 114 Sutphin, Felix A. --...-.--.4--..-...-..--.. Suttles, NVilliam M. .7--. ,,... --..-4.-. Swann, R. Paul ,,,, -..-.--.---.. .... - .... .m.-.- Swearinger, V. James ..... L-.--.----...-...W Swink, Robert l.. -.- ....... - .... 19, 95. 117 Tait, Elizabeth Elminga -L .... ---.-....-- Tanner, James Carlton, Jr. ..... - ......... 12 Tatom, Jacquelin -,.-.-. .... -...-..- ........... .-.. Taylor, Frances -...--.--.-.-L-.. .......... ----.- Taylor, John Edwin ..---..-...- ..........,.. ...-- Taylor, T. Earle ..--..---...-...-.........16, S9 Taylor, XV. Forrest -..-....- .... - ......... 19 95 Teatc, H. Luten -.-.-.L...-...- .... 34, 93, 103 Teilmann, Gunnar, Johan, Jr. ... ....,... -. ..... Telford, Jane ..- ...... ..-...--- ........ - ..,,,,. ....-..- Tenenbaum, Raymond --.... ..........,..,,. 23, 107 Teplis, Paul ,,,. -...-.--.-.-... .... -.... .... 19, 70 Tepper, Bernard --.-.--..-....-...---.W19, 107 Thomas, Ann Teasley --...-..- ........,,.. .-......- Thomas, Benjamin Franklin, Jr. .,S1, 112 Thomas, Pain ........ -... ........ - ...........,,..,..,... -. Thomas Harry G. ....-..--...25, 74, 93 Thomas, Russell DeYVitt ....... .....23, 55 95 Thompson, Standish ,... .............. .- .......... - .. Thornton, George Morris ..- .................. --.. Thornton, H. A., Jr. -.L ,.... - ..... -19, 99 Thurman, H. John L ,.... -..-..- ................... - Tidwell, Earl V., Jr. ...,.. .. .,....,.. - .... 23 91 Tilly, NVilliam Hollcyman ....,. ,.-26, S9 Tinkler, Sam A. ... ................. -.-.--12, 105 Todd, Charles Edward, Jr. ......,.,....... 19, S7 Todd, Rucker ..-12, 47, 53, 67, 69, 83, 89 Todd, XVilliams ............................ -...23, S9 Tolbert, Archie .... Tolbert, Louis E. ...-. Tolchard, Allen S. ..-..-26, 55 Tootle, George Slater Torras, Hoyt .-...-... 19, , 7 -4, 75, 103 99 Townsend, Lewis F. --..l...--.l Trcadway, Margaret ...- Treadway, Mary L-M.-WELL..-,-. Trimble, Henry Burton -...-..16, 95 Trimpi, Howard Dennis ...-1...-.-.- Tfipp, Wlilliam H. .M..-...19, 93 Trowbridge, James L---.L Tructt, W"illiam Lawrence Truitt, Leila ..... ..--.--..,-.- -31, 108 Turner, Charles Lewis ...,-....,.,,,,,... Turner, Guy Berry, Jr. nl.---...-.-.. Trulock. Albert Sutton, Jr. Turner, Henry Haywood -..-31, 91, 110 Turner, T. J. -.......-..-.-.-.-...--.-...... 12 Turrentine, Paul Everett -..--.--.-52, 110 Ttviggs, L. Marvin ,...--...-,....-,25, S9 Tyler, Lockland Vance -.,..... Tyson, William A., Jr. .. ..,... -.- Vann, fMrs.j Ruth -.ML Vann, Joyce --.....-.....-.. ..... - ..... .. ....,.. VanSant, Claude V., Jr. .,,,.--.....12, 2,7 Vaughn, James A., Jr. ...... .. ........ -..Q-..,,.... Varner, James E. -..-.--...... .... 12, 60 Veatch, Julian -..-.-..- ......... .....- ..., M.,-..- Vickers, Georgia Lee ..--L .....,. ...L ...,....,, .. Vickery, Thomas .... -..- ........ - ...........,.,,..,.,.... . Vidal, Joseph Droesch .,..,,-..--,,..,, ..,. Vincent, Robert Harold .... ,..- ,..,...,.. . 19 Wfadsworth, Eloise .,..-......- ..,............. - 43 Waddell, Jean ...-.-,..- .,..,,. .,.., ....., L ....,. -.. 43 Wager, Bill F. .... - ........ -.-..-..- ........ --..-.... Wagner, D. M, ......,.--...M ..,.., ...,. ........ ,...,... Wagnon, George N. ...... - ....... -..-..,31, 112 XVaite, Alvis A. ..- ..,,. N, ..... -.. ,... .,.... . 37 Waldrep, Jack Marion .... .... .. ..... 3 1, 112 Vlfaldrop, Glen G. ...... ........ - ............ -..M XValkcr, Charles C. .... -- ............ ..23, 101 Wfalker, Edwin M. .. ...,......... , ....... ...l6, S7 XValker, J. Edwin ..... -. ................. -16, S7 Wall, Hilton Frazier .... -.....-.31, 72, 108 Wall, Thomas .,.,..,... - .,., .. .,., .. ...,.,,..... 12, 97 Waller, Roy M., Jr. ...-. ....,..... - .... 12, 95 NValton, CHE L., Jr. .......... ..- ..... -.. ....... Walton, Jesse LeeRoy, Jr. 12 45, 50, 67, 93 Walton, Thomas Peytori II7 16, ss, 70, 79 NY'amblc, Elizabeth --,... XVannamaker, Lewis XV XVard, Evelyn .... -..-..-...-.--......- Vfard, William Quincy NVarnock, Frankie W.. ..--M- 19 W'arren, Wlilliam S. ,...l3-1, 48 XVaters, Robert Alston ..---....M---.- Watkins, Malrby F. .-.-,...-......-13, 99 Nvatkins, Xvilliam Marion -...-..23, 95' Watson, L. Chandler, Jr. MM, 53, S9 'W'atson, Theron E. .-.--..-,,.-- 26 Wfeathern, John Oliver --M-,--.. Wfeaver, James M. ........ -...M-..-...... 31 Wleaver, Robert Lamar ...19, 70, 83, 97 Webb, John ..- .... ------ ...... ---- 19, ss W'ebster, Ben .... --.... ...... ....-.--..-...... Weems, Howard V., Jr. . .... ..-16, 279 XVeinkle, Milton .....-, ............. -..-19, SS XVeinkle, Stanley -.--... .... -.-12, 79, SS, 117 NVellborn, Walter H., Jr. ...-.- .... .....--.- XVells, John C., Jr, .. .......... -......-..-..-.. 16 Werner , E. --........ -.-.....-...-....-..---...--- Wfest, Walter Leon, Jr. ......... -.-.-.-..-...- XVestervelt, Alice --..--..... .... -- ....... 1...- Westmoreland, John L. ........ -26, 54, P9 Wfethington, John Abner ........ -....-......... W'etzel, J. Sedwick -...... .....-...-...-,.,--.... Wharton, Charles -........... ...........-.-...--.-..- Whatley, Edwards ...... ....... 1 6, 70, 91 Wharley, Lewis Ross -...... ,. .... ..-..-..- Nllfharton, C. H. .- ..... - .... ,. -.....- - ........ .. Wlhelchel, Harriett .... -..- ..-....... .. ....... ....... . XVhiddon, Robert Earle ...... - ....... .-.Z3, 95 White, B. Dan ..- ............ ..- ...... ..-...... - ...-..- Whim, Cecil A. ................. --.. ..... ...12, 95 White, Clarence ..... ...- ........ . .. White, Delos H., Jr. ........ ...-.. 26 White, E. Borden, Jr. L ...... - ......... 16 White, James Clarence ..... ,.., - ...... - .... .... White, Leslie Comer ,-..-.-L.-....23, 103 White, Richard A. .. .... . ..-.. .....,.. White, Marvin ....,....... ...... . -.... 3 6 Whitenton, Joe B. .... - ...... - ........ ....-25, 93 XVhittle, Connie ....-.-..-.-.L ....... .--.-......-.. Widenhouse, Margaret ...- ........ -..- ...... - 43 Wielson, James V. ..- ....... -......-....-...-..---. Xvigand, Ed ..- .....- --.-..-...--.-M-..- Winefordner, C. Harry --.-1 ........... - 36 NVizand, Ed ,..- .... -...-.-...---.-..--.-.-T- Wilcox, Frank .-........ - -............ ...-.-...--.......- Wlilcox, Hugh B. ...--.-....-....-....-.-34, 43 !Wi-lder, Pelham, Jr. ..-. .... 40, 68, 78, 91 1' l if . , V 61 Onlyi W'ilkinson, Pete .......-- .,,,,, ,.,.,,,.-113, 95 Nvilkinscn, Thomas B. ...,.... -...-.16, 83, 105 W'illard, Ben C., Jr. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, -hw.,-,ul Willcford, Ben R., Jr. ..... -.12, 49, GS, 73 Wfilliams, Allison ... ...... .. ..,.,.,,,.. ,,.,19, 99 XVilliams, Howard Vivian, Jr. sz, ss, s9, 110 Williams, John M. ...... .. .... - ,,,, K ...... --.,.-. NVi1liams, Louis L. ..-..-..,. ...,.,..,,..... 16, 105 Williams, NVendell ........ , ,........, ZS, 83, 10S Williamson, Russell ....,,.,,,,,,.., 27, 49, 103 NVillingham, Robert Tilton, Jr. .-..,- 23 Wfillis, XVarren W. .... - .... - ...,...,.,, .... 3 6 Willis, XVilliarn. Russell 31, 72, 95, ios W'ilson, Arthur H., Jr. ..., ..... .. .... -,,12, S0 NVils0n, E. XVilliam ....,......... - ...... .. ....... ,, ,, Wilson, Prank A., 111 ...1......-33, 68, 108 Wilson, James V. ..--...-...- ...... -..-..12, S9 Wilson, John P. ..,... .. ,.,......., , ......, ...... ,.,,.,.,,, ,, Wilson, Joseph Sealy .-.19, 70, 71, S3, 93 Wlilson, Robert Lee -.. ...,..........,....,, ,.,.,,.,.--, XVinefordner, Clifford H. ......, ... .,......,.., , Wlindsor, James Thomas, Jr. ........ 19, 62 XVinslow, James A., Jr, .,. ...,............,,,,, ,..- Winslow, Jim ..- ...... - ,.,. - ..,.,...,, 33, 101, IOS Wlise, Edward Jean .... -..- ....,,........ -.23, 99 Witkind, Elliot ---..-..- ....... ----..-12, 107 Wfood, Arthur W., Jr. - .......... 32, 95, 110 Woodruff, Jack .... ..,. -..-..- ..... .. ..,.,,..., 19, 97 NVoods, Martha .-......- ........ L ..,. -...- .... ..-.., Vfoodson, G. C. .-...L ,..... ,..- ...,......., 23, 95 Wfoolf, William E. .............,..,..,..... ,..- .,.,, ... Wfooten, Sarah' ..... , ,... .,.. , ...,... ,........ -......,.,,.. Worth, Jack J., Jr, .,..... -..,... ..,,., 33, 112 Wortsman,y Werner E, ..... .....- ..,. ...,... Wfright, George William .....,,..... ....23, 95 Wright, J. Carter ....... - ........ .- ...... - .... 16 NVynne, Robert M. ... - .... -..... 16 Yarborough, C. A. ................ --.--16, 103 Yarn, Charles Presla, Jr. - ...,.. .- ,,.. .- .... .. Yeargan, Reagan ...- ...... - ........ ,.-- ...,.. -........ Yonks, Irving - ...............,,...... - ....., 19, 107 York, Joe C. ...... -... ............ - .... -....-..-.. 21 Young, L. Glenwyn ....-. ,...-...... .....,... Young, Robert George ...,,, ,. ,..,. ,.,.16, 87 Youngblood, Jesse C, ..,,, ,.-- .... ,..- ........, ,... Youngblood, Vernon H. ..-- ....... --- .... .-. Zahn, Louis J. -4. ..... ,-.- .......... -.......- Zimmerman, Jerome M. ........ ZS, 69, 70, S5 Zumwinkel, John H. -..-- ..... ...-.-...21, S7 94 QTL I- sr . ny, ,I A f, N ,fin-vw Q ' '1' 5 V - i . 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Emory University - Campus Yearbook (Atlanta, GA) online yearbook collection, 1935 Edition, Page 1

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