Emerson College - Emersonian Yearbook (Boston, MA)

 - Class of 1944

Page 1 of 136

 

Emerson College - Emersonian Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1944 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 136 of the 1944 volume:

tforeworf) . . . " We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breaths; in feel- ings, not in figures on the dial; we should count time by heart- throbs. He most lives who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best. " Page One a Page Two S. Justus In these chaotic days, more than ever we have had intrinsic need for the stabilizing wisdom and hope in the depth and range of his penetrative thinking. The liberal sweep of his outlook, his intellectual vision, his keen understanding of humanity and its foibles and above all his compassion for those foibles, have taken firm hold in our hearts. There is quiet power in the philosophy by which he lives, " to do justly, to love mercy and to walk humbly. " Always a kindly advisor, his genius lies in his ability not to tell us what we know not but to make us what we were not. His actions are characterized by a search for an ever higher justice. We, the class of nineteen hundred and forty-four, dedicate this book to Dr. S. Justus McKinley as a small measure of our deep love and appreciation. Page Three 0 c 0 6 © c © c ♦ c © 0 © 0 © c © c © © c ■ 0 © 0 0 0 © 0 © 0 c © c © 0 ■ 0 © © 6 © 0 ♦ 0 © t ♦ ♦ © c © c « 0 © f ' - 4 ' £ • £ K -v J( U V AJiVjxv 1 - . V’T “ . c- irvU W - ' " ' v v " -m L . tA A ‘- rt vOT 6U wC - % . « fe 1 ' ‘ ■ ° .. 6 us - rt - ft ' v ' v " ) O 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 3 © 0 © 0 0 ♦ 3 © 3 © 0 0 © 3 © 3 3 © 3 © 3 3 © 3 © 3 © 3 © 3 © 3 3 © 3 © 3 © 3 © 3 © 3 © 3 © 3 3 © 3 « 3 0 © 3 3 © 3 © 3 © 3 © 0 © 3 © 3 © 3 0 © 0 3 3 © 3 © 8 © 0 ♦ ♦ 3 © 0 « 3 » 3 © 0 3 0 © 3 © 3 3 Page Four c ♦ c 6 • c ♦ c ♦ o ♦ c © c c • c 0 c c • t 0 © c ♦ c • c c ♦ c © c c c © 0 ♦ c 0 © c ♦ c © c © 0 c ♦ c c ♦ c c ♦ c ♦ c c « 0 © 0 ♦ 0 c 6 © 0 ♦ c © c 0 © c © e © 0 © 0 « 0 o c © 0 c © 0 « 0 © c 5 c © c © 0 6 © 0 © c © 0 ♦ c 0 ♦ c ♦ c © c © c © c ♦ c c © 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 c © c © c © c © 0 © c ♦ 0 © I BOARD OF TRUSTEES Chairman— RUSSELL HENRY STAFFORD, D.D., LL.D. Clerk— ' WILLIAM HOWLAND KENNEY Term expires in June, 1947 EDWARD HOWARD GRIGGS, L.H.D., LL.D., Croton-on-Hudson, New York Author and Lecturer ALLEN A. STOCKDALE, D.D., New York, New York Dean, Speakers Bureau, National Association of Manufacturers MRS. HENRY LAWRENCE SOUTHWICK, B.L.I., Boston, Massachusetts College Professor Emeritus; Lecturer Term expires in June, 1946 HARRY SEYMOUR ROSS, AM.. Boston, Massachusetts College President PHILIP YOUNG, A.B , Boston, Massachusetts Partner, Baker, Young and Company, Inc., Bankers MRS. ROBERT T. BUSHNELL, B.L.I., West Newton, Massachusetts Co-Chairman, Child Welfare Committee, Massachusetts Civic League FRANK P. CRASTO, JR., St. Petersburg, Florida For twenty years Librarian of the American Academy of, Arts and Letters Resigned 1941 to do literary work Term expires in June, 1945 RUSSELL HENRY STAFFORD, D.D., LL.D., Boston, Massachusetts Minister, The Old South Church in Boston WILLIAM HOWLAND KENNEY, Leominster, Massachusetts College Professor of Speech DANA T. GALLUP, A.M., LL.B., Cambridge, Massachusetts Senior Member, Gallup and Hadley, Attorneys at Law WILBUR L. CROSS, Ph D , Litt.D., L.H.D., LL D. Dean Emeritus of the Graduate School, Yale University GODFREY DEWEY, Ed.M , Ed.D., Lake Placid Club, New York Author and Educator MRS. EDMUND SUMMERS HAWLEY, A.B., New York, New York Consultant of the Educational Policies Commission, Washington, D. C. DONALD B. MacMILLAN, A M., Sc.D., Provincetown, Mass. Arctic Explorer; Author LOWELL THOMAS, A.M., Litt.D, Pauling, New York Radio Commentator; Author Term expires in June, 1944 ALLAN FORBES, A.B., Dedham, Massachusetts President, State Street Trust Company, Boston WALTER R. MANSFIELD, A.B., M.D., Los Angeles, California Physician Term expires in June, 1943 ARTHUR G. CARVER, LL.B., Auburndale, Massachusetts Senior Member, Carver and Carver, Attorneys at Law WILLIAM T. CHASE, LL.B., Newton Centre, Massachusetts Educational Adviser DIDRIK C. TRONDSEN, Schuylerville, New York Founder, American Wood Board Co., and Blandy Paper Company MRS. WILLIAM VANAMEE, St Petersburg, Florida For twenty-five years Administrative Officer of the American Academy of Arts and Letters Resigned 1941 to do literary work Ex officio HOWARD HIGGINS, A.M., Belmont, Massachusetts College Dean, Lecturer W. WEBSTER McCANN, Auditor i Page Five 0 c 0 0 c c c " For we know in part, and we prophesy in part. But when that which is perfect is come, then that which is in part shall be done away. ' ' o o 3 0 9 • 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 0 « 9 0 9 O 0 9 9 9 O 9 9 0 9 • 0 « 9 0 O 0 0 o 9 » 0 9 O 0 o 0 9 0 • 9 9 0 a 9 0 9 9 o 9 9 9 a o 9 O 9 9 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 » 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 • 9 9 • 9 » 9 5 9 o 9 9 • 9 9 9 ♦ 9 « 9 9 0 , • 9 9 • 9 a 9 o 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 • 9 9 9 o 9 Page Six 0 c FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION 1943-1944 HARRY SEYMOUR ROSS, A.M. . HOWARD H. HIGGINS, A.M JESSIE ELDRIDGE SOUTHWICK, B.L.I WILLIAM HOWLAND KENNEY GERTRUDE BINLEY KAY S. JUSTUS McKINLEY, Ph.D SAMUEL D. ROBBINS, A.M DOROTHY PARKHURST, Ph.D ROWLAND GRAY-SMITH, Ph.D. . . RUTH SOUTHWICK MAXFIELD, A.M. ELSIE RUTHERFORD RIDDELL, B.S. in Ed. GROVER C. SHAW, M.Ed ETHEL BAILEY DuBURON, A.M JOSEPH E. CONNOR, A.M ADELE DOWLING LEVILLAIN, B.L.I. ELLIOTT NORTON, A.B ROBERT J. WADE ARTHUR F. EDES BARBARA STUART STANDISH, A.B BERNICE LYNCH, B.L.I ROGER WHEELER OCT AVIA K. FREES HARRIET HARTFORD HELEN GUILD HAMBLETON DOROTHEA PAULL President Dean; Professor of Education Professor Emeritus of Literature Interpretation Professor of Speech Professor of Drama Professor of Social Sciences Professor of Psychology Professor of Modern Languages Professor of Philosophy Professor of English Professor of Physical Education for Women Associate Professor of Speech; Director of Summer Session Associate Professor of Speech Associate Professor of Speech Assistant Professor of Drama Instructor in English Instructor in Drama Instructor in Speech Instructor in English Instructor in Drama Instructor in Drama Assistant Professor of Drama Instructor in Drama Instructor in Speech Librarian t i t ( Page Seven ( ( 4 c c c c 0 0 © e © 0 © 0 © © c c o HARRY SEYMOUR ROSS A friend of every student who passes through the portals of Emerson, a believer in the inherent good in every individual, President Harry Seymour Ross is a true teacher in that he develops the inquiring mind to search always for the right and leads his pupils toward the light of true knowledge. o » o 9 s » 9 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 5 9 0 © 9 0 o 9 9 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 5 9 © 9 © 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 « 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 9 9 9 © 9 9 © 9 9 © 9 0 9 © 9 © 9 ♦ 9 © 9 • 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ a © o © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 5 © 9 © 9 9 9 ♦ 0 ♦ 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 « 9 © 9 © 9 9 • 9 9 5 9 © 9 © 9 © Page Eight CLASS OF 1944 of EMERSON COL LEGE FOLLOW THE GLEAM At this parting of the ways, you will soon realize more than any preceding class that the Old Order is changing, giving place to the New; and that you are to face and fight under more difficult conditions than any whose names are inscribed on earlier college rolls. All this calls for Courage, Idealism and Sound Sense. You have the first, with all the enthusiasm of youth. For the second, keep ever in mind the admonition of the great Poet Laureate and " follow the gleam.” All who have made lasting contributions to the welfare of humanity have caught this flame and have followed it, whether in the black Bedford jail with Bunyan, or with blind Homer wandering through the seven cities, with Columbus on the lonesome deck, or the Curies watching and working weary years. Each has strained his sight to see, and faithfully followed, his faint far star; thus helping to bring a brighter day for all mankind. The last, is attention to factual, realistic teachings, that will keep you steadily on your straight path, as the aviator toward his directed goal. Allow no will-o ' -the-wisps to lead into miasmatic swamps of thought and action, and lure you away from the straight and narrow beampath. May good fortune go with you all your ways. Follow the Gleam; but. Keep on the Beam. HARRY SEYMOUR ROSS, President. Page Nine a o 5 o 3 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 0 5 9 O 9 0 9 9 O 9 O 9 o 9 o 9 9 9 9 9 O 9 o 9 9 9 9 » 3 9 o 9 9 9 3 O 3 o 3 « ♦ 0 ♦ 3 3 ♦ 9 ♦ 3 o»ooo )0»o«o«0)o»o»o»o»o«ete»e»o«o(OK, • ooeooeo HARRY SEYMOUR ROSS President HOWARD H. HIGGINS Dean Professor of Education ADELE DOWLING LEVILLAIN Assistant Professor of Drama Page Ten )to«o«o»oto o otototeto ototo o»o o oto o o»o o u«o«o«o »oto oty »o o o o toto«o o»o«o«o»o«o»o»o»o«e»o«o«o»o»o o»e oto«o«o«o»o«ototo o»e»e4o«o«o«o o»o«o»o»o»o»o»o DOROTHY PARKHURST Professor of Modern Languages ROWLAND GRAY-SMITH Professor of Philosophy Page Eleven s. Justus McKinley Professor of Social Sciences ♦ 0 ♦ c 0 ♦ 0 « 0 c 0 c ♦ 0 c 0 c 0 ♦ c o (1 • 0 0 o 0 o c e o c « c o c c o c ♦ c ♦ 0 0 c ♦ c c 0 c o c c c « t o c c 6 • c ♦ c • c c « 0 c o c c ♦ c ♦ 0 ♦ c c c 0 o 0 o c c c c c c c c 0 « c ♦ 0 o 0 c c c c c 0 ♦ 0 c ♦ 0 ♦ c 0 6 « 0 c c c c « 0 o c 0 0 ♦ 0 e ♦ DOROTHEA PAULL Librarian ini GROVER C. SHAW Associate Professor of Speech Director of Summer Session ELSIE R. RIDDELL Professor of Physical Education for Women Page Twelve o 3 0 3 3 • 3 3 • 3 3 • 3 5 0 O 3 0 5 « o 3 O 3 9 3 ♦ 3 3 3 O 3 O 3 o 3 o 3 9 3 9 3 3 9 3 o 3 ♦ 3 ♦ 0 ♦ 3 3 ♦ 3 ♦ 3 3 3 9 3 9 3 ■9 3 o 3 9 3 3 3 3 ♦ 0 3 ♦ 3 3 • 3 ♦ 3 ♦ 3 3 ♦ 3 3 3 • 3 3 3 9 3 5 3 ♦ 3 ♦ 3 3 ♦ 3 ♦ 3 ♦ 3 • 3 3 ♦ 3 o 3 « 3 ♦ 3 ♦ 3 ♦ 3 3 3 ♦ 3 » 3 3 3 o 3 3 RUTH S. MAXFIELD Professor of English ELLIOTT NORTON Instructor in English BARBARA S. STANDISH Instructor in English Pacje Thirteen GERTRUDE BINLEY KAY Professor of Drama WILLIAM HOWLAND KENNEY Professor of Speech JOSEPH E. CONNOR Associate Professor of Speech Page Fourteen ETHEL BAILEY DuBURON Associate Professor of Speech ROBERT J. WADE Instructor in Drama Pago Fifteen ARTHUR F. EDES Instructor in Speech c ♦ 0 0 ♦ c © c c 6 © c © 0 f c © c ♦ c f) © 0 ♦ e ♦ 0 • c 0 ♦ c ♦ c c « c ♦ 0 © c « c 0 ♦ c V c c c « c o c c c c © 0 0 0 © c c c © 0 © c o ♦ 0 c ♦ e 0 6 « 0 © c © c © c c © c c c © 0 0 « c c © c © 0 0 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c ♦ c 6 ♦ 0 © 0 c 0 © c © c c c © e o c © 0 ♦ c graduates o, ' 9M ♦ 0 5 9 » 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 « 9 I) ♦ 9 © 9 9 © 0 © 0 © 9 © 0 © 9 5 © 9 5 ♦ 9 © 0 © 9 9 © 0 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 ♦ 9 © 9 © 0 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 0 9 © 0 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 0 9 9 • 9 © 0 ♦ 0 9 ♦ 0 ♦ 9 ♦ 0 9 © 9 © 0 © 0 © 9 ♦ 0 ♦ 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 1 • 9 9 © 9 ♦ 0 © 9 Page Sixteen 0 • c c © 0 ♦ c c c © c ♦ c © c ♦ 0 « c ♦ 0 0 c © c c © e c c c © c c ♦ 0 • 0 c © c ♦ c ♦ c © 0 0 ♦ 0 « c « © c c ♦ c ♦ c 0 © 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c 6 © 0 © c c © 0 © c 0 © c © 0 © c © c © c © c © e © 0 © 0 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 6 © 0 © 0 c c ♦ 0 ♦ 0 e © c c © 0 © 0 5 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c © c © 0 © c © 0 © 0 © c © 0 0 © 0 5 ♦ 0 © 0 © a 3 5 o 5 3 © a « 0 5 3 © 0 a © a © © a © a © a 9 © a a © a a © a a » 1 © a o © J a ♦ a © a © a a 3 © a © a a a ♦ o " For of the soule the bodie forme doth take; For soule is forme, and doth the bodie make. " © © 5 © 3 a © a © 8 Page Seventeen - ♦ e e are mu3ic-ma LESLIE STEARNS BIDWELL A.B. Farmington, Connecticut Kappa Gamma Chi, Treasurer 2, 3, 4; Class Vice-President 4; Inter- national Relations Club, Secre- tary-Treasurer 4; Public Produc- tions 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom Com- mittee; Music Club; Associate Editor of " Emersonian.” Truly high-principled, her integ- rity makes her words and actions bonds of sincerity. Quietly dis- cerning, Les is aware of the rela- tive value of things. Yet she is unaware that she is an admir- able proponent of Plato ' s doc- trine: " Being not seeming is the end of life.” GENUINE o 9 j 5 0 • a o o a o ♦ 0 5 © o © 0 5 o o 5 o © 2 o 0 © 2 5 o © 0 © 0 © 0 © 2 9 © 9 © 2 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 5 9 © 2 5 9 9 © 9 © 2 5 5 5 5 9 © 0 © 9 © 2 9 © 9 • 2 2 2 9 © 9 « 9 © 9 © 2 2 9 9 © 9 9 © 9 o 9 ♦ 9 ♦ o 2 5 © 9 © 2 a 9 ♦ 9 • 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 • 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 Page Eighteen O»O»O9O4O«O« S»O O O O»O O O«OeO O O O»O»OeO O«O«O4O»O«O O6O4O8O»O0O«OeO«O4O4O4O»O»O8O«O«O»O«O«O«O O«O»O O O O O O»O»O«O O O O«O O»O O®O»O9O4O ' , 4nd na we are the di reamer s o reams . E. JOANNE BISHOP B.L.I. Toledo, Ohio Phi Mu Gamma, Social Chair- man 4; Public Productions 2, 3, 4; Class Secretary 4; Dean ' s List 4; Maid of Honor, Junior Prom Court. " Will you permit me? " Take a thimbleful of reticence, a drop of subtlety, a pinch of quiet humor well seasoned with unfailing tact; add two deep dimples, a sunny smile, a castle in the air, and there you have the recipe for " Bish. " WHIMSICAL Page Nineteen l 0 0»0 50«0»0 0»00090«0»090«0»0 00«0»0»0»0 0j00090«0«0 0 0«0»0»0»0»0»0«0»0«0«0»t -I)ivah one sea-breaneri ARLINE MARY BRASSIL B.L.I. Lowell, Massachusetts Zeta Phi Eta 4; International Relations Club 4; Newman Club; Public Productions 1, 2, 3, 4; Ju- nior Prom Committee, Assistant Editor of " Emersonian " ; Dean ' s List; Commencement Program Committee. A candid iconoclast with the crisp repartee of a fast draw- ing room comedy, irrepressible Arline has an underlying fund of impulsive energy and a color- ful flair for the dramatic which naturally includes the Army, the Navy, and the Marines. PROVOCATIVE a i » a ♦ o • 9 9 • 9 ♦ 9 9 0 O 0 • 9 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 0 o 9 9 ♦ 9 « 9 4 9 « 9 ■ 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 » 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 • 9 9 9 o 9 9 9 O 9 ♦ 9 o 9 9 o 9 4 9 9 4 9 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 O 9 • 9 9 • 9 9 9 9 o 9 9 « 9 9 9 9 o 9 • 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 « 9 9 ♦ 9 0 ♦ 9 • 9 9 9 o 9 4 9 9 o Page Twenty c c © 0 0 ♦ c ♦ c ♦ c ♦ c ♦ c • e 5 ♦ c ♦ c t c ♦ c « 0 © c © c ♦ c ♦ 0 © 0 c ♦ 0 ♦ c 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 0 0 ♦ c 0 • c 0 ♦ c 0 © t c ♦ 0 ♦ c 0 © 0 © 0 ♦ c © 0 © o © 0 © 0 © c © 0 © c © 0 © c 0 © 0 © 0 0 © c « € 0 0 © 0 c © c 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 t © 0 © 0 © c « c 0 ♦ 0 • 0 c © 0 0 © 0 © c o 0 c c © amd JEAN-ELIZABETH REYNOLDS COOPER B.L.I. Port Carbon, Pennsylvania Kappa Gamma Chi; Social Chairman; Maid of Honor, Junior Prom Court; Crowned the Prom Queen 4; Public Productions 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Commencement Committee. The gorgeousness ot a blonde bombshell coupled with an air of convincing earnestness — that ' s Jeannie! Intensely loyal, she is outspoken in her con- victions. Always impeccably groomed, her equable poise gives her a dash of savoire-faire. SVELTE o © 0 0 ♦ 0 5 0 0 5 5 © 0 5 © o 0 a o © © 3 5 o 0 © 0 o 3 © 3 © 3 ♦ 8 a © 3 © 0 © 3 0 3 3 3 © a o 3 © 3 Page Twenty-one Olid -losers and world- rSak erS L HELEN ZABELLE CORALIAN A.B. Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts Kappa Gamma Chi, Secretary 4, International Relations Club, Delegate to I. R. C. Convention; Spanish Club, Secretary; " Emer- sonian " Art Editor; Public Pro- ductions 1, 2, 3, 4; Commence- ment Program Committee. With the appealmgness of Puck and Peter Pan, Helen ' s interpre- tation of roles is a delightful causerie. Despite a modest ex- terior she has a rich appreciation for the artistic and a full quota of talent — and beaus! WINSOME Page Twenty-two s»o»o«oto»oto«e »o»o»o o«04040«g o»o«o»o »o«eto4o »o»o»o o o«o»o«o«o«o»e«eooto«o»o o ete o4o«o«o»o»o«ooo»o«o«o o 040oo«o»o«o»o»o«o »o«o«o On toll om i Dale moon 9 earns 0 0 o 0 0 » 0 5 FRANCES MARIE CROWLEY A.B. Watertown, Massachusetts Kappa Gamma Chi; Dean ' s List, International Relations Club; Spanish Club, Treasurer; Music Club; Newman Club; Public Pro- ductions 2, 3, 4; " Emersonian " Staff; Commencement Commit- tee. Sun bonnets, parasols, hoop skirts and jewelled fans — ah yes! and chaperones. . . . Perhaps it is Fran ' s quaint demureness, perhaps it is her quality of gentle ladyhood that recaptures the spirit of another age. Neverthe- less her sparkling eyes are defi- nitely twentieth century. GENTLE Page Twenty-three o o o»o»o»o o»o»o»o»a ►o o o o»o o o«w»o»o»o«o o»o o»o »o»o»o«o o«o«€)« «o»o«oto»o«e»o»e »e o«e»o«o«u«o»o»o«o«o»e»o«o«o»o»o»o»G»c •o»o ofo»o»o«oi u a c c o c 0 c 0 c c c © © c © c « 0 « c © 0 © 0 © c c © c c c c © c © c c © c c c c 0 0 © t c c • c © © c © c c 0 ♦ c ♦ c ♦ c c c © e « c © c © ■ c © c © c we am th ie mower 5 an BARBARA LESLIE GOLDBERG A.B. Haverhill, Massachusetts Sigma Delta Chi, Treasurer 4; Forum Speaking; Dean ' s List; Menorah Society, President 3; Treasurer 2. This then is Barbara — the pos- sessor of a beautiful reading voice and challenging brown eyes. Highly penetrative, keenly objective, her gravity is bred from reflection. Hers is the tem- pered steel of a fine mind bear- ing the decisive signature of honesty. SEDULOUS Page Twenty-four o»o«o»o c3 o o o»o o o o»ooo o»o»o»o»o» j »o o o»05o»o«o«o »o»o»o o »o»o»o»o»o»oto»eoo«o«o»o«o»o»o»e »ooo«o»q ©o«e©e©e »o»o«o«o»o«o«o»o»o»o»o»e ooo«o»o»ooo»o«o o©o©o©o»e©e©o ci 5«0006000»0«0«060 0«0»0«0 0»0®0t0»0»0«0»040»0 0 090«0«0«0«0 09000«r e0®0 0«040»0«0«0«0«0c0«0 0«0«0 0 0e0«0»0e0«0o0«000«0«0 0 0 n«0 ' oreuer it SecunS c • g g c » c o o c © c © 0 c « 0 ♦ c • c 0 © c © g g 6 © c © g wor • 06 JOAN CYDALICE HENICH B.L.I. New Rochelle, Nev York Kappa Gamma Chi, Sergeant- at-arms 2, Corresponding Secre- tary 4; International Relations Club; Newman Club; Junior Prom Committee; Stage Crew; " Emersonian " Staff; Public Pro- ductions 1, 2, 3, 4. Joan, the flaxen-haired heroine of innumerable public produc- tions, is our disarming exposer of inveracities. Unalterably frank in her opinions, she is definite in her code of ethics. Her flashes of insight prove a fundamentally understanding nature. CANDID a © g 5 o » 3 » g o © 9 © g © 3 © 3 3 3 3 © © 3 0 © 3 0 © 3 © 3 ♦ 3 © 3 3 9 3 3 © 9 © 3 © J 5 ♦ 9 9 © 9 3 ♦ 9 © © ♦ 0 » 0 ♦ ♦ Page Twenty-five ' 0»0«0»0i0 0t0«0 0 0t 0«0»0 0»0»0 0»0«040»0 0» 040 0»0»0 0»0 0«0»0»0 0« »♦»♦ 0 c «• 0 0 it 0 « o c c ♦ c it c « c c « 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c 0 c 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c 6 ♦ c ♦ 0 « c c o c ♦ 0 ♦ c 0 c c o c 6 0 ♦ 0 til e are Ine miiSic-malzerS L BERNICE LESLIE HERZOG A.B. New York City International Relations Club; Delegate to I. R. C. Convention; Stage Crew; Public Productions 1, 2, 3; Menorah; Literary Editor of " Emersonian ' ' ; Commence- ment Ball Committee. An unassuming air often belies the rare quality of an imagina- tive person. Bercie, refreshingly unaffected — has an exquisite appr eciation for classical music and a special talent for the crea- tive. Her femininity brings to mind delicate pastels and pink camellias. INTUITIVE 9 9 9 • 9 • 9 9 5 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 5 5 • o o 0 « 9 5 o o « 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 O 9 9 O 9 9 « 9 » 9 9 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 9 9 o 9 o 9 9 9 ♦ 9 O 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 • 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 • 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 o 9 d 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 ♦ 9 O 9 9 Page Twenty-six 50 0o0»0«00000 090 0«0«000»bc ©♦©♦©♦0»0»0 0«0«0»0 0»0 0 0»000«0 0 0«000»0 0«0«0»0 0«0«0»0 0 0«0»0»0»0 0 0»0 0 0«0»0«000 0 0 0«0909090o000»0«0 ' , 0 • c 6 ♦ (I » 0 0 c 0 c 0 0 c c « 0 « c 2 IRENE LELAND HILL B.L.I. Bar Harbor, Maine Phi Mu Gamma; Historian 3; Public Productions 2, 3, 4; Cap and Gown Committee 4. Penrod and Sam — and the little cherub Henry breathed new life under Irene ' s skillful characteri- zations. A polished actress off the stage as well as on the stage, she held " forte ' ' in the Happy Suite to the edification of de- lighted observers. A true esthete, she has an inherent sense of the graceful. AESTHETIC 9 O 0 0 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 4 9 3 9 » 9 9 0 3 9 9 0 5 9 9 $ o J c Page Twenty-seven c ♦ c ♦ 0 c « 0 4 c c 6 « c 0 c 4 c « 0 ♦ 0 4 ( 4 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c ♦ c 6 ♦ c ♦ 0 c c 4 c ♦ 0 ♦ 0 6 4 c 4 c c 0 4 c o 0 « c c 4 c o c c 6 4 c ♦ 0 c c 6 o c c 0 0 c • 0 0 c c ♦ c • c 6 4 0 c c 4 c 0 0 c « 0 6 «• 0 « 0 c ♦ 0 ♦ c ♦ 0 c 6 0 « c c c 0 o 0 c 0 0 c « c 0 4 0 wor iL cjreat cities . PAULA CAROLYN HILLERY A.B. Cambridge, Massachusetts Kappa Gamma Chi; Senior Class President; Student Government; Newman Club, President 2, 3; " Emersonian " Staff; Public Pro- ductions 1, 2, 3, 4. An energetic worker with a robust sense of humor, Paula added that certain jigger of spice to class meetings. She was an unforgettable Senior President, a dynamic personality. But above all, she refused to learn Siamese - and her hats out-Dached Dache! INDEFATIGABLE ♦ 9 • a j • 9 4 9 • 9 9 ♦ 0 4 9 • 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 9 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 a 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 9 4 9 ♦ 9 4 9 9 n Page Twenty-eight Numerous eligible fingers plucked numerous daisy petals to murmur mournfully, " she loves me not. " Here is the inspiration for lyric themes and romantic harmonies. " Engaging, en- gaged, married, " runs the refrain for attractive Phyl, for she is a starry-eyed example of the axiom, " Emerson women make excellent wives. " ENGAGING Page Twenty-nine c ♦ c ♦ 0 0 o 0 « c c c c c c 9 0 c « c 9 c « r 0 ♦ c • 0 e e c c c ♦ c ♦ 0 0 0 ■o c c c c ♦ c c 0 c o c © c t c © c ♦ c 0 © c 0 0 e c « c c t © c 0 ♦ c c © c c ♦ c c © c ♦ c c c © e c 0 0 c e t « c 6 c © 0 0 0 c © c 0 0 © 0 o c c c c $ 6 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 iailii non cm empire 6 KEORA KONO A.B. Honolulu, T. H. Phi Mu Gamma; Historian 3; Vice-President 4; President 4; Head Usher; May Queen; Public Productions 1, 2, 3, 4; Interna- tional Relations Club, Secretary- Treasurer 2, 3; Who ' s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Cosmopolitan in her tastes and talents, Keora is well schooled in all the requisites of grace. Her interpretations have a subtle finesse especially in the art of dance. " For the true idea of dancing is to realize perfect grace in motion and who does not know that a sense of the graceful is one of the highest faculties of our nature. " URBANE o a » 9 • 9 9 9 • 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 o 0 © 9 O 0 5 o 9 9 a 9 a 4 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 0 9 o 9 9 o 9 © 0 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 3 • 9 9 9 O 9 9 9 o 9 © 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 4 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 • 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 9 9 • 9 ♦ 9 ♦ a ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 9 9 4 9 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 4 9 9 9 9 Page Thirty 3 © 0 c • c c 0 o 0 c © c © 0 c © c c 0 c c 6 « c © 0 c 0 © . 0 ' c c • c c c • e 0 0 © c c 0 © e © c c c o 0 © c © c 6 ♦ 0 0 © 0 0 © c © c © 0 0 0 © c c © c © c © e © c 6 © c c © c © 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 0 © 0 © c 0 « c © 0 ♦ 0 € c c © 0 © 0, c 0 ♦ 0 c 0 0 c © n © 0 © c 0 © c Q ne man wi tk a cu a aream , a t P ' eaMiee SHIRLEE ANN LEVEN A.B. Providence, Rhode Island Sigma Delta Chi, Social Chair- man 2, Secretary 4; Public Pro- ductions 1, 2, 3; " Emersonian ' Business Manager; Menorah Vice-President 3; Commence ment Committee. Her vibrant personality has the sparkle of corked burgandy. It was professionally uncorked in " Blossom Time " this season to freshen the palate of Boston Theatre-goers. Beauty may be its own excuse for being but Shirlee effectively combines it with scholarship. SCINTILLATING 3 3 0 O 3 © 3 © 3 © 5 a ■ Page Thirty-one 0 0 • c e o c « c © c 0 « 0 ♦ c « 0 0 ♦ c ♦ c ♦ r ♦ c ♦ c ♦ 0 ♦ c c • c ♦ c 0 ♦ c c c • c c c ♦ c c 0 c ♦ c c c 0 « c c c o c c ♦ c c • c 0 c « c c ♦ c c c c 6 « 0 0 o c c © 0 ♦ 0 © c c o c c ♦ 0 c « 0 © c c c c c ♦ 0 6 ♦ c ♦ c © c c c • c c 0 © c 0 ♦ 0 • 0 conquer a crown . BETTIE ABRAHMSON LEVY B.L.I. Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania Public Productions 2, 3; Menorab 2, 3,4. Let it be said she has the forceful ambition of Clare Booth Luce. Let it be said she has the popu- larity of the number One spot on the Hit Parade. Let it be said she has the versatility of a centi- pede. But as for her wit, it is all Levy and a yard wide! PUNGENT Page Thirty-two 0 • 9 9 » 9 ♦ 9 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 0 0 0 o 0 o 0 5 9 o 0 © 9 9 • 9 9 « 9 ♦ 9 9 O 9 O 9 9 9 © 9 9 o 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 ♦ 9 9 © 9 9 © 9 ♦ 9 © 9 » 9 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 9 • 9 9 9 ♦ 9 » 9 9 • 9 9 9 9 O 9 9 o 9 9 • 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 0 ♦ 9 9 » 9 O 9 9 9 © 9 9 • 9 ♦ 9 9 9 ♦ 9 9 • 9 9 9 9 © 9 new t ♦ t 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c ♦ c ♦ c ♦ c t • c 4 c c 6 4 0 ♦ c c c 4 0 ♦ c 4 c c c ♦ c c ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 4 c 0 4 c 4 c 4 t 4 t 4 c 4 c 4 o 4 0 4 0 4 C 4 c c 4 0 4 C 4 c c 4 0 4 0 4 C 4 0 4 C « 0 4 0 4 0 4 t 4 0 4 0 c 4 C 4 C 4 0 4 c 4 C 4 0 c 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 . 4 c 4 C 4 C 4 0 4 c 4 C 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 4 C 4 e 4 0 4 C til min a PAULINE MANOLATO B.L.I. Valparaiso, Indiana Public Productions 3, 4; Stage Crew; Commencement Ball Committee. ioncj 5 measure . Pauline brings unusual sensi- tivity to her work, building spires ol meaning into the dryest parts. Behind that deceptive reserve is a wealth of bubbling humor and a gay spirit of camaraderie. The play is not always the thing " in which to catch the conscience of a king.” INTENSE Page Thirty-three empire clown LISBETH-ANNE NIESZ A.B. Niagara Falls, New York Phi Mu Gamma; Treasurer 3; Student Government, Treasurer 2, Secretary 3; Public Produc- tions 1, 2, 3; International Rela- tions Club; Dean ' s List; Who ' s Who Among Students in Amer- ican Universities and Colleges. Scotty is eminently positive in her attitude toward life. Whether she is expounding the mechan- istic analysis or analyzing the mad scene from King Lear, we can expect a comprehensive evaluation. Irndescent thoughts give a fleeting glimpse of a lumi- nous mind. Page Thirty-four o»o»o»o »o o»o»o»090»o»o»o»o o o »o»o ot 0 9ooo»o«o »oteto«o«o»e«o«o»o»e»o«o 9 o«q«o»o •ototoioootooQootooooototoiototo ooo oo oooototoco •o«o o»o«o»oto«e«o o»i 1 Ue are the Ji reameri o ream$ BARBARA SELIB PARNAS A.B. Brookline, Massachusetts Public Productions 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom Committee, Menorah; Sum- mer Theatre. Barbara made Emerson ' s halls ring with the laughter her viva- cious personality provoked. She ran the gamut from intense calm to excitable nervousness, and one never knew what to expect. One moment laughing uproari- ously, the next, seriously frown- ing, she kept us awake watching her next emotional move. UNPREDICTABLE Page Thirty-five e in the cuje6 hjincj AUDREY JANE PRENTZEL B.L.I. Hempstead, Long Island, New York Phi Mu Gamma, Secretary 4; Public Productions 1, 2, 3, 4; In- ternational Relations Club, Vice- President 4, Secretary 3; Dean ' s List 4; Commencement Program Committee. At times completely natural in her enthusiasms, at other times impenetrably poised, Audrey offers a perplexing study in con- trasts. The dominant note is the emphasis on modernism. Her fashions from Vogue have often made her the Lady of the Hour, with countless orchids for re- membrance. SOPHISTICATED Page Thirty-six 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 0 5 9 9 0 9 o 9 9 5 0 o 9 ♦ 9 9 9 0 o o o a 9 o 9 o 9 o 9 o 9 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 8 9 0 9 9 O o 9 9 9 • 9 9 9 o 9 « 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 • 9 9 « 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 • 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ♦ a 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ( « t c c 0 © 0 © c c © 0 c © 0 « 0 © o ♦ c • c $ c c c c © c 0 0 0 c c 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 © 0 © 0 © c © c c ♦ c 0 c t © 0 © 0 © c c © c © e © 0 0 t © 0 © c 6 © c © 0 c D © c © c 0 6 © 0 © 0 c © 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 0 © c c © 0 « c « c « c « c 6 © c c c 0 ♦ c © 0 « c © 0 © c © c 0 6 © c © c the buried ear HELEN C. ROSENFELD A.B. Brooklyn, New York Sigma Delta Chi, President; Dean ' s List; Menorah Society; Public Productions 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant Editor of " Emerson- ian”; Fellow of American Speech Correction Society. Alert, definite in ideology, yet that tang of recurring humor, that impish quirk to the eyebrow betray vivid Helen as an enter- taining raconteur of unforget- table anecdotes. Her mental sprightliness is not limited to anecdotes. No indeed! There was that course in geology. . . KALEIDOSCOPIC o 5 5 ♦ o © 0 0 3 o 3 © 0 3 3 3 © 3 3 © 3 O 3 © © j 3 © 3 © © Page Thirty-seven 3 ♦ u C • c 0 c 0 0 0 • c 0 c c c ♦ c 9 0 0 0 c c c c c « e c c c ♦ c c 0 c c c c ♦ 0 «• c 0 c ♦ l) ♦ c c 1 ♦ c c ♦ c 0 9 0 t ■ { e c ' 0 c « 0 ♦ c ♦ c ♦ t c ♦ o ♦ ♦ c c c 5 « 0 0 th un i la, our 5i CjllUUj EVELYN ANN SCHNURR A.B. Albany, New York Phi Mu Gamma, President 4, Pan-Hellenic Association, Vice- President; Public Productions 2 3,4. Evie offers the friendliness ol comfortable tweeds. Her warm fascination is based on hei ability to see everything objec- tively — including herself. She can observe the significant with impartial detachment and dis- cerning clarity. Then too, there is that unique flair for the origi- nal, reminiscent of Cornelia Otis Skinner — and a connoisseur ' s appreciation for the quixotic qualities in language. LINGUISTIC a a 3 a 9 • 9 0 • 9 ♦ 9 • 9 0 5 o 9 « a a 5 •» o 0 0 • 0 9 ♦ 0 0 3 o 9 9 0 9 0 9 o 0 « 0 9 ♦ 3 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 » 9 9 9 « 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 o 9 9 9 3 9 3 9 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 3 3 9 ♦ 9 9 9 3 • 9 3 ♦ a 9 9 9 9 O 9 9 9 3 • 9 9 • 3 4 ) • 9 » 9 o 9 ♦ 9 0 9 9 ♦ 9 • 9 1 9 • 9 9 9 9 • 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 II Page Thirty-eight 0 0 0 0 « 0 « 040 « 0 0 0 0 « 0 « 0 » 0 » 0 « 0 0 0 0 6 « 0 0 « 0 « 0 0 0 « 0 « 0 0 » 0 0 0 « 0 0 « 0 040 « 0 « 0 0 0 » 0 « 0 « 0 » 0 0 « 0 « 0 « 0 0 0 » 0 « 0 0 0 « 000 0 « 0 « 0 » 0 » 0 0 0 0 0 0 « 090 « 0 ' t ♦ c « c 6 o 0 o 0 © c © 0 © 0 © c 0 e c 0 ♦ c c © our mir til 5 5 5 5 © o MARJORIE JEAN SEMONIAN A.B. Arlington Heights, Mass. Kappa Gamma Chi; President, Vice-President; Dean ' s List; Inter- national Relations Club, Presi- dent; Delegate to I. R. C. Con- vention; Class Secretary 3; Pan- Hellenic Association, President; Spanish Club; Public Produc- tions 1, 2, 3; Editor-in-chief of " Emersonian " ; Who ' s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Striking, highly individualistic, Midge has the whimsical charm of one who deals with intangi- bles. Hers is the compelling humility of the idealist who un- knowingly personifies her own ideals. Richly creative, she holds a searching mirror to life and seeks cosmic truth in the reflec- tion. REFLECTIVE « o © a Page Thirty-nine 5 € 0 C c 0 0 c c 0 0 c « 6 o 0 c 0 « c 0 • c « 0 c c ♦ c 6 « c 0 c c 0 0 0 o ♦ 0 « c c c c ■ () c 0 V t c AJ o w th irew th iem wi NANCY JUNE SIMPSON B.L.I. Narbeth, Pennsylvania Phi Mu Gamma, Secretary 2, Vice-President 3; Class Treas- urer 1, 2; Vice-President 3; Dean ' s List; International Relations Club, Vice-President 3; Student Government, Vice-President 3, President 4; Public Productions 1, 2, 3, 4; Who ' s Who Among Students in American Universi - ties and Colleges. That ' s not a Shakesperian dag- ger Nancy sees before her. It ' s a gavel. She rules with all the dig- nity of one of Banquo ' s heirs, for she has the best perquisites for a criterion of justice. Nan is su- perbly at ease on stage, plat- form, or on a horse. Now does her project gather to a head. " Ta-Ta Mama!” VERSATILE o a 9 9 9 • 9 9 9 ♦ a ♦ 9 0 9 O 0 5 9 5 o 0 9 9 « 9 ♦ 9 • 9 9 9 O 9 9 O 9 9 • 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 O 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 • 0 9 9 9 ♦ 9 O 9 9 9 0 o 9 9 ♦ a 9 ♦ 9 » 9 9 9 9 » 9 9 © 9 » 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ ♦ 9 9 • 9 ♦ 9 9 o 9 ♦ 9 « ft Page Forty 0 0 g 0 © 0 © 0 o 0 c o g g c c « c « c 9 c c « g g o g c « g c ♦ c ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ g o o © g 6 o © 0 © c « € 0 © o « e o 0 o o o g c 0 © g g g g c © g 6 © c © c © g c © c © g g g c © o © g o © o © c © 0 © c © c g g g 6 © g c c © g g g c © c © 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 e new wor (L wor tk BARNABY PRESCOTT SMITH B.L.I. Newton Centre, Massachusetts Phi Alpha Tau, President 3, Class President 3; Class Treasurer 4; Public Productions 1, 2, 3, 4; Chairman of Commencement Ball. li Ik V " Out of the Frying Pan " into " The Tempest. " Yet Barney weathered four seasons of his- trionic intemperance for the sake of the Theatre Workshop. His technique is irreproachable at all times. An ardent Platonite, he made the smoker his Repub- lic, and sundry members of the fair sex became his willing Re- publicans. QUIZZICAL Page Forty-one 9 © 9 5 5 « 0 g o © 3 g 5 © a © 9 © g o © 0 o © © 9 © 9 © g 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 » 9 5 © g 9 © 9 © g 9 9 9 © 9 9 © © c 0 c c o c « c o c 0 c ♦ c c ♦ 0 o 0 © c © G t 0 © 0 © c c © c © c c © c © 0 c © c 0 c c 0 c c c c c c c c c c © c © c c 0 c c © c © c © c © c t c © c c c © 0 c © 0 G ♦ c c © c © c c © c © c c c © 0 0 © 0 Jor eacL age is a dream L LEONORA SOUSA A.B. Stonington, Connecticut International Relations Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Public Productions 1, 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Junior Prom Committee. Bright eyed little Leonore with the pert Harlequin glasses, busily whizzes in and out of class rooms or the Espy, or pops hap- pily over to Emerson Proms. Always high-spirited, always brimming with unconfined en- thusiasm, she finds time for everything and everybody in her travels. SPRIGHTLY » a • 9 9 • 9 • 9 9 0 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 © 0 © 9 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 • 9 ♦ 9 « 9 9 O 9 9 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 • 9 © 9 © 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 • 9 © 9 © 9 9 9 • 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 • 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 • 9 © 9 ♦ 9 0 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 9 © 9 9 9 » 9 ♦ 9 • 9 9 © 9 © 9 © Page Forty-two ♦ 0 • c 6 © c © c 6 © 0 © c c c c c « c e 0 ♦ c © c © c 6 © 0 « 0 c S ♦ c 0 © c c ♦ 0 ♦ c 0 0 « c ♦ c 0 0 © 0 ♦ 0 0 0 « 0 © 0 ♦ c 0 © 0 ♦ c © c © c © 0 © c © c « 0 © c © 0 © e 6 © c c © c 0 © c 6 © 0 © 0 o 0 © 0 © 0 ♦ 0 « c ♦ c ♦ 0 6 © 0 © 0 0 0 ♦ 0 ♦ e ♦ c « 0 ♦ 0 © 0 © c o 0 © 0 ♦ 0 Or one that is comma to birth MARCIA DEAN SPOUND A.B. Fitchburg, Massachusetts Commencement Program Com- mittee; Public Productions; Men- orah. In hair, smile, and heart, Marcia is the golden victim of St. Midas ' touch. The guintessence — is a certain refreshing friendliness. Thoughtful and unreservedly generous, she has the ability to see anything she begins to an enthusiastic finish. GENIAL 5 o 0 3 « 0 3 5 5 5 5 ♦ o ♦ 0 ♦ 3 3 5 5 © o 3 © 5 3 5 9 ♦ 0 ♦ 3 9 © 3 ♦ 9 9 5 3 5 o © a © a 3 3 9 3 3 9 5 3 3 o ♦ 3 © 3 3 5 a 5 © 9 3 ♦ 0 Page Forty-three u C c c 0 c c 0 © 0 ♦ c © c c c © c r • e © c « 0 © c © c © 0 © c c « 0 0 © 0 © c c c © c c c 0 c © c c 0 c c c c © c c c c c © c © 0 ♦ 0 ♦ e t © 0 © c © c © c c © c c © c c © c ♦ ♦ c c © c c © c © c c © c 0 ' ■ 0 0 th e are Lae mu 3 LC-maneri L MARY ANN SULLIVAN A.B. Brighton, Massachusetts Phi Mu Gamma; Public Produc- tions 1, 2, 3, 4; Dean ' s List 3; Class Treasurer 3; Summer Theatre. An incomparable hostess, Terry is the personification of all that is representative in the Gody ' s Book. Tea at five is a rule of polite society, so despite conflict- ing rehearsals, U.S.O. — or con- temporary literature — Terry complies. A convincing Raquel, a dauntless Rosalind, a capti- vating Miranda, but oh " Bedalia we love you so. " GRACIOUS Page Forty-four ♦ 0 • c c c c © c © c © 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 6 ♦ c • e c © c c © 0 0 •© 0 © c c ♦ 0 t © 0 © 0 c © 0 0 0 © c © c © t « 0 fi © c ♦ 0 0 © 0 0 © 0 © 0 0 © D © 0 c 0 © 0 0 © 0 « 0 © c © c © 0 © c © 0 © c © 0 © c © 0 © c © 0 0 © c © c © c © c © e © c ♦ 0 © 6 ' 0 © c © c © c ♦ 0 • 6 8 © B © 0 6 6 6 6 © B © we are the at reamers o reams RUTH ROXANNE THOMPSON A.B. Martha ' s Vineyard, Massachusetts Kappa Gamma Chi, Interna- tional Relations Club, Dean ' s List, Music Club, Spanish Club; Public Productions 3, 4. Ruth ' s philosophy is based on a resolute romanticism rather than on an absolute realism. Perhaps that is why one finds her rare dignity clothed in quiet senti- ment. Her quick smile betrays her keen sense of humor. A dev- otee of casual tweeds, she is a very lovely person with distinc- tive tastes. DISCRIMINATING « 2 5 o 5 © 3 5 3 9 © 0 3 © © 0 5 9 5 © 9 9 9 9 0 5 5 © 9 9 9 5 9 5 © 9 3 9 5 9 © 0 © 3 3 © © 3 9 3 « 9 © 3 © 3 © 3 ♦ 3 © © a © 9 © 9 3 a © a © o 5 5 9 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 3 © 9 © 9 9 3 Page Forty-five c g c o c o c « c © c g 6 g o c © c c © © 0 « 0 © c g 6 © g © © o c g c o c © t 0 © o © c c g 6 ♦ g c © g Books scattered carelessly on the desk, girls sitting all over my bed and the tloor, smoke, giggles and gossip filling the room — this is no condition conducive to remem- bering. I must be an odd soul . . . " Say, did you hear about . . " Yes, she did say that . . ' Isn ' t it awful that she . . " Did you see . . DID YOU SEE . . . " Did you see the college? Did you see the ' dorm ' ? Did you see the Dean and the President? Did you see the Esplanade? Did you see the theatre? Did you see those smooth upper classmen? " September 1940 — Shy girls and boys swept up in the routine of classes. The mystery attached to the class called Anatomy. The time the skeleton lost a phalange and the snickers that followed it until it landed in the corner. Ralph Patterson faint- ing gracefully on the stage and we knew it was Pantomime Class. Sebastian Sampas and Barbara Liflander exchanging verbal blows over Saroyan in Composition with Dr. Wiley acting as soothing mediator. Midge impishly introducing those elusive " clay ferbens on the derf side. " Then nights and nights spent with good books (or so Dr. McKinley said) for the " College Life " course. The big social event of the year, the Inter-Class Dance at the Sheraton . . . new gowns, new perfumes, new men. Then the big financial venture with Norman Lear getting five pounds slimmer till it was over. The raffle which our class sponsored that resulted in a radio victrola for the college smoker. The beautiful ships A1 Platt painted all over the smoker walls, and the sea-sickish feeling we got every time we looked at them. Those afternoon rehearsals and the thrill we all felt as we did our first college plays, " Fresh Fields " and " Susan and God, " directed by Mr. Shaw. Everyone wanting to play a lead opposite Barney Smith. The Class trip to Province- town where the girls developed beautiful sunburned noses and a crush on class president Johnnie Sheehan. Bercie spending all her nickels playing " I ' ll Be with You in Apple Blossom Time " in the juke box at the Espy. Bob Tennant ' s unforgettable reading of " Dover Beach " in Convocation for the " Oral Reading of Modern Poetry " program. All those bull sessions Steve Akillian and Russell Dunn held for the Social Science exams. Then it was June and time for Finals. Then came the hectic cram- ming which resulted in bitten nails, black circles under the eyes, and precarious knowledge in our heads . . . gay plans for the summer vacation. . . . " Good bye, see you next September. Don ' t forget to write.” September 1941 — Everyone walking up the stone steps with a comfortable feel- ing of belonging. The shrill squeals when we greeted one another All the ques- tions about the summer. People lying out on the Esplanade to see if they could keep that vacation tan. Jimmy Metcalf ' s frequent consultations with his little address book. Wilda ' s dramatic ensemble at the Inter-Class Dance. Bill Brennan ' s gripping theatrical performance Fresh-soph night. The mysterious disappearance of the © 9 © 3 9 9 • 9 • 9 0 © 9 © 0 © 9 3 5 © 0 © 0 5 5 © 9 © 0 a © 9 9 ♦ 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 • 9 « 9 « 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 3 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 « 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 ♦ 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 « 9 • 3 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 3 ♦ 9 9 3 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © Page Forty-six »o«o«oso»o»o«o oto oto(ooo»o»(? o otB«o ow«o«o»n«o«o«o»otc»o»o o»o«n mio»oto«o«oso«o«o«o o«0)0«o o»oeoso o oio o»oto«oto o o m-»»o«o«o«o«woto;o n o.o.o«oto»oio o«0)0«o o i janitor. The time the police squad arrived under the mistaken impression that it was a dead drunk, not a dead duck that was to be removed from the front lawn. All those history of English literature reports. The rehearsals for the One Act plays and " Night Over Taos” that kept us in the theatre Saturday afternoons and made us wonder whether being an actress was more important than missing the Harvard game . . . the inevitable wistful conclusion! The dashing appearance of Louis Calhern at " Convo.” Then the special musicale program. The reception accorded the first chapter of Paul Menard ' s first novel in Advanced Composition. Then December 7th . . . The panicky feeling we got. The solemn faces on everyone. The English " Lit” exam called off. The gathering of everyone into the unnatural quiet of the theatre to hear President Roosevelt ' s address. The student body singing the " Star Spangled Banner.” The boys going off to war — Steve Akillian, Norman Lear, John Sheehan, Bill Brennan, Robert Tennant, Sebastian Sampas, Albert Platt, Jimmy Metcalf, Allan Jaspar, Russell Dunn, Paul Menard, Barbara Gallison in the WAC, and Peggy Rosenblatt in the WAVES. September 1942— The important feeling that grew each time we signed " Junior” next to our names on the registration cards. The Junior productions done with more assurance than our other plays. " Heart of the City,” and our rollicking melodrama, ' Hazel Kirke,” in which we all sang off key and laughed at Paula ' s heart breaking rendition of " I Was Seeing Nellie Home.” The diverting merriment caused, by Helen ' s and Terry ' s roller skating olio number up and down the aisles of the work- shop. The excitement of the Junior Prom and the electing of Jean Lrancis as Prom Queen. Shirlee-Ann, Barbara S. and Helen R. convincing themselves that the only reason they didn ' t get it was because they hadn ' t paid their Student Government dues and therefore weren ' t eligible. The keen disappointment when Dr. Wiley left. The deep interest in psychology and Mr. Sheffield. Then came May and with it our annual May Day celebration with Keora as queen. The seniors gloating and feel- ing, oh so clever about our not finding out their plans for Sneak Day. The usual hubbub over class elections. The unparalled remark of Dr. Gray-Smith when the leg of his chair gave way during a debatable argument in Logic and he calmly remarked as he picked himself off the floor that " the argument didn ' t have a leg to stand on.” The annual cramming for exams at the Espy with a coke in one hand and an aspirin in the other. September 1943 — Seniors. At last we have reached our goal. Most of us feel young and slightly scared when we think about next year, and getting a position. We forgot about it while we gave our Shakesperian production, " The Tempest.” We had to forget it then for we were too busy laughing at Joanne ' s putty nose almost falling off, and the girls in the dressing room parading around in very feminine slips and very masculine beards. We forget about it when we listen to Mr. Wade ' s dry witticisms in the Workshop, or when Helen 0. and Lrannie demonstrate the effective- ness of saying " yes” in Spanish, or for that matter — in any language! We forget about it when we listen to Arline ' s humorous dissertations on the psychology of frustration. We forget about it while we busy ourselves with the productions of " The Philadelphia Story,” " Wingless Victory,” and " Claudia. " We forget about it when Nan Simpson offers threatening competition to Prank Sinatra with her one note range, or when Jeannie Cooper holds seances for us in the dormitory. Yes, we forget about graduation for a while when we rush through the halls to classes, or look hopefully in our mail boxes only to discover we owe a fine to the library. We forget about it when we have a last companionable " coke” with Dr. Parkhurst at the Espy. We forget about it when that Leap Year glint in our eyes finds a focus at the Senior Ball. But Commencement Week inevitably approaches and with it the rush of breakfasts and teas. Wonder where we will be next year, what we will be doing. . . . The letters have already started to come from our classmates in North Africa, Great Britain, Sicily, India, China and Alaska. Wonder where they will be next year, what they will be doing. . . . Page Forty-seven o « 0 o © 0 J 0 0 0 5 0 5 o © 5 © 5 0 5 © 0 4 C 4 C c 4 C o e 4 C c c 4 0 4 C 4 (i 4 0 4 0 0 4 0 4 0 4 C ♦ 0 4 C 4 e 4 c 4 C 4 0 4 C 4 C c c 4 c c 0 0 c 4 C 4 C C c 4 c 0 0 4 0 0 c 0 c 4 c 0 0 0 c 0 4 c 4 0 4 0 6 4 0 c c c 4 e 4 0 4 0 c 4 0 0 4 e o 4 C 4 0 0 4 c 4 c 4 c c 4 c 4 C 4 C 6 4 0 4 c c 0 4 0 4 fl CLASS PROPHECY The silent shuffle of feet moving hesitatingly along thick caipet — black mortal boards worn for the first time sitting insecurely on softly waved hair — rustling papers in the hands of solemn visaged professors — haunting strains of a well remembered tune resonating in the dim-lit chapel — . Amid such an atmosphere, we seniors file into our seats and sit, our eyes fixed upon the speakers ' platform, our faces registering assumed poise. Outside — it seems a thousand miles away — automobiles honk hurriedly by, taxis rattle up Huntington Avenue, a middle-aged woman with her dog stops lor a moment to scan the latest editions in the Dartmouth Street book store, and across the square a girl and a boy sip cocktails as they listen to a maudlin love song. We sit — we listen In a few moments our hands will receive that coveted roll of white paper elabo- rately scrolled in Latin. But in a few moments, the days of our formal education will be over — ended. Four years — a gust of wind across our faces. Four years — leaves falling from a now barren tree. Four years like a bright shining hour, fade away to be relegated to the dark recesses of remembrance. Can it be that all that experience was actually packed into so small a space of time; all that heartbreak of growing up — all the days and nights of youthful despair mingled with ecstacy — or was it just a dream we dreamed during the sleep of adolescence? No, it was no dream and what awaits us outside amid the roar of traffic and the tumult of a thousand lives, is no dream. This moment, all the moments before and all the moments ahead live, lived, and will be lived in a kaleidoscope of reality We sit — we listen. Little do the men and women sauntering by realize that among them stalk despair and happiness, failure and success rattling in their palms the dice of fate and playing an endless game — the game that is life — our life. Which ruthless gambler will claim us as his spoils? If we could answer that there would be no unpatterned destinies, colleges would close and professors would leave their rostrums. We do not know, can never know, what awaits us outside. Yet we who sit and listen have much in our favor. Here, at Emerson we have learned how to live, how to think, how to discriminate between that which is worth while and that which is irrelevant. We have learned how to take our place in a complex world made up of intolerance, false ideologies, and bitter defeats. We possess the power to make the first step in a tortuous trek toward a better world, a world of tolerance, justice and triumph for the ideologies we know to be right. We do not prophesy great things in matters of monetary success, we do not prophesy great things in matters of personal success, for they are too escapable, too intangible to really matter. There is only one thing of which we are sure; that in the years to come we shall have our place. America has entered her third year of war. The whole world is rocking with the bombardments of guns and shells. The wreckage of hopes lie in an endless heap before our eyes. Our world seems to be an ever turning turmoil. A hundred million hands are reaching out to grasp something that will enable peace of mind and serenity of soul. Peace of mind and serenity of soul — that is not very much to ask of life is it? But what can give us this, what can give us the slightest approximation? Yet it is all man asks of life and very seldom attains. We shall very likely never attain it, but perhaps our lives will be worth enough so that some future generation may succeed in its realization. We must look into the future and try to visualize our postwar era. The thou- sands ol boys and gi rls who have never lived a normal ' — if there is such a thing — life need leaders and teachers, men and women who are equipped with the ways and means of educating them. We must never lose sight of the fact that they are the hope of the coming world, and it is our task to help feed their starved minds with Page Forty-eight 5 4 9 4 a 5 4 9 0 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 0 4 9 9 4 0 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 ♦ 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 0 9 4 9 4 9 9 ♦ 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 ♦ 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 5 4 9 4 9 4 0 ♦ 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 0 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 9 4 9 9 4 0 4 0 4 a decent and right philosophy of life devoid of cynicism, remembering all the while that we, too, will be learning and profiting through experience and shall continue to do so until the bells toll for us. From a window on the third floor at 13G Beacon Street one may look out upon a Boston scene — old homes — Victorian architecture — purple-stained windows — yet, there, looming in the background, is a huge white building, handsome by its sheer contrast with the surroundings. It is twentie+h century in every respect — it seems to defy the little church which is dwarfed by its magnificence. But the little church covered with ivy, has weathered storms of all kinds. The little church, wherein we sit and listen, stands for all simplicity and Christian humbleness. Outside the world swiftly moves around and around; men die and are forgotten; ideals are smothered and hate and destruction run rampant. The clouds of rum are stretched out endlessly across the skies. W e sit — we listen — and as the music swells up to be heard for the last time, the sun bursts through a sliver in the sky. Its rays are caught by the stained glass windows. Momentary glory is bestowed upon our heads. Remember? It was Shelley who said, " Life like a dome of many colored glass stains the white radiance of eternity. " The church, the ivy, the white edifice, the music, the clouds, the sun, taxis, automobiles, men and women hurrying by — fit somewhere into a huge pattern. The old and the new go side by side. We must not condemn nor accept either. Rather we should take what is best from each. And so be it with our life — we sit — we listen. Bidwell, Smith, Hillery, Bishop Page Forty-nine c c o c c « c c ♦ c 6 0 c c c c c First row: Allen, Carman, Eldredge, Margolin, Swan. Second row: Sverd, Gallagher, Winterbottom, Quinn, Hodgman, Connor, Sullivan, Sanderson, Miller. Third row: Wilkish, Bouchard, Perry, Morrison, Pike, Whitney, Prescott, Black, Coleman, Bird. JUNIOR CI.ASS The sparks from memory ' s fire rose high tonight. The blue and orange and yellow of the flames intermingled and reached out into the darkness of my mind; they formed themselves into gay little flame-folk who danced intrepidly about and came to life before me. They took the shapes of familiar people, places and events and as I tried eagerly to catch them in the grip of a steadfast thought, they playfully evaded me. But one flame-folk rose too high and I caught it firmly in my mind. It was an inquisitive frolicsome figure wearing a purple and gold freshman cap with the letter " E” on the front. Suddenly the memories of our freshman year at Emerson College recurred lucidly, the first being the Reception Tea and how we all stood diffidently about, gazing in awe at the gracious upperclassmen. We played games and came to know each other fairly well. . . . Remember our first class controversy being whether or not to have a school election of Miss Emerson Freshman? But we went through with it and everything v as peaceful again. Then there were the plays on which we worked diligently, fust the names of which will always recall Saturday morning rehearsals in the bare white-wailed rooms of the next building- plays like " Susan and God,” " Personal Appearance” and " The Little Foxes.” Phi Alpha Tau was a prominent working force of Emerson then and their outstanding event was the varsity show they presented in the theatre one evening. The Conga act was the biggest hit of all; upon thinking of it we ' ll always hear the beating of the drums and the swish of the taffeta skirts and see the shadows of the dancers fall bewitchingly across the walls of the dim candle-lit workshop. Things that stand out Page Fifty o»o«ooo o o o o »o o o 090oo»ooo »o o o o »o o o(o»o»o»o ooo»o»o o o«o«ooo»o»o»o o oooo«o»o»o o o o«o»o«o«o»o»o«ooo o o»o ooo o«o»o»ooo«o«o »o o»e o»o o o e e 0 ' strikingly in our freshman year: How we received the news of Pearl Harbor over the radio in the smoker . . . the atmosphere of the " Espy " during the Star Spangled Banner after the President ' s speech . . . Boston ' s first blackout . . . and Erich von Stroheim ' s visit. I relaxed and allowed the wriggling impatient memory of my first year at college to escape and lose itself with the rest of memory ' s fire. I caught another dancing spark and recalled the struggle it was deciding whether or not to return to school that following September, everyone wanting to be actively connected with war work. Most of us came back — not only to collect the diploma we ' d started out for, but because we knew it was the right thing to do. Our boys started leaving us one by one and to this day we talk about them and wish they were with us. No matter where they are or what they are doing, Nicky, Arnold, Dominic, Jolly, the Altshulers, Tommy, Johnnie, Lennie and the others can be assured of best remembrances and a hearty home-coming at any time. That was the year of the Cocoanut Grove fire. It was the year we had the invaluable five-week vacation. It was the year that many " big-little " things happened to all of u s. We gave " Excursion, " " Hannelle, " " Every- woman " and " Stage Door. " It wasn ' t long before we handed in the closed accounts of our second year. " Two down and two to go " we were all saying, and the words held a different connotation for every one of us. We settled down to the extensive and elaborate plans of our junior year. It was our third Christmas at war. . . . There were big events like " Turandot, " " Guest in the House, " and our Junior Prom. Toward the end we began to realize that in only one year we would be aonning caps and gowns and marching forward to receive our degrees. A narrow stream, our senior year, separated us from that day and we knew that we ' d find Adventure once we ' d crossed it; but somehow, most of us preferred looking across at it rather than to be there. I had caught three separate sparks from memory ' s fire and held them all. But the cycle of my thoughts was incomplete; somewhere in the fire was a fourth flame, a final one that concluded our college years. The little flame-folk continued dancing audaciously about in my mind, flirting, taunting, daring me to catch them. I sought for the one that would finish the trend of memories. One spark rose brilliantly higher than all the rest and I seized and held it; and just before it elusively slipped away, I recognized it as a familiar favorite quotation held dear during college days. William Wordsworth said it: " Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive — But to be young was very heaven. " JUNIOR CLASS President FLORENCE ELDREDGE Vice-President JEANNE ALLEN Secretary OLIVE CARMAN Treasurer . AUDREY MARGOLIN Page Fifty-one t c o 0 c c « c First row: Sanderson, Rickards, Reynolds, Dowd, Austin. Second row: DeCaprio, Breakstone, Greene, Thompson, Costello, White, Schwartz, Glover, Mieluch. Third row: Saftel, Polian, Maxwell, Waldman, Lally, Geisinger, Walowit, Berkowitz, Small, Reda, Stern. 0 • 9 9 • 0 9 9 » 9 » 9 9 0 a o o 9 a o 9 4 9 9 9 9 9 5 9 ♦ t SOPHOMORE CLASS Prologue: The curtain opens upon a new stage, a new world of interest and adventure to intrigue the cast wisely directed by President Morrill Ring, Vice-President Eleanor Kleine, Secretary Dorothy Thompson and Treasurer Dexter Reynolds. The action begins with startling impa ct, this being Fresh-Soph Night. Like any other play the characters plunge forth with determined eagerness. Members of the cast become well acquainted; the plot still remains to be unravelled and as the Prologue nears its end, everyone looks forward to Act I. Act I Wherein the leading roles are portrayed by President Dexter Reynolds, Vice- President Bonnie Sanderson, Secretary Betty-Bird Austin, and Treasurer Beatrice Dowd. Scene I is a revival of Fresh-Soph night from a different perspective. We amateur freshmen attempt to entertain the more professional sophomores and emerge with slightly dampened spirits. Scene II needs no explanation as one gazes admiringly (we hope) at the Smoker, freshly painted in soothing shades of Rust and Green. The play will not end, the curtain will not close until the cast of ' 46 completes Acts II and III and sets out " to conquer " in the epilogue. 9 0 9 O 9 O 9 4 0 Page Fifty-two |0»0»U«0«0 0 » 040 0 ) 0 0 » 0 0 »0l0«0«0 »O(O«O»O«O«O«O Q0O»O«O«O»e»O«O«O0O»O»O»O »0»0 e»0«0»0»0«0»000 ' FRESHMAN CLASS We like Emerson . . . We like going to college . . . We like being the class of ' 47 . . . We like being royally entertained as guests at the Inter-Class dance. We like walking along the Esplanade (our million dollar campus) to get to school. We like the upper classmen who have been so kind to us and we wish to thank them for the help and confidence that they gave us when we first arrived here, a little nervous and uncertain. We like electing our class officers and attending our class meetings and watching our class grow and become something. We like our class officers: our President, Bob Guest; our Vice-President, Kay Rice; our Secretary, Emily Jennings; our Treasurer, Joan Peyser. We like the tradition of Fresh-Soph night when we can modestly exhibit our hidden talents. We like acting in our own little theater and look forward eagerly to playing many and different parts. We like presenting public pantomime productions. We like shouting " Whoa ' ' and doing other exercises to improve our voices in the most approved Kenney manner. We like studying our English grammar and writing " adult " Compositions. We like speaking over a microphone in our radio classes. We like being the class of ' 47 . . . We like going to college . . . We like Emerson . . . First row: Harris, Strassburger, Broussard, Touzjian, Dempsey, Franz, Parsons, Vogel, Douillette. Second row: Anderson, Levenson, Koffman, Fisher, Peyser, Guest, Rice, Jennings, Copellman, Rego, Levitan. Third row: Simmons, Bradley, Shor, Kessler, Sullivan, Kelley, Goldblatt, Fruitman, Bacigalupo, Leary. Fourth row: McGowan, Cates, Zais, Murphy, Sher, Britton, Shachat, Rubin, Abrams, Santry. Fifth row: Leary, Schreiber, Markoff, Rothschild, Goldstein, Solomon, Robinson, Copeland, Black, Portong, Wheeler, Mathis, Strickland. Page Fifty-three c c c 0 9 5 c First row: Niesz, Sullivan, Simpson, President; Perry. Second row: Reynolds, Eldredgc, Hillery, Guest. f d 1 (7 k STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 0 The life of Student Government Association is like the life of " a normal child. " It starts out with a wild flurry, flinging its arms and legs into every direction, gazing wide-eyed with confusion and bewilderment. Its youth is spent indulging in the gayeties of existence, but almost without warning, maturity arrives, with its cares and responsibilities. Student Government then becomes a true child of Emerson College, having passed through the four stages of Evolution. September — the Colossal — the period of the whole. Student Government spon- sors a school-wide tea, to welcome the Freshman. Brains are wracked and tradition is searched to find novel ways of getting acquainted. In the end, standard practice is adhered to, and name-cards are pinned to every student. At the close of the affair, everyone is everyone ' s else ' s friend. October — the Effective — period of the parts. The Inter-Class dance is presented by the governing body. Every girl dreams through her classes until that thrilling evening when she can make her stunning entrance into the Hotel Sheraton ballroom. Each shining face reflects a brilliance of its own. November to May — The Realistic period of Unity. Student Government adjusts itself to its duties, and endeavors to act wisely in all things. Bulletin boards are kept up-to-date, student lamentations are soothed, order in general is maintained. June — The Suggestive — the self-explanatory period. New officers have been elected, and the old Association leaves behind a sheaf of suggestions for the coming year. The months have been full; full of frowns as well as smiles, but they all add up to ... a happy year! Page Fifty-four )OOOtOtO OIO OtO 0»0 0 0®0»0 0 tt»0»040»0 »O«O O»O»O0O O?O OlO OtO OtO OtO 9OiO ' tO ' «OVOVotOVO0O(O(O»O O O O O O0O4O4O9O4O0O«O tO OtOOO OiO OOOOO OtOtOIOtOtOtO OtOtO 1 IP hen clubs are trum r Page Fifty-five t C 0 c c 0 4 0 4 c 4 ■ o 0 0 c c c 0 o o c c c c 4 c First row: Prentzel, Dr. Gray-Smith, Mrs. Standish, Dr. McKinley, Dr. Parkhurst, Semonian, Bidwell. Second row: Coralian, Kono, Herzog, Sullivan, Thompson, Simpson, Niesz, Henich, Crowley, Sousa. Not in picture: Carol Zendman, Bernice Currie. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB President MARJORIE SEMONIAN Vice-President AUDREY PRENTZEL Secretary-Treasurer LESLIE BIDWELL Faculty Advisor DR. S. JUSTUS McKINLET Page Fifty-six a • a 5 9 9 » 9 9 4 9 ♦ 9 9 9 o 0 o a o 0 4 a 4 9 5 9 9 0 9 4 9 4 9 5 5 o o 9 4 0 o 0 4 9 9 • 9 9 ♦ 9 5 9 4 9 o 9 o 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 a 4 9 4 a 4 0 9 4 9 4 9 1 9 9 4 0 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 9 4 3 4 9 4 4 0 9 4 9 9 4 9 5 4 9 9 4 3 9 • 9 4 0 4 9 4 9 4 9 9 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB The International Relations Club has completed its most vigorous and successful year since its organization. The club is limited to fifteen members and this year it was voted to make the club an honorary society in order to attract the most alert students in the college. Luncheon meetings were held once a month at the Wilbur and members of the faculty were invited as honorary guests. In October, Carol Zendman spoke on " Lin Y ' utang and Chinese Philosophy.” Helen Coralian, Bernice Herzog, and Marjorie Semonian attended the New England three-day conference in November, held at the University of Vermont, at which time twenty-nine colleges were represented. It was noted in the report on the conference that most of the conclusions resulting from the discussion hours were ideas that have been presented to us by Dr. McKinley in our own classrooms. In December, Dr. S. fustus McKinley, head of the History and Social Science Department at Emerson College, gave a critical discourse on " The Future of American Foreign Policy.” Bernice Currie spoke on " The Future of the Near East” at the January meeting. Two important events took place in February. Dr. Howard Griggs, author and lecturer, addressed an open Convocation taking as his subject, " Athen ' s Gift to the World. At this time he emphasized, " Enforce justice and the peace will take care of itself.” Mr. Sol Herzog, distinguished New York attorney, honored the club by giving a salient talk on, " Postwar Reflections.” In March, the members were invited to attend the luncheon discussion of the Foreign Policy Association at the Hotel Copley Plaza. Sigrid Schultz and Paul Hagen spoke on the subject " What to Do About Germany.” In April, Dr. Paul T. K. Linn was guest speaker for the club and he gave a probing analysis of " The Relations Between China and the United States.” Also in April, Marjorie Siff prepared a challenging report, on " Plans for a Postwar Youth Council.” Bernice Currie ' s comprehensive M. A. Address on, " The Atlantic Charter,” was given at the May meeting. The ideal of the club has been toward an increasing conception of a world com- posed of cooperative states in a world union. The club wishes to thank President Ross for his helpful interest and untiring aid and each member feels sincerely indebted to Dr. McKinley, our good friend and pro- gressive counsellor, for his understanding and unfailing encouragement. • c c 0 0 c c 0 c © c « © c © © 0 c o 0 « 0 © c © c c c © c c © 0 © c c c © c c c © 0 © c © 0 c 0 0 c c c 0 c 2 « 0 © c c © c © 0 © c c c © c © c © c c • 0 c © c c © c 0 c First row: Wilkish, Semonian, Coralian, Bidwell. Second row: Glover, Hillery, Reda, Henich. Third row: Greene, Thompson, Cooper, Crowley. Not in picture. Virginia Prescott, Carol Zendman. KAPPA GAMMA CHI President MARJORIE SEMONIAN Vice-President VALERIE WILKISH Secretary HELEN CORALIAN Treasurer LESLIE BIDWELL Sergeant-at-Arms JUNE GLOVER Social Chairman JEAN COOPER Page Fifty-eight KAPPA GAMMA CHI In the beginning lies the end; Consider the Kappa Album. Four years mark an episode in time. Consider the pictures in the photographic memory. Lights . . . Camera . . . Action! Sparkling eyes, provocative rhythms. . . . It ' s the staccato tempo of La Conga. It ' s the volcanic downbeat at the Sheraton. It ' s the setting lor all our closed dances. It ' s Kappa. Lights . . . Camera . . . Action! Set the scene in the Marine room — breakfast at the Puritan, breakfast at the Ritz-Carlton, tea at the Ritz-Carlton followed by infectious gaiety in the gardens; Tulip time in the gardens, Escapade in a Swan Boat (ah, there ' s the rub! Fourteen ladies in a tub with the State of Texas). Then Anchors Aweigh with eighteen Naval lieutenants at the Saturday Ball. Lights . . . Camera . . . Action! Quiet dignity in Wellesley Hills, at the Cambridge teas or in the graciousness of Mrs. Southwick at 81 Beacon St. Informal jollity at the McKinley ' s. Nostalgic mem- ories of toothsome charcoal steaks a la McKinley, a la carte. Allah! Flickering candles, warmth, cheery firelight at a studio supper bearing Mrs. Wade ' s distinctive touch of ingenuity abetted by Miss Bailey ' s ingenious combination of blues and greens. Lights . . . Camera . . . Action! It ' s the Kappa wanderlust and we ' re off to Cape Cod in a rumble seat built for two, or week-end guests of the hospitable Kenney ' s in Freedom, New Hampshire. Again, those juicy steaks! The Henich ' s had no steak, but the Henich ' s had a hay- stack! Until Kappa spent those colorful week-ends in the Berkshires and found that haystack! Ah, straw memories! — a brief respite at Wayside Inn . . . then a bit of the Latin temperament, a bit of the Spanish tongue via Harvard. No, senor! Lights . . . Camera . . . Action! C ' est la guerre: Kappa going over the top for victory with a memorable " over the top” quota in War Bonds and stamps. All the eager aspirations found their origins in those vivid bull sessions on Four. Lights . . . Camera . . . Action! Les Petites gourmets: Clustered around the smorsgasbord at the Ola, finding their way to Memory Lane, Du Barry ' s the Black Goose, Dinty Moore ' s or Durgin Park; having tea at the Coffee Shop, translating the menu at the Fighting French or revelling in the old fashioned charm of Hartwell Farms. Then came the flurry of parties: the Southern garden parties, the Elsa Maxwell party, gay festivities in the Captain ' s Cabin, the Pops Concert party, the special Kappa Party for Miss Bailey and all the honorary socials. Lights . . . Camera . . . Action! Turn the leaves of the album quickly to a softly lighted ballroom at the Statler . . . the lilting strains of a Viennese Waltz, richly-colored, gowns, the fragile scent of flowers . . . young hearts with high hopes . . . the dream within a dream. This was our Kappa album, an episode in time. Consider the pictures in the photographic memory. In the end lies the beginning. © 0 9 0 9 3 5 9 5 © 0 © 0 © 9 © 0 « 9 5 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 0 9 9 9 © 0 9 • 9 ♦ 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 9 9 © 9 © J 9 9 9 © 9 9 9 © 9 © 5 9 9 9 0 © 5 9 9 9 0 ♦ © 0 Page Fifty-nine 3 ♦ 0 V 0 ♦ c c « e « c « c 6 « c © c ♦ 0 « c ♦ c ♦ c © 0 « c ♦ c © t • c c c 0 ♦ c c ® 0 c ♦ c ♦ e c c © 0 c c © c © c o c ♦ 0 © D © c c c ♦ c © c c 5 c c © c ♦ 0 © c © 0 ♦ c c © c ♦ c « c © 0 © 0 © 0 © c c © c 0 ♦ e © c © c © c c 0 t 0 © c c c ♦ c ♦ c 0 c « c • c e © 0 ♦ c © c 0 ♦ 0 0 First row: Perry, Kono, Niesz, Prentzel. Second ro w: Hill, Andrus, Sullivan, Sanderson, Hodgman, Winterbottom. Third row: Connor, Austin, Morrison, Simpson, Bishop, Lally, M. A. Sullivan PHI MU GAMMA President EVELYN SCHNURR KEORA KONO Vice-President JEAN PERRY Secretary AUDREY PRENTZEL Treasurer LISBETH-ANNE NIESZ Page Sixty 9 9 iO o«o«g»o o»o o »o»o»o»e«o»oto o»o»o«o»o »o o«o«o»o o o«o»oio»o»g»o»o«o«o o o o»o o»o»o»g»o o»o»o»o o o o o o»o o o«o o o»o»o»o»o o»o o o»o o»o o o»o»o o o©o©o©o©o©o©o©w • PHI MU GAMMA Looking back on years well spent— On times chock-full of fun — On friendships that will last always — Are Phi-Mus — everyone! We seniors all remember well, And cherish with a grin Each crazy, happy moment Since Phi Mu took us in — ! Our first year did we entertain The president ' ' Nationale ' ' — And, my — such big excitement — Such pride-boosting morale — ! We laugh still at that ski week-end — Oh, my, the things we did! The people that we met there — The hills down which we slid!!! In fact we had so good a time, This year — same place — once more — We may not ski or skate well, — But we have great fun galore — ! We like each other ' s company — - We share each other ' s woes — And serving Luaus and spaghetti Keeps us right up on our toes—! Then those days we spent in Maine — ah me- ' Twas Spring — exams were near — We may have done no studying, — But there was lots of cheer! Last year brought Mr. Connor Reading Romeo and Juliet — - And that is really something That no one will forget — ! And this year, for our dear alums We started something new — A Founders ' Day Recital Tea — ! With lots more to ensue — ! We hate the thought of leaving, But we know there is no end To friendships and the pleasures That with Phi Mu we did spend. Page Sixty-one ♦ c • c 0 © 5 c © c 6 « 0 0 © c ♦ c ♦ 0 ♦ c © 0 0 © 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 © c 0 0 © c c ♦ c ♦ 0 ♦ 0 0 © c ♦ c © c 0 c « o © c c © c © c c 0 © 0 © c • c c c c © c ♦ 0 0 ♦ t c © c © c © 0 ♦ c c © 0 © c c c « 0 « c « c © 0 c « 0 © c 5 ♦ 0 ♦ c 0 6 ♦ c ♦ c • c c © c © 0 c c © c • c c 0 0 ♦ 0 First row: Goldberg, Rosenfeld, Leven. Second row: Strassburger, Shor, Sher, Walowit, Levitan. Third row: Saftel, Fruitman, Stern, Copellman, Kessler. SIGMA DELTA CHI President HELEN ROSENFELD Secretary SHIRLEE ANN LEVEN Treasurer . . BARBARA GOLDBERG Page Sixty-two 9 © 3 9 • 3 3 3 5 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 0 5 a © 9 © 0 © 0 © 0 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 ♦ 9 « 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 ♦ 9 © 9 © 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 © 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 9 ♦ 9 © 9 ♦ 9 © 9 ♦ 9 © 9 9 9 » 9 © 9 ♦ 9 © 9 9 © 9 o 9 9 • 9 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 0 ♦ 9 • 9 9 ♦ 9 © 0 9 ♦ 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 9 9 ♦ 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 SIGMA DELTA CHI Shakespeare once said, " Frailty, thy name is woman. " But Shakespeare never attended one of Sigma Delta Chi ' s strenuous meetings where our glamorous presi- dent, Helen Rosenfeld, presides with an efficient air, and where Mr. Kenney ' s voice training is of superlative value if you want to shout " Whoa, " above the rest of the members. Shakespeare never had the fun of witnessing one of our all night initiations that begins with the extreme apprehension of the scared pledges, continues with the realization of their fears and that is climaxed by our beautiful candlelight ceremony at dawn. Nor did the Great Bard ever attend one of our brilliant Rush Teas given annu- ally at the Statler, where each girl proves herself capable of juggling a cup of tea in one hand and five toothsome sandwiches in the other. It must be regretfully conceded that our streamlined secretary, Shirlee Ann, after four years ' apprentice- ship is more highly accomplished than her co-members. She not only balances six sandwiches in each hand, but her cup of tea besides. One of our invitations is always extended to our honorary member, Professor Joseph E. Connor, to come drink tea and juggle sandwiches with us. Shakespeare certainly would have swallowed his words had he seen the way our members gallantly gave up their treasured formal dinner dance at the Latin Quarter because of war-time scarcities — mostly men! His eyes would have widened in incredulity if he had attended our theatre party last year and had seen us sit through the shattering production of " Dracula, " without flinching and with only the loss of two or three fingernails. Not only do we wish Shakespeare had been on our sleigh ride this year, but we wish we had been there too! It was a chilling disappointment when we arrived at the stable where our hired sleigh awaited us only to be greeted by a bitter rain- storm. It was then we envied our competent treasurer, Barbara Goldberg, who sat snugly in front of her fireplace with warm thoughts of her fiance in England, while the rain played havoc with our sleighride coiffures. Yes, if Shakespeare had the sportive delight of being a Sigma Delta Chi, he never would have said — " Frailty, thy name is woman! " Page Sixty-three (1 ♦ t © c © c 0 e 0 © c c « 3 ♦ 0 r c © c 0 r © 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c c « c 0 ♦ c c • c © c e ♦ c c © c e c 0 « c c c © c © c © c 0 © 0 0 c c c © 0 © c ♦ 0 « 0 ♦ c c c © 0 © c © c ♦ c © 0 ♦ c c 0 © c c 0 « 0 © c © c © c 0 ♦ 0 © c ♦ c 6 © 0 ♦ t t 5 © 0 © c c 0 c t c © t 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 First row: Carman, Eldredge, Allen, Brassil. Second row: Rickards, Bird, Swan, Miller. Not in picture. Cuyler, Matthews. Z ETA PHI ETA President JEANNE ALLEN Vice-President. . . .FLORENCE ELDREDGE Secretary CUYLER MATTHEWS ARLINE BRASSIL Treasurer OLIVE CARMAN Page Sixty-four 9»o«o»o»o o o»o»o»o o»o o»o«o»o o»040 o •e»e©e«e«o»o»o«e»o»o»o»o»o»o»oto o»e o e»e«o«ooG«o o»o o«o«o»oto e©e»o«o»o«o«o40«Q«o»o»o«o»o»o»o»o«o»o»o«o»o«o«o »o©e«o©o©e©o©e©e©o©o© ZETA PHI ETA " And the greatest of these . . There is nothing quite so gratifying or satisfying as effection for and pride in others, especially when that affection and pride is derived from the joy of mutual accomplishment. Working together with unity of thought and purpose established a bond that mere words and pleasant association can never attain . . . and that deep oneness is Zeta. With a definite purpose in mind we work for the high standard that Zeta Phi Eta represents ... we work to present our annual Toy Theatre ... we work to establish and maintain our new sorority room at 289 Beacon Street ... we work to justify the faith our ever-active and ever-wonderful Alums have placed in us, and this constant activity brings forth the irrepressible mirth and hearty laughter that is Zeta. Sophistication and a paint brush — Bobbie, blistered and besmeared as she turns painter for the day at 289 . . . Saddlesoap and Shakespeare — Betts wielding a scrubbing brush and Falstaff simultaneously at 289 . . . Authority and sweetness— Jeannie presiding quietly at a formal meeting at 289 . . . this, the originality that is Zeta. Let ' s turn to a page in our Zeta Scrapbook. A single phrase evolves a panorama of sparkling activity . . . the subtle odor of fragrant incense and the delicate tinkle of china cups — our Chinese Rush Party . . . the scintillating conversation and stimu- lating speakers at the monthly luncheon-recitals with our Alumnae . . . " Our stock- ings are hung by the chimney with care, " to greet students and faculty, but then, you were there! — -at the Zeta Open House Party for Christmas . . . Candlelight and roses — the initiation of our two new associate members, Mrs. Barbara Standish and. Miss Octavia Frees . . . The Alumnae Tea, the endless rehearsals for Toy Theatre production, and finally, the splash and frolic at Lake Onedia . . . each page a bulletin of the activity that is Zeta. Zeta is tradition in the album of yesterday. Zeta is inspiration in the dreams of tomorrow. And the Zeta of today is fun! Zeta is all these things and more, but we know that " the greatest of these is love. " Page Sixty-five GLEE CLUB The Emerson College Glee Club became formally organized as a result of spontaneous informal group singing in the " Espy, " before convocation, or on memorable evenings at the dormitory. There are eighteen members in the club who gather together once a week at some prearranged meeting place, for one or two hours of song and jollity. The members have been learning college and patriotic songs under the enthusiastic direction of our accompanist, Davidine Coleman. The purpose of the Glee Club is not to develop a professional musical group, but rather to help us grow richer through the fellowship that comes with singing happily together. President JUNE GLOVER Vice-President ESTELLE LALLY Secretary BETTY-BIRD AUSTIN Treasurer PATRICIA MAXWELL Accompanist DAVIDINE COLEMAN Page Sixty-six SPANISH CLUB o ♦ c o 0 ♦ 0 0 ♦ c • 0 0 0 ♦ 0 c ♦ c ♦ c c © 0 © c ♦ c © c c © 0 ♦ c c 0 0 • c c ♦ c ♦ 0 ♦ c « 0 0 « 0 0 c « e ♦ c ♦ c c 0 © 0 © 0 ♦ 0 © 0 © c « c ♦ c 0 ♦ 0 « 0 0 © 0 ♦ 0 © 0 © 0 o c © 0 « c ♦ o 6 © C « 0 « c 0 © 0 © c © 0 c ♦ t ♦ 0 • e 0 c © c © c 0 0 • c c © c © 0 © c © c © o © o c © The Spanish Club was newly organized this year. A small group of students met every Tuesday for a lively supper meeting, at which time the topic ol conversation was limited to discussions in Spanish. Because of increasing understanding and interest in Latin America the students felt there was a definite need lor such a club in the college. Now that the club has made a start, it is the hope of the members that it will be able to function actively next year with the capable counsel of Dr. Parkhurst. President Vice-President Secretary .... Treasurer . CAROL ZENDMAN . . .VALERIE WILKISH . HELEN CORALIAN FRANCES CROWLEY o 5 o ♦ 0 ♦ 9 © 0 9 5 5 5 © o 9 0 9 9 © 9 9 9 9 © a © 9 © 9 9 9 • 9 © 9 ♦ 9 9 © 9 « 9 ♦ 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © J ♦ 3 ♦ © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 3 3 5 © 3 0 © 0 ♦ 0 Page Sixtv-seven 9 © 9 A 1 v 1 A A 17 f‘0 l 4 ' 1h gttveMO “ iHO i x . " •»■ ’ X „ )• : " ,0,: - « .1 , Staff ov ,... v,v t W „ l ' «■ Po« r « 4n ■’ 2 o e o © 0 0 o c © 0 © c © c © 0 c © 0 c © c © c e c © © c « 0 © 0 ♦ c © 0 © e © 0 « c 0 c © c © 0 © 0 0 0 © 0 « 0 © 0 © 0 © c 0 0 © 0 0 c 6 © © 0 © 0 6 © c © 0 © 0 ♦ c c 0 0 0 c 0 (Emerson College Vol. XII BOSTON, MASS., 1940 - 1944 1940 - 1944 NEW STUDIO POSSIBLE THROUGH THOMAS FUND The new Emerson radio studio, with its additional equipment, reflects the interest of the Alumni Association, whose con- tributions helped to finance architectural changes, Lowell Thomas, Pres. Harry Seymour Ross, Director Arthur F. Edes, and many students now in school who have given their time in superintending the alterations and movement of physical equip- ment. Mr. Thomas, an Emerson trustee, started the Thomas Radio Fund last year, and pro- ceeds from this have purchased standard technical devices. SOUTHWICK COURSE OF INTERPRETATIVE RECITALS The 41st season of interpre- tative recitals was opened on October 7th by Professor Grover C. Shaw with a reading of the current stage hit, “The Watch on the Rhine.” It was followed a week later by a program of poetry readings by Professor William H. Kenney. LUNT SENDS GREET- INGS TO EMERSON DRAMA WORKSHOP Alfred Lunt, who with Lynn Fontanne has just finished a far- too-short Boston engagement, re- members his early days in Boston as an Emerson College student, and as a bit player with the St. James Stock Company. It was former President H. L. South- wick who first introduced Mr. Lunt to the stage director. In a note to Dean Higgins, Mr. Lunt regretted that extra rehearsals prevented a visit to the college and expressed interest in Emer- son’s drama program. QUARTERLY EDITOR i i ROBERT J, WflDE QUARTERLY EDITOR Robert J. Wade, who became editor of the “Quarterly” in 1940, is a graduate of the Swain School of Design and a profes- sional stage designer and illus- trator. He served an appren- ticeship under Josef Urban, and for ten years was associated with stock companies at the Vineyard Playhouse, where he worked under such directors as Clifford Brooke (recently seen in “A Woman’s Face” and “They Met in Bombay”) and Paul Whitney of the Santa Barbara Playhouse. Photographs of his designs have appeared in seven consecutive numbers of the Theatre Arts Tributary Issue, and he aided in illustrating “Curtains Going Up,” a theatre survey by Mc- Cleery and Click (Pitman). Mr. Wade is a regular con- tributor to the Player’s Maga- zine and provides this publica- tion with articles on stagecraft and drama printed every other issue. Away from the editorial desk Mr. Wade is Technical Director and Designer for the Emerson Drama Workshop, where he also holds classes in stagecraft and lighting. bulletin No. 2 A.M. DEGREE E X T R A Just as this issue goes to Press word has reached the college that its petition for the right to grant the Master of Arts Degree was approved and made law by the signature of His Excellency, Governor Leverett Saltonstall. This advancement for Emer- son is a crowning achievement to the administration of Harry Seymour Ross who has given his major attention to the advance- ment of Emerson in the eyes of the public and in the regard of state and National authorities. SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS Miss Adele Dowling Levillain’s students of pantomime will pre- sent the old favorite “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” in the Drama Workshop. Ethel Vienna Bailey, head of Emerson’s Costume Workshop, wishes to thank those who have responded to her call for gifts of period garments. STUDENTS STAGE OWN SHOW To serve as a brief respite from rehearsals and academic lucubrations, Emerson students wrote, produced and directed their own show in the Drama Workshop: “Conga”!!! Produced by Phi Alpha Tan with the aid of other organiza- tions the affair was Emerson’s first musical “extravaganza.” Versatile entertainers also delved into the intricacies of legerdemain and magic. Page Seventy-one OYiik freedoms sy n - - - AGRIN, BLOSSOM— Waves AKILLIAN, STEVE — Army Air Corps ANDERSON, JAMES— Navy ALLEN, JOHN— Navy BAKER, ELMER JOLYON — Army Air Corps BAKER, ELMER E.— Army BALLABAN, CHERRY — U.S.O. overseas Unit BARONE, SAMUEL — Army BRENNAN, WILLIAM— Army BRODERICK, B. L— Army BROOKMAN, TED— Army BURKE, CHRISTOPHER— Army CANNEY, ANN— Waves CHURCHILL, BYRON — Army Air Corps DAVEY, NORMAN — Army Air Corps CROCKETT, DAVID— Army CRYDER, M. LYDA— Waves GALLISON, BARBARA— Wacs DAY, ELMORE— Army Lord in this day of battle Lord in this night of fears, Keep open, oh, keep open My eyes, my ears! DI FOGGIO, NICHOLAS — Army Air Corps DUNN, RUSSELL — Navy DUTCH, HAROLD — Army Air Corps Not blindly, not in hatred, Lord let me do my part, Keep open, oh, keep open My mind, my heart! HERMANN HAGEDORN. DWINELL, PAUL— Army GEISSLER, LORRAINE PILLION— Wacs HELMS, EDWARD — Army HANEY, PAUL— Army HALL, ELMER— Navy Page Seventy-two ff Behold a sower went forth to sow ;; PALMIERI, LUCIEN — Army PHELPS, MIRIAM — W aves PINNEY, CHARLES — Army Air Corps PLATT, ALBERT — Army REIFSNEIDER, ROBERT — Army REILLO, ACHILLE — Army RING, MORRILL — Army ROSENBLATT, PEGGY— Waves RUDSTEN, DANIEL— Marines SAMPAS, SEBASTIAN — Army Medical Corps SHEEHAN, JOHN — Army Anti-Aircraft HORNSBY, LEONARD— Wcray HOYT, MARTHA— Wacs HURLEY, HELEN— Wacs IASPER, ALLAN— Army KILBOURNE, RICHARD— Army McGILVRAY, ROY — Army Medical Corps LEAR, NORMAN — Army LEARY, HELEN— Wacs MABRY, ALTON— Army Signal Corps MacGREGORY, LESTER— Army McGIVERN, ROBERT— Army STANTLEY, NICK— Army SULLIVAN, EDWARD— Army SWEENY, DAVID— Navy McGURK, GEORGE — Army MacKINNON, B. A. — Waves MAHONEY, RUTH GRAY— Marines WASHINGTON, THOMAS— Army Signal Corps MENARD, PAUL— Army WERENSKI, STANLEY — Army METCALF, JAMES — Navy WHITE, P. MALCOLM— Army Page Seventy-three First row: Russell Dunn, Norman Lear, David Sweeney. Second row: James Metcalf, John Sheehan. Third row: Robert Tennant, Barbara Gallison, Jack Pinney, Fourth row: William Brennan, Nicholas Stantley, Sebastian Sampas. POETS TO COME Poets to come! orators, singers musi- cians to come! Not today is to justify me and answer what I am for, c But you, a new brood, native, athletic, continental, greater than before known, Arouse! for you must justify me. I myself but write one or two indicative words for the future, I but advance a moment only to wheel and hurry back in the darkness. Leaving it to you to prove and define it, Expecting the main things from you. IN MEMORIAM SEBASTIAN SAMPAS Sicily October 2, 1943 Dear Marjorie: I am in the very best of health and sincerely hope the same for you and yours. I am working in a ward in an Evacuation Hospital and at long last it feels satisfying to feel one is helping directly with this gigantic movement. My whereabouts must remain a temporary secret. I ' ve had an opportunity of spending a few weeks in some of the larger cities in North Africa: namely, Algiers, Oran, and Casablanca. I ' ve added many new experiences which for the necessary enforced censorship must also remain secret. Things happen rapidly, another day harvests startling significances and this living day by day does not allow one the time for a long-range kaleidoscopic view of perspective and the necessary analysis of noting the inter-relationships that occur. This is apt to make me feel that I am undergoing a steady spiritual and mental decline, and again it ' s been almost four months since I left a certain refreshing Page Seventy-six 10(0(0.0.010.0l010l0l0 0«0t0 0lot0l0t0t0t0«0tet010t0t010l0(0t01010 0.0t0 0t0l0l0t0«0l0»ot0l0t0 0 0t0t0.0.0.0- civilization. When one is severed from all the circumstances of a particular status quo as was the case in the States, and has to re-accept even the bare necessities of daily routine and existence, a transitional change in the personality is almost inevitable. One re-accepts some of one ' s old ideas, adds new ones, and casts away others. Somehow out of all this catastrophe and chaos, I ' ve lost myself completely in something greater than myself, but I ' m finding something ultimately for I ' ve found a religious sustenance to see me through the darkest days. I have come to realize that all religions are alike in that each fulfills basic needs which are common to all men. It is easier to find sustaining strength when one doesn ' t seek any particular religion but searches instead for the source of all religions. It is like groping through a dark chamber and emerging into the sun. How can we know the glory of belief without having known disbelief? Too often in the past our struggles in life have been comparatively simple and easy, enjoying the luxuries and liberties which only a democracy based on freedom afforded us. That word Freedom is such a great one, for Freedom alone is the nucleus of any great civilization. Freedom is that vital force which once belonged to the civilization of the Golden Age in the Athenian democracy. So too, today our postwar world should be founded on a just freedom. Freedom won with the blood- stained beaches of Salerno, , Guadalcanal, Bataan and Tunisia. But we shall never have true freedom without justice. Freedom is such a great word, Midge. I have been penning the aforesaid statements at about 3:110 in the morning where I am on night duty in a hospital ward. There is a chill night wind and one gets a pleasant feeling of ennui. The lamp flickers away the cherry wick of Time. My only regret is the lack of time in which to read. I miss my books. To me, they have meant everything and even now while I write I am pressed by the brevity of time. But sometime soon I will try to get around to writing that letter for the year- book for you, if you ' re sure you still want one. How soon would you have to have it? I was glad to hear that there is such a fine group of Freshmen at Emerson this year. So many changes have occurred since our class entered as freshmen. Who would have thought four years ago that today half the class would be scattered all over the world. If only this conflict will help emphasize the need for eventually having a world union we will have accomplished a little. Remember the bull session our group used to have in the little room on the third floor at 130 Beacon Street? I have written some poetry but not very much. A few poems were published in the Algiers, Casablanca, Alexandria, and Palermo issues of the " Stars and Stripes.” But there is always that ceaseless desire for accomplishment which con- tinually surpasses any present achievements. I sent some of them to Dr. Wiley. You know how much I admire her scope of vision, her experience and especially her " subtle of subtlest” observations. Back home the leaves are turning. It brings to mind Taggard ' s lines from Autumn Song for Anti-Fascists — " Leaves of pale yellow softly pile, Where we laid them single file.” The Charles River flows by — . Other college boys and girls walk along the Esplanade, gazing at the ducks wheeling about, watching the waves slap the shore as the hard, clean October wind drives the leaves to the earth with a soft slump. I ' ll miss New England in the fall, the sunset leaves, the russet and mauve, the green shading into purple, the stark beauty of Indian Summer, the asters standing on hard ground. There was a tree and the rustling of a million leaves. Remember Wolfe ' s lines? " Oh lost and by the wind — grieved ghost come back again. — ” " For in my house the winds are silent.” I have not forgotten ... I have remembered. Always, SEBASTIAN. Pvt. Sebastian Sampas 8th Evacuation Hospital c o P.M., N. Y., N. Y. Page Seventy-seven c ♦ c ♦ 0 0 0 c « c © c 0 ♦ c © c 1 c 0 0 0 « fl ♦ 0 © 0 © 0 ♦ 0 c © 0 0 « c c © 0 © 0 ♦ c c © c © 0 ♦ c 0 1 © c c c c c © c c 6 ♦ 0 « 0 ? 6 © c o c 0 e « c 0 © c © 0 © c o 0 © c © 0 c c © 0 0 c © c © c © c © 0 0 ♦ c ♦ c « c 0 © c ♦ c © c c © c 0 © c 0 5 ♦ 0 c e ♦ 0 ♦ Dear Friends: The British Isles January 23, 1944 To everyone everywhere, this is Johnnie saying " hello " ! With a wealth of material stored far up in my pen, I should be able to write a letter calculated to turn the yellow cover of the National Geographic magazine green with envy! But that suspicious old haunt " I, censor” is pointing a bony finger this way, and the only phrase I can see before me is the one on the advertisement slide of the Boston Elevated, " Zip your lip. " Well, things are approaching a climax. After visiting nearly every state in the Union, for the past two years, I ' ve finally said good bye to everything that I am sincerely proud to call American. The former absurd fear of spending the duration and six months touring the army establishments of all North America has been replaced by the qualms that face every soldier on approaching the highlight of his training. The one purpose of all military programs is success in battle. We will soon know if that purpose has been achieved. Inevitably, at this stage of the game, a man does wonder what he ' s fighting for. There ' s only one thing — to get back home. That ' s the driving point behind every bit of suffering and sacrifice these men endure. Over here it seems as though Americans have influenced the British a great deal and that includes the form of government, education, etc. It is interesting to note that American movies outplay the British variety by more than 20 to 1, despite our accent and different ways of doing things. It ' s easy to comprehend now why we are so easily understood over here. It ' s good old Hollywood, U. S. A., that ' s brought America — Home in Britain. Everybody wants to go to New York. They all would like to live in the States and about every other one has a relative somewhere over there. Perhaps a few lines about the homesick wandering of another G.I. would be well received back in the States. Maybe the folks would remark on how much " the boys over there " are sacrificing, or maybe they would remark on the cruelty of the war which separates soldiers from their loved ones. But nobody really sac- rifices anything worthy of the term until shells are whistling within inches of them. When a guy is so darn scared he can ' t talk, then he begins to see things in a true light. It ' s no sacrifice to join the Army and take a little physical hardening. Nor should it be considered a sacrifice when a man is separated from his family. It is only when a man gives his life or part of his body away that he has done something to merit respect. The mere fact that a soldier has fought should entitle him to no extraordinary respect. It ' s the only common sense thing to do. Pretty soon the invasion of Europe will materialize. That many, many lives will be lost is a foregone conclusion. Fellows that you and I knew well will be heroes, some posthumously. But everyone of us has the chance to get in and toss a few solid punches of our own. The present air raids are nothing compared to the action which will occur. When it is all over, over here, we can sail home unashamed. We ' ll still be fighting over on the other side to maintain democratic principles when the E. T. O. is a forgotten term. Do tell Dr. McKinley I was sincerely asking for him and that I shall write him sometime about conditions here. He would really be interested. I sure would love to hear him ramble on for an hour or so now! Social Sciences are my field for the future mainly because of him. Keep rooting for us, and remember it will be a happy day when we see every- one together again. As ever, JOHNNIE. 1st Lt. John G. Sheehan Btry B, 462 AAA Bn. APO 506, c o P.M., N. Y. C. 9 • 9 9 • 9 9 © 9 9 9 » 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 • 9 9 • 9 9 5 5 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 1 « 9 9 • 9 0 a 9 9 © 9 ♦ 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 © 0 9 9 9 « 9 9 9 ♦ 9 © 9 9 © 0 ♦ 9 © 9 9 • 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 © 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ a © o 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 Page Seventy-eight Sampson, New York February 28, 1944. Dear Mates: Here I am at Sampson, N. Y., waiting to be shipped out. Being subject to this kind of delayed orders isn ' t easy on any of us. We joined the Navy to fight America ' s enemies right away. However since joining, we ' ve learned that fighting a war is not merely rolling up our sleeves and saying, " let me at ' em. ' ' What is more important is knowing how to fight alongside of our buddies; we ' ve had to learn to fight as a team. And despite our intensive training here at close order drill, long hours of instruction in swimming technique, " Judo ' ' tactics, seamanship and Naval Courtesy, there lies ahead for us many more weeks of physical hardening, instruc- tion in small arms and gunnery, ship ' s nomenclature and other studies that will condition us to take our places as fighting men with the fleet. Througnout our training here we learn to live with other men and become more useful memoers of society. It seems to me that all educational institutions are pri- marily concerned with these very factors. I need only reflect upon some of my studies while at Emerson to be more certain of this. So it is at Sampson. From the day we arrive as somewhat bedraggled civilians until the day we leave as trim determined sailors ready to continue our training at Service Schools or to take our places as Seamen with the fleet, we are filled with a fighting spirit that will enable us to bring this war to a victorious conclusion. It ' s not all work and sweat here, though, for we have a very fine entertainment pre-gram which is conducted by the Welfare and Recreation Department. With Sullivan Auditorium, a theatre of modern design, boasting a seating capacity of 2,500, as the point from which emanate most of our recreational activities, we are offered diversion for nearly every evening of the week. While Sullivan is the spot where all feature attractions, such as the latest movies, USO and road show are given, a great deal of fun is provided without our own areas. " Happy Hours,” which take place at least one night each week within our own unit, provide a novel form of amusement. During these affairs amateur enter- tainers from our own companies take a hand and provide us with trumpet solos, piano solos and other acts, while a portion of the Station Band provides proper atmosphere. " Happy Hour” makes me think of Emerson work-shop shows in many ways because you know the kind of audience response we get at Emerson and the kind of loyalty that prevails. The same is true at our Station. When a performer from Co. 401, for example, mounts the stage in the center of the Drill Hall, members of his own company give him a good hand. If he ' s a good performer, the applause accorded his act is tremendous. If he ' s nervous or if his act isn ' t quite up to par, the roof comes off the building and the applause lasts until he returns to render an encore. The applause is genuinely friendly with total absence of jeering. We really try to put the fellow at ease and give him all the chance in the world. It ' s this kind of morale that counts; and it counts as much here as at Emerson, for each of us takes extreme pride in our own company, our own battalion and our own unit. In addition to the " Happy Hours,” Welfare and Recreation sponsor smokers, and such athletic activities as boxing and wrestling, so that none of us ever have to suffer an idle moment. Gosh, Mates, this training has been a terrific experience for me all the way. Even now my head ' s humming with the intonations of commands and orders. I know we ' ve all obeyed regulations before and carried out orders, but our Navy demands so much more in the way of speed, precision and accuracy. I remember the first command we obeyed on duty afloat: " Stand by to give way together!” It won ' t be long before many of us will be answering to: " Man your battle Stations!” Page Seventy-nine ©♦0»0 090«e»CT«0 0 0 0e0»P 0 0 ©♦©♦©♦0 ©9©«0e0«©»090 © © ©9© 0»©9© ©«0«© ©»© ©«©«0 © ©0©«©»0«0«0«© 0»09000 090f©»0 ©»© © © 0«0«0 0 ©»©0© 0«© 0» ©0©0©€©©0©0©0©0 « 0©0©C ©0e®©0©C When that order is given we ' ll all be in there pitching . . . pitching to bring the lour freedoms to a world that has been trampled on by ruthless aggressors. And when we do man our battle stations, we ' ll be doing it with the same spirit that we applauded our mates at " Happy Hour.” We ' ll be doing our job more efficiently because of the fine basic training we have received here at Sampson, just as I know you graduates of Emerson will step forth from the graduation halls well equipped to tackle the vicious problems that exist all around us. Good luck to you all, H. RUSSELL DUNN. University of Buffalo November 18, 1943. Dear Gang: Your letters have been received!!! 1 ' They arrived after having followed me around the country — Illinois; Laredo, Texas; Salt Lake City, Utah; Miami, Florida; then Buffalo. Life and the Army (much like " Time and the River”) have been moving so swiftly and incessantly these past months that I feel my negligence in answering is somewhat justified. My biggest news to date is that of my marriage!!! Yup, " I dood it!!” Was mar- ried October 21st, here in Buffalo. The Gal? Charlotte, the " girl friend back home.” She was up to an Inter-Class dance once; p ' haps you remember. Happy? Oh, yes-yes-yes-yes! I am an Aviation Cadet now; have been for some months. My Army rating is that of Sergeant. I am a qualified radio operator-mechanic and aerial gunner. Before I entered Cadets I was with a combat outfit, assigned to a Flying Fortress. Now I am in training to earn m ' bars, and get to fly one of the big babies myself. I have my wings already. So much fer de Army. (Wish the Army would say " So much fer Lear!”) I ' m tired of this life, ' though it agrees with me. I miss normality and Emerson (though I hardly mean to imply the two are in any way connected . . .). I miss being close to the theater. ... At the University of Buffalo, where I am undergoing the initial phase of this training, I have been able, in some degree, to keep my interests alive. In other camps I had acted in shows, produced some, etc. . . . but here I have reached my Army peak. I organized a Band, Orchestra, Glee Club and took over the Detach- ment Newspaper. . . So far I have put on two radio shows, and one large G.I. extrava- ganza, which proved to be a laff-riot. (Also three editions of said paper.) All this by way of " info”; and by way of letting you know that I am much the same guy you knew in peace and wished were in pieces. A bit more of the latter: Although I ' m poor on this writing stuff, my heart and mind are intact. I miss you all, truly. Yet, I feel as ever, and think as ever; yes, and even though married — get lonely as ever. I never forget for a moment the past and my friends, all of which I shall always be grateful for. Please give my fondest regards to Mrs. Kay (whom I adore) — to Mr. Edes, H. H. H., Mr. Kenney — yes and ever yone I forget for the moment. ... I know some names are slipping me for the moment. My very best to all. . . . Have a wonderful graduation; all the luck in the world to the graduates. (God, how I wish I were one of you!!!) God Bless you, gang. All m ' love, NORM. A S Norman Lear 23rd C.T.D. No. 33 University of Buffalo Buffalo 14. N. Y. a ♦ a a • a a • a a • a a ♦ a a ♦ a a a a © a © a » a « a a a ♦ a a ♦ a © a © a ♦ a a © a a a • a ♦ 9 • a a • a ♦ a © a a ♦ a ♦ a ♦ a a © a 9 a © a a ♦ a a a a ♦ a ♦ a ♦ a a ♦ a a • a a © a ♦ a o a © a • a a ♦ 3 9 2 a ♦ a a • a a a a ♦ a ♦ a a a » a a © a a © a ♦ a a Page Eighty Alaska July 30, 1943. Dear Friends: The Class of ' 44 about to graduate — impossible! — yet how true. It has been two years since I trod the boards at " Deah ole Emerson " as Tito Lombardi — what a play — and what fun we had doing it! Ah me — how time flies — I have been out on foreign service now for well over a year but I expect to be back soon for a short breather. When I think of Emerson I naturally think of the plays we did but my thoughts do not stop there. I find myself dreaming about the way the Charles River sparkled in the sunlight as viewed from a bench on the Esplanade — of white sail boats drifting leisurely along — of kids and dogs racing to and fro on the " campus ' ' (our five million dollar campus) — of the summer parades of fashions exhibited by the loveliest of girls strolling on the walk — of cool summer nights sitting on the roof of the college listening to the concert — the Shell softly lighted with all the different colors of the rainbow, power launches quietly grumbling off shore and the Carter ' s Ink sign splashing across from Cambridge. My most enjoyable memoirs. These dreams are our one salvation up here but they are interrupted quite frequently. An alert! — get those planes into the air!!- -and then — I ' m out on a mis- sion — The where, what, when and how are usually briefed to us by higher author- ities but quite often we find that we have to answer these questions ourselves. The successful completion of a mission and safe return depend on planning, teamwork, skill, luck and most important our faith in Jesus Christ. I am not a deeply religious man, but I have seen so many miracles brought about, that were above and beyond the powers of earthly mortals, that I firmly believe the Lord guides us in our flights. It is impossible to write the happenings past, present, or future — it would dis- please the censor immensely and even if he did not object, it would take volumes to cover the subject, so, using a favorite expression from one of my buddies — " Best we say no more. " One more thing — Don ' t let your every day in the States take on a common, bore- some aspect. Our little " every day " occurrences " back in the ' Old Country ' " take on a different appearance up here. We look back upon those days as the most wonderful days in our life — you hold on to them. Give my regards to the faculty and my very best wishes to the class of ' 44. Sincerely, JACK Lt. Charles A. Pinney 77th Bomber Squadron A.P.O. 980 Seattle, Washington Ft. Oglethorpe, Georgia November 28, 1943. Dear Emersonian: This is a report on the WAC from a classmate who, but for the war, would have graduated this year. I am in Officer Candidate School now, and providing nothing unforeseen occurs will be commissioned soon. Some of you have asked me about the WAC. I considered what to write and I can think of nothing more appropriate than to try to tell you why a woman who has spent over a year in the Army considers it the best spent months of her life. There ' s a satisfaction that comes of doing a job that needs doing so a man can go to fight, it ' s a consolation, when we see the wounded, to know that because of us their number will, mercifully, be fewer. The life in the Army is not easy; it is wearisome and, at times, discouraging, but down underneath it all, there ' s a promise of a better way of life to come. Page Eighty-two China December 9, 1943 (Excerpts from letters to Dr. Parkhurst) Dear Dr. Parkhurst: After another long journey I write today from another country. China is the latest. It was a long trip and it is a fine feeling to know that we can at last unpack our equipment tor a while at least. Naturally I didn ' t know what to expect from this country, but when we started out for China we all prayed that it would be a little better than India. Certainly it could be no worse. But to our surprise it was like stepping into a completely dif- ferent world. China is old and backward. True, but the Chinese are backward in a different way than the Indian. The Indian is lazy and dirty. The Chinese works hard and keeps fairly clean. Furthermore he is expressive, agreeable and very patriotic. The Chinese Army endures incredible hardships and suffers disadvantages in a military sense, that a more progressive nation would not. We are here as guests of the Chinese Government and Oriental hospitality leaves nothing to be asked. They have provided excellent, quarters and prepare food that would be difficult to manage within a ration book. Personal service is provided for us free of charge as is almost everything else we could ask. They are so grateful for our help that whenever we get to a town or are even passing through the countryside, we are besieged by hundreds of small children and the cheers of the older people. It seems good to know that we ' re wanted somewhere. Of course all is not milk and honey. One gets to miss American scenes, i.e., American girls, cocktail lounges, the newspaper and magazines. But our lot is a pretty fortunate one and there is a very fine morale on the part of all troops. I ' m not complaining and if I can get a little more mail (it ' s very slow in coming through) I ' ll be perfectly content to spend the duration here. Best wishes for Christmas and New Year, BOB. December 23, 1943. Dear Dr. Parkhurst: The only thing that worries the fellows is when they are going to get any sleep. You see we ' ve been bombed constantly for the last three days and while the dam- age to our personnel has been slight it has kept us awake. The more we see of the lap, the less respect we have for him. I don ' t mean that any of us are getting careless, but he doesn ' t come up to the American by far. Well for that matter neither do our little yellow allies. I have to give them credit for keeping going on a bowl of rice and 50c a month but as soldiers you can have them. We are trying to teach them, and all our students are officers. Well we have just about become resigned to the fact that you can ' t change their ways of working. Whether our methods be good or bad they aren ' t willing to change. There is a group here that you would enjoy meeting. Necessarily we have to teach through interpreters and these men are a wonderful lot. They have combed China for the better students and in the whole group you see a true patriotism. All of them are college students and true liberals. Although some are very " other- worldly, ' ' their liberalism is what Wallace and Monsson represent. Unfortunately they will not accomplish any great material change. They are too few and poverty and ignorance, with custom, too strong. Will write more later about teaching methods with the people. Always the best, Lt. Robert F. McGivern BOB. c o Postmaster New York, N. Y. o o « o c c c «• o f 0 0 • c 0 ♦ c 0 c ♦ l c ♦ c 0 o 0 ♦ c ♦ c 6 c Cl • 0 c ♦ t ♦ 0 « c 0 «• c c ♦ c 0 0 « c 6 e 0 • c « 0 0 c • 0 6 «► .0 ♦ 0 0 c c c c c c ♦ 0 ♦ 0 « c 0 ♦ 0 • 0 0 V 0 «■ 0 ♦ 0 c 1 ♦ « ♦ e e e 0 6 o c o ' 0 0 Page Eighty-one 0 ♦ $ 0 c ♦ c ♦ c 0 0 © c ♦ 0 ♦ 0 i c c £ 6 © c ♦ c c c ♦ c © c © c c ♦ c c ♦ c ♦ c ♦ 0 © c « c 0 ♦ 0 ♦ e 0 © c ♦ c ♦ c © c c 0 © 0 © c 0 © c © 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 0 © 0 © 0 © c © c © 0 © £ © 0 © c © 0 © 0 c © " C © c © c ♦ c © c c c ♦ £ ♦ £ £ £ « £ £ £ ♦ £ ♦ £ £ £ © 0 © 0 © c c © £ © £ The Army ceremony of Retreat is a daily reminder of the things we are striving for and the goat we must reach. We stand, shoulder to shoulder, eyes straight ahead, saluting as the flag is slowly lowered; the Star Spangled Banner is played and another Army day is done. There ' s a thrill in knowing that everywhere there is a Stars and Stripes, that there are men and women . . . Americans ... to lower her to that tune. There ' s a sense of kinship at Retreat with all soldiers . . . Africa, Australia, England. Italy, Alaska or the swamps of the South Pacific . . . wherever they may be It ' s a good Army, this one. For most of us there are no medals; no glory and not a shred of glamour. It is just the sense of doing the job as best we can, against the day of peace, that makes us, enlisted women and officers alike, proud to be a WAC. Always, BOBBIE. Cand. Barbara L. Galiison Co. 4, 22nd Reg. Ft. Oglethorpe, Georgia U. S. Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine September 26, 1943. Dear Midge, Classmates and all my Emersonian friends: So help me I ' ve started this letter to you all ten times if I ' ve started it once and each time I ' ve been interrupted by some " mate " or " jyreen " breaking my tram ot thought with " Hey ' Doc, ' how about fixin ' up my cold? " or " Say ' Doc, ' wanna take a look at my athletes foot? " But so help me this time I ' m going to finish this letter even if we have a surprise blackout. Anyhow — the story is — I like it a lot up here in Maine — at least I did until the cold weather started — but Tm-a-thinking I ' m going to continue to like it. Last week I returned from Sanford, Maine (I was on detached duty there lor a month), and upon my arrival I was put in charge of the " Sick Call Room. " My job is to assist the Medical Olficer who attends sick call. At present I am working with a British Surgeon Lieutenant who is stationed here as Medical Officer in charge ot the British squadrons. Most of our patients are " limies, " tor most of the complement is British. I have quite a time translating their English into ours, so the next time you see me it I have an English accent you ' ll know why. My work consists of any- thing from spraying throats to suturing lacerated wounds. This part of medicine I like — but when it comes to surgery and ward duty then that ' s another story. Although I ' ve seen several operations, I doubt if I could perform an appendectomy in a submarine. Liberty here is plentiful and I really have been fortunate to get down to Massa- chusetts as often as I have. Maine is wonderful country — " Vacationland ot the East. " The scenery is really beautiful. Well, I can see from the foregoing para- graphs I ' ve " scuttlebutted " long enough — so without further " adieu " I ' ll sign off and wish everyone of you the best always. I hope to see all you swell kids soon and I appreciate hearing from you. As ever, JIM (Alias " Doc " ) James Metcalf, Phm. 3 c United States Naval Reserve Naval Air Station Medical Department Brunswick, Maine Page Eighty-three Corpus Christi, Texas December 30, 1943. Dear Emersonian: Greetings from Corpus Christi Naval Air Station in " the heart of Texas. " I have been here for almost two months in the Link Trainer Department of one of the training sguadrons. The station is so huge that it would take days to see all of it, but I like the parts I have seen. Many people seem to think that women in service are given only routine office work or something equally unexciting. But the work we do is far removed from that. We teach instrument flight and radio navigation to naval air cadets and officer pilots, by means of the Link Trainer. The Link instructors ' school is at Atlanta, Georgia. After a month of boot training at Hunter College in the Bronx we took ten weeks of intensive training at Atlanta and then were rated as third class petty officers — Specialist (T) 3 3. Those of us who were sent to Corpus were given six weeks of advanced training with enlisted men who could give us the more practical side of the work. Teaching Link is difficult and exacting but always fascinating. The pilot becomes exasperated with the trainer, because it is actually more difficult to control than a plane. But later, when the same pilot has made a successful flight on instruments through a storm, he admits that his Link course was pretty valuable after all. By the way of added interest, we now have in our department Lieutenant Tyrone Power, U. S. Marine Corps Reserve. So far, no one has snatched his gold bars for souvenirs and the WAVES have refrained from mobbing him. But this military discipline may break down at any moment, for he is fully as attractive in his Marine greens as he ever was in a dinner jacket, or tweeds. I feel that joining the Women ' s Reserve of the Navy was the best thing I could have done. We have the satisfaction of seeing the sailor instructors " shove off " because we have been able to replace them at the trainers. Since air power is so vital in the winning of the war, I am grateful to have some small part in the training of naval aviators. The speech work I took at Emerson has helped me a great deal. In fact, clear speech and freedom from regional accent is one of the strictest requirements for Link instructing. My very best regards to all the Emersonians, MARIAN PHELPS, Sp (T) 3 c U. S.N. R. T. S. 13 A L.T. N. A. S. Corpus Christi, Texas Ft. Benning, Georgia October 24, 1943. Dear Bercie: Army life has been quite diversified for me. I ' ve done everything from being a " dogface " to becoming a lifeguard. At one time I taught illiterates. Now I am custodian of the Regimental Recreation Hall. In this capacity I am librarian and general looker-after to the boys who come into the Recreation Hall. I have to see that they are comfortable, make sure that paper and pencils or ink are available and provide them with magazines. I plan entertainment for them such as Bingo parties, ping pong tournaments, and song tests. I have arranged a Music Room where they can listen to great music by the Masters. There is also a " Garbo Room " where the boys who want to be alone for a time can go and sit comfortably and think. I am right at home here as I believe that morale is an extremely important part of this war. It is not really work for me but fun. I enjoy it immensely. Page Eighty-four o o o«o »o ototo oto o»o o o o o»o o o o o o © o )o o e o o o o o»oto o o o oto o«o o«o«o«o o o o»oto o o Q o o o o«o o«o o«o«o«o o»o o o o»o«o«o o»o«o o o e o o o»o o e o o io o«o®o o o o« 0«0«0 0«0 0 0»0 0»0 0«0«040»0»0»0»0«0 0»0»0»000»04040»0 0»0«0«0«000»0 0«0«0 0»0«0»060 0«0«0»0«0«0 0«040»0 0 00040»0«0«0« o«e e«o o»o«e«o«o«o«e«o«e o»e Lately I have organized a group of fellows who come over and read plays They are all people who have had some experience on the stage. We are short ' handed though, of material. If you have any scripts of current plays or any other plays, we would appreciate it a great deal if you would send us some. The boys would be extremely grateful for we ' ve been doing all our reading from one book. Sometimes if we are lucky, we get two. It is rather difficult for a group to read from one book or even two. Greet all the girls and fellows in the class for me and best wishes in your coming theatre productions. Even though it was not possible for me to graduate with my class, I hope that someday I shall be able to return to Emerson and once again be part of the vibrant life that exists there. Love to all, PAUL. Pfc. Paul H. Menard Co. " G " 300th Inf. Ft. Benning, Ga. Ardmore Army Air Field Ardmore, Okla. January 20, 1944. Dear Gang: I wonder if I shouldn ' t be grateful to my draft board in finding myself assured, this way, of space in my own class year book, for otherwise 1 wouldn ' t be able to enjoy this honor for several years. However, though I feel a little like a premature baby would if he could, here I am and happy to be My military career thus far hasn ' t been very eventful, but I take refuge in a comfortable personal satisfaction born of a myriad of experiences I ' ve had, am having, and will have. My conversion from sport clothes to khaki, and from Shakespearean tights to mechanic ' s coveralls has been an education in itself, and one which I ' m still enjoying. I ' m assigned to armament, and have worked on guns, turrets, and bombs and sights both on " the range " and on " the line. " 1 have iound, by the way, a particular fondness for things electrical, and hope to take a course in electrical engineering, someday, when this tragedy of errors shall cease. I ' ve seen a great deal of this U. S. A. so far, and it ' s really a wonderful country. I read a great deal, dance a little (I can lead the girls now!), bowl, see movies, write letters, play basketball, and so on. I had a Utopian furlough last August, and I am looking forward to another in March In fine, I am same! My morale is too, tnanks to the successful outcome of World War IPs major engagement: my own! My very best regards and wishes to all; acquaintances or no, there at 130 Beacon Street, but especially of course, to the former professor and students, Dean and President. May we all get together again — and soon! Very sincerely, NORM DAVEY. Cpl. Norman Davey Maintenance Sqd. " A " A. A. B. Ardmore, Okla. England October 30, 1943. Dear Midge: Sorry I couldn ' t answer your letter sooner, but I just received it. I ' ve been in England and your letter was sent all over the United States before it finally reached me. You see, when I was first inducted in the Army I was attached to the academic section of a Service Group in Missouri and had part in the Army Air Force show, " High Flight ' ' which travelled around to the larger cities in the South. Alter that 1 o « 0 0 « e Page Eighty-five was sent to Salt Lake City, Utah, with the same group of fellows I was with in Missouri. I ' ve been in England some time now and like it very much here. As the book has probably already gone to press I am not going to bother to send the infor- mation you wanted, but thanks for remembering me. The college can look forward to the best year book it has had in years. I trust everything is going well at school. Are many of our old gang still around? Give my best to the class and the faculty. As ever, Pfc. William C. Brennan BILL. 333rd Service Group A.P.O. 637 c o Postmaster, N. Y. C., N. Y. HEADQUARTERS, SECOND TRAINING WING CORPS OF AVIATION CADETS TECHNICAL SCHOOL ARMY AIR FORCES TECHNICAL TRAINING COMMAND Yale University New Haven, Conn. Yale University February 22, 1944. Dear Emersonians: In this terrible world conflict in which we find ourselves engaged it is the very things for which our school stands that are most at stake. The Axis crowd has made things very inconvenient for all of us. The freedom of expression which people in our profession hold so dear is non-existent in the camp of our enemies. The love of this freedom together with all the freedoms we Americans cherish has caused many of us to alter our entire lives. Many of the men and women of Emerson have rallied to the Colors and are now engaged in a totally different profession. The honorable profession of arms finds us scattered throughout the world in all of the services. For my own small part in this conflict my military history has been a varied one. I enlisted in the Army of the United States in January of 1942. I was sent to the Reception Center at Fort Devens, Mass., and after five days was sent South. I received my basic training at Camp Lee, Va., as a Medical soldier. At Camp Lee it was my good fortune to attend an Army Clerk School which greatly affected my future military career. I was assigned to a Dental Clinic as a clerk at Key Field, Miss. After seven months at this Air Base I applied for officer training, was accepted, and was sent to Miami Beach, Fla. After three months training in Administration I was graduated from the Army Air Forces Officer Candidate School as a 2nd Lieu- tenant on December 9, 1942. After graduation I was assigned as an instructor of Military Leadership at the school. The course was made up almost entirely of Public Speaking so I was back in my element. I had the unusual opportunity there to teach Eric Rhodes, of movie fame, public speaking. I taught at the school for three months and was transferred to Yale University. At Yale my assignment is vastly different. I am in the Military Department as a Tactical Officer. I have had several different positions since my arrival. I have been a Supply Officer, Squadron Commander, Group Commander, and now I command the 2nd Training Wing. I have ten squadrons in my command and I concern myself entirely with the Military Training of Aviation Cadets at this Tech- nical School. In closing, I want to say that the training I received at Emerson has helped me greatly in my military career. It is my earnest hope that you will not find it neces- sary to alter your profession and that Victory will be ours in the very near future. My very best wishes as always, Sincerely, W. DAVID CROCKETT, 1st Lt. , Air Corps, Commanding. a » 9 9 » 0 • 9 9 9 9 9 5 o 9 O 0 0 0 9 9 5 9 « 9 © 9 o 0 0 o a o o 0 o 9 0 o 0 o 9 o 9 9 9 9 9 9 Page Eighty-six »o»c«o»o»o o«o»o »oto«o»0)ooo«o»o »o»o o»u »e»o»o(e»o»o»o»o»e«o«o o«o»o«o«o»o«o«o»o«o»oi • 0 c 6 © t c c 0 0 © c 0 0 0 c c • c c © 0 « c c c © c c c • c © 0 © 0 ♦ c © c © c o c 0 c 0 ♦ c © 0 © 0 © 0 © c 0 6 © 0 6 © c c 0 © 0 © c 0 0 0 © 0 © t © c © 0 0 c © 0 © 0 © 0 0 0 © 0 © 0 0 © c © c 0 © c © c 0 c i © c © c 6 © 0 © c ♦ c 0 © 0 © 0 © c © 0 © 0 © c Ft. Meade, Maryland March 6, 1944. Dear Class of ' 44: At this writing I have one foot on the gang-plank; destination: overseas. But what ho! my embarrassment if, after such a heroic (and oddly punctuated) opening sentence I am still standing on native soil when these five paragraphs come at last to print. I must go overseas; how else can I say that no matter how far I may be from you, there is much of me that will never leave you: the upper right hand corner of my heart where sentiment grows; the white of my soul where nostalgia taints; the way, way corners of my mind where recollection nods. They stay. They stay with you, and the wonderful little corridors, and a hundredfold memories of a hundredfold happinesses. I must go overseas; to join those we once knew. They are my college brothers, my fraternity brothers, my brothers in arms. They have been fighting a long time; they have been decorated; — and one has given his life. . . . " Emerson IS Marching " — and I want to salute its sons — and daughters — who are in today ' s Big Parade. — And I want to salute the Class of 1944 lor devoting this section of its year book to those " in the fight. " I bequeath my gratitude to you. I wish you all, all the good luck you deserve. And I hope that you will be able to say someday that yours was the year when the great war ended. . . . PRIVATEly yours, PRIVATE NICK STANTLEY, United States Army. Page Eighty-seven © c c 0 0 c c « 0 « 0 0 © . ■ ♦ c © c c « t c 0 () c © c Emerson Plays are nationally known: Eleven photographs of Drama Workshop productions (1940-1943) clipped from recent issues of " The Players Magazine " The plays directed by Gertrude Binle-y Kay, Head of the Drama Dept.; Settings and Lighting Designed by Robert J. Wade, Technical Director; Cos tumes by Ethel Vienna Bailey. 9 ♦ 9 9 • 9 9 © 9 9 9 © 9 5 0 o 0 o 9 5 © 9 9 0 © 0 © a 9 9 o 9 © 0 © 9 5 © o © 9 5 5 © o 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 0 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 ♦ 9 © 0 ♦ 9 9 • 9 © 9 © 9 9 ♦ 9 © 9 © 9 o 9 9 © 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 « 9 ♦ 9 © 9 ♦ 9 © 9 © 9 9 © 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 © 9 9 9 » 9 ♦ 9 9 © 9 ♦ 9 © 9 Page Eighty-eight GUARD DETAIL They watched the sun go down Sinking in orange glory Beyond yellow desert sands Another sunset closer to the hour, Watching the sun go down, wondering inside, Knowing that all must end, even youth ' s pride. Lonely the sentry walks the stars What matter now the bayonet When beauty pauses in the night And crazed waves break upon the shore? The stars so brilliant, proudly free Look down and laugh contemptuously. The heart grows weary of the crescent moon As dreams of home press down the swimming brain, Will freedom once again be ours? Will morning find us closer to our goal? Watching the sun come up, knowing inside, It does not matter, this brief youth ' s pride. YOUNG POET REMEMBERING LOWELL Eventide . . . Prismatic sunsets, That sweeter melancholia, And the stark locale, Red, as the crimson-red of sumacs in the fall. I shall remember, Not for the mere sake of remembrance But for our eager striving that remains Integrated with eternity and impatient Struggle for the best. Cries, lost now In nether world find no refuge In the cold catastrophe of tears. SEBASTIAN SAMPAS. Pacje Eighty-nine TASTE THE NIGHTBANE 0 2 2 In tortured hours like these When all looms black (Unless it be the weird flame of our flak) I do not weave strange scenes I can not live to see, For fate with white cross spins my destiny, I do not dream the poet ' s heartbreaking dream, I have forgotten stardust and the sapphire gleam, I have remembered but your wet-eyed face When you kissed me in our last embrace. PATIENT No. 12 He is sleeping. Only now and then There is a fitful sob As fierce dreams block his mind With blackened cadence. Sirocco blows north-east and west It burns the past, all that is best. The lamp burns certain through his broken night, Tossing blue shadows about the whitened sheets, Only the hands . . . fretfully casting off the blanketed weight. Condemned to sorrow as a soldier is, Dear God! eleemosynary with Thy bliss. SEBASTIAN SAMPAS. Pa ye Ninety 0 « 0»090 »0»0«0»0 »0t0t0 0«0»0»000 »0 0 0»0 0 0«0«0»0»0»0»0 1010 000 0 0 000 0 0 0 000 000«0«000»000 »0 0«0 0 0»0 0»0 060 0 0 0»0 040 0 0 0 0 0«0«0 0 0«0«0«0t0«0«0«0 e 0 0 ' CYCLE Stark wind cuts the shuddering sea Stark wind cuts the sea, Chill omen whirled from sky to earth Disquiets me. Fragment of harnessed time men own, Fragment of time men own To girdle tide-swept globes, All atoms blown Back to worlds beyond recall To worlds beyond recall, Bits of unremembered dust Immeasureably small. Stark wind cuts the shuddering sea Stark wind cuts the sea, Forever lashing fettered waves Of prophecy. VARIATION ON AN OLD THEME I remember . . . And in the mind, the ghost of memory lurking in silent corners catches a fleeting thought, wringing it achingly dry. I remember . . . EFFICIENCY Crosses will not mark the place Destructive bomb claimed a man, Let science piece fragmented parts If science can. It is much the neater way, That is contemporary thought, Blow men into atoms — It takes so long to rot! MARJORIE SEMONIAN. Page Ninety-one FORMALITY This is not the hour, No one cares now To estimate the price At which the salt was wrung, Tears are unpatriotic, Save them . . . wait until A specified Memorial Day After the war, then Everyone will weep Appropriately together, Remembering . . . As part of patterned schedule. PROGRESS It is not hard to comprehend Why groping minds canno t transcend Grim boundary of experience; More soaring minds with no pretense To barriers, will crystallize Lost visions of high enterprise. DISCIPLINE Behind still face flit unrevealed The prisoned thoughts, the crowding fears, Shuttered eyes have long concealed A heart that sponges tears. MARJORIE SEMONIAN. ENCLOSURE Tread softly, Don ' t disturb the buds Or the leaves Or the grass; Don ' t leave tracks in the snow, Don ' t cause the water to ripple, Make as small an impression as possible. Breathe gently, Don ' t sigh Or laugh Or weep; Close the windows on your soul, Place a sentry at the door, Hold fast to what you have. Don ' t relax, Be invulnerable, Be impregnable, Don ' t be hurt. ABSTINENCE I lit a cigarette; The mirror caught my image and cast it back to me, Abortive attempt at worldliness, Pathetic attendance on a habit, Desire for protective screen of smoke, This is what I saw . . . I put out the cigarette. LIBBY RICKARDS. Page Ninety-three HOMESICKNESS Comes on without warning, poisonous to purpose, void of propriety and sense of easy atmosphere, this disease attacks its victims in spasms; relentless in its fury and stark agony, it is equally panicking in solitude or crowds. One has only to let his mind pull back a bit from the magnetic center of conversation to feel a lump rising in his throat. Knowing the hopelessness of struggling against this intangible yet he fights, collapses, and is quite ashamed. PATRICIA MAXWELL. TERRY LE TERRIBLE Blanc et noir un petit chien Qui ne veut jamais faire rien Que sauter, couler toutes les fois II ne fait rien qui nous fasse loi! II fait quelquefois tant de bruit Qu ' on ne peut dormir toute la nuit — •! Et quoiqu ' on dise, " Taisez-vous! " Mille fois continue-t-il, comme fou — Et n ' y fait pas d ' attention Malgre toutes sortes de persuasion Ni viand lait, ni pain non plus Fait obeir ce " Taisez-vous! ' ' Je ne sais que puissions faire Nous l ' aimons, mais il ne veut plaire Tant detruit-il les meubliers Mes robes memes et des souliers! Puis il sount et si joli Et je ne sais que faire de lui! EVELYN SCHNURR. DREAM IN SUMMER That breath of summer breeze Whiffling through my hair, The clinging flowery scent It bears through sticky air, Those golden siftings lying on the leaves The opalescent blueness far above Bring back the memory of another day, They bring you back, my love. The old green garden seat, Poplars near the rocks, Drowsy, buzzing insects, Gaudy hollyhocks . . . This might have been the afternoon we met, The setting is the same, and I am here, Each detail now is as each detail then, But where are you, my dear? AMBITION Once a friend told me " Take care, or you will find yourself alone. " I replied, " That does not matter. I have almost reached my star So I need no one. " How strange to have forgotten. It ' s lonesome on a star. VIRGINIA PRESCOTT. Page Ninety-five SEASHORE A narrow strip of golden sand Curving down to meet the tide With jagged rocks on either hand And white clouds racing far and wide Gray seagulls battling in the sky A snow-sailed schooner hurrying home The wild green water dashing high And a stain of oil lingering foam. SEEN FROM A TRAIN WINDOW IN LATE OCTOBER Countryside Flashing by the tram window There without The woods and meadows shiver White with rime Touched by the first cold fingers Of the frost. Deep black lakes With white steam rising from them Now lie still While waiting for that ice-coat which will come And still their laughing murmurs For awhile. Now a town Hurries by, slumbering still With a sun, Whose rays are touched with winter, Watery, weak, Trying hard to wake it with Feeble beams. Smoke and steam Obscure the dull days as we reach the yards The huge, stone station threatening ahead, The darkness presses downward On the world. VIRGINIA PRESCOTT. Page Ninety-six i «e»e o o«o«o e«o«o»e«e»e. ■vo«o o oeo»o«o o«o«o»o«o«o o«o«o o o«o»o»o o»o»o»o o o»o o»o«o«o»o o f5 »«o o»o o»o»o»o ® ® ® «« o o«o o»o«o»o«oeo o SO DOES THE YEAR So does the year Again and again Turn on its axis Driven by rain Softened by snowfall Tempered by pain. So does the spring come Violet-hearted, So do the seasons Kiss and are parted, Softly the year comes Back where it started. ROMANCE IN BROOKLYN Johnny ' s sitting on our stoop Whistling a tune, He ' s a dashing troubador Staring at the moon. Johnny ' s trying very hard To whistle carelessly I know it ' s not the moon he loves, He ' s serenading me! o c © c © c 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c c o 0 © c o c a © 0 © 0 TRAVELLING SOUTHWARD AT CHRISTMAS Robin, sung Upon the tree This is an Absurdity. You should be A crystal ball, A gilded star Or not at all. Certainly, You should not sing With such a springlike Carolling. BEATRICE DOWD. Page Ninety-seven CHRISTMAS EVE Pierrette ' s standing near the window Gazing sadly at the sky; Pierrette looks at Pierrot slyly From the corner of her eye. Pierrette thinks of stars and moonlight, But her glances are in vain, For her gay and charming lover Is winding an electric tram. MAYTIME The tasseled boots of Maytime, Wearing crocus at the toe, Lead rollicking young robins Where apple blossoms grow; Where rabbits ' fluffy ears lie flat, Because the fox will be Sniff-sniffing fragrance that assails him From the budded tree. ON LEAVING I like to think I ' ve left some part of me In every room whose floor my feet have pressed; In every echoing, familiar stair Whose shiny rail my fingers have caressed. I like to think some timid ghost of me Will roam these halls when I am here no more; Will search the faces that I knew, and slip Into a room if you should push the door. If you should ever pass a misty form That walks as dreaming in a witch ' s spell, And speaks no single word, I pray of you To guard her silly, little secret well; Nod to her, and continue up the stair As though she had a right to wander there. BEATRICE DOWD. Page Ninety-eight 0 • c 6 © 0 © 0 © 0 © c © c © c © c 5 c c c c © 0 © 0 © c 0 c e c • c « 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c c 0 © 0 © c c © e © c ♦ ; o c © 0 © c 0 © 0 c 0 0 6 © c © 0 0 6 © t © 0 © 0 © e © o c 0 © 0 0 c 0 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 0 0 ♦ ♦ 0 ♦ c 0 © c © c 0 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c ♦ c © 0 © c 0 0 © c 0 © c © n 9 © 9 9 5 5 0 9 o 9 © 9 9 9 • 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 9 © 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 • 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 5 ♦ 9 ♦ 3 j 5 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 5 o © 3 © 9 9 © 9 9 © 9 © 9 9 5 © 9 9 9 © 9 © 0 © 0 9 9 © 9 (1 ESCAPE My heart is full tonight, dear God, But the fullness is traitorous, faithless. It is the fullness I cannot resist — The parasitic fullness I have grown to love. It has claimed my heart once more, Defeating me utterly. Each morning when the fresh sun rises from its cleansing fog, I vow that somehow I will find The words, the voices, the sounds that will build the wall This sycophant cannot crush. But each night as darkness covers the light My barricade has dwindled, Leaving only scaly ruins That crumble into nothingness. And the emptiness is easy prey for that love of solitude I seek to dispossess. Like a serpent it slithers past my mind, on down into my heart. And craftily it tempts me with its trinkets — a shawl embroidered with the delicate strands of dreams, a pink kaleidoscope, mirroring a brilliant pageant of cities and rivers and space— a gold-bound volume filled with myriads of thoughts, ideas to be sifted into their separate dunes. It is then that I cease all resistance, For who can resist the source of their deepest joy? My heart is full tonight with the Love of Loneliness. Is it wrong, dear God ... or do you understand? LISBETH-ANNE NIESZ. Page Ninety-nine TENSE PAST: The stone facades stretched up to hide the sky. A thousand windows looked at me through half-closed eyes. And behind them bed where life slid down between the sheets, And hot-breathed sighs formed frost upon the panes. In the gutter the scum made lacy patterns As it hurried toward the drain. And passing under the street light, Was lit in ethereal magnificence. For the creations of the earthlings will outlive them As God ' s creations have outlived Him. . . . PRESENT: As I watch the sun rising on a new day, And remember the sun setting on the day before, I evolve a curious equation of life; That for every love there ' s a hate — That for every truth there ' s a lie — That for every beauty there ' s a sordid ugliness. So life balances out into nothing, And time is without end, And consciousness is without end. We walk the pavements without seeing. . . . FUTURE: In a corner of the sky the light faded — And the earth was still. Taxi meters stopped. The travail of the earth was over. There were no shades of light and dark, Only a strange, green pallor That radiated from a nether world. The earthlings slept under neat little mounds of brown earth. But the flat tops of the factories were still visible, Luminous in the half-light. Then I knew where man ' s Soul had gone too. CAROL ZENDMAN. Page One Hundred e«040406e40«0«0«9«e»0»0«0»e»0«0 0 0 0 0»040»0 0«s 0404040 0«0«0f 04040404 500»0«0«040«0»0e0«0»0 0«0»0»040«0 0 0«0c040«0«0«0»0»0 0»00000«0«040»0»0 ' ,rt n r 04 0«04940«0«040»0f0 c THE CITIES New universes, Looking back for patterns, Over stone-paved roads, Through a thousand pink-bathed sunsets To the spawn-infested archives of the cities. Ah! those cities Echoing churlish cried and muttered curses, Reverberating with thick-tongued incantations as the savages — They that moved in circles — The vultures concerned with processes of vulture life. Ideas of greater things flickered within them, Burned an instant, And were lost. And these men they called fools Or bowed down to them in adoration, Full of vulture prayers and sacrifice. Some felt humility even — Like a swift pain. And they guessed, Silently. And sometimes, on a ram-washed night, When the lights burrowed deep into the pavement, They would leave the accustomed paths And pass so close to one another in the quiet streets, That their Souls would touch. And, having touch moved on, Filled with the memory of the Soul ' s kiss In the night. . . . CAROL ZENDMAN. Page One Hundred One LA GUERRE, 1943 Ou sont les jours de la paix? Ou sont les jours d ' innocence? Mon ame est degoutee des cris des morts. Degoutee des sanglots des enfants — Degoutee de sang qui doit couler — Cette maladie des hommes, ne cesserait-elle jamais? Bon Dieu, dites-moi — Ou sont les jours de la paix? Regardez les tombeaux des jeunes hommes! Ci-git notre esperance a cote d ' eux. Adieu, mes pauvres jeunes hommes; Adieu mes pauvres enfants qui ne sont pas nes. Nous nous souhaitons un jour plus beaux que celui-ci — Plein d ' humilite humaine — Bon Dieu, dites-moi — Ou sont les jours de la paix? Le Bon Dieu sourit sagement, II se rappelle tous les univers — Aussi malheureux que le notre, Aussi fatigues que le notre, Aussi pitoyables que le notre. Le Bon Dieu sourit sagement — La lumiere de l ' esperance brille au monde, C ' est la response simple du Bon Dieu. CAROL ZENDMAN. 0 a e a « o a 4 0 4 0 o a a ♦ a • a a a a a a • o ■ • 9 ♦ 9 0 a » a • a a a o a ♦ a o a a a a a « a « o 4 a e a a 4 a a a ► a o a a a • a » a ♦ a a -» 9 a a a ♦ a a ♦ a 4 a ♦ a a » a a ♦ a ♦ a a « a 9 a a « a « a • a a 5 • a » a a a a « a o a a « a « a ♦ a a • 9 Page One Hundred Two HYMN TO DEATH Deep in the slime of swamps I lie, Deep in the endless sea, Deep in the holes of hell I rot, No one to cover me. Under an earth of bitter strife, Under a watery grave, Under the warmth of new-turned sod I fought so hard to save. Out from the love of family, Out from a crowd that wept, Out from the bowels of war I came And into this grave I crept. I am a Greek who starved to. death, I am a Russian man, I am a lad from Glasgow town And proud of my tartan clan. I never got to Bougainville, I nursed Corregidor, I am the man who will be called " Unknown — number sixty-four. " Yes, I am a cross on Sahara ' s sands, Or a gold star Navy son, I am the dead the world forgets, After the wars are won. VIDA PIKE. Page One Hundred Three THIS BOSTON " ... a city that is worn and old, Where stones are hallowed by the press of feet, Where gables sag, and open doorways hold A story of legends, where a narrow street Will twist and turn before me leisurely, And windows stare at me like tired eyes . . . Like men who grow more feeble yet more wise, With nothing much to do, but much to tell. " I love Boston. I love the constant rush and excitement of Tremont Street on snappy fall days with Christmas drawing near, I love Boston Common in the spring with its friendly pigeons, darting squirrels and little ponds and bridges. I love Copley Square at night with its bright blinking lights and hurrying taxis. I love Boylston Street with its multitudinous book stores and dress shops and souvenir marts. I love Boston for its plays, its aliveness, its Huntington Avenue and its Fenway Park. And yet, Boston was not always like this. There was a time when Boston was small and quiet and conservative; when the streets were nothing but narrow crooked cow paths; when the people were stern and solemn. From the time of its founding in 1630 to the present day of its constant glamor and excitement, Boston has never failed to be alive and interesting, and always a spot where history was being made. The settlement from which it has grown was made by members of the Massa- chusetts Bay Colony, bearing with them a charter granted by Charles I of England. The leader of the first expedition of settlers who landed at Charlestown, lune 17, 1630, was Governor ]ohn Winthrop, a Puritan gentleman. In his fleet came others of like condition, Sir Richard Saltonstall, Isaac fohnson and his wife, Lady Arabella, together with a company of sturdy Puritans chiefly from Lincolnshire. They landed 800 strong, the most considerable settlement on the American coast. At the end of the first summer, a season of hardship, they moved across the Charles River to the promontory of Shawmut — an Indian word meaning ' ' living fountains. " This headland, with ample water supply, was called by the English settlers Trimountain, from the three-peaked hill, now Beacon Hill, which formed its highest eminence. On September 17, 1630, it was voted to change its name to Boston after the Lincoln- shire town from which some of the chief settlers had come. From these dates on, the history of Boston has been famous. The Tea Party, the Massacre, the warning ride of Paul Revere, the escape of fohn Hancock and Samuel Adams, the fights at Concord and Lexington, have all worked their way into the world ' s history. Boston has achieved a reputation distinct, apart from that of any other historical city or town. A city of character and individuality, it is justly famous for its buildings and landmarks. For the student, the artist, or the tourist, this New England metropolis will always have a peculiar charm, for there is no place comparable to the " Hub. " Museums whose galleries are filled with the works of the great master artists, mag- nificent libraries and superb schools and colleges give it a high educational stand- ing. In speaking of Boston, one cannot limit himself to either the past or the present, for they are inextricably blended. Eleanor Early compares Boston to a nice old lady: if you don ' t know her well, one might think her prosy and dull. She is quiet and reserved, and tucks away her old-fashioned things into corners, showing them only to those who really love her. Page One Hundred Four Younger cities may be more sophisticated, but Boston in lavender and old lace has a beautiful dignity and a lovely charm. She couldn ' t for the life of her slap a guest on the back, and that is why unattached visitors are often left a bit to themselves. Strangers are sometimes bewildered in Boston. The streets are small and narrow and poky, twisting off here and there into almost nowhere. But once Benjamin Franklin drove his cows along these paths, and Paul Revere ' s horse kicked up the dirt into clouds of dust as they sped along with their warning. Could they but speak, the streets would tell stories of bloodshed and witches and graveyards and wishing stones. Boston Common, standing in the heart of the city, represents a permanence of Boston ' s ideals. Freely diversified with levels and slopes, thick with old trees, and alive with happiness, it is a pedestrian ' s paradise. On Sundays, the Common is usually filled with people, strolling about, taking pictures and feeding the pigeons The swan boats in the Public Garden are a part of Boston, too, and make of it a place where everyone likes to gather. It was at the Old State House where the people of Boston heard the repeal of the Stamp Act, listened to the Declaration of Independence, and came for news of victory and peace. About the square in those days were stocks, a pillory and a red-painted whipping post. Women, carried in cages, were brought here on carts, stripped to the waist and flogged for various misdeeds. Besides their cornhuskings, spelling bees, and spinning contests, our old Bostonians indulged in other sports. Gambling and cock-fighting were popular as well as the cruel sport of gouging, which consisted of pressing out an opponent ' s eye with the thumb. The Frog Pond in the Common was the scene of many Quaker deaths, and there was a ducking pool there where women who scolded and nagged were ducked. Nearby was a gallows where " pirates swung and Quakers were hung — Beneath the elms, m unknown graves, Their bones were flung. " Always Boston people have been solicitous about the respectability of their family names and they have always been proud of their good Boston stock: Every- one knows the familiar toast: " Here ' s to good old Boston, the home of culture and cod — Where the Lowells speak only to Cabots, and the Cabots speak only to God. " Yes, Boston people are interesting and that is because Boston is interesting. Today it is a center of learning and literature. Anyone who knows Boston well, loves to walk down Huntington Avenue past Northeastern University, Tufts Medical College and the Museum of Fine Arts. No one can help but to thrill to the wealth of treasures found in the Gardner Palace; and who has never enjoyed a baseball game at Fenway Park? Boston loves lectures. She ' ll listen to any kind at all: on astronomy, atavism and art; on Buddhism and butter-making; cooking lectures, cosmos lectures, curtain lectures, culture lectures; on duty and digestion; on philosophy and Plato; on how to speak, eat, think, and dream. And second to lectures are concerts in Symphony Hall, for Symphony in Boston is a ritual essential to social and spiritual well-being. At the bleak Huntington Avenue auditorium, one probably sees the most represen- tative people of real Boston. Boston is a city of idols and ideals; of beliefs and prejudices; she is made up of traditions that are fine, and a remembrance of things past. Wm. Dean Howells once said that " Boston would rather perish by fire and sword than to be suspected of vulgarity. " If a thing isn ' t done in Boston, one just doesn ' t do it. For Boston is Page One Hundred Five proud to a fault. She has supplied America with Peace Jubilees, Browning Societies, ' ' Pops ' and Harvard men, whom you can always tell — but can ' t tell much. I love Boston when spring brings the reappearance of swans on the Fenway, the lilacs in the stone urns in front of the Algonquin Club, ' and the crews raising their strokes up and down in the basin of the Charles; and when winter makes the hemlocks in the Arnold Arboretum heavy with snow and the bare boughs gleam with ice. I love the Museum, where one can revel in the collections of sculptures, paintings and tapestries; the Egyptian Room and the Japanese Galleries and the hall of Spanish Art. I love the playbills on the fences of Boston; the smell of the subway stations as one passes by; the noise and confusion of South Station on a busy day; the fur coats and flying banners during football season. I love Wash- ington Street on a Saturday afternoon; and the selling of gardenias at theatre time; the lights and eeriness of Chinatown. 1 love the spaciousness of Commonwealth Avenue and the dignity of Beacon Street; and the Esplanade which all lovers love. Bulfinch houses, fishballs, Frothinghams, Sargent portraits, Christian Science and the churchbells on Sunday morning — all comprise the glorious, distinctive, aristocratic essence that is Boston ' s— Boston ' s all alone. IRENE SULLIVAN, ' 45. Page One Hundred Six Page One Hundred Seven — -i. " (I ♦ c ♦ 0 c 0 o • c c 0 c o 0 « 0 9 c ♦ c 0 c 0 0 c c o 0 ♦ c ♦ c ♦ c 9 c ♦ c c 5 • 0 ♦ c c o c t ♦ 0 ♦ c ♦ c c c c c 0 0 ♦ e ♦ e c 9 0 9 9 (J l Brassil, Rosenfeld, Semonian, Bidwell. EMERSONIAN STAFF Editor-in-Chief MARJORIE SEMONIAN Associate Editor LESLIE BIDWELL Literary Editor . . BERNICE HERZOG Assistant Editors ARLINE BRASSIL HELEN ROSENFELD Business Manager SHIRLEE LEVEN Art Editor HELEN CORALIAN Advertising SHIRLEE LEVEN PAULA HILLERY JOANNE BISHOP Photography Editor . JOAN HEN1CH FRANCES CROWLEY Page Orte Hundred Ten o 9 • 9 9 9 • 9 9 9 0 9 9 9 o 9 9 9 » 9 9 9 9 9 o 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 • 9 O 9 9 O 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 - 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 c • o e c ♦ o © c © c © c © c © 0 © 0 0 ♦ c c 0 0 o 0 © 0 © c c © 0 « o © c c ♦ c ♦ 0 0 © c ♦ c « c c 0 ♦ c 0 « c 0 « c © c e 6 o c o c o 0 0 ♦ 0 « 0 c 0 o c o G © c © 0 © c © c © 0 6 © 0 © c • c 5 « 0 © 0 c © 0 © 0 0 0 c © 0 ♦ 0 « © c © c © c © e 0 ♦ G © 0 ♦ 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 © 0 0 6 © 0 c Hillery, Coralian, Crowley, Herzog, Bishop, Henich. Knowledge we ask not, knowledge Thou hast lent, But Lord, the will, there lies the bitter need; Help us to build above the deep intent, The deed! the deed! JOHN DRINKWATER. Page One Hundred Eleven 5 5 3 u © 0 © © 0 5 5 5 © 5 5 3 3 a 5 3 3 3 © 0 3 © 0 3 © 3 5 ♦ 3 3 © 3 © 0 © 3 © 3 © 3 © a ♦ o ♦ 0 © 3 5 5 © o u 0 c 9 c 0 9 0 9 c « c 0 o c 9 9 c c r 9 o 0 9 c 6 9 c o 0 0 c 9 0 c 0 0 0 « c c 0 c c 0 c 0 c 9 c 9 t 9 e c c « c FRIENDS OF EMERSON Mr. and Mrs. John Bacigalupo Mr. and Mrs. Ellis M. Bidwell Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Bishop Mrs. Myrtle E. Blanch Mr. and Mrs. G. Whitney Broussard Mr. and Mrs. John E. Cates Jean-Elizabeth Reynolds Cooper Mr. and Mrs. Morton Copeland Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Coralian Mr. and Mrs. Charles Crowley Ensign and Mrs. Daniel Donovan Jean Caust Feldman Mr. Sully Fruitman Mr. Harold Gallagher Mrs. Giftos Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Goldberg Ensign and Mrs. Stanley Goldsmith Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Goldstein Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Glover Mrs. Helen W. Greene Mrs. Florence Herzog Mr. Sol Herzog Mrs. Sylvia Leland Hill Capt. and Mrs. P. J. Hirshman Marianne Hirshman Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Hillery Mr. and Mrs. George A. Hodgdon Mr. and Mrs. Willis K. Hodgman, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. H. Henich Mr. and Mrs. John F. Lally Mr. and Mrs. George J. Leven Mr. and Mrs. John Levitan Mr. U. R. Mansfield Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Margolin Helen McHugh Mrs. R. G. Mathews Mrs. Frank Mclnnis Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Niesz Mrs. Phillip O ' Keefe Mrs. John W. Ormsby Mr. and Mrs. Sanford Parnas Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Parsons Adelaide Patterson In Memory of Marilen H. Playdon Audrey Jane Prentzel Mr. and Mrs. Henry Portong Mr. and Mrs. Alfred E. Prescott Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. Quinn Mr. and Mrs. Eugene F. Reda Mr. and Mrs. George P. Rickards Mr. and Mrs. Moe Rosenfeld Mr. and Mrs. Max Schnurr Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Semonian Mr. and Mrs. A. Shackat Mr. and Mrs. B. G. Simpson Mr. and Mrs. A. Small Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Spound Mrs. Jean Strickland Mrs. G. M. Sullivan Mr. William A. Thompson Dr. and Mrs. Y. Touzjian Mr. Charles A. Vogel Mr. and Mrs. S. E. Weagly Mr. Edmund Winterbottom Lt. and Mrs. Herbert l. Winer Mr. and Mrs. J. Raymond Young Mr. and Mrs. H. Zais Mrs. Jane Zendman Spanish Club International Relations Club c c J 0 0 5 5 • ♦ 3 0 9 0 0 3 5 0 0 9 0 5 0 0 o 0 o a ♦ 3 9 0 ♦ 0 • 0 o 0 0 9 0 o 0 5 o 0 0 9 0 a 9 0 9 3 3 9 8 9 3 3 3 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 3 3 3 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 3 3 9 8 ♦ 3 9 3 9 0 9 3 9 3 ♦ 3 3 3 9 3 9 3 9 3 3 9 3 9 3 3 9 3 9 3 3 3 9 0 9 3 9 J. Page One Hundred Tv elve ♦ ©♦O O«O O»O«O O O«O«O O O O«O«O0O O O»O O«O«O«O«O O O«O«O»O O4O»O O O O O O4O O O O O OeO O»O O«O O O O«O O O O«O»O O«O O O O O« O$O»O«O«O0C3 OGO STUDENT DIRECTORY ABRAMS, ELAINE, 65 Judwin Ave., New Haven, Conn. ALLEN, CYNTHIA — 561 Union St., E. Braintree, Mass. ALLEN, JEANNE, 107 Park Ave., Onskany, N. Y. ANDERSON, JEANNE, 14 Hamilton Rd., Waltham, Mass. ANDRUS, ELIZABETH, 79 Lake Drive, Mountain Lakes, N. J. AUSTIN, BETTY-BIRD, 368 West Clinton St„ Elmira, N. Y. BACIGALUPO, NORMA, 74 Chadwick St., Haverhill, Mass. BERKOWITZ, JANICE, 26 Beechwood Terrace, Yonkers, N. Y. BIDWELL, LESLIE, R.F.D. No. 1, Elmwood, Conn. BIRD, BETTY, 1311 N. James St., Rome, N. Y. BISHOP, E. JOANNE, 411 V 2 Hawthorne Ave., Williamsport, Pa. BLACK, HELEN, 156 Summer St., Somerville, Mass. BLACK, JOHANNE, 14 Mineral St., Ipswich, Mass. BLANCHE, DOROTHY, 52 Main St., Lubec, Maine BOLOUS, MARIE, 2 Auburn St., Lawrence, Mass. BOUCHARD, FRANCOISE, 27 S. Mam St., Caribou, Maine BRADLEY, ARLINE, 43 S. Pine St., Bradford, Mass. BRASSIL, ARLINE, 404 Wentworth Ave., Lowell, Mass. BREAKSTONE, CECILE, 280 Riverside Drive, N. Y. C. BREWER, RUTH S., 37 Langdon St., Cambridge, Mass. BRITTON, JUDITH, 25 Orchard Terrace, Leominster, Mass. BROUSSARD, MARY, 9 Stearns St., Cambridge, Mass. BRUNICK, CLAIRE, 554 Broadway, S. Boston, Mass. CARMAN, OLIVE, 6 Florence St., Cambridge, Mass. CATES, BEATRICE, 52 Howard St., Lawrence, Mass. CAUST, ANNETTE, 70 Brookledge St., Roxbury, Mass. COLEMAN, DAVIDINE, 30 Stengel Ave., Newark, N. J. CONNOR, PATRICIA, 57 Webster St., No. Quincy, Mass. COOK, RAMONA COOPER, JEAN, Cherry St., Port Carbon, Penn. COPELAND, NANCY, 138 Warren St., Randolph, Mass. COPELLMAN, GLORIA, 22 James St., Brookline, Mass. CORALIAN, HELEN, 19 Kirkland Circle, Wellesley Hills, Mass. CORBETT, DOROTHY, 73 Gaunley Rd., Medford, Mass. COSTELLO, ELIZABETH, 247 Chestnut Hill Ave., Brighton, Mass. COURTNEY, CLAIRE, 586 Mass. Ave., Boston, Mass. CROWLEY, FRANCES, 111 Poplar St., Watertown, Mass. CURRIE, BERNICE, Hyde Boulevard, Ballston Spa, N. Y. DANIS, RENA, 98 Crawford St., Woonsocket, R. I. DE CAPRIO, LOUISE, 10 Colonial Ave., Newtonville, Mass. DEMING, BEVERLY, 104 Cole Ave., Providence, R. I. DEMPSEY, GERTRUDE, 610 Main St., Stoneham, Mass. DOUILLETTE, BETTY ANN, Pembroke St., Pembroke, N. H. DOWD, BEATRICE, 668 E. 23rd St., Brooklyn, N. Y. ELDRIDGE, FLORENCE, 83 Mead St., Hempstead, N. Y. FEIGIN, LEATRICE, 7 Dellwood Rd., Worcester, Mass. FISHER, NATALIE, 66 Henry St., No. Quincy, Mass. FRANZ, EVELYN, 56 Tower St., Needham Heights, Mass. FREAR, JANE, 104 Eastwood Ave., Utica, N. Y. FRUITMAN, RHODA, 53 Keer Ave., Newark, N. J. GALLAGHER, MARY LOUISE, 5 Elm Rock Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. GAROFANO, LOUISE, 140 Pratt St., Mansfield, Mass. GEISINGER, RUTH, 62 Fayette St., Cambridge, Mass. GLOVER, JUNE, 1715 3rd Ave., Beaver Fall, Penn. GOLDBERG, BARBARA, 76 Marshland St., Haverhill, Mass. GOLDBLATT, DOROTHEA, 22 Dewey St., Lawrence, Mass. GOLDMAN, HENRY, 152 Stanwood St., Dorchester, Mass. GOLDSTEIN, LUCILLE, 155 W. River St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. GOUSE, LILLIAN, 102 Sewall Ave., Brookline, Mass. GREENBAUM, CLAIRE, 242 Corey Rd., Brighton, Mass. Page One Hundred Thirteen • 9 9 5 5 ♦ 0 9 9 3 3 3 5 0 0 5 o 0 o 0 0 9 » 0 o ♦ 9 0 o 9 0 3 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 9 9 9 » 9 ♦ 9 3 9 0 o 0 J 0 9 « 9 O 3 9 9 9 9 O 3 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 0 9 3 0 3 9 9 9 3 9 3 9 ♦ 9 9 ♦ 9 o ♦ 9 9 9 ♦ 9 GREENE, ELEANOR, 109 York Ave., Towanda, Pa. GUEST, ROBERT, 182 Magazine St., Cambridge, Mass. GREENWALD, ARLINE, 70-47 Kessel St., Forest Hills, N. Y. HARRIS, RUTH, 221 Linden Blvd., Brooklyn, N. Y. HAWKINS, DOROTHY, 20 Oak St., Belmont, Mass. HENICH, JOAN, 42 Van Guilder Ave., New Rochelle, N. Y. HERZOG, BERNICE, 33 Madison Ave., N. Y. C. HILLERY, PAULA, 80 Grozier Rd., Cambridge, Mass. HILL, IRENE LELAND, 21 Federal St., Bar Harbor, Maine HODGDON, GEORGE, 14 Laurel St., Melrose, Mass. HODGMAN, MARY, 19 Cedar St., Taunton, Mass. HOFFMAN, PHYLLIS, 60 Parker St., Chelsea, Mass. HOLM ES, ROBERT, 75 Prospect St., Greenfield, Mass. HOWARD, LILA, 225 W. End Ave., N. Y. C. JENNINGS, EMILY, Somers, Connecticut JOHNSON, GLORIA, 395 Ocean Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. JONES, EDRA, Clinton, Arkansas KESSLER, JOAN, 53 Lincoln Park, Newark, N. J. KOFFMAN, BERNICE, 275 Ferry St., Malden, Mass. KONO, KEORA, P. O. Box 978, Honolulu, T. H. KELLEY, DOROTHY, 21 Elm St., Worcester, Mass. LALLY, ESTELLE, 29 Orchard St., Holyoke, Mass. LAUTERBORN, JACK, 49 Irving St., Cambridge, Mass. LEARY, ELIZABETH, 93 Lawton St., Brookline, Mass. LEARY, NORMA, 348 Payson Rd., Belmont, Mass. LEVEN, SHIRLEE-ANN, 106 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. LEVENSON, PATRICIA, 16 Old Rd„ Dorchester, Mass. LEVITAN, LILA, 32 Deckard St., Roxbury, Mass. LEVY, BETTIE, 32 W. South St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. LORETTI, BETTIE, 210 E. Falls St., Ithaca, N. Y. LOUGHLIN, LORRAINE, 4 Palmer Hill Ave., Reading, Mass. LYONS, EDGAR, 1636 Preston St., St. Petersburg, Fla. Me ENROE, THOMAS, 569 Franklin St., Melrose, Mass. McGOWAN, RUTH, 35 Lorette, W. Roxbury, Mass. McHUGH, HELEN, 19 Emerson Rd., Watertown, Mass. McINNIS, RITA, 44 Ranney St., Springfield, Mass. MACK, ELSIE, 44 Stanton Rd., Brookline, Mass. MAGRONE, MARCIA, 68 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. MANOLATO, PAULINE, 3 Lincolnway, Valparaiso, Indiana MARCLAY, NORMAN, 157 Hoisted St., East Orange, N. J. MARGOLINE, AUDREY, 24 Grove Ave., Leominster, Mass. MARKOFF, LOIS, 230 Broadway, Norwich, Conn. MATHIS, ALICE LEE, R.F.D. No. 1, Wyalusing, Pa. MAXWELL, PATRICIA, Slingerlands, New York MEANS, PRISCILLA, 59 Court St., Mockiss, Maine MIELUCH, RUTHE, 31 Mt. Vernon St., Melrose, Mass. MILLER, GEORGINE, 3504 Fort Roberdeau Ave., Alstoona, Pa. MORRISON, MARILYN, 178 Brighton Ave., Allston, Mass. MURPHY, VIRGINIA, 24 Holbrook Ave., Lowell, Mass. NASH, DOROTHY, 8 Mt. Vernon Ave., Melrose, Mass. NIESZ, LISBETH-ANNE, 3083 Macklem Ave., Niagara Falls, N. Y. O ' NEILL, MARY E., 117 Modena Ave., Providence, R. I. PONESIS, BESSIE F„ 556 Center St., Middleboro, Mass. PARSONS, C. MURIEL, 21 Dickinson Ave., Binghamton, N. Y. PERRY, JEAN P., 10 Russ St., Lawrence, Mass. PEYSER, JOAN E„ 365 W. End Ave., N. Y„ N. Y. PIKE, VIDA, 85 Glencross Rd., Wellesley Farms, Mass. POLIAN, SHIRLEY, 89 Floyd St., Dorchester, Mass. PORTONG, JOSEPHINE, 375 Dogwood Lane, Manhasset, L. I., N. Y. PRENTZEL, AUDREY, 138 Bedell Ave., Hempstead, L. I., N. Y. PRESCOTT, VIRGINIA, 565 Wilder St., Lowell, Mass. Page One Hundred Fourteen poo»ooo»o»o»o oto o o o ocooo«ooo o o»o«o »e«e«o»o ooo«e«e»o»o o«o o»o»o o to«o«o«eoo»o«o»o«o«o«o»o«o«ooo»o •©♦©♦©•o»o»o»o»o»o«ooooo o»o«o»o»o»o ooo«o«o«o o»o«o o oto»o»o o c ♦ 0 • c 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c ♦ c c ♦ 0 ♦ c c i ♦ c ♦ c c 0 © 0 ♦ c ♦ c c © 0 ♦ c c 0 ♦ c ♦ 0 ♦ c ♦ 0 c ♦ c ♦ 0 0 ♦ c « c 0 © 0 ♦ c c 0 0 ♦ 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c © 0 ♦ 0 c c 0 ♦ e ♦ e ♦ c ♦ 0 « c o c c c 0 0 ♦ c « 0 © c ♦ 0 o 0 © 0 © c c © c 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c ♦ 0 c © c © c c 0 ♦ 0 ♦ c ♦ 0 o 0 © c c ♦ c 0 © 0 © 0 ♦ c QUINN, MARY GAIL, 124 Moore St., Lowell, Mass. REDA, LOIS, 710 7th St., Patterson Hts., Beaver Falls, Pa. REGO, LEONORA, East Main Rd., Newport, R. I. REYNOLDS, DEXTER, 6 Chipman Park, Middlebury, Vermont RICE, CATHERINE, Western Ave., Augusta, Maine RICKARDS, ELIZABETH, Stottville, N. Y. ROBINSON, JACQUELINE, 14 West Blvd. Rd., Newton Center, Mass. ROBINSON, PATRICIA, 52 Cliff St., Naugatuck, Conn. ROSENFELD, HELEN, 1559 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. ROTHSCHILD, GERTY, 775 Riverside Drive, N. Y. RUBIN, CHARLOTTE, 591 Ellsworth Ave., New Haven, Conn. RUBY, NORMAN, 36 Gerald Rd., Brighton, Mass. SAFTEL, MARILYN, 585 Co mmonwealth Ave., Newton Center, Mass. SANDERSON, BONNIE, 6 Long Ave., Belmont, Mass. SANDERSON, ISABELLE, 32 State St., Seneca Falls, N. Y. SANTRY, MARY, 150 F St., South Boston, Mass. SCHNURR, EVELYN, Slingerlands, N. Y. SCHMIDT, JUNE, 321 E. 162nd St., N. Y„ N. Y. SCHREIBER, CAROL, 1082 East 9th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. SCHWARTZ, MILDRED, 1110 Beach 12 St., Far Rockaway, N. Y. SELIB, BARBARA, 24 Addington Rd., Brookline, Mass. SEMONIAN, MARJORIE, 30 Cliff St., Arlington Heights, ' Mass. SHACHAT, RITA, 33 Williamson Ave., Nillside, N. J. SHER, SYLVIA, 9 Red Rock St., Lynn, Mass. SHOR, MYRTLE, 1714 No. Shore Rd„ Revere, Mass. SIFF, MARJORIE, 17 Holland St., Newton, Mass. SIMMONS, ARLINE, 17 Holland St., Newton, Mass. SIMPSON, NANCY, 41 Hobard Rd., Newton, Mass. SMALL, BARBARA, 21 Summit Ave., Salem, Mass. SMITH, BARNABY, 80 Mount Vernon, Boston, Mass. SMITH, ROSAMOND, 10 Dava St., Malden, Mass. SOLOMON, SALLY, 1236 Squirrel Hill Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. SOUSA, LEONORA, 87 Water St., Stonington, Conn. SPENCER, NANCY, 165 Harding Rd„ Glen Rock, N. J. SPOUND, MARCIA, 9 Atlantic Ave., Fitchburg, Mass. STERN, BLANCHE, 1188 Grand Concourse, Bronx, N. Y. STRASSBURGER, RITA, 96 Goldsmith Ave., Newark, N. J. SULLIVAN, DOROTHY, Comstock Park, Oak Lawn, R. I. SULLIVAN, IRENE, 1166 S. Mam St., Fall River, Mass. SULLIVAN, MARY ANN, Park Lake Apts., 1980 Com ' w ' lth Ave., Boston, Mass SWAN, ROBERTA, 315 4th Ave., Haddon Heights, N. J. SVERD, NORMA, 10 Monroe St., N. Y„ N. Y. TEMPLETON, CATHERINE, 1051 Adaceme Ave., P.H., Cincinnati, Ohio THOMPSON, LOIS, Freedom, Maine THOMPSON, RUTH, Vineyard Haven, Mass. TOUZJIAN, SEDA, 4 Adams Ave., Watertown, Mass. VOGEL, LILLIAN, 70 Cutter Hill Rd., Arlington, Mass. WALDMAN, HONEY, 69-08 Seminole Ave., Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. WALHIMER, JANICE, 123 Colony Rd., New Haven, Conn. WALOWIT, GLORIA J., 158 Maybew Drive, South Orange, N. J. WHEELER, RUTH, 25 Mayo Ave., Needham, Mass. WHITE, CONSTANCE, 14 Norfolk Terrace, Wellesley, Mass. WHITNEY, ESTHER, 36 Birch St., No. Quincy, Mass. WILKISH, VALERIE, 103 Atlantic Ave., Marblehead, Mass. WINTERBOTTOM, PHYLLIS, 79 Howland Rd., W. Newton, Mass. ZAIS, ADELE, 31 Albion St., Fall River, Mass. ZENDMAN, Carol, 30 W. 54th St., N. Y. C. ( TOTAL NUMBER 348 ) Page One Hundred Fifteen 3 3 0 5 © 0 © 0 0 5 3 0 0 © 5 © 2 5 © 0 ♦ 3 9 3 a 3 3 3 © 3 9 J 3 3 ♦ BOSTON . . . 350 Boylston Street . . . In Wellesley and Providence, too. the clothes you Emersonians love are our specialty . . . we know you like your suits trim and tailored to the nth degree . . . and your prom gowns the ultimate in glitter and glamour . . . and your skirts and jackets and sweaters ultra-casual but with an aristocratic air . . . and we know, too, what you like to spend . . . that ' s why shopping at Fredleys is an Emerson tradition .... ATTENTION— Graduates and Students of EMERSON COLLEGE! LAST YEAR, during summer vacation time, many of you girls patriotically came to the aid of the HOME FRONT. Working with us here at RAYTHEON, in Newton, you helped immeasur- ably in speeding our production of radio tubes for the FIGHTING FRONTS. RIGHT NOW, we are planning our summer schedule and shall be pleased to have you with us again this year. Won ' t you let us know your plans now? Tel. BIGelow 7500 and ask for Mrs. Petersen or write EMPLOYMENT DEPT. RAYTHEON 55 CHAPEL ST., NEWTON (Descriptive circular sent free on request) Page One Hundred Sixteen ©♦O»O»O»O O«O«O»O»O O»O«O O»O O«O O O O O O O»O«O4Q4O0O0O O O O O O ' O ' O«O4O«O«O«O O»O«O«O O O OtO 6iO«O» ® ® 0 ® O«O O«O«O O»O OtO»O»O»O«O0O»O»O«O O O O«O«O4O4O4O«O O4O« 9 « 2 0 0 • 0 0 0 5 0 5 8 ♦ 0 « a o F R E S H M A N JUNIOR CLASS SOPHOMORE CLASS CLASS 5 o 0 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 5 « 5 » 0 9 5 5 0 o J ♦ 0 9 a 5 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 STUDENT 9 ♦ 9 9 9 9 9 ♦ 9 9 9 ♦ 9 9 Page One Hundred Seventeen 0 c u 5 o 9 9 9 0 9 9 9 9 KAPPA GAMMA P HI MU CH I G A M M A SIGMA DELTA C H I Z E T A PHI ETA Page One Hundred Eighteen p »0t0»0»0 90»0 0»0 »0«0 0«090909090»0»0»090 0 090«0 0 0«0»0 90I09040 »0t0»0»e»e«0«0»e«0(0»0«0«0«0«0«000ft0«0«0t0»e»e»09090«09090«0«0»0«0»0l0«0000040«0«0»0«0 »0«0»000o040«0®0o0«0«0 0«0«09090«0»0 0«0«0«0«090»0«04e»©«0 090e0»0«0 0«090«0 0«0 000«0e000«0 0«0«0«0 ' 040«0»0 0 0 040i0«0«0»0 0 0«0«0«090o0fl04090 0»0 0 0 0e0»0«0»0«090«0«0«0«0 Compliments of THE ELIOT PHARMACY M. H. HI LEERY Motor Transportation CAMBRIDGE MASS. 97 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. at NEWBURY ST. BOSTON, MASS. Esplanade Tea Room Page One Hundred Nineteen HAYDEN COSTUME CO., INC. Compliments of Costumes for the Amateur Stage Plays Operas Pageants WEBER SAUSAGE FARM Carnivals Masquerades 786 WASHINGTON ST. BOSTON, MASS. Telephone EIANcock 4346 PLAINVILLE, MASS. Tel. KEN. more 6470 THE ELIOT FLOWERS W. J. GROSVENOR CO., Inc. 270 CEDAR ST. SOMERVILLE, MASS. 87 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. NEAR COMMONWEALTH AVE. BOSTON, MASS. Mrs. Bernard S. McHugh President N. Silver Metal Mouldings Page One Hundred Twenty 3»c»oto»o»o»o«o»c »e»o»o»o»o»o«e«e»o o»o»o»o»e»ovo)e»e»eoe »o Q»oto o»o»o o»o o»o»g»o«o o«o o o»o»o»o»o»o»o o«o o»o o o«o»o ooooo o o»o o o o o o»o«o«o»o»o o»o o«o»o»o»o»o»©»o»o Compliments of Greylock Confectionery Company RAPID ) SERVICE 4 70 TELEPHONE LIB. 1840 Compliments of JOHN P. QUINN CO. LOWELL, MASS. Page One Hundred Twenty-one Compliments of Mr. and Mrs. Moe D. Rosenfeld c c o c 0 0 c c o c 8 ♦ c C Cherry and Webb’s LOWELL The Home Of Thoroughbred Fashion Page One Hundred Twenty-two »o»o o«e »o«o»o»o«o»o»ooo»o»a o o »e»oto e»o»o»o»o»e o»e«o »e»o»e»o«o«o»o«o o»o«o o»e»o»o»o»o»o«o«o»o»oto»o»o«o«o«o»o»ooo»o»ooo»o«ooo»o«o»o«o«o«o«c o o o»o»o»o o»w o o o Where the Students Meet for that Delicious Snack KENmore 1304 o 0 © c c 0 o 0 0 0 o c 5 c c c « c 0 6 © e © 0 c c 6 « c c « c © 0 ♦ c ♦ 0 6 0 c 0 © c c ♦ c 6 © c « c © 0 0 © 0 © 0 © c 0 c © c 0 © c © c c 0 © c © 0 © o © 0 c c © c © c 6 © 0 © 5 6 ♦ c • c c 0 c c 0 © c © 0 © 0 © t c 0 c © c NEWBERRY DELICATESSEN 84A 86 MASS. AVE. BOSTON, MASS. Open All Day and Evenings Until Twelve THE YARN SHOPS Fine Yarns Free Instruction In appreciation for your patronage and hopes for its continuance. 27 SOUTH ST. 89 MASS. AVE. Boston, Mass. Boston, Mass. Tel. Hub. 3384 Tel. Ken. 4658 652 CONGRESS ST. Portland, Maine Tel. 3-5361 M ARTIN Exclusive Hack Bay Beauty Salon Coiffures of Distinction Specializing in all branches of Beauty Culture 57 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. BOSTON, MASS. NEAR COMM. AVE. AT STORES EVERYWHERE Page One Hundred Twenty-three 0 c c « c c c c © 0 ♦ c © 0 © 0 ♦ c © 0 « c o © c © c c c © t 0 c 3oiirL ALBA c 0 c c 0 6 © c c c c c 0 c c c c 0 c c c ♦ c © e c Complements of C « c © 0 c © 0 c ♦ c c © c A FRIEND Page One Hundred Twenty-four p»o«o»o«o»o»ototototo o»o»090»Q«o»o»oto»ti »e90 e»o«Q«e«e»o«o»o»o»o»o»e90»o«o«o«o«e«o»o«o»ooo»o«o»o»o«o»o»Q»ete»o»o90«090»o»o»040«o o o o»o»o»o»o»o«o«o«o«o »o«o«o©o 0 0»0«0«090 0 €?«0«©«©«0«0»0«0009000«0409ft»0»090»0(l0 0»0« 0»0 0«080»0 0? 0ftc 0 0 0«00 060«0« 0»e 0«0»00090 ' KEN more 3263 WE SELL TEXT BOOKS BOOK CLEARING HOUSE 423 BOYLSTON STREET BOSTON, MASS. The Emerson College Book Shop WE BUY TEXT BOOKS CHARLES RIVER PRESS Printers of tins Year Book Compliments of COPLEY CHEMICAL CO. 292 MAIN ST., CAMBRIDGE 42, MASS. KIRkland 9035 Page One Hundred Twenty-five 0 ♦ c 5 © c © e ■ 0 o c 0 ♦ c © c 0 ♦ 0 © 0 ♦ c ♦ c ♦ c ♦ c « c ♦ c © c © c © c © c 0 ♦ c c © c c c ♦ c c c © o © c c c c c c 0 © c ♦ c © c 0 c c ( c ♦ c 0 e c © 0 © c © e c © 0 © c © c c © 0 ♦ c ♦ 0 © 0 © c o c © 0 0 © • c 6 « c © c © c « 0 © 0 C c © c c c 0 © e © c ♦ 0 « 0 0 OFFICIAL P H ( )T( )G R A P H E R FOR THE CLASS OF 1 ( H4 ARMAND 184 BOYLSTON STREET BOSTON, MASS. Candid “Snaps” For the Class of 1944 Were taken by WARREN PATRIQUIN ARLINGTON, MASS. Compliments — WHITING MILK COMPANY Quality for a Century 3 • 3 3 • 3 0 • 3 0 • 3 ♦ 0 « 0 0 « 3 © 0 © 3 © 0 © 3 » 0 « 9 9 • 0 9 9 « 9 9 © 0 © 9 © 9 9 9 « 9 © 9 3 ♦ 1 ♦ 9 9 © 3 © 0 9 9 © 9 © 9 • 9 9 ♦ 9 ♦ 3 3 © 9 3 9 0 © 9 9 ♦ 3 9 9 • 9 0 9 • 9 9 © 9 « 9 9 © 9 3 9 9 3 5 9 9 © 9 » 9 ♦ 9 « 9 3 © 9 • 0 9 3 © 9 ■» 9 9 © 9 © 9 © 9 Page One Hundred Twenty-six


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Emerson College - Emersonian Yearbook (Boston, MA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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