Elmhurst College - Elms Yearbook (Elmhurst, IL)

 - Class of 1942

Page 1 of 120

 

Elmhurst College - Elms Yearbook (Elmhurst, IL) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 120 of the 1942 volume:

I Digitized by tine Internet Arcinive in 2015 Inttps : arcli i ve . org detai Is 1 942el ms 1 942clas THf lOUIffi Of OLD mOlO . . . in the center of things at Elmhurst College, looks down on the divergent activities of classmates and faculty . . . Robert Kross .... Editor Earl Buck ... Business Manager C. O. Egner . Faculty Adviser . . . the campus biography of Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, Illinois is brought to you in this, the twenty-burth volume, via camera and pen plus an occasional injected thought. Presented by the Student Union, it serves the purpose of recording and reflecting life at Elmhurst during the year. Irion Hall forms appropriate background for spring scene ill ' ' " ' a 1 0 siuoyiiiG B " oiysT " Lab, library, orclass, studying is unavoid- able. But who careS especially if you ' re a botany student and on one of thiose jaunts throughi the park? Dreamers in the labs? There aren ' t many of these . . . a slip of the scalpel may ruin a specimen, while a wrong mixture might put Elmhurst off the mop. Although the mention of studying brings loud laments and tragic glances, only a ew find It too great a price to pay for the value received. Top — Park Escapade. . . . Mrs. Nilsson and botany class. Middle - night. Bottom — Prof. Kalm- bach and Dilly . . . something ' s cooking ;i " Mlliin,,uin,iM. Main floor of Memorial Li- brary - - - intellectual center. For reference work the library is the most popular place on the campuS whether this work is in the form of studying or " rendezvousing " . Day and night, students surge in and out. flCIIVITIfS - PIlliCTICflL fXPtRlfnCt So what do we do when we ' re not in class? Study, yes, but definitely not to the exclusion of all else. Thespian, journalist, linguist, vocal virtuoso and so on down the line can, and usually do, find extra-curricular activities to keep their time well occupied In range, these activities extend from such impromptu but rare affairs as this year s hHome- coming victory strike all the way to the theological endeavors of the pre-minister group- sociny ■ fOfiiniiL ... infoenifli Left — Invitation to the dance . . . Diane and Al. Right — Buck, Dr Sander, and Parsons . . . bull session. Bottom — Cokes and after-class chatter. Away from the grind and humdrum of studies casual cokes, student-faculty bull sessions, and above all those formal dances, when music and manners are at their best . . . Alumnus Len Wolf presents trophy to Mauch, repeat winner of the annual hlomecoming Mile. IT ' S fl TliflDITIOn AT tLfnPfiST When the gossamer web of time enfolds one ' s college days and mokes of them a continuous round of hilarity, certain events out-shine all others. All of the unpleasantness of college routine slips away from the retrospective alumnus, and he returns to the campus eager to take part in the main events at the scene of his former triumphs. Faces, courses, and activities may change. But there is consolation in finding that his favorite traditions are still maintained. Examples? Prexy ' s occasional teas ... the beaming host and hostess ... the groaning board ... the profs outstuffing the students. And the hHomecoming gome when the stands are packed with nostalgic alumni . . .the traditional mile run between halves, the exuberant crowd cheering the exhausted winner. Or in more serious mo- ments, the Chapel Choir at its best with a hHille arrangement . . . with the student body strangely solemn and attentive . . . Left — Daily pilgrimage to chapel services on exodus from the worldly. Right — Tea time at the Lehmonn s. " fIGHT Ttam fIGHT 11 A well integrated team, a competent coach, and a co- operative crowd plus a little luck and you have something. We had something in ' 4l- ' 42. W in all the games? No, but hit a good percentage. . . played well-fought battles. Pep squad . . . inciters of triumph. Add football, basketball, baseball, track, tennis, golf and table tennis and you have a typical college athletic program. Athletics at Elmhurst build bodies physically and tend to relax mental strain of student life. School spirit serves as the final ingredient in a successful intra and intercollegiate athletic program. From the gym class " wonder " to the grid or track star there ' s a place for everybody . . . and the vv ise ones take advantage of that fact. Common sense, and lately notional defense, prove the positive value of sports. December 4, 1871, Elmhurst College opened its doors. Fourteen students, a single frame building, and Inspector Carl Kronz formed the nucleus. Proseminar at First, Elmhurst was in reality only a high school. In the year 1923, the school was accredited as a junior college. The agitation for a four year liberal arts college began to gain mo- mentum and in April, 1933, the North Central Association accredited us as such. Mean- while a great event hod occurred. September, 1930, coeducation invaded Elmhurst. Elmhurst today can show an enrollment of over 350 students with coeds numbering a little over one-third, and boasts a beautiful campus with 14 buildings to its credit. PfifVKUJ Of fLUlHOfiST ' S DlflfflOOD JOBILtf Someday, when alumni return to Elmhurst, it may be the campus as pictured below that will greet them. Growth continues even now despite momentary wartime setbacks. Seemingly idealistic dreams of the founders and their suc- cessors will soon become fact. Five years from now, the campus is scheduled to make significant changes in appearance. Construction of a stu- dent union building, a fine arts building, a well-equipped science center and a more adequate chapel, plus improved library facilities and the completion of the swimming pool are all on the program. Elmhurst College . . . futurama style. Struggle, struggle, toil and trouble We don ' t work ' cause life ' s a bubble. u . Senior class officers — President Volbrecht Vice-president Marsh Secretary Maier Treasurer Kruse With all the pomp and ceremony which accompanies graduations, an- other senior class is launched into a chaotic world. The problems ahead are many including adjustment to life in a wartime society. But education has pre- pared for such an acid test. Graduates of Elmhurst are trained for medical, business and teaching positions in the present order of things. They are schooled in psychology, history and so- ciology and ready to plan for the inevit- able peace. They have learned to lead and to follow when the occasion de- mands. They are as adequate to the situation as education can make them. War or peace, we predict great things for the Class of ' 42. FRESHMEN Officers — President Dagley, Secretary Locke, Vice-president Herrmann, Treasurer Went- zel. The college melting pot depends upon assorted ingredients for spice and va- riety. The new freshman has much to offer. He has vitality, unweakened by tests, lectures, and college report cards. He has enthusiasm undampened by the setbacks which the old guard has met. Above all, he has a long way to go and a lot of fun ahead. SOPHOMORES Officers — President Clevenger, Vice-presi- dent Bickel, Secretary Ernst. The sophomore presents himself as a sadder, wiser individual. To such a melting pot he can contribute experi- ence. He has had just enough educa- tion to realize how much he doesn ' t know. JUNIORS Officers — President Schumacher, Treasurer Noffke, Secretary Zeiler, Vice-president Haefner, Advisor Young. The college junior finds himself in control of most campus activities. The world is now his oyster and he has his professors well doped out. And so to the seniors, a more or less finished edu- cational product. . . . m U If ' 42 « - Selma Bartels Theresa Baumann Isabella Bennett Magdalene Berger Raymond Bizer Peter Blau Erna Bock Leia Bremer Earl Buck Marjorie Davidson Lois Deiters James Doellefeld Leonard Dohrmann William Eagan Barbara Fawcett SENIORS Selma Barfels . . . poised and capable in any situation . . . elected secretary then vice- president of Goethe Verein . . . attained honor roll on several occasions . . . worked way through college with comparative ease . . . tutored in German . . . played organ in between times . . . divides leisure among literature, music, and home ec activities . . . plans tri-linguist teaching in English, French and German. Tess Baumann . . . intellectual with a flair for the risque . . . avocation provoking discussions of the vio- lent sort . . . women ' s vice-president of Stu- dent Union this year, secretary last . . . col- lected assorted scholarships through the years . . . managed to find time to be an Elm Bark editor with ideas . . . has her eye on graduate work in biology. Isabelle Ben- nett . . . assistant business manager of Theatre . . . won four-year Theatre award . . . acquired Women ' s Union award for steady attendance . . . earned intra-mural athletic letter . . . French Club treasurer junior year . . . Elm Bark reporter . . . extra- class activities — tutoring, collecting poetry, athletics, and dramatic enterprise . . . has s ' ncere pedagogical aspirations. Magdalene Berger . . . president of Irion Hall . . . effi- cient in all she attempts . . . Women ' s Union social chairman . . . member of Goethe Verein . . . brain in math . . . . . . President of F. A. L. C. . . . made the honor roll two years . . . delights her friends with her elfish sense of humor . . . in the future plans to teach in a high school. Raymond Bizer . . . two years on the base- ball diamond won Ray his letter . . . varied musical interests brought him renown . . . sang with Glee Club and Chapel Choir . . . awarded sweater for Band activities . . . has a yen to do something in amateur photog- raphy . . . studies for the ministry loom in the very near future. Peter M. Blau ... a sentimentalist with brains . . . psychology sleuth . . . yearns for discussion of Freud and other controversial topics . . . wrote individualistic column ' Trom the Margin " in Elm Bark . . . participated in Children ' s Theatre work . . . contributed liberally to all campus journalism . . . we can see Peter as a writer after world conflict subsides. Erna Helene Bock . . . unobtrusively clever and consistently good natured . . . makes lasting friends everywhere . . . active Elm Bark aide de camp . . . intra mural letter winner . . . freshman class secretary . . . ditto Science and Math Clubs . . . writes poetry with T. S. Eliot flavor . . . reads and sews in leisure time . . . future will be in pedagogy. Leia B. Bremer . . , Murray State Teacher ' s College two years . . . indulged linguistic activities there . . . consistent honor roll member at Elmhurst . . . interested in activities of Women ' s Union and S. C. A. . . . a straight- forward girl, LeIa made many loyal friends . . . sociological bent may lead to a future in social service work. Earl Buck . . . advertis- ing manager of Elms in junior year and busi- ness manager in senior year . . . belonged to Pre-The Society . . . odd pipes and bright ties catch his eye . . . milk shakes are his favorite food . . . carefree manner hides his sincere and generous nature . . . sociology major with his future in the ministry. Mar- jorie Davidson . . . social activities at Elm- hurst would have suffered without " Davie " . . . received title of prom queen in ' 41 . . . served as chairman for the circus, the prom bid committee and style show publicity committee . . . Women ' s Union cabinet member . . . main outside interest is art . . . plans to teach after graduation. Lois Deiters . . . French Club prexy senior year . . . top- ped off three years of Glee Club as secretary- treasurer in junior year . . . honor student four semesters . . . reads, bowls, and swims in spare time . . . future plans indefinite . . . interested in library work but will probably settle down. James Milton Doellefeld . . . dual scholarship winner . . . hacked his way through college as Commons meat cutter . . . found time to be an intra-mural man- ager . . . entered into Goethe Verein activi- ties . . . made friends slowly but perma- nently . . . chose history as center of scho- lastic efforts . . . hopes to make his way as future minister. Leonard B. Dohrmann . . . entered from Dickenson State Teachers ' College in junior year . . . soon became ac- tive in Pre-The Society . . . served on S. C. A. cabinet this year . . . managed to be a stu- dent without grinding . . . likes orchestral music . . . especially enjoys private sessions with his trombone . . . future will be in the ministry with a sociological slant. William Eagan . . . agreeably frank and to the point . . . outside school activities left little time for campus affairs . . . liked discussions of world problems . . . interested in his history major . . . experimented in practice teach- ing at Hawthorne Junior High . . . probably in line for army . . . other plans indefinite. Barbara Fawcett . . . one of those women with vigor that people always write about . . . member champion basketball team soph year . . . alumni scholarship senior year . . . W. U. vice-president . . . Elm ' s mainstay three years . . . French Club treasurer . . . if she had been born 40 years ago, she would have been a woman suffragist you may be sure . . . remembered for her piquant humor. 21 SENIORS Lois Fluegge . . . ardent spectator sports woman . . . rooted at all baseball, basketball and football games . . . participated widely in sports . . . bowled consistently high scores . . . member of assorted committees, dance, circus, Homecoming, etc. . . . " E " Club auxiliary . . . dates and knits in spare moments . . . has quaint sense of humor . . . interested in library work as vocation . . . Herbert Fritzsche . . . chemistry major from Forest Park . . . main interests besides chem — music and a girl back home . . . earned super grades in science courses . . . belongs to Men ' s Glee Club, and Chapel Choir . . won admittance to University of Chicago Chapel Choir of as- sorted college men . . . found time for Mathematics and Science Clubs. Rob- ert Froeschner . . . spent his time in many various activi- ties . . . South Hall and S. C. A. presi- dent, S.U. vice-presi- dent, chapel chair- L man, and head of Pre-The Committee . . . biology department staff member . . . received three scholar- ships, two as ranking student . . . spent spare time studying hepetology and rearing his reptiles . . . added marriage to his many achievements . . . will enter the ministry. Armin Ceisler . . . cosmopolitan in his in- terests . . . went to three colleges in four years . . . won awards in track and gymnas- tics at Occidental College in Pasadena . . . enjoys teaching his Sunday School class . . . intends to do medical work in the slums after his seminary training . . . likes serious bull sessions, music and mechanics. Earl Gerfen . . . one of those genuine people . . . track captain senior year . . . vice-president Glee Club soph year . . . active " E " Club member . . . blithely bus-boyed his way through college . . . enthusiastic about music in general . . . likes to collect stamps in leftover moments . . . plans to do future track workouts with the army. Walter A. Coletz . . . four-letter man in football . . . captain in his senior year . . . Student Union athletic chairman and president of " E " Club . . . square shooter Coletz won himself a definite niche in the senior hall of fame . . . decided future for himself at end of first semester when he joined the U. S. Coast Guard. Harold C. Crunewald . . . honor roll student from Dayton, Ohio . . . indicated executive ability in many offices held . . . elected president of freshman class, presi- dent and business manager of Glee Club, freshman proctor of South Hall, and chair- man of Pre-The steering committee . . . won two basketball letters . . . garnered " E " Club membership ... did everything well that he did at all. Dorothy Halvorsen . . . North Park emigree . . . soon acclimated to local activities . . . exhibited extraordinary talents in Chapel Choir and Glee Club . . . became president of Glee Club senior year . . . sings for a hobby . . . office work holds future interest ... an efficiency expert who always has time to help out. Virginia Herz- ler . . well liked by all who know her . . . four year honor roll student . . . has made music her hobby as well as proposed voca- tion . . . accompanied Women ' s Glee Club senior year . . . served on Women ' s Union Cabinet two years . . . member of S. C. A. has ' angelled ' the women ' s tennis team as manager for three years. Marian Johnson . . . pleasant company at any time . . . prom queen attendant . , . secretary of F. A. L. C. . made the honor roll two consecutive years . . . has many friends because she never does any back-biting . . . college theatre member . . . " E " Club auxiliary . . . Women ' s Union publicity chairman in her junior year . . . likes bowling and California c limate. Paul Jordan . . . active in most intra-mural sports . . .prominent member of all the campus maintenance crews ... fa- miliar figure on the tractor, shoveling coal, directing traffic or moving chairs . . . head truck driver for three years . . . member of Goethe Verein . . . honor roll occasionally . . . noted for his ability to get things done . . . chooses radio for sideline. Hans Kalk- brenner . . . quiet and sincere in campus relationships . . . participated in varied ac- tivities of the Men ' s Glee Club . . . acquired friends through general cooperative attitude . . . German his scholastic specialty . . . pointed spare moments toward professional ■nterests . . . plans to keep up a long-estab- lished Kalkbrenner tradition in pursuing post grad theological studies. Harold Kamenz . . . socially conscious senior . . . interested in labor movements and social justice . . . held varied and assorted positions — president South Hall . . . Pre-The steering committee . . . Chapel chairman . . . mem- ber Student Union and S. C. A. cabinets . . . studies psychoanalysis and abnormal psych in between times ... an ideal pre-the with essential vitality, svmpathy, ability and amiability. Francis Karasek . . . unassum- ing genius . . . managed to win practically all available scholarships . . . quietly worked toward goal of graduate study at University 22 Lois Fluegge Herbert Fritzsche Robert Froeschner Armin Ceisler Earl Cerfen Walter Goletz Harold Crunewald Dorothy Halvorsen Virginia Herzler Marian Johnson Paul Jordan Hans Kalkbrenner Harold Kamenz Francis Karasek Norman Kehrii August Klu ge Robert Kross William Kruse Leiand Leahigh William Lithgow Hilda Lohans Lorraine Maier Ruth Marsh Delbert Meitz Dorothy Meredith John Meyer Gilbert McKinley Thelma Newgard Robert Nolte John Parsons Marcia Powell Jacqueline Propst Marian Ohrman Walter Rauh Donald Riechmann Walter Sandner SENIORS of Illinois . . . spends all leisure time trying to keep his Model A running sans rattles . . . not often on campus after classes, but well liked at rare reappearances. Norman Kehrii . . . Pre-The whose immediate goal is Eden Seminary . . . went through college the hard way — sweeping floors in South Hall . . . made philosophy his curricular interest . . . active participant in functions of S. C. A. . . . elected member of dormi tory council . . . energetic and capable in all he under- takes to do . . . unbothered by petty con- ventionalities. August Kluge ... a man with a scientific outlook on life . . . his chem short cuts even baffle the experts . . . one of those rare individuals who always have time to help out with campus activi- ties . . . spends most of his spare time work- ing .. . plans a future in chemistry unless Uncle Sam has other ideas. Robert Kross . . . absent-minded Elms editor . . . repeated term as French Club vice-president . . . ditto position as track manager . . . successfully managed publications in junior year . . . two year track team member made him " E " Club enrollee . . . photography fiend for campus publications and as hobby . . . music number two leisure activity . . . future plans — first navy . . . later commercial photography along advertising line. William Kruse . . . finance and athletics kept Bill well occupied . . . served as S. U. and senior class treasurer . . . Elm ' s business manager, student manager of employment bureau for two years, assistant in accounting courses . . . won two letters in basketball and three in baseball . . . baseball captain, member of " E " Club . . . will enter Naval Reserves then accounting. Leiand Leahigh (Jack) . . . easy going and amiable biology transfer from University of lllino ' s . . . major activities fall into two classifications ■ — dramatic enterprise and Rena Rodda . . participated frequently in College Theatre plays on and off stage . . . curricular science interests will broaden into pre-med work for future profession. William C. Lithgow . . . one of few fellows in on everything . . . freshman vice-president . . . Social Life committee member . . . prom chairman . . . mellow soloist with Glee Club, Quartette and Chapel Choir . . . honor roll off and on . . . swimming, dancing, and golf enthusiast . . . amiable and social-minded . . . future plans, Naval Reserve and post- war med studies. Hilda Lohans . . . consis- tent honor roll member . . . divided her time between the Elm Bark and Forum staffs . . . delved into social work with an eye to a future occupation . . . renowned for good sportsmanship on and off campus . . . ex- hibited executive ability as S. C. A. vice- prexy . . . Hilda ' s infectious laughter will long be remembered on the campus. Lor- raine Maier . . . unofficial coach, chief rooter and co-captain of the football team . . . enjoys collecting things — now it ' s dolls and plants . . . served as secretary of the junior and senior classes . . . choreographer for theatre productions and reviews . . . smooth coed . . . junior prom queen attendant . . . cheer leader . . . Women ' s Glee Club . . . " E " Club auxiliary. Ruth Marsh ... in and about most campus activities . . . Women ' s Union president . . . social life committee chairman . . . Elm ' s staff two years . . . vice- president senior class . . . chairman style show junior year . . . takes to music and knitting for leftover moments . . . peppy and resourceful on and off the job . . . fu- ture aspirations matrimonial. Del Meitz . . . won assorted letters in tennis, football, and track . . . tutored in Math for pleasure and profit . . . active in Science Club . . . member athletic committee . . . president newly-formed Math Club . . . likes sports as participant or coach ... as cadet teacher en- jovs eighth grade science classes . . . will follow aviation interests in Army Air Corps. Dorothy Meredith . . . restful type . . . varied campus interests . . . French club advocate . . . member Science Club . . . Homecoming Decorations chairman . . . divides spare mo- ments between traveling and musical in- terests . . . latest hobby, photography . . . plans to go into Social Service activities, office work or matrimony . . . won repute for ability to know when to stop talking. John Meyer . . . history major hailing from Oak Park . . . gravitated between North- western and Elmhurst . . . football manager at Northwestern for tw o years in reward for which he won his numerals . . . diligent stu- dent . . . quiet and unassuming with a pleas- ing personality . . . after the army he plans to take up law. Gilbert McKinley . . . trans- ferred from Drake after freshman year . . . outstanding athlete . . . mainstay of the foot- ball, basketball and track squads . . . president of the " E " Club in senior year . . . served as Elm Bark reporter and la- ter as Student Union Publications Chair- man . . . intends to make athletics his vocation after mid- shipman activities. Thelma Newgard . . . hails from Wilton Junction, Iowa . . . biology her curricular concern . . . ministered to sick as student 25 SENIORS nurse . . . found time for active partici- pation in Science Club activities . . . plays organ in idle moments . . . equable disposi- tion guarantees success in future plans . . . may go into army, later teach in hospital. Robert- Arthur Nolte . . . another natural minister . . . personality pleasant and mag- netic . . . made honor roll frequently . . . won scholarships two years . . . secretary- treasurer Glee Club soph year . . . secretary to S. C. A. junior year . . . Goethe Verein librarian . . . baseball manager . . . member defense council . . . classical music enthus- iast . . . made sociology his major in prepara- tion for later theological studies. Jack Par- sons . . . pre-lawyer with eyes on a govern- ment job . . . immediate plans also govern- mental in nature, V-7 that is . . . majored in economics . . . worked on Elm Bark adver- tising staff, later business-managed . . . likes active sports, especially baseball . . . indoor activities include cards, stamp collecting and history . . . has the oft-quoted seldom seen head for business. Marcia Powell . . . finds pleasure in tickling the ivories at frequent intervals . . . amuses herself academically with history activities . . . supported Ger- man Club functions with interest and vital- ity .. . known as one of those well-balanced personalities . . . plans for a white collar girl future in a modern office . Jacqueline Marion Propst . . . athletics " Jacque ' s " main interest . . . played tennis three years — obtained her letter and also the cap- taincy . . . includes bowling and ice-skating among hobbies . . . women ' s sport writer for the Bark . . . French Club member two years . . . served on Defense Council . . . worked at Employment Bureau . . . will teach Eng- lish and physical ed. Marion Ohrman . . . biology major . . . hard-working little girl . . . radiates sunshine and pep wherever she is . . . " holds her own " in any discussion . . . the toss of her head, her quick step, and her frankness will not be soon forgotten . . . unselfishness and loyalty has made her dear to those who know her . . . will enter nurses ' training in the fall. Walter Rauh . . . stand- by of the track team . . . set a record for javelin throw which still stands . . . member of S. C. A. cabinet and Pre-The society . . . sang in Chapel Choir and Glee Club . . . reads extensively . . . makes a hobby of music of all kinds . . . plans to enter the ministry after his army service. DonaH A. Riechmann . . . his tenor voice identified with Chapel Choir and Glee Club . . . pet hate is women who take him too seriously . . . I ' kes legitimate plavs . . . writes Doetry . . . collects classical records . . . made the honor roll one year, then relaxed . . . served on Elm Bark staff . . . belonged to Goethe Verein . . . after his army stint plans to teach history. Walter Sandner . . . boogie-woogie chemist . . . has his own band a la Duchin . . . composed the music for two homecoming revues . . . fasci- nated by amateur radio and photography . . . " E " Club member . . . four year honor roll . . . belonged to Science and Math Clubs . . . Chapel Choir tenor . . . Glee Club ac- companist . . . plans to do research or grad- uate work in chemistry. Myron Schmitt . . . two year College Theatre vice-president . . . played football as freshman, managed team senior year . . . participated in football and Softball intra- murals . . . won scholarship . . . majored in soc. . . . primarily interested in history of labor plus current problems . . . gained friends through pleasant, sincere disposi- tion . . . has an eye on Eden for theological studies. Jim Schram . . . gifted with an ex- cellent voice . . . Glee Club . . . College quar- tet . . . self-styled ' heavy built ' student . . . College Theatre vice-president . . . manager of the ' 41 - ' 42 basketball team . . . Elm Bark Gezzoo for two years . . . chairmaned the year ' s Homecoming Revue and parade . . . his future is in fhe hands of Uncle Sam. ' Clarence Schweer. . . econ major with a real eye for business . . . spent hours be- tween classes on the tennis courts and in Y Room . . . won many intercollegiate tennis matches . . . won just as many pri- vate card games . . . earned tennis squad captaincy . . . known as a good loser and a cagey winner in any activity. James Simon- son . . . campus comedian . . . addicted to cars, planes, sports, name bands and blondes . . . managed to make honor roll when he felt the urge . . . circulated in track, Elm Bark, and French Club activities . . . invar- iably furnished right remark at the right moment . . . Jim ' s natural adaptability will aid him in army and later personnel work. Blaine Spies . . . one of our most likable fel- lows . . . Pre-The student . . . S. C. A. mem- ber . . . pastime in Senior Lodge was playing cards . . . earned nearly all of his funds for school . . . German major . . . never missed a campus baseball game . . . loved a friendly tete-a-tete . . . left for home, Belleville, Illi- nois, in January . Ivan Sparling . . . student mainstay of dramatics at Elmhurst , . . thes- pian crews worked to capacity under his able leadership . , . College Theatre president Conlimietl on page 96 26 Myron Schmitt James Schram Clarence Schweer James Simonson Blaine Spies Ivan Sparling Elmer Stock Ann Thompsen Arthur Van Camp Jack Van Voorst Edith Vogt Ervin Volbrecht Paul Vonder Ohe Raymond Voss Gilbert V awak Walter Westermann Harry U illman Dale V olfgram u Melvin Abele Lowden, Iowa Anthony Ancona Melrose Park, III. John Barcy Elmhurst, 1 Theodore Braun Webster Groves, Mo. Ruth Brophy Elmhurst, III. William Conley - Oak Park, III. Herbert Hillebrand Napoleon, Mo. Helen Hinrichs Elkhorn, Wis. Robert Huboi Elmhurst, III. Betty Jans Detroit, Mich. Eugene Kalkbrenner Palatine, III. Paul Kehle Monroe, Wis. Anna Marie Leinberger Dunkirk, N. Y. Jerry Lestak Hinsdale, III. Alex Lutzow Chicago, III. Henrietta Maas Chicago, III. Theodore Mauch New Buffalo, Mich. Richard Mernitz Chicago Heights, 28 MM i , Ik ■ ' % • Vincent DeRose Melrose Park, 111. Eugene Dillenbeck Chicago, III. Robert Keller Lombard, III. Cora Klick Hermann, Mo. Russell Mueller Iving, III. Henry Noffke Speedway, Ind. Philip Fischer Wauwatosa, Wis. Arnold Ceske Oconto Falls, Wis. Dorothy Klick Columbus, Ohio Theodore Klose Villa Park, III. Frederick Piepenbrok Deerfield, III. Lloyd Pfautsch Washington, Mo. Felix Haefner Elmhurst, III. Erma Jrne Hahn Mishawaka, Ind. Eugene Koenig Elmhurst, III. William Lansing Oak Park, III. Phyllis Rachau Elmhurst, III. Marion Ramien Kankakee, III. 29 u S8 Edith Ratzer Oak Park, III. Rena Rodda Frostburg, Md. Ernst Saeuberlich Augusta. Mo. Frederick Schumacher Huntingburg, Ind. Warren Schleinzer Elmhurst, III. Diane Seeberger LaPointe, Wis. Wanda Sines Lombard, III. Aria Mae Taylor Petersburg, III. Lucille Thulis Elmhurst, 111. Frederick Traut Baltimore, Md. Odette Vahrenwald Maywood, III. Betty Whitaker Oak Park, 111. Howard Varney Oak Park, 111, Wilbert Wobus Manchester, Mo. Helen Zeiler St. Louis, Mo. 30 SiiilE II Social climax of the Elm- hurst season is the junior prom. Number one deb and prom queen is elected from a roster of junior girls and presented to the student body with appropriate cere- mony. This year Betty Jans captured the crown from an especially attractive field of fellow juniors. Diane See- berger and Dorothy Klick were next in the line-up of the beauty derby and won positions as attendants to the queen. Total combina- tion of scene, setting and celebrities made this prom a better-than-ever formal affair. Juanita Adams C. W. Ahlf Robert Albrecht Nelson Andres Isabella Arft Thomas AuBuchon Betty J. Bache Dorothy Barkau Herbert Beecken Eugene Bickel Grace Bockoven Henry Centner Robert Clevenger Albert E. Cohen Gale Copping Barbara Cross Vernon Deiters Warren Dolby Fowler Duckworth Charles Duffy Ruth Ernst Merlynn Fessler Blossom Fletcher Lee Froetscher if ' U L Janet Clidden Mary Clidden James Cruse Clifton Harm Stewart Hawthorne Herman Helfrich Albert Hilberg Jody Hinckley Robert Hunt Robert Huntsha Paul Irion Ralph Jans Lorraine Johns Darlaine Jones Thomas Justie Kurt Kalkbrenner Marie Klein Jerome Klose Esther Koenig Robert Kraatz Rosemary Kross Jack Laning June Lensing John Lichtenheld mmmi Donald Marsh Paul Meyer Maxine Miller Ralph Mochel Stuart Moureau Edith Muecke Carlotta Mueller Cordon McCarrell Helen Neumann Harold Newman William North Betty Ormsbee Mary Ormsbee Harry Papadakis Arthur Papenmeier Dean Plassmann William Plesscher Anna Mae Poile John Popp James Postula Otto Press Harriet Reich Herbert Reichert Charles Rockey Jean Rose P ' ' f ' ' Se- lf 41-% w LI p ST .iiMIJHi f. ' mf- M SIPIIIIfiES John Schnackenberg Henry Schroerluke Jeanne Scott Willis Scott Patricia Sedgwick Everett Seegers Warren Seyfert Kenneth Shallcross Raymond Shallcross William Shattuck Donald Sickbert Daniel Simmons Ruth Smith Stephen Soltes Frederick Steinhebel Lewis Stoerker Maynard Strothmann Harvey Thieike Edward Vertovec Gilbert Vetter Kathleen Victorine Virginia Warner Mary Louise Wegner Marshall West George Winkley Robert Abbott Gudrun Andres Eva Balla Irene Barcy Charles Allen Owen Baer James Bamberger .Mae Bartsch John Baumann Allan Bennett Margaret Benson Beverly BaShore Merle Beach Cayle Benson Robert Bizer Virginia Blomberg Ruthe Brunton Helen Chandler Arthur Block Louis Bosworth Preston Bullard Donald Clark Joel Croll Patricia Dagley Gregory Dillon Fern Cluever Harry Dagley Martin Dawson Mary Louise Engel 35 CiflSS If 1H3 Dwayne Evenson Robert Fowler Robert Calbraith Eleanor Croggel Frank Floyd Norman Frega Orville Cregson Robert Crosrenaud Maurine Halbe Gregg Haney Robert Hermann Steven Cyure Elizabeth Hammond Mary Ann Harkins Dorothy Herrmann William Homeister Darline Howell Russell Jensen Evelyn Hodges Harry Horst Kay Jennings Alfred Johanningsmeier Roy Johnson Charles Keller Raymond King Robert Johnson Richard Karasek Phyllis Kelley Gertrude Kircher 37 Arthur Koch William Koshewa Louis Lammers Armin Limper William Koehler Theresa Kruse Leon Le Beau Eleanor Lithgow Florence Lockwood Walter Marsch Warren Melgaard Elizabeth Locke Fred Lueck Ruth Mathison John Meyer Meredith Michael William Miller June Mulvey Virginia Meyn Marjorie Michels Joan Muir Bert Nagy Betty Pace Stanley Pelcher Craig Reed Janice Nelson Ramon Patheal Norma Phillips Scott Rich m 38 Robin Rowland Louise Sanford Bernice Schmidt Eugene Schneider Elaine Russell Anna Marie Schler Robert Schmidt Michael Schotter Donnell Scott John Simmons Patricia Spahr Carl Schroeder Evelyn Seybold William Simmons a: Walter Stark Marie Strahl William Taylor Edna Venable Paul Stockert Donald Stuart Hubert Thomas Verona Warskow Dorothy Weltge Ronald Wilson Catherine Witte Helen Wegner Kenneth Wentzel Lois Witt Ethel Young 39 IDMINISIRHIOn Dr. Lehmann is a busy man . . . not only works hard to keep Elmhurst out in front but finds time to be intimately acquainted with each student . . . keeps up-to-date on all campus activities knows when congratulations are due . . . understands students and willingly supports any logical action . . . always ready with needed encouragement, timely advice or just a friendly chat 42 mm imm Dean Staudt has an understanding of human affairs that is hard to surpass . . . knows the problems of the younger generation . . . mothers the girls in Irion Hall . . . teaches, yet always has a moment for a troubled student. Dean Mueller knows the college catalogue backwards and forwards . . . and the students too . . . knows what they want and how they can get it . . . serves college in multiple capacity as teacher, counselor, and friend. Left — Menzel, Kalbfleisch, and Sander. Right — Chapel in action. In these days of confusion students are seeking to find the meaning be- hind it all . . . guiding them in their research is Dr. Herman Sander . . . personifies the well-rounded life . . . coaches the baseball team after school . . . dances aren ' t complete unless he is there . . . nonchalant, companionable, and a gentleman of the old school. To George Kalbfleisch falls the position of Dean of Chapel counselor to the boys in South Hall . . . sees to their physical and spiritual needs . . . young enough to understand but old enough to give advice. Under Professor Menzel re- ligion becomes adaptable to everyday needs . . . guides and explores with lhcs3 who are inquisitive . . . yet patiently drives it into seniors who have waited until the last minute. 44 Left to right — Kalmbach, Handel, Sharp, Nilsson, Helmick, De Bruine . . . Seers of Science. King of the microscope is Dr. Harvey De Bruine . . . popular, interesting and human . . . effervescing with life and good will . . . lectures to classes filled with students eager to strike up an ac- quaintance with " Mike. " With him was Mrs. Nilsson who left in May . . . young and full of ideas she is irreplaceable. Third floor is the explosive department and houses the chemistry genii . . . Dr. H. H. Helmick, wizard of the elements . . . and Dr. George Sharp, warmly welcomed back from his sabbatical. In the base- ment diligently grinding lenses and watching weird contrivances is Professor Kalmbach, physics man supreme and possessor of a friendly smile. Besides her regular math classes Miss Handel now teaches navy requirement courses. icnii ii imm Who who has had him could forget Professor Carlson . . . reminds one of tea and crullers, hardy tweeds and misty heaths . . . frowns on tardy stu- dents . . . the kind of teacher to whom a student enjoys talking. Professor Belgum has the job of keeping the students posted on modern literature . . . and he does it . . . demands inquisi- tive minds ... to be Norwegian is to be king of the universe . . . has a sense of humor that ' s subtle and different . . . and a smile for the lost souls who aren ' t with him. Professor Breiten- bach knows that every comma has its place and sets out to find it ... a con- firmed walker who believes legs were given to us for a purpose . . . can trace every word to its source . . . winces at slang and modern youth. Professor Arends is the Orson Welles of the campus . . . performs miracles with student talent . . . epitomizes pa- tience. Left to right — Belgum, Arends, Carl- son and Breitenbach . . . connois- seurs of English. Clockwise — Dummer, Stanger, Rich ter, Wagoner, and Dienes . . " furriners. " mmn iiiEyHiiiiH[[ Dr. Dummer is one of the intelligentsia . . . well known for his books and current articles. Dr. Richter ... a man of military bearing . . . born teacher . . . does things systematically . . . inter- ested in students. Professor Wagoner now possesses naval secrets . . . joined at mid-semester . . . sure to trip spies with his friendli- ness. Professor Stanger . . . dignified, kindly, and absent-minded . . . teaching career testifies to his versatility . . . students amuse him. The Reverend Dienes ... a new-comer to the campus . . teaches Hungarian. mmm u ni nm Head of the history department is Dr. Crusius . . . has an un- concealable twinkle in his eyes . . . revealed his ability along crea- tive lines in the Elmhurst Pageant . . . sympathetic to student problems. When Dr. Eller transferred to Tacoma, Washington, he left a large gap in the faculty line-up. Dr. Robertson lends the feminine touch to the department . . . crowded classes testify to her capability lecturing on material which in her hands sounds like the most recent best-seller. Mr. Wiese completes the depart- ment . . . inveterate pipe-smoker . . . tutor of the history survey course . . . aide to floundering freshmen. ifli-pyfiifi i A man ' s biggest problem is himself . . . why he does what he does and who pushed ... it takes research to figure this out. Dr. Henssler heads the list of profs who enjoy their classes . . . likes a good laugh . . . interested in why his students tick . . . his French, German, and Eng- lish serve to give him a pronuncia- tion that is inimitable. No student ever hesitated to ask Professor Egner for help . . . he ' s ready, willing, and able . . . likes volleyball . . . quiet manner is misleading as circuses have shown . . . Earl Young, formerly most eligible bachelor . . . friendly, coopera- tive . . . has an in with the students . . . has and deserves their respect . . . Dean Mueller, another one doing double duty on the campus . . . some time or other manages to prepare lec- tures for sociology . . . keeps students interested and working . . . same things hold true for Miss Sfaudf- . . . teaches education classes and finds time to travel all over Elmhurst to keep posted on the cadet teachers . . . knows just when to apply pres- sure and when to overlook mishaps. Professor Hille seems to absorb his music . . . then let it float through his fingers onto the piano or out the baton . . . keeps the campus musically minded . . . Miss Bouslough directs the Women ' s Glee Club . . . cheerful and friendly . . . her smile is a pleasure to behold . . . Miss Foote teaches organ . . . tirelessly donates her time to chapel four times a week. For the violinists there ' s Mr. Zander and for voice coaching Eddie Schlundt. With the death of Mrs. Koons the music school lost a piano teacher who will never be forgotten . . . she could al- ways bring out the best in her stu- dents and never tired of working with them . . . her pupils are now studying with Mrs. Davison . . . Mrs. Finne- more, artist of the piano, completes the music department . . . Mr. Lemon, is the brush wielder of the fine arts division . . . resourceful, frank, and thoroughly modern in his outlook. 50 on, yon. eoon The library, hub of the campus . . . center of knowledge . . . wisdom of the ages in one building . . . fiction, science, philosophy, or just plain facts . . . has answers to all questions . . . reflects tenor of student ' s conscience . . . here it is that genius works . . . lovers meet and students learn . . . all in earnest. Those who are informa- tionally stymied find Miss Sfech an invaluable aide . . . trim, dark, and efficient . . . actually believes stu- dents deserve help and never turns one away . . . knows where to find any answer . . . Mr. Frommherz helps keep the library running at top speed . . . smiles continually . . . congenial and willing . . . bustles busily. Through them student wants are satisfied, whether it ' s thesis material or a back copy of Smilin ' Jack. Frommherz and Stech . . . information please. 51 Teach and Pete . . . muscle makers. ! yi[|[fis-i[f[is[ mm... Gym classes took on a new tone this year as it became patriotic to ' mind your muscles ' . . . requirements were boosted. . . classes overflowed . . . gym teachers sweated . . . and stu- dents groaned. Forgotten muscles were found and ligaments strained as students organized all out for defense . . . over supply of classes required ingenuity on part of instructors . . . Teach Johnson solved it by running a continual two-ring circus . . . out- door and indoor sports were practiced simultaneously . . . girls doubled back and forth trying their hand at them all . . . Pete Langhorst suffered added worries because of his year-round coaching job . . . had his hands full managing the boys and their muscles . . . remained unperturbed through it all. ■II [i Left, top to bottom — Leonhardt, Cos- grove, Cameron, Schafer. Right, top to bot- tom — Tiedemann, Farquhar, Pulse, Voigt. A smooth public appearance requires plenty of manipulating back-stage and these are the ones who know how it ' s done. Head man in the business office is " Umpah " Leonhardt . . . takes stu- dent financial problems to heart . . . has ready systems of convenient time pay- ments . . . manages college business without a frown . . . Mr. Tiedemann is keeper of the cash . . . classic name is bursar. Third member of the business office, who help to keep heads above water, is Mrs. Cosgrove. College diet is in the hands of Mrs. Farquhar . . . sees that students get their proper vitamins. The general office had a completely new staff this year . . . Miss Pulse took over Miss Lang ' s job as secretary to the dean . . . Miss Cameron acts as secre- tary to the president, in place of Mrs. Schirneker. Cross-campus, cloistered with the accounts of the school of music, is Mrs. Schafer. While Mrs. Voigt continues to serve as matron . . . hostess to overnight guests. i flPP[iifliC[ ... Credit for the looks of the campus grounds and buildings goes to a well- known group . . . Mrs. Wichman, housekeeper of the campus . . . keeps the library gleaming . . . bears with the sour notes in the school of music . . these, plus " 27, " Eden Advance, and Women ' s Union room keep her busy . . . Mr. Wichman is responsible for the immaculate halls in Old Main . . . guardian of light bulbs in South Hall. Chief mechanic on the campus is Emil Vanderohe electrician, roofer . . . jack of all trades . . . Philip Kutz does the carpentry . . . active students keep him on the job . . . added task was rebuilding the porch of Senior Lodge. For the campus carpet credit goes to Paul Hein . . . has the fun of riding the power mower . . . main- tainer in general. Philip, Paul, Emil, Mrs. Wicky, and Wicky . . . keepers of the campus. Women ' s Union keeps the gals oc- cupied . . . orientation of the unac- quainted through the efforts of wise upperclassmen . . . the Little Sister tea . . . more teas and meetings . . . dishwashers and speakers . . . Coed Dance . . . big moment of the year when the fellows appreciate the ut- most in attention . . . when the dating process is reversed and the gals do all the worrying ... a chance to make a " move " . . . the great circus . . . exca- vation of buried campus talent, fun for all, but it takes real cooperation to put it across . . . glamour . . . they have it . . . the style show. Student Union controls destiny of campus life . . . m.smbership is a part of being a studeni . . . offers chance to criticize and help correct ... in action, typical student government . . . new constitution gives freshmen a break . . . supplies student relaxa- tion at proper moments — fall mixer, Christmas party and let-downs plus S. U. store owned and operated by members . . . offices are highest to which collegian aspires . . . 58 Left — Thompsen, Marsh, Seeberger, Klick. W. U. Satellites Right — Mad Men , from Moscow. Froeschner, Baumann, Willman, Volbrecht, McKinley, Marsh, Kruse. . . . house of representatives. Get acquainted week for homesick freshmen . . . student shuffles . . . open house . . . dormitory sings . . . informals in Irion Hall assembly . . . sport nights . . . theater parties ... all in the hands of Social Life committee. Student and faculty representa- tives meet bi-monthly to iron out campus difficulties . . . seek to coordinate campus life and achieve adjustment between teachers and students. mum nmm Consider the ELMS — and how they grow . . . late hours . . . spent energy . . . lost copy . . . nights in the dark room . . . tense moments . . . last min- ute deadlines . . . the history of a year in one book. To an outsider it ' s an- other ELMS ... to the staff it ' s a brain-child ... a super-human effort . . . an accumulation of surprises and disappointments . . . the result of one year ' s work. This year the ELM BARK changed its shape to a half sized news maga- zine . . . filled eight pages, weekly . . . campus news, gossip and comments . . . scheme of things included Sub- Norma and hair ruffling by Cezzoo . . . editorials and letters to the edi- tor caused many a campus comment. Pride of the BARK is a phone of its own . . . compensates for late hours . . . heated arguments and messy proof. What is the student world . . . secluded and sheltered . . . actual and vital? Some want things as they are . . . some campaign for change. FORUM editors follow the policy that students have a right to say what they think . . . may cause controversy . . . may be wrong . . . may scare people . . . such as advocating war on the Axis before December 7 . . . aims at wider variety of student and fac- ulty opinions. Blau, Bock, Baumann, Lohans, Thulis ... a question of policy. Fawcett, Marsh, Kross, Buck . . . printer ' s prey. THE ELMS Left to right — Pfautsch, Egner, Lithgow, Lichtenheld, Piepenbrok, Popp, Hinckley, Dillenbeck, Hinrichs, Kross. THE ELM BARK Row 1 — Braun, Mathison, Sickbert, Brunton, Ahlf. Row 2 — Muivey, Phillips, Hinrichs, Whitaker, Kelley. Row 3 — Horst, Warner, Propst, Harm, Belgum. Row 4 — Bickell, Wobus, Limper, Koch, Vetrovec, Papadakis. FORUM Left to right — Mauch, C. Klick, Froeschner, Lohans, Braun. 61 urn mm College theater offers an outlet for the campus stage-struck . . . not only in acting but for those who want to help oil the machinery. This is no ordinary group . . . does all its own work . . . plans, builds, hammers, and paints . . . offers practical experience in all fields. Freshmen are admitted as " guppies " . . . tutored by older members . . . tested by work , . .drilled for an examination . . . their worth proven, pins are awarded. Theater presents three major productions a year . . . during last two years two have been completely original . . . Sparling and Sandner responsible . . . finished productions . . . excellent sets. Director C. C. Arends knows how to get the best . . . works hard, long, and late. Piep — " Curtain ! boss Iv lends a hand. 62 There ' s very little glamour in the scene shop . . . it ' s mostly old clothes and paint ... no place for idlers, especially during a production. Sparling handles the plans . . . and does a fine job . . . Kluge and Piep are electricians supreme. Neumann is paint-mixer, with Scott, Poile, and Klein wielding the brush . . . college theater is one group that makes everyone pitch in. 63 mm flf iiiE ... Coeducation is a wonderful thing. . . women are fine singers too ... a record of successful tours and harmonious songs is that of the Women ' s Glee Club. Under the direction of Miss Bouslough this group appeared before in- numerable appreciative audiences . . . added to the Christmas Candle-light service and annual homecoming celebration. . . season ended with Mother ' s Day concert. Men ' s Glee Club . . . oldest club on the campus . . . rightly acclaimed as most important . . . American folk music as arranged by Hille worked miracles for the popularity of the group . . . aired over WMAQ and WBBM . . . Spring tour through Indiana and Ohio . . . crowning achievement came when group was named as regional winner in Fred Waring Pleasure Time contest . . . ranked with Dartmouth, Duke, Washington and Lee, Rollings . . . trip to New York for national contest became an actuality. Chapel Choir . . . mixed chorus of campus . . . selected voices in selected arrangements . . . vary chapel programs with bi-weekly appearances . . . music to fit the theme . . . full length programs for special occasions. Took first tour in Chapel Choir history, a trip to Milwaukee. Nothing stereotyped about their programs . . . repertoire ranges from Bach to Hille. Members of the choir sing for enjoyment . . . compensation for service is theater party. WOMEN ' S GLEE CLUB Top row — M. Clidden, Cluever, M. Ormsbee, Meyn, Poile, Sanford, Schmidt, Jans, Halvorsen. Middle row — Russell, Warskow, Ernst, Klein, Jones, Herzler, Neumann, Scott, Zeiler, Hammond. Bottom row — Seybold, Seeberger, Mueller, Wegner, Wagner, Howell, Strahl, Mathison, Ramien. MEN ' S GLEE CLUB Top row — Abele, Irion, Pfautsch, H. Kalkbrenner, Reichert, Albrecht, Beecken, Noffke, Schoerluke, Koshewa, Cohen, Popp, Seyfert, Fisher. Middle row — Press, Roch, Johnson, Duffy, Braun, Koch, E. Kalkbrenner, Sickbert, Lithgow, Fritzsche, Simmons, Rauh. Bottom row — Crunewald, Wobus, Hilberg, Marsch, Meyer, Schumaker, Reed, Helfrich, Koenig, North, Sandner, Mauch, King, Strothman, Bizer. CHAPEL CHOIR Top row — Rauh, Pfautsch, Irion, Schoerluke, Fritzsche, Sickbert, Bickel, Roch, Riechmann. Middle row — Crunewald, Mernitz, Jones, Klick, Strahl, Scott, Neumann, Herzler, Schumacher, Nagy. Bottom row — Sandner, Hilberg, Ernst, E. Lithgow, R. Kress, Zeiler, Ramien, Mathison, Jans, Leinberger, W. Lithgow. 65, GERMAN CLUB OFFICERS Left — Bartels, Irion, Reich FERNCH CLUB OFFICERS Right — Deiters, Ramien, Fawcett, Kross i [ mmu GOETHE VEREIN Popular organization with an un- usually large membership . . . faculty mainstays, Drs. Dummer and Richter . . . monthly meetings feature music, talks, entertainment, and refresh- ments . . . members have opportunity to absorb and apply the German Ian- gauge at informal get-togethers . . . some meetings conducted in German . . . climax of year ' s program — a com- plete German play presented at a stu- dent assembly. LE ERCLE FRANCAISE Although its membership is not of gigantic proportions, its regulars have a real interest in the club . . . mem- bers are interested in a variety of things French: songs, recorded music and contemporary art . . . occasionally jabber in French jargon at meetings Profs Wagoner and Stanger keep interest high as faculty boosters . . . main event of year — potluck supper at Prof Stanger ' s domicile. mim m umn... Never let it be said that the Pre- Thes aren ' t organized, and efficiently too ... a well-established policy sets forth the standards and goals to be at- tained . . . informal discussion groups help iron out the problems of pros- pective ministers ... a clearer ap- praisal of the ministry and its de- mands is promoted . . . besides all this, an attempt is made to direct stu- dent life on the Elmhurst campus. Monthly meetings of the Elmhurst Student Christian Association serve as forums for examination of vital problems of everyday life . . . faculty and students intermingle ideas in an attempt to further religious objec- tives of group . . . sincere effort is made to provide answers for questions of political, economic, and social na- ture ... as a sideline, the Association maintains a room for reading and dis- cussion. Top — Dohrman, Crune- wald, Braun. Bottom, back row — Dohrman, Braun, Rauh, Mauch, Meyer Schumacher, Mueller, Strothman, Reichert. Front row — Warner, Froeschner, C. Klick, Lohans, Dr. Sander. According to members, this is the most active club on the campus . . . prejudiced, no doubt, but this spirit of activity has been noticeable since the very first meeting . . . organized on a completely new basis . . . main pur- pose of the group is to provide an interest-outlet for the study of the natural and mathematical sciences . . . three types of membership possible . . . active, associate and honorary . . . all student members must have had some work in the field of science . . . actives present an original paper to the group . . . anything goes ... as long as it is scientific . . . under the three classifications, any one is eli- gible for some type of membership . . . the popularity of the club is due largely to the fact that it was con- ceived by students, organized by stu- dents and is governed solely by stu- dents . . . only active members may hold offices . . . lending greatly to member interest are the meaty topics discussed, fine science profs, and plenty of good food at all the meet- ings . . . since Elmhurst excells in the scientific field, this group hopes to soon become one of the stronger campus organizations. " E " Club officers Centner, Schweer, McKinley, Will- man. " E " Club is one of the more exclu- sive clubs on campus . . . membership limited to letter men . . . must have an invitation even then . . . hold monthly meetings . . . guest speakers include athletic authorities, coaches, and athletes . . . feature sports movies . . . Pete always in attendance . . . purpose — offering those students in- terested in athletics an opportunity to meet together and further their ath- letic interests . . . members a swell bunch of fellows . . . alumni attend- ance at meetings larger than for any other club in school . . . additional activities this year — coke concession for basketball games, hayride for fel- lows and frails. " E " pin . . . best known means of making social an- nouncements on campus. 69 min m [ m Too little is the work of this fine group publicized . . . members are women whose feeling for the college and its students is strong enough to compel cooperation in campus affairs . . . activities are many and varied — sewing wall drapes to glamorize the gym . . . mending the stage curtain when the need arises . . . stitching window curtains to brighten Irion hall assembly . . . supplying complete furniture and redecoration for South Hall reception room . . . these and many other services are rendered un- obtrusively and without ceremony for an appreciative student body. 70 I Top — Ancona . . . employment office. Middle — Riechman . . . library work room Bottom — Rich and Jordan . . . obvious. Elmhurst College runs its own em- ployment office . . . aims to help those working their way through school . . . community cooperates by hiring Elm- hurst students for window washing, painting, washing floors, or taking care of children . . . bureau has filled jobs calling for bridge experts or escorts on New Year ' s Eve. Office is run by college students Sines, An- cona, Strothmann and Schroerluke . . . received over 1100 calls this year from prospective employers . . . col- lege aids student employment by hir- ing collegians as library, coal shovel- ers, janitors, furniture movers, and office help. Employment office also tries to be of service to alumni . . . seniors turn in complete records of experience and capabilities . . . men- tion all fields in which they would accept work . . . pledge themselves to notify bureau when jobs are available iwH! m mi South Hall shelters a majority of the men on the campus . . . ruled by President, Russ Miller, after Froesch- ner ' s marriage . . . tries to keep water fights under control . . . light bulbs in their sockets . . . noise at a mini- mum . . . and students cooperative. This year ' s men campaigned for a recreation room . . . attempt to cut down on room damage . . . keep all exuberant students in one place. Life in dormitory trains men to work to- gether . . . residents look forward to year in Senior Lodge. Freshmen girls, breaking ties for the first time, find Irion Hall a new kind of place . . . home was never like this . . . sleep is irregular . . . break- fasts are skipped ... all things must be tried and tested. After four years — girls are wiser . . . sleep is a dor- mitory institution . . . quiet hours are respected . . . people now work to- gether, not individually. President of Irion Hall is Dee Berger . . . sees that freshmen girls are acquainted with house rules . . . efficiently man- ages open house . . . diplomat on all occasions. Top — South hall at sunset. Bottom ■ — Irion hall at 10:10. South of the campus lies Senior Lodge . . . home of pioneer spirits . . . sponsor of a senior ' s last fling at care- free youth . Building houses about ten men . . . prexy, Irv Volbrecht, maintains order . . . fellows take turns with janitorial duties . . . guests al- ways welcome. Croup has fond mem- ories of Sunday morning rhumba lessons — results appliable to only one piece . . . Willman and his lumpy bed . . . feeling of solidarity that existed with house members. ! I Alumni of Elmhurst are really or- ganized . . . bulletins are issued to graduates four times a year . . . con- tain news of the school and members out in the world . . . army and navy now manages to take care of most of the men but there are still some mak- ing a name for themselves. Of those who left just last year . . . Sam Po- banz, medical school at Indiana U., plans to marry in December . . . Bob Biermann, in and out of the air corps and into the navy . . . his fiancee, Yvonne Jorgensen, teaching school in Elmhurst . . . Judy Cleland, fourth grade teacher in Maywood. Dalhaus and wife-to-be. Plassman and Simmons. Budge Fisher. 74 mn mi Bill Block, working at Jefferson Electric . . . Ralph Maschmeir, Union Seminary . . . Dee Roe, math teacher in Jr. High . . . Harold Klipfel, at work for Santa Fe Railroad . . . Homer Freese, Illinois Med . . . Budge Fisher, manager of a mink farm before Uncle Sam took him . . . Dean Plassman sta- tioned in Hawaii . . . Barb Pillinger, married to a navy air corps man . . . Lu McClure, office work at Mars Company . . . Jean Pulse, taking over Miss Lang ' s job in the office. Herb Sadler, entered navy in Jan- uary . . . Larry AuBuchon, officer ' s training in New Jersey, married Dor- othy Miche in November . . . Werner Lueckhoff, army air corps . . . Howie Griesbach married during May . . . Bart Sackett with A. E. F. . . . Walt Plassman interne at Elmhurst Hos- pital . . . Sally Zeeman, nurses train- ing at St. Luke ' s . . . Sherm Fuller, air corps, stationed in Florida . . . John Hein, news editor for the college, married in May . . . Dan Mabee, air corps, due for wings in August . . . Walt Coletz, coast guard, stationed in New York . . . Dorothy Davis Duerr, married life agrees with her . . . Fred Traut, eligible for officer ' s training . . . Elmhurst alumni are actually in the proverbial four corners. Bill Bohle. Hildebrandt, Carstens, and Frees. Moe Krueger. 75 Early to bed, Forget the smoke ; It ' s training time — And that ' s no joke. Hi Sport! n - u • • • 78 m mmm piesiii Four wins, three loses and one tie! Pete as well as the whole campus agreed that the 1941 football season wasn ' t bad at all. All the fellows did well, even though some of the games looked more like swimming sessions, or snow fights. With Goletz at the quarterback post, the backfield was generally a hot one . . . McKinley, an exception- ally good plunging fullback, Meitz, bucking, passing, and running ace, and Thomas, the boy who could pass on a dime, who was unfortunately lost when half the season was over, rounded out the strong backfield . . . vacancies were well fitted on occa- sion by Clevenger, Dillon, Postula, Horst, Cer fen, and Huntsha. The bulwarks of the outfit were in the line . . . Vertovec, Mernitz, Ancona, Barcy, Froetscher and Dag- ley comprised this forward wall . . . Centner, Kraatz, Jans, Will man. Stock, and Popp taking over when they were sent in. Back row, left to right — Coach Langhorst, Mernitz, Postula, Vertovec, Jans, Dagley, Willman, Meitz, Kraatz, Volbrecht, Huntsha, Manager Schmidt. Middle row — Jensen, Bamberger, Barcy, Patheal, McKinley, Dillon, Bullard, Meyer, Clevenger. Front row — Stock, Centner, Horst, Thomas, Goletz, Froetscher, Ancona, Soltes. The team started successfully by beating Mission House 13-6. North Central was a little too much for the boys in matching points, Elmhurst coming out on the short end of a 21 -0 score . . . total yardage for the Jays showed they had gained 30 more than the opposition, though. In a heavy downpour, the eleven swam over Aurora ... a total of 26 points to the opponents ' goose egg. The game the following week was a real disappoint- ment . . . Eureka, keyed up by its homecoming and with the aid of a fluke pass nosed out Elmhurst 13-7. But the following week the boys came right back . . . went to Carthage and spoi led thei r host ' s homecoming game with a 3-0 score. The real highspot of the season . . . our homecoming game with Concordia . . . not since the eleven of 1932 beat Shurtleff for an Elmhurst homecoming crowd had the home team finished in front . . . inspired plunging, kicking, and pass- ing on our part swamped Concordia 27-7. 80 FOOTBALL — Continued This conquering of Concordia gave rise to a student strike next Monday morning when the victory fever rose to an all-time high . . . class attend- ance went the way of an all-time low. The spark of Elmhurst-Wheaton ri- valry was all but put out by rain and snow the following week . . . the whole affair ended in a scoreless tie. The last game of the season brought in a newcomer on the Elmhurst foot- ball schedule . . . Heidelberg, sister college from Ohio . . . they brought a trainload of rooters as well as a color- ful marching band ... to get to the point, they also brought along a pow- erful team . . . the muddy circles they ran around our boys gave them 25 points to our 0. .anghorst Iraatz ans Vertovec Centner Meitz Thomas Froetscher Barcy McKinley Clevenger Ancona Mernitz Stock Dagley Coletz Willman Volbrecht !1 PIN ' Basketball power awakened this year . . . the quintet had quite a suc- cessful season. Under the guidance of Pete, veterans Van Voorst and Ahlf found three lively freshmen as their aides . . . high scoring forwards Bizer and Frega coupled with an impreg- nable guard, Dagley . . . molded into a first class team . . . could meet Elm- hurst ' s opponents on a more equal basis than usual . . . balanced, but nicely, the win and loss budget. Kruse, McKinley, Crunewald, Scott, Vertovec and Harm formed a sepa- rate team of their own . . . were used to wear down the opposition the opening period of each game . . a part of Pete ' s offensive strategy. A combination of all this resulted in 8 losses, 7 wins. Valparaiso lost 24-34 North Central lost 26-28 Aurora won 55-42 Eureka lost 37-46 Valparaiso won 31 -26 Concordia won 43-42 Wheaton lost 41 -47 Eureka won 41 -34 Concordia lost 30-31 DeKalb lost 40-46 Carthage lost 32-61 Wheaton won 45-39 Principia won 46-36 Carthage lost 42-61 Aurora won 74-35 mm II The quintet failed to find its stride in the first two games of the season as it dropped contests to Valparaiso, 34-24 . . . North Central gave them a 28-26 scare. The Jays found the range in their next game with Aurora as they hung up markers 55-42 . . . Eureka provided a 46-37 setback but the Elmhurst five came back to trim 84 Top — Coach Langhorst, Crunewald, Frega, Dagley, Van Voorst, Ahlf. Bottom — Bizer, Laning, McKinley, Harm, Schram. Valparaiso 31-26 . . . nosed out Con- cordia in what was perhaps the best game of the year . . . 43-42 . . . not until the last few seconds was the game decided. Wheaton torpedoed Elmhurst in its next contest 47-41 . . . again they came back to get re- venge 41 -34 in a return meeting with Eureka. This was followed by a lapse of Elmhurst power as Concordia, DeKalb and Carthage won the next three games . . . 31-30, 46-40, 51-46. Per- haps these losses coupled with the ancient Wheaton-Elmhurst rivalry fired our quintet to outplay Wheaton to win 45-36 on the home court. Pete took the boys south for the next two games . . . playing Principia and Car- thage in the tip of the state ... St. Louis alumni cheered Elmhurst to a 46-36 triumph over Principia . . . Car- thage was not so amiable. Defeat was tasted bitterly as the Indians scalped our Jays 61-32 . . . feeling they owed Pete an explanation Aurora received a terrific walloping in the season ' s final on the home court . . . scoring was much in their own hands as they sank 74 points to their visitors ' 35 . . . new scoring record for the college . . . Norm Frega held his scoring to a mere 31 points . Season record . . . seven wins and eight losses. And then there are the boys who will probably become the next years ' strong team . . . freshmen all . . . had a little team of their own . . . numbers 9 . . . 1 1 . . . 8 . . . 7 . . . etc. . . . we will be seeing more of them in the future. Left to right — Meyer, LeBeau, Koshewa, Horst, Stockert, Wentzel, Gregson, Haney, Wilson. I Lichtenheld mil mm I Astonishing things on the cinder path ... a very strong and very suc- cessful track team . . . undefeated in dual meets . . . lost one meet ... a triangular with Illinois Tech and Wheaton . . . perhaps the best bal- anced team Elmhurst has had in re- cent years. This year ' s track team amassed a total of fourteen points at the Beloit Relays, and garnered more points than ever before in its own E. I. I. Many of the men were out- standing . . . Schleinzer was chief weight man . . . shot put and discus were his meat . . . Rauh tossed the javelin to a new school record in the first contest of the season to better his old mark of 1 76 feet 1 0 inches by 4 feet 1 1 inches . . . Lichtenheld turned out to be the best half-miler ever to run for Elmhurst . . . Mauch excelled in the mile, and also was a relief man on the relay team . . . out- standing freshman was Koshewa who sprinted the quarter mile and ran on the relay team along with Lichten- held, Jans, Meitz or Mauch . . . Wink- ley hopped heme over innumerable hurdles, backed up by Meitz . . . But by far the most outstanding member of th2 team this year was Csrfen who consistently won the 100- and 220- yard dashes as well as the broad jump. 86 SCORES Elmhurst . . 68.4 .. Morton ... 62.6 Elmhurst. .68.66. . I. I. T....62.33 Elmhurst.. 70 . . Wheaton . . 61 TRrANGULAR Elmhurst — 62.5 Wheaton — 65.5 I. I. T.— 35 Le Beau, pole vaulter . . . start of a relay . . . Ceske and Frega . . . Piep, high jumper. iWB- " -• ' t " Left to right — Meitz, Lang- horst, Van Voorst, Papadakis, Abbott, Rauh, Gerfen, Koah- ewa, Braun, V inkley, Haney, Bullard, Beecken, Jans, and [. Sixteen teams competed this year in the Elmhurst Intercollegiate Invi- tational, the biggest and best track meet for smaller colleges of the mid- west ... a smooth running meet, as usual, but this year, it definitely rained . . . most events looked too much like aquatic endeavors . . . con- sequently a slow track and a slippery field . . . new records were an impos- sibility. Outstanding and best known performer was Lenover of Loyola who in the half mile and the mile was clocked at 1 :57.4 and 4:29.6. From our own ranks, Lichtenheld came in with a third in the half, finishing only 4.4 seconds behind Lenover . . . Wink- ley took a fourth in the high hurdles . . . Rauh tossed the javelin into fourth place . . . thus Elmhurst came out with 7 points, ranked eighth in the meet. TABLE OF POINTS DeKalb 71 Vz Loyola 42 Western Michigan 22 2 I llinois Normal 1 7 Wilson 17 North Central 16 2 Mi Iwaukee Teachers 8V2 Elmhurst 7 Carroll 6 Morton 4 I llinois Tech 4 Concordia 3 George Williams 2 2 Chicago Teachers 2 Wheaton 1 2 Valparaiso 0 Left to right — Haefner, Klose, Hermann, Pel- cher . . . divot diggers. Prof Sharp and Pete combined to select the team personnel in the mid- dle of April . . . based on qualification play . . . Haefner led with 203 strokes for 45 holes . . . Captain Haefner. The hackers started strong . . . Loy- ola tasted defeat in the first match . . . 91 2-81 2 . . . handsome Stan Pel- cher is the team ' s silent man, but his 85 was low . . . Cards Hermann proved that his golfing far surpassed his poker . . . Ted Klose is as efficient on the fairway and green as he is in the chem lab . . . Haefner spent most of his time in the rough at Loyola . . . Seegers, Wilson, Fessler, and Sandner fought for a place on the team . . . Low scores kept them there . . . Pros- pects for a fruitful season are promis- ing . . . four wins and only one defeat with two more matches yet to play. 89 fifiii m mm Perhaps the most outstanding thing about the baseball team has been its transition from a mediocre one to one of the best . . . Coach Sander has an excellent infield . . . made up of solid players such as Abele, Pfautsch, Ahlf, Captain Kruse, and Melgaard ... be- hind the plate with his chatter . . . the outfield has backed up the excel- lent pitching of frosh Cregson, and seniors Westermann and Bizer to help the team along toward what may prove to be the best baseball record the school has seen in recent years fly-catchers have been many and varied this year . . . Meyer, Bobby Bizer, and McKinley were the main- stays . . . injuries were few, but one was a honey . . . Kruse flirted with a bouncing grounder and has retained the colorful memory of the encounter all Spring . . . under his right eye . . . with three scheduled games yet to be played, the boys have won five, and lost but two . . . the remaining three will, according to Doc Sander, be tough ones since the team has already been defeated by two of the outfits . DeKalb and Wheaton . . . but . . . 90 Left, standing — Abele, Pfautsch, McKinley, Ahlf, Stockert, Stoerker, West, Melgaard, Ho- meister, Huntsha. Seated — Mgr. Nolte, Keller, Meyer, Gregson, Dawson, Bob Bizer, Johnson, Coach Sander ... fly s watters. Right, top — Captain Kruse. Bot- tom — foul tip. ■ Left, top — Schweer . . . num- ber one boy. Bottom — Wentzel and Noffke . . . racketeers. Right — Coach Arends, Schweer, Plessher, Stock, Wentzel, Noffke. North Central lost 6-0 Aurora won 6-0 Illinois Wesleyan. . . .won 5-1 DeKalb . . Concordia Wheaton Normal . . lost 5-1 won 5-1 .lost 5-1 tied 3-3 In spite of unfavorable spring weather which greatly limited early practice, Coach Arends turned out a fairly well-rounded team . . . Schweer, climaxing four years of competition, again played number one man this year . . . Stock, another four year man, Plessher, a sophomore, and a very promising fershman, WentzeL com- pleted th e team . . . Noffke, reserve insurance, stepped in wherever he was needed most . . . after a slow start the boys worked until they achieved a .500 average . . . the most pleasant upset of the season was the tie with I llinois Normal, and the defeat of I lli- nois Wesleyan after the netmen had been defeated by Wheaton which had lost to both of those schools . . . the loss of Schweer next year will be somewhat offset by the great im- provement which Plessher has shown in the last three matches . . . the re- maining matches which were post- poned earlier in the season because of inclement weather will perhaps prove the theory that this team is all dog. 93 Hearty participation . . . Top — Intramural tournament play. Bottom — Softball in the sunken garden. ilSU! Mil Intramural sports . . . parallel var- sity spors throughout the year . . . keen competition resulted from a change to the single class-team sys- tem . . . season scores and student participation showed that the change was a wise one . . . seniors again showed their dominance on the grid- iron in a repeat of last year ' s per- formance ... a fairly strong Frosh eleven was runner-up ... the junior quintet reigned at the end of the basketball season . . . their second year to hold this " most coveted and honorable title " . . . Spring . . . and all sorts of activities begin . . . track and baseball lure the athletically minded . . . frosh cinder power nosed out the sophs by a mere fraction, while the seniors followed a very close third ... the juniors, of course, were last . . . Softball ' s a favorite on the campus in Spring . . . with still some games left to be played, the seniors seem to be a cinch for first place . . . the juniors did not quite live up to expectations. 94 !n the form of healthful rather than keen competition the gals par- ticipated in intramural sports . . . volleyball and basketball saw some action between the different classes, but only on a small scale ... in bad- minton, individual tournaments pre- vailed and to date, still continue, no one yet considered queen of the court. Archery brought in quite a bit of interest . . . the highest 1 2 con- tenders after 24 rounds of action are to enter a tele raphic meet. Tennis hit a low this year . . . good material in Propst, Whitaker, Warner, Ernst, Strahl, and Kelly was present, but lack of available practice facilities led to disaster. To cope with the situation of unorganized women ' s sports, petitions have been circu- lated in an attempt to organize a Women ' s Athletic Association — one that is an organization within itself, not one that is only a part of the Women ' s Union. Top — Croggel and Michels . . . tennis devotees. Bottom — Archery enthusiasts. SENIORS—C o n t i n u e d this year, secretary last ... a self-financed college man who never let it bother him . . . wrote super Homecoming Revue scripts for two successive years . . . future prediction — successful stage director of legitimate plays. Elmer Stock . . . promising economist . sports his sideline . . . managed to earn two football letters and one for tennis . . . acquired alumni scholarship senior year . . . lent support to all " E " Club activities . . . peppy, affable and efficient . . . plans to give the Navy a try and then go on with account- ing interests. Ann Thompsen . . . potential woman executive . . . gets things done in f:rm, easy going manner . . . turned out suc- cessful circus as Women ' s Athletic Chair- man . . . won intra-mural letter . . . added special talents to Social Life Committee . . . served as Women ' s Union treasurer this year . . likes athletics for energy outlet . . . hopes for a career in library activities, Arihm Van Camp . . . one of those genial lads who hang their hats in Senior Lodge . . . a pre-minister with Glee Club and Col- lege Theatre propensities . . . tuition strug- gle has limited Art ' s activities during last two years, yet his friends are many and per- manent . . . special hobby — collecting rec- ords of the light classical variety. Jack Van Voorst . . . man ' s man whose extra class ac- tivities are athletic . . . won three basketball letters . . . captained team in senior year . . . acquired three additional letters in track . . . " E " Club member since soph year . . . refe- rees basketball games in odd moments history major Jack will have chance to make his own history as ensign in U. S. Navy. Edith Vogt . . . repeat scholarship student . . . linguist with Goethe Verein inclinations . yearns to hit the open road via bicycle in her spare time . . . economics major who will try her hand in the business world ... re- member those still waters that run deep! ' Edtih fits description perfectlv. Ervin Volbrecht ... set executive precedent . . . served as prexv of Senior Lodge, Senior Class and Student Union simultaneously . . . suc- cessful junior class president . . . played football and won " E " Club membership . . . honorary chairman of defense council . . . air raid warden . . . gained his popularity through innate friendliness . . . chose chem- istry as vocation and avocation. Paul Vender Ohe . . . two year Stockton scholarship win- ner . . . associated with Pre-The organiza- tion . . . member Goethe Verein . . . primary pastime — dealing with individual problems . . . likes to probe for motives and suggest possible solutions . . . has his heart in the ministry with teaching as a sideline . . . has that sympathy so vital to religious profes- sion. Raymo nd Voss . . . Social Life Com- mittee member . . . interested in Pre-The and S. C. A. organizations . . . active on com- mittees for dances . . broad extra curricular pastimes . . . stamp collecting, ornithology, classical music, and paintings included in list . . . plans for the future — seminary, ministry, marriage in the order named. Gilbert Wawak . . . Y Room devotee . . • always willing to indulge in a card game engaged to a former student . . . comes out of his shell occasionally to join bull ses- soins . . . business manager of Elm Bark . . . astute manager and organizer of commit- tees . . . after the army intends to do per- sonnel work. Walter Westermann . . . " Westy " made a hit on the campus right from the start . . . freshman year took over the frosh dance as chairman . . . soph year became class prexy . . . acquired three base- ball letters and an " E " Club membership . . found time to edit sports for Elm Bark . has those qualities of leadership so es- sential to the ministry. Harry Willman . . . known as the " Blimp " . . . had his workout every year in baseball and football and re- ceived two awards in both . . . secretary of " E " Club . . . athletic chairman of S. U. . . . belonged to Goethe Verein . . . has the cheery disposition of big people ... his suc- cess in the ministry assured because of his ability to make friends. Dale Wolfgram . . . another potentially successful minister with necessary sincerity and pep . . . varied cam- pus interests included S. C. A. and German Club . . . reported two years for Elm Bark . . . active in sports . . . intra-mural manager junior year . . . spends greater part of spare time on photographing hobby . . . heads for Eden Seminary following graduation. Indianapolis Engraving Co Rogers Printing Co- mm Out of the Window of Step into his life as the girl h e ' ll want to remember! ! Be Smart and Smooth . . • Correct yet Casual in clothes that set you apart . . . Tantalize that man with a saucy vision of you in clothes of lovable femininity . . . Morning, Noon or Night you can ' t go wrong in clothes from the 1C8 N. York Street ELMHURST, ILLINOIS Top Victory Elmhurst Style Bottom Future Fire Wardens ' Practice. It has been truly said that a Man ' s appearance is a measure of his success. Let us help you on your way up the ladder. T H E B A C H E L O R Contact COME TO imwi TO SATISFY ALL YOUR HOUSEHOLD NEEDS WHETHER THEY BE LARGE OR SMALL Visit Our Balcony A nnex The Largest Store in Elmhurst Serving Elmhurst Community for 22 years ENJOY THE BEST IN ENTERTAINMENT Spend an Evening of Perfect Relaxation from your studies. CONTINUOUS MATINEE DAILY THE HOUSE OF GOOD SOUND T H f y 0 e K T H t fl T t B GIRLS . . . are you looking for a new and charming dress, or a sweater to liven up your present outfit, perhaps even a necklace, pin, or gay little hanky ... or maybe the problem is a gift for a girl friend . . . You will find all the solutions to your needs in our large variety. MU m SHOPPt 109 N. York St. THOMPSON ' S SEALTEST ICE CREAM SERVED in the College Commons Student Union Store THOMPSON ' S ICE CREAM CO. 415 E. 24ih Si, Ch icago, WOMENS ' UNION CIRCUS Stockert Lion or ' Mo SAVE Elmhurst 2100 BUY DEFENSE BONDS AND STAMPS Prescriptions Our Specialty MAHLERS DRUG STORE 124 W. Park Avenue Phone 3711 When at a loss as to Where to Enjoy that Dehcious STEAK OR CHICKEN DINNER Try BOSWORTH ' S Lake Street Add isori OPEN HOUSE But no luck MILK PEPS YOU UP DAIRY PRODUCTS OF SUPERIOR OUALITY R AT H BU N FARM PRODUCTS CO. Phone Glen Ellyn 130 GLEN ELLYN, ILL. WATCH WORDS . . Dependability . Complete Service The Robillard Chapel ROBILLARD ' S FUNERAL HOME 1 34 S. York St. Follow the gang to the ELM DRUGS, whether it be for o coke or o chat or a luncheon, you are always welcome. Satisfy your personal needs. ELMHURST DRUG CO. Phone Elmhurst 5 101 S. York St. We ' ve a Flare for g IT ¥ L g Give your wardrobe a fair deal and shop where the latest styles are seen first ... for fun, for comfort, or for glamour stop at PAT DOT ' S 119 N. York St. COMPLETE FURNISHINGS FOR THE HOME John M. Smythe Co Established 1867 " Deep Rooted Like an Oak " 134 North York Street FOR HIGH HEAT VALUE Use Certified SAHARA Washed COAL All Sizes Including HOME STOKER Compliments of Sahara Coal Company Top Such a Pine afternoon. Bottom- As you like it " Sweet and Swing ' DON ' T RUSH FROM STORE TO STORE! SHOP WITH EASE AT OLLSWANG ' S " DUPAGE COUNTY ' S LARGEST DEPARTMENT STORE " Step in the door and outfit yourself from tip to toe or your room from stem to stern — Relax under the Quick Efficient Service at OLLSWANG ' S DEPARTMENT STORE 106-110 West Park Ave. Elmhurst 3535 BUY DEFENSE STAMPS AND BONDS For Service — You Ring ELMHURST 1000 We Call and Bring FRENCH CLEANERS 116 South York Elmhurst, Illinois Found: the answer to the question of a " perfect afterwards " for Informals theater parties or any time you want delicious sundaes, toothsome sand- wiches and other delights to please the taste. KEELER ' S CANDY SHOP North of Theater T H E Y O R K I N N The perfect spot to spend an even- ing in tranquility. Enjoy one of our delicious Steak or Chicken Dinners, or just a plain sandwich. Lake and York Streets Elmhurst, Illinois H E S S E MEN ' S WEAR Men . . . To be or not to be, is the question! You will be in style with a suit, sport coat, top- coat, or with any of the smaller items you can get from HESSE ' S HABERDASHERY. Ph one Elmhurst 300 118 N. York St. 1 PROSPERITY CORNER Only 7 out of every 100 of the world ' s inhabitants live in the U. S., but, at the last reading, Uncle Sam ' s people had of the world ' s wealth 35% of the railroad mileage, 45% of the radios, 50% of the telephones, 70% of the automobiles . . . and regularly used 56% of the rubber, 53% of the coffee! What a tribute to the ingenuity and energy of the American people! We live more abundantly than any other people in the world! There is no standard of living equal to our American way of life! For over 81 years, A P has conducted its business with but one aim,- to bring more good foods to more people for less money — thus to contribute to a higher standard of living in the U. S. A. THE GREAT ATLANTIC PACIFIC TEA CO. Top Bottom Tuning Up Taking Off ... A gift that ' s different is always appreci- ated. When you want something new for some- one you like ... A gift that reminds you of things past or things to come . . . Try the DANISH PEASANT SHOP In the Bank Building ONLY THE BEST FOR THE BEST .... When a birthday looms over the horizon, when a dance draws near, or any occasion that calls for a remembrance send her something that will make memories . . . Send her favorite flowers either as a corsage or a bouquet . . . greeting cards and gift specialties. I PFUND AND CLINT FLORISTS Phc 3060 1 39 N. York Hungry? Thirsty? Hot and bothered? Stop at the PRINCE CASTLE Set your jangled nerves at rest ... a " One in a MiHion " , a cool cone, sundae, tophat, or a satisfying castleburger may be just the thing you need to pick you up. PRINCE CASTLE ' S ICE CREAM Corner of York and North Let Spyrison ' s Solve All Your Shoe Worries Freeman and Florsheim Shoes For Men Red Cross Shoes For Women Women ' s Sports and Novelties SPYRISON ' S SHOE SHOP " The Store with Collegiate Ideas " Phone Elmhurst1020 160 N.York Mrs. Pete — " Robber " I F The College office buys from us, we must be good. See us for your school supplies. WEST SUBURBAN STATIONERS 114 S. York St. SPORTS WILL KEEP YOU FIT! A balanced college program . . . includes sports For physical fitness . . . ALL AMERICAN equipment will help you excel! in American Sport Hobby Shop 107 N. York St. School Sweaters and Athletic Shoes at School Prices LINEN SUPPLY ROY HARTLESS 4719 W. Lake St. Chicago, Illinois Telephone Austin 0639-0640 ELMHURST goes to the Big City For Every Spread . . . 13 § g D B g © " THE HOME BAKIN ' BOYS " Call for Genuine MAI ROE Sweet Rye, made with a Special Rye Mix. Retain that Vigor and Health by demand- ing the Best. 5029 N. Western Avenue Chicago, III. Longbeach 2448-9 Shop at Sears and Save! Men ' s furnishings . . . hardware . . . paints and wall paper . . . sport- goods . . . auto accessories . . . housewares . . . plumbing and heat- ing .. . building materials . . • floor coverings . . . " Fast service on catalog orders. " SEARS ROEBUCK COMPANY 170 N.York St. Pfione 3600 DRY CLEANING RELIABLE HATTERS SHOE REBUILDERS COUNTY CLEANERS Phone 644 141 N. York St. Across from Tfiecter PEOPLES COAL MATERIAL CO. B. J. SHNEEHAGEN, Prop. York St. at C. G. W. R. R. Tracks HOMECOMING . . . Top The ELMS ' Prize Winning Float Bottom W. U. Active too. This is the Front Line of Democracy Here is the classroom -at Elmhurst College and at schools throughout the Democratic world — lies the real front line defense of Democracy. Long before men, and women, too, leave to fight or to supply fighting materials to distant outposts, the colleges wage and win the first battles of Democracy. In the classrooms of Elmhurst College, youth- ful ideals and early enthusiasms ore transformed into a practical way of living, the Democratic way of life. Elmhurst has a grave responsibility for the defense of that way of life. Despite whatever sacrifices the war effort may require, Elmhurst will carry on with a normal program. It will expand its program to meet special defense needs. Students, too, hove a responsibility on this front line. Unless and until called for speci fic service elsewhere, it is the duty of every young high school graduate to continue in the normal course of his or her education. Elmhurst Col- lege IS ready to serve. Expert counsel con be had free of charge. The published opinion of national leaders and of military, naval and selective service officials. CONSULT YOUR ADMISSIONS COUNSELOR ELMHURST COLLEGE A Church-Related College Supported by the Evangelical and Reformed Church DR. TIMOTHY LEHMANN, President ELMHURST, ILLINOIS FOR THAT LAST MILE EDELWEISS GELATINE BUOYS YOU UP! GOOD FOOD FOR PLEASED GUESTS mm " This Book is bound in o Molloy-Made Cover " THE DAVID J. MOLLOY PLANT Decorate Your Home With Highest Quality Wall Paper and Paints from J. C. LIGHT CO. 1 1 1 W. Second Street Elmhurst ' s Most Dependable PAINT STORE Keep in step with the government ' s " fitness cam- paign " . Dairy products will aid you in keeping your health up to par. You will Find our efficient fountain service with tasty drinks and sandwiches very satisfying as well as health building. CLOVERLEAF DAIRY 131 Addison Elmhurst, Illinois CHICAGO, ILLINOIS COMPLIMENTS OF ROTHMEVER COAL CO. ELMHURST ILLINOIS The ELMS staff wishes to take this opportunity to thank all ELMS ADVERTISERS as well as others who have helped to moke this publication possible. PLEASE MAIL TO ELMHURST COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, ELMHURST, ILLINOIS O I— u O U o e o o S Z : o 01 o ; c Sch for c ten D Ul 0 E c D 0) O 0 e e Q. a -T3 o o (D D Z Q 0) " O u CD c - O -O U a E o 0) (1) 11 -ID E CD 0 o -a CD E o CD O O O Z E E O U CD o I— u O ; o (D E O Z CD 2 E -D O Z CD o 0) O — J= a o o o CD (1) , o o . CD CD CM 0) J O CD CD " Q O X o o c o Ul .E o CD E ±; D c CD Ol E n D- ca a E D O CD " O c (D c CD E Oi CD E o Z — O CD Cl CD (D II Q CD O Q z CD CD E E O o u 00 u O CD £ E -O o -a o Z 2 E -O O " O z LTi o CD CD E O OZ D O O " D TJ " D CD CD CD i2 CD CD CD o O) D) D) CD ® CD " Q Q O I ■ 2 • c ;t Rank . Service ' ged as CD 0 D . I o £5 o o CD CD E E O U SIONIini ' iSynHVN13 ' NOIIVDOSSV INVNOIV 393nOD iSanHVNIB Oi niVVN BSVBId rr


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Elmhurst College - Elms Yearbook (Elmhurst, IL) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

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Elmhurst College - Elms Yearbook (Elmhurst, IL) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 1

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.