Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book

 - Class of 1945

Page 1 of 62

 

Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1945 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
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Page 12, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
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Page 16, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1945 Edition, Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection
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Text from Pages 1 - 62 of the 1945 volume:

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IF WE REMIND YOU OF GENERAL QUARTERS, MAKING SMOKE, WORKING PARTIES, LONG HOURS OF WAITING, THE SQUEAL OF A BO'SUN PIPE, OR ANY OTHER DISAGREEABLE ITEM .... PARDON US. IF WHILE YOU READ AN ARTICLE OR 1 LOOK AT A PICTURE, YOU SMILE AND A BRIGHT ,TWINKLE FILLS YOUR EYES, BECAUSE YOU RECALL CLOSE ,FRIEND- SHIPS AND STAUNCH BUDDIES, WE WILL FEEL THIS BOOK HAS SERVED ITS PURPOSE. 'il' 'I I 5 annum:-sun ,.,.,, .- ,.- f ....,.-5.4,-A , ff 7,7-.,-7.-L , .-J:. ,-1-Q' ..., tw, ' N' "3:.x1'1'7'3fX-bQl'?f9? ?9v.'Sf-?E-4?':i ' A-f,,.l2f'7t 5- . I - 1--Z.T:'7"'1Q"9Sflf532, 'isfg-53 'lg af. sive .vm - Qs-nflifrr-f.--gag:-311-7f?.f,gi , M A I -1 as . 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J - - ' ' fs- :sm 5135: -5 T5 17 sa. ii 4gQ?4i2955if315IoIA- A , ,,, 5:53 legal:-,g'3:'fjf?1?l.g.fq55::-i,3:'- - r xg. -- I-v 32-5 ..., igflrgt K r -N,,., , a Qtr?-,rixgi-251 . 1 . ,-.v,. ,Q L ..,. 5,1 3.453-,L-Y,rgZ,th-:xA1sqtx2iSx,,j'Q.nXkqS: '. -M s' ,4::,g,.-sec--f, ',A5.'.r:" c,-,-L - EDITOR G.C., HAWLEY ASSISTANT EDITOR Ko REEVES LITERARY EDITOR WQE. DOWNER LAYOUT AND PRODUCTION M.Ao GREITZER X ,. ,ARTISTS A ' D.E., GALLOCK F.P. VENTIMIGLIA PHOTOGRAPHER' W.C. MACY ARTICLES COE. TAYLOR DRA FTSMAN GQG. BRADBURN f LITIHOGRAPHY GOD- LEWIS S 1. TIPESCU A - 1, GRIGORAS P. SCHWARTZ . , NJ. CANGEMI 'BINDING' 1. ESELUNAS 'r A I G.A o ATTER ELECTROMATIC TYPING B. C. WROBEL A Cosa RU ZIC ' M.H. HEIKE I DISTRIBUTION F.P. ADVISORS LM., G.K4 ONDA KUYKENDA LL ISUNK CONTRIBUTORS! FQE. DONAHUE, D.E. DELONG, LB. SOPKO ' LE. WEBBER, P.A. VERDIN, R.E. MERRITT CJ. RAFTER, G. A. THEISS, CJ. 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U..S.S. ELDORADO I I 1 In the presence of the families and friends of her new crew, the U. S. S. ELDORADO was placed in commission at Bethlehem Steel Yard, 56th Street Pier, Brooklyn, New York. A large part of the ship's complement were "green hands", still fresh from boot camp and navy trade schools: the others, old timers who had seen duty on other navy vessels and who would form the experienced nucleus aboard this new one. Most of these men had been assembled for a brief period of training at the Newport, R. I. Train- ing Station. It was a short processing they received there, but they were already beginning to work to- gether as a crew when they left Newport on August 23, 1944. Two .days later, on August 25th, they arrived aboard the ELDORADO, and it was then that Captain I. R. Wallace, reading the orders he had received from the Navy Department and greeting the offi- cers and men who would serve under him, officially assumed command. H R, xx , X . , S ' HR K H 1 1 X 1 ifka I 5 KQQ R0 . 1 , ATIONS 6,98 fb it ATUI' R r QNGR '76 C V 041, 5 5 E E E 5 VI SI TING RELA TI was Ei???121k?QQEw' A A X s v I f M- , ,, f I vs , ' g- Lg 1 ' -f - .5 M 49, ' , '- sgf x' layvnul T .-It fl z .' ky. QQ , K? ' I .?' 'X , 5 N223 r 53 . 4 Y 4l2 fF' finx W L 5 Q DS 1 ALL MN , NT 54 'TTE Three fm! HDS COMPANY wk' f asf" IN We-1 ,Q if V AF' I Nl , 'avg'- , v eff . WS hx-,fab 5.1, . W wf-W if-, M gag' , L65 . V A rg I 45556 ,L E! : W , de. i t W - , z:!'l'1?:- , es :A f' ,qbifzf Y.,' ,. ,ig ,' , '.?v:, ,Qi f-w-PW: N-, ff" " -Q-QW 1. 'ff .. ' -5 .ww '- 1 , 441, k - ' " 545, .M M 12 ' ' 'af'-'+ :nk "Maki jx ,.- wma ! 2,l'5+f65f"f A x F4 "I'.x 'K ' . .. -A , ,I . . .., -Q- , Wu- I 43 ' 5- 9565 ,. ' Q ,glif -:ri j' 'Wir ' ilmwmw V535 .L K 91?-4 fl-.L be E. ..H'Z. 1, lxyhkiz jj 622 .x wp if 2. . a," , .mx 7 ' :LAWQQD it , , , WL., A M' - ,M Upffwe-Q 4 V 1,a:,, .-.ffhflv-Qfpfpvifi-,:-tis if 'L -A. 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Yr RFP. 31 "' P+ is 3,4 f 532' S IIVIISII INIS I.C. ROOM X gn, itil 3HYVWY7QYiSH l no ttn, ix! H4 k Q K n vi, .I U . MACHINE SHOP ix ' DECK HANDS More than a thousand men, grouped into fifteen divisions, are necessary for the successful operation of a ship of this type. To these divisions goes the bulk of the credit for the efficiency with which the Eldorado has discharged her duties. The work of each division, ' though distinctly outlined and different from that of the other divisions, is in close harmony and relationship with that of the others. This 5inter-depen- dency'. makes it impossible to say that one division is of more importance than any other oo.. although the 'Black Gang' fcomposed of 'AZ sE','B', and 'M' Divisions? make a strong bid for first place. ' The men of the black gang work be- low decks in the fierce temperatures and bewilderingly complex mechanical arrangements of the engine room . That engine room, to a casual visitor, seems like the bowels of an unusually vast and intricate pinball machine, com- plicated With bright lights and deafen- ing noise. In it are most of the many engines, motors, generators and pumps maintained and operated by the black K gang, though there is a large amount of other gear scattered throughout the ship that falls under their. supervision., ln-qon-4 - The superiority of the black gang has always been challenged by those divi- sions that work topside.....the deck force, comprised of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd di- visions. The men of these divisions , known to the engineer department as 'deck apes', do the work and stand the watches necessary above decks, from the hu mble paint chipping to the respon- sibility -bearing and dangerous jobs of look-out and gun watches. A great amount of skill and knowledge is necessary to perform the duties re- quired of these men. They must moor and anchor the ship, assist the officer of the deck in his watches, raise and - lower boats, load and unload cargo, op- erate the booms and Winches, and be ready 'at all times to man the guns for action against the enemy. So proficient in airplane identification are these di- visions aboard our ship that not once during the invasions of Iwo Iima and Okinawa did they open fire on a friend- ly plane! l + "R" Division, composed of ship- fitters and carpenters, are the crafts- men of the ship. They handle all wood- work and welding and are responsible for the maintenance of the ship's boats. Their emergency duties are as impor- tant as any on theship .... that of damage control. Fortunately, the ELDORADO has sustained no damage of an emer- gency nature, but through their routine duties, HR" Division has proved its ability to deal competently with any that may arise. 'C 7 Division, handling all commun- ications, perhaps has a right to feel slightly superior aboard this, a com- munication vessel. This group of sig- nalmen, radiomen, radio technicians, and yeomen are responsible for the maintenance and operation of all equipment used in communications, and almost all 'paper work' done aboard ship. Although they man no guns, they have slaughtered their percentage of the enemy with type- writers, signal flags and paper clips. The efficiency with which they dis- charge their duties is shown by their records during the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, during which the Eldoradoss Communication gang broke all existing records for the handling of messages for any ship at any time! More than a thousand were handled in a single day! -1-o-1ob-4-v-- GD' Division is the Marine detach- ment aboard .... a wing, so to speak, of the 'C' Division. They are almost all high-speed code men, many of them are equally proficient as radio and radio teletype materiel men, and any one of them will admit that 'DP Division has the best radiomen...and the best of anything, for that matter, on the ship, and possibly in the entire Pacific Fleet. These men,,however short they may be on modesty, are long on ability, they are a group of highly skilled communication person- nel with a unique ability of making good their boasts. i...l.p.qqp-411-1 Radar, that 'miracle invention' of this war that has done so much to win it for us, is maintained and operated by 'K' Division. The activities ofthis division were kept mysteriously sec- YEOMEN ret until only recently, until the end RADIO 1 of the war brought a release on some aspects of it. Most of us, however, after reading about it, are willing to let matters stand as they weregv the technical complications of radar are sufficient to maintain its security. Radar and 'K' Division proved their value to us during the invasions by their amazing ability to detect the approaching enemy planes at great distances, thereby giving us time to prepare a suitable reception. .l--9-497-4:-1-1 'N' Division is perhaps the most versatile aboard, it is composed of Quartermasters, Cartographers, Lith- ographers, Printers, Buglers and Aer- ologists. The Quartermasters primary t duty is navigation and suffice to say they have done a first class job of sail- ing our ship some 23,000 miles without mishap. The Cartographic Section, which includes the Cartographers, Lithographers and Printers, has print- .WMM C.I.C. PLOT Seven fi: A :ff ,W Sf A A P QQ ! Q i AEROLOGISTS i 1 l . N 1 W l w 1 E . if E , COBBLER'S SHOP Q , wg f 41. N, gggwiggif 4, 'Q 5 -4 5 I I i 3 X 5 SICK BAY - h Eight l xi 3, ed over 300,000 charts and maps and over 7,000,000 pieces of copy. This Year Book was printed by the Carto- graphic Section. The Photolab has contributed its share to the success of the operations, the lab has pro- cessed over 15,000 negatives and de- livered over 130,000 prints, including stills, aerials and sonnie rolls, their battle reconnaissance photos deliver- ed by the Lab have saved many lives. The Buglers have blown reveille over 400 times Cin which function they have yet to achieve perfectionl. The Aer- ologists release their balloons and track them, then with the use of their various gismos and gadgets plot wea- ther charts and keep us posted on the coming weather. 1 'S' Division, also multi-rated, bears the main burden of maintaining the crew's morale. It is the division re- sponsible for feeding the crew, supply- ing it with cigarettes...a vital factor in morale building...handling the ship's service, small stores, disbursing, tail- oring, cobbling and laundering. Any one of these branches of GS, Division, caring for 1200 men, have a difficult jobg the most difficult of all, probably, is that of satisfying gastronomically the needs of these 1200men, each of whom uses, as a basis for his judge- ment, the memory of food that 'mother used to make'. SS' Division has done Wellg if they have consumed an inord- inate amount of aspirin, they have had sufficient reason. , Our hospital facilities are adequate- ly taken care of by 6Hy Divisiong the men comprising that division are well-trained, hard working and con- siderate. A year of treating the El- dorado's sick, with a seasoning of wounded from the invasions, have 'made them calm and ,confident veter- ans. They operate the equipment in our dental office, pharmacy, steril- izing room, dressing station, isola- tion ward, ix-ray room and diet kit- chen. They are not 'castor oil and throat spray' specialists! +-4ou-4-i-- 'Ly Division, the Eldorado's'b0at crew, is one' of the smallest and least known divisions of the ship. During the invasions they were of- ten called upon to 'make smoke' during air -raids, and to make trips to and from the beaches under enemy fire. The competency of 'L' Division gives it a proportional equality with its bigger brothers. i These are the fifteen divisions that have sailed the.Eldorado from New V York to Manila, through two invasions, through rough waters and high winds. Nine eh "AH DIVISION WM "E" DIVISION F? I-SJ "B" AND "MW DIVISION "N" DIVISION Eleven Tvyelve "R" DIVISION FIRST DIVISION THIRD DIVISION 4 I I 3 , 3 3 SECOND DIVISION --. Thifteen Fourteen "D" DIVISION "H" DIv1s1oN X6 ivff.. IZ? i NK" DIVISION ,yw"""""wWJM K1 ff ,WW "C" DIVISION fSigna1menD Fifteen Sixteen "cu D1v1s1oN cnadiomeny "C" DIVISION cfreclmiciansy 'c" DIVISION QYeomenD ORDNANCE CREW x X Seventeen I I I I I W .l 11 I! tg 'I , 1 I I I , I V i I 1 1 E AE 3 l l C W I In Xl I I .3 I I I f'i 3 fi ...Z Ag.4z,,c 'I fx II 5 I 3 Eighteen "S" DIVISION HSV" DIVISION Sew! ' X72 9, hw s f gag? ff 1 2 A M, f g X' ZA ' f Q54 , 1 'ze Q Q fe, W Q , f 9 X, a I 1. nf, Hg: w'f..ff4m W. X X f! 0 Y, xi cf, 1 Q , ,X -f , f 'Q , Q, V5 y ijx- .MM A 4 ,Ee Q, w fifeam K 0 '49 N- X 525 2 - iy 4 H 4 X x 9+ 4 A. MASTER -:AT-:ARMS FORC E fair, - 6' g me X- fe ,QW Q f f, ' Em QQ AGFA ' E, f E pew? W f 5 X f b f f f ef qs-955, ,, 4 X , ZW ff if ,. ,, we me Ab, WW J f f M17 QQ se Q, GEMM w. 1 Q f , 991 Wg NSW Wk , 5 Cx., 4 X, , f ,Q - 7 M., , KS . Je mtv, f Q Wm' YZ Www! ,r -19 M W' I X 1 ef ff N ,xv ' Q, .-1 , Xa Z ,. f .Z ,, 4 xQ"'P' f Q X xy 2 M wb I 1 5 "L" D1v1s1oN Nineteen l V1 GS rm- ' annoys. -, , , RM .P . fam 'We fy ff-1 J , H . - ,,, '.. A V ' " X ' 'A 5,5 A 'A" Wig 9 QAQT .. rim ' e' 59? 3 ..- . .5 U 'YJ 'Wg A fvs' ' ,www-My 9 gg vu- TAKE THE ONE -5-, :wi-- ffgsiikii L'-. . ' 1 'S '+ V Y ""'Q3fNi2F'1'fl53i9 yxgwtft' ' S , M.: .qu , - .... D-H SOFTBALL TEAM ' PEARL HARBOR' VIRGIL SMITH 'VS' QUENTIN REAM TRQIILLO 'VS' ROSS Twenty-two RICHARDSON FIELD ' P.H. L The forming of the crew which was to sail the ELDORADO took place at the Pre-Commissioning base at Newport, R. I. As the men finished their processing activities, and began settling into regu- lar ELDORADO routine, it became evi- dent that considerable athletic talent ' comprised the organization. Happy hour revealed some of the more pro- ficient athletes, and it didn't take long to organize a top-notch soft ball team. While still at Newport, boxing bouts l were arranged between different pre- 5 commissioning ships and our boys gave a good accoimt of themselves. Although many of the crew took part in varied sports activities, it was the softball team which made an impressive name for the ship. During our stateside ten- ure the team played and defeated four- teen different outfits, and were crowned the champions of that base. After being moved to Brooklyn and aboard ship, the sports curriculum was 5 curtailed because of space, but the soft- , ball coaches Ens. Bostrom and Lt. Pm- 1 nell continued: to plan for days when shore would beckon out in the Pacific I area. Upon arriving in Pearl Harbor games were sought for this sharp outfit, and an additional five scalps were hung beside the fourteen previous Ones. In addition, each division organized a team and a regular schedule was conducted on the grounds near our berth. While at Pearl Harbor, several boxing cards were held between the ELDORADO and the . AUBURN, and great pleasure was enjoyed by all hands, as each contestant tried to connect with every blow known to the ring. In addition to these activities all the men had ample opportunityto visit Waikiki Beach and swim in the warm waters there. Our stay in Hawaii was ' splendid for the athletically inclined, and all of the fellows took advantage of the facilities at their disposal, and prepare themselves for a long bout with the ene- f my. l d r Guam produced the first defeat for X the softball team, as the USS HUDSON 1 pinned back their ears. However a re- cord of 21 wins and 1 loss wasn't any- l thing to take lightly, but tougher oppo- , sition was to be encountered in the Philippines. At the present writing the team has amassed 28 wins against five losses and a well done should be given to the members of this invincible aggregation. Brinn, Leoty, Ujobai, '1H1rnbull, Mermilloid, Sopko, Merritt, Wilson, Wirmer, Pessetto, Thornton, Schretzman, Taylor, Silverstein, Smeeth, Cavendar, Westerdahl, Mitsch, Glenn, and Larkin are regular members, but additional support was supplied by A many more of the crew, and they too de- serve a lot of credit. These boys had a wealth of defensive strength, wonderful pitching and more than adequate hitting ability. ' i .f, .fa .7 f .M g 1 I '59Nf 1 ' I-1-fs' X, f Kiwi, ,,Wf U gwgawmm 4 Vkjg ,,.-1, 451 , f I , ,fun ' X 4, f Q I K 5 , Q, 'W ., , , A c if Y A f 3' X FM 'Wwm, AW X f X S get gi, Rf' ,. . N - , X Q5 N p Q. f 5 M VJ SERVICES - l2,AUG.1Q S Chaplain C.W.V. Iunker The Church Pemiant moves to the top of the halyard where for an hour it will fly above the national colors as men and officers pause to proclaim their supreme allegiance to their Creator and Prince of Peace. The bugle sounds 'Church Call', the boatswain pipes attenu- tion and announces over the loudespeakersi 'Divine Service is now being held. Knock off all card games. Keep silence about the deck during services. The smoking lamp is out'. Thus, Sunday after Sunday, in port or under way, men gathe- ered on the boat or superstructure deck aft or, in bad weather, below decks in the crew's messing compartment. Shortly be- fore, the Church Rigging Party transformed the spot into a very Churchly scene with the strikingly beautiful walnut altar framed from behind by deep red and blue dossal curtains. The organ or chimes helped set the background and the ser-2 vice began as the Chaplain vested and took his place. At first it was Chaplain Harvey C. Porter who guided us through pre-:commissioning detail and served as ship's chaplain. Later as we prepared and moved out for Iwo Jima it was Chap: lain Curt lunker who was to serve as our padre. From that time on, each service was to end with the singing of the tra-I ditional Navy hymn, 'Eternal Father Strong To Save', sung in a new version to include those on land, sea and in the air .... a Prayer Hymn for Our Amphibious Forces. Then, with the 'Blessing of God Almighty' the assembled worshippers depart to their duties or pastimes. 5Divine services are over. The smoking lamp is lighted' eeee traditional Navy phrase. The Church pemiant comes down and the national ensign takes its place at the top until the next service. .i.1.,.qgp.41-- The visiting Roman Catholic Chaplains, from, our sister ship, the Auburn, from the Hospital Ships off Iwo jima and at Okinawa, Fr.. Paul Redmond, the famous Marine Raider Chap- lain, all had a close bond with our ship and men. While at sea there were always at least rosary or other devotional services led by men of the ship's comapny. Notable was the Pontifical Mass and service of Benediction on August 12th in Manila Bay. The celebrant was the Apostolic Delegate, the most Reverend Archbishop Piani. The superstructure deck was jammed with men from all the ships in the harbor. When the great Jewish holidays came, the men had special services. The Passover Seder service was held in the Chief's Mess and for Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur the men joined with many others in services at Manilays Rizal Stadium. Approaching Iwo Jima, our first real invasion, our regular Communion service had even more meaning than ordinarily. The sermon wasz 'Courage is Fear which has said its Pray- erss. Present were Secretary of Navy Forrestal and several Navy dignitaries from Washington. That night before the forthcoming attack as we all waited at our battle stations, the Chaplain came around and pressed into our hands a small blue card which included the three hundred year old prayer, 6Lord, I shall be verie busie this day: I may forget Thee, but doe Thou not forget me ls It helped! The only Sunday without a service was LeDay at Okinawa but we had had our big Easter Communion service-the even- ing before below decks. As the Commanding General of the 10th Army and his staff worshipped with us, even as they had done at the good Friday services the day before, we off - ered many an earnest prayer. All Associated Press papers carried accounts of this service and the Mutual network carried the Chap1ain's Easter Message from Okinawa. When President Roosevelt died it was our Memorial Service Cwe had been at Battle Stations until eight minutes beforel which was broadcast around the world and rebroadcast to the Fleet. The film The Fleet That Came To Stay' includes that service. Later on VQE Day a portion of our Mothers' Day service was broadcast by NBC. While in Manila Bay a service of Confirmation was held the Sunday next to july 4th when the Rt. Rev. Norman Binsted, Episcopal Bishop of the Phillipines was aboard. And then:-M long to be rememberede:-sthe Service of Thanks, 'Vision after Victory', August 12th when it became apparent the laps anese were ready to quit. And then at last, our Val Day Sera vice. Twenty-three TRUMPET TONES YUL ETIDE GREET INGS T Wenty-four THE G CO PPE ' R H T THA T H10 H NOT THA Ba 'r'sN QT SN OW Y ou' ns SEBI NG fi UP TUNING GUI 7'-41? If ELODIES CIN? ISTIIAS CAROL S J-1V?7l'3V ,fs F SANTA CZ AUS CDIIES YD Sr, Q Tlilz CREW ARS CIG ND M CAKE A A, CRE ICE Twenty' me 1 1 1 F , 1 N m 1 1 IN ACTION fs x 4? 5 u 3 I 1I 'r 1 W I I I J , 1 1 'Q J" I i , 5 L x Q H THA T FEMININE roucy 9 1 11 - Twenty- six FICKIN GT HE WI W www.,-M NNER W K NM A SHIPB OARD SWING TIME PRES QR' B PRE sT1D1G THE SWEET P0 737D S THE YUMP RCYAL CROWN --MSS, .gg V REFRESHMENTS FOR ALL HAIL! THE KING Tvventy-seven 1 I I -M-W , ,I A I I W for GP? 00 'N I vs JACKIE COOPER VISITING SICK BAY 0 63' 05' 0 X53 S Y' Y: X9 Q P586 '5 Q51 Twenty-eight O 59 PH 59 xc S SYS? pl XXX ,P+ G0 " Q50 .IASEN - U.S.0. 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" :frm P: . img-5 n l-Q t ie:-1 wg. 6 P F.-.I ',17,,,.. -' M - - " 5' .,,,,j,!.' " -s----' ' 1-JJ-i-f" -' ' 1' 4 -'-'- ""' ' 7m v-1ob-oi- It was a wonderful 'morning in the early part of 1945, and as the rising sim pushed its way through billowy cloud formations to beam down on the beautiful Hawaiian Islands, the Eldor- ado -was preparing to leave her berth and head for the vast expanses of the Western Pacific. All of her crew were excited and the conversation was con- fined to wild guesses as to her ultimate destination. Within a short time we found our- selves leading a convoy of troop trans- ports, and knew for a certainty that we would soon become involved in opera- tion against the enemy. Our troops consisted of units of the Fourth and Fifth Marine Divisions, which had dis- tinguished themselves in previous en- gagements with the Iaps. For several days we headed west, and finally we arrived at Saipan, where a few days were spent in perfecting plans, logis- tics and final preparations for the early invasion of Iwo Jima. The USS Eldorado was the latest type of command ship, and for that reason was destined to act as the 6'brain" of the entire operation. Our ship of the hundreds thatengaged in the operation was the one best suited for the huge volumes of communication traffic that must necessarily flow be- ' tween commanders and their various., units. With us since our departure i from P. H. were Vice Admiral R. K. Turner, U.S. Navy Commander of the Amphibious Forces in the Pacific and his staff, also Lt. Gen. H.M. Smith, U.S.M.C., Commander of Expeditionary FIRST WAVE 'D' DAY, 'H' HOUR AT Iwo Thirty-eight I MT. SURABACHI, 'HOT ROCKS' Troops of the U.S. Marine Corps, and his staff. At Saipan we were joined by Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable James V. Forrestal and his party, which included Rear Admiral L. E. Denfield, Assistant Chief of the Bureau of Naval Persormel, and Rear Admiral E.W. Mills, Assistant Chief of the Na- val Bureau of Ships. , Iwo Jima, a small pin-point of an island in the Volcanic chain, was to be the first actual Japanese territory to be invaded. For more than two months this tiny island was subjected to mass bombing raids by our Marianas based bombers and by carrier planes. The final pre-invasion softening-up pro- cess was t1u'ee days of intense naval bombardment by the giants of our com- bined fleets. During the night of Febr- uary 18th, which was the eve of D-Day, large fires and gum flashes were vis- ible for many miles and the thtmder of the big guns sounded like a constant rumbling of thunder as they kept up their ceaseless pounding. . February 19, at 0900, the Fifth Marines went ashore on the left flank, north of the volcanic Suribachi Yamag the Fourth Marines on the right, facing the southern airfield of Motoyama. The Nips had been preparing for this for a long time, and the landings were recei- ved with withering machine gun fire and a deadly barrage of accurate mortar shelling. Great losses were suffered in the initial encounter, but by night- fall of D-Day a beach of 2 112 miles had been established, extending from y the East Boat Basin to the foot of Suri- bachi and across the narrow isthmus to the west coast. The following day the troops, supported by air, artillery 9 'S gp . X V X . . 4 .. t If . 'gsm THE FIRST FOOTHOLD ' and naval gtmfire, secured the air-strip and made further advances across the rugged terrain. Beaches were con- stantly under heavy mortar fire, and mechanized equipment was virtually useless. The laps were well dug in and the whole island was a maze of concrete and steel dugouts and pillboxes. Flame throwers were brought into play on numerous occasions, and their impor- tance cannot be over-estimated. The next two days were devoted to eliminating all resistance on the moune tain, for it was from there that the ace curate mortars and snipers were keep:- our beaches in chaos and making every landing trip one of great dan: gers. The heroic efforts of the gallant marines was eventually rewarded when at 1038 on the morning of February 23rd, our lookouts spotted the eventful raising of old glory atop rugged Suriv ' bachil It was a fitting tribute to the brave men who gave their lives to make the picture of this happening, one which will be forever remembered by a grateful nation. Considerable fighting was still in progress on the island, and the Japanese air force was still' harrassing our naval units constantly. For many of us it was the first time we had engaged the enemy, and volumes could be written on personal experiences. p Our greatest danger was the nightly air -raids, but rough weather kept them to a minimum. Our troops continued to meet with stiff resistance, but short gains were steadily putting pressure on the fanatic enemy. On March 7 the final drive gained momentum, all divisions making good progress. The Fifth fought down w if x,', 3 T OLD GLORY ATOP MT. SURIBACHI, ridges to the sea, and the Third Mar- 1Il6S, who entered the fight on February 23, had taken over the center line of at:- tack and carved out a five -hundred yard advance. OnMarch 8ththe enemy showed Signs of cracking as the Fifth pushed to the water's edge, while the Third and Fourth began the slow job of -cleaning out the caves of their lap occupants. The end was in sight, and since our ship had completed her part in this eventful struggle we prepared to turn over the amphibious command to an- other vessel, and return to the rear area. On March 9th, we departed from Iwo Jima, leaving behind not only a bad- ly beaten enemy and a piece of land which will bear the visible marks of United States armed might, but a mem- orable imprint on the pages of history which will always stand as a shrine to ways of freedom and democracy. . -l--c-1ov-o-1--- Iwo HMA fgmg to the tune ofMarine's Hymnj By M.A. Grei tzer We struck the foe a thunderous blow, At Iwo lima Isleg We drove them back with our attack, In the U.S. Marine style. Our heroess blood mixed with the mud, On that hellish little strip 3 And each foxhole brought us closer to, The finish of the Nip! ELG" THE HARINES FOUGHT AND PAID FOR THIS BEACHHEAD Thirty- nine hmm The ELDORADO, having 'completed her first invasion operation success- fully at Iwo Jima, turned the command over to a sister ship and proceeded to Leyte Gulf in the Philippines. From March 9 to March 15, 1945 we engaged in dress rehearsals for the forthcoming amphibious operations against the Iap- anese owned island of Okinawa and sur- rounding territory. This operation,as were the other successful operations against the Nipponese, was under the able command of Richmond Kelly Turner, four star admiral in charge of all Pacific amphibious operations. This was to be the largest invasion yet attempted, and everyone knew the dan- gers involved in striking so close to the homeland of the enemy. Our rehearsals consisted of the proper deployment of ships, naval gunfire to be delivered in support of invading units, air support coverage, complete demagnitude of lo- gistic problems and correct timing of every' element concerned. Finally the time for departure arrived, and once again the ELDORADO headed a large convoy of troop laden transports and cargo carrying ships. "Love"day, the day chosen for attack, was to be Easter Sunday, April' 1, 1945. ' Five days prior to the landing on Okinawa, an expeditionary force of sev- eral thousand men and a few hundred combat ships, launched a surprise attack on a group of rugged islands south of the Okinawa mainland, known as Kerama Retto. As usual the big guns of the battleships and rocket-firing LSM's, pav- ed the way for a rather easy seizure of these vital pieces of land. Everything TRANSPORT AREA ACTION N KY X ' . ., ., y. , , Wvfff?svwfa,52-vis, fsn, if 5 . V, ,fl-fluf f sl,:.1-4' f , , ,K 'A x?MY,,g?,t!xiXgiK1. 86' V F 1 'zjgfg sl' Q 355. A n Q , ,.., 9 if at r F- -fr' S , 1 K M V. gf . ..:g.ffv-.--....I-1 M -A ' I " '- - '- . ,, , ,V "' A T5 X t ,kk-, , , . a t , ,,,VV r.':,,,,- wg, afA-., ,2,- ,Wasil , J' ' 475 - 'W , ' V f M " H ' y rx r JK ' ozv THE WAY zo THE BEACH an KAMIKAZE KID MEETS HONORABLE ANCESTORS Forty was then in readiness for the huge arma- da of 1200 ships, of all varieties, to move in and take the strategically im- portant island of Okinawa. Early on the morning of Easter Sunday, the ELDORADO and her task group heard the pleasant booming of sixteen inch giants as they paved the way for the first wave of the Tenth Army Infantry and the elements of the Sixth Marines to land successfully. Love day schedule was met in every re- spect. There was a slight surface haze which reduced visibility to about 6000 yards in the early morning during the final approach to the transport area, but otherwise Weather and hydrographic conditions were excellent. Enemy sui- cide boats were 'active more or less sporadically, but the conquest of Kerama Retto reduced this instrument consider- ably. Four hundred such fboats were captured there and seventy-one more were destroyed on Love Day at Okinawa. Enemy submarines were not aggressive although numerous sound contacts and several visual sightings were made. Our forces, after landing, proceeded inland ata rapid pace and by 1230 of the first day they had captured both Yontan and Kadena airfields with only slight losses to our men. Very little fire was received by our ships and the landing of material progressed at a terrific rate. It had been a master stroke of invasion genius, and the easy seizure of this large beach-head stood us in good stead in the campaign. ' If we were harboring the thought that the enemy was going to succumb without first putting up a terrific fight, it was quickly dispelled,as it was during this N ...,fasf' -1 2 Tak' . iii., A K., f V .- H 1-fav' .5 H, .-,256 ,M fafyr O g angry, if Q' - ' , KV ' ,ua Z-if -4-"ik 4 if yvnkaf eqhvjo ffl -2Z,,v,", fur fag ,L 'W ik, ZW- " . w ' I 'fb 'R , if iytfgkuf gay, I Wk 45, ,A I 'fx x ww w ' qvyi- Sig. 5'2" ' 4252 f f :eg .Aim ,fp Lf- 5 QV , ,f xa'9'f'!sr 5 "?L':'Y, J. W T. Y ,, 4 . RETURNING TO THEIR HOMES campaign that the laps introduced large scale suicide tactics by their aircraft against our surface units. There were daily bombings, torpedo attacks and fan- atical Kamikaze charges. The most dangerous air attack occurred on April 6th when 22 of our ships were hit by suicide planes alone. The total box score of the memorable day shows that they suffered 396 planes destroyed by our combat air patrol, AA fire, and by their own tactics. The ELDORADO wasn't without her own perils from these forces and her guns were blazing almost nightly. Sev- eral near misses were registered and a few members of her gum crews were severely wounded although no fatalities resulted. Many conflicting stories will be told, but the seriousness of suicide attacks can never be exaggerated. The name Okinawa will always represent enormous losses for the Navy and the brave men who combated the Kamikaze 'kids' should forever be held in rever- ence. They did a wonderful job against the worst type of opposition and emer-' ged victorious. As the Army and Marine infantry- ' men moved further toward the capital city of Naha, the enemy had stiffened and were throwing everything they had into a desperate struggle for survival. Again the men were forced to dig them from holes like rats, but this was something they enjoyed doing and the Nips were paying with their blood. On the 16th of April, a landing on the island of Ie Shima was effected despite enemy interference. Two days later, the 18th of April, the noted war correspondent, Ernie Pyle was killed on the island by Jap sniper fire. sw-ns... BANZAI! Many such small islands surroimd- ing Okinawa were taken in much the same manner, and each of them were to play their part in the ultimate defeat of Iapan. They were to be used as bases for our deadly bombers and aggressive fighter planes. V Fanatical aircraft suicide attacks were a daily occurrence and the destroy- ers assigned Radar picket duty suffered greatly in both ships and personnel. Sev- eral of our vessels wrote a glorious name for themselves in the annals of American Navy history. Among them, the U. S. S. LAFFEY who suffered six suicide hits yet remained afloat and reached the west coast of the United States under her own power. The U. S. S. HADLEY accounted for 23 enemy planes by her AA fire alone. To us, the men of the MIGHTY EL, it meant 268 hours at battle stations with 562 designated air raids! And --------- 90 ho1.u's of "make smoke!" The duties of our flagship were com- pleted on the 17th of May when Admiral T1u'ner handed his command over to Admiral Hill and all hands of the U. S. S. A N C ON . It was with great satisfaction that we left Okinawa, for we had played an important role in the conquest of enemy held territory so very close to their mainland. As we left the Ryukus little did we think that the stubborn lap would soon call it quits. The great day of rejoic- ing found us anchored in historic Man- ila BaY,and the welcome news gave us all cause for sincere thanksgiving. This was the end of the line for a great ship and a gallant crew. y.q.,.,..... . .ll"'5w 1 ' 5, , f , . s ff af, 9 X ' ,M ,gr . , ,fa O ,,.., . 1 THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER Forty-one THE BATTLE FOR IWO IIMA By Guy Owensby Doorstep to the House of Nippon Garrison of ash and sand, , 'Sulphur Islands some still call you , Others brand you 'No Man's Land'.. From the beachhead, onward, inward Trudge our troops by inch--byyard, Stumbling over those who faltered Facing fire, dying hard. Distant intermittent rumbles Of the lap artillery, Proved their strong retaliation, Rain was their auxiliary. Broken bodies maimed with shrapnel One more mortar casts its spell, , Twisted wreckage--scattered debris Constitutes this living Hell. N ightfall marks the first dayss fighting Overcast impairs the sight, Danger lies in infiltration t Star -shells penetrate the night. Tracers from destroyers off-shore Dot the sky like liquid fire, Aircraft bomb the gun-positions Shadows lurk, grotesque and dire. Dwelling side -by -side with Satan Sand-fleas ----- Rations 6K9 and 'C9, Eyes that burn from sand and ash dust Bones that ache incessantly. From the depths of cratered shell-holes Reeks the stench of those long dead, ' Friend or foe alike are coffined Draped in khaki tinted red. ' Surabachi, King Volcano Scarred and burnt beyond rebirth, Stars and stripes now crown your summit Lessening a nations girth. Motoyama, valued air-strip Home of enemy birds of war, Shattered runways, littered rubble Mark your planes that are no more. 'Bloody Iwog, cry of havoc, t Hated for your endless strife, Where man is but a tool to kill The evils that have threatened life., Blood and bane now stain your beaches, Coral cliffs now harbor death, Cave and pillbox now are silent Tomb of those who draw no breath. Hear Ye, Emperor of Nippon! We have now unlocked the door, Men have died upon your threshold, Iwo's ours, Forevermorelll! b Forty- two, I, . UNDER FIRE K By Guy Owensby Those were dark, depressing hours For the 'Mighty Ely , i And for all other shipps who saw That Okinawa he ll. Twilight brought familiar fear To those out on that sea, For twilight meant the dusk alert And dusk meant mystery. What would come this dismal night? I shuddered at the thought win 'Kamikazi visitors' Death to uslallot? I thought no more and let it pass, KNO raids tonighv, 1 Said, N0 sooner did I say it when I heard 'FLASH RED! FLASH RED! The O-ineC was on the phones When I had reached my post, 'Customers tonights, he joked 'Looks like we're the host.' The radars turned in their reports, 'Three bogies, angels low--, A C.A.P. Reports a contact one 'Val' -'raiiyholl , Minutes passed, which seemed like hours, Two svals' vectored in, 'I see them now !', port look-out cried 'And one is in a spin !' 'Aft 5-inch, confine your range! Port 40ys fire at will? ' A puff of flakes-a blinding flash, A wing aflame-ethe kill! 'C.I.C. to fire Qcontrol:-3, t The phones then blurted forth ' 'Raids two and three at one 2-fourefive Closing to the north !' The skipper ordered 'Smoke eMake smoke ! Boats three and four drew near, The oily fog soon siftedthrough The cordite atmosphere. The Eldorado did not stir, Protected there, she lay Beneath her veil, her guns ceased fire Lest flash give her away. Silence stalked the entire ship A Patience was the word, Watching, wondering, 'Can they see us?9 Not a sound was heard. Newsfrom other ships came in, Casualties were high, One destroyer took two zero's Thank Goa, the 'Ei' got by! 'To THE TRoP1cs' 4 I haven't traveled far, But Iyve seen a doggone lot Of the beauty of the tropics And that stupid sort of rot. Oh! The mountains and the valleys And the coconut trees so tall, The gentle balmy breezes And the pretty ports of call. The shy enchanting natives, With their quaint peculiar ways. And the luscious, lissome maidens, Oh, happy carefree days. But, now I've had enough of it, My language is quite plain, As far as little me's concerned, It's just a goddam pain. For I hate the dirty natives, I loathe the ports of call, With the blasted, blazing sunshine And the coconut trees so tall. And there's the luscious maidens You ought to see the cows, With skins of brass, skirts of 'grass A dirty bunch of frows. The islands are not pretty They're just another drudge, And if you donyt believe me, Come down and be the judge. So if some stupid begger says, 'ltys such a pretty place' just ignore the silly blighter, Or kick him in the face. Youyll be doing me a favor, And please yourself as well, If you take your blasted islands And go right straight to hell. ' Author G 2-unknown Death was a reality q Of this there was no doubt, Thos dazed and wearym-numb with fear Our faith prevailed throughout. Many nights were thus repeated, Loss of sleep began to show Some lost more than sleep--from shrapnel, How many--we'll not know. Those were dark depressing hours - For the 'MightyfEl', And may God grant we'll never see More Okinawa hell. H Inl INl REID ,f., , Nvwxxvv , ADM. HILL A GEM SUI TH STAL, GEN. surrn v-nun I Ann. rumvzax, SEC- FORRE A ma, Aw. fvfmrz Q' 11,0 flhA INVA .syom SEC NAV IN PRESS CONFERENCE GEN' SMIT H- AD M . TURNER' ADM HILL Forty- three Forty-four NsTRu E T or SURRENDER - e, actinq by command of and in behalf of the Emperor of Japan, the Japanese Government and the Japanese imperial General Headquarters, hereby accept the provisions set forth in the declaration issued by the heads of the Governments of the United States, Ghina and Great Britain on 26 July i9-45, at Potsdam, and subsequently adhered to by the Union of Sovi'et Socialist Pepublics, which four powers are hereafter referred to as the 'Allied Powers. We hereby proclaim the unconditional surrender to the Allied Powers of the Japanese imperial General Headquarters and of all Japanese armed forces and all armed forces under Japanese control wherever situated P E , u We hereby command all Japanese forces wherever situated and the Japanese people to cease hostilities forthwi'th, to preserve and save from damage all ships, ai'rcraft, and military and civil property and to comply with all requirements which may be imposed by the Supreme Gommander for the Allied Powers or oy agencies of the Japanese Government at his direction, ' ' We hereby command the Japanese imperial General Headquarters to issue ot once orders to the Gommanders ot all Japanese forces and all forces under Japanese control wherever situated to surrender unconditionally themselves and all forces under their control. We hereby command all civil, military and naval officials to obey and enforce all proclamations, orders and directives deemed by the Supreme Commander tor the' Allied Powers to be proper to effectuate this surrender and issued by him or under his authority and we di'rect all such officials to remai'n at their posts and to continue to perform thei'r non-combatant duties unless specifically relieved by him or under his authority, -, . g We hereby undertake for the Emperor, the Japanese Government and their successors to carry out the provi'si'ons of the Potsdam' Declaration i'n good fai'th, and to issue whatever orders and talre whatever action may be required by the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers or by any other designated representative of the Allied Powers for the purpose of giving effect to that Declaration. We hereby command the Japanese imperial Government and the Japanese imperial General Headquarters at once to liberate all alli'ed prisoners of war and civilian internees' now under Japanese control and to provide for their protection, care, maintenance and immediate transportati'on to places as directed, The authority of the Emperor and the Japanese Government to rule the state shall be subject to the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers who will take such steps as he deems proper to effectuate these terms of surrender, Signed are TQKYQ EBAY , JAPAN of 0904 o th E ' H 6 SECOND day are SEPTEMBER 1,945 A MAMORU SHl6'EMl7'5U 51' Command and in behalf of lhe Emperor of Japan and lhe Japanese Governmenl, E YOSHIJIRO UMEZO By Command and in behalf of lhe Japanese ffiwerial General Headauorlers. Accepled gf TOKYO BAY ,JAPAN gf 0903 00 file SECOND day of SEPTEMBER 194.2 for lhe Uniled Slales, Republic of China, Unifed Kingdom and lhe, Union of Soviel Socialisl Republics, and in lhe mleresls of the other Uniled Alalions af war wilh Japan. DOUGLAS MACARTHUR Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers. A C W lVlMl TZ ' United Slales Represenlafive HSU YUNG ' CHANC Republic of China Represenlalive BRUCE FRASER Unifed Kingdom Represenlalive LIEUTENAN7' GENERAL K DEREVYANKO Union of Soviel Socialisf Republics Represenlalive 7T A. BLAME Y Gommonweallh of Auslralia Represenlalive L. iuoonf coseim VE e Cominion of -Canada Represenlalive LE CL E RC Provisional Governmenl of lhe French Republic Represenfalive C. E L. HELFRlCl-l Kingdom of lhe Alelherlands Represenlafive LEUNARD M lSlT7' Donmmion of New Zealand Represenlalive Forty- fifie . 1 -gif v FNIW --: ' - , -5- X . ,,,.y.-.N . -4- ,- ,,.-1...-.. 1 -5 . ,.,, ...-...,., ., ,,.,... ,msg ,, ,,. .. .. .-.N .f....- .4 , --...HL -,4..- ,-s,,,.,... ,,,,,N,.,:-54,,.1-,g.,,.,,,. -1,mf.-.- .. . x-.9 , g 4.-,3,':Q7,:-T-+ L yi ,. ,,..gy-,:1s5a1'1fy'f'gy:-1.-.-12 1:1-'j -gg.-eegrf-'.-1f'1'i, mr: f Q:-'fig-.1 nf. 1 , 9 ' M L 1'-""I"':4Tf5 Aiif-T i'?'lf:c"-1.3 'L--fit F7 -13'-' -' -' - 'f'+7E?"-f?1YS-"1'iY-fi.-314:17 "' "' 'Q 11454. 412:-5 .P - 1,. - I- . . --:- ,lr-, I-.., 5. ln-,,., :gr jg.. r 1 'F Q, Ao . -Y -. -' T51 " 1' 'S-"-T? -L' I ' f :1 -'I' ' -- K' - . ' gg-' ,qugifp N . ' 'fi Q5 ffx - N239 Q 9 f nb Jr- 1,3 -. S, si 2 rf- V-5.1 NN E.,-. . ,' ::igiE'E:,,- Ke l I 1 , . N ' - 5. 4 11' 1 x f- N X P Q X, x - 1 ' In V7 A- f -2- x-s-..- fi-'rw-,3KYv'1 -1-as-s ii-. ' - 1:-71,-,-5.,--.--3-l vm-.mf .-...N . -A.. - - , l Aug. 25, 1944 Sept. 6, 1944 sept. 7, 1944 sept. 15, 1944 sept. 29, 1944 Forty- six .571 Tl ' -3-.ggi " 5-bi 4 f.-Q .st -A -5 ., jf " A brief ceremony marked the occasion of the ELDORADO's commissioning .......... Captain Wallace accepted command of the ship, the first watches were set, and offi- cially the Navy took over from Bethlehem Steel Corp. Actually the commissioning 4 made no noticeable difference in life a- board the lmcompleted ship. Work contin- ued at a furious pace, workers swarmed over the hull with welding torches, pneu- matic chisels, other scientific noise mak- ers, ship's crew continued to work day and night to ready the ship for sea. On .... The ELDORADO was ready, and cast off on her maiden voyage. For the majority of men aboard, this was their first ship and their first voyage, and they made the usual contribution to Neptune as the ship rode the rough water between New York and Norfolk. 'These noveau-salts offered fervent thanks when the ship dropped an- chor in Norfolk on Although they may have thought them- selves dying of mal-de-mere. enroute, these new-comers recuperated swiftly and discovered for themselves why Norfolk is the sailor's FAVORITE LIBERTY PORT! It was with mingled feelings that the ship's company readied the ship for another step toward her ultimate destination. By Sep- tember 14th the ship was standing out to sea, when the reports of a great hurricane sweeping the East Coast began to come' in., The ELDORADO wisely remained at the mouth of the harbor, until the next day. During that time she performed her first service by picking up a weak "sos" signal on her radio equipment and by relaying it, she was directly responsible for the salva- tion of a vessel in distress. The hurricane abated sufficiently by So that the ELDORADO was able to continue her voyage. Smooth sailing from Norfolk to the mouth of the Panama Canal, and on September 21st the ELDORADO slipped through the Canal and emerged in the Paci- fic the next morning. No stop-overs in Panama ..... time was too valuable to waste and the ELDORADO was a vital ship, so it was straight from Panama to San Diego, where she arrived on She stopped there long enough only to take on ,stores and ammunition, and to drop the weeping Marine Detachment, which, in- stead of enjoying liberties inSan Francisco and Sacramento, ,would undergo a "tough- ening" process in San Diego. Sadly we said good-bye to the Marines, and left San Diego, to arrive next day. . R xxx U ' . . . , iff? x -9 .1 Q1 . ff' 9 , 5159 ff , .jg-- , X ,frlggigs X4 Wf as 'n 4 ,- ' -1' -.xxx 9 Q Bom' do 1' - 3 iv - 11 " - U . W wc, WWW 'l l Ah i l A an t' 1 V eg o fl n h l ,W W , 9 ' sa' 4 .1 DC Zig? X , Q1 fa f -Ziff' 1. ,jgjfv it z ,Q , 164.44 Je. X., fi' 42,1 2 ' -faq ,Mem Lffl' XS X 4' fa fxq-, X xzilv, 4, X V? X fix' ' fa. ,- il, Z ,fra-, K - X., Am? 5""' H 4 2 f, 4-f 1 - xi ,I ,f Vfzf' ' 'x 'QQ , V ,f f 1 X Wx QW 1 1 .2 , 4? 5,7525 1' , f rim' '-- . A ,- , ey-4i k0f -we A i f f , X-Wall . 'W 4035 few Q W .. ' fe.-.S A? PA X' f ff ,V 2,5 X 'f f Vg, J K it DQ -All T p l I f J N! yt I g - ,-If Hx V K 1 V 5 l U Sept. 30, 1944 Nov. 22, 1944 Nov. 28, 1944 Jan. 27, 1945 Feb. 11, 1945 Feb. 12, 1945 Feb. 19, 1945 March 9, 1945 March 16, 1945 March 27, 1945 At Mare Island. There it was Bethlehem Steel Yard all over again, with shipyard workers crowding aboard and cutting vi- ciously into the vessel. Apparently the en- tire ship had to be torn apart and reassem- bled on different lines, The job was mn-ac- ulously completed in a few short weeks, stores were brought aboard, ammunition, all last minute bits of miscellaneous gear. Our Marines were returned to us, tanned and rugged, and still weeping. No liberty for them, for we shoved off. Our destination was one of those secrets known to everyone .... Pearl Harbor. En- route a plane crashed into the ocean near the ship and we stopped long enough to pick up the planes former occupants, who were damp, but unhurt. And the ELDORADO pulled into Pearl Har- bor with the crew eagerly gazing over the side for a first glimpse of the Hawaiian Islands, Land of Paradise, hula girls, leisl No leis ...... work! More last minute re- pairs, gear brought aboard, stores .... and the boys came back from liberty saying much the same thing about Pearl Harbor as they said about Norfolk. Almost a month there, but on We pulled out of Pearl Harbor, boundfor the forward areas of the Pacific. We stopped for two days at Eniwetok .... not much to see on that atoll.. and hove to at Saipan on We took a long look at that island, taken only a short time before from the Iapanese. It began to dawn upon us that war was somen thing besides liberties and chow lines. The meaning of war became even clearer on When we left Saipan for a short rehearsal, off Tinian. A dress rehearsal, complete with planes, bombs, ships, marines. It pro- ceeded, apparently, quite satisfactorily, and on February 16th we left Saipan in convoy, and arrived at Iwo lima in time for the' grand opening on Our first contact with those little yellow men we'd been hearing so much about! None of us were scared ...... even on February 22, when the japanese deluged us with 12 air- raids that one night .... but our sensations were rather peculiar! No one seemed to re- gret it when we left Iwo Jima on Two days later we arrived in Guam, and two days after that, before we had a chance to tell the Guamanians that we were heroes, we left Guam. Leyte, of the Philippines, was our objective this time, and we arrived on We successfully invaded the fleet recreational ,Q area, drank beer, traded with the natives land Rr' many of us lost our shirtsl, and on We left Leyte again in convoy, and on April 1, 1945 May 185 1945 ' May 22, 1945 O June 9, 1945 Iune 14, 1945 August 9, 1945 We arrived for the opening of "Okinawa", To us, the battle-worn and bogie-wise veterans of one invasion, it was all routine...the "Flash Red, Control Green" that sounded night after night, the smoke that filled our compartments, the suicide bent Japanese airmen., It was more intensified at Okinawag the raids came oftener, and the laps dived more recklessly. There was the night of Hirohito's birthday, celebrated by the Jap airmen in an unprecedented mass raid' on the Okinawa invasion fleet. On We left Okinawa, and cheerfully! The Japanese suicide plane that swept close ,by us shortly be- fore we left and, missing us, plunged into the New Mexico , did nothing to dampen that cheer- fulness. We made Guam by - Where we breathed deeply once again and re- laxed. Stores, painting, ship's work .... every- thing possible was done to make the ship per- fectly conditioned. On We left Guam, boxmd for the Philippines, and on We dropped anchor in Manila Bay. Liberty ashore ..... we gaped at the blasted city, ex- plored the sights, sounds ---- and smellsg aboard ship we were readying for the next operation, when on The first atomic bomb was dropped! From then on smooth sailing! The ELDORADO had accomplished her mission, and was an honored survivor! G Frisco, here we come!! 11-11 1 . -, - - , l il- 'ii' ' A 4' Lwgf T ' TJ f ' ,-Ya-Lia ff x-1 X-14,5 Eff .fr.J , K 1 , 2-D L Ml ' ff- ' A f f , f K ?llLfQ-f' 1 .1 X1 XI I xg? f 1 1 . , Lf- f Y'-. '. " I , -1 ,-,jk . ,. .. , . 1--111.,..-, 'L 1 , Jf , ' - . 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Bulletin, Sec Nav Ltr. 45-526 of 28, May, 1945, has been complied with in its production. Published at no cost to the government, on gov,- ermnent equipment. Photographs and news matter herein have been approved by censorship, and issues, unless ,expres- sly ordered otherwise, may be mailed by all personnel.


Suggestions in the Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book collection:

Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1951 Edition, Page 1

1951

Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1962 Edition, Page 1

1962

Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1966 Edition, Page 1

1966

Eldorado (AGC 11) - Naval Cruise Book online yearbook collection, 1967 Edition, Page 1

1967

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.