Elms College - Elmata Yearbook (Chicopee, MA)

 - Class of 1960

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Elms College - Elmata Yearbook (Chicopee, MA) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 176 of the 1960 volume:

1960 College of Our Lady of the Elms Chico pee, Massachnsettes along the sunset corridors of our yesterdays. Come trace with us the rnemoried march of years mirrored in this one, fleetfooted as a sigh, so much more full. See here the teartorn, windborn page of past. Smooth now the crumpled memory. Our guide? JV ' e need but one, the only T ruth which led us then at the beginning of the end, which leads us now at the end of the beginning. I 2 Faculty Page 14 Organizations Page 30 Student Life Page 30 Underclassmen Page 76 Graduates 3 e Dedicate Words are so often inadequate instruments of thought, and our strongest feelings lend themselves least easily to expression. To sound the depths of appreciation for num- berless hours of unsung labor; to express sincerest gratitude for unceasing devotion; to oice heartfelt thanks for tireless efforts: such was our desire in dedicating this Elmata. Yet we ha e taken pen in hand only to discover in the final analysis that the result of our labor succeeds only in reflecting our initial intention. You have gi en so much; we, so little. You have brought to us daily Him in Whom we ha ' e our being. You have guided us, faltering, closer to eternity. You gave of your- self so completely, so unselfishly that we thought you could give no more. But still you continued to minister to our every need. For this, and for so much more, we offer you. Father Pierce, our chaplain for these fourteen memory-replete years, our Elmata, the work of our hands, the expression of our hearts. May it remain fore er the symbol of our love, the record of our gratitude, the expression of the inexpressible. His Holiness POPE JOHN TWENTY-THIRD AND His Excellency THE MOST REVEREND CHRISTOPHER J. WELDON Chancellor of the College of Oi r Lady of the Elms on the occasion of his recent “ad limina " visit. 5 Sister Rose William President Catholic Liberal Arts College “Blessed indeed are the young leotnen whose minds mature and expand in schools of superior education, in which science and religion ad- vance hand in hand, where heaven speaks as well as earth, where God reigns while teacher instructs and pupil learns.’ We four himdred and fifty Elmites are now among these young women whom our first president and co-founder Bishop Thomas Mary O’Leary thus termed blessed. 6 Sister Helen Clare Dean of Studies I Sister Helen Joseph Registrar We are enrolled in a Catholic Liberal Arts College with Onr Lady of the Elms for onr protectress and model and with well-trained Sisters of St. Joseph, capable Diocesan Priests, and staunch Catholic lay leaders as instructors. Under their guidance and direction, onr adoles- cent minds learn to live more fully, to take responsi- bility seriously, to develop God-given talents, to distinguish the weapon of truth from the wide- spread errors of mankind, to be well-bred and courteous — ladies of Our Lady of the Elms. Blessed will we be now and hereafter if we are loyal to these teachings, for endowed with the intellectual and spiritual graces of the type of women our Alma Mater aims to develop, we will be women rich in intellectual interests and capable of making a full and generous contribution to the world’s work, whether in the ranks of Religion, in the classroom, in industry, or in the home. “Culture without religion, always incomplete and perilous, is especially so in woman, of whose life the priceless ornament must ever he the graces of religion.” 7 The Campus BEHIND THE SHADE of the ever- furnishes us with an mcenttve . . . green trees, Frosh are at home in St. Thomas ' Hall. SPIRITUALITY AS IT SHOULD BE is found within our chapel. SENIORS SPEND one last year at COLE in the beautiful surround- ings of their dorm. both intellectually and socially. i 8 GREEN LAWNS LEADING to a spacious veranda welcome Frosh to Beaven House. O’LEARY HALL, CENTER OF ACTIVITY, is the gathering place for Elmites. 1 j i 9 STUDENTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME at the Chaplain ' s Residence. Here Father Pierce takes time out to chat with some Juniors. ADDING MAJESTY to our campus is the tower. THE QUIET ATMOSPHERE of the library offers opportunity for study. ARCHWAYS line corriders that lead to foyer of Administration Building. FIRST IMPRESSIONS are lasting as is the gracious beauty of the rotunda. Favorite Haunts FUTURE HOMEMAKERS have ample practice. “LET’S HEAD FOR the Campus Lounge. " 12 PAT O’NEILL AND JEAN ZDON enjoy the dayhop room for studying. BUSY COLLEGIANS ENJOY a rare moment of re- laxation in O’Leary Lounge. O’LEARY DINING HALL has its quiet moments. 13 Pause here, Ha«ultu but enter not, lest entering yon linger on. This is the kingdom of Queen Wisdom. Her guardians dwell therein, in that small cottage, glimpsing the cold light of truth, sensing the heat of love, sharing eternity. Sisters of St. Joseph Sister Anna Cecilia Mathematics Sister Carmella Marie Biology Sister Florence Joseph. Librarian, Education Sister John Martha Sociology Sister Lawrence Marie Music Sister Margaret James Biology Sister Maria Maurice Chemistry, Physics Sister Mary Antonella. History Sister Mary Chrysostom Education Sister Mary Cornelius Erench, Spanish Sister Helen Clare Erench Sister Mary Oswald History, Mathematics Sister Helen Joseph English Sister Rose Dolores Art Journalism, Spanish Sister Ignatius Loyola English Sister Rose William Latin, Philosophy Sister James Mary. English, Journalism Sister Teresa Daniel Librarian, Education I while Seniors and Juniors give their thanksgiving for the graces and blessings of the past month. Our Faith . . . After classroom echoes have faded and many facts have been forgotten, still there will be that faith which is “the substance of things to be hoped for, the evidence of things that appear not.” To send students forth with an effective faith based upon rich heritage of Catholic doctrine is the aim of the Religion Department. AT FIRST FRIDAY MASS in the auditorium, Fr. Pierce distributes Holy Communion to fervent underclassmen. Reverend Thomas B. Pierce Reverend Robert H. Stafford Reverend Roger L. Viau Reverend Donald A. Desilets And Searching for Causes . . . who am I? Why? Those who are philos- ophers, “lovers of wisdom,” cannot take the world and self at face value but must ponder the essence of life and reality. Reason is their tool; logic, their cornerstone in the study of Thomistic philosophy which also embodies a study of ontology, cosmology, epistemology, natural theology, psychology, and the moral study of ethics. INITIATING studies, Fr. challenging Sophomore ELMS STUDENTS in philosophical Viau finds himself confronted with and pertinent questions from alert minds. PAUSING IN THE ROTUNDA for a brief minute, Fr. Stafford and Fr. Desilets take time out between classes and enjoy chatting with Cecelia Joy, Carol McKenna, and Natalie Basile. And Social Workers. “Feed the hungry . . . give drink to the thirsty . . . clothe the naked.” Along with these corporal works of mercy, social work actuates its sound principles through variegated field trips and versatile speakers. Incorporating the art of human relations, it is both a science and a skill used to mobilize the capacities of the individual and the community. Make Sound Teachers . . . To become a skilled and understand- ing teacher, one must not only learn method courses but also digest thor- oughly techniques of educational and child psychology. An enriching supple- ment to this is found in an assimilation of the various philosophies in education along with an adept handling of the objective test in the course offered on tests and measurements. ASSISTANCE IS THE KEYNOTE os Fr. Devine solves a difficult child pschology problem which has perplexed Juniors T. Chapdelaine, J. McLaughlin, J. Binet, and A. Bergeron. ON A LOCAL SOCIAL WORK FIELD Trip to the Alcoholic Clinic in Springfield, Joan Gelinas, Natalie Basile, Carol Young, and Fr. O ' Con- nor listen to a representative explaining the organization’s functions. Reverend Thomas F. Devine Reverend Vincent M. O ' Connor Phenomena of Life .. . MW? HH “A child said, ‘What is the grass?’ and fetched it to me witli full hands.” This same intellectual curiosity and attendant reverence for life is fully realized through the application of many scientific disciplines in the field of biology, the study of life from its conception to its end. SR. CARMELLA MARIE clarifies a structural adaption of the earthworm, or scientifically lumbricus terrestris, for Jane Slattery and Judith Coppola. And of Elements . . . A sincere desire for organic and physical knowledge and a firm self-discipline permit die chemist, through qualitative and quan- titative analysis, to organize theory and ob- servations into diverse bodies of chemical information. Coupled with a sound philos- ophy, this information is potential to dis- coveries necessary for both the security of the present and the needs of the future. VIEWING SIMPLE DISTILLATION are Mary Wynn, Barbara Lane, and Roberta Shumski. Robert I. O ' Herron AFTERNOON PROJECT LEADER for physical chemistry class, Madeline Joseph, demonstrates crystal structure to interested classmates Linda Lavallee and Mildred Bogacz, while Mr. O ' Her- ron, instructor, looks on. 21 ect To exhaust the events of the past, to be alert on transitory contemporary affairs, and to challenge the future with indomitable courage are the goals of ever ’ conscientious histor ’ student as she travels through ancient, medie al, and contemporary periods. Consisting of factual trutli, history leads to a greater knoxs ledge of life. Mathematics . . . Being the intricate science of the symbols, math deals with the exact relationships between opera- tions. Some of its divisions include various thought- proxoking problems in the theory of equations and statistics along with the study of curves and graphs. A factual skill, math is the foundation required for many sciences. And Sociology. Pursuing the development of social thought and psychology based on sound Catholic principles is the task of each sociology major as she explores the origins and evolutions of society. Intelligent discus- sions on diveise social problems are also presented, so that the “tempest-tossed” may receive the greatest care when this student goes forth. 22 Kturrti t tssER CO, n t 1 NOTES! NOTES! NOTES! Freshmen history students must listen intently to outline the events of Western Civilization as Sr. Mary Oswald lectures to the class. A SLIDE RULE PROBLEM is demonstrated by Barbara Turner under the supervision of Sr. Anna Cecilia as Betty Stamant and Mary Lynch observe her. DISCUSSING THE CURRENT sociological problems of Communism are panel mem- bers Mary Julian, Carol Shannon, Mary O ' Brien, Barbara McCarthy, Audrey Ab- biuso, and Mary Privetera. 23 Learning Foreign Languages . . . INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION, while not pos- sible on a large scale on the college level, is a valuable asset in pupil-teacher relations. Here Miss Dorothea Kuehlen clarifies puzzling as- pects of German studies for Barbara Trzcinka. In order to understand the different histories and to appre- ciate various social customs, it is necessary to learn the literature where their philosophy is expounded. By conditioning ourselves to the beauty of a foreign language, we are conditioned against the sordid roots of prejudice which spring from ignorance and pride. Through the study of Latin we see its classical effect on the literature and language of other nations, especially Spain and France. In cultivating a facility for these romantic tongues, we sympathize with our neighbors. To be a good scientist, one must know many German terms, and therefore all budding scientists develop an appreciation for this language. The bond for peace is gained through an under- standing of peoples with the study of their language. AN INTEGRAL PART of a Liberal Arts curriculum is a study of Roman Civilization and the Latin language. Going over a perplexing translation with Sr. Rose William is Frosh Catherine Connelly. IMPORTANT TO LANGUAGE success is the gleaning of enjoyment from it. Sylvia Ready, Terry Lincoln, and Mary Lou Dunn take a few minutes after class for an informal discussion with Spanish instructor. Miss Mary Martin. DEPARTMENTAL CO-OPERATION is a necessity for the development of a broad and accurate scope, as an aim in any field. Sr. Helen Clare of the French Department confers with other French instructors. Miss Roy and Miss Topor, concerning the attainment of this aim. 25 ADDING TO HER KNOWLEDGE of the various schools of English literature, Senior Marie Ferrindino listens to a reading of T. S. Eliot in the expanding record section of the Elms Library. ENGLISH INSTRUCTOR Harold A. Boyle adds one more book to the reading assignment of Senior Maureen Friel as they greet each other after class. And Mastering Concentrating on analytic and interpretive thought, comprehending the complexities of intricate plots, and ap- preciating the creative abilities of each author, English students cherish the voluminous works of the favorites. From the timeless dramas of Shakespeare to the mod- ernisms of Hemmingway, courses in English literature inspire the inquisitive student to delve deeper into bound- less realms of the creative, thus initiating e nthusiasm for exhausting all literary forms. TO BRING TO THE STUDENT a love of English literature and a desire to explore its depths is the challenge which Sr. Ignatius Loyola faces daily. Here, Sister enters the room shortly before class followed by Karen Kern and Carol Landry. 26 .1 Benefit Futu Teachers . . . To ask and to be answered — to seek and to find — to struggle and to succeed are the results that teachers desire for young minds. Howe er, in order to edu- cate others, it is necessary that teachers educate themselves and continually open their minds to new knowledge gained from numerous experiments in modem times. Besides this, methods of teaching various subjects, observing in classrooms, and experiences of practice-teaching give every education student a finn founda- tion in this creative art. VISUAL AIDS, so important to good teaching, are demonstrated by Senior Anita Lussier in Sr. Mary Chrysostom ' s Education class. HELPING THE INDIVIDUAL is important to practice-teacher. Senior Helen Cullen, as she receives valuable training in the classroom. And Physicists. Indispensable to biology and chemistry majors, who incorporate physical prin- ciples in their chosen fields, is physics, the science of energy and energy trans- formations of electricity, light, and heat. The perfect harmony and simplicity of these scientific laws must necessarily lead the true physicist to that Divine Archi- tect Who has ordered the world and the laws in it. EXPECTANTLY AWAITING RESULTS of their physics experiment are Frosh Diane Peters, Junior Diane Guilmet, and Frosh Cathy Benoit. LIBRARIANS, Sr. Teresa Daniel and Sr. Florence Joseph, assist Carolyn Dukiewicz and Carol Brown. GESTURE, one aspect of speech, is demonstrated by Mrs. Marian Sweeney. We Speak; As college graduates it is imperative that we become adept in speaking well. The ability to stand in front of an audience, to address it with poise, dignity, and composure along with clear enunciation is always a determining factor for future success. We Read; A glimpse into our library discloses a small seg- ment of the vast literary world. Confusion of the various functions of source materials, card cata- logues, stacks, and reserve shelves soon is dissolved after a tliorough course in library science. EXAM RESULTS! Mrs. Guerdeline Curran hands Barbara Landers her lest mark as other Frosh await their turn. We Recreate. To develop the vdiole indi idual is to include physical education in the curriculum. Through calis- thenics, indoor and outdoor sports, this is accom- plished with the maintenance of a sound and healthy body. In learning children’s games, student-teachers gain experience for a rainy recess. i 28 We Express Our Thoughts; We Enjoy Music . . . Music has charms that soothe . . . Through a study of its history, featuring the origins of Gregorian Chant, first- year students are introduced to the fundamentals of music, which include the types of scales, notes, and rests. Teaching methods in music in addition to instructions on the use of the pitch-pipe are offered to Juniors. SUPERVISING KEYBOARD and staff knowledge of Kathleen O’Connor and Mary Ann Lynch is Sr. Lawrence Marie. The end of creative and factual writing is found through the pen of tlie journalist. Not only is structure and content analyzed thor- oughly but also the business angles of a news- paper and a creative magazine are explored. Besides reviewing campus news and literary magazines from other colleges, journalists evaluate various ideas of style and content. JOURNALISTS Cecile O’Reilly, Marie Chicoine, and Anne Meagher examine front page make-up of exchange papers. And Art. An encouragement of fingers to produce skillfully imaginative figures and pictures and an appreciation of art are included for future teachers in the Freshman and Junior class. The varied and original decorations of spooks, finger paintings, papier-mache ani- mals, or holiday decorations prove that every- one has creative and aesthetic values and can enjoy making and appreciating art. DESIGNING LINOLEUM, art students are supervised by Sr. Rose Dolores. near the meeting places, common ground of seekers. Here did we feed on fuller life, the good, and, feeding, ' - hungered still. , ■ ’ •; 1 -• ■ ' ' t{ ' , . • . ! ‘ ■■ •• » ■ ■ • ' " • i ' i;. ' ' ■ !;i, ' )•}•. • ' ■I ' V ' ' 1 " ’ ■ ' ■ - :■ ■ ■ ' i . Ann E. McQuaid President EFFICIENT LEADERS OF STUDENT GOVERNMENT are R. Broderick, vice-president; M. Cunningham, secretary; and M. Griffin, treasurer. Students Direct . . . ► To develop responsibility and individual integrity constitutes a main purpose of Student Government. With the establislnnent of the relatively new honor system, it is hoped that mature collegians will prove themselves capable of shouldering duties flowing from student responsibilities. With joint co-operation of faculty and student body, Student Government sponsors many activ- ities and encourages student opinion through voice. First row Mary Lou Liucci, Margaret Donohue, Frances Balcer- zewski, Lillian Perrault, Mary Lou Griffin, Joyce Douville, Margaret McLean, Marilyn Brunet, Mary Gene Praetz, Clare Connors, Libbie Harris, and Joyce Marieb. Second row: Margaret Maybury, Jill Sheehy, Mary Murphy, Deborah Coon, Judith Stagnaro, Eileen Carroll, Rosemary Broderick, Janet DiFonzo, Gail Furman, Jane Slattery, Virginia Koonz, Mary Kay Cunningham, Mary Ellen McCarthy, Ann McQuaid, and Louise O ' Leary. Through Our Lady . . . Since adapting the selective system three years ago, Sodality is progressing towards the realization of its ideal of bringing stu- dents to Jesus through Mary. This year sodalists initiated the cell system, a method which encourages the qualities necessary for fervent sodalists. Also included in its activ- ities was a day of recollection at the Marian Retreat House. A new office, that of Coun- selor of Probates, was created in order to insure proper training of aspirants. SELECTION OF COMMUNION HYMNS for First Friday Mass is one of the tasks of Sodality vice-prefect, Joanne Donovan; treasurer, Maureen O ' Neil; and secretary, Mary Fonteyn. Judith A. Stagnaro Prefect PLANNING LITERARY, MARIAN, AND MISSION activities revolving around a common spiritual theme are Sodality committee chairmen, Marsha Macary, Carolyn O ' Con- nor, and Catherine Tieuli. SR. HELEN CLARE briefs S. Shaw and N. Borysewick on opportunities for graduate study. McCarthy, Senior delegate; M. G. Praetz, Junior delegate. Collegiate Action . . . NFCCS strives always to destroy the barriers between the widely divergent realms of the practical and the actual. By sponsoring leadership seminars, students are made more aware of their committment to intellectual excellence in a pluralistic society. AN NSA SPONSORED discussion group develops the topic of further education. NSA OFFICERS — J. Marieb, co-ordinator; A. O ' Shaugh- nessy, alternate co-ordinator. And Organization. Initial years are difficult years for a young organization, but NSA seems oblivious to all ob- stacles. Under its efficient leaders, a committee initiated a study on federal aid to higher education, and the findings were presented to regional and national convocations. 34 Catholic Mothers, Spiritual Leaders. In order to strengthen domestic capabilities and to impart knowledge of married joys and tribulations, Family Life Club was formed. Thus its members realize through well-informed speakers, informal dis- cussions, and panels, the importance of their future roles as Catholic family mothers. ATTY. KENT SMITH prepares to speak for Family Life Club. Man, as a creature, is drawn by his nature to the worship of his Creator. The Liturgy Club en- deavors to bring students closer to the fountainhead of spirituality in the Mystical Body by outlining tlie essence of liturgical life. MRS. MARY REED NEWLAND, speaking on the student apostolate, inspires her audience. LITURGY OFFICERS — E. Magee, J. McMahon, regional and national Liturgy chairmen; J. Campbell, president; D. Guil- met, vice-president. FAMILY LIFE OFFICERS — M. Sullivan, president; A. Sokolo- sky, treasurer; P. Perry, secretary; S. Villares, vice-president. Delta Epsthn Stgma DELTA EPSILON SIGMA recipients are Anita Lussier, Joan Gelinas, Constance McGovern, Judeth Crowley, Theresa Vinisko, and Jeanne Atkinson (absent). The oldest honor soeiety on campus, the Alpha Kappa Chapter of Delta Epsilon Sigma, has as its prerequisite for admission outstanding scholastic achievement plus evident leadership qualities. With the emphasis today on brilliant minds and acceler- ation in courses, this society honors those who have qualities necessary to fight the apathy in tliis modern world and attracts the attention of industry to those who are worthy and dependable candidates for efficient employment. 36 OUTSTANDING MEMBERS from the class of ' 60 in Who ' s Who are Carol GrifFin, Sylvia Blouin, Barbara Grady, Margaret May- bury, Madeline Joseph, and Dorothy Coffey. COLE Rewards Personal Achievement. High scholastic rating and outstanding leader- ship qualities are characteristics which lend faculty approval to seniors selected by their classmates to Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities. Besides the privilege of wearing the gold or silver key which signifies membership in the society, those chosen may make use of the nationally recognized job placement center as well as have their biographies in the annual directory. Exclusive among Catholic women’s societies is Kappa Gamma Pi which stresses academic achieve- ment plus monumental leadership attributes, since its prime purpose is to cite present leaders with an eye to future leadership among Catholic laywomen. Not more than ten percent of the graduating class may be chosen for this honor. This proves that there are few outstanding women with a medium between scholastic and social qualities. Whos Who Kappa Gamma Pi KAPPA GAMMA PI recipients are Mary Brennan, Dorothy CofFey, Carol Griffin, Ann McQuaid, Barbara Grady, and Margaret Maybury. ASSOCIATE EDITORS C. McGov- ern, D. Coon, and J. Atkinson dis- cuss plans for club writings. PREPARING FOR A BUSY AFTERNOON, J. Finn and A. Sokolosky, editors of the faculty section, make themselves comfort- able in the spacious office. ENTERING THE NEW ELMATA OF- FICE are J. Stagnaro, E. Carroll, and M. E. McCarthy, activity sec- tion editors. WITH A SIGH OF RELIEF, co-editors B. Grady and M. May- bury, business managers J. Riordan and G. Gavigan, and art editor M. Joseph rest after putting the final touches to Elmata, 1960. Seniors Recall; To record a fleeting year in the fullness of its tears, its joys, and its memories is difficult for the fal- tering pen. Such was our task one year ago. Our Elmata is a mirror of one segment of life — for some, the beginning of the end; for others, the end of the beginning; for all, a memory to be cherished. DISCUSSING PROS AND CONS of other yearbooks, J. Chriscola, typist; D. Newman and H. Cullen, photography editors; and editor ex-officio, J. Sheehy, prepare suggestions for other staff members. i 38 t i JUNIOR JOURNALISTS of Tourmaline — M. Kelly, circulalioti; M. Yerick, short stories; C. Connors, poetry; E. Magee and J. Marieb, co-editors; M. G. Praetz, art; D. Gallese and S. Shaw, staff, take time out for retrospect before rushing to meet their deadline. Juniors Create; That everyone has a need for creative ex- pression is found in Tourmaline, literary magazine produced by Junior journalists. Outstanding lay apostles themselves, mem- bers of the staff crusaded tirelessly to instill in students apostolic fervor and love for th e creative. While matter supersedes form, the staff presented their kernels of Catholic thought in a modern and colorful setting. Sophs Record. For the first time in the history of our Journalism Department, Sophomores proved themselves capable of staffing the Elmscript which records events within the limits of our campus. Subjects of timely and topical inter- est to the student are treated in monthly edi- torials. No ideas for vital features or action- filled pictures escape the staff which has increased in number from previous years. STAFFING THE ELMSCRIPT are co-edifors C. O ' Reilly and M. Chicoine, with D. Gallese, R. Hart, E. O’Flynn, M. Powers, E. Sullivan, C. Cronin, M. Dwyer, P. O ' Hara, L. Perrault, P. Thompson, A. Smith, R. Ford, P. White, H. Holfelder, E. O ' Connor, M. Rush, A. Meagher, and L. Cianci. Spp I GLEE CLUB OFFICERS — M. A. O’Brien, president; M. O’Neil, song leader; M. Ferrindino, treasurer; M. Fonteyn, secretary; T. Chapdelaine, vice-president. Voices Blend in Harmony. One section of lilting sopranos, a dash of rich altos, and a blend of melodious second sopranos are the components of the Elms Glee Club. During the Advent season, an addition of male voices of the Holy Cross Liturgical Choir resulted in the annual Christmas concert. At spring, Fordham visited the Elms campus and again proved that tireless hours of practice make a perfect performance. With a dinner preceding the concerts and a dance following them, each member had an opportunity to improve her hostess abilities. I MUSIC LOVERS comprised an appreciative audience listen- ing intently to the Elms-Holy Cross Concert, under the stu- dent direction of Maureen O’Neil and Peter Cinelli. Selec- tions ranged from Handel’s ’’Halleluia Chorus " to the beautiful and ever-popular traditional carols. Organ and piano solos completed the harmonious performances. I IN AN INTENSE SCENE from " The Chalk Garden, " Judy Stagnaro greefs Bob Baker under the watchful scrutiny of Marilyn Brunet. Actors Dramatize . . . To quote Shakespeare, “The world is a stage,” is to realize that Verdeoro brings the world to the Elms campus in its many first- rate productions. Beginning the season with a fine presentation of “The Chalk Garden,” Verdeoro instilled an eager anticipation for the Christmas productions, “The Second Shepherd’s Play” and “Christmas at the Crossroads.” Interclass plays bring spirited competition and add to the activities of the Dramatic Club which trains future Catholic laywomen to present themselves admirably before an audience. MOMENTS BEFORE THE CURTAIN ASCENDS, Kath- leen Swords puts make-up touches on thespian, Fran Mahoney. I i VERDEORO OFFICERS — M. Shea, corresponding secretary; E. O ' Flynn, recording secretary; E. Carroll, president; T. Lincoln, vice- president; R. Quirk, treasurer. And Debaters Convince. PREPARING THEIR CASE, Frosh J. Rura and S. Gelinas take notes for an interclub debate on the Electoral College. By argumentation and disputation will all see more clearly the pros and cons of issues before the world today. The debaters in the MJB Debating Society, through extensive research and intensive persuasion, present the challenge to the future history makers of America. Intercollegiate debating is their main activity; knowledge and foresight is their gain. MJB OFFICERS — J. Atkinson, president; A. O’Shaughnessy, vice-president; E. Carroll, business manager; and M. Donohue, secretary. CCD OFFICERS — M. Dupuis, president; S. Villares, vice-president; M. Denisevich, treasurer; B. Thorne, secretary. Christ-bearers . . . “As long as you did it to one of these my least brethren, you did it to Me.” Bringing the truth of salvation to children is the ultimate goal of the CCD organization. This special aim is accomplished directly by those members who teach in nearby parishes; others fulfill their work in- directly by constructing visual aids for classroom use. 42 IRC OFFICERS — S. Shaw, president; P. Fogarty, vice-presi- dent; E. Gleason, secretary; M. Ambrose, treasurer. Discuss Events . . . Stimulation of intelligent discussion of contem- porary problems is the goal of IRC’s publication of weekly news briefs. With a new outlook, tlie club has set out to investigate the major foe of democracy — Communism. The fallacy of its philosophy is re- vealed through comprehensive research which en- lightens all those interested. IRC’s activities also include guest speakers, a discussion of historical novels, and panels. IRC NEWSBRIEFS are prepared by Anne Koback, Nancy Mirto, Mary Moore, and Patricia Wolos. TEACHERS OF CCD, Mary Ann Lynch, Pat Fradet, and Patricia White cherish their long-awaited diplomas and will soon be active in parish confraternity work. 7- || , y ■ « H I Hi i ' 1 French Consideration of traditions, customs, and vari- ous provinces of France is the means by which the members of Le Cercle Fran9ais obtain their end: the acquisition of excellence and perfection in the media of oral communication. The showing of vari- ous slides of travel highlights and a lecture on methods of teaching the language in elementary schools are avenues of growth for these linguists. FRENCH CLUB OFFICERS — A. Lussier, president; P. Pelland, vice-president; J. Smith, secretary; M. Belanger, treasurer. Spanish Conversational Spanish is the practical applica- tion of classroom knowledge of construction and vocabulary. Not only the intrinsic beauty, but the realistic practicality of the language is taught through gatherings conducted entirely in the tongue of Castilian Spanish. Linguistically inclined, the members of La Corte Castellana acquire firsthand knowledge of the Spanish people, customs, and cul- ture by exchanging thoughts and ideas through the oral media. SPANISH CLUB OFFICERS — C. McKenna, president; R. Mor- tellite, treasurer; M. Powers, secretary; M. L. Dunn, vice- president. 44 Through the Medium of Language. TRUE SCHOLARSHIP is not limited to the classroom but ex- A NEW PHASE IN EDUCATION inter- ests members of the French and Span- ish Clubs as Miss Roy speaks on foreign languages as taught in the elementary schools. English Wrinkled brows, puzzled looks, enlightened minds, and studied thoughts are those character- istics indicative of die research and energy mani- fested in the discussion and comment of great literary works. A relatively new and active organization espe- cially of interest to language majors, the English Club strives to comprehend the complexity of litera- ture through the centuries by means of open disputa- tion and commentary of books and authors. ENGLISH CLUB OFFICERS — A. O ' Flynn, president; S. Vil- to further research. Here, Jeanne Atkinson makes use lares, vice-president; D. Guilmet, secretary; M. Ferrindino, " ew library facilities to broaden her critical reading, treasurer; K. Worthley, librarian. 45 SOCIOLOGY OFFICERS — V. Duggan, president; P. Perry, vice-president; P. Molloy, secretary; C. Shannon, treasurer. SCIENCE OFFICERS — C. Gilboy, president; J. Croughwell, vice-president; M. Calabrese, treasurer; P. Borsari, secre- tary. Realizing that it is the duty of every Catholic to know the Church’s teaching pertaining to the scientific world, the Monsignor Doyle Science Club has as its format the discussion of scientific thought and discovery. It also combines the act of sound reasoning with scientific investigation. TECHNIFAX REPRESENTATIVE, Mr. Habib, demonstrates slide projector techniques to J. Crowley. Modern Science Aids Society. Following the example of tlieir patron, Blessed Martin de Porres, members of the Sociology Club set their goal of performing spiritual and corporal works of mercy. Visiting the aged at the Chicopee Infirmary and the children of Our Lady of Providence Home are ways that they fulfill their mission. DR. THOMAS DOOLEY discusses his Medico program with Rosalie Ford, Virginia Duggan, and Patricia Perry. 46 PRACTICING HER AIM is archery en- ACTION AND PRECISION ATTRACT spectators to an intramural basketball game, a thusiast Carol Brown. favorite sport among students at COLE. ATHLETIC OFFICERS — P. Cummings, vice-president; J. DiFonzo, president; J. Chambers, secretary; and A. Morgan, treasurer. PING-PONG PLAYERS Jean Dejnak and Cathy Taylor enjoy a game after class. GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP is shown by Maureen Bercury, Maureen Friel, Ginny Duggan, and Terry Moruzzi. Young Athletes . . . Impressing upon its members the maxim that a strong body aids the physical and mental well- being of the whole person, the Athletic Association sponsors interclass and intercollegiate basketball competition. Every season brings its own sport: skat- ing is enjoyed in the winter and on spring days one finds softball popular. Tennis, ping-pong, badmin- ton, and archery also lend support to the athletic prowess of the students. Come From Near and Far. From the rolling hills of the Berkshires, from the surf and sun of the South Shore, from the bustle of our country’s largest metropolis, and from the quiet of the Con- necticut Valley, COLE draws her under- graduates. Seven organizations give proof to the fact that our student body has diverse enviromnents, yet all strive for the same ob- jective. Holiday dances, teas, picnics. Com- munion breakfasts, and other recreational activities, continued throughout the academic year, keep the spirit of a united student body alive. BERKSHIRE CLUB OFFICERS are R. Quirk, secretary; M. A. O ' Brien, treasurer; B. J. McCarthy, president; D. Morrissey, vice-president. HOLYOKE CLUB OFFICERS take time out to strike a pretty pose. Seated: M. McLean, vice-president; L. O ' Leary, presi- dent; M. L. Griffin, secretary. Standing: J. Marceau, treasurer. SPRINGFIELD CLUB OFFICERS are aware that time goes by fleetingly. Kneeling.- N. Manning, president; S. McCarthy, vice-president. Standing: J. Lambert, treasurer; M. Brown, secretary. SOUTH SHORE CLUB OFFICERS relaxing in lounge are D. DiSciullo, secretary; M. Fitzgerald, vice-president; J. McLaughlin, president; K. Murphy, treasurer. NEW YORK-METROPOLITAN CLUB OFFICERS are B. Borden, secretary; M. Yerick, president. Absent were H. Holfelder, vice-president and M. Scott, treasurer. WORCESTER CLUB OFFICERS, happily posing, are C. Tieuli, presi- dent; E. Sesia, vice-president; A. Smith, secretary; M. Murphy, treasurer. CONNECTICUT CLUB OFFICERS strike a peaceful pose. Kneeling: M. Macary, vice-president; G. Gavigan, president. Sfanding: C. Barry, secretary; J. Milko, treasurer. 49 where we received refreshment, strength, for each rising sun. Now drink once more, one final time, and then move on. Beginnings . . . Included in the Freshman orientation period were ad- vance letters of thought-provoking content that set the tone of ehallenge for achievement in all aspects of collegiate life. Early entertained by other classes, prisoners of war soon were initiated by German officers with strict commands. But a truce was called and peace made our campus a community of one. FRESHMAN REGISTRATION for the incoming class is aided by Sr. Helen Joseph, Registrar, as the Frosh make their choice of courses. HIGHSTEPPING FRESHMEN show their good sportsmanship during their performances for their Senior Sisters in the last phase of their orientation. " GAUDEAMUS IGITUR " echoes in the Rotunda os Seniors throw Freshmen green and gold beanies, their symbol of acceptance as a vital part of the Elms. WONDERING ABOUT HER FUTURE four years at the Elms, Frosh Janet Kelliher models her new beanie as she starts collegiate life. LENDING A HELPFUL HAND are Dora Morrissey and Gladys Archey as they prepare a Little Sister ' s bed for the night. 53 SENIOR CAROLYN O ' CONNOR places her Cap and Gown in Fr. Pierce’s hands, thus offering her four collegiate years to God, as Joanne Riley, her Soph Sister, looks on. Bring Fulfillment Before receiving their caps and gowns, Seniors offered them to God at Mass on October 4, 1959. Congratulations and the red rose from Little Sisters sparked warm glows of achievement in each heart as the academic attire was donned for the first time on Cap and Gown Sunday. p 1 ' ic.1 HOLDING THEIR TRADITIONAL ROSES, Seniors Maureen O ' Neil, Maureen O ' Keefe, Audrey O ' Flynn, and Terry Oganowski are attended by Nancy O ' Donnell, Nancy Smith, Joan Talbot, and Joan McLaughlin. CARRYING LONG-AWAITED caps and gowns. Seniors solemnly leave the auditorium to don their academic attire for the first time. “Grave old Seniors” look forward with mixed emotions to their final year at the Elms. Through Tourmalines A mark of achievement our beloved Tourmaline. Ring Night imparted an indefinable spark of pride to each eager Junior as she awaited her Tourmaline ring from Sr. Helen Clare and her Little Sister. With her symbol of upperclassmanship proudly on her finger, she showed everyone that she had combined the newness of beginning years with golden Junior moments. M. Fitzgerald, J. Delaney, M. Sinkoski, M. Hammond, P. Cummings, A. Brown, and S. Musante. BELOVED TOURMALINE is placed on the finger of Kathy Dwyer by Ethel Welch. WITH OUTSTRETCHED HANDS, eight proud Junior recipients sport sparkling new Tourmalines. Clockwise are G. Dowd, " DOIN’ WHAT COMES NAT ' RALLY " are Soph country dancers, while cowboy and Indian classmates look on with smiling approval. A TOUCH OF THE " CAN-CAN” livens the show with Soph steppers, led by Patricia White. And Soph Talent. On a fragrant autumn evening, Texas moonlight flooded the stage of Veritas Audi- torium as the class of 1962 transported us to the land of cowboys and ten-gallon hats. Through scenes of peaceful Indians and the General .Store, the Sophomores imparted a memorable rendition of their theme “Deep in the Heart of Texas.” Resulting in a step toward unity this Soph Show displayed both school and class spirit. TOWN MAYOR, Jean Chambers, welcomes visitors to the annual cele- bration, and invites everyone to join in the festivities. 56 ( 1 I i ACADEMICALLY CLAD Linda Lavallee proudly slips a white jacket on her Little Sister, Barbara Ciszek. RESOUNDING THE PRAISES of the class of 1962 are tired but happy jacket-clad Sophomores. A MOST unhappy Helene Holfelder relates the tragic tale of her horse and his numerous legs. IV ' H ' ll W DANCING TO THE TEMPO of the Cha Cha Cha highlighted the annual Senior Elmata dance. Surrounded by a rhythmical motif of swaying natives, the informal affair garnered high praise for the contrasting pink-black design. Elmata ' Cha-Cha ' Delightful Latin figures romped against a gay candy-striped background and were personified by Elmata dancers, who proved that everyone loves to Cha Cha Cha. Multicolored balloons of different sizes and shapes bounced lightly and added a dimen- sional effect to the life-size rhythmic figures. Thirst-quenching punch and delicious cookies satisfied the lively dancers who were enjoying the music of John Dion. Financially and socially this Elmata dance was a success and a tribute not only to the conscientious committee but also to e er one who was determined to support her yearbook. AUDREY O ' FLYNN, CHAIRMAN, and Peggy Young, art decorator, pose with their escorts at the Elmata. 58 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS register with co-chairmen Jean Kasuba and Pat Perry at the start of the day’s activities. Turning our campus into a showcase for neighboring high school upperclassmen, stu- dents worked zealously, under the direction of co-chairmen Jean Kasuba and Patricia Perry, to make another High School Day a spirited success. Exuberant cheerleaders sparked their teams on to victory at the an- nual basketball game, while Texas came to the Elms as the Sophs welcomed our visitors with entertainment from their show. Bene- diction ended the day’s activities. BOOK STORE ARTICLES are displayed by Elizabeth Anderson and Carol Korytoski. I I Warm I I Hospitality 1 1 BASKETBALL ANYONE! One of the I day ' s highlights, the traditional ij basketball game is played by I Freshmen and Sophomores. Fight- ■j ing for their respective teams, student players watch the ball in- tently as they are cheered on to I victory by their classmates. I Christmas Festivities With a festive spirit of Christmas pervading tlie air, the Christmas banquet oflRcially heralded the coming l)irth of the Christ Child. Midst carols, old and new, Santa Claus appeared on the scene with his bag of surprises for all, and this was followed by entertainment rendered from the four classes. Topping oft the evening were the Christmas plays: “Christmas at the Crossroads,” a modern miracle play; “The Second Shepherd’s Play,” a medieval miracle play; and a Christmas tableau oftered by Verdeoro. OUR CAMPUS CRECHE, a reminder of the true meaning of Christmas, is admired by Carol Shannon and Peggy McLaughlin. COLE CAROLERS emanating Christmas spirit pause for a row: M. O ' Brien, P. Fradet, P. McLaughlin, E. Sadowski, moment to serenade O ' Leary Hall. Front row.- E. Mackie, M. J. C. Shannon. Privetera, C. Tieuli, T. Vinisko, J. Milko, R. Mortellite. Second 60 BUSY WAITRESSES MOVED SWIFTLY to feed hungry Elmites as the student body assembled in the gym for the annual Christmas banquet, which was under the co-chairmenship of Louise O ' Leary and Joyce Douville. Second helpings were in order, as turkey, potato chips, buns, and pickles were consumed and topped off with ice cream. CHRISTMAS IS THE SEASON OF GIVING, and the spirit of Saint Nicholas is not lacking at COLE. About to open their gaily-wrapped packages under the traditional Christmas tree, are Lorraine Pelletier and Mary Ellen Mallory, while Anita Lussier presents her Little Sister Mary Williams with her Christmas gift. I NANCY MIRTO GESTURES THREATENINGLY at shepherds Carol Thayer and Barbara Trzcinka, while Judy Stagnaro regards them with awe in “The Second Shepherd’s Play. " Striking nine on a brisk Friday evening in Febrnary, the clock rang in tlic long-awaited junior Week End. The first oft-campus prom Tonight We Love was held at the Sheraton- Kimball till one o’clock, and Ehnite prin- cesses danced with prince charmings to dream-woven notes. On Saturday afternoon Juniors and their escorts enjoyed a li cl jazz concert at an elite country club, and the dinner that followed was hailed exuberantl) ' by all. After these gay social activities, Elm- ites culminated their perfect week end by giving thanks to Our Lord in the form of a Communion breakfast. Junior S CO-CHAIRMEN Libbie Harris and Jacqueline Smith along with their escorts admire prom favors, fragile brandy snifters. Enjoy Week End. J y CAPTURING THE MOOD of the theme Tonight We tove, chandeliers sparkle in the spacious ballroom of the Sheraton-Kimball as Elmites and their dates dance to the captivating music of Ronnie Drumm. LAST YEAR’S JUNIOR PROM CO-CHAIRMAN Ann McQuaid and her escort are starry-eyed with the sparkling atmosphere. AT THE WYCKOFF COUNTRY CLUB, Juniors dance with their dates during the lively Jazz Concert. Elmites Profit from Lectures . . . REV. RICHARD J. POWERS and Dan Ferrone present “Musical Comedy in America. " Broad in scope and ricli in deptli, a lecture series implemented onr cnltnral education. Rev. Richard J. Powers and Dan Ferrone began the program with “Musical Comedy in America;” Dr. Thomas Molnar followed, speaking on “Modern Art as an E.xpression of Onr Times.” Finishing the series were Rev. Alan Keenan, O.F.M. discoursing on “The Modern Sick- ness: its Symptoms and Cures” and Dr. Barry Ulanov lecturing on “Literary Traditions of Christian Hu- manism.” DR. THOMAS MOLNAR discourses on “Modern Art as an Expression of Our Times.” MAUREEN AMBROSE CONGRATULATES Rev. Alan Keenan on his timely speech concerning the sickness which plagues our modern society today in the form of beatniks. A COFFEE HOUR followed the lecture given by Dr. Barry Ulanov. Here, Dr. Ulanov answers pertinent questions pertaining to his subject on Christian Humanism. 64 DELIGHTING THE FIRST CONCERT AUDIENCE with music of four centuries, the Knickerbocker Players accompanied Eugene List. ALEC TEMPLETON, renowned blind pianist, reposes in thoughtful solitude, while he contemplates his forthcoming recital. METROPOLITAN BASS BARITONE, Lorenzo Alvary, prepares to join in an operatic duet with Miss Harbrecht. Musical Culture . . . Inspiring campus and community crowds to greater cultural heights was the Community Concert Series. Open- ing with Eugene List and the Knickerbocker Players, the series continued with soprano Ewan Harbrecht and bass baritone Lorenzo Alvary. John Crain, tenor, and pianist Alec Templeton culminated the program. CHARMING SOPRANO Ewan Harbrecht vividly interprets the famous aria from Verde ' s La Trayiata. " LOVELY TO LOOK AT, DELIGHTFUL TO KNOW, " is a phrase aptly applied to models Coralie Lucas, Julie Gosselin, and Patricia White, as they pose for the camera-man prior to the fashion show. Modern Styles . . . The fresh young look was embodied in a wide array of crisp cottons, casual sport clothes, and pen ' enial basics. Accessories accented the stem-sheath sophistication of dresses for “that special occasion” as attractive Ehnites soloed into spring and summer with the season styles. The fashion show audience demonstrated its enthusi- astic approval, as each svelte model accomplished a pirou- ette to accent the best feature of her outfit. CHAIRMAN OF THE FASHION SHOW, Senior Madeline Joseph adds her approval to a dress to be modeled. SOPHOMORES Mary Lou Griffin and Mary Ann Burns add a congenial atmosphere with Beverly Thorne and Veronica Plante as they take a “Happy Journey.” CHARMING MURDERESSES (Eileen Carroll and Carol Mc- Kenna) discuss the burial of a victim with their brother Teddy (Dorothy Corcoran) in the Seniors ' adaptation of “Arsenic and Old Lace.” And Thespian Rivalry. Encouraging both class spirit and dramatic competition, the annual Interclass Plays drew a large audience. The Verdeoro trophy was awarded to the Sophomores for their version of Thorton Wilder’s “Happy Journey,” and Mary Lou Griffin of the Sophomore class was selected by the judges as the Best Actress of the Evening. IN “SORRY WRONG NUMBER,” Joyce Marieb is emotionally disturbed at operators Sheila McCarthy and Sandra Shaw. RUNNER-UP FOR BEST ACTRESS of the Evening, Mary Ann Leary, soliloquizes in the Freshman production, “Ah Romance.” RETREAT GIVES AN OPPORTUNITY to remove ourselves temporarily from the material world and to contemplate the spiritual. Here Patricia Pelland and Marie Gravel meditate on Christ ' s crucifixion. Procession . . . Proving tlieinselves worthy children of Mary, Ehnites raised their hearts and voices to God in prayer and ottered to Him a rosary of living beads and a cross of fervent students in counteraction to the Communistic celebration of May day. Academ- ically clad Seniors led the procession to the statue of Our Lady of the Elms in front of the Administra- tion Building where the symbol of faith was formed. Chairman Maureen O’Neil carried the erueifix, our weapon in defense of Christianity. WARM BREEZES tug gently at dark skirts and white blouses, as Seniors form a living rosary and the rest of the student body compose the cross on Mary’s Day. Every prayer from each Elmite ' s heart has a special intention: that Communism will not spread and overtake democratic nations. 68 4 Reverend Nicholas J. Spagnolo, C.P.S. -It-.-.. Reverend Richard A. Daly, C.P.S. Inspires Peace. Because a time of withdrawal is often Irenefieial to the spirit of man, March 8-1 1 were set aside as retreat days on our campus, and Elmites spent their time in prayer, solitude, and reflection. Guiding our hours of recollection were Rev. Nicholas J. Spagnolo, C.P.S. who served as retreat master for upperclassmen, and Rev. Richard A. Daly, C.P.S. who counseled the Freshmen and Sophomores. In keeping with the psalm of joy which was printed on the retreat program this year, students found reason to rejoice and be glad in the peace and consolation they found in their visit with God. Music: Organ Tones, Seldom does one find present in an artist, perfection of performance and personality; hnt Richard Ellsasser, famed organist, com- bined these admirable qualities at the Elms first organ concert. Called the “Paganini of the Concert Organ,” Mr. Ellsasser is re- nowned for an outstanding pedal technique. Audience participation was proof positive of his artistry and of the privilege it was to meet Mr. Ellsasser, the man and the artist. TRANSPORTING THE ORGAN from its traditional church surroundings to a popular concert stage, Richard Ellsasser accomplishes this transition with aplomb. By clever change of pace and flashing pedal notes, he established complete rapport with a capacity audience. 4 ' d Concert Ahmad Jamal, one of the nation’s best sell- ing jazz pianists, was presented by the Stu- dent Government at the Springfield Andi- toriiim on Saturday, Eebrnary 27, 1960. Impeccable renditions from the albums “But Not Eor Me,” “Ahmad Jamal,” and “Music, Music, Music” were enjoyed by a large and appreciative audience, as the Ahmad Jamal trio, consisting of piano, bass, and drums beat time to the jazz melodies. BEFORE HIS APPEARANCE on stage, Ahmad Jamal flashes an enthusiastic smile as he is greeted by chairman Rosemary Broderick who is looking for- ward to an entertaining evening of jazz melodies from the Quartet. PROUD DAUGHTERS place the traditional carnations in the lapels of happy fathers, a small token of filial love. Daughters Regale Parents . . . POSING FOR A PRE-OPERETTA PHOTO are participants Joan Gelinas, Sylvia Blouin, and Clare Connors. After preparing our campus for observance of Parent- Daughter Day, we not only honored them but also brought pride to ourselves and to our college. Fathers, bedecked witli carnations, and mothers, presented with roses, thoroughly enjoyed the entertainment and explored all aspects of col- legiate life along with campus facilities. Besides this, singing old songs brought tears to many eyes as the peiwading “esprit de corps” among us was fully extended to our parents on their day. SENIOR MARY HAYES welcomes her parents to the Elms for the annual Parent-Daughter Day festivities. MARY ' S DAY PROMPTS physical and mental devotion to the patroness of our college. Designated to combat May Day rallies in Communist- held countries, the students proclaim their allegiance to Our Lady. And Crown Mary. CROWNING OUR BLESSED MOTHER Is sodality pre- fect Judy Stagnaro, while Joanne Donovan and Maureen O ' Neil are in respectful attendance. SOPHOMORE SONGS PERMEATE the air of a spring ' s day, as competition between the classes is held on O ' Leary ' s steps. Farewell to the Queen of our college — but not a final one! With flower-wreathed heads and sweet musical voices, underclassmen paid tribute to Our Lady of the Elms on Mary’s Day as sodality prefect Judy Stagnaro crowned her in the Grotto. Stately Seniors offered white carnations in a ceremony which was clima.xed by Benediction in the chapel. co-editors; Marie Ferrindino, class song; Deborah Coon, class historian; Carol GrifFin, class orator; Sylvia Blouin, class will; and Mary O ' Brien, class prophet. Farewell . . . THE CLASS TREE is planted by Senior president Jill Sheehy, assisted by Junior class president Clare Connors. Seniors N. Manning, M. McLaughlin, M. Julian, N. Ouellette, M. Calabrese, and M. Macary enjoy the ceremony. LEADING A SOLEMN PROCESSION of Seniors into the audi- torium for class day activities is Eileen Carroll, class marshal, followed by Margaret Maybury and Barbara Grady, Elmafa So close we came to the end of the beginning, yet we lingered to bid farewell to the grounds we have loved, the friends we have made, and the tears we have shed. In our farewell, we left something of ourselves, a symbol of our oneness and our fulfillment. There- fore, on Class Day, we planted our tree of memories ever-green, ever reminiscent of our cherished four years. And Last Dance IN CLOSE CONFERENCE discuss- ing various details concerning the Senior Ball, that event which cul- minates the social season, are co- chairmen Nancy Manning and Mary L. Carroll. LIGHT AND SHADOW present an ideal foil for the profiles of M. Wright and her escort. ENJOYING THEMSELVES between dances are Seniors B. Grady, L. Lavallee, O. Shannon, B. Lane, M. Maybury, and escorts. Magical moments sped by quickly at the annual Senior Ball where Seniors danced for the final time as Ehns undergraduates and shared with their class- mates once more the joy of having fun together. But all too soon, the ball was over. PARENTS AND FRIENDS gather for Commencement, filled with pride for the well-deserving graduates who have reached the " end of the beginning. " Bring Collegiate The curtain of college years was finally closed as students became Catholic college graduates, and the world received them as future Christ bearers. Teachers, scientists, journalists, doctors, mothers, and religious will flower from these trained women. As each received her diploma, a mark of her achieve- ment, she stepped over the threshold of maturity, ready to offer her gifts to all who awaited her. With the w ' ords of the commencement address ringing in their ears, members of the class of 1960 walked down the auditorium aisle for the final time. HIS EXCELLENCY, The Most Reverend Christopher J. Weldon congratulates each Senior after she has received her long- awaited diploma and the applause of her family and friends. c Here is the very home, the morning place, where looms the love ; , Tf ' L that links us to you, , where grew the chain which only swells of heart can ’] i ’’ ' ■ ■ ■ ' ' ' 1 - y ' - ' I ' ‘ ' j ‘ And when we slip into tomorrow ' i ' . it will bind our beinps still ' tor now, and tor jorever. ' ' 5; V ' V 78 Eager Frosh . . . “Oh, so this is the Elms’ great heart!’’ Yes, dear Frosh, you found this out tlie very moment the “grave old’’ Seniors commanded you to do their bidding, for you detected the smile hidden behind those solemn eyes. We, too, discerned the laughter behind your frightened expressions. Nor could we hold back the tears on Elms Night when the class of ’63 became official Ehnites. Orientation over, you began the studies which were to make your first year so full, so rewarding. These were your first college classes, and the tran- sition to be made was a difficult one. Living up to expectations, you made it smoothly. Routine estab- lished, you began to search for clubs and activities to round out your college life. Watching traditions so revered by Ehnites, you were caught up in the spirit of COLE, and the days flew quickly. As we leave, we echo our wish for you on Elms Night: “May your future years be brightened and your future work be lightened by the joy and spirit here.’’ Seated: Ruth Gammons and Julie Sittard. Standing: Jean Kasper, Elizabeth Conlin, Mary Patricia Donohue, Carroll Auth, Christine Lynch, Maryalice Dignan, Margaret Lynch, Mary Denisevich, and Janet Kelliher. Seated: Janice Perrault, Joan Eiardi, Alice Philpott, and Catherine Ormond. Standing: Mary Jane Moore, Louise Paquette, Alice Auth, Margaret Wright, Eleanor Spring, and Elizabeth Tallarico. Seated: Jeanne Chick. Standing: Jill Morrison, Helen Cerrone, Dorothy DiGeronimo, Carolyn Griswold, and Dorothy Didonna. Carol Thayer, Ann Zysk, Sandra Halladay, Katherine Quinn, Joanne Rura, Ann Dassatti, and Kathleen Murphy. Seated: Jane Deasy, Doris Stick- ney, Mary Lee Keefe, and Mary Shea. Standing: Frances Ranno, Jane Regan, Jane McMahon, Gail Furman, and Beata Betagh. Become Well-Integrated Elmites . . . 80 Seated: Charlene Poliwczak, Catherine Connelly, Louise Meunier, and Joanne Ray- mond. Standing: Joanne Allen, Mary Ann Cleary, Ethel Welch, Carolyn Accorsi, Margaret Begley, Mary McMahon, and Ruth Owens. First Row: Barbara Trzcinka and Judy Bottone. Second Row : Catherine Benoit and Faith Nascemb eni. Kneeling: Kathleen O’Connor, Ann Malboeuf, and Anne Henneberry. Standing: Theresa Kolano, Susan Gelinas, Karen Kern, Patricia Hart, Barbara Cronin, Patricia Wolos, and Jeanne Archey. 81 In Campus Life. Firsf Row: Kathleen Donnellan, Kathleen Griffin, and Sandra Avault. Second Row: Virginia Koonz, Anne Koback, and Miriam Pratt. Kathleen Geoffrion, Phyllis Wilson, and Mary- margaret Gavigan. 82 First Row: Linda ladarola. Second Row: Ann Szetela and Elizabeth Bagg. Third Row: Joyce Richards and Anna Lonergan. M 1 f |i 1 L.— •4 ' 1 • 1 ■ " M i i 1 — 11 . Sondra McCarthy, Irene Quintal, Dolores Kapinos, Carol Landry, and Diane Peters. First Row: Nancy Mirto and Julianne Gobeille. Second Row: Mary Belanger and Rayna Danton. Third Row: Edith Me- chinko and Mary Ann Leary. Judith Gooch, Barbara Landers, Mabel Sartori, Barbara Sokolowski, Anna Betagh, Wallace McDowell, Jeanne Gaboury, Patricia Lines, and Mary Ann Lynch. 83 Botfom Row: Maureen Moriarty, Sheila Hurley, Donna DiSciullo, Beverly Thorne, Margaret Rush, and Irene Cieplinski. Top Row.- Nancy O ' Donnell and Julia Ferrero. “And the gayest Sophomores that the Elms has ever seen!” These are not just words to you, dear Soplis, for this has been a year of gaiety. And yet, Little Sisters, you handed us our treasured caps and gowns with dig- nity as you added a special touch to that very important day in our lives. We watched with pride as you diligently planned and practiced for that show of shows. On that special night, finding our- selves “Deep in the Heart of Texas,” we wit- nessed a class with heart. Your white jackets, which we so proudly gave you, were a fitting climax to this outstanding performance. You will be stepping into a new phase of collegiate life, and you will have your own Little Sisters. We, too, will he entering a new phase of life, which will be challenging. There are so many things we will miss when we are gone, hut we will miss you most of all. Anne Meagher, Jean Dejnak, Patricia O ' Hara, Jean Chambers, Pauline Borsari, and Elizabeth Austin. i 84 Lois Morelli, Carol Stroiney, and Mary Ann Burns. Jane Slattery, president; Lillian Perrault, vice-president; Jane Morrissey, secretary; and Barbara Ciszek, treasurer. Seated: Marie Raucci, Carolyn Murphy, Jean Pouech, Linda Cianci, and Judy Coppola. Standing: Frances Balcerzewski, Carol Barry, and Patricia White. Barbara Broderick, Gail Albertine, Maureen McCool, Mary Williams, Clare Burrows, Eileen O ' Flynn, Elizabeth Belsito, Roberta Quirk, and Agnes Smith. Readily Prove Their Capabilities . . . Seated: Barbara Ciszek, Carol Brodeur, Eileen Lawson, and Joan Fitzgerald. Standing: Mary Lou Liucci, Joan Brunelle, Eleanor Boynton, and Judy Marceau. Helene Holfelder, Nancy Smith, Ellen Sullivan, Maureen Brown, Mary Fonteyn, and Mary Powers. Filomena Lourenco, Mary Jane Eichorn, and Ann Farrell. Ann Monaghan, Patricia Thompson, Cecile O ' Reilly, Joan Talbot, and Patricia Dyer. Patricia Bozek, As Collegiate Members. Seofed; Carole Millette, Judy Lambert, Ann O’Shaughnessy, and Celina Conde. Standing: Geraldine Crimmins and Patricia Kolano. I I Bottom Row: Anita Doyle, Carolanne Cronin, Henriette Dumas, and Elizabeth Kirby. Top Row-. Judy ! Lavelle, Evadine O’Connor, Margaret Dwyer, and Lillian Perrault. Jovial Juniors . . . “Junior year last year! Oh, that was the best year.” You truly know the meaning of these words now, for you have finished your best year. How proud you were of your very own “Little Sister” on Elms Night! And as the Frosh became Ehnites, you could then officially refer to your- selves as upperclassmen. Still the Jolly Juniors, you awaited that special night when the Tourmaline was slipped on your eager hand. With this ring, a new dignity was yours along with new obligations. You assumed both with a spirit for which your class is known. Selecting a major field brought a change in your curriculum. At the same time Elm- dom awaited the first issue of Tourmaline which surpassed expectations. In the midst of all this, started the meeting behind closed doors to keep your big secret carefully guarded. We pre- tended not to care, but you knew differ- ently. As we danced away our last Junior Prom, the spirit of ’61 could not be missed. Our hearts were light in the knowledge that we were leaving our Seniority in your capable hands. “And now at last you are the Senior Class of OLE.” Mary Dupuis, Mary Kelly, Cecilia Joyce, Mary Fitzge- rald, Livia Menin, Kathleen Worthley, Marilyn Phelan, Donna Millin, and Joan McMahon. : iE:i 90 i Anne Morgan, treasurer; Clare Connors, president; Joyce Douville, vice-president; and Patricia Perry, secretary. First Row: Carol Ouellette and Marion Spiewak. Second Row: Kathleen Dwyer and Mary Hammond. Third Row: Kathleen Weldon and Margaret McLean. First Row: Joan Delaney. Second Row: Mary Kay Cunning- ham and Juliette Binette. Third Row: Jacqueline Croughwell and Jacqueline Smith. Fourth Row.- Patricia Cummings. 91 Proficiently Assume Upperclassman Role.. First Row: Elizabeth Brisson, Mary Wynn, Jean Zdon, Maureen McDonald, Susan Bell, and Gloria Bonneville. Second Row. Joan McLaughlin, Mary Austin, Anna Flasinski, Marion LaFond, Mildred LaFerriere, and Kathleen Mahoney. 92 Stephanie Stephanik, Mary Ann Furey, Mary Ellen Lynch, and Anita Bergeron. Carol Young, Joan Topor, Ann Lavelle, and Gertrude Dowd. As Campus Leaders. Jane Campbell, Theresa Chapdelaine, Mary Cameron, Sally Mc- Cormick, and Marilyn Brunet. Alice Toomey, Anne Walker, Margaret Callahan, Joan Coleman, Natalie Basile, and Patricia Babineau. 94 r Kneeing: Sheila McCarthy, Susan Musante, and Joyce Dou- ville. Standing: Patricia Fradet, Marlene Frulla, Mary Rea- gan, Eileen Collins, and Anne Brown. . L-: . Kneeing: Sandra Shaw and Sonia Villares. Standing: Ellen Sesia, Dora Morrissey, Libbie Harris, and Joyce Marieb. First Row: Rebecca Butler, Gladys Archey, Mary Lou Dunn, Margaret Yerick, Sylvia Ready, and Mary Gene Praetz. Second Row: Marie Huot. Third Row: Diane Gallese, Audrey Abbiuso, Joanne Donovan, Brenda Borden, Elizabeth Ashe, and Elva Gleason. k 95 W e pdiise uoiv, Soft sighhig silence shapes our thoughts too sacred for the word. too tauutiug for the silence. No tear. For ive shall meet again beyond tomorrow and the forlorn star. WE SALUTE YOU, leaders of the class of ' 60! Pictured above in academic attire are Louise O’Leary, secretary; Carol McKenna, treasurer; M. Jill Sheehy, president; and Margaret Maybury, vice-president. CLASS OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer 1956-1957 Mauheen Sullivan Marcia Wright Mildred Bogac:z Carolyn O’Connor 1957-1958 Mary Mltrphy Nancy Manning Maureen Friel Cecilia Joy 1958-1959 Agnes Sadowsky Rosemary Broderick Carol Cilboy Carol Mc:Kenna 98 I Maureen Catherhie Ambrose SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS History Accent on the casual . . . femininity mod- ein style . . . probing mind under a tranquil exterior . . . reserve well worth penetrating . . . methodical mind and manner . . . prac- ticality, her criterion . . . neatness, her vir- tue ... a definite approach to life . . . prudent in decisions . . . spirit of independence . . . steadfast loyalty in friendship . . . refresh- ing directness . . . Maureen. IRC 2, .3, 4 (T); NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1, 2; Sprinpfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Elizabeth Jean Anderson NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS istorij Gathering an immense enjoyment from life, laughter, and love ... a meticulous appear- ance . . . sparks of songs springing in her heart . . . gaiety glowing in new interests . . . a serious vein beneath the surface ... a source of spring hope through dark clouds . . . proficient in history with a remarkable memory for dates . . . dependability and generosity, her forte . . . Betty. Family Life 4; Holyoke Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; IRC 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1, 2, 3,; Tourmaline 3 (Bu.s. Mgr.). 99 Retina Leah Archey PinSFlELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Understanding shining from a girlish smile . . . petite in size, mature in sense . . . meticulous appearance . . . determination for things worth while . . . quiet voice emanat- ing from a lively mind . . . willing hands . . . considerate heart . . . dependable judgments . . . lover of life ... a touch of sophistica- tion . . . unswerving allegiance to quality . . . truly representative of COLE . . . Regina. Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Berkshire Undergraduate Club 1 (T), 2, 3, 4; Blessed Martin de Forres Sociol- ogy Club 2, 3, 4; Cercle Francais 1; NFCCS; NSA; Besident Council 2; Sodality 1, 2, 3. Jeanne Marie Atkinson CHICOPEE FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS English Journalistic fluency . . . accepting the world on her own terms . . . lengthy hours of unsung labor . . . attacking each project with vehement gusto ... a debater of life . . . intellect tempered with truth . . . dra- matist, poet, linguist . . . appreciation of objets d’art . . . familiarity necessitates admir- ation . . . soul of an artist . . . abhorent of mediocrity . . . born to lead . . . Jeanne. Athletic Association 1, 2; Corte Castellano 1, 2; Elmata 4; English Club 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Initiation Co-Chairman; Liturgy 2, 3 (National Chairman), 4; M]B Debating Society 1, 2, 3 (Bus. Mgr.), 4 (P); NFCCS; NSA; Springfield Under- graduate Club ], 2, 3, 4; Tourmaline 3 (Co-Ed.); Verdeoro 1, 2, 4. 100 Maureen Frances Bercury PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS English Strong defender of everything collegiate . . . idealistic heart, realistic mind, in con- stant struggle . . . child-like eyes searching for understanding . . . pledging a loyalty so true . . . gaily swinging a tennis racket . . . quietly gathering a wealth from books . . . sensitivity suppressing sentimentality . . . gratefully acknowledging the smallest kind- ness . . . smiling at life’s every experience . . . our pixie . . . Berc. Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Berkshire Under- graduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Blessed Martin de Porres Sociology Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Corte Castellana 1, 2; English Club 3, 4; Family Life 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Verdeoro 1, 2, 3, 4. Sylvia Ann Blouin SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Mathematics A love of life reflected in her features . . . a sparkling voice to match her eyes . . . able and active . . . never a dull moment . . . Soph Show, a treasured memory . . . songwriter by popular demand . . . friends caught un- aware by her trusty tape recorder ... a library of stereophonic sound . . . innate teach- ing a bility with a fondness for children . . . fun-loving sophistication . . . Syl. Cercle Francais 1; Glee Club 1, 2 (S), 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1, 2; Soph Show Co-Chairman; Springfield Undergraduate Club; Who’s Who. Mildred Sophia Bogacz THREE RIVERS, MASSACHUSETTS Chemistry Superabundant energies, prudently chan- neled . . . sincerely selfless, selflessly sincere . . . demon with a test tube . . . and a Dodge . . . expert on matters culinary . . . the Elms’ very own financial wizard . . . generous of all that is hers . . . cherishing each friendship as a once-upon-a-lifetime gift . . . radiating sunshine from a heart of pure gold . . . Mil. Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Secretary 1; Liturgy 3, 4; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality I, 2, 3, 4; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Government 2, 3; VerdeoTo 1, 2. Mary Anne Brennan NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUESETTS istorij Poised and ladylike ... a complacent exterior masking a delightful wit . . . en- chanting naivete . . . fragile as a delicate piece of china . . . impeccably groomed with inherent good taste ... a calmness pervad- ing all that she undertakes . . . dancing eyes betraying a joyful heart . . . blessed with virtue, wisdom, and queenly grace . . . loyal and true as a friend . . . Mary. Athletic Association 1, 4; Cerclc Francois 1; Hol- yoke Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; IRC 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Verdeoro 1. 102 Rosewary Theresa Broderick HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS English Able leader . . . fervent follower . . . cap- tivating the campus with sincerity and sun- shine . . . winsome ways . . . too busy to rest . . . too interested to pass you by . . . happiest when overburdened . . . working hard at all things that are undertaken ... an inspiration to all . . . tall and straight like bamboo that bends in the wind but never breaks . . . Ro. Blessed Martin de Forres Sociology Club 2, 3, 4; CCD 2, 3, 4; Class Vice-President 3; Family Life 3, 4; Holyoke Undergraduate Club 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Ring Co-Chairman 3; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Stu- dent Government 4 (VP). Mary Ivwiaadate Calabrese WINSTED, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Goodness, the core of her being . . . per- vading aura of cheerfulness . . . possessing an understanding heart . . . exploratory spirit in the field of science . . . instinctively aware of others’ needs . . . patience of Job . . . enthusiastic loyalty . . . assiduous devo- tion to duty ... a placid exterior cloaking inner competence . . . wisdom emanating from life itself . . . richness of self profiting all . . . Mary. Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Connecticut Under- graduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 1, 2, 3 (VP), 4 (T); NFCCSi NSA. Eileen Mary Carroll SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS English Staunch principles of right and wrong . . . trntli her compass on life’s journey . . . ex- perienced in the art of impartial analysis of people . . . fervor for all things Irish . . . faithful promulgation of Saint Jude . . . whirl- wind of activity ... a flair for dramatics . . . self-expression in all mediums, especially journalistic . . . unwavering convictions . . . quality, not quantity . . . Eileen. Elmata 4; Elmscript 3 (Co-Ed.); English Club 3, 4; MJB Debating Club 1 (S), 2 (VP), 3 (VP), 4 ( Bu.s. Mgr.); NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Spring- field Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Govern- ment 4; Verdcoro 1, 2, 3, 4 (P). Mary Louise Carroll LONGMEADOW, MASSACHUSETTS English Capability which commands respect . . . charm in abundance . . . portraying the full spectrum of mood on stage . . . wide range of interests . . . forensic ability . . . calm consideration of both sides of a discussion . . . possessing grace of gesture and strength of expression . . . carrying her own at- mosphere wherever she goes . . . breezy col- legian with a cosmopolitan touch and infec- tious air . . . Mary Lou. English Club 3, 4; MJB Debating Club 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; S])ringfield Undergraduate Club 3, 4; Verdeoro 3, 4. i04 Diane Sylvia Cavallim SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Sunny Italian smile . . . warm Italian heart . . . dedicated persistence in her chosen field . . . inquiring mind continually seeking the core of the problem . . . thirst for knowledge . . . well-read in arts and sciences . . . char- acteristic stability ... a desire for perfection . . . yet undemanding in friendship . . . deserving of life’s best . . . Mary’s standards hers . . . Diane. Athletic Association 1, 2; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 1, 2, 3; NFCCS; NSA. Lorraine Ann Cehnla CHICOPEE, MASSACHUSETTS Biology A gentle touch in all things . . . the Hall- mark of true understanding . . . sensitive to the deeper meaning of life . . . wide doe- startled eyes . . . happy and secure in her friendships . . . noting the importance of details in the field of science . . . the femi- nine touch . . . giving but fleeting glimpses of a personality well-worth the capturing and appreciating . . . Lorie. Family Life Club 2; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 105 Joyce Muriel Chris cola AGAWAM, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Petite in stature hut powerful in perform- ance . . . practicality her motto . . . always a joh well done . . . animated conversationalist . . . possessor of an enviable memory for details . . . capable and indefatigable worker . . . competent business-woman . . . clever fingers moving with agility and accuracy . . . possessing manual dexterity . . . straightfor- ward and unpretentious . . . frank opinions . . . commanding respect . . . Joyce. Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Blessed Martin de Porrcs Sociologi Club 2, 3, 4; Cercle Francais 1, 2; Ebnata 4 (Typist); Family Life Club 3, 4; NFCCS; NS A; Resident Council 2; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Dorothy Ami Coffey HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS French true friend . . . soft-spoken, yet firm . . . many a joke shyly related to an ever-waiting audience . . . loyalties that run deep ... a beautiful blush revealing a sensitive soul . . . making all who pass her way delighted to know her . . . interested in many fields . . . penetrating each . . . confidently supporting high ideals . . . Dottie. Blessed Martin de Forres Sociology Club 1, 2; CCD 3 (T); Cercle Francais 1. 2, 3 (S), 4; Corte Castel- lana 2; Holyoke Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NS A; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Verdeoro 1; Who’s Who. 06 Marjorie Deborah Coon LUDLOW, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Indifferent to material values . . . pro- pensity to detachment . . . romantic vein in an unfettered spirit . . . journalistic per- fection ... a graphic turn of pen ... an eye for atmosphere . . . efficiency cloaked in casnalness . . . accepting people for what they are . . . personally discreet . . . dedicated worker . . . discriminating taste in art, liter- ature, and music . . . cherished sense of inde- pendence . . . Debbie. Athletic Association 1; Blessed Martin de Forres Sociology Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Ccrcle Francais 1; Elmata 4; Elmscript 3 (Co-Ed.); English 3, 4; Liturgy Com- mission 3 (Regional Chairman); NFCCS; NSA; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Government 2, 4; Verdeoro 1. Dorothy Marie Corcoran PAWTUCKET, RHODE ISLAND Sociology Gay, gamin spirit, belying a serious turn of mind . . . firm exponent of personal con- viction . . . lover of life . . . cognizant of socially significant occurrences . . . bundle of energy . . . always time to listen to that problem . . . perceptive eyes . . . simplicity with a sophisticated air . . . pint-sized pack- age of personality plus . . . never to be for- gotten . . . Dotsy. Athletic Assoc iation 1, 2; NFCCS; NSA; South Shore Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 107 Judeth Ann Crowley WEST SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Pleasing paradox of high intellect and little girl whiinsey . . . impeccable taste . . . innate ability to sum up a given situation . . . scien- tist with a classical mind . . . attentive to details . . . every opinion worth remember- ing . . . words well-chosen . . . appreciative of life’s humor . . . constant keeper of a well- ordered notebook . . . honest with herself and honest with others . . . Judy. Litiiigtj 3; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Springfield Under- graduate Chib 1, 2, 3, 4. Helen Mary Cullen SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS History A paragon of neatness ... a hard worker reaping results . . . never too busy to say, “May I help?’’ . . . forgetful of her own troubles in her eagerness to sympathize with others . . . loyal to what is worthwhile . . . picture conscious on the job to record the year’s events for Ehnata . . . punctuality, a virtue ... a gracious hostess ... a charming colleen . . . Helen. Athletic Association 1; Blessed Maiiin de Porres Sociology Club 1; Ehnata 4 (Photograpliy) ; Faculty- Freshrnan Reception Chairman 2; Family Life 4; IRC 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 108 Carol Ami Daiiry PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology A penchant for order . . . bowling enthusi- ast . . . advocate of a Berkshire holiday . . . hearty laughter permeating the air . . . living life in earnest ... an undisturbed aura . . . patience pervading . . . faithful correspondent . . . initially reserved ... a joy to be with . . . bonded family interest . . . attraction to the gayer lights . . . never a day with- out merriment . . . Carol. Athletic Association 2, 3, 4; Berkshire Undergraduate Club 1, 2, .3, 4; Blessed Martin de Forres Sociology Club 3, 4; Corte Castellana 1; NFCCS; NSA. Janet Betty DiFonzo SOUTH BARRE, MASSACHUSETTS Spanish Sincerity proclaimed in her very being . . . easy to be with . . . more difficult to know . . . meticulous in appearance . . . sensitive to the feelings of others . . . cheerful giver of advice . . . Athletic Club’s publicity agent . . . living each day as if it were the most important . . . sweet as cotton candy . . . just as nice . . . Jannie. Athletic Association 1, 2 (S), 3 (VP), 4 (P); Corte Castellarm 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Resident Council 3; Sodality 2; Student Government 4; Worcester Undergraduate Club 1, 2 (S), 3, 4. Rosalie Marie Dizek HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Striking in every way . . . our welcome junior year transter . . . entering immedi- ately into the spirit of the Elms . . . seldom at a loss for words ... a favorite entertainer . . . kitten on the keys . . . radiating con- tagious gaiety . . . coal black eyes, reveal- ing a seldom-seen sincerity . . . always just herself . . . making music wherever she goes . . . always enjoying life . . . Rosalie. Athletic Association .3, 4; Holyoke Underf raduate Club 3, 4; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA. Frances Lucille Dragon SOUTHBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Optimism pervaded by realism . . . down- to-earth sincerity . . . zip on a basketball court . . . always on hand to help with all projects . . . sun worshipper . . . twenty-four hours of good-natured mischief . . . topically the eager beaver ... a smile erupting into laughter . . . undemanding in her friendships . . . spritely gay . . . clear-sighted . . . Franny. Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Blessed Martin de Forres Sociology Club 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Verdeoro 1; Worcester Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. I 10 Virginia Margaret Duggan SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS English An extraordinary combination of realism and romanticism . . . heart in the clouds . . . feet planted firmly on the ground . . . gay laughter stemming from a remarkable sense of humor . . . wrinkle-free brow . . . practical nature always ready to advise . . . taking delight in everything, everyone . . . friend- ship as warm as spring rain . . . Ginny. Blessed Martin de Porres Sociology Club 2 (S), 3 ( T), 4 (P); Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Junior-Freshman Weekend Chairman; MJB Debating Society 1; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Springfield Under- graduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Sarah Hay dee Fernandez PONCE, PUERTO RICO Biology Senorita Congeniality . . . welcome visitor from sunny Puerto Rico . . . adjusting well to a new environment . . . quietly winning many friends with a sparkling smile . . . un- compromising sense of honor . . . firm and staunch in her convictions . . . conscientious student . . . tantalizing sense of humor . . . fun-loving companion and colorful conver- sationalist ... a girl of character . . . Sarah. Athletic Association 3, 4; Cercle Francais 2; Corte Castellana 2, 3 (T), 4; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 2, 3, 4. Marie Carolyn Ferrimimo SPHINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS English Business woman of high esteem . . . holds the record for holding pursestrings . . . cheer- fidness her guiding light . . . an ear for rhythm . . . an eye for color . . . piano proficiency . . . using God-given talents wisely and gen- erously . . . contagious enthusiasm belying a persistent relish of the offbeat ... no prin- ciple undefended . . . sifting life’s best from every moment . . . Marie. Athletic Association 1; Cercle Francois 1; Elmscript 3 (Bus. Mgr.); English Chib 3, 4 (T); Eucharistic Commission Chairman .3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 (T); IRC 2 (S); NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 2, .3, 4; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Verdeoro. Judith Amie Finn HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Philosophical turn of mind ... a ponderer of perplexities . . . relentless pursuer of truth . . . compassionate . . . sensitive to aesthetic values ... a sense of whimsey relishing the unusual . . . poetic soul . . . cre- ativity at her fingertips . . . cosmopolitan aura . . . insatiable thirst for exploration of both the arts and sciences . . . originality leading to independence . . . Judy. Elmata 4; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 1, 2, 3; NFCCS, NSA; Sodality 1, 2. 112 Mnry Ellev Fitts SOUTHBHIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Possessing the warm appeal of a shy smile . . . strong-willed . . . genuineness of char- acter complemented by an unassuming man- ner . . . inner depth . . . having the ideal irtnes of a lady . . . her honesty reflected in clear, direct, blue eyes ... a good listener . . . artistic leanings . . . deft fingers sketching portraits . . . w ' holesome and unpretentious . . . strong ties to home . . . Mary Ellen. Athletic Association 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 1 . 2 . 3 , 4 ; NFCCS; NSA; Worcester Undergraduate Club 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 . Jill File ! Fitzgerald THOMPSONVIELE, CONNECTICUT Chemistry A winsome smile that flow ' s from the heart . . . problems debated over a hot cup of coffee her delight . . . humorous equips and observations belying her apparent calm re- serve . . . complex chemical fornndas seem- ingly snatched from the air . . . possessor of infinite interest and patience in all projects . . . dependable, definite, and delightful to know . . . Jill. Connecticut Undergraduate Club ], 2 ; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 1 , 3 , 4 ; NFCCS; NSA; Spring- field Undergraduate Club 3 , 4 . 113 Mury Elizabeth Flaherty WEST SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Reserved until known . . . once known, then lasting friendship . . . staunch supporter oi sincere ideals . . . her dry wit brightening many a heart . . . her sympathetic nature endearing her to all ... a tribute to her sacred namesake . . . all things taken in easy stride . . . diligently studying far into the night to conquer those hurdles which defy easy treking . . . Mary. Athletic Association 1, 2, .3, 4; Blessed Martin de Porres SocioIop,y Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA, Sprinp,field Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Vatricia Anne Fogarty MANCHESTER, CONNECTICUT istory History scholar-tutor all in one . . . week- long narrator of week-end capers ... a study in composure, especially during e, ams . . . staunch defender of Connecticut dri ers . . . definite opinions, logically reasoned ... a strain of the regal, intermixed with a touch of the blarney . . . sweetly sentimental, pro- foundly practical . . . principally a lady . . . truly a friend . . . Pat. Athletic Association I, 2, 3, 4, Connecticut Under- p.raduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; IRC 2, 3 (P), 4 (NT); MJB Debating, Society 1, AFCCS; SSA. I 14 .Maureen Elizabeth Friel WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS English Womanhood in perfect flower . . . little girl sweetness . . . magical creator of things domestic . . . “There’s no place like home.” . . . holding her standards high . . . superbly following them . . . seeing goodness in all of God’s creatures . . . patient . . . under- standing . . . kind . . . giving her heart to her friends . . . possessor of the Midas touch . . . our golden girl . . . Mo. Athletic Association 1, Blessed Martin dc Pones SocioIog,y Club 2, .3; Class Secretary 2; En Jish Club 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Worcester Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3 (VP), 4. Graceami Mary Gavigav ALBANY, NEW YORK Sociology Radiant smile flashing willing dimples . . . demure and dainty in demeanor . . . charm weaving a spell of old-fashioned sophistica- tion . . . that “just-breezed-in ’ look . . . story- teller of easy parlance . . . every comment a tactful one . . . admirer of the new ... a mind for business . . . using encouragement as her motto . . . the freshness and sparkle of dew . . . Graceann. Athletic Association 1; Blessed Mai tin dc Porres Sociology Club 2, 3, 4; Connecticut Undergraduate Club 1 (T), 2 (S), 3 (VP), 4 (P); Elmata 4 (Bu.s. .Mgr.); Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Resident Council 2; Sodality 2, 3, 4. 115 ki jocni Ami Gelinas ( IUC:()PEE KALES, MASSACJIUSETTS Sociology Quietly unassuming . . . making her pres- ence known . . . her friendship, lasting and loyal ... a thorough w ' orker on all class projects . . . an ardent supporter of all she undertakes . . . dependal)le and diligent . . . a serious student w ith a capable mind . . . part of an inseparafrle duo . . . constantly happy ... a personality liked by all . . . Joan. Athletic A.s.sociation 1; Blessed Mai tin de Forres Sociolofiy Club 3, 4; Cdec Club 3, 4; NFCCS, NSA, S])riup,field Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Verdeoro. Joyce Marie Gelinas CHICOPEE FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology A sparkling personality . . . full of joy and surprises ... a teaser and a jokester . . . injecting a serious note as the situation dic- tates . . . her hobby, horses ... a picture of beauty as she rides them ... a pleasant com- panion . . . always ready to do something new or different . . . working hard for those things which are not easy to attain . . . Joyce. Athletic Association 1; Blessed Martin de Forres Sociology Club 3, 4; Glee Club 3. 4; A’FCCS; iVSA, Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3 ( T), 4; Verdeoro 1, 2. I 16 ( ' arol Ann Gilboy ilOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Our nomination for career girl of the year . . . clianning us all with her casual grace . . . smart, simple clothes, her trademark . , . numerous capabilities readily shown . . . sensi- tivit - supreme . . . silently working behind the scenes . . . unaware of what is hers to give . . . gi ing it so graciously by being herself . . . explorer of science . . . Carol. Athletic Association 1, 2; Class Secretary 3; Family Life 1, 2 (S), 3 ( T); Holyoke Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Monsip,nor Doyle Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4 (P); NFCCS; HSA; Resident Council Chair- man 4; Sodality 2, 3, 4. Genevieve Mildred Gorezakoski NORTH ADAMS, MASSACHUSETTS English Our very own princess . . . regal in every- thing she does . . . reminiscent of sunshine . . . possessing a heart of gold to match her golden locks . . . Junior-year addition to our ranks . , . everyone ' s friend . . . smiling her way through the years . . . loving gaiety . . . liringing laughter . . . sensing the importance of each day . . . Ginger. Berkshire Undeifiraduate Club 3, 4; English Club 4; .YFCCS; NSA. im I 17 UarlhV ' a Ann Grady WEST SPHINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sj)aiusl} Little girl exuberance masking a truly ma- ture mind . . . heartfelt enthusiasm making each day that much brighter . . . penchant for the creative . . . candid opinions, capably defended . . . (piietly unassuming, patiently persevering . . . f(ntunate possessor of a sense of wonder . . . searching for truth . . . view- ing the world with wide-eyed innocence . . . seeing God eserywhere . . . Barb. Athletic Association 1; Carte Castcllaiia 1, 2, 3, 4; Elmata 4 (( o-Eil.); Eupjish Club 3, 4; Famili Life 4, CIcc Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; ASA; Sociality 1, 2, 3, 4; Springfield Undernradnate Cbd? 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Coveninierit 3; Tonnnedine 3 (Co-Ed.); Who ' s Who. .Uaric .Martha Jeanne Gravel SiMUNCElEU), MASS.XCHUSETTS French A hcai t with room tor every joy ... a fun- lo ing companion . . . beneath the surface a seriousness not easily observed . . . “ ' ive Ic Ganada and the Aly Khan” . . . scholar- ship to a memorable summer at Laval . proud possessor of a library of the best in literatuiT ' . . . emphasis on the historical . . . li ing each day to its fullest . . . Re. Cerele Franeais 3, 4; IRC 2; AFCCS, NSA; Spring- field C ndernraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; crdcoro E I 18 Carol Miirgcwet Griffin W ' ATERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS English A synipliony in blue and gold . . . thoughts akin to the music she loves so well . . . spir- itualit) ' as it should he, unpretentious and sincere . . . deteruiiucd, dauntless, and de- cisive . . . she of the sensitive heart, attuned to the whispers of life . . . seeing the finer things . . . seeking eternity . . . building her monument in the sky . . . our Grif. Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Ccrcle Francais 1 (T), 2 (S); Ehnscript 3; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1, 2 (S), 3 (N’P); South Shore Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3; V7io’,v Who. Mary Marg aret Hayes LEE, MASSACHUSETTS Historij Unfussed, unhurried, yet always getting things done . . . an appealing shyness . . . portrait ot a lady . . . genuineness exempli- fied in nnassnming manners and quiet direct speech ... a sensitivity to the finer things in life . . . always time for fnn ... a guardian ot the values . . . possessor of a mature out- look and opinion . . . old-fashioned charm and progressive ideas . . . Mary. Athletic Association 1; Berkshire Undergraduate Club 1,- 2, 3, 4; Ccrcle Francais 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; IRC 1, 2, 3, 4; Resident Council 2; Sodality 1, 2. 3, 4. I !9 Dorothy Mary Joseph EAST LONGMEADOW, MASSACHUSETTS Ilisionj Warm, friendly, sincere ... a favor done with no need to ask . . . continually on the go . . . lull of fnn and laughter . . . the campus chanffenr boasting a variety of ehicles . . . shyness overcome by willing- ness to work . . . practical jokester . . . appre- ciating others’ jokes . . . trustworthy and trusting . . . with high ideals . . . aware of life’s special joys . . . Dottie Jo. Athletic Association 1, 2; Coiic Castellana 1; Family Life Club .3, 4; IRC 1; NFCCS; NSA, Sodality 1, 2; Springfield Lhulerp,radnatc Chib 1, 2, 3, 4; Verdeoro. Madeline Ann Joseph FITCHBURG, MASSACHUSETTS Chemistry Loving every moment she lives . . . laugh- ter unfurled as a wonderful gift . . . fun is fun, work is work . . . loveliness caught in a warm heart . . . artistic talents adding per- sonality to onr Elmata . . . many hours behind ' ' erdeoro’s scenes . . . master of repartee . . . making possibly dull moments something to remember . . . always at the spot where help is most needed . . . Maddie. Athletic Association 1, 2, 3; Elmata 4 (. rt Editor); Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; fnnior Prom Co-Chairman 3; Monsip.nor Doyle Science Club I, 2, 3, 4; FCCS; iVSA; Sodality 1, 2. 3, 4; Tourmaline 3 p it Editor); Verdeoro I, 2, 3 (T); Who’s Who; Worcester C nderp,radnate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 120 ( ' ecelia Amie Joy WASHINGTON, D. C. French A song on her lips ... a dance on her feet . . . petite and lovable . . . soph show, proof positive of her talents ... a look of disbelief accompanied by “Are yon kidding me?” . . . alert and aware of the world around her . . . French, her delight . . . Paris, her treasured dream . . . determination to make her dreams a reality . . . Cecelia. Athletic Association 1, 2; Cercle Francais 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Treasurer 2; Glee Chib 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NBA; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Soph Shoiv Co-Chairman 2; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. I Mary Joan Julian I SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Quietly surveying life with serenity of manner . . . intensely domestic ... a relish lor relics of the past . . . amiable nature, a compound of kindness and sincerity . . . con- I geniality . . . an understanding heart revealed by potentially expressive eyes . . . hers a calm i detachment . . . striving to reach goals not I easily attained . . . never hurried . . . but I always there . . . Mary Jo. I Athletic Association 1; Blessed Martin de Pones : Sociology Club 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; I NSA; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. { I 121 fean Marie Kasiiha PITTSFIELD, MASSACIRTSETTS Biology Practicality, her forte . . . scientific in thought and deed . . . niischievons pixie cut concealing a serious soul . . . intense but approachable . . . carefully selecting her por- tion ol life . . . inclination toward the proved hypothesis . . . unrevealed poetic dexterity . . . willing songstress . . . one of Mother Nature’s most ardent admirers ... a feeling lor adventure . . . Jeannie. Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4; Berkshire Under- ‘’radiiatc Cdid) 1, 2, 3 (VP), 4; Famihj Life Club 1, 2; Hifth School Day Co-Ciiairman 3, 4; Initiation Co-Chairman; Monsip,nor Doyle Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 2, 3. Carol Ann Korytoski FLORENCE, MASSACHUSETTS History Staunch and efficient supporter of meals served cafeteria style . . . always willing to do her share . . . never shirking a detail . . . ready listener for all problems . . . undaunted dayhop owning half-interest in the road to Northampton . . . admirably self-reliant . . . possessor of God-given tolerance . . . alwa s looking to the sunny side ol life . . . Carol. Holyoke Undeiyrradiiate Club 1. 2, 3, 4; IRC 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1, 2. 122 Barbara Frances Lane CHICOPEE, MASSACHUSETTS Biology A petite wisp of Irish determination . . . spontaneous opinions . . . wardrobe sparked by the exotic toucli ... a voice soft and com- pelling . . . sincerity of motive . . . champion of the progressive while cherishing the tradi- tional . . . unexpected and unconventional comment . . . discriminating taste untainted hy prejudice . . . always time to be friendly and understanding . . . Barbara. Mon.si iior Doyle Science Club 3 , 4 ; NFCCS; NSA; Springfield Underfiradiiate Chib 3 , 4 . Linda Ida Lavallee WILLIMANSETT, MASSACHUSETTS Chemistry-Biology An admiration for old things in new forms . . . science her true vocation ... no project left undone . . . ever yearning for self-expres- I sion . . . infectious enthusiasm for offbeat acti ities . . . candid admirer of unique musical instruments . . . magic touch on the bongo drums . . . delicate flavor of the indi- idual ... a friend to be depended upon m time of need . . . Linda. Athletic Association 1; Blessed Martin de Pones Sociology Club 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Cercle Francois 1 , 2 ; 1 Family Life Club 3 ; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 1 , 2 . 3 , 4 ; NFCCS; NSA; Springfield Undergraduate j; Club 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Verdeoro 3 , 4 . r 123 Coralie Amie Lucas HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Fresh and vital as spring’s first leaf . . . a decidedly original approaeh to standard situations . . . secrets and surprises . . . smil- ing with her heart . . . tireless seeker after truth . . . sincerity rejeeting sham . . . the rare possessor of a child’s sense of the won- der of life . . . always finding the reflection of her own generosity and candor in others’ deeds . . . Coralie. Glee Club 1, 2, .3, 4; Holyoke Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Monsignor Doyle Science Chib 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA. Anita Marie Lussier CHICOPEE, MASSACHUSETTS French Serene and sensitive . . . possessing con- scientiousness, capability and co-operative- ness in every action . . . unassuming, but assuming much . . . accomplishing ordinary things extraordinarily well ... a profound thinker, performing with painstaking perfec- tion . . . avidly exploring the sound truths of knowledge . . . placid faith in God . . . enthusiastic enjoyment in explaining the almost unexplainable . . . Anita. Ccrcle Francais 1, 2, 3, 4 (P); Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1, 2, 3; Springfield Under- graduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 124 Liry JoiTii Lynch SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Mathematics Infectious laugliter and wit . . . coupled witli moments of seriousness . . . capturing the depth of ideals . . . anxious moments surpassed hy diligent effort . . . warm friend- ship . . . deep character . . . clear thinking . . . expert on matters mathematical . . . able to explain complex problems . . . willingly using this talent to help others . . . sunlight presence making the day brighter . . . Mary. Athletic Association 1; Blessed Maiiin de Forres Sociology Club 1, 2, 4; NFCCS; .VSA; Springfield Undergraduate Chd) 1, 2, 3, 4. Marshii Anne Macary WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT History Vivacious and expressive with a generous, happy heart . . . animated expressions show- ing alert interest and boundless enthusiasm . . . bubbling over with new, original ideas . . . creative fashions . . . an exactness in eti- quette . . . flair for the unique and dramatie . . . a conversationalist par exeellence . . . devoted to her friends . . . always a cheerful word for everyone . . . Marsha. Athletic Association 1; Cercle Francais 1, 2; Con- necticut Undergraduate Club 1, 2 (T), 3 (T-S), 4 (VP); Clee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; IRC 1, 2, 3, 4; Literary Committee Chairman 4; NFCCS; NSA; Resident Council 3; Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4. 125 Mary Ellen Mallory SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Contagious laughter . . . greeting each sunrise filled with joy and anxiety for the day to come . . . endless evenings of canasta . . . “New York, New York, what a wonderful town!” . . . collector of music from Broad- w ' ay shows . . . bursting forth with a favorite melody . . . happiest when singing . . . keenly aware of the future . . . trusting in His Will and Goodness . . . Mary Ellen. Blessed Martin dc Forres Sociolot ij Chib 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NS A; Sodality 1, 2; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Nancy Ellen Manning SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS English Camera-sensitive smile . . . concentrated conversationalist . . . rapt listener . . . doting on excitement ... a harmonious blend of the socially inclined and the studiously diligent . . . hers an interior piety and stability . . . bearing a definite aversion to apathy . . . proportional sense of values resulting from a realistic outlook . . . originator of “the awake look” . . . Nancy. Atidetic Association I; Blessed Mai tin de Forres Sociology Club 2, 3, 4; Class Vice-F resident 2; English Club 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 2, 3, 4; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1, 2, 3, 4 (P); Student Government 2; Tourmaline 3; Verdeoro. 126 Margaret Cecelia Maybury EAST LONGMEADOW, MASSACHUSETTS Mathematics Possessor of the rare quality of depend- ableness . . . the magic touch of a true dip- lomat ... a direct candor resulting only from an integrity of self ... an innate thoughtful- ness . . . unpretentiously gathering friends and cherishing them . . . delighting all with her sense of humor . . . self-reliant but not self-sufficient . . . her judgments respected . . . her ideals true . . . Peggy. Athletic Association 1; Blazers Co-Chairman 2; Cercle Francois 1; Class Vice-President 4; Ehnata 4{Co-Ed.); Glee Club 1,2,3; NFCCS; NSA; Sodal- it j 1,2; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1,2, 3, 4; Student Government 2(S), .3; Who’s Who. .Maureen Paula Messier NORTH ADAMS, MASSACHUSETTS KlloUsJ} Dark, sparkling eyes depicting a fiery spirit . . . a comfortable niceness about her . . . innocent rascality behind gleaming eyes . . . Italian beauty and charm ... a sunflower in anyone’s garden . . . blooming personality . . . responsive to the realm of humor . . . sympathetic audience . . . always time to lend for a good cause . . . rich personality endearing to all . . . Maureen. Athletic Association 1,3,4; Berkshire Undergraduate Club 1, 2,3,4; Englhh Club 3,4; NFCCS; NSA. 127 jacquelainc V ee Milko NORWALK, CONNECTICUT Sociology Welcome Junior-year addition . . . easily won triendships . . . countless smoker chats . , . dancing through lite with gaiety and light- ness . . . delighting in each new day . . . an elfin spirit giving new life to all things . finding something to admire in each of God’s creatures . . . putting the prop er value on His gifts . . . everybody’s friend . . . Jacque. Athletic A.s.sociatioii 3; Blessed Martin tie Forres Sociolop,ii Cduh 3.4; Connecticut Under ;radnate Club 3,4 (T); Famil, Life Club 4; FCC.S, A’SA, Sodalitri 4 ( Probate ) . Irene Louise Montagihi WEST SPIUNGFIELn, MASSACHUSETTS I list on Genuine generosity surrounded by the [learl of humility . . . optimistic to the utmost . . . sympathy for others saturating her heart . . . con erting the complex to the simple with patience and prudence . . . walking through life with soft shoes . . . huhhling oxer when excited . . . constant conscientiousness to succeed in each endeaxor . . . superlatixe (jualities of xxarm cheerfulness and agree- ahility . . . Irene. Athletic Association 1,2,3: CCD 3,4; IRC 3,4; iVFCCS, iVSA, Sprinp,fiehl Undergraduate Club. 128 I ‘ Rita Ami Therese Morteilite BRISTOL, CONNECTICUT Spanish Piquant . . . with a touch of exquisite black lace . . . maturity beyond her years . . . sift- ing life’s experiences for her betterment . . . delicate old world charm . , . anticipatory delight in life . . . never forgetting that spe- cial occasion . . . sheer pleasure just to be with her . . . lover of the dance ... a good word for all . . . Hummel expression . . . cxerybody’s friend . . . Rita. Athletic Association 1,2, .3; Blessed Martin cle Pones Sociology Club 3,4; Connecticut Undergraduate Clnh 1,2,3.4; Corte Castellana 1,2,3,4(T); .VFCCS; .VS.A, Resident Council 1; Sodality 2,3,4. Theresa Ratdhie Moruzzi CLARKSBURG, NORTH ADAMS, MASSACHUSETTS Spanish Enthusiastic, possessing a ready flow of words . . . continually striving for self- improvement . . . responsive to things of quality . . . friendly outgoing spirit . . . prophet of calamities which never occur . . . absolutely meticulous in dress as in self . . . fresh air of wholesomeness ... at ease on her Berkshire ski trails . . . her friends, her ideals . . . Terry. Athletic Association 1,2, 3, 4; Berkshire Undergrad- uate Club 1,2, 3,4; Corte Castellana 1,3,4; Glee Club 3,4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1,2,3,4. 129 Liry Klizahetb Murphy WORCESTEH, MASSACHUSETTS Biology A leading lady of 1960 . . . modeling her life after that of the Lady whose name she hears so gracefully . . . ever ready, willing, and oh-so-ahle to lend a hand . . . accom- plishing her tasks with thoroughness . . . fortunate possessor of inner peace born of con ’ictions uncompromised . . . cherishing the ideal . . . choosing accordingly . . . anticipating a golden future . . . Murph. Athletic Association 1,2, 3, 4; Blazers Co-Chairman 2; Class President 2; Freshman Chairman 3; Liturgy 1,2,3(VF); Mardi Gras Co-Chairman 1; Monsignor Doyle Science Club 1,2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1,2, 3, 4; Student Government 1,2,3(T), 4; Worcester Undergraduate Club 1,2,3,4(T), Bar hard Joan McCarthy PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Most welcomed transfer from Anna Maria , , , easily winning friends by her gay man- nerisms , , , devoted to the world of sociology , , , wry sense of humor , , , underneath a ery serious mind , . , talented seamstress , , , always finding time for that particular cause . . . straightforward in her views , , , strong 111 her beliefs , , . comfortable to be with . . . a heart with room for all , , , B. J, Berkshire Undergraduate Club 2,3,4 (P); Blessed Martin dc Forres Sociology Club; NFCCS; NSA. 130 Miiry Ellen McCarthy SPHINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS History A blend of all things unusual . . . gay chatter with sound reasoning . . . proponent of the good life . . . dilettante of the fine arts . . . modish seamstress . . . rare enthusiasm for the unexplored . . . extensive command of the extemporaneous . . . old-fashioned ideals in the twentieth century . . . never enough hours in a day . . . cosmopolitan country girl ... a paradox . . . Mary Ellen. Ehnata 4; IRC .3,4; March Gras Co-Chairman 1; MJB Dehatinp, Society 1,2 (T); NFCCS I, 2 (Alter- nate Delegate), 3(Junior Deletiatc), 4(Senior Dele- B,ate) NSA; Sodal ity 1,2, 3, 4; Springfield Under- graduate Club 1,2, 3, 4; Verdeoro 1,2. Mary Ter esc McDonough HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Radiant with serenity and happiness . . . a meticulous attention to details, her delight . . . unassuming of her talents . . . spinning silken dreams to fulfillment . . . ready and willing to help ... a pleasure to know . . . possessing smoothness in manner and relia- bility in all tasks . . . her ideals encased in the enduring steel of high hopes . . . Mary. Athletic Association 1,2, 3,4; Blessed Martin de Forres Sociology Club 3,4; Family Life Club 4; Holyoke Undergraduate Club 1,2,3, ' 4; NFCCS; NSA; Resi dent Council 3. !3I Constaiu ' c Madelhie McGovern AGAWAM, MASSACHUSETTS History Steadfast convictions revealing a dauntless individual . . . snappy with witty remarks . . . stability formed by intrepid assertations of rights . . . frank opinions backed by sound reasoning . . . determination demanding a high scholastic record . . . decisiveness in practical opinions ... a just pride in all accomplishments . . . cherishing each new acquaintance . . . Connie. Athletic Association 1; Elmata 4; IRC 2,3,4; NFCCS: ’SA; Sodality 2,3; Springfield Undergraduate Cluh 1, 2, 3, 4; Verdeoro 1. Carol Kathry n McKenna HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS Spanish Actively attentive . . . painstaking crafts- manship . . . gifted with culinary de.xterity . . . lady-like with child-like naivete . . . an appreciative eye for detail . . . inherent kind- ness giving an enconraging word to all . . . thoughtfid in deed as in word . . . traditional values . . . wide-eyed wonder admiring originality . . . leisurely approach to life . . . brimful of optimism . . . gentility . . . Carol. Class Treasurer 3,4; Carte Castellana 1,2,3,4(P); Glee Cluh 1,2, 3, 4; Holyoke Undergraduate Cluh 1, 2,3,4; Sodality 1,2,3; NFCCS; NSA. 32 Ami FJizcibeth McQiiaid VE1J-ESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Pint-sized gamin with giant-sized energies . . . penetrating into the very heart of COLE . . . mind, lieart, and soul behind Student Government . . . qualifying as a eteran diplomat . . . possessor of the wis- dom to know the more perfect way . . . and the courage to follow it . . . one of whom it is said with pride, “This is an Elms girl” . . . horn to lead . . . Ann. Blessed Martin de Pones Sociology Chd) 2, .3, 4, Junior Prom Co-Chairman 3; NFCCS; NSA; South Shore Undergraduate Chd} 2,3(VP),4; Student Gov- ernment 4(P). Marg uerite Mary McLaughliv PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Quietness offset by quiet humor ... a con- siderate nature . . . old-fashioned principles exemplified in sterling qualities . . . level- headed but still a good bit of that mischie- ous leprechaun in her . . . dependable and hard-working . . . casual naivete ... a warm, sympathetic heart ... in agreement to all worthwhile . . . infectious laughter . . . patient and prudent . . . generous and good . . . Peggy. Berkshire Undergraduate Club 1,2, 3, 4; Blessed Mar- tin de Porres Sociology Club 2,3,4; NFCCS; NSA; Besident Council 2; Sodality 1. 133 Dhwe Marie Newf zau WEST SPRINGFIEI.D, MASSACHUSETTS Sociologij Apt listener with avid interest in all prob- lems . . . inultitaceted mirth reflecting a love of life . . . quick actions springing from boundless enthusiasm in the exciting and different . . . willingness to work conscien- tiously . . . ever ready with an erupting eagerness bursting with friendliness . . . sin- cerity plus sympathy, equivalent to staunch sociability . . . resoluteness in judgments, both practical and sound . . . Di. Athletic Association 1,2, 3, 4; Blessed Martin de Pones Sociolof’t) Club 2,3,4; Ehnata A{Photof’raphii) : Cdee CInh 1,2,3, 4; NFCCS; NS A; Sprin rfield Under- praduate Cdiih 1,2, 3, 4. Mary Agues O ' Brieu LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS Sociologt Possessor of the golden ability to make everyone laugh . . . witty creativity emerg- ing from speech, pen, and song . . . throwing herself whole-heartedly into all she under- takes . . . singing with her heart . . . speaking from her heart . . . e pressi e features telling a story . . . loyal to all that is Irish . . . model child of her namesake . . . Mary. Athletic Association 1; Berkshire Underp,raduate CInh 1,2 (S) ,3,4 ( T) ; Blessed Martin de Pones Sociolopp CInh 2,3,4; IdinscriiP 3; Cdee CInh 1,2, 3(VP),4(P); NFCCS; NSA; Besident Council 3; Sodaliti 1,2, 3, 4; Student Covernnient 1. 134 ( ' irrulyii Miiry O ' Comwr SPHINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS English Utterly true to herself and her ideals . . . rollicking sense of humor . . , exploding at the merest provocation . . . happy-go-lucky . . . optimistic in her views . . . realistic in her goals . . . alto tones so pleasing to each listener . . . energetic student teacher . . . looking forward to having a class of hei ' own . . . possessing a natural gift for friend- ship . . . Carol. Athletic Association 1,2; Class Treasurer 1; Enpjish Club 3,4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NS A; Sodalitij 1,2, 3, 4; Sprinpfichl Underp,raduate Club 1,2, 3, 4; Verdcoro 1,2. Audrey lionise O ' Fly mi SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS English The fragility of Dresden china . . . child- like innocence fused with knowledge . . . possessor of natural beauty . . , aware of the meaning of perseverance . . . often portray- ing interior diffidence . . . yet reaping results from conscientious labor . . . honest enthusi- asm for the wonders of the literary world . . . pacifist by nature ... at ease in any social climate . . . our Irish colleen . . . Audrey. Athletic Association 1; Blessed Martin dc Torres Sociolottu Club 2; CCD 2; Cercle Francais 1; Elinata Dance Chairman 4; Enpjish Club 3(T),4(P); Glee did) 2,3,4; Liturfiij 3; M]B Debating Society 1; NTCCS; NSA: Sodality 2, .3, 4; Springfield Under- iiraduate Club 1,2, .3, 4; Tourmaline .3; Verdcoro 1,2.4. 135 rbercsii Mary O;roiiowski CHIC:OPEE EALES, MASSACHUSETTS Biologn Homespun pliilosophy revealing strength of purpose ... a contented mind . . . unpre- tentious and sincere . . . generosity emanat- ing from a heart of gold . . . child-like in her goodness, adult in her decisions . . . pleasant con ersationalist . . . dedicated to the field of science . . . serious and realistic in hei tuture hopes . . . unselfish and considerate . . . humhle of heart . . . Terry. Mon.sif’nor Doijlc Science Club 1,2, 3, 4; NFCCS, NSA; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1,2, 3, 4. Man reel Mary O ' Keefe WALES, MASSACHUSETTS History Hells on her toes . . . impish “Hi” . . . sun- shine peeking out from behind a cloud . . . seriousness at just the right moment . . . ex- cess energy . . . counselor for the little ones . . . happiest in light-hearted surronndings . . . aversion to gloomy people . . . leprechaun- like enjoyment of life . . . chauffeur extra- ordinaire ... a smile diffused into cheery laughter . . . O’Hara. Athletic Association 1,2; Corte Castellana 1; IRC 3,4; NFCCS: NSA; Worcester Undergraduate Chdi. 136 Iconise Comtance O ' Leary HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS Spanish Able organizer . . . genuine and sineere . . . never too busy to do a little more . . . barinony with a bong .. . a twinkle to her eyes that see only the good in others ... so easy to be with . . . patienee and perseverance . . . dignified manner clothed in easualness . . . her appearance like a burst of sun after a shower . . . Louise. Athletic Association .3; Ccrcle Francois 1,2; Class Secretary 4; Cortc Castellano 1,2(S),3( VP),4; Holi oke Undergraduate Cduh 1 (T),2(S),3(VP), 4(F); M]R Debating Society 1; NFCCS; NS A; Resi- dent Council Co-Chairman 3; Sodality 2,3,4; Student Government 3, Maureen Rita O ' Neil SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Ever-present Irish smile , . . stalwart sodal- ist . . . adept manager . . . effervescent charm gracing a regal carriage . . . appreciative of life’s humors . . . sympathetic listener so will- ing to give advice . . . flair for the dramatic . . . indefatigable worker with a buoyant spirit . . . diligent purveyor of eternal truths . , . sparkling personality . . . piety brighten- ing the commonplace . . . Mo. Rlessed Maiiin de Forres Sociology Club 4; Glee Club l;2,3,4(Soag Leader); NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1,2,3,4(F); Springfield Undergraduate Club 1,2, 3, 4. 137 Patricia Ami O ' Neill SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS flistonj Soft-spoken seriousness ... a kind heart with a very special tenderness for little ones . . . quiet walks . . . connoisseur of the latest in dancing . . . iinpeccahly groomed ... a ()ice suited for harmony . . . sincere smile . . . patience that comes from a love of her tellowman ... a willingness to wait yet an eagerness to he doing . . . Pat. Athletic Association 1,2; Family lAjc Club 1; IRC .3,4; Mission Committee 1..3; .VFCCS,- NSA; Sjninp,- fielcl Undergraduate Club 1,2. 3, 4; Verdeoro I. Nancy Ann Ouellette WEST SPRINGFIELD, MA,SSA( HUSETTS Etiglish Elfish wisps of humor spilling into laughter . . . as gentle as a soft breeze . . . grateful for the least fa or . . . accomplishing her work in a quiet, unpretentious manner . . . loving enjoyment . . . reflecting it in her dancing dimples . . . always a gracious greeting and a helping hand . . . most appreciati e of eserything ... a golden heart . . . Nanc ' . Athletic Association 1; Blessed Martin de Forres iiociolofiy Club 2; Corte Castcllana 1; English Club 4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1,2; Springfield L ' nder- i’raduate Club 1,2, .3, 4; Verdeoro 1. 138 I itriciii Anne lA lhrnd WILLIMANSETT, M ASSAf HUSETTS French Nothing inipossil)le to a willing heart . . . attempting much . . . accomplishing all with an enviable ease . . . one to give her all and still insist that it was nothing . . . Molly Malone of soph show fame . . . her friend- ship, a treasure . . . her treasures, her friends . . . not one to forget . . . not one to he for- gotten . . . Pat. Cercle Frmicais I,2,3(V ),4( VP) ; Clcr Club 1,2. 3,4; NFCCS; NSA; Sodalitii 1, 2, 3, 4; Springfield Ibtderf’rodiuitc Clnh 1, 2, 3, 4. Lorrahie Marie Pelletier SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology An effervescent personality .springing from an energetic being . . . observant of the world around her . . . fashionable taste in clothes . . . the personal touch . . . conscientious in her every endeavor . . . eager to please . . . hers a refreshing friendship . . . an immense fervor for social work . . . overwhelmingly enthusiastic . . . yet posses.sor of an inner calm . . . Lorraine. Blesficd Martin dc Forres Sociolotiij Clnh 3,4; S’FCCS; NSA; Sprinfijicld Vnderp,raduate Clnh. joy re Iconise Veros ' wo CHICOPEE FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Filled with the spirit of genuine scientific inquiry . . . questions, questions, questions . . . a devoted scholar . . . ready with a smile and a word of assurance . . . skilled in pro- ducing intricate and subtle lighting arrange- ments for Verdeoro . . . behind the scenes mainstay ... a special devotion to Our Lady ... a twinkle in her eye and a smile for every- one . . . Joyce. CCD 1,2, .3, 4; Eucharistic Committee Co-Chairman 2; IJturp,ii 1,2,3(P),4; Monsif ' iwr Doyle Science Club 1,2,.3,4; NFCCS; .VSA, Sodality 1,2, 3,4; Sprinfi- fteld Underf’raduate Club 1,2, 3, 4; Verdeoro 1,2 (S). jiTuet Barbara Bradella EAST LONGMEADOW, MASSACHUSETTS History Greeting each day with welcoming arms . . . sincerely interested in others’ thoughts . . . frequenter of the collegian’s favorite haunts . . . seasoned party-goer and part - giver . . . loving life . . . capering through it . . . good-hearted rascality . . . optimism at its best . . . completeK ' down-to-earth in her dealings with others . . . sympathy for all . . . inimitably individual . . . bringing laughter and joy . . . Janet. Athletic Association 1,2. 3, 4; Cercle Francais 1,2; IRC 3,4; NFCCS; NSA; Resident Council 2; Spring- field Undergraduate Club 1,2, 3, 4; Verdeoro 1. 140 Mivy Jane Frivit era LEE, MASSACHUSETTS Sociologij Contagious cheerfulness . . . amiable chat- ter . . . bright eyes shining with enthusiasm and interest ... as warm-hearted and sunny as her beloved Italy . . . carefree companion and faithful friend . . . willing worker . . . conscientious and diligent in her studies . . . genuine humility . . . wholesome goodness . . . a generous heart with understanding toward all ... a true diplomat in any situa- tion . . . Mary Jane. Athletic Association 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Berkshire Undergrad- uate Club 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Blessed Martin de Forres Soci- ologij Club 2 , 3 , 4 ; Corte Castellana 1 ; Glee Club; NFCCS; NSA; Resident Council 3 ; Sodality 3 , 4 . jndith Elizabeth Riordan INDIAN ORCHARD, MASSACHUSETTS French Enterprising and efficient with encourage- ment to all . . . friendliness, a virtue . . . always with a smile . , . assiduously placing life’s puzzles together , . . delighted to listen . , . to listen to her, a delight , . . sensitive to sacrifice and to the beauty of truth , . , a firm foundation in the faith of God, the hope to succeed and charity toward others . . . Judy, Athletic Association 1 , 2 ; Cercle Francais 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Blessed Martin de Forres Sociology Club 2 ; Ebnata 4 (Bus. Mgr.); Glee Club 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; NFCCS; NSA; Sjiringfield Undergraduate Club 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 . 141 ■ii GerLildiue Louise Rucki CHICOPEE, MASSACHUSETTS Spanish Sincerity sprinkled between ripples of laughter ... a sparkling livewire charged with serious positiveness . . . captivating capers . . . eager to employ her energy as an animated conversationalist . . . intense- ness in action pins thought . . . engrossed in I’espahol, yet fond of le fran ais . . . ready to advise with any difficulty . . . her eyes revealing her confidence . . . Gerri. Ccrclc Fmncais 3,4; Coiic CastcUana 1,2, 3, 4; NFCCS; iVSA; Sociality 1,2; Springfield Undergrad- uate Club 1,2, 3, 4. Ai iies Elizilbeth Stulowsky XOKTHAMPTON, MASS.ACHUSETTS Biology Athenian features hearing witness to inner strength ... a study in inspiration ... a qniet voice hiding those ideals w ' hich ring so true . . . firm in conviction . . . diligent in duty . . . light-hearted when apropos . . . ready and willing to help . . . always anxious to please . . . setting distant goals and possess- ing the ability to achieve them . . . Betty. Athletic Association 1; Class President 3; Holyoke Undergraduate Chib 1,2, 3, 4; Monsignor Doyle Sci- ence Club 1,2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NSA; Resident Council 1,2; Ring Co-Chairman 3; Sodality 1,2,3. 42 Miuy Affiles Scamiell HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS History Artistically inclined . . . taking delight in festive occasions . . . breezy and sporty as a crisp autumn day . . . dutifully helping all with her niagie crayons . . . history discus- sions for hours on end . . . combining care- freeness and enthusiasm in the right propor- tions . . . remarkable collection of collegiate somenirs . . . heart of good will . . . Mary. Athletic As. ' ociation 1,2,4; Carte Castcllanu 1; Hohjoke Undergraduate Club 3,4; IRC 2,3,4; Junior Prow Co-Chairman 3; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1; Verdeoro 1,2. (avoI Ami Shamwn SEIUNGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology A depth to her eyes . . . her heart shining out to all who know her . . . lover of children ind loved by them . . . unselfishly giving of her time where needed . . . always ready to laugh with an ability to live life to its fullest . . . contagious love for all living things . . . close to man and closer to God . . . Carol. Athletic Association 1,2; Blessed Martin de Porres Sociology Club 3,4 (T); Cotie Castellana 1; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1,2, 3,4; Springfield Undergraduate did) 1,2, 3, 4; Verdeoro 1,2. 143 Olivia Ann Shannon SPHINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Sociology Always ready with a friendly greeting . . . her anecdotes holding a captive audience . . . forever excited over some new horizon discovered by her whimsical curiosity . . . setting high goals . . . working hard to accom- plish them . . . confident, yet cautious . . . casual, yet sincere . . . diplomatic and de- pendable . . . collecting friends wherever she goes . . . endearing to one’s heart . . . Li ’. Athletic Association 1 ; Blessed Martin dc Forres Sociolofty CInb 3 , 4 ; NFCCS; NS A; Springfield Un- dergraduate Club 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Verdeoro 1 , 2 . Mary Jill Sheehy FRAMINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS English Unswayed by life’s vicissitudes ... a calm hand controlling a difficult situation . . . hers a prudent reticence . . . an orderly exterior complementing an orderly interior . . . con- stantly striving for quality . . . but humble in her every accomplishment . . . hockey de otee . . . fashions flavored for the petite . . . loyal to her beliefs . . . emphasis on sincerity . . . consistency her keyword , . . Jill. Athletic Association 1 , 3 , 4 ; Blessed Martin de Forres Sociologi) Cdub 2 ; Class Fresident 4 ; NFCCS; NSA; South Shore Undergraduate Club 3 , 4 ; Verdeoro . 3 . 4 ; Worcester Undergraduate Club 1 , 2 . 44 Roberta Carol Shirmski CHICOPEE, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Individualistic . . . possessing the quiet elegance of a true lady . . . avid interest in science fiction . . . epitome of neatness . . . always poised and polite . . . happy in the ties of her friendships . . . sage in her prac- ticality ... a keen intellect flavored with sound mechanical ability ... to know her is to like her . . . Roberta. Mcmsignor Doijle Science Club 1,2, 3, 4; NFCCS; NS A; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1,2, 3, 4. Ami Martha Sokolosky TURNERS FALLS, MASSACHUSETTS French A smiling hello to everyone . . . sincere ex- pression of wide-eyed wonder . . . travel- minded . . . travel-wise . . . summer school in Canada . . . particularly fond of the French language . . . relating each new experience with delight . . . thoughtfully lending a help- ing hand . . . slowly and steadily meeting life face to face . . . anticipating a golden to- morrow . . . Ann. Blesned Martin de Forres Sociology Club 2; Cercle Francais 1,2, 3, 4; Ebnata 4; Elmscript 3; Family Life 3,4 (T); Holyoke Undergraduate Club 3,4; NFCCS; NSA; Resident Council 2,3; Verdeoro 3,4; Worcester Undergraduate Club 1,2. 145 Judith Anne Stagnaro WILBRAHAM, MASSACHUSETTS English 13edicated sensitivity . . . keenly conscien- tious . . . dramatic actress of quality ... no task left uncompleted . . . unceasingly active mind with thoughts flowing in well-ordered channels . . . sodality’s tireless prefect . . . cordiality warmly extended via a dazzling smile . . . hers a responsive sympathy . . . imagination vibrant with life and energy . . . integrity and loyalty, her code . . . Judy. CCD ,3; Carte Castellana 1,2; Ehnata 4; Elmscript 3; English Cluh 3(VP),4; Glee Club 1,2,4; M}B Debating, Society 3; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1,2, 3,4 (Prc ect); Springfield Undergraduate Club 1,2, 3,4; Student Government 1; Verdeoro 1,2,3(VP),4. Elizabeth Louise Stmnant WEST SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Mathematics Tiptoer through life . . . charming casual- ness coupled with calm candor . . . striking composure . . . pondering a question first, later being positive . . . calculating mathe- matical problems and solving life’s puzzles with confidence . . . positive values, well- formed . . . inquisitiv ' e in conversations . . . a methodical mind following each step con- secutively . . . trustworthy . . . trusting e er - one . . . Betty. Athletic Association 1,3,4; CCD 3,4; NFCCS: .VS.4,- Springfield Undergraduate Club 1,2, 3. 4. M6 Maureen Theresa Sullivan SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS English Magnanimous heart embracing the world . . . tremendous drive to better self . . . humility surpassed only by charity . . . innate desire to please, to pacify, to perfect . . . treating each new friend with sensitive care . . . taking to heart each spoken word . . . gratefully accepting every small token of love ... so much to give ... so desirous of giving her talents . . . Sully. Athletic Association 1,2; Blessed Martin de Pones Sociolof’y Club 2,3,4; CCD 3,4; Class President 1; English Club 4; Family Life 3,4 (P); NFCCS, NSA, Sodality 1,2, 3, 4; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1.2, 3, 4; Student CwOvernment 2. Kathleen Mary Swords HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS English Whirlwind of thought . . . clear-sighted his- torian with an eye to the present and future . . . the dramatic flair . . . memorable as the organ grinder in our Soph Show . . . up-to- date peruser of the latest novel . . . her mind a hop, skip, and jump ahead of any subject . . . thought-provoking questions . . . unique personality too extensive for capsule form . . . apt conversationalist . . . Kathy. Athletic Association 1; Corte Castellano 1; Holyoke Undergraduate Club 1,2,3,4; IRC 2; NFCCS; NSA; Tourmaline 3(Art Editor); Verdeoro 1,2, 3, 4. f 147 Karen Marie Tierney PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS Spanish Lilting as a lark ... a beam of sunshine on a cloudy day . . . willowy grace . . . modestly accomplished scholar . . . giving advice from an understanding heart . . . never unjust . . . amusing expressions of awe . . . cherubic enthusiasm . . . every day, a breathless antici- pation . . . dependable assistance for a mere inquiry . . . bluebird of happiness . . . gentle persuader . . . Karen. Athletic Association 1,2; Berkshire Undergraduate Club 1,2, 3, 4; Corte Castellana 3,4; Glee Club 1,2, 3,4; IRC 2; NFCCS; NSA. Catherine Ann Tienli MILFORD, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Serenely surveying multitudes . . . depth of quiet understanding . . . persevering in all things . . , eyes, deep, dark pools of thought . . . gay laughter charming all those who hear . . . quick to lend a helping hand . . . a beautiful butterfly emerging from its cocoon . . . contemplating each problem with calm concern . . . realizing her place in life’s pat- tern . . . Cathy. Athletic Association 1,2, 3, 4; Cercle Francais 1,2; Monsignor Doyle Science Chd? 1,2, 3,4; NFCCS; NSA; Resident Council 2; Sodality 2,3,4; Worcester Undergraduate Club 1,2,3,4(P). 148 Margaret Elizabeth Tooviey WEBSTER, MASSACHUSETTS History Miss Collegiate, 1960 . . . viewing the world with rose-colored glasses . . . history lover extraordinaire . . . one of a large clan . . . spicing quotable quips with a charming “Webstah” accent . . . tripping the light fan- tastic on the sidewalks of New York . . . sauntering casually, yet surely, through the corridors of life . . . Peggy. Athletic Association 1 , 2 , 4 ; Corte Castellaiia 1 ; IRC 2 , 3 , 4 ; NFCCS; NSA; Worcester Underf radiiate Club 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 . Barbara Mae Tunier LEE, MASSACHUSETTS Mathematics Disarming honesty . . . thinking straight, acting straight . . . capacity for recognizing true worth , , . satiric sense of humor . . . serenading us with her melodious accordion so well-played ... a virtuoso on the vocal side with her warm voice . . . smooth, unruffled calmness . . . unpretentious and frank . . . practical-minded and realistic in her attitudes toward life . . . independent and individual- istic in her manner . . . Barb. Athletic Association 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; Berkshire Undergrad- uate Cluh 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; NFCCS; NSA. 149 Mtiry Kathryu Valero CHICOPEE, MASSACHUSETTS English Mobile features expressing quickly moving thought . . . contagiously high spirited . . . unruffled good humor . . . Junior-year trans- fer quickly becoming an integral member of the class . . . steeped in Shakespeare . . . ready for fun or frolic at a moment’s notice . . . yet deep cunents of wisdom . . . versatile in her interests and abilities . , . reflective, responsive and refreshing . . . Mary. English Chib 3,4; Glee Club 3,4; NFCCS; ,VSA, Springfield Undergraduate Club 3,4. Theresa Marie Vhiisko WESTFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS English Straight as an arrow . . . facing each task with the determination of an intellectual . . . always ready to speak her mind . . . knowing whereof she speaks . . . lover of good litera- ture . . . prodigious reader . . . expert on matters contemporary . . . happy in her friendships . . . capable of great things . . . soon to achieve her place in the sun . . . Terr -. Athletic Association 1,2,3; Corte Castcllana 1,2; Elmscript .3; English Club 3,4; Fainihj Life Club 4; NECCS; NSA; Sodality 1,2,3; Springfield Ihider- graduate Club 1,2. 150 Marcia Dorothy Wriirht SPRINGFIELD, MASSAf:HUSETTS french Wild Irisli rose . . . special agility in the field of the dance . . . yen for adventure . . . always a gleam in her eye . . . enjoying a good hearty laugh . . . readily serious when the occasion requires it . . . competence in official capacity ... an alert and serious student . . . French flair . . . unvamishexl truth, an out- standing quality . . . genial personality . . . an asset to any gathering . . . Marcia. Athletic Association 4; Cercle Francois 1,2, 3, 4, Class Vice-President 1; English Chib 4; Glee Club 2,3,4; M]B Debating Society 1,2; NFCCS; NSA; Sodality 1,2, 3, 4; Springfield Undergraduate Club 1,2, 3, 4. Marguerite Marie Young LONGMEADOW, MASSACHUSETTS Biology Erin’s lass with a generous dash of Nea- politan flavor ... a myriad bouquet of colors in her wardrobe . . . discerning collector of fine and lasting friendships . . . independent and definite in her outlook . . . engaging and generous . . . loving the bold sweep of a modern canvas . . . the vision of her artistry transforming humble materials to creative efforts . . . Peggy. Monsignor Doyle Science Club 2,3,4; NFCCS: NSA; Springfield Undergraduate Club 2,3,4. Sister Frauces Elizabeth, S.S.J. English Sister Frances Mary, S.S.J. Sociology Special Graduates 1960 Margaret M. Ambrose Education Mary F. Millea Sparhsh 152 and we in them. Thieving time will never snatch from us the sound of years. The Temptress waits us and cornering our treasure in hoarding heart, centering all things in Him Who is our Love, we slip away with Her. 153 First row: Lorraine Pelletier, Sarah Fernandez, Roberta Shum- ski, Dorothy Corcoran, Jill Sheehy, Maureen Bercury, Janet Pradella, Frances Dragon, Linda Lavallee, Catherine Tieuli, Helen Cullen. Second row: Maureen Friel, Nancy Manning, Audrey O ' Flynn, Cecelia Joy, Madeline Joseph, Jacquelaine Milko, Mary Jane Privitera, Mary Valego, Mary Ellen Mc- Carthy, Deborah Coon, Jeanne Atkinson. Third row: Patricia Pelland, Mary Julian, Olivia Shannon, Mary McDonough, Mary Ellen Fitts, Joan Gelinas, Marie Gravel, Joyce Gelinas, Sylvia Blouin, Carolyn O ' Connor, Marcia Wright, Maureen O ' Neil. Fourth row: Carol McKenna, Eileen Carroll, Coralie Lucas, Carol Korytoski, Ann Sokolosky, Judith Finn, Carol GriFRn, Carol Gilboy, Dorothy CoFFey, Rosemary Broderick, Carol Shannon, Maureen Sullivan, Marguerite McLaughlin. How High m Flame Flame burns brightly now. Our torch ascending blinds Each night of past, Each night of come. Slip closer now. In silence see in flame the Search of eyes for slabs of ice and light, In flame the bleeding souls staunched Only to flow And overflow. Yes, flame burns brightly now. To soar more all-invadingly with Each symphony of truth. Each sigh of eternity. How else are we to live? For we are not unsubstanced shadows Sated soon, so soon with gossamer and things. Our fingers fly for stars; our arms Yeani only for the blinding whiteness of tomoiTOw’s seed. Hold high the Flame! Eyes, folding mist, see There Our being, life, and all; God’s truth! 154 Jeanne Marie Atkinson First row; Theresa Moruzzi, Barbara Grady, Graceann Gavigan, Diane Newman, Rha Mortellite, Marie Ferrindino, Elizabeth Stamant, Barbara Lane, Patricia O ' Neill, Theresa Vinisko, Regina Archey. Second row: Margaret Maybury, Genevieve Gorczakoski, Mary Flaherty, Constance Mc- Govern, Mary Lynch, Maureen Ambrose, Patricia Fogarty, Anita Lussier, Irene Montagna, Maureen O ' Keefe, Maureen Messier. Third row: Kathleen Swords, Mary Calabrese, Carol Daury, Barbara McCarthy, Judith Stagnaro, Janet Di Fonzo, Geraldine Rucki, Virginia Duggan, Mary Scannell, Rosalie Dizek, Jean Kasuba, Margaret Toomey. Fourth row: Mary Ellen Mallory, Mary Agnes O ' Brien, Karen Tierney, Marsha Macary, Elizabeth Sadowsky, Mary Brennan, Louise O ' Leary, Judith Riordan, Mary Hayes, Mary Lou Carroll, Mary Murphy, Joyce Chriscola, Barbara Turner. A Senior ' s Prayer We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time. T. S. ELIOT Yes, God! In our unending desire for happiness, we seek fickle creature-accept- ance and search for passing beauty of appearance. We weary ourselves with the pressing excitement of fleeting events. How incomplete and empty all this is, O God! Without You, the winding paths of, experience collapse under the fatal power of their own frailty. Now, having finished our care- free and exciting e.xplorations of childhood and adolescence, we turn to You at “the end of the beginning and the beginning of the end.” O God! We will not waver hesitatingly if we can but possess You as our First Guide in this present beginning of adulthood. Help us to remember always that our beginning was from You — our life is for You — and our end must be in You. Help us to cease exploring this finite world alone and to begin seeking in it the Infinite You. Barbara Ann Grady 155 a CLASS OF 1963 ACCORSI, CAROLYN M. 268 Prospect St., E. Longineadovv ALLEN, JOANNE T. 90 Donlyn Drive, Chicopee ARCHEY, JEANNE M. 42 Kensington Ave., Pittsfield AUTIl, ALICE K. 473 Hillside Ave., Holyoke AUTH, CARROLL A. 16 O.xford St., Springfield 8 AVAULT, SANDRA E. 88 Mt. Royal St., Chicopee BACG, ELIZABETH A. Milford St., Mendon BALAKIER, KATHERINE C. 34 Dresser Ave., Chicopee BEGLEY, MARGARET M. 19 Nye St., Springfield 4 BELANGER, MARY L. .5.5 Stearns Ave., Pittsfield BENOIT, CATHERINE L. 255 East St., Chicopee Falls BETACH, ANNA C. 545 Prospect St., Woonsocket, R. I. BETACH, BEATA F. 545 Prospect St., Woonsocket, R. I. BOTTONE, JUDY M. 48 Barclay St., Longmeadow BROWN, CAROL A. 45 Druids Lane, W. Springfield CERRONE, HELEN M. 24 Hancock St., Worcester CHICK, JEANNE 11. 2 Barn Hill Rd., Bloomfield, Conn. CLEARY, MARY ANN 22 Hadley St., Springfield 8 CONLIN, ELIZABETH M. 44 Talcott Ave., W, Springfield CONNELLY, CATHERINE A. 76 Edgemont St,, Springfiekl 9 CRONIN, BARBARA C, .51 Atwater Rd., Springfield 7 DANTON, RAYNA J. 69 Belvidere St., Feeding Hills DASSATTI, ANN M. Box 3, Readshoro, Vt. DEASY, JANE T. 585 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow DENISEVICH, MARY C. Broadway, Graniteville DIDONNA, DOROTHY A, 140 Rocky Hill Rd., Hadley DiGERONIMO, DOROTHY A. 124 North Main St., Leominster DIGNAN, MARYALICE 50 Brookline Ave., Springfield 7 DINSMORE, GAIL L. 60 Center St., Northampton DONNELLAN, KATHLEEN M. 488 Newbury St., Springfield 4 DONOHUE, .MARY P. 203 Westford Ave., Springfield 9 DUTKIEWICZ, CAROLYN F. 197 Kings Highway, W, Springfield EIARDI, JOAN I. 14 Hillcrest St., Holvoke FITZGERALD, MARY J. 82 Woodside Terr., Springfield 8 FLORCZYK, SANDRA P. 272 Maple St., E. Longmeadow FURMAN, GAIL A. 900 Main St., Holyoke GABOURY, JEANNE M. 254 Oak Hollow Rd., Springfield 8 GAMMONS, RUTH L, 34 Laurel St., Holyoke GAVIGAN, MARYMARGARET A, 10.3 Orlando Ave,, Albany, N. Y. GELINAS, SUSAN M. 2.5 Harding Ave., Adams GEOFFRION, KATHLEEN M. 8.3 Woodlawn St., Springfield 8 GOBEILLE, JULIANNE M. 33 North East St., 1 lolyoke GOOCH, JUDITH A. 267 Houghton St., North Ailams GRIFFIN, KATHLEEN M. 48 Donna Ave., Pittsfield GRISWOLD, CAROLYN F. 19 W heeler Ave., W ' orcester HALLADAY, SANDRA J. 28 Hamilton St., New Britain, Conn. HART, PATRICIA A. 769 Allen St., Springfield 8 HENNEBERRY, ANNE E. 32 Hampshire St., Pittsfield lADAROLA, LINDA-MARIE 48 East W alnut St., Milford KAPINOS, DOLORES J. 6 Meetinghouse Rd., Chicopee KASPER, JEAN A. 132 Walnut St., Agawam KEEP’E, MARY L. 437 Lincoln St., New Britain, Conn. KELLIHER, JANET M. 94 Anniversary St., Springfield 4 KELLY, ROSEMARY A. 3.5-30 1,53 St., Flushing, N, Y. KERN, KAREN L. 130 Waldorf St., Springfield 9 KOBACK, ANNE T. 12 W ' hipple Ave., Blackstone KOLANO, THERESA II. 37 Stafford St., Springfield 4 KOONZ, VIRGINIA M. 180 Eagle St., North Adams LAFLAMME, LUCIE M. 101 Dartmouth St., Chicopee Falls LANDERS, BARBARA A. 53 Andrew St., Springfield 9 LANDRY, CAROL A. 22 Davis St., Easthampton LARKIN, JOAN A. 71 Margaret Ave., Crestwood, N. Y. LAVIN, PATRICIA A. 166 Ashland St., Holliston LEARY, MARY A. 19 Lawndale St., Springfield 8 LINES, PATRICIA E. Hamilton, Bermuda LONERGAN, ANNA C. 1.56 Willard St., New Haven, Conn. LYNCH, CHRISTINE M. 130 Mildred Ave., Springfield 4 LYNCH, NlARGARET A. 28 Buick Ave., Springfield 8 LYNCH, MARY ANN C. 121 Daviston St., Springfield 8 MACKIE, ELLEN P. 95 Orciiard St., Pittsfield MALBOEUF, ANN K. 7 Progress Ave., Dudley MARSICO, DOROTHY C. 28 Lvons Rd., Scarsdale, N. Y. MECH ' iNKO, EDITH F. 7 Loudon St., W ' orcester MEUNIER, LOUISE R, 39 Chapin Terr., Springfield 7 MILLIN ' , SHELIA A. Church St., Boylston MIRTO, NANCY A. 34 North Elm St., W ' aterhury, Conn. MOORE, MARY JANE K. .565 South Canal St., Holyoke MORRISON, JILL L. 12 Tutherly Ave., Claremont, N. II. MURPHY, KATHLEEN A. 44 Endicott Place, Stoneham McCarthy, sondra m. 80 Maple St., Easthampton McDowell, w ' allace a. 60 W ' alter St., W ' illimansett McMahon, jane m. .55 Bartlett Ave., Pittsfield McMAHON, MARY E. 42 Alberta St., Springfield 8 NAJIMY, VIVIEN A, 53 Onota St., Pittsfield NASCEMBENl, I’AITH L. 655 North Main St,, E. Longmeadow NORTON, JUDITH A. 50 Rich St., W ' orcester O’CONNOR. KATHLEEN 5530 N. W ' ashington Blvd., Arlington, ' ORMOND, CATHERINE M. 1180 East 29 St., Brooklyn. N. Y. OW ' ENS, RUTH M. 936 Dwight St., Holyoke PAQUETTE, LOUISE L. 88 Newell St., W’illimansett PELLIZZARO, JEAN E. Fairview St., Lee PERRAULT, JANICE C, 20 Tampa St., South Hadley Falls PETERS, DIANE G. 35 Brainard Rd., N. W ' ilbraham PHILP04T, ALICE B. 71 W ' estfield Rd., Holyoke POLIWCZAK, CHARLENE G, 18 Hunter Place, Springfield 9 PR.VTT, MIRIAM V. 60 k’airfield St., Springfield 8 QUINN, KATHARINE M. 20 Randall St., Adams QUINTAL, IRENE J. 34 Dickinson St., Aldenville RANNO, FRANCES J. V. A. Hospital, Leeds RAYMOND, JOANNE M. 7 Pine St., Whitinsville REGAN, JANE P. 79 Vista Ave., Leominster REIDY, ELAINE M. 925 Worthington St., Springfield 5 RICHARDS, JOYCE C. 1 Franklin Court, Northampton ROCHE, MARY-REGINA 170 Bowles Park, Springfield 4 RURA, JOANNE M. 90 Lindbergh Blvd., W ' estfield SARTORI, MABEL T. 24 Sylvan St., W ' . Springfield SHEA, MARY A. 51 Forest Park Ave., Springfield 8 SHEPPARD, ELEANOR J. 10 Hill St., Bondsville SITTARD, JULIE M. 218 Newbury St., Chicopee SMITH, PATRICIA C. 38 Thorndike St., Palmer SOKOLOWVSKl, BARBARA W ' , 10 Belleview Drive, W ' estfield SPRING, ELEANOR M. 226 Sumner Ave., Springfield 8 STICKNEY, DORIS A. 23 Herschel Ave., W ' aterbury, Conn. SZETELA, ANN T. 29 North Summer St., Adams TALLARICO, ELIZABETH M. 496 W ' est Main St., North Adams TAYLOR, KATHRYN A. lames St., Barre TERAULT, SHIRLEY C. 31 Bell St., Chicopee THAYER, CAROL A. 351 Federal St., Greenfield TRZCINKA, BARBARA J. 42 Clarendon St., Pittsfield VINCELETTE, ALICE A. 1.5 Rinir St., North Adams WELCH, ETHEL M. 158 Cochran St., Chicopee h ' alls WILSON, PHYLLIS J. 309 Main St., Bristol, Conn. WOLOS, P.YTRICIA A. 71 Fresno St., Springfield 4 WRIGHT, MARGARET P. 17 Federal .V e., Agawam ZYSK, ANN E. 103 Furnace St., Little I ' alls, N. Y. 156 CLASS OF 1962 ALBERTINE, GAIL B. 21 Clinton St., Ware AUSTIN, ELIZABETH R. 611 Front St., Chicopee BALCERZEWSKI, FRANCES A. 638 Southampton Rd., We.stfield BARRY, CAROL A. 12.5 Fiske St., Waterbnry, Conn. BELSITO, ELIZABETH C. 4.5 Forbes St., Worcester BORSARI, PAULINE M. 225 Earle St., New Bedfoid BOYNTON, ELEANOR M. 22 Plymouth Ave., Florence BOZEE, PATRICIA A, 19 Undervv(K)d St., Springfield 1 BRODERICK, BARBARA A. 127 Strong Ave., Pittsfield BRODEUR, CAROL A. 46 Dresser Ave., Chicopee BRODEUR, JUDITH E. 35 Temple St., Adams BROWN, MAUREEN R. 22 Medford St., Springfiehl 7 BRUNELLE, JOAN A. 15 Grant St., Springfield 9 BURNS, MARY A. 288 Parker St., Gardner BURROWS, CLARE F. 212 Lincoln St., Worcester CABANA, PATRICIA L. 465 Allen St., Springfield 8 CASEY, BARBARA J. 142 Gale Ave., Pittsfield CHAMBERS, JEAN W. 1760 West St. R 1, Mansfield CHICOINE, MARIE A. 1075 Granby Rd., Chicopee Falls CIANCI, LINDA J. 150 Barbour Rd., New Biitain, Cionii. CIEPLINSKI, IRENE B. 210 Maple St., E. Longmeadow CISZEK, BARBARA A. 269 Fairview St., Chicopee CONDE, CELINA R. 465 Winsor St., Ludlow COPPOLA, JUDITH L. 42 Pleasant St., Milford CRIMMINS, Geraldine M. 5.5 Buckland St., Palmer CRONIN, CAROLANNE M. 51 Atwater Rd., Springfield 7 DEJNAK, JEAN F. 133 Wisdom Way, Greenfield DiMARIA, CARMELINA T. 27 Lafayette St., Thompsonville, (aimi DiSCIULLO, DONNA M. 42 Tremont St,, Brighton DONOHUE, MARGARET F. 113 Merrifield St., Worcester DONOVAN, MARY L. 250 Chestnut St., E. Longmeadow DOYLE, ANITA F. 54 Middle St,, Florence DOYLE, MARY P. 679 Westhampton Rd., Norll lampton DUMAS, HENRIETTA Palmer Rd., W ' are DWYER, ELIZABETH A. 126 Howard St., Pittsfield DWYER, MARGARET M. 776 North St., Pittsfield DYER, PATRICIA A. 6 II 2 High St., Greenfield EICHORN, MARY J. 39 Crandall St., Adams I ' AHEY, MARGARET A. 25 P ' ranklin St., Thompsom illc, Gonn. I’ARRELL, ANN M. 89 Embassy Rd., Springfield 9 FERRERO, JULIA R. 94 Shaker Rd., E. Longmeadow I ' lORENTINO, MARJORIE C. 105 Malden St., Springfield 8 I ' lTZC.ERALD, JOAN T. 333 Nottingham St., Springfield 4 FONTEYN, MARY B. ' Ihe Knolls, W ' illiamstown I ' ORD, ROSALIE J. 48 Silver St., W. Springfield GRIFFIN, MARY LOUISE 70 Longwood Ave., HoRokc HART, REGINA E, Strong St., Amherst HOLFELDER, HELENE .M. 1247 East 29th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. HOLT, DOROTHY L. 15 York St., Holyoke HURLEY, SHEILA A, 3708 91st St., Jackson Hts., N.Y. JOHNSON, MARY E. 51 Colonial Ave., Springfield 9 KIRBY, ELIZABETH J, 781 White St., Springfield 8 KOLANO, P.ATRICIA 53 Davis St., Ludlow LaFERRIERE, DOROTHY JEAN G. 511 Grattan St., Chicopee Falls LAMBERT, JUDITH A . 121 W ' ilbraham Rd., Springfield 9 LAVELLE, JUDITH A. 60 Pennsylvania Ave., Willimausett LAWSON, EILEEN M. 89 Gallup St., North Adams LIUCCI, MARY L. 426 Carew St., Springfield 4 LOURENCO, FILOMENA V. 577 Winsor St., Ludlow LYNCH, LOIS C. 51 Westminster St., Springfield 9 MARCEAU, JUDITH A. 20 Cherry St., Holyoke MEAGHER, ANNE M, Elm St., Stockbridge MEUNTER, LORRAINE E. 27 Royal St., Fairview MILLETTE, CAROLE A. East Rd., Adams MOLLOY, PATRICIA A. 9 Montana St., North Arlams MONAGHAN, ANNE F. 7 Los Angeles St., South Hadley Falls MOQUIN, PRISCILLA L. 17 Columbus Ave., Holyoke MORELLI, LOIS A. 32 Munro St., Manchester, Conn. MORIARTY, MAUREEN C. 59 Wilbraliam Rd., Hampden MORRISSEY, JANE F. 81 Court St., Westfield MURPHY, CAROLYN A. 3335 Boston Rd., North Wilbraliam McCOOL, MAUREEN E. 5 Ferry Hill Rd., Ciranby O ' CONNOR, CATHERINE E. 30 Deerfield Rd., Wycoff, N. J. O’DONNELL, NANCY E. 760 Chestnut St., Springfield 7 O’FLYNN, EILEEN G. 270 Berkshire Ave., Springfield 9 O’HARA, PATRICIA A. 952 East 29th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. O’REILLY, CECILE .M. 16 Terryville Ave., Bristol, Conn. O’SHAUGHNESSY, ANN M. 67 Euclid Ave., Springfield 8 PERRAULT, LILLIAN M. 5 Nash St,, Willimansett PETROPULOS, CATHERINE A. 98 Corinth St., North Adams PLANTE, VERONIQUE A, 57 Beacon St., North Adams POUECH, JEANNE T. Lakeside Lane, RED 1, Vernon, Conn. POWERS, MARY B. 59 Janet St., W. Springfield QUIRK, ROBERTA N. 67 Main St,, Williamstown RALICCI, MARIE S. 40 Magnolia Ave., Bristol, Conn. REILLY, MARY E, 31 Sherrill Ave., Pittsfield RILEY, JOANNE M. 6 James St., Holyoke RUSH, MARGARET II. 74 East Housatonic St,, Pittsfield SCOTT, MAUREEN F. 62 Dosoris Lane, Glen Cove, N. Y. SLATTERY, JANE M. Dubois Ave., Alpine, N. J. SMITH, AGNES M. 52 Granville Ave., Worcester SMITH, NANCY E. 2 Coronado St,, Jamestown, R. I. STROINEY, CAROL A. Crescent Lake Dr,, Hazardville, Conn. SULLIVAN, ELLEN M. 9 Colrain St., Greenfield SWEENEY, BETTYANNE 136 Naubuc Ave., East Hartford, Conn. TALBOT, JOAN M. 46 Chevy Chase Rd., Worcester THOMPSON, PATRICIA G. 57 Mathieu Dr., Chicopee THORNE, BEVERLY A. Route I, Box 930, Old Orchard Bcarh, Maine WIirPE, PATRICIA .M. 73 Maynard St., Springfield 9 WILLIAMS, MARY T. 222 Plumtree Rd., Springfield 8 157 CLASS OF 1961 ABBUISO, AUDREY A. 24 Winter St., Milford ARCHEY, GLADYS M. 42 Kensington Ave., Pittsfield ASHE, ELIZABETH A. 33 Elm St., Dalton AUSTIN, MARY C. 611 Front St., Chicopee BABINEAU, PATRICIA J. Memorial St., Deerfield BASILE, NATALIE A. 222 South St., Northampton BELL, SUSAN M. 42 Graves Ave., Northampton BERGERON, ANITA M. 6 Lapierre Ave., Sonthhridge BINETTE, JULIETTE E. Farm St., Blackstone BONNEVILLE, GLORIA A. 15 Montrose St., Springfield 9 BORDEN, BRENDA A. 125 Navy Walk, Brooklyn, N. Y, BORYSEWICK, NANCY L. 3 High St., Florence BOUDREAU, PATRICIA A. 591 East Main St., Chicopee Falls BRISSON, ELIZABETH A. 1 Sonoma Place, Holyoke BROWN, ANNE M. 281 Le.xington St., Springfield 4 BRUNET, MARILYN A. 51 Avon Place, Springfield 5 BUSHIKA, CLAIRE L. State Rd,, Cheshire BUTLER, REBECCA C. 2455 S. Monroe St., Arlington 6, Va. CALLAHAN, MARGARET E. 115 Bay Rd., Hadley CAMERON, MARY J. 32 West Alvord St., Springfield 8 CAMPBELL, JANE E. 250 Washington Ave., Clifton, N. J. CHAPDELAINE, THERESE J. 154 Pondview Drive, Springfield 8 COLEMAN, JOAN M. 55 Bonnyview St., Springfield 9 COLLINS. EILEEN M. 23 Algonquin Place, Springfield 4 CONNORS, CLARE F. Mechanic St., Bellingham CROUGHWELL, JACQUELINE M. 124 Crane Ave., Dalton CUMMINGS, PATRICIA M. 20 Orchard Terrace, North Adams CUNNINGHAM, MARY K. 50 Pine St., Pittsfield DELANEY. JOAN F. 70 Uxbridge St., Worcester DONOVAN, JOANNE F. 51 De.xter St., Springfield 5 DOUVILLE, JOYCE A. 50 Whitman St., Willimauseit DOWD. GERTRUDE E. Ill Manchester Terr., Springfield 8 DUNN, MARY L. 16 W ' e.stminster Ct., New Rochelle, N. Y. DUPUIS, MARY F. 80 Grove St., Milford DWYER, KATHLEEN M. 16 Bayonne St., Springfield 5 FENTON, MARY M. 50 Hitchcock St., Holyoke FITZGERALD, MARGARET E. 81 Bancroft Rd., Melrose FITZGERALD, MARY T. 162 Rosevvell Ave., Springfield 9 FLASINSKI, ANNA J. 71 Kalish Ave., Thompsonville, Conn. FRADET, PATRICIA M. 48 Magnolia Terr., Springfield 8 FRULLA, MARLENE L. 64 Columbia St., Lee FUREY, MARY A. 32 Frew Terr., Thompsonville, Conn. GALLESE, DIANE M. 312 Eagle St., North Adams GLEASON, ELVA M, 42 Abbott St., Pittsfield GOSSELIN, JULIE A. 61 Maple St., Chicopee Falls GUILMET, DIANE M. 532 Rindge Rd., Fitchburg HAMMOND, MARY E. 96 Caconicus St., Fall River HARRIS, LIBBIE A. 6-1 Bay View St., Galveston, Texas HINKELL, MARY E. 932 South Church St., North Adams HOUGHTON, BARBARA M. 595 School St., Webster HUOT, MARIE A. Saco Ave., Old Orchard Beach, Maine JOYCE, CECILIA E. 56 Cunningham St., Springfield 7 KELLY, MARY A. 60 Allyn St., Holyoke LaFERRIERE, MILDRED M. .511 Grattan St., Chicopee Falls LaFOND, MARION T. 64 High St., Monson LAVELLE, ANN F. 75 Center St., Holyoke LINCOLN, TERESA B. 11 Hill St,, Thorndike LYNCH, MARY E. 205 Northampton Ave., Springfield 9 MAGEE, ELIZABETH A. Holtshire Rd,, Orange MAHONEY, K.YTHLEEN M. 6.33 Chestnut St., Springfield 7 MARIEB, JOYCE M. 9 Mooreland St., Feeding Hills MENIN, LIVIA M. 12 Melrose Ave., Pittsfield MILLIN, DONNA M. Church St., Boylston MORGAN, ANNE C. 1678 Northampton St., Holyoke MORRISSEY, DORA M. 328 Onota St,, Pittsfield MUSANTE, SUSAN J. 1144 W. Hampden St., Holyoke McCarthy, shelia e. 43 Ruskin St., Springfield 8 McCORMICK, SALLY A. 31 Homecrest St., Longmeadow McDonald, maureen c. 33 Clark St., Holyoke .McLaughlin, joan e. Mendon Rd., Cumberland Hill, R. I. McLEAN, MARGARET J. 49 View St., Holyoke McMAHON, JOAN M. 26 Thompson St., East Longmeadow OUELLETTE, CAROL M. 84 Cooley Ave., East Longmeadow PERRY, PATRICIA L. 7 Beauview Terrace, West Springfield PHELAN, MARILYN C, 24.5 Norfolk St., Springfield 9 PRAETZ, MARY G. 233 Gillette Ave., Springfield 8 READY, SYLVIA A. 268 Dwight St. Ext., Springfield 5 REGAN, MARY C, 146 Avon St., Malden SCORDATO, SARAH M. 4 Parkway East, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. SESIA, ELLEN A. 180 Prescott St., Clinton SHAW, SANDRA L. 196 Valley Rd., Middletown, R. I. SINKOSKI, MARY L. 17 Castle St., Ware SMITH, JACQUELINE M. 80 Peekskill Ave., Springfiekl 9 SPIEWAK, MARION E. 187 Wheatland Ave., Chicopee Falls STEFANIK, STEPHANIE M. 2.52 South St., Holyoke TOOMEY, ALICE E. 21 Lincoln St., Webster TOPOR, JOAN C. 11.5 Hillside Ave., West Springfield VILLARES, SONIA I. 2 Vizx-arrondo St., Box 454, Caguas, Puerto Rico WALKER. ANNE E. 233 West Park St.. Lee WELDON, KATHLEEN G. 41 Forest St., Springfield 8 WORTHLEY, KATHLEEN A. E. Paris Ave., Charlestown, N. H. WYNN. MARY I. 14 Herman St., Springfield 8 YERICK, MARGARET K. 102 Laurel Ave., Larchmont, N. Y. YOUNG, CAROL 63 Bridle ' Path Rd., Springfield ZDON, JEAN M. 114 Rimmon .Ave., Chicopee 158 CLASS OF 1960 AMBROSE, MAUREEN C. 398 Sumner Ave., Springfield 8 ANDERSON, ELIZABETH J. 32 Nortlr Elm St., Northampton ARCHEY, REGINA L. 42 Ken.sington Ave., Pittsfield ATKINSON, JEANNE M. 2.5 Medford St., Chicopee Falls BERCURY, MAUREEN F. 134 Howard St., Pittsfield BLOUIN, SYLVIA A. 192 Davis St,, Springfield 4 BOGACZ, MILDRED S. 75 Pleasant St., Three Rivers BRENNAN, MARY A. 185 North Elm St., Northampton BRODERICK, ROSEMARY T. 564 Appleton St., Holyoke CALABRESE, MARY I. 161 E. Lake St., VVinsted, Conn. CARROLL, EILEEN M. 30 Wolcott St., Springfield 4 CARROLL, MARY L. 109 Colony Rd., Longmeadow CAVALLINI, DIANE S. 178 Leopold St., Springfield 9 CEBULA, LORRAINE A. 34 Wentworth St., Chicopee CHRISCOLA, JOYCE M. 1 185 Suffield St., Agawam COFFEY, DOROTHY A. 102 Beacon Ave., Holyoke COON, MARJORIE D. 138 Hubbard St., Ludlow CORCORAN, DOROTHY M. 67 McCabe Ave., Pawtucket, R. 1. CROWLEY, JUDETH A. 185 Ashley St., West Springfield CULLEN, HELEN M. 283 Le.xington St., Springfield 4 DAURY, CAROL A. 24 Church St., Pittsfield DiFONZO, JANET B. V ' alley Rd., South Barre DIZEK, ROSALIE M. 86 Maple St., Holyoke DRAGON, FRANCES L. 37)2 Central St., Southbridge DUGGAN, VIRGINIA M. 34 Hazen St., Springfield 9 FERNANDEZ, SARAH H. Cristina 46, Ponce, Puerto Rico FERRINDINO, MARIE C. 164 Pendleton Ave., Springfield 9 FINN, JUDITH A. 44 Calumet Rd., Holyoke FITTS, MARY E. 68 Dresser St., Southbridge FITZGERALD, JILL E. 243 Pearl St., Thompsonville, Conn. FLAHERTY, MARY E. 18 Burford Ave., West Springfield FOGARTY, PATRICIA A. 28 Porter St., Manchester, Conn, FRIEL, MAUREEN E. 52 Rowena St., Worcester GAVIGAN, GRACEANN M. 103 Orlando Ave., Albany, N. Y. GELINAS, JOAN A, 50 Theodore St., Chicopee Falls GELINAS, JOYCE M. 50 Theodore St., Chicopee Falls GILBOY, CAROL A. 13 School St., Holyoke CORCZAKOSKI, GENEVIEVE M. 133 Reed St., North Adams GRADY, BARBARA A. 956 Amostown Rd., West Springfield GRAVEL, MARIE M. J. 607 Chestnut St., Springfield 7 GRIFFIN, CAROL M. 96 Russell Ave., Watertown HAYES, MARY M. 59 Summer St., Lee JOSEPH, DOROTHY M, 171 Porter Rd., East Longmeadow JOSEPH, MADELINE A, 64 Milk St., Fitchburg JOY, CECELIA A, 3224 Sherman Ave. N. W. Washington 10, D. C. JULIAN, MARY J. 121 Hartford Terrace, Springfield 8 KASUBA, JEAN M. 197 Second St., Pittsfield KORYTOSKI, CAROL A. 62 Straw Ave., Florence LANE, BARBARA F. 42 Orchard St., Chicopee LAVALLEE, LINDA I. 120 Rivers Ave., Willimansett LUCAS, CORALIE A. 28 School St,, Holyoke LUSSIER, ANITA M. 35 Bell St., Chicoiree LYNCH, MARY J. 63 Gillette Circle, Springfield 8 MACARY, MARSHA A. 36 Dixie Ave.. Waterbury, Conn. MALLORY, MARY E. 143 Kimberly Ave., Springfield 8 MANNING, NANCY E. 167 Johnson St., Springfield 8 MAYBURY, MARGARET C. 31 Redin Dr., East Longmeadow MESSIER, MAUREEN P. .50 Notch Rd., North Adams MILKO, JACOUELAINE V. 27 Bonus Ave., Norwalk, Conn. MONTAGNA, IRENE L. 29 High St., West Springfield MORTELLITE, RITA ANN T. 204 Park St., Bristol, Conn. MORUZZI, THERESA P. Rt. 19— Clarksburg, North Adams MURPHY, MARY E. 84 Eureka St., Worcester McCarthy, Barbara j. 3.5 Roberta Rd., Pittsfiehl McCarthy, mary e. 53 Gold St., Springfield 7 McDonough, mary t. .56 Linden St,, Holyoke McGovern, Constance m. 27 Alhambra Circle, Agawam McKENNA, CAROL K. 57 Hitchcock St,, Holyoke McLaughlin, marguerite m. .34 Garden St,, Pittsfield McQUAID, ANN E. 66 Beechwood Rd., Wellesley NEWMAN, DIANE M. 26 Bliss St., West Springfield O’BRIEN, MARY A. 96 Church St., Lenox O ' CONNOR, CAROLYN M. 31 Webster St., Springfield 4 O ' FLYNN, AUDREY L. 270 Berkshire Ave., Springfield 9 OCONOWSKI, THERESA M. 34 Wildermere St., Chicopee Falls O’KEEFE, MAUREEN M. Sizer Dr., Wales O LEARY, LOUISE C. 3 Fairfield Ave., Holyoke O ' NEIL, MAUREEN R. 113 Harkness Ave., Springfield 8 O’NEILL, PATRICIA A. 172 Carew St.. Springfield 4 OUELLETTE, NANCY A. 252 Ashley St., West Springfield PELLAND, P.ATRICIA A. 497 Chicopee St., Willimansett PELLETIER, LORRAINE M. 73 Massachusetts Ave,, Springfield 9 PEROSINO, JOYCE L. 21 Richelieu St., Chicopee Falls PRADELLA, JANET B. 42 Hazelhurst Ave., East Longmeadow PRIVTTERA, MARY J. 97 Main St., Lee RIORDAN, JUDITH E. 78 Oak St., Indian Orchard RUCKT, GERALDINE L. 88 Gilbert Ave., Chicopee SADOWSKY, AGNES E. 20 Forbes Ave., Northampton SCANNELL, MARY A. 842 Dwight St., Holyoke SHANNON, CAROL A. 121 Johnson St., Springfield 8 SHANNON, OLIVIA A. 46 Tenrple St., Springfield .5 SHEEHY, MARY J. 310 Old Conn. Path, Framingham SHUMSKI, ROBERTA C. 75 F ' ariview Ave., Chicopee SOKOLOSKY, ANN M. Stevens St., Turners Falls STACNARO, JUDITH A. 30 Maebeth St., Springfield 9 STAMANT, ELIZABETH L, 12.58 Westfield St., West Springfiekl SULLIVAN, MAUREEN T. 227 White St., Springfield 8 SWORDS, KATHLEEN M. 1184 West Hampden St., Holyoke TIERNEY, KAREN M. 1201 West St., Pittsfield TIEULI, CATHERINE A. 22 Spring St., Milford TOOMEY, MARGARET E. 21 Lincoln St., Webster TURNER, BARBARA M. Chapel St., Lee VALEGO, MARY K. 99 South St., Chicopee VINISKO, THERESA M. 21 Holland Ave., Westfield WRIGHT, MARCIA D. 448 Franklin St., Springfield 4 YOUNG, .MARGUERITE M. 20 Ellington St., Longmeadow 159 Graduate THE ALUMNAE THE SOPHOMORE CLASS THE ERESHMAN CLASS THE JUNIOR CLASS STUDENT GOVERNMENT ☆ SODALITY VERDEORO NFCCS ATHLETIC CLUB ☆ BERKSHIRE UNDERGRADUATE CLUB SPRINGFIELD UNDERGRADUATE CLUB HOLYOKE NORTHAMPTON UNDERGRADUATE CLUB ☆ CONNECTICUT UNDERGRADUATE CLUB INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB DEBATING CLUB FRENCH CLUB WORCESTER UNDERGRADUATE CLUB FAMILY LIFE CLUB GLEE CLUB MONSIGNOR DOYLE SCIENCE CLUB CCD CLUB ENGLISH CLUB SPANISH CLUB METROPOLITAN UNDERGRADUATE CLUB SOUTH SHORE UNDERGRADUATE CLUB 160 Honorary Patrons Mr. and Mrs. Joseph G. Ambrose Mrs. Alphonsine Anderson Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. Archey Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Atkinson Mr. and Mrs. W. Donald Bercury Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Blouin Mr. and Mrs. John S. Bogacz Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Brennan Mr. and Mrs. Richard Broderick Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Calabrese Mrs. Mary R. Carroll Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Carroll Mr. and Mrs. Louis J. Cavallini Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Cebula Mr. and Mrs. Frank Chriscola, Jr. Mrs. Francis J. Coffey Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Coon, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Edward B. Corcoran Mrs. Blanche Courtemanche Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crowley, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Edward T. Cullen Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. Daury Mr. and Mrs. Joseph DiFonzo Mr. and Mrs. Steven Dizek Mr. and Mrs. Bernard M. Duggan Mr. and Mrs. Maximiliano Fernandez Mrs. John Ferrindino Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. Finn Mr. and Mrs. William R. Fitts Mr. and Mrs. Maurice P. Fitzgerald Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Flaherty Mr. and Mrs. Bernard M. Fogarty Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Friel Mr. and Mrs. James R. Gavigan Mr. and Mrs. Albert E. Gelinas Mrs. Anthony F. Gilboy Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Gorczakoski Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Grady Mr. and Mrs. Alphonse Gravel Mrs. John H. Griffin Mr. and Mrs. Edmund A. Hayes Mr. and Mrs. Elias Joseph Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Joseph Mr. and Mrs. James B. Joy Mr. and Mrs. William J. Julian Mr. and Mrs. Oliver J. Korytoski Mrs. Frances Lane Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Lavallee Mr. and Mrs. Alfred O. Lucas Mr. and Mrs. Odias A. Lussier Mr. and Mrs. James B. Lynch Mr. and Mrs. Martin Macary Mr. and Mrs. William Mallory Mrs. John J. Manning Mr. and Mrs. William J. Maybury, Sr. Mrs. Mary Messier Mr. and Mrs. Vincent S. Milko Mr. and Mrs. Renato C. Montagna Mrs. Frank Mortellite Mr. and Mrs. Carlo Moruzzi Mr. and Mrs. James F. Murphy Mrs. Margaret H. McCarthy Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. McCarthy Mr. and Mrs. William F. McDonough Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. McGovern, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. McKenna Mr. and Mrs. Daniel McLaughlin Mrs. Charles D. McQuaid Mrs. A. C. Newman Mr. and Mrs. George T. O’Brien Mrs. Theresa O’Brien Mr. and Mrs. Thomas T. O’Connor 161 Honorary Patrons Mrs. Dermot J. O’Flynn Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Ogonowski Mr. and Mrs. James O ' Keefe Miss Mary M. O’Leary Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. O’Neil Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. O’Neill Mr. and Mrs. Vital A. Ouellette Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Pelland, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Pelletier Mr. and Mrs. John F. Perosino Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Pradella Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Pnvitera Mrs. J. Joseph Riordan Mr. and Mrs. Max Rucki Mr. and Mrs. Chester S. Sadowsky Mr. and Mrs. John J. Scannell Mr. James N. Shannon Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Shannon Mrs. Eugene Sheehy Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Shumski Mr. and Mrs. Chester J. Sokolosky Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Stagnaro Mr. and Mrs. John E. Stamant Mr. and Mrs. Raymond F. Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. John J. Swords Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Tierney Mrs. Teresa Tieuli Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Toomey Mr. and Mrs. Raymond W. Turner Mr. and Mrs. Fred F. Valego Mr. and Mrs. John Vinisko Mrs. Charles F. Wright Mr. and Mrs. Harry W. Young ☆ His Honor, MAYOR WALTER LYSEK Chicopee, Massachusetts Business Patrons Al’s Campus Lounge 86 Springfield Street Chicopee, Mass. Auth Fuels, Inc. 507 North Mam Street East Longmeadow, Mass. Lillian Bernard Dress Shop 223 Maple Street Holoyke, Mass. Best of Luck Class of 1960 A Friend Balakier’s 229 Exchange Street Chicopee, Mass. 162 Bishop’s Jewelers 306 High Street Holoyke, Mass. Business Patrons John Breck Company Dwight Street Springfield, Mass. Byron’s Funeral Home 684 State Street Springfield, Mass. Casual Corner 1373 Main Street Springfield, Mass. Joseph Chapdelaine Sons, Inc. 154 Pondview Drive Springfield, Mass. Chicopee Savings Bank 36 Center Street Chicopee, Mass. Chriscola’s Farm Equipment, Inc. Suffield Street Agawam, Mass. Coca-Cola Bottling Company 33 Plainfield Street Springfield, Mass. Paul E. Collins, Insurance 137 State Street Springfield, Mass. Cotrell QC Leonard, Inc. Academic Attire Albany, New York Curran Jones Funeral Home 109 Main Street West Springfield, Mass. Dave’s Foodtown 60 Shaker Road East Longmeadow, Mass. Donut-Dip, Inc. 1305 Riverdale Road West Springfield, Mass. Door Bell Card Shop 14 School Street Springfield, Mass. Dragon’s Music Store 35 Central Street Southbridge, Mass. Lewis Dunbar Ann Dunbar Shops East Longmeadow, Mass. Durocher Catering 836 Bay Street Springfield, Mass. Exchange Package Store, Inc. 559 East St. Corner Carew St. Chicopee Falls, Mass. Falls Provision Company 521 East Street Chicopee Falls, Mass. Fenton’s Flower Shop 233 Maple Street Holoyke, Mass. Fogarty Brothers, Inc. 319 Broad Street Manchester, Conn. Forbes, Inc . 240 Maple Street Holoyke, Mass. Frosty Corner Corner East and Carew Streets Chicopee Falls, Mass. Gelinas Service Station Broadway and Belcher Chicopee Falls, Mass. Guimond’s Drug 259 Exchange Street Chicopee, Mass. Francis G. Hafey, Funeral Home 494 Belmont Avenue Springfield, Mass. Hastings Stationers Market Square Chicopee, Mass. E. W. Hausamann — Photographer 286 Bridge Street Springfield, Mass. Hector’s Variety Store 20 Center Street Chicopee, Mass. F. W. Hemsworth, Wholesale Dealer 385 Liberty Street Springfield, Mass. Holbro Paint Company 1846 Flatbush Avenue Brooklyn, New York 163 Business Patrons Interstate Tire Store Cabot Street Holoyke, Mass. James P. Moriarty, Atty. 3 1 Elm Street Springfield, Mass. Janis Bake Shopj e 62 Springfield Street Chicopee, Mass. Muriels House of Fashion 1451 Mam Street Springfield, Mass. Jerry’s Esso Station 536 Exchange Street Chicopee Falls, Mass. Nagle Pharmacy 69 Sumner Avenue Springfield, Mass. Kamuda Photo’s 208 Main Street Indian Orchard, Mass. National Library Bindery Co. 271 Park Street West Springfield, Mass. Kelly-Fradet Lumber Company, Inc. 557 North Mam Street East Longmeadow, Mass. New England Church Supply 40 Vernon Street Springfield, Mass. Kendall Catering Co., Inc. 56 North Street Fitchburg, Mass. New Jefferson Bowling Alleys 255 North Street Pittsfield, Mass. In Memory of Maurice B. Landers Landers Glenwood Pharmacy Springfield, Mass. Normandeau Memorials Riverdale Road West Springfield, Mass. Lido Restaurant, Inc. 555 Worthington Street Springfield, Mass. Michael O’Brien Florist, Inc. West Street Lenox, Mass. Loevv’s Poli Theatre 194 Worthington Street Springfield, Mass. Daniel O’Connell’s Sons, Contractors Hampden Street Holoyke, Mass. Charles A. Ludden Co., Son 252 Springfield Street Chicopee, Mass. Edward F. O’Donnell Funeral Home, Inc. 494 Chestnut Street Springfield, Mass. C. J. Lynch, Florist 391 Armory Street Springfield, Mass. Oliver Auto Body Co., Inc. 1060 Bay Street Springfield, Mass. Mr. Mrs. William C. Lynch 76 Ridgeway Circle Springfield, Mass. One Hour Martinizing 6 Springfield Street Chicopee, Mass. S. Marks 8C Co. Inc., Paint Center Maple 6r’ Lyman Streets Holoyke, Mass. Othote Caterer 306’ 2 Belmont Avenue Springfield, Mass. Milton Bradley Company 74 Park Street Springfield, Mass. Oxford Country Club East Main Street Chicopee Falls, Mass. Mr. Sc Mrs. James Moran SC Family 1113 Suffield Street Agawam, Mass. Page Pharmacy 423 East Street Chicopee Falls, Mass. 164 Business Patrons Park Motel 557 Main Street West Springfield, Mass. Parkway Drive-In Boston Road North Wilbraham, Mass. Dr. Mrs. Frederick S. Ranno V.A. Hospital Northampton, Mass. River Lodge — Fine Food South Hadley, Mass. Robert Rollins Blazers, Inc. 832 Broadway New York 3, New York Roosevelt Food Store 20 Roosevelt Avenue Chicopee, Mass. Round Hill Drive-In 101 Plainfield Street Springfield, Mass. Rucki’s, Inc. 152 Center Street Chicopee, Mass. Rucki’s, Inc., of Holoyke 2 Cabot Street Holoyke, Mass. T. P. Sampson Co., Funeral Directors 730 State Street Springfield, Mass. Shaker Farms Country Club A. Zepko R. Papanti Westfield, Mass. Leo J. Simard, Jeweler 54 Suffolk Street Holoyke, Mass. Roger Smith Hotel Holoyke, Mass. Chester J. Sokolosky A. H. Rist Insurance Company Turners Falls, Mass. Richard Soulier Brimfield Oil Company Brimfield, Mass. Sports Haven Bowling Alleys 122 Columbus Avenue Pittsfield, Mass. Springfield Electric Co. 784 Bay Street Springfield, Mass. Springfield’s Student Prince 8C Fort Fort Street Springfield, Mass. Springfield Tobacco 8C Candy Company 1482 State Street Springfield, Mass. Raymond F. Sullivan, Insurance 1421 Main Street Springfield, Mass. The Great Atlantic 8C Pacific Tea Company 29 Worthington Street Springfield, Mass. Tonelli’s Restaurant Hosts — Lou Tonelli fsf Jack Kennedy Holoyke, Mass. R. D. Toomey Funeral Home 1065 Westfield Street West Springfield, Mass. Vadnais Lumber Company 1023 Page Boulevard Springfield, Mass. Valley Cinema, Inc. 958 State Street Springfield, Mass. Waltham Foundary Tom fef John Curtin Waltham, Mass. West End Pharmacy 218 Center Street Chicopee, Mass. Western Bronze Company 54 Western Avenue West Springfield, Mass. WWLP Television Channel 22 Springfield, Mass. “Y” Pharmacy 732 Chicopee Street Willimansett, Mass. 165 Index Abbiuso. .Audrey A.. 25, 05 Accorsi, Carolyn M . 81 Admimslration. 7 Aibertine. Gail B . 86 Allen. Joanne T.. 81 Alvar ’, Lorenzo. 65 Ambrose. Margaret C., 152 Ambrose. Maureen C.. ‘45, 64. 00, 153 .Anderson. Elizabeth !,. 50. 00 .Arcbey. Gladys M-. 53, 05 .Arcliey. Jeanne M-. 81 .Arrbey, Regina I... 100, 155 Art. 20 Ashe. Elizabeth A-. 05 Athletic Association, 47 Atkinson, leanne M . 58. 42. 45. 100. 154 .Austin, Elizabeth R-. 84 .Austin, Mary C.. 02 Auth. Alice K . 78 .Auth. Carroll .A . 78 Avault, Sandra E.. 82 Bablneau. Patricia J.. 04 Bagg. Elizabeth .A-. 82 Balakier. Katherine C .. SO Balcerzewski. F ' rances ,A.. 52. 85 Barr ' . Carol A., 40. 85 Basile, Natalie .A., 18. 10, 04 Begley. Margaret M-. 81 Belanger. Mar ' L . 44. 85 Bell. Susan M.. 02 Belsito, Elizabeth C.. 86 Benoit. ( atherine I-. 27. 81 Bercur ’. Maureen F ' . 47. lOl. 154 Bergeron. Anita M.. 10. 05 Betagh, .Anna C.. 85 Betagh, Beata F ' . 80 Binelte. luliette E.. 10,01 Biology. 20 Blessed lartin de Porres Soc. Cluh. 46 Blouin. Svlvia ,A,. 56. 71. 75. 101. 154 Bogacz. Mildred S. 21. 102 Bonneville. Gloria ,A.. 02 Borden. Brenrla A.. 40, 05 Borsari. Pauline M , 46, 84 Bory’sewick, Nancy . 54. 05 Bottone. ludy M.. 81 Boyle. Marry A.. 26 Bovnton, F ' .leanor M . 86 Bozek. Patricia A.. 87 Brennan. Mary ,A . 102. 155 Brisson. Eliz:abeth .A,. 02 Broderick. Barbara A . 86 Broflerick. Rosemaiy T., 52. 70. 105. 154 Brodeur. Carol A.. 86 Brown, .Anne M . 55. 05 Brown. ( arol .A.. 28. 47 Brown, Maureen R . 48. 87 Bninelle, loan A . 86 Bninet, Marilyn A . 52, 41, 04 Burke, Rev. Joseph ,A.. 17 Burns. Mary A . 67. 85 Burrows. Clare F.. 86 Bushika. Claire I .. 05 Butler. Rebecca C.. 05 Cabana, Patricia I-. 88 Calabrese. Marv I , (6. 71. 101, 1 11 Callah an. Margaret E.. 04 ( ameron. M ary I . 04 Campbell, lane I ' ... 55. 04 ( up and Cfoirn Sunday. 54 Carroll. Eileen M. 52. 58. 41. 42, 67. 75. 104. 154 C ' arroll. Marylou. 74, 104, 155 Casey. Barbara I., 88 ( avallini, Uiane S., 103 ( ' CD. 45 C ebnhi. I orraine A.. 105 Cerrone. Ilelen M.. 70 k hambers. Jean , 47, 56. 84 Chapdelaine. 1 herese I . 10, 40. 04 Chemistry, 21 ( hi( k, leanne I I . 70 ( hi(oine. Marie A. L.. 20, 50, 88 Chriscola. Joyce M., 58. 106, 155 Christmas, 60 61 Cianci, Linda J,. 50. 85 ( ieplinski. Irene FL, 84 Ciszek. Barbara A.. 57. 85. 86 Class Day. 75 C ' leary. Man, ' .Ann. 81 ( offey, Dorothy A.. 57. 106. 154 C olenian. loan M . 04 C ollins. Eileen M . 05 Commencement, 75 Community Concerts, 65 Conde. Celina R.. 88 Conlin. E ' .lizabeth M . 78 Connelly, Catherine A., 24. 81 Connors. ( lare F ' .. 52. 50, 71, 75, 01 Coon. M. Deborah. 52. 58. 75, 107, 154 Coppola. Judith L., 20. 85 Corcoran. Dorothy M.. 67. 107. 154 Crimmins. Geraldine M.. 88 Cronin. Barbara C., 81 Cronin. Carolanne M.. 50, 80 C ' roughwell. Jar jueline M . 46. 01 Crowley, lufletli 46. 108 ( ' ullen. Helen M . 27. IS. 108. 114 ( urnmings, Patrir ia M . 47. 55. 01 C unningham. Mary K . 52, 01 Curran. Guerdeline. 28 Daly. Rev Richard A . 60 Dajiton. F ayna I . 85 Dassatti. Ann M.. 80 Daur ' . Carol ,A . 100, 155 Deasy, Jane T . 80 Debating Clnh. 42 Dedication, 4 Dejnak, lean F . 47. 84 Delaney, loan F.. 55. 01 Denisevich. Mary C . 42. 78 Desilets, F ev. Donald A . 18 Devine. F ev. Thomas F.. 10 Did oima, Dorothy A.. 70 DrF onzo. lanel FV. 52. 47. 100, 155 DiGeronimo. Dorothy ,A . 70 Dignan. Marvalire, 78 DiMa ria, arnielina T . 80 Dtnsmore. Gail I. . 80 DiSciullo. Donna M , 40. 84 Dizek. Rosalie. I 10. 155 Donnellan. Kathleen M , 82 Donohue. Margaret F ' . 52, 42. 80 Donohue. Patricia, 78 Donovan. Joanne F.. 55. 72. 95 [)ooley. Dr. Thomas, 46 Douviile. Joyce A.. 52. 01. 05 DowtI. Gertrude E.. 55, 05 Doyle, Anita L., 89 Doyle. Mary F ., 88 Dragon. Frances L . 110, 154 Duggan. Virginia M., 46. 47, Ml, 155 Dumas. FJenriette, 89 Dunn. Mary L.. 25, 44, 05 Dupuis. Mary F.. 42. 00 Dutkiewicz. Carolyn F.. 28 Dwyer. Kathleen M , 55, 91 Dwyer. Margaret M.. 59, 89 Dyer. Patricia .A . 87 ' .ducation. 10. 27 F ' .iardi. Joan 1 . 78 Eichorn, Mary 87 Ellsasser. Richard. 70 Idmaia Dance, 58 E rnaia Staff. 58 E mscript Staff, 30 inghsh, 26 English Cluh. 45 F ahey. Margaret A.. 88 Family Life Cluh. 55 Farrell, Ann M., 87 Fashion Shotn, 66 Fernanrlez. Sarah M. Ill, 154 Ferrero. Julia R.. 84 Ferrindino. Marie C., 26. 40. 45, 75, 1 12. 155 Ferrone, Dan. 64 frinn. ludith A., 58. 112, 154 F ' iorenlino. M arjorie C.. 54. 89 F-itts. Mary E.. 115, 154 I itzgerald. Jill E., 115 I ' itzgerald. loan T.. 86 I itzgerald, Margaret E.. 49. 55 F ' itzgerald. Mary T., 55, 90 Flaherty. Mary E. Ill, 155 Flasinski. .Anna J.. 92 Fogarty. F atriria A . 45. 114. 155 F onteyn. Mary B.. 53. 40. 87 F ord. F osalie I.. 50. 46 F ' radet. Patricia M., 45. 60. 05 reshmen. 78 85 Freshmen Orientation, 52-55 Friel, Maureen E.. 26. 47, 115. 154 Fnilla. Marlene F .. 05 Furey. Mary Ann. 05 F ' urnian. (Jail A . 52. 70. 80 (Jaboury. leanne M.. 85 (ladaire. Dr. Charles FT, 20 ( allese, Diane M . 50. 05 Gammons. Rutli L., 78, 79 Gavigan. Graceann M . 18, to. 111 . Ill Ciavigan. Marv-marffarrl A.. 82 Crlina ' ;. loan A . 10. 71. 116. 114 GrI inas. loyc e M . 116, 154 Gelinas. Susan M . 42. 70. 81 Geoffrion. Katideen M , 82 Gilboy. C( uol A . 46. I 17. 154 ( ileason. Elva M . 45. 05 Cilrc C (ih. 40 Ciobeilie. lulianne M . 85 Goo( h. ludith A . 85 Gorezakoski. Genevieve. 117, 155 (•osselin, lulie A., 66 Grady. Barbara A., 56, 58, 75, 74, 1 18, 155 CJravel. Marie M,. 68. 118. 154 CJriffin. Carol M,. 36. 75. I 19. 154 Ciriflin. Kathleen M., 82 CiriFhn. Mary I,ou. 32, 48, 67. 88 CJriswold, Carolyn F " , 70 CJuil met. Diane M.. 27. 55. 45 Mabib. David. 46 Malladay, Santlra J., 80 Flanimond, Mary E., 53. 91 Flarbrecht, Ewan. 65 Harris, Libbie A., 32, 62. 95 Hart. F atricia A., 70, 81 Hart. Regina E.. 59. 88 Hayes. Mary M,, 71. 119, 153 Henneberry, Anne E.. 81 High School Day. 59 Hinkell. Mary E-. 95 His Ejccellency Christopher J. W eldon, 5. 75 His Holiness F ope John Will, 5 History, 22 Holfelder, Helene M . 50, 57, 87 flonor Societies. 36-57 Huot. Marie A.. 95 Hurley. Sheila A., 84 ladarola, Linda-Marie, 82 Interclass Plays. 67 IRC. 45 Jamal. Ahmad. 70 Johnson. Mary Ellen. 89 ournalism. 20 Joseph. Doro thy M., 120 Joseph, Madeline M.. 21. 37, 58. 66. 120. 154 Joy, Cecelia A., 18. 121, 154 Joyce, Cecelia E.. 90 Julian, Mary I., 25. 75. 121. 154 funiors. 00-95 unior We li End. 62-65 Kapinos, Dolores J-. 85 Kasper, lean A.. 78 Kasuba, lean C . 50. 122, 155 Keefe. Mary L,. 80 Keenan. Rev. Alan. 64 Kellihcr, Janet M-. 55. 78 Kelly, Mary A.. 50. 00 Kelly. F osenmry A . 80 Kern, Karen L.. 26. 81 Kirby, F ' .lizabeth I , 80 Knickerbocker Players. 65 Kobark. Anne T-. 45. 82 Kolano, F atricia. 88 Kolano TFieresa FI . 81 Koonz. Wginia M . 52, 82 Kor toski, Carol A., 50. 122. 154 Kuehlen, Dorothea F... 24 f.a Corte Castedana, 44 F I ' erriere. Mildred M . 02 I iFond. Marion T,. 02 Lambert, ludith A-. 48. 88 I anders. Barbara A-. 28. 85 l-andiy. Carol A.. 26, 85 Ijine. Barliarn. 2 1 . 74. 125. 155 fxinguages, 24 I.arkin. loan ,A , 80 I,a elle. Anne F . 05 Fjivelle, ludith A , 80 166 Index Lavallee, Linda 1., 21. 57, 74, 123, 154 Lavin. Patricia A.. 80 Lawson, Eileen M.. 86 Leary, Mary A.. 67, 83 Le dercle Francois. 44 Lecture Series, 64 Library. 28 Lincoln. Teresa B.. 25. 41 Lines. Patricia E., 85 Liturgy. 35 Liucci, Mary L.. 32, 86 Liifing Rosary, 68-69 Locale. 8- 1 3 Lonergan, Anna C., 82 Lourenco, Filomena V.. 87 Lucas, Coralie A.. 66. 124. 154 Lussier. Anita M.. 27, 44, 61, 124, 155 Lynch. Christine M., 78 Lynch, Lois C.. 89 Lynch. Margaret A.. 78 Lynch, Mary Ann C., 29, 45, 83 Lynch. Mary Ellen, 93 Lynch. Mary J.. 23, 125, 155 Macary. Marsha A., 33, 49, 75, 125, 155 Mackie, Ellen P., 60 Ma gee, Elizabeth A., 35. 39 Mahoney, Kathleen M.. 92 Malbocuf, Ann K., 81 Mallory, Mary Ell en, 61 , 126, 1 55 Manning. Nancy E., 48, 73. 74, 126, 154 Marceau, Judith A., 48. 86 Marieb, Joyce M.. 32. 34, 39, 67, 95 Martin. Mary C.. 25 Mary s Day 72 Malbemalics, 22 Maybury, Margaret C.. 32, 37, 38, 73, 74. 98. 127. 155 Nleagher, Anne M,. 29, 39, 84 Mechinko. Edith F., 83 Menin. Livia. 90 Messier. Maureen P . 127, 155 Meunier. Lorraine E., 89 Meunier, Louise R.. 81 Miiko, Jacquelaine, 49, 60. 128, 154 Millea, Mary E., 152 Millette, Carol A., 88 Ntillin, Donna M.. 90 Mirto, Nancy A., 73. 61, 85 Molloy, Alice P.. 46, 88 Molnar. Dr. Thomas. 64 Monaghan. Anne F.. 87 Monsignor Doyle Science Gluh. 46 Montagna. Irene L., 128, 155 Moore, Mary Jane K., 43, 78 Moquin, Priscilla L.. 89 Morelli. Lois A., 85 Morgan, Anne C.. 47, 91 Moriarty. Maureen C., 84 Morrison. Jill L., 78 Morrissey. Dora M.. 48. 53. 95 Morrissey. Jane F., 85 Mortellite. Rita Ann T., 44, 60. 129, 155 Moruzzi, Theresa P . 47. 129. 155 Murphy. Carolyn W ' ., 85 Murphy. Kathleen A.. 49, 80 Murphy. Mary E.. 32. 49. 130, 155 Musante, Susan J., 55. 95 Music. 29 McCarthy. Barbara J,. 23. 48. 130, 155 McCarthy. Mary E-. 32. 34, 38, 131. 154 McCarthy, Sheila E., 48, 67, 95 McCarthy. Sondra M.. 83 McCool, Maureen E., 86 McCormick, Sally A., 94 McDonald, Maureen C., 92 McDonough. Mary T., 131. 154 McDowell, W ' allace A., 83 McGovern, Constance M.. 38. 132, 155 McKenna, Carol K.. 18. 44, 67, 98, 132, 154 NlcLaughlin. Joan E.. 19, 49. 54. 92 McLaughlin, Marguerite M.. 60, 73. 133, 154 McLean, Margaret J.. 52, 48. 91 McMahon. Jane M., 80 McMahon. Joan M.. 35, 90 McMahon. Mary E.. 81 McQuaid. Ann E.. 32. 63. 133 Najimy, Vivien A.. 80 Nascembeni. Faith L.. 81 Newland. Mary Reed, 35 Newman, Diane M., 38, 134, 155 NFCCS. 34 NSA. 34 O ' Brien. Mary A.. 23. 40. 48. 60, 73. 134, 155 O Connor. Carolyn M . 33. 54. 135, 154 O Connor, Evadine K.. 39. 89 O ' Connor. Kathleen, 29. 81 O Connor. Rev. Vincent M., 19 O Donnell, Nancy E., 54. 84 O Flynn, Audrey L., 45. 54. 58. 135, 154 O Flynn, Eileen G., 39, 4 1 , 86 Ogonowski. Theresa M.. 54. 136 O ' FIara. F atricia A.. 39, 84 O Herron, Robert I.. 21 O Keefe, Maureen M., 54, 136. 155 O Leary. I ouise C., 32, 48, 98, 137, 155 O Neil. Maureen R., 33, 40, 54. 72. 137. 154 O Neill, Patricia A.. 13, 138. 155 O Reilly, Cecile M., 29, 39. 87 Ormond. Catherine M., 78 O Shaughnessy. Ann M., 34. 42, 88 Ouellette, Carol, 91 Ouellette, Nancy A., 73, 138 Owens, Ruth M., 81 Paquette, Louise L.. 78 Parent-Daughter Day, 71 Pelland, Patricia A., 44. 68. 139, 154 Pelletier. Lorraine M., 61, 139, 154 Pell izzaro, Jean E., 80 Perosino. Joyce L., 140 Perrault, Janice C.. 78 Perrault, Lillian M . 32, 39. 85, 89 Perry, Patricia L., 35. 46. 59, 91 Peters, Diane G.. 17, 27, 83 Phel an, Marilyn C.. 90 Philosophy. 18 Philpott. Alice B,. 78 Physical Education. 28 Physics. 27 Pierce. Rev. Thomas B.. 17. 54 Plante. Wronique A.. 67. 89 Poliwczak, Charlene G., 81 f- ouech, Jeanne T., 85 Powers, Mary B., 39, 44. 87 Powers, F ev, Richard J.. 64 Pradella, Janet B,. 140, 154 Praetz. Mary G., 32. 34. 39. 95 Pratt, Mariam V., 82 F rivitera, Mary J.. 23, 60. 141. 154 Quinn. Katharine M., 80 Quintal. Irene J.. 83 Quirk, Roberta N.. 41. 48, 86 Ranno, Frances J., 80 Raucci, Marie S., 85 Raymond. Joanne M.. 81 Ready, Sylvia A.. 25, 95 Reagan. Jane P., 80 Regan. Mary C.. 95 Reilly, Mary E., 88 Religion. 17 Retreat, 68-69 Richards, Joyce C., 82 Riley. Joanne M., 54 Ring Night, 55 F iordan. Judith E.. 38, 141. 155 Roy. Kathleen M-, 25, 45 F ucki. Geraldine L.. 142. 155 Rura, Joanne M.. 42. 80 Rush. Margaret H., 39. 84 Sadowsky. Agnes E.. 60. 142, 155 Sartori. Mabel T., 83 Srannell. Mary A., 143.155 Senior Ball. 74 Se nior Class. 154-155 Sesia, Ellen A.. 49, 95 Shannon. Carol A., 23, 46, 60. 143, 154 Shannon. Olivia A.. 74. 144, 154 Shaw, Sandra L.. 34. 39. 43. 67, 95 Shea. Mary A,, 41. 80 Sheehy, M, Jill, 32. 38. 73. 98. 144. 154 Sheppard. Eleanor J., 80 Shumski. Roberta C.. 21. 145, 154 Sinkowski, Mary L.. 55, 93 Sister Anna Cecilia. 23 Sister Carmella Marie. 20 Sister Florence Joseph. 28 Sister F’ ranees Elizabeth. 152 Sister Frances Mary. 152 Sister Helen Clare. 7, 25. 34 Sister Helen Joseph. 7, 52 Sister Ignatius Loyola, 26 Sister l-awrence Marie, 29 Sister Mary Chrysostom. 27 Sister Mary Oswald. 23 Sister Rose Dolores. 29 Sister Rose William, 6, 24 Sister Teresa Daniel. 28 Sittard, Julie ' T.. 78 Slattery, Jane M.. 20. 32. 85 Smith. Agnes M.. 49. 86 Smith, Atty. Kent. 35 Smith, Jacqueline M . 44. 62, 91 Smith. Nancy E., 54. 87 Soda Worh. 19 Sodo ogy, 22 Sodality, 33 Sokolosky. Ann M., 35, 38. 145. 154 Sokolowski, Barbara W.. 83 Sop iomores, 84-89 Soph Sho 56-57 Spagnolo, Rev. Nicholas J , 68 Speda Graduotes, 1 52 Speec i. 28 Spiewak, Marion E.. 91 Spring. Eleanor M., 78 Stafford. Rev. Robert H., 18 Stagnaro, Judith A.. 32, 33, 38, 41,61. 72. 146. 155 Stamant. Elizabeth L.. 23. 146, 155 Stefanik, Stephanie M.. 93 Stickney, Doris A.. 80 Stroiney, Carol A., 42, 85 Student Government. 32 Sullivan, Ellen M., 39, 87 Sullivan. Maureen T.. 35. 147, 154 Sweeney, Bettyanne, 88 Sweeney, Marian. 28 Swords, Kathleen M., 41. 147, 155 Szetela. Ann T., 82 Talbot. Joan M., 54, 87 Tallarico. Elizabeth M.. 78 Taylor, Kathryn A., 47 Templeton. Alec, 65 Thayer, Carol A., 61. 80 Thompson. Patrida G-. 39. 87 Thorne, Beverly A., 42, 67, 84 Tierney, Karen M., 148, 155 Tieuli. Catherine A.. 33. 49. 60, 148, 154 Toomey, Alice E., 94 Toomey. Margaret E.. 149, 155 Topor, Joan C.. 93 Topor, Mary A., 25 Tourmaiine Sta . 59 Toun ille, Clarence J . 20 Trzeinka, Barbara J., 24. 61, 81 Turner, Barbara M., 23, 149, 155 LHanov, Dr, Barry. 64 Dndergraduatc Clubs, 48-49 Valego, Mary, 150. 154 Verdeoro, 41 Viau. Rev, Roger L.. 18 Villares. Sonia I.. 55. 42, 45, 95 Vinceletle. Alice A,. 80 Vinisko, Theresa M , 60, 150, 155 W alker. Anne, 94 Welch, Ethel M., 55. 81 Weldon. Kathleen G., 91 WTite, Patricia M.. 39, 43. 56. 66, 85 Williams. Mary T., 61, 86 Wilson, Phyllis J , 82 Wolos. Patricia A,, 43, 81 Worthley. Kathleen A. E,. 45. 90 Wright. Marcia D.. 74. 151, 154 Wright. Margaret P.. 78 Wynn, Mary F . 21, 92 Yerick, Margaret K-, 39, 49. 95 Young. Carol. 19, 93 Young. Marguerite M.. 58, 151 Zdon, Jean M . 13. 92 Zysk, Ann E., 80 167 Dear Reader: We too have come to the end of a beginning. Endless planning, interminable hours, and united co-operation of many for one cause have brought to a finish this Elmata, and with this finality the memories of our last year at the Elms have been captured forever. At first our task seemed insurmountable, for we had no idea of the help we would receive from people who took such an interest in us and to whom we are most grateful. Pleasant surroundings always add to the success of any undertaking, and our attractive newly painted Elmata Room with its new furnishings and ready supplies was no exception. For this we express appreciation to the Administration, to Mr. William Maybury, to Mr. Edward Cullen, to Mr. John Besiak, and to the Broadway Office Supply. For moral support we turned to the faculty and student body, but especially to our Senior sisters; and we were not disappointed. We are grateful to them for their unfailing co-operation in the taking of pictures and their support of Elmata functions. The Seniors especially came to our assistance with financial support, by a very successful Elmata Dance, a profitable Fashion Show, a hundred percent Honorary Patron list, and a generous Business Patron list. We ask you to read this list of our supporters carefully and, if possible, to give them your support. Without the excellent co-operation of our publisher and photographers, this yearbook could not have been completed. To Mr. John C. Ursprung, Jr., executive vice-president of the William T. Cooke Co., we express sincere thanks for his helpful suggestions and untiring patience. We look on him not only as a business associate but also as a friend, a “Rock of Gibraltar” through everything. And what would tlae yearbook be without fine pictures? We are grateful to the Hausamann Studio for their co-operation and patience with extra demands, last minute calls, and retakes. Much of our worry was also eliminated by a closely united, hard-working, generous staff. To our art, photography, business, and associate editors and to our typist we express our thanks for their fine spirit of co-operation and for the many extra hours they spent on the 1960 Elmata. And now our final word of gratitude is to our advisor. Sister Ignatius Loyola. Through it all, the joy and tlie anxiety. Sister advised, consoled, and helped us along to the final product. To her we owe our deepest debt of gratitude. Yes, this is the end of the beginning. It is your Elmata, Seniors, a record of your last year at the College of Our Lady of the Elms, of its work and activities, joys and pleasures. We hope it will mean as much to you who read it as it does to us who planned and edited it. Sincerely, Barbara Gicady and Margaret Maybury Co-Editors Editor Ex-Officio Jill Sheehy Art Editor Madeline Joseph T ypist Joyce Chriscola Photography Editors Helen Cullen Diane Newman Busitiess Managers Graceann Gavigan Judith Riordan Mary Ellen McCarthy Constance McGovern Jeanne Atkinson Eileen Carroll Ann Sokolosky Associate Editors Deboralr Coon Judith Finn Judith Stagnaro


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