Edwardsville High School - Tiger Yearbook (Edwardsville, IL)

 - Class of 1942

Page 1 of 136

 

Edwardsville High School - Tiger Yearbook (Edwardsville, IL) online yearbook collection, 1942 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 136 of the 1942 volume:

MEET THE “TIGER” 1942 At Edvuardsville High School ALBERT HUGGINS. BUSINESS MANAGERIllinois SeniorFOREWORD ★ After a year’s labor, the Tiger Staff, in behalf of the class of ’42, presents the 1942 Tiger. During the past year we have witnessed the completion of a new addition to our school. This annex is symbolical of the forward progress of E. H. S. in all of its activities. In this annual we have recorded activities of the past year. We also hope that this Tiger upholds the high standard set by previous annuals. Our greatest desire has been to present an annual that not only lives up to former standards, but surpasses others in all respects. As you page through the Tiger, remember that it is a memorial to one of the happiest years of your life. 4CONTENTS PERSONNEL 0 This section is dedicated to the School Board, Administration, and Faculty. CLASSES 0 Here we present the student body, their history, past and present, and snaps of them. SPORTS 0 Ah! mighty muscles, towering torsos; that’s the track, football, and basketball men of E. H. S. ACTIVITIES % Our band, clubs, plays, and parties; the activities which gave so much entertainment are shown here. ADVERTISEMENTS 5 9 In this section are listed those merchants of Ed-wardsville who made it possible to publish the Tiger. 6★ PERSONNELSUPERINTENDENT. MR. ALEXANDER PRINCIPAL. MR. BLOOGETT ADMINISTRATION Our school is like a pump, constantly pumping education. Mr. Alexander, as Superintendent, sees that education flows forth in a steady stream; not only here, incidently, but also in the other Public Schools of Edwardsville. And while wondering where he will get money for another school improvement, he usually is brightening our halls with his friendly smile. Mr. Blodgett pays special attention to the quality of the education that flows forth. If the general policy of the school needs to be altered in any way, he sees that it is altered. He is the teacher’s teacher. One must admit that he has perhaps the most difficult job in our school. Mr. Love is watcher of the boys; and at the same time their friend and counselor. He is our Dean of Boys and the Vice-principal. Every boy knows him personally, for what boy hasn’t paid him a visit in his little office? And no one can say that the flow of the stream of education has ever slackened on his account. Miss Sloan, Dean of Girls, sees that the girls come daily to get their share of education. She is their friend and helper. The girls “beat a path’’ to her door in her fine new office in the addition; this is her first year in her richly deserved office. 8JAMES L. REED President A. E. BAYER Secretary R. C. CUNNINGHAM CLYDE FRUIT Not Pictured Mrs E. A. BOLLMAN DR. WAYNE B. COX . J. F. Gillham BOARD OF EDUCA TION Behind all progress and activities of our school is a group of people whose work is often too easily slighted. This group is our Board of Education. Through this board we have obtained, along with many other things, the new addition to E. H. S. It is very evident that this organiaztion is composed of people who know the feelings and understand the activities of high school students. We are grateful to the Board for the benefits we received from it and hope they have just as many more successful years as they have had. This year also marks the retirement of Mr. Bollman, who has served on the Board of Education for twenty-four years. Everyone appreciates the work he has done on the Board and we all pay our respects and give our best wishes to him. 9EDNA ABENBRINK Home Economic E. 111. St. Tea.. B. Ed.; Colorado State ALICE CHEEK English U. of Illinois. A. B.; U. of Missouri, M. A.; U. of California JOHN DRISCOLL English Eureka College. Washington U.. U. of Illinois A. M. GIBSON Science III. Wesleyan. B. S.; U. of Illinois. U. of Michigan VERA ADAMS Foreign Languages So. 111. Normal. B. Ed.; U. of Wis., M. A.; Washington U.. U. of Colorado. Western Reserve U. GRACE M. CUNNINGHAM Edu. and Mod. Lang. U. of 111.. B. S.; U. of Colo.. M. A.; Mc-Kendree Col.. U. of Wisconsin MRS. FLETCHER Librarian ' • . 7 ? ft ESTHER HARLAN Phys. Ed.. Art Illinois State Normal. B. Ed. HARRY ALLEN Commerce III. St. Normal. B. Ed.; U. of Colorado GRACE DAVIS Commerce Eureka College. 111. St. Normal U.. U. of Illinois, U. of Colorado CARLA GEWE Foreign Languages Washington U.. B. A.; U. of Colorado. M. A.; U. of Wisconsin EMIL HAUDRICH Agriculture U. of Illinois. B. S. PAUL HEBBERGER Math., Ind. Arts Cen. Mo. St. Tea. Col.. B. S.; Washington U. LYLE HENDERSON Social Science E. III. State. B. Ed.; U. of Illinois FACULTY Pictured on these two pages is the group of hardy individuals who during the past year have tried to increase the education and knowledge of every student. Take your hats off to them because they really tackled a job! Even though it is hard to believe, judging by the action of the students, everyone is grateful to them. Students, just think what a dreary place old E. H. S. would be if it weren’t for Mr. Love’s never-failing greeting, Miss Sloan’s cheery smile, or Mr. Allen’s chuckle as he fires a tough Bookkeeping test 10FACULTY at you. All the teachers have been doing things which make them liked by all students. This year we lost a few teachers by various means. Mr. Lercher is serving in the U. S. Army; Miss Jones and Miss Voss drifted lightly (?) away from us on the wings of marriage and Mr. Dragalin is now teaching at another school. But to offset this a new group of teachers were added to E. H. S.: Mr. Hebberger and Mr. Miner as Math instructors; Miss Cunningham, Spanish; Miss Abenbrink, Home Ec; Miss Matheson, Librarian; Miss Lumb, Science; and Mr. Tracy, Social Studies. CATHERINE HOSKINS Commerce C rb'dale T. C., B. Ed.; Baylor College. Bowling Green C. of C., U. of Iowa DON LERCHER Science West. III. St.. B. E.; Colorado State RALPH SHANNON Music Illinois Wesleyan, B. of Music; Illinois St. Normal U. ELNORE STOLDT Science MacMurray Col., A. B. WILMA JONES English Drury College. A. B.; Wash. U., M. A.; St. L. School of Theatre MARIE MATHESON Modern Languages Carthage Col.. A. B.; U. of Illinois. B. S. GLENN C. SMITH Physical Education U. of Missouri. B. S.; U. of Illinois v FRANCIS TENDICK Home Economics MacMurray CoL. B. §.; U. of Illinois P. H. KINSEL Social Science U. of Illinois. Eastern 111. St., B. S.; Washington U.. M. A. HILBERT MINER Mathematics Western Illinois St.. B. E. S. S. SMITH Commerce Bradley Tech.. B. S. J '  Hri— i ' w ■ ■;'- . ■ •• y v.. ? .vsftaw ★ CLASSES OFFICERS HAROLD LANKFORD President BETTY FAYE ROHRKASTE Vice-president EUNICE NEUDECKER Secretary SENIOR CLASS HISTORY We looked like Freshmen, we talked like Freshmen, we acted like Freshmen—we were Freshmen. But that was way back in 1938. We weren’t much then, just something to be shoved around in the halls between bells, and laughed at in study halls after the bells; but we took it and liked it. It wasn’t long, though, before the shoving stopped—we were Sophomores—and were getting pretty big ourselves. We let everyone know it too. There wasn’t a football or basketball game we didn’t see, we were at all the plays and parties—well, we could dance too. We were noticed a little more by then, but —the “big awakening” came in 1940 when we, as Juniors, presented the never to be forgotten play, “What A Life.” We were then a success, and we remained a success through our studying and other activities, and now— As Seniors we are at the top of the ladder of success (at least in our own eyes, we are) and we hope the memories of the class of 1942 will be as many and as pleasant as our memories of “dear old E. H. S.” 14SENIOR CLASS WILL I, Glenn Ackermann, leave because the doors are too low. I, Ed Agles, leave my height to “Fergie.” I, Jack Allen, leave to join the Foreign Legion, where they will appreciate my infernal gabbing. I, Annabel Ambuel, leave my newspaper job to anyone who hasn’t time to study. I, Evelyn Ammann, leave smilingly and sweetly. I, Ruby Augsburger, leave Clara to carry on in my place. I, Fred Autenrieb, leave to take better care of my little brother and sister. I, Bob Baker, leave—gone, but not forgotten. I, Gene Bardelmeier, leave my knowledge of farming to Junior Gaertner. I, Melba Bartels, leave to spend more time in the county with Millie Gieseking. I, Mary Bayer, leave for Collinsville. I, Roland Beck, leave to peddle my groceries. I, Jack Belshaw, leave my muscular build to “Baby-Dumpling” Hensley I, Gilbert Bergschneider, leave to go out and get a short beer. I, Bill Biegert, leave to become head man at Ballweg’s. I, Verda Bigham, leave my telephone number with the Hi-Y. I, Bob Birmingham, leave to continue my courtship in Worden I, Ida Bircher, leave without a worry or a care. I, Dorothy Bonham, leave in time to get married—I hope I, Jean Brockmeier, leave for “High-land-er” low land. I, Lester Buhrmester, leave to take over the paint shop. I, Mathew Burger, leave my height to Lawrence Schultz. I, Russell Bunn, leave for Worden on the 3:30 train. I, Bob Burroughs, leave to go snap-happy. I, Cecil Burrus, leave, but not without Pat. I, Carla Caldwell, leave my squeeky shoes to Mr. Shannon. I, Sam Caldwell, leave in my maroon coupe. I, Kathleen Cheney, leave to be with Cletus. I, Harold Clawson, leave my sister Lena to dazzle the boys. I, Mary Cooper, leave my quiet manner to Bill Hicks. I, Harold Corrie, leave to continue in my bashful (?) way. I, Hilda Crocker, leave to dish out more ice cream. CONTINUED ON PAGE 87ACKERMAN. GLEN “Glen'’ “Ichabod Crane” AGLES. EDWARD “E. C.” "Too tall to walk under hla own um brella!” Football 1-2-3-4. ALLEN. JOHN "Jack” le can say In minutes what it takes others to say in a half hour.” Speech Club 1-2-3-4; Latin Club 1-2-3-4; Operetta 1-2-4; Jr. Play 3; Tiger Staff 4; Class Sec.-Treas. 3; Latin Club Sec. 2. AMBUEHL. ANNABEL “Annabel” “Ah. romance, will It never come?” Alhambra High 1-2; Cheer Leader 1-2; Band 1-2; Newspaper Staff 1-2-4; Hl-Trl 3-4; Home Ec. 4; Library Club Sec. 4. AMMANN, EVELYN “Evie” “Seen, but seldom heard.” Hi-Tri 2-3-4; Home Ec. 3-4; Commerce 3. AUGSBURGER. RUBY “Reuben" “There’s mischief In this girl." Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; Commerce Club 3-4; Stamp Club 3-4; Latin Club 3-4; Band 1-4; Speech Club 1. $ BAKER. ROBERT “Bob” "If ignorance is bliss. I’m blistered.” Speech Club 1-2-3-4; Cheer Club 1; Football 1; Jr. Play 3. BARDELMEIER. GENE “Baldy” “A good natured country chap.” Latin Club 1-2; FFA 3-4; Cheer Club 1-2; Speech Club 4; FFA Sec. 4. BARTELS. MELBA “Melba” “All the world loves a quiet girl.” Latin Club 2-3-4; Commerce Club 3; Hi-Tri 2 3-4. BAYER, MARY “Dutchie” "Has anyone seen a boy?” Hi-Tri 1-2 3-4; Home Ec. 3-4; Glee Club 3-4. BECK. ROLAND “Beck” “Girls, won’t you give me a chance?” Camera Club 3. BELSHAW. JOHN “Jack” "Short and snappy.” Speech Club Cheer Club 1-2; French Club 1; Band l; 1. BROCKMEIER, JEAN “I love all the boys and me.” Glee Club 1-2; Hi-Tri 1 Ec. 3-4; Cheer Club 1; GA A 3; Football Maid 3. BURROUGHS. BOB “Boobye” “I’m not In the roll of common men.” Operetta 1-2-3: Hi-Y 2-3-4; Tiger 4; Cheer Leader 1; Science Club 3-4; Camera Club 2-3-4; HI-Y Vice Pres. 4. LESTER “Doc” ■nothing to say for a change.” Chess Club 4. BURRUS. CECIL “Mike” “Her initiats spell ’PET’." Track 1; Basketball 4; Speech 4. BUNN. Russell “Russy” “I arrived here for a purpose—but what?" Softball 3; Basketball 4; Latin Club 3; Band 4; Chorus 2-3; Marine 1-2-3; Latin Vice Pres. CALDWELL. CARLA “Carla” “When there’s nothing else to do nights. I study.” Speech Club 1-2-4; Operetta 2-4; Student Council; A Cappella 4; Tiger Staff 4; Hi-Tri Vice Pres.; Latin Club Sec. 4; Chorus Sec. 2. “He breaks the record for staying after “Lend me school.” Glee Club 1-2; Cheer Club 1-2. Stamp Club BIGHAM. VERDA “Verda" gets around." Latin Club 4; Hi-; Tiger Times 4; Collinsville 1%. IDA lde” B l Marine 1-2-3; Chorus BONHAM. DOROTHY “Dot" prefers a green coupe.” Hl-Trl Home Ec. 3-4; Cheer Club 1; 3; Latin 1-2; Football Maid 3. BERGSCHNEIDER. GILBERT “Gib” BIRCHER. “Eager to learn.” 1-2-3. BIEGERT. WILLIAM CATALANO. SAM “Sam” "What makes you think he’s Italian?” Band 1-2. DAVIS. WILLIAM “Bill” “The true American boy.” Operetta 3-4; Speech Club 1-2-3-4; Science Club 2-3; A Cappella 4; French Club 1-2; Student Council 2; Cheer Leader 2-3-4. DAUBE. EUGENE “Jim” "It is better to play than do nothing.” Worden High 1-2-3; Glee Club 2-3; Soft-ball 2-3; Basketball 2-3; Track 2-3. DYE. NORMA “Bill” “Short, plump and sweet.” GA A 3-4; Latin 2-3; Glee Club 1; Science Club 4; Commerce Club 4. CHENEY, KATHLEEN “Katy” “A steady girl." Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; Latin Club 1-2; Home Ec. 3-4. DAECH, HAROLD “Harold” ”Dld someone say they liked my humor?” Commerce Club 4; Track 1; Basketball 1; Tiger Times 4. DURHAM. CLIFFORD EADS, ROBERT “Bob” “Neglected by the gentler sex.” Cheer Club 1-2-3; Model Club 1-2; Football 1-2-3-4; Track 1-2-3-4; 8clence 4. Speech 4. COOPER. MARY “Mary” "Cute as she can be.” Band 1-2; Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; Jr. Play 3. DANNENBERG. LOIS “Dickie” “I tell Jokes too.” GAA 1-2-3-4; Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; Glee Club 4; Home Ec. 3-4; Tiger Times 4; Cheer Club 1-2; Speech Club 4. DURHAM. ROLLA “Bull” “Oh. for a lasting love.” Football 1-2; Wrestling 1; Track 1-2; FFA 3-4. EBERHART. HILBERT “Hib” “Sorta bashful but—oh my!” French Club 4; Model Club 4; FFA 3-4. 17» EBERHART, WILMA, "Wilma” “A city minded country lass.” Hl-Tri 1-2-3-4; French Club 1-2; Home Ec. 4: Commerce 3-4; Hl-Trl Vice Pres. 4; French Club Sec. 1. EI HAUSEN, QUINTEN "Ike” "He's on the Rood side of the mayor.” Basketball 1-2-3-4; Track 1; Speech Club 4. EDWARDS. DOUGLAS "Doug” ‘‘i11® sister Is his chaperone." Club 4. ktamp EILERS, HARRIS "Harry" ‘None but himself can be his parallel " EICKMANN. DOROTHY "Dot” "I’ll have a Koch,’ please." GAA 3-4; Home Ec. 3-4; Science Club 3-4; Cheer Club 3-4; Hi-Trl 1-2; Speech Club 4. ENGLISH, FORREST "Banks” "Keep the school fires burning.” Worden High 1-2-3; Basketball 3. ERLICH, LEON "Leon” "There must be hard work In him for none ever comes out.” Cheer Club 1-2; Football 1-2-3-4; Basketball 1-2; Cheer Leader 1. FINK, DORIS "Finkie” "A woman’s hair is her cr Hl-Tri 1-2-3-4; Glee Club,4;l ‘Tillie’ Pres. Speech wtDcn. rnUL raui y "I’m speedy.” Worden High FFA 4. 1-2-3; GENNER, ALBERTA "Berdie” "A girl you should know." GAA 1; Glee Club 1-2-3-4; Hl-Trl 4; German Club 1-2; Home Ec. 4; German Club Vi Pres. 2. ERSPAMER, MATILDA. "I never avoid a mirror.” StamD ri„K 1-2-3; Commerce Club 1-2-3-4 3-4; Speech’Club 4 Ec. 4. 1-2-3-4; Glee Tiger Times 1 Club •2-4; Home FISCHER, LLOYD "Fi h" "Women are the least of my worn . • » Latin Club 1-2. les- FHltDMOFF RUTFL'"Ruth.e" "Many a boy fc'odriqueretT by' herJ Hl-Tri 1-2-3-4; Latin Club 1-2; Glee 1-2; Cheer Club 1; Home. Ec. Tragic 3.4-Football Mai — fl FAGAN. MATHEW "Ceasar” "The Great American Problem.” Latin 2; Speech Club 4; Jr. Play 3. FISCHtF MUR I EL ANN "Jerry — "She wears a lovely shade of lipstick.” Clearwater High 1-2; Science Club 4; Hl-Tri 3-4; Spanish 2; Glee Club 1; Home Ec. 3-4; Speech Club 4. GILDERSLEEVE, MARGA "She studies army etiqu Club 1-2; Hl-Trl 1-2-3-4; Speech Commerce Club 4; Glee Club 'Lv, GREBEL, KENNETH "Kenny” %£} 5 ‘ "Remember me?" GAERTNER, BERNICE "Bernice” A maiden fair.” Hl-Trl 1-2-3-4; Iatin ib 1-2: Home Ec. 3-4. ESEKING. MILDRED "Mildred” A pleasant companion.” Latin Club ■A: Commerce Club 3; e Ec. 4; Glee Club 4. Hl-Trl 2-3-4; Stamp Club 4. ■ bon.” Speech Latin 2-3; Com-Pres. 4. GREENWOOD. MAXINE "Max” "An All American Girl.” GAA 1-2-3-4; Speech Club 1-2-3-4; Hi-Trl 1-2-3-4; Cheer Club 1; Student Council 1; GAA Pres. 4; Speech Treas. 2. GRANT. LESTER "Le ” "I’ll try anything and everything.” Worden High 1-2-3. GROSENHEI DER. GERALD "Grosy” "A little man but a mighty wrestler.” Wrestling 1-2; Stamp Club 1; Cheer Club 1. GWYN, LEO "Jeep” "A stranger in our midst.” Worden High 1-2-3; Band 1-2-3; Glee Club 1. HAMEL, EUGENE "Ham” "I swallowed my gum on the way to get my first date.” HANVEY, " Al” Hi-Tri 1-2-terce Club 3-4; HARRELL, MARY LU "Lulu” "Always out for a good time." Speech 1-2-3-4; GAA 1-2-3-4; Tiger Times 2-3-4; Home Ec. 4; Glee Club 1-3-4; French 1; Pres. Hl-Trl 2; Jr. Play 3. HENRY, SIMON "Simon” "Mr. Love’s right-hand man." Band 1. HENTZ. ROBERT "Tink” "Avaunt thee, woman.” Stamp Club 1-2; Glee Club 3; Operetta 3; Band 1-2. H1SE. MADGE "Madge" "Success Is written on her face.” Hl-Tri 2-3-4; Commerce 3-4; Speech 4. HOMANN, KENNETH "Kenny” "Men like me are hard to find.” FFA 4. HOGUE, CHARLES "Charlie” "Do you think I’m smart? I hope. Football 1-4; Track 1. HOWERTON, IRMA "Irmie” "It isn’t James, it’s Bill.” HOLT. EUNICE "Eunie” "She’s Just bustlin’ along." Hl-Tri 1-2-3-4; Commerce Club 3-4; Glee Club 4. HUELSKAMP. ROGER "Poge” "Let me teach you how to bowl.” 19HUGGINS. ALBERT “Hug" “He will accomplish much." Band 1 2-3-4; Glee Club 1-2; Speech Club 2-3-4; Student Council 3-4; Cheer leader 1; Operetta 2; Tiger Staff 4. JACOBS. “I was born to Science Club 1 2; Cheer Leader 1 2; Band 1-2-4; Glee RUTH “Ruth" dance." Shipman 1-2 Pres. Science Club 1 Library 4; Hl-Trl 3-4 Club 1-2. HUSER. HELEN “Nina" “You never know what she's going to do next.” Speech Club 1. JAHN. DOROTHY “Dottie" “She makes the ivories fly.” 3-4; Glee Club Accompanist 3-4; Be. 4; Operetta 3-4. Latin Home JACOBS. MARY ELLEN “Jakie" “Just wait, i’ll show you what I can do." Hi-Tri 4; Home Ec. 4. JAROS. “Quiet, but Commerce 3: Club 1. EMILY Jk. Em oh. boy!” Hi-Tri 2-3-4; Student Council 4; Latin JOHNSON. ALMA “Johnnie" “Yes. we have no gossip." Tiger Times 3-4; Tiger Staff 4; Hi-Tri Council 1-4; Speech Club 1-2 3-4; Commerce Club 3; Operetta 2-3-4; Junior Play 3. JOHNSO r BONITA “N.ta" "L 0 lot 'women make the world go roundMr Independence. Kansas 1-2; GAA 1-2-3-4; Home Ec. 3; Hl-Trl 3-4; Commerce Club 3-4. JONES. AARON “Buddy” “A man’s best friend is his dog.” FFA 3-4; Track 3-4. JONES. DOROTHY “Dot" “Some day I will tell you of my secret love afTair.” Hl-Trl 1-2-3-4; Speech Club 3 4; Home Ec. 3-4; Latin Club 1. KAHTZ. ROBERT “Bob" “Free, fast and furious." Operetta 2-3-4; Track 1 2-3-4; Tiger Staff 4; Hl-Y Pres. 4; Class Vice Pres. 2; Student Council 4; Glee Club 3. KERSHAW. GERALDINE “Gerry" “Nice to know." Hi-Tri 1-2 3-4; Speech 12-3-4; Commerce Club 4; GAA 12-3-4; Tiger Tales 2 3. KLAUSTERMEIER. VERNON “Vern" “I’m Cincinnati bound." Tiger Times 4. KESL. KATHRYN »“Kay' “Seriousness, sweet and smJlinj 12-3-4; Hl-Trl 1-2-3-4; Glee Play 3; Tiger Staff Speech Sec.-Treas. KASSING. NORMA "Nik" “Good natured as the day is Speech Club 1; Hl-Trl 1-2-3-4; 3-4; Commerce Club 2. long." Home Ec. KOLE “Our own Wrestling 2; “The bi Tri 2-3-4 5 Speech 4; KLAUSING. ROSE “Rose Mae" the quiet girl she seems to be." Hi-TrlV 3-4; Home Ec. 3-4; Cheer Club l;(UblV Club 4; Jr. Play 3. UETER. LEROY “Le” nows all there is to know." FFA JA. THOMAS sign painter.’ Football 2-3-4. ALICE Glen Carbon.” Club 2-3; Commerce 3. A “Judy" o'-is sweet, from her ' Speech Club 1-2-3-4; k- ;' Glee Club 1-2-3-4; Class :er Staff 4; Hi-Tri Council Club Vice Pres. 3. LANGWISCH. 'W “Won’t “Isle” me?" Stamp ISABELLE some one make up my mind for Commerce Club 3; Hl-Trl 3-4; Club 3-4; Home Ec. 4. LADD. JACKLYN “Jackie" “Blonde Bomber." Glee Club 12 4; Hi-Tri 1-2-4; Speech Club 2-4; Football Maid 1-2-3: Operetta 4. LANKFORD. HAROLD “Lank" “You gotta be a football hero to get along with the beautiful girls." Speech Club 1-2-3; Football 1-2-3-4; Track 2-3-4; Operetta 3; Hl-Y 4; Sec.-Treas. Boys’ Chorus 3; Class Pres. 4; Football Captain 4. LAUTNER. ALLIEN “Allien" “A girl you can depend on.” Commerce Club 2-3; Home Ec. 3-4; Hi-Trl 3-4. LAWYER, GORDON “Gardenia" “I drove all the girls wild." Tiger Times 4; Athletic Manager 4. LEE. “Go West. Tri 1-2 3-4; 2-3-4; Band Club 1-2. LA VERNE “Bunny" young maid, go West." Hi-Home Ec. 3-4; Speech Club 1-2; Football Maid 2; Latin RAYMOND “Ray" the badge of inexpe- LONG. “Blushes are rience." FFA 3-4; Speech Club 4; Hi-Y 4: Track 3: Library Club 4; FFA Pres. 4. I jif ASSA. CHARLES “Shadow” “My speech is on Aeronautical Engineering." Model Club 2; Science Club 2: Camera Club 2; Stamp Club 3; Hi-Y 3; Track 2. LOVE. BETTY “Betty" “A whiz in bookkeeping." French Club 1-2; Hi-Tri 3-4; Commerce Club. MATEYKA. Leona “Lonnie" “It’s hard to be wise when you’re in love." Latin Club 1-2; Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; GAA 1-2-3-4; Football Maid 3; Glee Club 1-2-4; Operetta 2; Home Ec. 3. LOZIER. ANITA “Shorty" “Ever quiet and serene.” MATEYKA. LORENE “Teka" “How about a date tonight?" Hi-Tri 12-3-4; Home Ec. 3-4: Stamp Club 1; Cheer Club 1; Library Club 4. MCDERMOTT. ANN “Tootle" “Gentlemen prefer blondes I’m blonde." GAA 1-2-3 4; Hi-Trl 2-3; Cheer Club 1; Commerce Club 4. McREAKEN, VIRGINIA “Ginger" “I’m quiet but sweet as sugar." GAA 2 3-4; Hi-Trl 2-3; Commerce Club 4; GAA Sec. 4. MEYER, ELEANOR “Connie" "A girl, wise or otherwise." Worden High 1 2-3; Glee Club 2 3; GAA 1-3; Band 1-2 3-4; Home Ec. 4; Hi-Tri 4. 21MEYER, ELTON “Shorty" “Women are my specialty." Hl-Y 4; Speech Club 1-2-3-4; Model Club 1; Jr. Play 3; Chorus 4; Band 1; Science Club 1-2; Tiger Times 2-3. MILLER, MARGARET ANN “Margie" “A petite brownette." Commerce Club 3; GAA 1-2-3-4; Home Ec. 3-4; Hl-Trl 1-2-3-4; Football Maid 2; Glee Club 2-4; GAA Treas. 4: Jr. Play 3. w MUNZERT, CHARLES “Chuck" “Women are the pastime of the idle." MEYER. LORNA “Lorny” “That’s right, I'm Lorna." Glee Club 1-2-3-4; Operetta 2-3-4; Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; Tiger StafT 4; Hon e Ec. 3-4; Home Ec. Sec. 3-4; A Cappella 4; Swing Band 4. ORMA iyfform" sweet." ‘Speech Club 4; BandJI. NEUDECKER. EUNICE “Eunie” “She’s gone steady two years with a mechanic." Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; Speech Club 1-2-3-4; Glee Club 1-4; Commerce Club 3; Commerce Club Vice Pres. 3; Senior Class Sec-Treas. 4. NORMA -Normy” "Neil N«M7l»a x Glee Club 1-2 3-4; Ope re MB 2-3-4 Mi-O'ri 1-2-3-4; Tiger Staff 4; Home E {A Student Council 1; A Cappella 4; lSwlng Band 4. MORGAN. JOHN “Slug" “Give a man a girl he can love.” Speech Club 1-4; Band 1-2 3; Chorus 1-3; Athletic Manager 2-3; Hl-Y 4. NEUHAUS, LLOYD “Lid" “You don’t realize my possibilities." Glee Club 1-2-3-4; Softball 1-2; Band 1-2-3-4; Operetta 3; Jr. Play 3. NILSSON. JEWELL “Julie” “She thinks too much, such girls are dangerous." Speech Club 2-3-4; Latin Club 2-3-4; GAA 2-3-4; Hl-Trl 1-2-3-4; Commerce Club 2; Class Pres. 1; Vice Pres, of Latin Club 2. NIX. DOROTHY “Dot” "That laugh of hers.” Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; Orchestra 4; Commerce Club 3; Home Ec. 4; Commerce Sec.-Treas. 3. NORRIS. VIRGINIA “Ginny” “Independent always." Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; Science Club 3 4; Glee Club 1-2-3-4; A Cappella 3-4; Operetta 1-2 3-4; Football Maid 3; Speech Club 1-2. OHM. CHARLES “Ohm" “A man about town." Latin Club 2-3-4; Science Club 4; Track 3-4; Hl-Y 3-4; Latin Club Sec. 3. PFEIFFER. MARY ALICE “Map" “Some may laugh and some may talk, but I’ll do both forever." Hl-Trl 1-2-3; J tln Ci lb J-2; Tp. Play 3; Operetta 4; flee Club 1-3-4. JU- Clee ORMAN. WANDA “My heart belongs to merce Club 3-4; Speech 1-2-3-4. “Judy" Carl." Corn-Club 4; Hi-Tri RICHARDS. HERBERT “Her Want to hear a Joke?" Tiger ROBINETTE. HELEN “Robbie" "Full of fun and mischief." Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; French Club 1; GAA 1-2-3-4. PENDRACKY. WALTER “Walter” a mind of his own.” FFA 2; EN. HARRY “Harry” suits.” Worden High 1-2-3; School Publication 3; Class •Dot” one know me?" Hl-Trl Ssjggn r- • y ROHRKASTE. BETTY “Bctt” “QonsCIentlous and conservative." Hl-'Frt l-2-3-4; Commerce Club 3; Glee Club l ST-4; Orchestra 4; Home Ec. 4; Vice Pres, of Senior Class 4;, Hl-Trl Council Treas. 4. ROSENTHAL. KERMIT “Kermit" “No time for haircuts.” Speech Club 1-2-3-4; Latin Club 1-2; Tiger Times 4; Jr. Play 3. rine 1-2; Mariner Staff c. 3. SCHLEMER, LEO “Leo" “Gee. I wish I had a girl.” Club 1; FFA 1. Cheer A. “Rita" know how to 4; Glee Club 3-4; IAEP£W. MARG ptT “Mickey” me.” Hi-Tri 1-2-4; Commerce Club 3; lb SCHL “Tall, bio; Council 2-3-Cheer Clu GLEMN “Glenn" and hiyiasome." Student Junior Play 3; Football 2-4; Student Council Vice Pres. SCHMIDT. FAYE “Red" "I gotta go—vaguely." Speech Club 1-2-3; Hl-Trl 1-2-3-4; News-Operetta 1-2-3-4; A Cappella Club Vice Pres. 2; Hi-Tri 1-2-3; GAA paper 1-2-3; 3-4; French Council 4. 3-4; Tiger Editor 4. SCHMIDT. HORTI “A good pal of 1; Hl-Trl 1-2-3 Comj Baton Twirling Home 3-4; NevfsDarff Edit. Assoc, ltd I “Horsey" ." Glee Club erce Club 3; Ec. 3-4; Speech 4; Newspaper RIZZOLI, CHARLES “Charley" “May your shadow never grow less.” Football 3-4; Latin Club 1-2; Operetta 3-4; A Cappella 4; Speech Club 4; Student Council 4; Vice Pres, of Model Club 4. ROHRKASTE. Verna “Blondie” “Walt a minute. I forgot my gum." Commerce Club 3: Glee Club 1-2-3-4; Jr. Play 3; Hi-Tri 4; Home Ec. 4; Tiger Times 4. SCHABERG. RUTH “Ruthie” “Quiet people accomplish much.” Hl-Trl 3-4; Commerce Club 4; Library Club 4. SCHELDRUP. MARGARET “Margie” “Master of anything she undertakes." Hl-Trl 1-2-3-4; GAA 2-3; Speech Club 1-4; French Club 3; Latin Club 1 2; Operetta 3; Orchestra 4; Home Ec. Vice Pres. 3. SCHMIDT. EDITH “Edith” “She chooses a new boy friend each week.” Hi-Tri 1-2-3-4; GAA 2; Glee Club 1-2-3-4; Operetta 2-3; Home Ec. 3. SCfHM12 T. RUTfA “« Mden 'but?' weTe ofT the “Silence. golden 'but ve gold faQMHXxrT GAA 1-2-1-2-3 4 ;; Speech Club 1-2-3-4; 3-4; Vice Jr. Play 3; Pres. 4; Ua GAA 1-2-3-4. 23Red” IMIDT.yVERNA "What color la your hair, anyhow?’ Vl?"?'4' Speech 1; Home Ec. Glee Club 2-3-4; Operetta 2-3-4; A pella 3-4. Hi- “Wonder If he does any knee-swltch- 3.4; Ing?” Football 3-4; Track 2-3; Wrestling Cap- 3; Jr. Play 3. SCHNEIDER. CHARLES “Charlie" “Ho-hum. school is such a bore.” SCHOENLEBER. DELMAR “Schanie” Kr°w up yet!” Wrestling 1; r r A 4. SCHOENLEBER. WALLACE “Wally” “One of the chauffeurs for home room 312.” SCHREIER. THOMAS “Tom” "You can send a boy to school but you can’t make him think.” Football 2 3-4; Basketball 1-2; Cheer Club 1-2. SCHUMACHER. HILBERT “That smile of his—wow!” 1-2-3. “Hib” SHASHEK. KENNETH “Kenny" Alhambra “He spends his time down on Plum Street.” Track 1; FFA. 3-4; Science Club 2; Band 4. B. J.” A Cappella SNAJDR. WILLIAM 1 “The life of the party." .. w-1,1,Vi., 3-4; Glee Club 2-3-4; Speech Club 1-2-3-4. French Club 2-3; Tiger Tales 3; Operetta 3-4; Jr. Play 3; Speech Club Vice Pres. 4. SOUTHARD. WARREN “Werry" "Not extravagant when It comes talking." FFA 3-4; Cheer J- STEWART, MARGARET “Stooie" “Brains and ability are a marvelous combination.” Jr. Play 3; Drum Major 2-3-4; Class Officer 1-2; Hl-Tri Council 2-3-4; Band Officer 3-4; Tiger Staff 4; Student Council 1-4; Operetta 2-3-4. STOLTE. CLIFFORD “Tip" “Bashful men are so surprising." STEW rHe’d laugh Glee Club 3-4; 4; Latin Club Club 4; East I LI P “Phil" anything.” Hi-Y peretta 3-4; A SICKBERT, EILEEN “Ein" “Yes. I was here the last four years." Glee Club 1-2-4; Hl-Tri 3-4; Commerce 4; Library Club 4. STARKEY. JAYNE “Janie" “Blushes may come and blushes may go. but freckles hang on forever." Cheer Club 1-2; Speech Club 4; Band 12-3; Glee Club 1-2-3-4; Tiger Tales 4; A Cappella 3-4; Operetta 1-2-3-4. STRAHAN. LARRY “L 'He loves to dance.” Glee C STILLE. LUCILLE “Lucille” jcerely yours.” Glee Club 1; Hl-Tri Vi-4; Home Ec. 3-4. STOLZE. WILLIAM “Bill" fc-jdad owns a station wagon, girls." ■J 2-4; Swing Band 4; Stamp Club 2. STULLKEN. LOIS “Lois” “I’m Just a nit-wit." Hl-Tri 1-2-3-4; Home Ec. 3-4; Latin Club 1-2; Glee Club 1-2-3; Operetta 2-3-4; Speech Club 2. fife?" WILLIAM “Bill" ’“e.'Ways than one, I’m a speedy cUY- $«5 €JhoruB 1-2-3-4; Operetta 3-4; A Oiypjiiyftsi 3-4; Latin Club 1; Band 4; Swing UfrtKl 4; Tiger Staff 4; Jr. Class Pres. 3. J S SULLIVAN. ETHELYN “Ethelyn" “I know little about men." Hl-Tri 1-2-3-4; GA A 2-3; Glee Club 1-2-3; Home Ec. 4. "It’s rath print.” e to see rrw name In TAAI “She’d mja5 5 riWw Tm»del." Glee Club 1-2-3-4;Cappella 3-4; Operetta 2-3-4; Jr. PWy 3; Hi-Trl 1-2-3 4; Speech Club 3; Home Ec. 3. TAKE. GLADYS “Glad” “Seen but seldom heard.” Hi-Tri 1-2-3; Stamp Club 2; Chorus 4. TIPTON. RICHARD “Dick" "Women are his hobby." Belleville High 12; FFA 1-2-3-4; Track 3-4. TURNER. LaVELLE “Shorty" "Ready, willing and able." Band 1-2-3-4; Hl-Tri 1-2-3-4; Commerce Club 3; Home Ec. 3-4; Tiger Times 4. THEUER. ROBERT “Bob" “Silence speaks of power." Band 1-2-3-4. TOSH, ROBERTA “Cotton" "Gone but not forgotten." Hi-Trl 2-3-4; Speech Club 1-2; GAA 4; Commerce Club 3-4; Glee Club 1. UKENA. VERNON “Ukena" “His shouts are as the dropping of a pin." THA-rtH£jRr PATRICIA “Pat" “Oif’owm thflat n gukle." Hi-Trl 12-3-4; Spc )tffW|6sJ 2-¥-4; Jr. Play 3; Operetta Tiger Tales 2-3; Tiger Staff 4; Hi-Tri »Pres. 1; French Club Treas. 3. TRENT. LOUISE “SqueeiX" "She looksy Cirte In pigtqitls Hi-Trl 1-2-3-4; GAA l 2-3-4 Spetjoh Cl b; Jr. Play; OpereW, 3-4: Glee C|ub 3-4; Tiger Times; Student Council. VIETH. WILLIAM “Bill" "You say farmers are dumb looking, but look at me.” Speech Club 4; Track 2-3-4; Commerce Club 3-4. viethP “A vanit the drugat Cheer rMl. A “Eddie" hand is worth ten in , 3-4; Hi-Trl 1-2-3-4; Commerce Club 3-4. VOTRAIN, LAVON “Vonnie" "Quite quiet—you would say." Home Ec. Club. WALTER, JAMES “Jim" "Am I funny?” Wrestling 1 2; Band 1-2; Model Club 3-4. 25f WEAVER. PETE ••Pete,, “The man who tried to do nothing and succeeded." Student Council 1, Tiger Times 4. WEDROSKY. RAYMOND “Ray” “Who knows, you may yet come to agree with me." Football 1 2. WELCH. MARY LEE “Mary Lee" “A red head- woo woo!” Hi-Tri 1 2-3-4; French Club 12; Speech Club 1; Commerce Club 3; Home Ec. Club 3. I WENDEL. EDGAR “Eddie” “Not as bashful as he looks." FFA 3-4. WILHELM. ELSIE “Elsie" “A friendly smile for one and all.” Hi Trl 2-3-4; Home Ec. Club 3-4. WILLE. EDWARD “Willie" “Serious of mind but warm at heart." Latin Club 1-2. WILLIAMS. ADA MAE “Ada” “A woman of few words." WILLIAMS. CLIFFORD “Cliff" “Where do I come in?" WILLIAMS. MARTHA “Martha" “Married and living in Wisconsin.” WOLF. BILL “Wolf" “Monday comes too soon after Sunday night." Student Council 2-3-4; Band 1-2-3-4; Cheer Leader 3; Chorus 1-2 3-4: A Cappella 3-4; Operetta 1-2-3-4; Class Vice Pres. 1; Student Council Pres. 4. WYNNE. GEORGIA “George” “Art that’s her drawing point." Latin Club 1-2; Hi-Trl 1-2-3-4; Jr. Play 3; Speech Club 3-4; Hi-Tri Council 3-4; Tiger Staff 4; Jr. Class Vice Pres. 3; Newspaper Art Editor 3-4. YENNE. PAUL “Bud" “Easy come: easy go." SENIORS WITHOUT PICTURES AUTENRIEB. FRED “Fritz" “A flute player.” Band 1-2-3-4; Stamp Club 3-4; German Club 3. CORRIE, HAROLD “Corrie" “I’ve Just arrived here girls, don’t rush me so." Anna Jonesboro 12-3: Basketball 2-3-4; Football 2-3-4. GRINSTEAD. WILMA “Dimples" “The smile of a tooth paste ad." Glee Club 1-2-3; Pep Club 1-2-3; GAA 4; Carrollton High 1-2-3. WRIGHT. EUGENE “Weinme" “Your right, the name is Wright." BURGER. MATTHEW “Matt” “Tiny, but oh my—" Cheer Club 1. CROCKER. HILDA “Mickey” “I work in an ice cream shop.” Latin Club 1. HENTZ. ROMAN “Romey" “It’s a grocer’s life for me." ZAJICEK. DONALD “Don" “Last, but not least." CLAWSON. HAROLD “Harold" “Just me." GREGOR. MAURICE “Tootie" “Is he really hurt?" Basketball 1-2-3-4; Football 2-3-4; Track 2. WOOD. NOLAN “Mike" “Lux to him Is a show, not soap." 26CLASS PROPHECY It’s been ten long years since the class of '42 has been together. Because I thought you might be a little curious about what each of them is doing, I’m going to let you read this letter from one of my old classmates. Dear You: In my trip around the U. S. I came across many of our old friends. Here is what i found them doing: In Hollywood, Doris Fink has now accepted a contract with Super Duper Films, Inc.; Evelyn Amman and Isabelle Langwisch also work there as extras. Others in the movies are the Stolte twins. They have replaced the Mauch twins. Rose Mae Klausing has gained world wide fame in Hollywood as an iceskater. Not in the movies, but in California, is Don Zajicek who is football coach at U. S. C. Eill Vieth is a Forest Ranger in a Colorado National Park. After handling all of the '42 Tiger money, Albert Huggins is now a bank president in Yuma, Arizona. Driving through the Arizona desert, I found Bonita Johnson and Lois Dannenberg running a hamburger stand (5c each, or 3 for 10c). Several miles farther is Maurice Gregor running a filling station. In Reno, Nev. Jackie Ladd is managing a hotel for young divorcees. Her cook is Hilda Crocker. Some of her regular customers are Ruth Friedhoff, Dorothy Jahn, Norma Kassing, and Gladys Take. While walking along the street in Kalispell, Montana, I saw “Ray’s Market,” run by Ray Wedroskey. Leo Schlemer owns a Dude Ranch in Greybull, Wyoming. Every night he has Larry Strahan sing to his guests. A few of his yearly visitors are Mary Ellen Jacobs, Lucille Stille, Edith Schmidt, and Lloyd Fisher. Several have opened up places of business in New Mexico. Harry Renken has a restaurant famous for its ham and eggs, which Grace Schaefer will serve you. Eugene Wright owns a tire shop. He reports business as not being so good. Wilma Grinstead and Bill Snadjr are the star attractions at “Cooper’s Cuddle Cup” run by Mary Cooper and Verda Bigham in Canta Fc, New Mexico. Verna Rohrkastc is the hat-check girl. In Idaho, I met Bill Davis. Since he left E. H. S., he has been touring the country, teaching college cheer-leaders just how it’s done, James Moran for one. Gordon Lawyer is now a prosperous lawyer in Oklahoma. At the present he is handling the divorce case for Faye Schmidt against Quinten Eihausen. Faye accuses him of speaking to another woman, namely Anita Lozier. In Texas, Mathilda Erspamor has just opened a beauty shop. Her slogan is “Use Tillie’s Texas Tints and you too can be a blond.” They say she has a standing appointment once a week to give Matt Burger a manicure. Lorna and Norma Meyer are the Blues Singers at the “Hot Spot” night club in Kansas, owned by Charles Hogue. Members of the dancing chorus are Ruth Schaberg, CONTINUED ON PAGE 106OFFICERS BOB ROTH President BERNICE BANGERT Vice-President BERNARD HUELSKAMP Secretary JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY The year nineteen hundred and thirty-nine will never be forgotten, for in the fall of that year a large group of students entered the portals of E. H. S. As Freshmen we naturally made quite a few blundering mistakes, but Freshmen are like that. As Sophomores we gave a little aid to the Freshmen. After another year we became important upperclassmen. We’re not dignified Seniors, but we’re happy hard-working (?) Juniors and we are mighty proud of it! We think the Junior class does a lot of work for the dear old school. This year we presented a superb play that made the audience fairly roll in the aisles. The name? “The Cat Came Back.” The Junior-Senior Banquet was a smash hit and no Senior can deny that. Besides this any number of the Junior class were members of the football, basketball, and track teams Those of us who didn’t take part in the sports were right there “rootin’ ” for the team all through the year. In most of the assemblies given during the year there were always a generous sprinkling of Juniors. Next yeai when we are Seniors, we will probably have a lot of fun, but we’ll never forget the year we were Juniors. 29 Group 1—Engelke. Bangert, Moore. Lngelke, Henke. Group 2—Fox. Ramsey. Winte. Group 3—Shannon Fletcher, Bartels, Roessel. Braasch. Group 4—Schaake. Homann, Reynolds, Eberhart, Cooper Group 5—White, Huenemier. Lee. Schiebal. Group 6—Schlemer, Ostendorf. Stahlhut. Kaufman Schmidt. Group 7—Childres. Kidd. Luksan, Huelskamp. Shasek. Group 8—Leischenring, Lange, Hanser, Suhre, Hill. Group 9—Heepke, Goodnich, Augsburger, Rahn, Henry. Group 10—Menk, Fensterman, Pltonak, Akaamit, Bigham. 30 I tjb t CLASS OF ’43CLASS OF Group 1—Piazzi, Sterman, Schoon, Zaruba, Sperandio, Sedlak. Group 2—Hosto. Dustman. Davis, Meyers, Bartels. Group 3—Hilla. Nischwitz. Hensley, Sentenne. Reid. Group 4—Blume, Foehrkalb, Bryant. SomerJad. Meyer, Bryant. Croup 5—Black. Bekemeyer, Green, Erspamer. Burle. Group 6— Godfrey, Clark, Colgate, Colbert, Daniels. Group 7—Lantcrman, Metzger, Stahlhut, Brunworth, Bardelmeier. Group 8—Roth. Perry, Schulze. Howard. Harris. Group 9—Meyer, Jereb. Bouse. Jellen, Dehn. Group 10—Dieterman, Duval, Graham, Durham, Fischer. Group 11—Gerling. Gius, Gemoulis, Braden, Brant.OFFICERS HOWARD STEWART President BEVERLY FINK Vice-president Sophomore Class History We entered E. H. S. September 1940. Boy, what a big-place it was! For a time it was a hard job to find all our classes and the upperclassmen tried to pull the gag about using the elevator. But, all in all, it was one “swell” year. Now we are ending our second year of school in E. H. S. This year has been even more enjoyable than the first. We are very proud of our class as we have many outstanding people in it; some gained fame in sports, others were outstanding in their studies, and still others have taken part in a great many of the parties, clubs, and other functions about school. We have always had a class to be proud of and our highest hopes are that we will always be proud of everyone in the class. The whole class is looking forward to next year when we are Juniors and even more so to two years hence when we will be Seniors and the “big-shots” of E. H. S. 33Back Row—Seals, Schmidt, Sievers. Stille, Sickbert, Slovak, Soehlke. Rohrkaste. Middle Row—G. Schafer. Reid. Schmidt. Parrish. Stewart, H. Schafer, Smith, Rosenthal. Settle. First Row—Stahlhut. Spanholtz. Schneider, Strahan, Patton, Ptncek. Rogers. Schafer, Smith. Schwab, Schoenlcbcr. Back Row—Zika, Utechtt. Zillibodi, Winkle, Wehling, Wilharm, Weimers, Viere. Middle Row—Wendel, R. Sasek, R. L. Sasek, Woll, York, Westerholt, Tosovosky, Trares, Schiermeyer, Vogel, Werner. First Row—Wild, Van Camp. Scheckowski, Ukenn, Weiler, Schipkowsky, Threewit. Walter, Wilkenson. Back Row—Gephart, Hardbeck, Jones, Hicks, Norris. Middle Row—Heepke, Hartung, Nilsson, Kershaw, Harrell, L. Kesl, Jaggers, A. Kesl, Henke. First Row—Nordstrom, Hydron, Jones, Heady, Nem-nich, Owens. Haywood. 34Back Row—Bode. Brase, Nantz. Meikamp. Brode. Arbough. Bange. Baierleln. Bircher, Becker, Aumann, Meyers. Middle Row—Broderick, Brummit. Arth, Barnes. Ax, Bates, Bohm, Augsburger. Bunte, Ben-net. First Row—Neathammer, Bouse, Baughman, Brown. Bracke. Bardelmeier, Ahrands. Meikamp. Behrendt. Back Row—Gusewelle, Gaertner, Flavin, Evans, English. Emhousen, Coulbaugh. Emhousen, Davenport, Gephart. Middle Row—Cox, Clark. Frey, Cronin. Grosenheider, Grotefendt. Foltz, Gent. Fagg. Dunbar. First Row—Evans. Conner, Dannenberg. Grange, Meyer. Clawson, Crawford, Fink, Foehrkalb. Back Row—Knauel. Kruckeberg. Kurz. McCracken. Mateer. Luksan. Lloyd. Lautner. Middle Row— Mathis. Maddox. Knecht. C. M. May. C. May. Long. Maggil. Marks. Krumeich. First Row-Koch, Massa, Lewis. McDonald, Klaustermeyer. Lischmann, McNellly, Landa. 35OFFICERS MARY LOU BLACK President BILLY WAYNE Vice-president CLEONA LUTES Secretary Freshman Class History Something green was added to the throng of E. H. S. last September. A wonderful thing took place on September 7 when this happy and hard-working class came in. The green horns had arrived. The key to the flag pole was a simple job and the elevator is a wonderful invention. The elevator “boy”, Mr. Blodgett, is a fine gentleman after you get to know him. After the passing of six months we were no longer green. The freshman class has boys playing football and basketball and, ah yes, some of the lovely lassies running around school are Freshmen. We freshmen have great ideas for this school and hope to get to use them by the time we are Seniors, and a fine bunch of Seniors we shall make. We also hold the Seniors of this year in respect and hope we can do as good when we are Seniors. We don’t wish to brag or anything like that, but we do think we have one of the best classes that has hit “dear old E. H. S.” Our class is large and hopes to be as good a Senior class as we are Freshmen. 37Back Row—Dieterman. Gildersleeve. Eberhart. Elckman, Hale, Greenwood, Gildersleeve, Downing. Grosen-heider, Hanse, Ellis, Ferguson. Dale, Deppe. Middle Row—Frickenstein, Feldner, Eicker, Feezel, Evans, Goff, Erickson. Erspamer, Hamer. Fagan, Downing. First Row—Davis. Dumbrow. Fleming, Etzkorn, Figge. Dunning, Hanse, Ferguson, Foehrkalb, Goodnich. Back Row—Stolze. Runge, Reiter, Schroeder, Reynolds. Richards. Robinson. Smith. Sparks, Rosenthal, Schmidt. Middle Row—Stewart. Robinette, Springer, Schafer, Smith, Schmidt. Stahlhut. Schaffer, Shephard. First Row—Svoboda, Sands, Rizzoli, Rethmeier, Raffaelle, Shashek, Schafer. Schmidt, Shermann, Rinkel. Back Row—Howells. Ketcham, Schmidt, Jahns. Johnson, Welles. Klenke, Huenemeier. Hawes. Middle Row—Klenke. Suhre, Deacon, Hotz, Krumeich, Jellen, Highlander, Kovarik, Krome. First row— Jones, Harman. Knoche. Irvin. Henry, Johnson, Kurman, Hichs, Hubbard, Klueter, Huelskamp. 38Back Row—Ontko. Munzert. Marks, Ostendorf. Pelichoff. Landers. Pittman, Mellenthin. K. Levora, Lenglet. Middle Row—McCracken, L. Levora, Meikamp, Nieman, Mateyka, Lanham. Langwisch, Puncher. Orman, Lange. First Row—Pryor, Leitner, Owens, M. Lanham, Mindrup. Lutes,. Losch. Mayer, Moore. Miller. Back Row—Woll, Wicorek. Unterbrink, K. Winte, Schoenleber, Whyers. Wilson, Zoelzer. Middle Row— Voyles, Votrain. Woods. Wayne, Sedlacek. Townzend. First Row—Weaver, Ward. Tencick, Vieth. Williams. S. Wilson. Walker, Troeckler. Wild. Back Row—Camarata, Coulbaugh, Beck, Charapan, Brase, Cooper. Bearden, Bange, Badalamente. Middle Row—Bayer, Coulters. Bartlett, Aksamit, Bridwell. Black, Browning, Bardelmeier. Claytor. First Row—Cooper, Backs, Carter, Bckemeyer. Coffman. Arbough, Alexander, Beck. Bagby. Cunningham. Back Row—Daech. Klueter, Kohlburn, Merkel, Schroeder. Berleman, Owens. Farrell, Knauel. Nischwitz. Davis. Middle Row—Meyer, Lagan, Haug, Weber, Fiegenbaum. Kipp, Rizzoli, Ochs. First Row— Schneider, Norris, Shephard, Lloyd, Nix. Schroeder. Brown, Lenglet, Moehle, Zilliboti, Dresch. 3940Back Row—Purtle. Stolte. Volz. Barth, Jones. Hensley, Coach Smith. Middle Row—Krejci. Kuethe. Lankford. Moore. Sterman. Bode, Kahtz. Martin. First Row—C. Moore, Vieth. Pendracky, Bartels. Huenemeier, Schafer, Becker, Black, Jellen, Bartlett. GOING UP OVER THE TOP PURTLE UNDER FULL FLYING HIGH STEAM THINK I'LL MAKE IT? OOFI! TRACK 1941 The opening of the track season found many prospects galloping around the quarter-mile oval, all with aspirations of becoming a member of the E. H. S. track squad. With quite a few outstanding fellows digging in, the outlook for this season was bright. As we now know the Tigers did enjoy a fairly successful season and Bill Martin, the Tigers ace hurdler, even represented Edwardsville at the State Track Meet. In the first track meet, which was with Collinsville, E. H. S. came out on the long end of the 72 to 41 point score. The juniors won also by the score of 85 1-2 to 17 1-2. The tables were turned in the sec- 42TRACK 1941 ond meet, when Belleville defeated Edwardsville, 71 1-3 to 41 2-3. The only first place taken this time by E. H. S. was in the hurdles. One of the biggest meets of the year took place next, the Conference Relays. For the fourth straight year East St. Louis took first place, while the Tigers finished in fourth place. Next came the Quadrangular Meet, in which Edwardsville, Granite City, Alton, and Wood River, the host, took part. The “Tiger-men” of E. H. S. again came out victorious, shading their nearest competitor, Wood River, by a full twenty points. A week later Edwardsville again defeated Wood River, the seniors winning by a score of 61 1-3 to 422-3 and the juniors 74 to 30. The next victim of the powerful Tigers was Alton, who was beaten by a score of 86 to 27. The Edwardsville boys really poured on the steam by taking every possible point in the hurdles and pole vault in this meet. The juniors won, 45 to 23. CONTINUED ON PAGE 115 SENIOR TRACK LETTERMEN Kahtz............Hurdles, relay team, broad jump, high jump Martin . Hurdles, relay team, broad jump, high jump, 100 yd. Krejci ......................Hurdles, relay team, 220 yd. Schaffer ................................................ Mile Jones ............................................. Half mile Pendracky ............................. Half mile, broad jump Volz....................................Pole vault, high jump Sterman ........................................... Pole vault Lautner......................... Pole vault, discus, shotput Hilla ...................................... Discus, shotput Merkel.................................................Hurdles Lankford...................................Dashes, relay team Kuethe .......................................... 440 yd. JUNIOR TRACK LETTERMEN Hensley ........................... Shotput, discus, 50 yd. Black.................................. Dashes, relay team Marks.................................High jump, pole vault Becker....................High jump, half mile, relay team Moore .................................. Shotput, discus Koch ...................................... 440 yd., hurdles Bode .............................................. Hurdles Purtle .................................Dashes, relay team Huenemeier..............................Dashes, relay team Bartels ........................................ 440 yd. Stolte ......................................... 440 yd. Meyer .......................................... Pole vaultLOOKING UNDER GIVING A HELPING HAND WATCH THE FLIES SNEAK PLAY FUNNY. HUH? REAR VIEW COMING OUT FOR PRACTICE FOOTBALL 1941 GILLESPIE 0 — E. H. S. 12 The E. H. S. Tigers started the football season off with a “bang” by trouncing Gillespie 12-0. In this first game Coach was experimenting with players and finding the weak points of the players. The backfield gave a good account of itself in handling the ball and the line easily outplayed Gillespie’s. STAUNTON 0 — E. H. S. 14 The Staunton-Edwardsville game was given plenty advance publicity by the E. H. S. whitewashers who also became “de-white-washers.” The spirit of competition before the game was high and a large crowd was on hand to watch the Tiger gridders walk over Staunton 14 to 0. In this game the Tigers showed exceptional blocking ability and galloped around Staunton’s ends for several good gains. MADISON 7 — E. H. S. 33 Still playing non-conference games E. H. S. ran rough-shod over Madison and ran their winning streak to three games. On the Madison field the Tigers opened up with an aerial attack that had the Trojans running in circles. The E. H. S. defense also showed up brilliantly in this battle by stopping anything Madison shoved at them. 44FOOTBALL 1941 EAST ST. LOUIS 19 — E. H. S. 0 Whoosh ! ! the bottom dropped out of everything when the East Side Flyers flew over, under, and through the Tigers. During the first half the Tigers held their own against a fast-running, hard-hitting team, but in the second period they were just too tired to halt the Flyers’ attack any longer. WOOD RIVER 12 — E. H. S. 0 A highly-favored Edwardsville team was upset on their opponent’s field when the Oilers slapped a 12-0 reverse in the Tiger’s face. The E. H. S. men seemed dead on their feet; continually losing the ball, missing blocks, and being outcharged by the Wood River line. BELLEVILLE 20 — E. H. S. 0 Playing the Maroons before a large homecoming crowd, the Tigers found it very difficult to stop Belleville’s plunging fullback. Although the score doesn’t show it, Edwardsville was on the offensive during the last half, playing almost continually in Belleville territory. The main trouble in this game was in keeping Belleville out of the Tiger backfield. ALTON 0—E. H. S. 7 Finally the Tigers broke the ice and stole a game from their opponents, the Alton Redbirds. After going through a hard week of practice and also changing their style of play, the Tigers again looked plenty strong on the field. This was a hard-fought game from beginning to end and the outcome was unknown until the final gun. CONTINUED ON PAGE 121 Back Row—Coach Smith. Schafer. Purtle. Hilla, Schulze. Agles. Bartlett. Hogue. Schrier. Koch. Ramsey. Miner. Middle Row—Fox. Huelskamp. Schlueter. Nilsson. Lutes. Rizzoli. Kesl. Black. Bauer, Hartung. Gregor. First Row—Winkle. Kolesa. Eads. Schmidt. Lankford. Hensley. Merkel. Becker. 45L E T T E 1 9 LAWYER Manager The last week of August found quite a few fellows out on the football field passing, blocking, and booting the “ol’ pigskin” around. For about three weeks Coach Smith had to work the squad pretty hard in order to get them in shape for the first game. With only six lettermen returning, Coach’s big problem was to find replacements for the positions vacated by graduation of last year’s championship lettermen. The line was fairly well fixed with only two replacements needed, but in the backfield the only returning letterman was Hensley at fullback. The situation wasn’t really as hopeless as it looked, for a number of reserves from last year’s squad were on hand, plus quite a few boys who moved up from the Tigerettes. Things really looked bright when the team took the first three KESL Back KOCH Back BECKER Back RIZZOLI Tackle LUTES Guard SCHULZE Tackle COACH SMITH LANKFORD Tackle AGLES End MOORE Tackle KOI.ESA Guard BARTLETT CenterR M E N 4 1 MERKEL Back HUELSKAMP Guard EADS Back BAUER End PUPTLE Tackle HILLA Back WINKLE Manager SCHREIER Center SCHMIDT Guard SCHIUETER Guard HOGUE Tackle GREGOR COACH BLACK End MINER Back games, from Gillespie, Staunton, and Madison, running up a total of fifty-nine points to the opponents’ seven. Our bright grin was sort of dulled when we suffered defeats and upsets in the next three games at the hands of East St. Louis, Wood River, and Belleville. Recovering from these losses the Tigers came back and handed Alton and Collinsville a defeat apiece and then tied Granite City in the last game. This group of wins and losses gave the Tigers a .625 percentage. In conference play the team came up with fourth place. Altogether there were twenty-four lettermen, with thirteen of them returning next year. Coach Smith can look forward to another good year next year with an experienced backfield coming back. Good luck in ’42.After tucking away football suits and rubbing down a few “charlie horses’’ still hanging on, the Edwardsville Tiger was ready to turn to basketball. With only four lettermen returning from last year’s championship team, Coach Smith had to rebuild the squad. The Tigers took the first game from Highland by a safe margin; then lost to Litchfield and then to Greenville in an overtime game. Starting the conference season against Madison, the Tigers waltzed over the Trojans 28 to 12. In the next two games Edwardsville lost to Collinsville, and then whipped their own Alumni in their annual get-together. Next, playing in another non-conference tilt, the Tigers won a close one from Mt. Olive 28 to 27. The following week again found the Bengals in conference play, beating Belleville and then taking •a trimming from the Alton Redbirds. A week later the Edwardsville sharpshooters tangled with the future conference champions, Wood River. The Tigers were unable to keep up with the Oilers and received their worst setback of the season from them. Regaining the old fight, the team took Granite City, Staunton, and Madison to camp in the next three games. “Rockie” Eihausen was starting to shine now, coming up as high point man quite fre- 48 GERLING BARTLETT HEBBERGER Letterman CORRIE Letterman NILSSON Back Row—Coach Smith, Hicks. Nilsson, Eihausen. Stolte. Ketcham. Coach Hebberger. First Row— Bartlett, Marks, Corrie, Black, Schulze, Becker, Koch. Gerling. BASKETBALL 1941-42BASKETBALL 194142 quently. In the next game Collinsville slipped by Edwardsville 27-25 and then Alton also slapped one on the Tigers. The Oilers again beat the Edwardsville team, but the Tigers then came back and whipped a strong East Side machine and in the final game of conference play lost to Granite. The Tigers ended up in fourth place, having a record of seven wins and seven losses in conference games. SCHULZE FIHAUSEN STOLTE COACH SMITH B« ACK MARKS BECKERBasketball Lettermen Quentin Eihausen, forward.—“Rockie” was Edwardsville’s high scorer this year and also among the high scorers of the conference. Harold Stolte, center.—This was Harold’s first year on the squad, but he played like a veteran. Stolte was the boy who came through with points in the pinches. Jim Marks, forward.—Jimmie was Edwardsville’s sophomore sharpshooter. He had the best shot-percentage on the team. Harold Black, guard.—This was “Blackie’s” second year as a letterman and he proved valuable as a ball-handler and defensive player. Even though he was short, he was always in the battle. Maurice Gregor, guard.—“Tootie” graduated at the half-year and was missed very much. He was a cool-headed player who kept the rest of the team from getting too wild in the game. Lawrence Schulze, center.—Schulze is a junior and one of the few big boys on this year’s team. Victor Becker, guard.—“Vic” is Black’s other half and plays the same kind of game; a good ball-handler and defenseman. Harold Corrie, guard.—Corrie came from Anna-Jonesboro in his senior year and made the Tiger squad. Norman Nilsson, forward.—Another sophomore who made the first team. Norm didn’t play a whole lot this year but he'll be around in the future. 50Our Record Highland 21 ........E. H. S. 41 Litchfield 29 ..... E. H. S. 22 Greenville 37 ..... E. H. S. 36 Madison 12..........E. H. S. 28 Collinsville 35....E. H. S. 20 Alumni 17 ......... E. H. S. 27 Mt. Olive 27........E. H. S. 28 Belleville 25 ..... E. H. S. 28 Alton 33 .......... E. H. S. 30 Wood River 49 .... E. H. S. 26 In 1941-42 East Side 37 .....E. H. S. 13 Granite City 21 ... E. H. S. 23 Staunton 29...E.H.S.35 Madison 29 .......E. H. S. 35 Collinsville 27 .... E. H. S. 25 Belleville 35...E. H. S. 33 Alton 35 .........E. H. S. 27 Wood River 42 .... E. H. S. 26 East Side 28 .....E. H. S. 38 Granite City 39 ... E. H. S. 33 Loyal Curporter After the came. Get that ball TOURNAMENT This year Edwardsville was again host for a regional tournament. The teams participating in this tournament were Lebanon, Madison, Wood River, Granite City, Alton, Western Military Academy, Troy, and Edwardsville. The Tigers won out over Lebanon in a hard-fought game 36 to 30. In the semi-finals they were beaten by Wood River. Wood River then went on to win the Regional Tournament, Sectional, and were defeated in the State quarter-finals by Centralia’s state champions. 51GIRLS’ ATHL Softball Volley ball Basketball Archery The purpose of this club is to create a greater interest in athletics and teach better sportsmanship to the girls. Meetings are held every other Thursday, but for special occasions extra meetings are held. Each meeting is prepared by an appointed committee. Officers are elected from the Senior girls by the entire membership of the club. Sports heads are also chosen, but they do not have to be Seniors. These girls aid the sponsors of the various sports. To be eligible to join this club a girl must take physical education and some sport which will credit her with a certain number of points. The more sports in which a girl takes part, the more points she will receive. Physical education also provides additional points. If a certain number of points are made a letter is awarded. After a sport has been completed, awards are presented to the winning team or a party is given in honor of the team. 52♦ TIC ASSOC Besides being sponsor of the G. A. A., Miss Harlan is also in charge of basketball, softball, and volleyball. Miss Stoldt is in charge of archery and Miss Cunningham has charge of bowling. Near the end of the year a Senior girl is chosen and awarded a trophy for being the “all-around G. A. A. girl.” Some of the qualifications are good sportsmanship, loyalty, honesty, leadership, scholastic standing, athletic ability, and personality. To meet expenses, the G. A. A. sells candy at the football and basketball games. Some of the other activities are a party for the Senior girls given near the end of the year and the camp which the girls may attend during the summer. £ a Fourth Row—Mateyka. Mateyka. McDermott. Dye. E. Schmidt. Erickson. Dannenberg. Miller. Eickman. Bagby. Greenwood. Hanvey. Ferguson. Fagan. Carter. Shannon. Johnson. Third Row—Lind beck. Nilsson. Vieth. Lange. Schwab, Bryant. Kershaw. Harrell, Ward. Tencick. R. Schmidt, Arbaugh. Schoenleber. Vieth. Second Row—McCracken. Somerlad, Kellerman. Browning. Fletcher, Goff. Feezel. Menk. R. Metzger. Dierkes. Green. Bryant. Rogers, Tosh. First Row—Foehrkalb, Dombrow. Johnson. Losch. Rizzoli, Alexander, Huelskamp, Figge. Hicks. Weaver. 53 Officers BowlingACTIVITIES 55Fourth Row Schlueter. Rizzoli, Kahtz, Wolf. Roth. Nilsson. Third Row—Mr. Blodgett. Zaruba. Colgate. Mathis. Rosenthal. Second Row—Ferguson. Bardelmeier, Irwin, Weaver. Stewart. Jaros. First Row- Browning. Lanterman. Heady. Bangert. Trent. Frickenstein. Fifth Row—Lance. Going, Eickman. Fischer. C. M. May. Nemnich, Williams. F. Schmidt. Mathis, Long. Davis. G. Bardel-meier. Huggins. Allen. Colgate. Lankford. Fourth Row—Gildersleeve. Miss Jones. Shashek. Eads. Thatcher. Caldwell. Kennecke. Dierkes. Morgan. Tosovosky. Meyer. Barnes. Baker. Neathammer. Snadjr. Harris. Third Row—Scheldrup. George. Greenwood. Colbert. Lee. R. Schmidt. Lindbeck. Kellerman, Stahlhut. Nilsson. Vogel. Schiermeyer. Trares, Nischwitz. Second Row—Godfrey. Johnson. Neudecker, Kesl, D. Fink. Harrell, Wynne. Long, H. Schmidt. Brower. Goddard. Ladd. First Row—Starkey. Taake. B. Bardelmeier. C. May. B. Fink. Trent. A. Johnson. Kershaw, Rosenthal. Piper, Leitner. Sturgeon. Sentenne. STUDENT COUNCIL The aim of the Student Council is to discuss the problems of the school and student body. Its membership is made up of students elected from every home room and it is sponsored by Mr. Blodgett. During the last year the Student Council formed a constitution as one of its projects. This year, for the first time, a delegation was sent to the Student Council District Meeting at Alton. Last September a handbook was published by the Student Council and was favorably received by the student body. SPEECH CLUB The Speech Club is made up of a group of enthusiastic students who are interested in drama. This year the Speech Club was divided into a number of groups under the heads of Acting, Directing, Stage Set, Play Selection, General Properties, etc. Each of these groups are led by a student chosen from the Speech Club. Several groups meet during the week and work on their various projects. As an example, the Stage Set committee is building flats to be used on the stage in 201. These groups, have put on several plays. 56LATIN CLUB Gocietas Latina discipulis scholae Eswardsvilliae salutem plnrinum dicit. In other words, greetings from the club. Ail Latin students are eligible for membership in the Latin Club. Programs for the meetings usually deal with the different customs, heroes, myths, and literature of the Romans. This is to aid the students in becoming-more interested in their Latin classes. During the year the club had a party and also a Roman banquet, at which time everyone dressed as Romans and were served by “Freshmen Slaves.’1 SCIENCE CLUB The Science Club offers opportunity for work in science outside the regular classes, with meetings devoted to demonstrations, lectures, discussions, and project work. During some years the club has been affiliated successfully with Illinois Junior Academy of Science. Field trips are taken when possible for the purpose of studying natural history, soil erosion, etc. This type of club makes it possible for pupils to work individually or in groups along the lines of their own interests, hobbies, and needs. Fifth Row—Gent. Melenthin. Wayne, Jahn. Pittman. Shepard. Blumberg. Bennett. Smith. MacCracken. Talick. Mathis. Fourth Row—Fleming. Strahan. Van Camp. Fink. Trares, Klausing. Poos. Kennecke. Lee. Allen. P. Stewart. H. Stewart. Soehlke. Gewe. Bates. Frey. Herman. Third Row. Feldncr, Cronin. Ax. Schiermeyer, Clark. Jones. Meikamp. Kurman. Jahn, Masra. Fagan. Feezel. Huelskamp. Werner. Bagby. Second Row—Wilson. Baughman. Dannenbcrg. McNeilly. Shashek. Troeckler, Schneider. Westerholt. Long. Frickcnstein, Nilsson. Mayer. Levora. Barnes. Beck. First Row—Ar-bough, Foehrkalb. Heady. Bardelmeier. Behrendt. E. Springer. MacDonald. Meikamp. Hanse. Williams. Vogel. Nemnich. Brower. Rizzoli. H. Springer, Aherns. Foltz. Alexander. Fourth Row—MacCracken, Ohm. Miss Stoldt, Mr. Lercher, Miss Lumb, Meyer. Norris. Pfeiffer. Seals. Cox. Massa. Third Row—Gephart. Gaertner, Viere. Henke. Lee. Bennett. P. Stewart. H. Stewart. Hicks. Bekemeyer. Brase. Fox. Mathis. Second Row—Augsburger. Springer. Dye. Lange. Eads. Sasek. Vogel. Nemnich, Brower. Aksamit. Kennecke. Eickman. F. chcr. Wcidncr. First Row—Braden. Harris. Burroughs. 57COMMERCE CLUB STAMP CLUB Even though the Stamp Club is the oldest club in school, it had the lowest membership ever. In the meetings discussions are held on the presidents of the United States and other subjects pertaining to stamp collecting. Once every month an auction is held, in order that the members may acquire new stamps from one another. The club also subscribes to a magazine and also buys a stamp catalogue for the use of the members. The club gave an assembly in which an F. B. I. agent spoke and also in the spring the club held a party. Miss Davis, the sponsor, has been a life-long collector of stamps and is very well-fitted to take care of the club. Any student taking a commercial subject is eligible to be a member of the Commerce Club. Through the club’s activities, the members increase their knowledge of business problems and are given help in selecting the type of job they desire. During some of the club’s meetings, an open discussion is held in order that the students may help each other. In this manner the club serves as a vocational guidance group. Third Row—Daech. Johnson. Holt. Sherman, Woll. Monical, Hubach, Mr. Smith. Going. Lance. Klenke. Bouse. Davis. Second Row—Bridwell, Christie. Childres, Nischwitz, Arth. Fensterman. Shannon. Eads. Shashek, Gildersleeve. Hise. Reynolds. Russel. Wynne. Sickbert. Shaberg. First Row—Vieth. Bryant. Orman, Williams. Brunworth. Metzger. Burle. Nemnich. Vogel. Lange Hill. Jereb. Suh e. Hanser. Ringering. Third Row—Klenke. Bartels. Stewart. Seals. Purtle. Second Row—Burle. Wheat, Langwisch. Hill, Figge. Hanser. Eicher. Smith. First Row—Nantz, Dale. 58MODEL CLUB The Model Club is an organization of boys interested in aviation and other types of model building. They not only build model airplanes, but are interested in aviation of a larger scale, for instance, the designs and construction of our government planes as well as the foreign type planes. The club expects to visit Parks Air College and other possible places of interest. The Model Club participated in other activities of the school, such as, a sketch for the assembly and a float which won second prize in the Homecoming Parade. Third Row—Arth. Rizzoli. Massa. Renkcn. Meyers, Colgate, Erspamer. Gerling. Brockman. Second Row—Stolze. Huene-meier, Bartels. Harrell. Stewart. Walters. Blumberg. Bircher. Cox. Mr. Hebberger. First Row—Take. MacCracken, Henry. Dunbar, Rohrkaste, Smith. ) yi “ Fourth Row Wayne. Kahtz. Stewart. Bartels. Bunte. Bennett. Nilsson. Third Row—Klaustermeyer. Baker. Morgan. Colgate. MacDonald. Brockman, Burroughs. Second Row—Mr. Love. Nantz. Fox. Reed. Meyer. Long. Allen. Lankford. Marks, Brummit, Brase. First Row—Dunbar. Massa. Baierlein. Marks. Rosenthal, Levora. Klenke. HI-Y The Hi-Y is an organization for boys and the discussion of boys’ problems. The purpose of this club is to create, maintain, and extend throughout the school and community high standards of Christian character. The club meets at night, once a week or once every other week, according to the wishes of the members. At the meetings there is a regular business meeting, then a talk by some outside speaker or a discussion of the problems of boys. 59Third Row-Miss Hoskins. Wynne. Stewart. Kubicek. Rohrkaste. Cunningham. Second Row—Lindbeck. Weidner. Leitner. Jaros, Eberhart. A. Johnson. First Row—May. Vieth, Trares. MacDonald. Browning. Figge. Johnson. Second Row—Miss Adams. Threewitt. Nischwitx. Schmidt. Ladd. Goddard. Scheldrup, Thatcher. First Row—Snadjr. Purtle. Brummit. HY-TRI Success, the top of the ladder, that is the aim of every Hi-Tri girl. She strived for success by having friendship, loyalty, pleasure, character, and courtesy. Every girl in school is eligible to join the Hi-Tri. She pays no dues and takes no oaths. She belongs to one of the groups: Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior. If she is elected as an officer, she is a member of the Hi-Tri Council. The purpose of the Hi-Tri Council is to govern the four separate groups, to sponsor the Kid Party, the Barn Dance, and a welcome ceremonial and weiner roast for the Freshman members. FRENCH CLUB Since the fall of France in the summer of 1940, the number of students taking French has steadily decreased. With this in mind, the 1941-42 French Club was founded, to keep alive the spirit of France and of the French language. Membership is open to anyone who has taken or is taking French. The meetings are conducted entirely in French, and any member who speaks English is fined. A party was held at Christmas in place of the regular meeting. The purpose of the club is to aid the students in their classes and to further show them the customs and habits of the people who speak French. 60NEWSPAPER STAFF The Tiger Times is a school newspaper published every week by the students in Journalism and Commercial classes. The Journalism students gather and edit the news, make up the paper, staple and sell the papers. The Commercial students cut the stencils and mimeograph the paper. The purposes of the paper are to keep the students and faculty informed of school events, to be a record of school life, to encourage activities and desirable practices in the school, to build school spirit, and to provide practice for students who publish it. F. F. A. The Future Farmers of America is a national organization of boys studying vocational agriculture in the public high schools. At the present time forty-seven states, Puerto Rico and Hawaii have chartered associations. The local chapter serves to create interest in agriculture and to strengthen the confidence of farm boys in themselves and their work. The club’s activities of the year included several field trips. Two of the most interesting ones were a trip to a hybrid seed corn production farm in Central Illinois and the trip through the National Stock Yards. Third Row—Klaustermeyer, Daech. Rosenthal, Purtle, Richards Gemoules. Fischer. Weaver, Corrie. Second Row—MacDonald, B. Johnson. Dannenberg, H. Schmidt, Starkey, Ambuehl, Turner. Miss Cheek, Agles. First Row. Biegert, Harrell, A. Johnson. Jacobs. Trent, Bigham. Rohrkaste. Wynne, Lawyer. Fourth Row—Wiemers. Whyers. Schlemer. Heepke. Klueter. Durham. Southard, Wendell. Dustman. Eberhart. Daube. Tipton, Holman. Krome. Brandt. Hardbeck. Mr. Haudrich. Third Row—Unterbrink. Sparks. Wehling. Pendracky. Jones. Shashek. Becker. Bardelmeier. Ketcham. Long. Grant. Schoenleber, Emshousen. Weber. Cooper. Second Row—Mellenthin. Vieth. Birmingham. D. Schoenleber, Knecht, Bayer, Votrain, Stille. Cox. Schoenleber. Eberhart. Pence. First Row—Gusewelle. Heepke. V. Becker. Hans. Schroeder, H. Ketcham, Alexander, Luksan. Sommerfeldt. Maddox. Emshousen. 61HOME EC CLUB “Keep the home fires burning.” This is the motto of the Home Ec Club. This organization is for all girls who are studying Home Economics. This club was organized the second semester last year. Meetings are held every two weeks during which lectures and social meetings are held. The club was organized to increase the students’ knowledge in Home Economics and it also serves as a vocational guidance in selecting the kind of job in this field you would desire. Fourth Row—Landa. Long. May, Tosovsky. Wendell, Gaertner. Cheney. Eickman, Schaefer. Eberhart. Stilie. Homan. Kellenberger. Lischman, Gehner. Bayer. Hubach. Third Row—Dierkes. Bekemeyer. Bardelmeier, Grotefendt. Schwalb. Hydron. Bauer. Schmidt. Clostermann. Fisher. Augsburger. Bohm. Dannenberg. Miller. Engelke. Second Row—Engelke. Bardelmeier. Stahlhut. Jahn, Herman. Daniels. Brockmeier. Friedhoff. Sullivan. Schmidt. Bouse. Nix. Meyer, Harrell. First Row— Jones. L. Meyer, Schmidt, N. Meyer, Kellerman, Metzger, Lindbeck. Tencick, R. Schmidt. Lee. V. Schmidt. Stullken. Vieth. A. Jones. Rohrkaste. Third Row—Mrs. Fletcher. Miss Matheson, Hubach. Ambuehl. Johnson, Turner, Tosh. Hanvey. Weidner, Rogers. Second Row —Tipton. Fletcher. Shannon. Dierkes. McNeilly. Schoenleber. Schwab. V. Johnson. Weaver. Traulson. Dannenberg. Goddard. Nischwitz. Mathis. First Row—Ketcham. Knecht. Rohrkaste. Rosenthal, Dunbar. Fox, Mateer. Kurz. Wehling. LIBRARY CLUB Much credit is due Miss Matheson for the organization of this new club. It was organized in September, 1941 and soon attained a membership of forty-five. The purposes of the club are to build a bigger and better library, make it serve the needs of all students more efficiently, and interest students in good books. Another objective of this club is a thorough knowledge of library organization. 62TIGER STAFF Glenn Schlueter....................... Editor-in-Chief Margaret Stewart ....................Assistant Editor Albert Huggins.............................. Business Manager Jack Allen................Assistant Business Manager Bill Straube .................... Advertising Manager Bob Baker...............Assistant Advertising Manager Judy Kubicek....................................Sales Manager Pat Thatcher.................Assistant Sales Manager Bob Burroughs............................Photographer Kay Kesl...............................Society Editor Georgia Wynne..............................Art Editor Bob Kahtz...............................Sports Editor Phil Stewart..............................Joke Editor Lorna Meyer................................... Typist Norma Meyer .................................. Typist Mr. Allen, Miss Wood, Miss Lumb..............Sponsors 64THE TIGER Lying before you is the best TIGER that has ever represented Edwardsvile High School. This statement is sufficient, for we (the intellects on the opposite page) know it’s true, and believe you will agree with us. And here is how we created and produced this immortal volume: Well, last year’s staff — burnt-out wrecks — graduate and tell us we have an impossible task before us. They moan and gnash their teeth and dump the whole blamed job in our laps. We look at them with pity and dream about our summer vacation. June; we enjoy visits and picnics. But Editor GLEN SCHLUETER isn’t satisfied with just picnicking—he begins to worry, and gets worked up to such an extent that he talks to MR. ALLEN (the fellow who holds the bag if we slip). They call in AL HUGGINS to worry about the business end of things and go to work. So when school starts in September the working plan, or "dummy”, is ready. CONTINUED ON PAGE 125 SALES STAFF Davis, Purtle Thatcher, Caldwell, Kubicek. Johnson, Jaros. AD STAFF Straube, Schlueter, Wolf, Baker. Thatcher, Starkey. 65A CAPELLA CHOIR The A Capella Choir is an organization of about thirty-six upperclassmen, specially selected for the particular blending qualities and beauty of tone of their voices. The choir meets once weekly to devote its time to the study of the higher and more difficult types of music. They practice solely for perfection and unity in their work. Singing unaccompanied, the choir demands the utmost in ability and cooperation. With their director, Ralph Shannon, the choir makes several appearances annually, including the Christmas assembly, the annual music assembly, and the Baccalaureate Services. We predict a great future for this fine organization which has already become an important part of E. H. S. life. A CAPELLA CHOIR MIXED CHORUS 66MIXED CHORUS This year the Mixed Chorus again took part in several school assemblies and also in the “music festival” in Collinsville. In the Mixed Chorus the students are taught the fundamentals of group singing. Also the chorus is one of the few outlets for students interested in music and music appreciation. Another of the activities of the Mixed Chorus was the presentation of an operetta last fall. The Mixed Chorus is under the direction of Mr. Ralph Shannon, who is teaching music for his third year at E. H. S. Mr. Shannon must be complimented for the rapid strides he has made in all branches of music—choral, band, and the swing band. GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 67 BOYS' GLEE CLUBSWING BAND When you hear the soft wail of cornets, the low moan of slide trombones, plus the various rackets of saxaphones, clarinets, drums, bass, and piano together, rendering their version of “Rain,” then you know that the Tiger Swing Band is hard at work. Every Tuesday and Thursday morning, sometime between 8:00 and 9:30, they have their private little “jam session” in 321. This is just to prepare themselves for entertaining the student body of E. H. S. A part of their rehearsals is devoted to making a study of popular music. CONTINUED ON PAGE 126 68BAND The Band has made a great deal of progress during the past year. They have done several things to bring this about and have done them well. With flags waving, plumes flying, and feet steppin’ high, the E. H. S. Band made its appearances at football games and parades under the twirling baton of Margaret Stewart, our drum majorette; and also the other two majorettes, Ruth Schmidt and Hortense Schmidt. They are all Seniors this year and have done a wonderful job and deserve a lot of credit. The band formed various letters and symbols for their team and the opponents; sometimes using neon lights on the bass drum, bells, and bass horns, while tiny lights on the caps of the band members were used while the football field was in darkness. One of the best drills was when the band made the three circles and had a square dance. The band usually ended up in front of the Edwardsville grandstand playing “Loyalty.” Many times the band was introduced by trumpet fanfare. The band also played for all the basketball games here with the exception of one game, which was taken care of by the Swing Band. 69 CONTINUED ON PAGE 71E H S B A N D OFFICERS President Vice-president Secretary-treasurer Director MARGARET STEWART ALBERT HUGGINS JIM FLAVIN RALPH SHANNON The officers of the band are all students who have been in the band for a good while and who are well known and liked. Margaret Stewart, besides playing-clarinet in the band was also a drum majorette. Albert Huggins played the oboe, and Jim Flavin ,the clarinet. Under the officers’ very capable direction many projects were carried out by the band. 70BAND CONTINUED FROM PAGE 69 One of the most effective displays was the . . .—, “V” for Victory flashed on the gym floor while the band played the “Star-Spangled Banner” and the spotlight was flashed on the flag. The band has played many concerts, including the opening and closing of the Talent Revue which was to raise money for the March of Dimes. As soon as the basketball games were over they began practicing overtures and arrangements to be used for their spring concerts. This year the band has done something unusual. They needed new uniforms very badly, so they took it upon themselves to raise enough money to buy them. With the aid of Mr. Shannon they began collecting newspapers, sponsoring programs, playing for games, giving concerts, and giving dances. Each member along with the band officers and Mr. Shannon worked very hard and they hope to raise enough money before the year is up for their new uniforms. Mr. Shannon’s great personality has helped many with the knowledge of music. He is always ready and willing to help anyone who needs extra help. Both Mr. and Mrs. Shannon have taken part in many of the musical activities in this vicinity.Homecoming'Football Prom At 8 o’clock on the evening of November 15, 1941 the most important social event of the year took place in the colorfully decorated gym of E. H. S. It was the Coronation of the Football Queen, and none other than our lovely Miss Judy Kubicek was crowned “Queen of the 1941 Football Season.M Preceding the queen to the throne were the lettermen and their maids and the retiring queen, Miss Betty Barnett. As our queen approached the throne, she knelt and the crown was placed on her head by the 1940 Queen. This was followed by a short speech by Coach Smith. After the first dance, which was for the Queen, maids, and their escorts, everyone enjoyed dancing to the music of Art Zeiss’ orchestra. MAIDS AND LETTERMEN Theodora Shashek Betty Browning Elsie Menk Evelyn Arth Judy Kubicek Jeanne Godfrey Georgia Traulson Leona Mateyka Mary Jo Kellerman Adrian Christy Gordon Lawyer Norman Merkel Tom Schreier Harold Hogue Maurice Gregor Harold Lankford Glenn Schlueter Ed Agles Bernard Huelskamp Harold Black Ruth Metzger Emily Jaros Joyce Irvin Mary Lou Black Bernice Bangert Nina Jane Heady Ovella Sterman Dorothy Nix Lawrence Schulze Roland Bauer Victor Becker Dale Purtle Bob Bartlett Bob Eads Duane Moore George Koch Wilfred Hilla Murle Lutes Tom Knlesa Albert KesselHALLOWE’EN PARTY In a true Hallowe’en setting of corn stalks and bales of hay many spooks, witches, beautiful young ladies and handsome men (?) gathered together in our gym for the annual Hallowe’en party. After the grand march and the awarding of prizes we began to recognize one another, including many of our teachers. A few of those who won prizes were Harold Lankford and Tom Colgate as “Uncle Walter’s Doghouse,” Miss Cheek as Carmen Miranda, Hortense Schmidt as the most beautiful girl, and Ed Gerling as a clown. Very shortly we heard music, and it didn’t take very long before everyone was dancing, jitterbugging, or whatever you call it, to the music of Joe Ladd and his orchestra. Then about that time of the evening when we began to feel the pangs of hunger, we were reinforced with food, and after a little more struggling on the dance floor, we were sent on our way, home or otherwise. t But after talking it over among our friends, we concluded that the Hallowe’en party is still looked forward to from year to year. 74BARN DANCE As usual, the Hi-Tri scored another triumph when they gave the Barn Dance. All the girls got out and rounded up all the boys and roped them into going to the old Barn Dance. Confidentially, the boy’s didn’t have a chance! They all dressed up in their plaid shirts and overalls and the girls wore everything from jeans to ginghams. Nothing like being comfortable, I always say. Everyone wondered why they could hardly move the day after the party; couldn’t have been that they chinned themselves too much on the chinning bar or swung too much on the rope swing. Or maybe it was the Square Dance. The decorations were very effective although simple; consisting of a scarecrow here and there, few bales of straw, some corn stalks and corn. We can’t leave the corn out. 75 CONTINUED ON PAGE 126KID PARTY Ring-around-the-rosy! London Bridge is falling down! You’re it! were many of the cries resounding in the E. H. S. gym at the annual Kid Party, sponsored by the Hi-Tri. We girls let our hair down, donned tiny tot’s dresses, wore big hair ribbons and pigtails, and had a wonderful time acting like children. At the beginning of the evening Pat Thatcher took charge of the program. Dramatic skits, singing, dancing, and readings provided the material for the skits. All the while, the girls were popping bubble gum and eating licorice sticks. It was really fun to step out of our usual high school life and into a children’s age once again. After the program, all the girls got hep to the jive and jitterbugged to the music of Joe Ladd’s Orchestra. Doughnuts and milk were served near the end of the evening. One more party success for the Girls of Ye Olde Hi-Tri. 76JUNIOR PLAY “The Cat Came Back” was the title of this year’s Junior Play. The plot centers around a cat, Mussolini by name, who causes much commotion in the household of Gardner. Our hero, Gerald Gardner, is determined that both his newly acquired wife and her cat cannot live in his house. Leona Gardner is equally determined even to the point of moving into the new home and leaving her bridegroom to batch it in the garage. Trouble really comes when an old family friend is expected and to keep up appearances, Gerald gets a substitute bride. Of course, the play ends well although it takes Gerald three acts to bring it to a happy ending. THE CAST: Leona Gardner Gerald Gardner Fanalce Tim Gallegher Mrs. Peters Mr. Peters Lily .......... Doris Kelly Mr. Jackson Billy . Mrs. Oberkamp Bridget Mussolini Faye Frickenstein Tom Colgate Lawrence Finke Kenny Scheibal Betty Stahlhut Chester Harris Edna Clark Doris Aksamit Harold Bartels Bill Lee Betsy Lindbeck Alice Weidner The Harris Cat 77OPERETTA-“The Mocking Bird” “The Mocking Bird" was Mr. Shannon’s choice for this year’s Operetta. After long and gruelling try-outs the cast resulted thusly: Yvette Carla Caldwell The Marquise Mary Alice Pfeiffor Manon Maxino Colbert Janette Norma Meyer Eugene DeLorne Bill Wolf Lanore Lorna Meyer Bob Finchley . . Bill Straube The Countess Virginia Norriss Captain Beloit Bob Baker Pierre Larry Strahan Governor Aubrey . .Bill Snajdr Chloe Alyne Poos Maxime Charles Rizzoii LeFarge Don Mathis Javotte Vivian Barnes Don Aurelio Bill Davis Carla Caldwell and Maxine Colbert were excellent in the two feminine leads while, Bill Straube and Bill Wolf played the two leading parts well. Charles Rizzoii was wr|j casf as the miserly Maxime. The cast was well supported by the chorus, especially the chorus of immigrant girls who sang and danced two numbers. 78SENIOR PLAY-“Fight For Your Lady” On the night of April 16, the Senior Class presented their yearly attraction. The play, “Fight For Your Lady,” was taken from a movie and had its setting in a New York hotel. The plot was built around the complications of an American opera singer when he broke up with one girl and became attached to another. CAST Ham Hamilton, a "breezy promoter" . ......................................... Elton Meyer First Man Reporter Albert Huggins First Woman Reporter Muriel Fisher Second Woman Reporter Margaret Stewart Traslc, a "seasoned newspaperman" Bill Straube Josey, a talkative hotel maid .......................................... Mary Alice Pfeiffer Bob Densmore, an opera singer ............................................... Gienn Schlueter Mike Scanlon, a slow-witted wrestler . . . Harold Daech Marcia, a changeable "romancer" ......... .... Carla Caldwell Gypsy Waitress ........................................................ Maxine Greenwood Nayda, a gypsy fortune teller .... Faye Schmidt Felice, a cafe proprietress ................................................... Alma Johnson Boris c . , , . . , Charles Rizzoli jorl$ Spad.ssmno s subs.rv.ent guards Matt Fagan Marietta, a cafe singer Judy Kubicek Charlotte, a wisecracking "dummy" ................... .. Louise Trent Spadissimot an excitable Eurpoean fencer . . Dale Purtle Undertaker Lloyd Fischer Florist's Assistant Madge Hise First Police ...............................................................Richard Tipton Second Police Delmar Schoenleber Extras Eunice Neudecker, Jack Allen, Larry Strahan, Jane Starkey, and Lynette Taake 79On these two pages of photographs you will see a few of the things that make for happiness every day at E. H. S. Look down in the far right corner of the next page; those three gentlemen? They’re the janitors, the boys who put the building back together after we tear it apart. And two pictures above, you’re not seeing double, it’s the Meyer twins. In the upper righthand corner we have the cheerleaders. Now return to this page and look at that smile on Mr. Allen’s face— but who wouldn’t smile. Pages of snaps like this only show part of the enjoyment we get out of our great high school. 80MODERN HISTORY Dear students, after going through all your textbooks of history, I was unable to find any which covered the subject of Modern History adequately. By modern history, I mean the great era through which you have just passed—the 1941-42 school year. During this space of time any number of important events took place, new lands discovered and new faces found out about or at least new facts about them. You will recall that during this school year the second World War was going on. How did this affect you? Remember how “Pop” used to warn you not to put too many miles on the car when you went on a date? Remember getting a couple new teachers because of the draft? And remember how patriotic everyone was by buying defense stamps and being willing to park in order to save tires. - - - Our parties were again big successes. Do you think the lettermen will ever forget how they all started out to have a big time in St. Louis after the Prom and ended up in White Castle Hamburger Spots, Parkways, and such? Uh! Uh! And then there was that eventful night when the basketball squad upset the ol’ applecart by whipping the Alumni, and then enjoyed a dance on them. JANUARY 13 must be spelled with capital letters, for it was on that night that the Hi-Tri girls took over and gave a party for the boys. What a night! girls dragging boys around—short dresses, woo! woo! and the next day all the fellows complaining about sore muscles, the pantywaists. - - - The scene of the year was Mr. Blodgett pushing Edwardsville’s Michael Angelo, Rembrandt, and Raphael (Kolesa, Schrier, and Ramsey) out on the gym floor in a cart during a football assembly. These artists gained quite a lot of publicity for E. H. S. by their Staunton mural and also made themselves a couple of pairs of sore knees. - - - It was during football season that everybody showed up for a big bonfire and got a lot of pep up for the East Side game, but East St. Louis was very unsympathetic and knocked the same out of us. - - - The main discovery of the year, we all agree, was the Rock Road. What a busy place that was in the early part of ’42. Credit for discovery must go to Chuck (Columbus) Harbry, but he soon had a lot of company out there. Harold Corrie held the title of traffic cop, Kahtz intended to set up a popcorn stand, and “Rockie” Lankford had intentions of setting up barricades and charging admissions.-I’ve just touched on the high-spots here, but you may get the complete volume by coming to Kubicek’s Korn Korpor-ation, 121212 West Broadway, Glen Crossing. Plato, XXXVIII IN MEMORIAM FLORENCE GIESEKING BETTY STALHUT 82 CLASS OF 1944 CLASS OF 1943SCHOOL CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 5 Freshman Day—We hope they like it here. 8 10 11 Classes begin—The upperclassmen look over the Freshies. Junior Play tryouts. Second annual paint job on the front walk—BEAT GILLESPIE. Tsh, tsh! 15 16 T. B. tests for Seniors—but it didn’t hurt. New cheer leaders were chosen—Izy Metzger, Cleona Lutz, and Damaris Childres. 19 22 The first football game—and naturally we beat Gillespie, 12-0. And what group of boys journeyed to Staunton to paint their walks? 26 First matinee dance, but where were all the Freshies? We won against Staunton, 14-0. OCTOBER 3 Played at Madison and won, 33-7 8 Big bonfire and pep meeting in the parking lot. Who says we haven’t any school spirit!! 9 10 16-17 23 24 Reception for parents of the Freshmen. First conference game with East Side—but we lost, 19-0! Teachers’ Institute—Oh joy—our first holiday in six weeks! Junior play—and we’ll admit they gave a fine presentation. Report Cards, oh!!—and we lost the football game at Belle- 30 ville, 20-0. Not such a good day. Yes, it can happen here. Lercher got caught in the draft (army). Maybe a few tears were even shed! 31 Football game here with Alton. We won!! NOVEMBER 1 First big party of the year—the Hallowe’en party. 7 High school conference. 10 We were on our best behavior—Parents’ visiting day. Also 14 pink slips went out. The big event—Homecoming. The parade in the afternoon and football game with Granite at night. We lost though! 15 20-21 27-28 Football Prom—and Judy Kubicek crowned queen. A nice Thanksgiving vacation. Glee Club put on the operetta “The Mocking Bird.” 28 Started out the basketball season by winning at Highland. DECEMBER 3 Report cards again!! 5 Game with Litchfield here. 8 12 19 23 Basketball game at Greenville. Game with Madison here. Journeyed to Collinsville for the game, but we didn’t do so good. Parties in all classes and matinee dance. 24—Jan. 4—Christmas vacation, just what we’ve all been waiting for. CONTINUED ON PAGE 124 83 CONTINUED ON PAGE 124Patrons We Appreciate Your Unfailing Support During These Times of Insecurity— Show YOUR APPRECIATION BY YOUR SUPPORTIndex For 1942 Tiger PAGE A B Feed Store............................................. 98 Anderson, Chas. 0............................................ 94 Auerbach’s ................................................... 93 B R Recreation............................................. 120 Baker, U. B................................................. Ill Ballweg's Drug Store ........................................ 95 Bank of Edwardsville ......................................... 94 Barnsback, Dr. R. S.......................................... 113 Beauty Mart ................................................. 93 Bectold Co................................................... 96 Ben Frankfin Store .......................................... 88 Biegert, Walter ............................................. 88 Blume’s ..................................................... 93 Bob’s Band Box .............................................. 99 Bohm, Alvin C................................................ 88 Bothman . Sons ............................................. 116 Buhrmester Paper Paint Co.................................. 107 Butler’s Store ............................................ 110 Cassens Sons .............................................. 93 Cassens Tin Shop ........................................... 110 Cathcart's Cafe ............................................. 113 Central Shoe Shop ........................................... 119 City Departments ............................................ 97 Clayton Cleaners ............................................ 117 Clover Leaf Loan ............................................. 91 Cox, Dr. Wayne B............................................. Ill Crossing Inn ................................................ 119 Day Night Garage............................................ 99 Delicate, Dr. W. E........................................... 103 Desmond Mfg. Co.............................................. 119 Eberhart Brothers .......................................... 117 Eberhart Dustman .......................................... 105 Edwardsville Bottling Works .................................. 98 Edwardsville Creamery Co...................................... 90 Edwardsville Feed Seed Store............................... Ill Edwardsville Loan Ass’n...................................... 107 Edwardsville Lumber Co........................................ 94 Edwardsville National Bank Trust Co........................ 123 Edwardsville Water Co........................................ 121 Eeck, John F.................................................. 93 Estabrook, W. L............................................... 96 Ferguson. Dr. E. C............................................ 99 Fiegenbaum, Paul G........................................... Ill Figge’s Service Station ..................................... 88 Fink Electrical Co........................................... 114 Fink, Dr Leroy M.............................................. 96 Prey, A...................................................... 99 Geers’ Corner Store ......................................... 99 Gem Cafe ..................................................... 96 Gent Plumbing ............................................... 121 Gordon’s Garage ............................................. 110 Halley’s Market ............................................. 102 Hartman, Harry .............................................. 122 Hartung Bros................................................. 88 Healey, Joseph .............................................. 122 Hellrung, Dr. Cecilia M................................... 117 Herff-Jones ................................................. 102 Hiles Newell............................................... 103 Hirsch, Dr. J. A............................................. 117 Home Building Loan......................................... 101 Home Nursery ................................................ 116 Hotz Lumber Co.......................................... 101 Hurst Pontiac Co........................................... 96 Idlewood Inn ............................................. 89 Illinois Lumber Co........................................... 103 Imber, Norman ............................................... 93 Imperial Refineries ......................................... 120 Kane. Architects ............................................ 102 Keenan. Dr. O. R............................................. 102 Kiem’s ...................................................... 105 PAGE King Bee Candy Kitchen...................................... 88 Kiwanis Club .............................................. 122 Klueter's Grocery .......................................... 96 Knauel, Dr. R. 1........................................... 105 Kroger Grocery ............................................. 93 Ladd. Earl ................................................ 120 Ladd. Thomas F............................................. 105 Leclaire Store ............................................ 105 Lee Shops ................................................. 103 Leland Barber Shop.......................................... 88 Madison County Mutual ..................................... 110 Madison Store ............................................. 103 Marks Funeral Home ........................................ 115 Marks Weber Funeral Home ................................ 107 Mechanic's Planing Mill ................................... 106 Meyer, E. C. Son......................................... 110 Mindrup’s Automotive Service ............................... 98 Mottar Drug Co............................................ 112 Nash, Dr. M................................................. 88 Nelson, N. 0............................................... 106 Neudecker's Barber Shop ................................... Ill Normans’ Market ............................................ 93 Organized Labor Union ..................................... 103 Orman’s Standard Service .................................. 119 Overbeck Bros.............................................. 105 Parent-Teachers Association ............................... 113 Peerless Cleaners ......................................... 117 Penney, J. C.............................................. 88 Pork House Market ......................................... 119 Raffaelle Ferguson ...................................... 118 Ray’s Market .............................................. 117 Rhodes-Burford Furniture Co................................. 99 Richards Brick Co.......................................... 108 Rosenthal, R. H............................................ 119 Runge Zeigler Co.......................................... 88 Schmidt. Oscar ............................................ 120 Schmidt Tin Shop ........................................... 87 Schneider Funeral Home ..................................... 88 Schroeder. Dr. W. H......................................... 88 Schulte Ahlert .......................................... 113 Schwartz Drug Co........................................... 117 Schwartz Furniture Co....................................... 99 Scott. Dr. Lawrence ....................................... 102 Shupack, A.................................................. no Silverbloom ................................................ 89 Simpson, Reed, Burroughs .................................. 113 Solter Kriege ........................................... 103 Straube Funeral Home ....................................... 86 Strebler Studio ........................................... 100 Springer. F. E............................................. Ill St. Boniface Bowling Alley................................. 101 Strejcek, Frank J.......................................... 119 Taylor, Paul C............................................. 122 Terry, Gueltig Powell ................................... 117 Three Flowers Cab Co....................................... 102 Tiemann’s Home Made Ice Cream.............................. 113 Tietze. Dr. H. C........................................... 105 Tomboy Store .............................................. 110 Tri-City Grocery Co......................................... 98 Wahl. Dr. E. F............................................. 102 Walter, Joseph A........................................... 119 Warnock. W. W............................................... 96 Wayne Bros.................................................. 87 Wehrle, John ............................................... 88 Western Auto Associate Store .............................. 105 Wildey Theater ............................................ 122 Wonder Cafe ............................................... 103 Woodlawn Gardens ........................................... 99 Wood, Ben F................................................ ip? Woolworth Co., F. W......................................... 96 85 Illinois and Missouri Licensed Straube Funeral Home Phone 60 512 North Main Street Edwardsville, Illinois 86 SENIOR CLASS WILL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15 I, Harold Daech, leave my funny (?) jokes to Miss Davis I, Eugene Daube, leave in search of some excitement. I, Lois Dannenberg, leave my primping to Joyce Irvin. I, Bill Davis, leave an dwith me goes all of my “wim, wigor, and wi-tality.” I, Clifford Durham, leave, why not! I, Rolla Durham, leave to continue my work in the Home Guard. I, Norma Dye, leave my path to school for Ruth Suhre to follow. I, Bob Eads, leave my football suit to Smokie Bartlett. I, Hilbert Eberhart, leave with no regrets. I, Wilma Eberhart, leave in the blue Chevie. I, Douglas Edwards, leave by bicycle to John Reed to walk it and Crystal to school. I, Dorothy Eichman, leave my brother Leroy. I, Quinten Eihausen, leave a history of basketball. I, Harris Eilers, leave the Physics “lab” with regret. I, Forrest English, leave before the “fire-bug” gets me. I, Leon Erlich, leave—just leave. CONTINUED ON PAGE 89 a a a a a a Compliments of Compliments of Schmidt Tin Shop Wayne Brothers Sheet Metal and Heating Groceries and Meats a a a 229 North Main St. a a a Phone 1246W Edwardsville, 111. North Main St. Phone 38 a a a a a a E. H. SCHMIDT a a a 87 COMPLIMENTS OF Leland Barber Shop John Wehrle Walter Biegert Dr. W. H. Schroeder Hartung Brothers Schneider Funeral Home Figge’s Service Station X X Bob Hawes: My Dad and 1 know everything. Miss Lumb: How many examples did you get correctly? Chuck Schmidt: Oh yeah, well what’s electricity? Box Cox: If 1 get this one right and three more, it Bob H.: Oh, that’s one my Dad knows. will make four. Compliments of Dr. M. D. Nash i Runge-Ziegler Shoe Co. CROSBY SQUARE Dentist i Authentic Fashions in Men’s Shoes 420 N. Main St. Edwardsville, 111. i We Give Eagle Stamps Alvin C. Bohm i Ben Franklin Store Counsellor at Law Featuring Onward Brand School Supplies Bohin Building Edwardsville, 111. Edwardsville, 111. , Compliments of Compliments of King Bee Candy Kitchen George Coukoulis The Place to Buy Your Ice Cream and Candy 88 [ Compliments of 1 1 ' x x x Frank J. Wolf Idlewood Inn St. Louis Rd. The Class of 42 x x x GOOD EATS COMPLIMENTS. BEST WISHES TO ALL X OF YOU COURTEOUS SERVICE XXX $ $ The Silverbloom, Inc. Phone 1129 Edwardsville, 111. ' 8X8 SENIOR CLASS WILL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 87 I, Matilda Erspamer, leave to wait for Roberta Perry. I, Matthew Fagan, leave Mr. Blodgett alone. I, Doris Fink, leave my charming manner to a deserving Junior. I, Lloyd Fischer, leave still wondering what “it’s” all about. I, Muriel Fischer, leave my office duties to Shirley Bardelmeier. I, Ruth Friedhoff, leave to be a great success—or something. I, Bernice Gaertner, leave to be with mother. I, Alberta Gehner, leave to spend more time with Bud. I, Dorothy George, leave still trying to capture that certain masculine heart. I, Mildred Gieseking, leave for the quiet country. I, Margaret Gildersleeve, leave for Chicago and nursing school. I, Gloria Going, leave in time to get to Glen. I, Lester Grant, leave with fond memories. I, Kenneth Grebel, leave my walk to Lennie Kesl. I, Maxine Greenwood, leave to buy more cute clothes. I, Maurice Gregor, leave my dancing style to Jack Take. I, Wilma Grinstcad, leave to try and get in circulation once more. I, Gerald Grosenheider, leave my power of exaggeration to some needy speech student. 89 CONTINUED ON PAGE 90SENIOR CLASS WILL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 89 I, Leo Gwyn, leave to put Marine on the map. I, Eugene Hamel, leave my yellow and black suspenders to Miss Lumb. I, Alice Hanvey, leave the beauty of my eyes to Bob Pittman. I, Mary Lu Harrell, leave all of my ribbons to Gerry Stahlhut. I, Simon Henry, leave my bashfulness to Merlin Gusewelle. I, Bob Hentz, leave for the St. Boniface bowling alley. I, Madge Hise, leave to continue my search for the tall, dark, and handsome man. I, Charles Hogue, leave with Sam. I, Eunice Holt, leave for Glen Carbon via the yellow school bus. I, Kenneth Homann, leave by the south door—the windows are too high. I, Irma Howerton, leave for Glen Crossing with Bill Belshaw. I, Albert Huggins, leave my hair-do to Bob Hartung. I, Helen Huser, leave to wait for more news from the U. S. Army. I, Mary Ellen Jacobs, leave for a heavy date. I, Ruth Jacobs, leave to attend Joe’s next dance. I, Dorothy Jahn, leave my blush to Edna Foehrkalb. I, Emily Jaros, leave to take more rides in my sister’s convertible. I, Alma Johnson, leave to dig up more questionable gossip. I, Bonita Johnson, leave my athletic ability to Betty Schiermeyer. CONTINUED ON PAGE 91 ► ► ► ► f ► ► 90 Edwardsville Creamery Company QUALITY DAIRY PRODUCTS Milk, Cream, Cheese, Butter and Evaporated Milk 223 W. PARK ST. X X X For Prompt and Satisfactory Delivery Service Phone 364-365 x x xHere’s A Security Defense Plan In these uncertain days, everyone is looking for security, and the end of the war. Investing in Building and Loan Stock Shares will give you that security now and after the war. X X X A 52 YEAR RECORD------ PAYING EVERY DIVIDEND XXX CLOVER LEAF LOAN OLDEST BUILDING AND LOAN IN THIS CITY Edwardsville National Bank Building Phone 122 SENIOR CLASS WILL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 90 I, Buddy Jones, leave to find someone else to tease, besides the teachers. I, Dorothy Jones, leave all alone. I, Bob Kahtz, leave my jokes to someone that will appreciate them. I, Norma Kassing, leave also for Collinsville. I, Geraldine Kershaw, leave my excellent bridge game to Virginia Levora. I, Kay Kesl, leave my ability to wear clothes to Glenna Daniels. I, Rose Klausing, leave my gracious smile to a deserving Soph. I, Vernon Klaustermeier, leave never to return. I, Verna Klenke, leave quietly for the country. I, Leroy Klueter, leave. Goodby, all! I, Thomas Kolesa, leave to find a new substitute for white wash. I, Judy Kubicek, leave to join Tommy and his drums. I, Jacklyn Ladd, leave my vamping technique to Eleanor Springer to use at Vassar. I, Alice Lance, leave with Gloria. I, Isabelle Langwisch, leave my gum popping ability to Miss Abenbrink. I, Harold Lankford, leave. Ah—EHS loses another Casinova. I, Allien Lautner, leave my reducing diet to Barbara Brower. I, Gordon Lawyer, leave my job as water boy to Gene Ostendorf. 91 CONTINUED ON PAGE 92SENIOR CLASS WILL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 91 I, Laverne Lee, leave to spend more time with Jack West. I, Ray Long, leave Faye alone and blue. I, Betty Love, leave my cheerful disposition to Mr. Tracy. I, Anita Lozier, leave for Wood River. I, Leona Mateyka, leave for Missouri U.—maybe! I, Lorene Mateyka, leave to go join up with a part of the Army. I, Ann McDermott, leave my basketball ability for future use by the G. A. A. I, Virginia McReaken, leave the G. A. A. in a terrible condition without me. I, Eleanor Meyer, leave my hair dye to Margie Mindrup. (It’s a fake.) I, Elton Meyer, leave to show the Hawaiians how it is done. I, Lorna Meyer, leave with the hope that hereafter people won’t call me Norma. I, Norma Meyer, leave with the wish that people won’t call me Lorna. I, Margaret Miller, leave my vivacious manner to Maxine Colbert. I, Norma Monical, leave as quietly as I came. I, John Morgan, leave to build a dwelling for Bev and me. I, Charles Munzert, leave to join the other quiet people in the world. I, Eunice Neudecker, leave ’cause I’m done. I, Lloyd Neuhaus, leave—but not to set the world on fire. I, Jewell Nilsson, leave with much knowledge. I, Dorothy Nix, leave my laugh to anyone who can make good use of it. I, Virginia Norris, leave in time for the next furlough. I, Charles Ohm, leave the Chem “lab” in total disorder. I, Walter Pendracky, leave my technique at Rummy to Joanna Goddard. I, Mary Alice Pfeiffer, leave my gift of gab to Mary Rizzoli. I, Dale Purtle, leave my laugh to Jacelyn Mayer. I, Harry Renken, leave to tutor Einstein. I, Herbert Richards, leave my ability to argue Miss Cheek out of anything to Alvin Arbough. I, Dorothy Ringering, leave with that old feeling. I, Charles Rizzoli, leave my school loyalty to all who enter EHS. I, Helen Robinette, leave to take care of the out-of-town boys. I, Betty Rohrkaste, leave Mr. Henderson my ability to play the fiddle. I, Verna Rohrkaste, leave my blonde tresses to Carmen Nemnich. I, Kermit Rosenthal, leave some of my hair to Mr. Hebberger. I, La Rita Rosenthal, leave the locker room mirrors to Jeanne Godfrey. I, Ruth Schaberg, leave Carol May to take notes into Chorus the fifth period. I, Grace Schaefer, leave without a sigh. I, Margaret Schaefer, leave my ability to slay ’em to Audrey Bohm. I, Margaret Scheldrup, leave to find a new “beau” (for my violin). I, Leo Schlemer, leave, still knowing nothing. 92 CONTINUED ON PAGE 95 , a a a a a a ' Compliments of 1 Auerbach’s j Cassens Sons Ladies Apparel Dependable Used Cars a a a f Always Something New to Offer ’ ( a a a a a a DODGE PLYMOUTH i We Specialize in Formals and • • Complete Service Phone 308 • 1 Bridal Outfits 1 a a a ■ Eagle Stamps Your Extra Saving a a a a , 121 HILLSBORO AVE. ' 126 N. Main Edwardsville , a a a a a a Mary swallowed her little watch, Now the watch is gone. Mary walks down the street— Time marches on. Miss Stoldt: As we walk out-of-doors on a cold winter morning and look about us, what do we see on every hand? Biology Class: Gloves! 1 Compliments of Blume’s Women’s Apparel 104 N. Main Phone 509W Compliments of Norman lmber . . r | Nation-Wide Store Normans’ Market N. Wehmeyer—Props.—N. Dankenbring 215 N. Main St. Phone 696 We Deliver ► Compliments of Beauty Mart ’ 211 Commercial St. Phone 11 | i , Compliment of John F. Eeck Attomey-at-Law Bank of Edwardsville Building Compliments of Kroger Grocery Baking Co. Two Stores 204 N. Main 100 E. Vandalia ' 93 K » a » ' i • Compliments of ► Compliments of ' Ldwardsville Lumber Co. j • ® a » f ► Charles O. Anderson j Headquarters for ► L ytm, ► ► Justice of the Peace a a a h H ► 424 E. Vandalia SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Paints and Varnishes : : a a a 1 ■ ! Matt Fagan: If Mr. Love doesn't take back what he said this morning I'll leave school. Viola N.: What did he say? Matt F.: He told me to leave school. Wilma Engelke: You know the old saying, "What you don't know won't hurt you." Bill Biegert: So what? Wilma E. You lucky boy, you're invulnerable. We Congratulate 1 he Class of 1942 on their opportunity as well as on their present achievement. We know they, like their fellow alumnae, will give a good account of themselves in the eventful years ahead. ® « THE BANK OF EDWARDSVILLE Established 1868 MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 94SENIOR CLASS WILL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 92 I, Glenn Schlueter, leave for 3rd term as mayor of Glen Crossing. I, Edith Schmidt, leave still wondering what I learned. I, Faye Schmidt, leave my basketball dreams to Blackie. I, Hortense Schmidt, leave my quiet personality to be distributed generously to the “Freshies.” I, Ruth Schmidt, leave my noisy ways to Marian Herman. I, Verna Schmidt, leave to help Lois find a man. I, Bill Schmidt, leave to look for an honest woman. I, Charles Schneider, leave swiftly. I, Delmar Schoenleber, leave my sister, Dolores. I, Wallace Schoenleber, leave for the farm. I, Hilbert Schumacher, leave after just getting here. I, Thomas Schreier, leave to become part of the “Kolesa, Schreier, and Ramsey Painting Enterprises.” I, Kenneth Shashek, leave to run Harry James out of business. I, Betty Settle, leave to go places and do things. I, Eileen Sickbert, leave mv quiet ways to “Red” Reed. I, Bill Snadjr, leave to become chief stooge at Woolworth’s. I, Warren Southard, leave for Poag and the cantaloupes. I, Jayne Starkey, leave my bangs to some poor, unsuspecting Freshie. They droop! CONTINUED ON PAGE 104 Compliments of “The Corner Drug Store” Main and Vandalia Streets Edwardsville, Illinois XXX Phone 272 95. S X ® ® Hart Schaffner Marx Clothes Stetson and Champ Hats Munsingwear Underwear Covers and Binding Arrow and X-Act-Fit Shirts Beau Brummell Ties ■ for the t Interwoven Socks Hickok and Paris Belts 1942 Tiger h » » JS Si Si Si The Newest Thing in Sportswear -by- V . W. Warnock Co. 1 ' Becktold Co. Now in the Palace Building St. Louis, Mo. ® a ► ► i Si Si Si - Carl Brockman: Is the doctor in? Nurse: No, he went out for lunch. Carl B.: Will he be back in after lunch? Nurse: No, that's what he went out after. Mr. Eberhart: And now let me warn you that early hours are the rule in this store. Tootie Gregor: That's good. You can’t close any too early for me. 1 i ► Compliments of W. L. Estabrook 401 Bank of Edwardsville Building Firestone Store Prescribed Sendee Shop OLIVER FARM EQUIPMENT Hurst Pontiac Co. 401 North Main II Compliments of F. W. Woolworth Co. Corner of Main and Hillsboro f Compliments of Dr. LeRoy M. Fink Dentist Gerber Building 1 ■ 1 STOP AT THE GEM AND EAT IN THE PERFECT GRILL STEAKS — CHOPS — CHICKEN ( Gem Cafe 225 North Main Compliments of Klueter’s Grocery We Give Eagle Stamps ! Your Extra Saving Phone 374 96★ CITY OF EDWARDSVILLE MADISON COUNTY, ILLINOIS ★ OSCAR SCHMIDT MAYOR EDWARD H. POOS CITY CLERK JOSEPH ROTTER CITY TREASURER Police Department ALFRED F. DAECH----Chief CHAS. KRIEGER - Night Captain ARNOLD SCHAEFER, Patrolman FRED HOFEDITZ - - Patrolman JOHN HUSE......Patrolman GORDON BURROUGHS CORPORATION COUNSEL M. ESTHER FUNKE CITY ATTORNEY Fire Department DENNIS HENTZ......Chief LEONARD DAVIS----Fireman E. W. WEEKS.....Fireman CHAS. FIEGENBAUM - Fireman ★ Department Street ★ ERWIN SEHNERT SUPERINTENDENT HERBERT KENNEDY ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT ★Stranger: Can you tell me where the post-office is? Jack Allen: There it is right across the street, any fool knows that. Stranger: Yes, that's why I asked you. ■ i---------------—— ---------------; f Wheel and Axle f • Alignment Service , Dynamic Wheel Balancing ' Brake Service x x x , Mindrup’s Automotive ■ , Service Edwardsville, 111. X X II-------- Pessimist (looking at convertible): How many will this car hold? Optimist Salesman: Three, but six can get in if they are well acquainted. — ' » x XXX Compliments of Compliments of ■ A. B. Feed Seed Store, Tri-City Gro. Co. Inc. The Store Wholesale and Retail ' 1 That Saves XXX You Money Profit Reaper, A. B. Feeds J XXX Flour - Hay - Feed - Salt Seeds Two Stores Grinding, Cleaning and Mixing in “Where Feed and Seed Is a Science” Edwardsville XXX XXX 98 « Bob’s Band Box ■ Cleaners and Launderers Robt. Ferguson, Jr., Prop. Compliments of ; Woodlawn Gardens 1ft) J. H. Blixen No Shrinking No Odor i No Fading A Laundry and Dry Cleaning Service ' To Fit Everyone’s Purpose. ► , YOUR APPEARANCE IS OUR BUSINESS ’ 1407 St. Louis Street We Pick Up and Deliver f Phone 28 112-114 S. Main St. K « K i Lady Buyer: These eggs aren't fresh. Gene Bardelmeier: If a man smashed a clock, would Grocer: Why, lady, the boy brought them from the he be convicted of killing time? country this morning. Lad : Yes, but what country? Bob Birmingham: Not if the clock struck first. } i Compliments of i Compliments of Dr. E. C. Ferguson i Geers’ Corner Store ' Bank of Edwardsville t So. Buchanan St. Phone 1143 1 i Compliments of ■; ► Compliments of Day and Night Garage ' • Adolph Frey “Complete Automotive Service” ’ Choice Fresh and Salted Meats, Chickens, Electric and Acetylene Welding Lard, etc. 206 St. Louis St. Edwardsville, 111. i , 227 North Main St. Phone 62 ■ Compliments of ' Compliments of Schwartz Furniture Co. ; i Rhodes - Burford HOUSE FURNISHING CO. , 111 Main St. Phone 400 , ► - The Pleasant Store 99Individuality in Photography MEANS NOT THE WAY WE MAKE OUR PICTURES BUT THE WAY WE EXPRESS YOUR THOUGHTS AND YOUR OWN PERSONALITY We Interpret YOUR Individuality—Not Ours STREBLER STUDIO 114 St. Louis St. Edwardsville, IllinoisH C CS X a z c £ Mr. Gibson: This examination will be conducted on the honor system. Please take seats three apart and in alternate rows. Scene: Sunday morning in the drug store. Lennie Kosl: Can you giv« me change for a dime, please? Clerk: Certainly, and I hope you enjoy the sermon, son. BUILDING AND LOAN SHARES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE- You will be dollars ahead by spending a few moments to familiarize yourself with our savings plan that puts money to work earning substantial profits. Let us show you how Building and Loan Shares can provide for college education, business opportunities, and security for later life. a a J8 HOME BUILDING LOAN ASSOCIATION • EDWARDSV1LLE NATIONAL BANK BUILDING « ' • EDWARDSVILLE, ILLINOIS 101 HerfTJones Company Indianapolis, Indiana Designers and Manufacturers — of — Class Jewelry and Graduation Announcements Cups, Medals, Trophies Official Jewelers to Class of 1942 Edwardsville High School Represented by R. L. Jacobs Jacksonville, Illinois Jacklyn Ladd: Where did you do most of your skating last winter? J. Goddard: About the same place I'll do my horseback riding this summer. Faye Schmidt: What do you mean telling your boy friend I was deaf and dumb? Squeix Trent: You're wrong. I didn't say you were deaf. I- Compliments of Dr. Lawrence Scott OPTOMETRIST 130 N. Main St. Halley’s Cash Market Meats - Groceries Corner Hillsboro-Chapman Phone 214 Compliments of Dr. E. F. Wahl National Bank Building Compliments of M. B. KANE EDWARD A. KANE REGISTERED ARCHITECTS Bohm Building Edwardsville Compliments of Compliments of Dr. O. R. Keenan Three Flowers Bank of Edwardsville Building Cab Company Phone 32 250 N. Main St. Phone 88 102 i ’ XXX XXX Edwardsville Compliments of High School for Local Labor Union Better Education XXX 179 Illinois of Lumber Co., Inc. for Edwardsville Better Material XXX XXX Mr. Love: If a man buys an article for $12.25 and sells it for $9.75, does he gain or lose on the transaction? Ginger Norris: (after thinking for a long while) He gains on the cents, but loses on the dollars. Vic Becker: I'm a football player and 1 want my photo taken. Mr. Strebler: Full face? Vic Becker: No half back. Compliments of , Compliments of Madison Store Purcell Street Edwardsville, Illinois Solter Kriege Hardware 110 North Main St. Phone 588 1 The Stores of Greater Value r Compliments of Wonder Cafe Lee Shops Quality Food — Quality Service So. Buchanan St. Edwardsville, 111. Compliments of Dr. W. E. Delicate 1 Compliments of Hiles Newell National Bank Building - - 1 103 SENIOR CLASS WILL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 95 I, Margaret Stewart, leave my success to Beverly Fink. I, Phil Stewart, leave my curly locks to Bob Norris. I, Lucille Stille, leave for keeps. I, Clifford Stolte, leave my pretty blue pants to Lawrence Finke. I, Harold Stolte, leave to spend a year in isolated research to figure out whom to date. I, Bill Stolze, leave Mary Jo to no one. I, Larry Strahan, leave my dainty walk to Buck Moore. I, Bill Straube, leave to become Muny Opera’s next headliner. I, Lois Stullken, leave with the hope of finding a man. I, Etheleen Sullivan, leave the school to itself. I, Lynette Taake, leave to compete with Marlene Dietrich. I, Gladys Take, leave ’cause it seems to be the custom. I, Pat Thatcher, leave to become another Katherine Cornell. I, Robert Theuer, leave to give talks on “How I Got Through High School Without Having a Date.” I, Richard Tipton, leave my plaid shirts to Jim Marks. I, Roberta Tosh, leave my red hair to Jean Dierkes. I, Louise Trent, leave my catching smile to D. R. B. I, LaVelle Turner, leave the cornet section in an uproar. I, Vernon Ukena, leave as quietly as I came. Did you know I was here? I, Edna Veith, leave in time for the next dance at St. Jacob. I, William Veith, leave in time for milking. I, Lavon Votrain, leave. That’s all. I, James Walter, leave my loud mouth to Miss Hoskins. I, Pete Weaver, leave very little of anything. I, Paul Weber, leave to learn more about life. I, Ray Wedrasky, leave to go back to Glen. I, Mary Lee Welch, leave to play the role of a quiet woman. I, Edgar Wendel, leave because there is nothing else to do. I, Elsie Wilhelm, leave following in my sister’s footsteps. I, Edward Wille, leave for better butchering at the Tri-City. I, Ada Mae Williams, leave but not to go far. I, Clifford Williams, leave and am I glad! I, Bill Wolf, leave my awful puns to Mr. Gibson. I, Nolan Woods, leave in my blue Ford with Lois. I, Eugene Wright, leave to find a job. I, Georgia Wynne, leave my artistic touch to Sue Sentenne. I, Paul Yenne, leave—so help me. 104 Compliments of — Compliments of Western Auto Associate Store Leclaire Store i Tony Jansen, Prop. “Nothing But the Best” ' 140 North Main St. Phone 73 512 Leclaire Ave. Edwardsville, 111. ► ' i . Compliments of Compliments of KIEM’S Dr. H. C. Tietze ► Women’s Apparel Edwardsville’s Fashion Comer Offices in Bank of Edwardsville Building i i Compliments of ► 1 i j Compliments of Eberhart Dustman ► i Dr. R. I. Knauel i Red White Store ► 1 i Chiropractor 112a N. Main St. ► ■ 106 N. Main St. Phone 390 ► FOR GOOD HEALTH ► Bill Vieth to a druggist: Now be sure to write plain on Sue Sentenne: Of course 1 like you. Haven't 1 danc- those bottles, which is for the horse, and which is for ed six times with you tonight? me. 1 don't want anything to happen to him before 1 Harold Bartels: Yes, but what does that prove? get all the hay cut. Sue S.: You'd know if you realized how you dance. 1 • ► ► M M M i » » St Compliments of i Compliments of i Overbeck Bros. i ► Thos. F. Ladd - i i Contractor i “The Home of Fine Wallpaper ' and Paints” 229 Commercial St. ' • K K s « s » i i Plastering Concrete • 120 N. Main Street a si ® Edwardsville, 111. Phone 1003 Edwardsville, 111. » » 38 1 m sa a 105 CLASS PROPHECY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27 Ruby Augsburger, Melba Bartels, and Kathleen Cheney. James Walters has a Medicine Show at Medical Lodge, Kansas. His slogan is “Use Jimmy’s Junk and Jump for Joy.” Roberta Tosh, Leroy Klueter, and Wilma Eberhart help him sell it. From all the contact they had with high school principals, Gib Bergschneider and Matt Fagan now are co-principals at their own school for problem children in Crab Orchard, Nebraska. A member of the class of ’42 who has followed his life-long ambition is Harold Lankford. He’s drilling on teeth in Arkansas, and does he love to make you squirm! Ed Agles and Tom Kolesa are still playing football. I just saw them lose in the Orange Bowl game in New Orleans. Lester Grant and Warren Southard are picking cotton in Alabama. In Florida, Harold Daech has his own baseball team, which has already won the World Series for the past five years. Some of his well known players are Harold Clawson, Bob Birmingham, Fred Auten-rieb, Roland Beck, Buddy Jones, Lloyd Neuhaus, Charles Massa, Hilbert Schumacher, and Clifford Williams. While walking along the Florida beach who should I stumble over, sunning themselves, but Mary Lee Welch and Etheleen Sullivan. Glenn Schleuter has formed an orchestra and his theme song is still “Georgia.” He claims it’s because he lives in the state of Georgia! Several of your friends have returned CONTINUED ON PAGE 108 1 XXX XXX Best Wishes of Compliments ] N. O. Nelson Co. of ;, i XXX ■ Mechanic’s ’ ' Makers of i Planing , “Nonco” Fixtures Mill, ' XXX ■ Inc. ► All the brass parts of “NONCO” Plumbing XXX 1 fixtures are made by local people and guaranteed by a local concern. ■ j Phone 487 » XXX XXX i i 106 X X fio §L Look Buhrmester Paper Paint Co. Ahead AND x x x f Enjoy More Savings Profits Wholesale - Retail ► We have savings accounts that Wallpaper can be adjusted to fit your needs. Open one soon. Paints ► X X x Supplies f f Edwardsville 244 N. Main St. Edwardsville ■ Loan Association . SECOND FLOOR ® ® | ; Edwardsville National Bank Building Mr. Meyer: I've worked herd these fifty years, son, and I feel that it's time for me to retire and turn the business over to you. Elton M.: Aw shucks, Dad, why don't you work a little longer, and then we can both retire. Mrs. Lankford: What makes you think Harold is in love? Mr. Lankford: Well for gosh sakes, what else would make him put his dirty shirt to bed and then jump down the laundry chute? a a ® COMPLIMENTS OF MARKS-WEBER Funeral Home » » » AMBULANCE SERVICE EDWARDSVILLE WOOD RIVER a m « 107CLASS PROPHECY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 106 to the Southern states. Kermit Rosenthal has a tobacco plantation and Bill Schmidt is president of a girls’ school in Georgia. He says he likes it. Elsie Wilhelm and LaVon Votrain are in Singling Bros. Circus. They are both trapezists. Edgar Wendel is the lion tamer and Paul Weber the water boy. Lester Buhrmester, Harold Corrie, and Vernon Klaustermeier run a Dog and Cat Hospital in South Carolina. Alma Johnson is a famous flyer in New Jersey. Her instructor was Bob Hentz. He is now teaching Dorothy George and Emily Jaros the art of flying. Quite a few are in New York. Georgia Wynn is drawing illustrations for an advertising agency. Bob Burroughs has his own models, and a photography studio. Some of his models are Margaret Schaefer, Leona Mateyka, and Betty Rohrkaste. Pat Thatcher has become famous on Broadway—“The Modern Katherine Cornell.” Her most ardent admirer is still Cecil Burrus and her understudy is Lois Stulken. Ginny Norris is studying voice in New York. Gerald Grosenheider has won several prizes with his cartoons. His latest was one of Glenn Ackerman. Bill Stolze runs a Date Bureau in Massachusetts. He says business is very good. Already he has fixed up dates for Hilbert Eberhart, Kenny Homann, Dorothy Eickman, Walter Pendrackey, and Ruth Jacobs CONTINUED ON PAGE 109 IT PAYS TO BUILD WITH BRICK i a a a FACE BRICK COMMON BRICK HOLLOW TILE BUILDING BLOCKS FLUE LINING GLASS BLOCKS When you plan to build, remember this . . . IT PAYS TO BUILD WITH BRICK. No painting, lower insurance, permanent beauty, low upkeep, protection against fire . . . these are all very important considerations when they concern YOU and YOUR HOME. a a a RICHARDS BRICK CO. ► ► » ’ ► i ► ► - ■ ► - ► 108 EDWARDS VILLK ST. LOUISCLASS PROPHECY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 108 In Maine, who should I see but Edna Veith and Helen Robinette running a girl’s camp. Dorothy Ringering is cook, and Eileen Sickbert is chief bottle washer. Robert Theuer, the guide, is the only man on the place. Margaret Sheldrup has gained world wide fame in playing her violin. She lives in Philadelphia most of the time. Kenny Grebel is her accompanist. Hortense Schmidt now has her own newspaper in Washington, D. C. Her assistant, Jayne Starkey, writes the famous “Twinchell’s Column.” In West Virginia, Louise Trent has a dog kennell. She has everything from a Mexican Chow Wow to a St. Bernard. Also in Virginia I saw Albert Gehner managing an antique shop. Bill Wolf is now in Ohio, still blowing his trumpet. He has organized an orchestra and they call themselves ‘‘The Wolves.” Maxine Greenwood has taken up where her sister left off, and is coaching basketball at a girl’s school in Indiana. Some of our fair lassies who have been serving their country as hostesses in army camps are Gerry Kershaw, Mildred Gieseking, Lorene Mateyka, and Verna Schmidt. Lynette Taake and Allien Lautner entertain them with an Abbott and Costello act, and Mary Alice Pfeiffer croons to them. While at the Kentucky Derby, who should I see riding the winner ‘‘Jumpin’ Jive” but Delmar Schonleber, and on the loser “Slow Poke” was Wallace Schonleber- Carla Caldwell is singing in the Muny Opera in St. Louis. Also in St. Louis was Pete Weaver, the prizefighter, and his manager, Paul Yenne. A few of our old classmates have settled down to a peaceful life on Iowa farms, such as Russell Bunn and Leo Gwyne. Nolan Woods is working in a cheese factory in Wisconsin. He lives with Kenny Sha-shek who is a piano tuner. Forrest English and Charles Schneider are working in a defense plant in Detroit. Also in Michigan is Eunice Neudecker as private secretary for the Hudson Motor Co. But not for long—they say she has her eye on the boss. Last but not least, we come back to Illinois where many of our class have stayed. Every night you can see Elton Meyer reading over the “Death Column” to see to whom he can sell tombstones. Jean Brockmeier has a farm and is raising chickens. Harris Eilers helps her count them every morning. Eugene Hamel is proprietor of a cafe in Hamel. His waitresses are Annabel Ambuel and Bernice Gaertner. Gloria Going and Alice Lance have recently made their debut in Glen Carbon. It seems that Glen has increased it’s population these last ten years. Bob Eads is mayor and Charles Munzert runs the department store. Mary Bayer has replaced her father on the school board. Other board members are Bob Baker, Tom Schreier, Norma Dye, Leon 109 CONTINUED ON PAGE 111Madison County Mutual Automobile Insurance Company » ' “A Service That Serves” « X • 306 Edwardsville National Bank Building ■ Phone 961 A wise man is a thinker. A thinker speculates about Mr. Minor: Bob, how far were you from the correct various things. A speculator is a gambler, and to gam- answer? ble is foolish. Therefore, it is folly to be wise. Bob Baker: Only three seats, sir. 110CLASS PROPHECY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 109 Erlich, Norma Monical, Herb Richards, LaVelle Turner, and Vernon Ukena. Gene Bardelmeier has won several prizes at the County Fair with his cattle. Kay Kesl is doing her best to have Notre Dame become co-educational. Margaret Stewart is preparing to run for president of the U. S. Some of her heavy campaigners are Ida Bircher, Eleanor Meyer, Betty Settle, LaRita Rosenthal, and Betty Love. I hear that Ruth Schmidt’s campaigning is also quite effective. Some men who are strongly opposed to her have formed a “Down With Stewart” club with Simon Henry as president. Charles Rizzoli is following his life-long ambition, that of a butcher. Doug Edwards has his own drug store now. Business is so CONTINUED ON PAGE 112 —•“ Compliments of U. B. Baker Justice of Peace X X Compliments of Frederic E. Springer Attorney-at-Law XXX 156 N. Main St. Edwardsville XXX Compliments of Paul G. Fiegenbaum Real Estate and Insurance Compliments of Edwardsville Feed and Seed Store Phone 284 Compliments of Neudecker Barber Shop 135 North Main Street Dr. Wayne B. Cox Extends Hearty Congratulations to the CLASS OF 1942 inCLASS PROPHECY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 111 good that he has two assistants, Bill Biegert and Phil Stewart. Sam Catalano is chief soda jerker. Glen Carbon now has its own Police Force. Chief of Police is Dale Purtle. Other officers are Jack Bel-shaw, Rolla Durham, Ray Long, and Richard Tipton. Several of our other E. H. S. grads are running some of the town’s most prosperous stores. Dorothy Bonham now runs “Silverbloom’s.” Bob Kahtz is manager of “Kroger’s” and John Morgan is assistant manager. Jack Allen manages “Penney’s” and LaVerne Lee is his New York buyer. Eugene Daube is the town veternarian. Judy Kubicek is still faithful to a certain drummer; his initials are T. W. Charles Ohm is teaching chemistry in E. H. S. now. Some of the ’42 graduates have come back to teach the prodigy children about Latin, etc. Muriel Fischer is the office secretary. Jewell Nilsson has taken Miss Gewe’s place and Virginia McReaken is teaching typing and shorthand. Mary Lu Harrell is still inviting guests in to try her new recipes she learned at Cooking School in Springfield. Her latest victim was Madge Hise. The other day when Irma Howerton gave her calling card to Margaret Gildersleeve, it read “Mrs. William Belshaw.” We CONTINUED ON PAGE 114Betty Piper: Are you the new life guard here? Lifeguard: Why yes, who are you? Betty Piper: Oh, just a girl that's about to drown. Miss Harlan: That girl is so dumb she thinks a football coach has four wheels. Ruthie Schmidt: Well, how many wheels has it? Compliments of Schulte — and — Ahlert JEWELERS 133 North Main Street Compliments of Simpson, Reed Burroughs Attorneys-at-Law » » » National Bank Building ® » » 113Leo E. Fink Lindell J. Kniser FINK ELECTRICAL SUPPLY CO. 1 07 Purcell Street Dealers of Everything Electrical General Electric Radios — Electrical Ranges Electric Kitchens — Electric Refrigerators Household Appliances — Mazda Lamps Electric Contracting Fishing Tackle and Shotgun Shells Movie Equipment CLASS PROPHECY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 112 see Bill Straube drumming up business for the Meyer Monument Co. You probably know that Bill has continued with his father’s business. Remember the “Crossing”? Well, it seems to have grown quite large in these last ten years as it even has a floor show now—“The Swing-sters.” Members of the chorus are Alice Hanvey, Eunice Holt, Helen Huser, Dorothy Jones, Verna Klenke, and Ada Mae Williams. Ann McDermott sings and Dot Nix accompanies her on her violin. Edward Wille is the owner. I think that I’ve given you an accurate account now of what they are all doing. Maybe in ten more years we’ll hear from them again. Love, Me. 114TRACK 1941 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 43 In the District Meet the only E. H. S. trackster to take a first place was Bill Martin, who captured the low hurdles title. This made him eligible for the State Meet, where he headed into a bit of tough luck. After getting off to a good start, Bill tangled with a hurdle, took a dirty spill, and rolled himself right out of the race. Everyone at the meet admired Bill for being able to smile after taking this heart-breaking fall. At the Conference Meet at Belleville, the Tigers again pitted their strength against the other seven members of the Southwestern Illinois Conference. The final score of the meet was: East Side, first with 57 points; Granite City, second with 20 points; and Edwardsville, third with 19 points. The old jinx seemed to still haunt Edwardsville, for this was the second time that they were beaten by Granite City by only one point. With the ’41 season stored away the Tigers are now waiting to see the results of next year’s toils. There will be several lettermen back to fill in the positions left vacant by the graduation of several valued stars. Here’s hoping for a good year in 1942. FUNERAL HOME S A service as modern as tomorrow As gracious as yesterday Ambulance Service Phone 577 S 210 N. Kansas St. Edwardsville, 111. Home Nursery Greenhouses Ernest Tosovsky, Prop. Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere XXX Trees and Shrubs Corsages A Specialty Cut Flowers Potted Plants XXX St. Ixniis Road Phone 706-R Edwardsville Faye Frickenstein: But if you are a thought reader, why do you read my hand instead of my mind? Ray Long: It's so much easier. I can see at once that you have a hand. Duke took his aunt out riding, Though icy was the breeze He put her in the rumble seat To see his anti freeze A. Bothman Sons Service Department Open Til Midnight We Service All Makes of Cars VANDALIA STREET PHONE 602 116 ' XXX ► Peerless Cleaners Congratulations to the L Deal 1942 “Tiger” . The Cash and Carry Way and Save , , XXX ' XXX ' FULL INSURANCE COVERAGE XXX 1 ' 1 t ECNARD SCHWARW A DRUG STORE fOg EVERYBODY Edwardsville, 111. ( 110 N. Second St. t i XXX • XXX | Jim Walters: Say waiter, help me find my hat, will you? Waiter: Listen, dope, it’s on your head. Jim W.: Don't bother then. I'll look for it myself. Lady Customer: How much are peaches young man? Kermit R.: Penny each, M’am. Customer: I'll take one. Kermit R.: Giving a party M'am? Compliments of Ray’s Market ' Meats, Vegetables and Groceries ' 128 N. Main St. Phone 58 ► Compliments of Eberhart Bros. Grocery Compliments of Dr. Cecilia M. Hellrung Palace Building Phone 224 ► ► Dr. J. A. Hirsch f Bank of Edwardsville Building 8 to 10 a. m., 1 to 2 p. m., 7 to 8 p. m. Phones: Office 174 — Residence 317 ' Best Wishes of ! Terry, Gueltig Powell ' Attorneys-at-Law National Bank Building ; ! i ; • Clayton Cleaners Cleaning and Laundry Service A Service With Personal Attention 111 E. Vandalia St. Phone 1070 117Raffaelle Sl Ferguson Wholesale Only ★ TOBACCOS CANDIES CIGARETTES 207 West High Street Phone 147 Eduiardsville, Illinois - i XXX Do Business With a Dependable Firm Compliments of i R. H. Rosenthal i I Insurance and Real Estate See Rosenthal on all your insurance Desmond Mfg. Co. problems. We have a Special Savings Plan for Young People. XXX 318 St. Louis St. 1 1 Try Our Confidential Service. XXX 1 1 223 S. BUCHANAN ST. ► 1 Edwardsville, 111. Phone 163; Res. 525 XXX 1 - XXX Bill Sntjdr: What's the name of that coffee that's supposed to make you sleep? Marge Scheldrup: Sanka? Bill S.: You're welcome. Mrs. Gerling: What are you sitting by the icebox for. with the door open? Ed Gerling: I'm watching the milk to see if it really turns. Compliments of Earl Orman Earl Harold 201 E. Vandalia St. FRftnKJ.STRIJCEK insuRancE AGincv • ALL TYPES • AOTO financing • NOTARY PUBLIC Compliments of Central Shoe Repair Shop CHARLIE’S PLACE 20 YEARS OF RELIABLE SERVICE 108 Hillsboro Avenue Edwardsville ■ • Compliments of Crossing Inn E. Rudat Troy Road Pork House Market Compliments of ’ Meats and Poultry Joseph A. Walter Phones 393 - 595 Justice of the Peace ' Ted Schumacher ( 1481 2 N. Main Street 119.[ ► , XXX ( Compliments of 1 Imperial ► • i ■ ( Oscar Schmidt Agency , (Refineries) » 1 XXX XXX i ► Every Form of ' GASOLINE Insurance and i 1 MOTOR OILS XXX Second and Center Streets i Protection XXX Edwardsville, 111. Edwardsville, 111. Phone 138 XXX i XXX Wolf: Give mo a mafch Bill. Straube: Hare it it. Wolf: Well, can you beat that? I've forgotten my cigarettes. Andy Smith: What does the word Asbestos mean on a theatre curtain? Jack Take: Don't be a dope. That's the Latin word for Welcome. XXX i XXX i Compliments of B. R. Recreation i i Earl Ladd’s ' “8 Tournament Alley’ West End Service Station j St. Ix)uis and West Streets XXX XXX 1 • Bowl Mobilgas and Mobiloil and Stay Healthy i Certified Mobilubrication XXX XXX i PLUS EAGLE STAMPS 300 W. Vandalia St. XXX i “If It Can Be Gotten — We’ll Get It” XXX XXX 120X BS X George A. Gent Plumbing, Heating and Sewering Supplies and Appliances 115 Herbert Place ED WARDS VILLE, ILLINOIS Phones — Residence, 327; Office. 324 X x XXX Compliments of Edwardsville Water Co. Boyd Case, Local Manager XXX Running water in the home was once considered a luxury, but modern standards of living consider it a necessity— The Edwardsville Water Company seeks to faithfully render this small but important service. is x x FOOTBALL 1941 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45 COLLINSVILLE 6 — E. H. S. 7 The Kahok-Tiger game was without a doubt the most interesting game of the year. The Tigers, outweighed by their opponents, fought hard and kept the game going all over the field. The Kahoks, sporting a heavy line, scored first hut missed the extra point. After the Tigers pushed the ball across the goal line, Hensley split the uprights to give E. H. S. the winning margin. GRANITE CITY 7 — E. H. S. 7 This was the Homecoming game and also the last game. The Happy Warriors were the first to score and also made their extra point. Shortly afterward the Tigers repeated this performance and knotted the score 7-7. The rest of the game was fought to a standstill. In the closing seconds of the game, the E. H. S. crowd almost had heart failure when Hensley missed a 40-yard field goal by inches. 121HARRY T. HARTMAN ★ Democratic Candidate For SII E R I F F 21 Years Police Experience. Qualified By Experience. .i r.. ★ Your Support Will Be Appreciated. Election:- Tuesday, November 3, 1942 ★ Cop: Say young lady, do you know anything about driving a car? Laitner: Oh sure! Is there anything you'd like to know? Bill Lee: What did you do with my white shirt? Mrs. Lee: 1 sent it to the laundry. Bill: Ye Gods! The whole history of England was on the cuffs. , Compliments of Ben F. Wood Republican Candidate for County Clerk Compliments of 1 1 Compliments of Tramp: Say buddy, can you spare a dollar for a cup of coffee? Paul C. Taylor Charlie Rizzoli: What, a dollar for a cup of coffee. Don't be silly. County Recorder Tramp: Just tell me yes or no. but don't tell me how to run my business. Compliments of Compliments of Joseph Healey Kiwanis Club Probate Clerk Edwardsville, 111. ' 122The Door To Friendly Service TT HROUGH THE YEARS AT EVERY STAGE of your life you will find a banking connection useful. It may be in safeguarding your first savings, in building a reserve for opportunity in business, or in other ways. Isn’t it logical that the sooner you establish this relationship you can start benefiting by it? This Bank is an important factor in the life of the community. A connection with us will add to your standing and prestige. ★ EDWARDSV1LLE NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY CHARLES BOESCHENSTEIN, PRESIDENT WITH A RECORD OF UNBROKEN SERVICESCHOOL CALENDAR CONTINUED FROM PAGE 83 JANUARY 2 The Alumni game—and did we show them!! 27-17. 5 Once again we came back to resume our studies. 7 9 10 13 16 19 20 Failure slips go out again. Basketball game here with Belleville—we won!! Game at Alton, but we didn’t come out so good. Our team journeyed to Wood River—and lost. First air-raid drill—basketball game with East Side. We lost. First use of new building. Hi Tri Barn Dance. The one time in a year when the girls treated the boys. It was a big success. 22 23 24 27 29-30 29 Public Relations Dinner and Glee Club sang. Basketball game with Granite here. Basketball game here with Staunton. P. T. A. Stunt Show. Exams—oh! Game at Madison. FEBRUARY 2 No school!! 3 Second semester begins. 6 11 12 13 14 17 19 20 23 24 Basketball game here with Collinsville. Science Club sponsors Magician show. No school! Lincoln’s birthday. Basketball game at Belleville. Valentine Day!! Game with Alton. Game here with Wood River. Grade school program. Matinee dance. Game at East St. Louis. Flunk slips go out again! Basketball game at Granite. MARCH 3- 6 Regional basketball tournament here. 10-13 13 20 Sectional tournament. End of fourth marking period. Matinee dance. APRIL 3 9 10 16 24 25 28 Good Friday. Chorus Festival. Freshman-Sophomore party. Seniors show their dramatic abilities in the Senior Play. End of fifth marking period. Matinee dance. Conference Relay meet. Meeting of parents of class of ’46. CONTINUED ON PAGE 125SCHOOL CALENDAR MAY 2 Quad meet. 3 High School Band Vesper Concert. 9 Ah, Jr.-Sr. Banquet. District Track Meet. 12 Registration for 1942-43. 15 All school musical. 16 State Track Meet. 22 Class Day—and the Seniors strut their stuff. 28-29 Senior Exams. 31 Baccalaureate. JUNE 1- 2 Semester Examinations. 4 School Picnic. 5 Commencement! School; and responsibilities are thrust upon the rest of us. BOB KAHTZ brings in his last year’s track notes and starts writing sports. Mr. Strebler starts taking photographs. BOB BURROUGHS is reminded of the hundred or so photos he’s supposed to take; snaps pictures like mad. Our propaganda is loosed; GEORGIA WYNNE draws posters—tickles the student body with them. JUDY KUBICEK and her ad staff write poetry, compose crazy words to songs, and preach TIGERS to the students—down to the last Freshman. Sales begin climbing. Parties and the Homecoming cause KAY KESL to pull out her fountain pen and write the society copy. By the end of the year BILL STRAUBE and staff are making the rounds of Edwardsville business men. Cash pours in. 1942; our job is two-thirds done. EDITOR GLEN sees that all the copy is in; writes some himself. AL HUGGINS worries about our bank account. MR. ALLEN worries. We all worry. February; in a last minute rush we finish the details and get everything in under the deadline. And here it is. We proudly present the 1942 TIGER—THE BEST. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 124 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 65 125 SWING BAND 5 NS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 68 Probably every “big name” band has had some kind of a "break” before they became what they are today. Well, the Swing Band has had its “break”.; It was discovered during the annual music assembly that two members of the band are really Viennese fan dancers. They made quite a hit. So, who knows? Perhaps some day you will see your own Tiger Swing Band along with Glenn Miller, Kay Kayser, Fred Waring, Guy Lombardo, and the rest. BARN DANCE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 75 Speaking of corn, the program was definitely on the Corn side, a Bigham and Verna Rohrkaste sang a few selections and Carla Caldwel and Pat Thatcher corned a few farm songs, too. Another pari of the program was a good-old-fashioned Square Dance. ■ Joe Ladd and his orchestra furnished music for dancing. Refreshments were served during the course of the evening. Everyone departed at 11:15, having had the time of their lives. It takes the girls to make a success of things. : JOItl S Ray Long: What model is your car ? Bill Vieth: It's not a model—it’s a horrible example. Mr. Driskell: Can anyone give me an example of the indirect tax? Bob Kahtz: I can, the dog tax. Mr. D.: Why is that an indirect tax? Bob K.: Well, the dog doesn't pay it. Chuck Harbry: Why don't you like girls? Gib B.: They're too biased. Chuck H.: Biased? Gib B.: Yes, bias this and bias that . . . until I'm busted. Judge: Tell me, young man, just how did this accident occur? Baker: Well, your Honor, I had dimmed my lights and was hugging the curve- judge: That's how most accidents happen. Five dollars. Bill Hotz: Dad, do you think anyone will ever discover a substitute for gasoline? Mr. Hotz: They have. Bill Hotz: Have they? What is it? Mr. Hotz: Shoe leather. Carmen Nemnich: I'm looking for something particularly nice for a young man. Clerk: Have you looked in th» mirror? Miss Woods: Give me a definition of home, Smokey. Smokey: Home is where part of the family waits until the others are through with the car. Tom Schrier: Where did you get that D on your sweater? Bud Ramsey: I played football for Edwardsville. Tom Schrier: But Edwardsville starts with an E. Bud Ramsey: I know, but I played on the second team. Wanda Orman: What became of that man of steel you married? Martha W.: Oh, he's just scrap iron now. 126AUTOGRAPHS PRINTED BY Intelligencer Publishing Company ENGRAVED BY Indianapolis Engraving Co.. Inc. 128 EDWARDSVILLE. ILLINOIS NDIANAPOLIS. INDIANA i v . JfS


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