Eastern Washington University - Kinnikinick Yearbook (Cheney, WA)

 - Class of 1929

Page 57 of 146

 

Eastern Washington University - Kinnikinick Yearbook (Cheney, WA) online yearbook collection, 1929 Edition, Page 57
Page 57



Text from page 57:


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1929 KINNIKINICK PAN IN LOVE HERE was a garden. It was a superbly congenial garden, but drenched with somber traditions. There was a fairy in the garden, perched on the head of a bronze idol and steadily peeringat a slippery, green frog on a lily pad. The frog stared back with silly, blinking eyes. A scornful sun sat mockingly upon the tired hills. flinging his burning vanity across the indifferent skies. The fairy was Pan, fiery tempestuous Pan! What was he doing in the garden? The idol was silent as the Sphinx. The jade pool whispered nothing. But there was an answer in the face of Pan: in the tiny, wizeuned face of Pan: in the little, glittering eyes. Pan was in love with a Mortal! What could be more tragically romantic? . Q . . . . 1 1 . Q Q f Q The moon emptied a basket of silvery beams into the lap of the garden. Pan was still there, brooding on the shadowy idol. The frog was gone. A shadow slipped into the garden and the eyes of the fairy loved. The shadow was a Princess-a Princess with dark, slanting eyes and hair like foamy sunbeams, clustered. She was ecstasy of Youth, trembling in the haunting sweetness like a reed. She touched the idol. lt was enchanted. She laughed in delight, teeth gleaming. She danced in delight, feet gleaming. Pan, in glee, danced with her. Cunning Pan! His tiny hands caressed her cheek-her cheek, that glowed like a sun-kissed poppy. At last, she fell, ex- hausted, into the sweet, wet grass. She dreamed of rain that cooled her face: tiny, silvery raindrops. But it wasn't rain. It was the kisses of Pan-the kisses and the laughter of Pan. . . . . . . . . f . . . . A nightingale sings the story yet in the old garden. The idol is still there, symbolical of the mysticism of centuries. But Pan and the Princess are gone. Pan dwells on for- ever in the forest and the Princess is-dead. ALBERTA AMUNDSON. l47l

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