Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA)

 - Class of 1957

Page 1 of 222

 

Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Cover
Cover



Page 6, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 7, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 6 - 7

Page 10, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 11, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 10 - 11

Page 14, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 15, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 14 - 15

Page 8, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 9, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 8 - 9
Page 12, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 13, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 12 - 13
Page 16, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collectionPage 17, 1957 Edition, Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection
Pages 16 - 17

Text from Pages 1 - 222 of the 1957 volume:

X . 4 4 1 I 4 4 I F +- Psalms 34:3. Naiarene College is God-centered. As the Creator is of man, solalso isl-le the means, and everything must begin and The study of chemistry, no less than a well-played basketball game, takes on meaning outside of itself when it seeks to promote the glory of God. A E. N. C. has been founded in this dedication to Him. It remains for us, the present student body, to finish the dedication, to give Christ the living worship of our lives. Let this, the thirty-fifth volume of the Nautilus, then, be a token of the homage we do Him and a pledge of our continuing devotion as we seek in every activity, in every facet of our lives, to be always . . . O3AC5q'ZI1:'1lIq'Z6 the LUASCER .... .' rf 1 . 1 5:4 -57 f 'L 1 at ' , 11 x ' '.g.,X."'1.w-', M '.r.s,.g, - fl. 5 l n ,of is iii 3 Hmm: QA wr-x5'3j,, ' , -4 fx ' by f 4 ' Tlziii U 13 "gQf:a'Q,f"4'5" 'Siu ff'-' .,-I g ,A M, ,yy .Q ?,.x,,:,,:1, Hb-?2l,,,,.e ,sl 35-352, if ,U . Y f -- a. 91' ' .:.',., 1 -is -Q-C.-4 ' s A' ' ra S Qf.ifX'i2,,lgiifiie. Q ' 5-'ggi 5:-Q la sr. g,vLg.,s-.,.'efz+'ifZiNXeg-,rg f35.,gQ.gg,f:'jf,iQi.1f ?'Qf..L'i':gf-Q , 4 X A 16 : rygj- .'f,'f..gg-gifpiggl,Q:5xZ.5ff5qgiy..gi5-5.3.5.sig-.?5gg4?ijii " .wiv - ',, v,,. .-lg Q , -.,-.g,+g.L4 - ..g .-A-z. ,4 .pf .Cf 4 Q 'gflefvi '13, fi3g"q?w,fiQg5,1.Q1L:vii'MN if A-f' 5-1if!:.i,57?g".-' Cv 1 'SNC' gs-'...y'?5if1 .hs Ex. ' ff 1-Si'ffff'-if?-'eiiwillez-5,s'w-'aifiimifrz41,0-1'WST' P 3385 C Jgg1i?i'k3gH5i'i?i5i.. , .sw 'f?'K' ,:i.1, ,I wxrv- -+3 . , - 4 1 ,. 1 - -. . ..,ea-w,.,.,...5A2.f -. pw..-,p'g. o, . ,x .., , ,--.Gym ,A-rw ,.:1,,,p.'... ,X-1553 Ks layty Q ,,,-.- g e Q., pq sh , .Ag + ,Jaw .5,fs1,yA.Lrg Q ,--gvwgi 4 -v 1 ,s 1,-- -Y 44, 1 Q 'xr ' v . Huw- . C C- V, l o f lf., 1 wa- ew5-fm-.-ff.,1wpw so M w ..,f R.,?g4':w. . . fvfv' A. ,xfffff . -is v'. C o 3 -Q ,., , . A - y r '.14gzy:5?? gvykegfQ,i.g6g:3knngM5.a,,, -.lf -5. ,,z ,?3,5g e!, "5fs:j,g.g- ,Q ' A fQ3:',,,y5, -.,,,'-.135 , ' ' g.. my 1.-ve f. -.,-f.-..:.. ' 1.14.31 ' . - , ff' ,X 4 -. s...,- A i. -. '.:5'-Wg fer 4 , ' a -iz. 5Ms.lzuif:fMa:2wmaQ1'.am5Q's5-:ssEf?K:51QWi?'3?b:A-sf, 1 im iii- ,isle ' --.- .. emu.. 452-.uL..m sf. . 'T ,,e-' Y . I 47 ,42 t O ,fd w V WITH OUR LEADERS IN IN IN IN OUR CLASSES OUR WORSHIP OUR STUDENT LIFE OUR ORGANIZATIONS IN IN OUR SPORTS OUR BUSINESS CONTACTS My -4,- ,, lv L.: ,.'.v,:.,-. ,A-...V 35 L. xl .4!'LQ.J 1. DEDICATIO IN TEACHING . . . Who will ever for- get his classes? From the lirst his broad smile inspires your confidence in him. He is so honest and sincere that you have com- plete faith in his ability to teach. He chal- lenges you to endure the frustration of a problem until the light breaks through. He challenges you to hours of hard work but in such a manner that you cannot help en- joying his classes. From opening prayer to closing assignment he presents a challenge to better Christian living. IN GUIDANCE . . . Who will ever for- get a chat in his office? When you enter his oiiice, all he is doing is forgotten and you become the center of his attention. It is then you realize his understanding, his basic kindness, and his brilliant mind de- veloped through long, lonely hours of self- disciplined study. With sincere patience he discusses your problems-large and small -in the light of the facts at his command. Then, through his vast background of ex- perience he helps you to formulate a solu- tion. IN EXAMPLE . . . Who will ever for- get his Christian life? He testifies in a clean and clear-cut manner. His life has been a willing sacrihce to his Lord. In every phase of his life Christ is pre-eminent. He strives to walk in the footsteps of his Master. Truly his life-in teaching, in guidance, and in example-magnifies the Master. WE THE STAFF OF THE NAUTILUS, DEDICATE THE 1957 NAUTILUS TO: PROFESSOR JASPER R. NAYLOR Yi. . 5 3 hi' I., 'X '. K 4 1 an a 5 .r . -4k-N .A MGH 3 , Jw fir' n 3 Y 4 1 4 4 1 a fS llofpssol .ldspu R. Nmlul v , u v.:: , ,ff-aw. f "'t?""ffi4?7' psuuuuuuq f -I xx' if ff. , ' xr ' N.. , xi .tk - 'wx ' il' H. Q .qv 'K mg: 1 al w V. ,No- , Qx ap, h .4.': M" 'vf ' 50: Dil- ll3'i .3 1- .J A xaT'f',gc' '4 F 1 , u ,Ii M , M1 ll M A 5 'U L wi 'al . .i A, 4 ' 1 .f' I' ' r . , Q 5 . . I we "' ' 2-N 9: Q fx 9' ,Q wa, - ,u'.f A P V y ' 4,-, f 'It 1.35 I .L Q' , M 1 l 3 0 , 3' . Q'-s' J' 5, "Q ' 5, f ' f'fL '. -'a ., 'iff 0 J it B4 4 "ll 1 Q on ,f x as 'W I 1 - ,, .s Irj ,G H Q . ' ' , , , t ..' ' . 4 . I 9 . , N t t JY ., Ik! 'bl . :qt . A I' I X ,gr f ' iw- 'Q , ' -s H, .MQ 4, 'A . 0 1 J , ,M lt.. V. fi xx A Q -Q' 4 , 4 Q 'G Q I JA, . " ' 1 'hu X 6 O. i A vw J A - ' ' up ' .L ' . Wt'-. i W X 1. V ' Y' U au 5 5 'U' s .. . , V H' . 'Q' f 0- z E 0 . L 'A iw' ' ' I x ', ' . 'aff 49 I Q . ', . its ' , ' fy- , 4' ' sg f, at - A.c,w, . L . 4 Q,f endif 1 -' is B . .1 - .va 41.47 i. -9 4 It r ,SQ xsbysv ' C Q -15 xg I u 36. .7 '1:r1l".,- A ' '.m ff" . - H" 'lbwflf . Q 'W M , , - f 7 r 1' : 'O' 7'-' Q " Q- .fl -uf 1 'a - guy" A ' 'Q- I " 1' : 5 ' . 11.3 . :N N 7 3 ' , nfl 3 - ,. 2 i 4' so ' ' o 19" , 'for ! -I' ni 3 " ,117 Q V te ' : Q . f 1 J" fn ,' , r ' Q " A 4 Q is ' - 1 1 f'-'z - 41 'Y .4 a' ' 3. 2 ' 'rr' n f V 5 . ' A 'ff' 'ga ' J , ' 5 I If 'P ' ' 4 :L f I I 1"F'j,n lu.. ,- , I .. Q ' :- is 0 . ,, - 'I' 1 ' rr ' Q- N ,.' .5 ' 1 'sfff '.-'- - ' . J av., 4 R ., ., 1 I 1 at -fl x n1.fdN ' 4 .- t J ' 'ff :Li.lN:' :"7 2' 157- ,IV ' " .5 lf- .iff-'N . ' - ' 14' ' 4, Y . , . ' ,- . 21 ' S- -, -, f-P 1 ' "' ' f Q + '- -+. . .Ac , Q ' , f " j ' x. in ' Miss .V is ' Q , .- ,,-fgsjfgi- ' qv- ff' N ?"I"' f 01 . -.74 .5 ,, -- P .- 4 E , Q. 4 'N,.A,: ,. A ,ff ,. ' 1 " 4 sg-, Q I, - . ' I 1 . Yi'- l" . sf.-I """! -Q1 . s X UF' '21 . .,,, J 'N -"vi-N' Q , .,.,,h...vul' ' .4 .Nia -1. 1.- ' 1 l 'f 14155 't -.. 5 ' in ' n I ' , 4 7' 'H 's . v ,r ' -- . , ?zAg.V,,7r 3, vtr X . x 3 ,f 1, 4 ,' . 'FE . . l ,,.,-U" A J ,f ,A 4 Y , 1 1 A , ' I, fa 'ab X.. "ji.'f.: , , ' s ' .- , .. D . ,. . K .., k ' oi ' 'Jfvp W' .xg x ,Q , v- 1 4 - "'N' ' ""x"1 N . '. U 9- -0' " , G . 'l r - 'F' 9 A yt f ' 1 .1 ':- X . A ,. , ,. . .JA f ,Q J' , .r , " ' W , Q - 5 .. -- X Q. '.,' if.. 5 , . ...fag ' ' .,., .,n,,4 -' 1 8 5 l ' '. n " . 'ff sl"-vb-feb ' ,',Qf , " - , , . ., 'Q ' ' ' J' . .. V. . - . .v4'f,. I-.. . . ' I , ,r 1, '. ,,, -x- ,. Afgpogv I -- I - ' X :QF X 4:g,7t. 'f-A -' . . ' I 'fy 5-.-nj, 3 32 A - - 1' Q- NE.- Q wa- M: wr, -14--1 - fr J fc 2- Q93 . t' 'X ' JN ,: V ' 'cry . "H M '.. -I ' ' , VI"-E 0 , 'f' Q , . ' F' ,, 'W , 7 - . ,R . I. , . ' x - ' 1 'A K , V Y ri - , j-L 4' gg ,fa ' . ' ,ki 1 , 5 ' -- , ' - , 'lf , bpimlllguns '- r 1 . Y? t - ' ' K n ' , p . .- . P Gallup ,Q r V ,, Q ly .Q ,, . r , 1 1 wud , . . ' .4 vb.. 'ag is - i" "f,.f'a.i'1rs i IW? - - S 14 .' , A f,J"- -, ' Ja W V r i- 1. 4-41" .f , 4 If . l i ,y .. ,' ..... r f -F. 2'-4' -,rf M - M v . -' ki ' X., Ns- -3,1 5. .S U' 1 - . W , r ,,, ..,."" .. ' N ft , ,. .Y -M r, ,, - k g - .A v. .ax , I a r r- ' fa? .1 ,, ' - '--' . I - f . d f' :gig L -f " ' , M.- T' J - 'L 4-f.-"fy Q4 r-t"'.. ER, 1 rv.,- ' -on Canterbury Music Hull 4 'Ls .n f fa , 5 - Ur 'ls 1 ...-Q--1 ' fo'. ,i Y w I' 7 .uf , V T . -MWW' ' Awww., ....-.--H ...,-av---I., I , 1 . 1 1 ' A A, A r- ' J' .W rl 1.:,1.:::p Q, y V ,.. , 4,-r - .,. x -,v x T l Nec se Library , ,K z9 ' A . - 4-D mmf Me efmd upon our campm, 52006 Zyl? to tie Hue. H W,,Q il l X , 35 , r V JX . XQ4 IJ' 1 f X ' ' '--11 '9 , 47 . I. fl ,L E E ' f"' ' . V - - p 1 ' r 1 rigs.. 4' Q l gl wx ,rp 3.421-,zdfh V .-' Q5 ' f 'W , . A , 4 . 55-'-.. . -.Q 'f'v2"5:z'Kf ' L Y' wif. 'V -fc 'fz,:.:f, 4-fs' -.i . f , Fifi'-5315 U r,.""f.'1 H'-,ii-'v ,. , Qpd L Y I' I 44. r , ,n ' D,.r-3 'f ,' "' I-"' x Y , 5 :,q-I1 4" ' f ,,,f'ig: . I , ,, 5 . I - .X tw 'gfzm A . f 7' Ng' ,, . ,. . 'A-'i'+ " pa? f , , FF' f' "" ' L0-fi N , x 'X 3 , w X 1 A K ', uw V , -Y i .1-65,1 ' ix F' K, 1, N , ' 'X -g ,, V F3 H. V' sg 1 if ,. ., g HM' 14114 JL- Q ' ,M!'.!!?'3s3':"'L-Q -EW , 1 wi. .. I It Q' " "---...- - , 31:13- .QDQ X Q..- umcy Mansion fr' ,V ' 'fl Z, ,xavg +1 7' - S 4 , x ml 1 x- wx - .. V K qfh... .fs ' . N 'B 59 Q-' 5'4x-' .253 '11 -I YQ ' R I 11' K. ,yr-1--A N I Y 15 fJ'fw,f s A x'X',, '..J1"'F'fx. ' .WML xr' -' 1 ' N 'g 1 .-VQQ r - - 'Mix WW" I N Q 'xx K' 9 f --M. QA fs, +-9 ' ' N1 1:55 ' T-gf s-"N" Q-Q fx-:w5.'f'-'J x, - , ' V .mp V. l X. ' X .Q X lx S., .K J i . ,vi I , x -Q , X Wollasfon Churchif,yQ,q Iizgrpnw' f-as Q S . . -A xx-,H -Q -- "Xi '!ff'4f"2:.f"f '.'f- . M - . -"' " ' ' 'X' 3 Q' mir.. lj ' - ' '. - ' A 'C' 1 7 "'2'-'fl--'J"sm-'7IL+17' .'fLT' ,'l' "' 1' "' .f ' - X fifhl-'JHQ :".4 ', f'..ru 1.5,-:.1,-lw CG 'Ifi ..Li ' - '-.1.. , A' ' ' GDAGCDIPHIUCS the CDASCER By accepting advice, seeking guidance and respecting the authority and wisdom of our leaders we cooperate with them in "Magnifying the Mas- ter" in scholastic, spiritual and social activities. Cooperating with our pro- fessors in the classroom, en- couraging them by our stu- dious performance, following the examples of our leaders' Christian l lives, and sharing fun with them gives us an op- portunity to "Magnify the Master" in daily activities. ,qxvf Q f-4, XY'-' ,I our aders x Ei-. 1 a .TI 1 , A vii 5 'T Lf?r? 2.5!-1 ad. I '17 r..-'QA . . -I. ,.I, ,,, A .. .. . ..,.... .., ,.., A .A ...A ..' FT' f . . . I U. M... sh. 9 pw... mf. 1 'I I, ,Il ,r .1 -?'!'5,g1?Q L .. -, ' -'Z ' .. Af., f '.-4 .H ".-.. f' 'A . .A.f'..'L . . .. . Il. fr .-. . , Af: -- ., 411. - ,BI-Ii, .5:'1IkI I I qil IA- ..II MII: .53 .I ff . Al' . , f'?'4'..'. if ., ' -"A LA. ?g?gA.x I '.1i7.E': - ,vu 32 Q' -:'r!'1f.A ' L Wif- 1" ' .' A -JH.. - .'. ' . Aiwa' '.. . A. 1, A 4. J' . I . ,nuff 'iv ,Alix ,. '.. Q II ,,. ,5 .KMA I,IISfI..,I I IIIIg2II4III,. II . 4 'UA .- - .n,,,,g,w.-.',. A ' .Q A' . . 'ff-. 2 , I fr. I ',-.A -,W-, I ., II. i1.,.,I ' A. , x. A- A 4- ' .A kg rl I -3 :Ulf 4' g Affgfw ii .. ffm 'Lg 3 Q- . fx. 'fig II: fn 79 fm QEIMI 'Y 0 U I . 43' 1,9 IIIIIA 'fi .. QEQ .OJ lu JV er 'fi WA if Asahi: r' gl we -r"i Au S f ff? it .."4 IIN, LM IQE ,gi fIy1 , f i I M' hi: If fi if I! l cf f' ,IDI , , W ,II fi . , f CVZIQHHI Q10 Il gay! 1 5:91 ff ' f, Ig, ! wi' f fc22?45f,f'5f, ff A f A 4 , WMM w- ! I I rf I' f"'1 :IA A fUf 7 Q qw Xl' II ' , II ? jg?7 1 N ,gl NY ix 'A x w5,x,IfB1 xxx www xx '-. w ""' yi if I4 V J 1 i ji fl f nl ,ff 'Ak' QQXYMXXQQWIIXIII y 1 W x 'A " I 1 I, I wa A uf N' 1' N 4 X Q. I A wit X I. A .4 ' I - gA,. 4 .ut .f. . -. A. 1 -A .' A. ' A J: 4-'A 'W " 11-"4 M '- ' ' "' A51 34 A532 A fllf' A'-.52 - 431 Ar. .H--:I .sri ff: - f:'j4IIAaegQQ+ . I A . IA A- I , II LI ,.- II ,, , AHA., ,.I..IJ, I , '. s fflm. A -'A ..AvA':..1 -. A . f,,. AAI- '. - 'II . -A- , . " 'ff-' A A' A. "1 --1' - ' . .' ,- ..'ff'.jg.. - - . -A' - .I J..I7I', 11.1 ,, . I .?IIfIIrIIgII, I AI NI IJ.: I . Q., A -I . .' - "A,'i -., .I .. -I .2 - .',1, ,,. .33 . , ,A . " A Bic -, ' 1 QA. ilu , .-1 A". ff ' A4 ' gf' A . ' L V ' Ui A. rr" AK' '1' . Aw-v aj-" iff ' " " ' - . II? II I., III' I il Iy.I.I I,.I3:ffI.,,' ' ,.Ii,I 4431'I,2:,f :TIA f it I III If ' Kid' 2175 3' 5' f X1 X. 227. r . --if' 4 KV' 'vt' At.:-gif. I :Af f.':...A..-' - . A .A . 3.4, 5. 1- A A A AA A 'A LAM- -M' 5 A 'wif ff Aw. f 'Z . N. f. .. g. f 122,-A .' . Q . .Q ' A ," . A"-Q1 ,ji-..C A A. ' .' 'F - ':, .XILVE " I " "1 1-"'I7 A?".! "A ' A - il: N15 ' P- 11, Ag, .A , I., A ,43 1 . . ' ' .' Q .If -. . III.35I,x?1I III I .II AII I I ..f, . gIIA, , I A - 1 " . 1 Q" is ,.. ., ,A - vfffgr. . ' . 94 Ile if A . I5-Ig..I?.I ,.. . Ig' 'II III A :ff 5 . A .lf if :'I '.-4"l': -ft" ' f-:"'.. ', 11232, A' .' ' ., 1, :'- A '-in fri. ' A", -,J I-I ', . I Ia II' . II . , . ,I Iffj :Ri I ... -,' , ' 'Q wc--'-'AI , . I ', ..', A715- , "L , ,Ifgfgy 1, 'Z fish III,-AA, ,if I. gtg 1 I I . A .-.III I,I.. AI II .I .II.I I 5 I IIII,I III II .. . 'az ,W nf Z1 '. A "i..I f"S, ,MQ kflfifv' 3 .15 1' w. if' F' . 'N A f.. ,- . ,' - w '. ' 'f, W , ' - I-.1 'L ' A A- . ,y A . . . A 3.1, I A3 'W ' . gif. ', .-I'A1'Il? 'Z "IQ A, ' J, "a, A A 'A ' ' 95, -4 ' fi? J'2"f A ' A ', 1'."'?"'ig9". . ! - -:IXYI - .I I5 : I II I I I' 1 .3 . A . ,A Aw ' -- A -, . I - I. . III-g,II.- A II A ,,c, -- 2, I I , I. I NIA ,II Inf-IQ: I. If , IIIIIIAIIAAII ,I . I . .fu ' '- 1 ' A. . ,A w' .1-:ii 1 5. A" Q.. - I v A -JI gm" .,,,Ag ,I : Fey' II M . - I7,I3I 4, A. I Z1 -.., a- A. . -A3 A ' QA A-- - -' .' 1 1. I ., ,5I QI A A-.gf I I53 A," 44 I A. ,Lia . .I '- A Q. A- ' . 5- ' " A f 'A yarn .A A . S. 1 ,. . Aa A fx ..g' I ,, I. r. I. II , . - A. ..,,U- v , I . f 1A Q ff A -. ,gi A, , ., - 4. II .III II A 'Y ' " ' ' X. A 'Mi . . A. -. . . - A 11.1 'I A ' A Q," AA. -.I f - , .I , . ' .. I ' ' 2.2 I A is , I , vf': If , . 5-Ax. 1' I, . , I-. ..A IK. . . I A j,,I 5 , .Af ,ff . ' A-4 . ' " . f . ' A . 'X 5 A fx. 3.35. ' ' . ' . .Iwnr In I-I 2. 1Ij-.- ' .' I I II ,mi f . II, Q . . . S I . . . ' 4,.- .. . ' ff ' "8-f A' .1 i' -VN: ,.., ' .. ,ir 'fg:Ai:.AAjffsf5Nu 1 ., -. n .l ,. A' t',nLy'xg4 f.'.:3.g+,- .- A ' -,.,I.L . IA",, ,H Hfqy-..I .QU - Aff xfffi 2'fx11A.0imif.E--'Lg ffifi I . . ., . . ,p,. l.,I 1 . 1 ., .. .3 . v- 13 'f. .I...,.A:.3 Hplc' 524 ,Q','fa,::, " 'e " '.A , 5 ',f A 1v1p..',lf.,,A fri lim.:-1. - 'U 'A " "' ' If 'x' -V ifgf 'Z F' ffm pawn . A .,. :I , - . 1, . 5, 4 'fi f AJ. 5':1H7I'f in 'A 11 'ive . I ' I . - I Jil I Ui 4 ' 11 ' ., ,- 9-.!f'.,1..,,z.1. WI ' . A ' fs. 'A':-.'!l ' Q N54 ' . ,A '? ' 7 ' l.f?:z2i1!.g'flf nv. Q .QAM ' ' A ..A,. I,g 4-:,,.g5,1- 5 ,g , I'-yA,.I I 5: I i Aff Q A.'.Afyf,-,,'flA'f'7 ,Is4",!,'llfg1 Ai ' ',A-4.13. ' . A. -A I ,A.,.Af,..:,'fl,lA,."'3-.WAI i mI?yf:Zf.f,"1..,! .I Q A 1J.A5.Af,.'yjls ? gd.. ig.-Q..ff9,Aii1f:f..z'.e. . . A 'jif -M, ' w1,A' 'fg 5-,xyfv :A5sAw. I I .f,!I.IIIIII. .IIGII IIIIAII .H ,III !,1IfIflI.,,I:III1g,I,II.I " !.'A.A.' HZ "W F' 'fl' ' A A I .'A'fzlfAf.....,MH ..-:If me W.-fxf I v.III,II 'UIQ If If :I Ijjg. I JII ,:,'I,I. '..11vI1 ,I II 1 X' - .zu-...A .A -me-.,.A.A. 147 fm. .. A , 7 ,uf-L' .ml . wil . ff, 2: - .q'..A my' 'QEAQJ -X. AY 1-.A . A-' . Af" ',.... A .QM . .fffk .A."11-' NY1x'G'-X'fA-30..x'v.A'-1- .f . A' , 'ANAL -'fi -f ' if aff" 'Hxgu AX vm .lwzyw . ,. A.A '- ' 1, .A Af ', A I If 1,-ft., :Arif 1-YIQQA-,Q-AA. .Jj -, 'K 1-ga. A -f 'MQQ A' C! "Ku . " ", 98,1 .".!i'! . .1xg.1A'.'gKl.51.3.XL' .' '. A" A' , Auf A f 'vu :,:.f,-'A. ..'f'... '-1'-A -" K 1. .' A - X' I AA.,'i,' . -0 f -ny, " Af.-,135 gf-.A ,gs .. , WK.,-K-,Y 'g.A.,..- - A . wwf' ,. A.. I A.5.,f,.- . A'fI"f, .Ibm- A,5.IA.g.A.. g,A,' ' -.A' 'ffff vi ii, .Afy . "L- "X.'xwf7"Af"Z:?"fr . A'Qk"'I'5 Ziff ' H' . A' AA- "' -3 ' ', ,fi . ,. A., .'n,",y gi w. -7 'f1f'1:'.- -32. ' A ' A, Ch. Avi A' -vfj. .IA ff. 4.115 gm. . A'5.,AI' -,'5".'.j,,AAi,','ta-, ' A. ' ,ZI:qiIyif". ,glhf 1".jI'i.' 'YJ ' A ,A'1,i!."l4".i ,'!,E-iff., I: A' . A. ,I , ,I If , I '- fx. .M ,A,.jI1-,MQ 3 Iggzji, I-,I.A,-.g,v:,gA I. '71,- gf .'f-'CCA fy: AY' 192' 2 V75-:"'3A1 ' A""T",55:'Hf"'f.f'iff!'!.' Vik? -1 Al-f..f I ,AA 1I"'. .'5F1"3,'j' F155 f".1-'JfQ"f'.2.Af":3fH.j, '.xV.:'.A "- . A A' ,' I. ' ..I,f:- ' . . U I. . I -.-QI. A :,'..- '.'. 1 I.I.. I I I I II H.-I III4g'fWff 432, ,I :I II.I.,I1I..,,I,I,. I..,.'.I :III ,I I . I I II .f. . .,I I. I- - , I yi . 3, I II I..II...I-.:.III5I'I, .AVI I. . ., ,I,. .., 5... .. I AIAAIrI.III,-,LIIQIII II:I,Ig!III'IIfII . A wffffr- A - . ' 1.1.1,w..A.g-:,. IN Wh.: -4- ' .. . jg-'A-A '. v II 1 ,LN 'g XV- A. .' :TM V . f ' 5Ayiff.5"5f'f:.gI'f:MJ.. y:'fwI' II A -.' '11, A, -- 1 'Aa-' .5!l':!: e'Pff','W,. A A'Ar.'?f x 'fA.A, 'A ' 'A .3-'T-Aff. .ANA . A 417,f,.ff. 1' 1 1 A 4 . A,,!-lf?-'!.1'!?.,ArI -I.. , 1 1.1.1 9 .- A 'A .iAj- . 1 f. ,, gf.. ' ' f'A.A'.j--Iiiff-1I,g. j'2.i. . .. I: I , :IZfII.iI.gIII, II III I LII? wiv ij ..II, ' I1,1IIA,II5,I?iI3:IfIIIIHEKIIQ f 5 I II . ., .I-II1fHw,!-..I:., 245, -.Ag AI I M UA' ' ' A'gA-zs.":1y.'f1f Asif x-Ay A .- ,A - A 'A .f .,' ,In . - . .A1.A','. 9 A 1 I IIIIIII I IIIII ., AIII, I.-I If - II., II,I.II xy, I I..,::1'4 .I-IA,f., IAA" A. ,, '.'1.e.I:g, ,A :Ifw.. IIMIE -xI I- .'I,fI j I .A ,.. I I pf ' . :II .II'5, .xI4 I T. . .- --,-Y 'A --Nff, IZA' Q4 ,.7',e,'.".A ,. - ' A - W! 'Qzlf Alf?Lf:.1if.45'31Af?14iff'5 Q ' ' In,-I.':li I, j .j.,II' - A JT -7. ...., 3193:-F ' Vg' . A .A A --.- QQ., 'A . X N I:,-' X ,- ,I . I -' NQ' . A -TT. ?A"1'3'l ' -Tpfsr-A1Af..r,. . . I - ' .Q .f I I. I'IIN. .- ,:AA'.Af'fQQ"-Igj.QQf.f Agfa - A . .Aj 'fl ,-i-:.1I+,ggfAp5,g1..AQWA IA , . A - - T, '. - -'.":A,-. -X '. A . , .,-I I .M .I .Iv X I. .NI ., I I A ' 1 ' A ,.. A A-,:,.yA: A - , .,:j.., -"- ' P .A , '. . ' 'A N " -1-A :-Ar: " ' L! QA' A '. ' 'V TLA.-QE, M ., ' .. A A . - A- A flf-1' rg. A .A . QQ-ff A" H f ' KH- Mfg, A - QA., ' QML' A ., I I 1 -'I .I II.. .I fI'I I. A 'I ' V' wg '-141. Q QV- fAxfII' '. . A' ' ' . , I if f: 3' ' ' K ' A 'V ' "I 'T ' ..,Jf..I: AI1 ' .I:A, '.'. A ,y , A . . I I.I-I A - II II .. .'.n1f'.x 'ASB' N ' . A 'XL' I' A'-' V: Q-Ti . . .I , I ' A' 'lf ' A. " IL- X K "' ' "" L' " ' :' ' A' "JZ."TLIQf5'i '..,"""":.1.LLf.':.1..1g.: u. gg? '. ...'r..-1:-:A :umm-AA--?.Q.:. . A 3... .. L.-...f ..:.. .. -.,..,,. ff!! Us K -Alav- 3 l 'I A an 554 nn- THE PRESIDE Presidents Message "Magnifying the Master" is a worthy theme for the I957 NAUTILUS. It not only presents a challenge to the members of the stalt who pro- duce this annual record of college lifeg it is the highest possible ideal for any student at E. N. C. It is a source of great satisfaction to the faculty and the administration of the college that this lofty aim has motivated so many students. It is this aim which impels some to choose a Christian college rather than a secular one. Others with this goal in mind have made their choice be- cause of deep conviction despite the wishes of relatives and well-mean- ing friends. For many this decision has involved financial hardship and long hours of strenuous labor in order to meet the cost ofa college edu- cation. Those who have completed their course of study at E. N. C. have refused to give in to physical disabilities, to intellectual fatigue and to social pressure. They have become worthy of praise for their etiorts because they have maintained their high purpose. Some of these have exemplified this aim in their choice of a vocation. Home mission projects have been chosen in preference to churches which paid a larger salary. Sacritices have been made to assist further education and thus prepare for lives of usefulness in teaching, in nursing, in medicine. The comfort and security of the homeland has been aban- doned for the hardships and loneliness of the mission field. Lives have been dedicated to supporting local churches with finances and prayers. So many have given magnificently oflife and strength in the upbuilding of the Kingdom of God. Students of l956-57 have also taken seriously the task of "Magnify- ing the Master." They have done it in 'the classroom, in the dormitory, on the basketball floor, on the job, in the chapel, and in Christian serv- ice. It is this ideal which E. N. C. aims to build into the life and character of every one of its students and graduates. 15 President Mann in morning chapel 1 I I A t . I X, BO RD GF TRUSTE J J Svarml.f0re,g'm111ul: D. H. Strong, Roderick MacNevin, J. H. Mue- Gregor, J. C. Albright, B. D. Powell, W. C. Lahue, R. I. Goslaw, R. I. Ingland. R. F. Heinlein, L. W. Durkec. Svutvzl. miililla mu-- W. G. Angell. H. B. Ward, C. D. Taylor. M. R. Emery, Edward I-moot , if ' . 21,1419 rl L , 'Y . , .. f ' 1' --'W '- -'-'lm 'f -' . 4 . -' , , ,QQ I, 2.53 pa .i 1' :lx , a , At the Nease Library Mortgage Burning, Sept 25, 1956, Lair In Right: Ernest E. Grosse, Clzairman, Renard D. Smith, Secre- tary, Maurice R. Emery, Treasurer, Edward S. Mann, President of the College. Mann. E. E. Grosse, R. D. Smith, H. R. Gray, C. D. Clapp, A. M. Fallon. Slandingx J. R. Bell, R. F. Woods, C. M. Williams. W. H. Benson, A. C. McKenzie, K. H. Pearsall, J. Z. Andree. g I -uma,-.. v ' ' 5 l 5 J C f 5 ' 5 I avi ' l. 6- L '55 tri? , lm, ...- ASSISTA T DEA The selection and organization of the col- lege curricula into a working program is but one of the many duties of the Assistant Dean of the college, Dr. Alvin Kauffman. He also represents Eastern Nazarene at conferences, co-ordinates counseling ac- tivities, and is active in committee work. He serves as chairman of the Committee of Academic Standing and of the Division of Philosophy and Religion. Dr. Kauffman's main concern is to be a friend of students. Those who have been helped by his counseling or who have been motivated by his teaching agree that his aim is realized. His sincere and deep de- votion to God is exemplified in every phase of his life. Alvin H. Kauffman, Ph.D., Asxixfufzt Dean ufrlu' Cullciuc' 1- QT' My .. 636-U43 mf + ' qua-:W nv M ,g.g.q,m., . eliiallwwq ' Q DEAN As academic head of Eastern Nazarene Dean Bertha Munro confers with students over their tangled schedules and helps them straighten out the impossibilities which always seem to develop on registra- tion day. As a friend and counsellor she tal-tes time out to pray with them over their spiritual struggles and misunderstandings and gives her own sincere testimony to the transforming power of Christ. Asa teacher ofliterature she correlates the best recorded thought of the ages with present day liv- ing. ln every way Dean Munro constantly emphasizes the value ofa Christ-centered education and is an outstanding example ofa Christian scholar. Bertha Munro, A.M., Dean of the College s mf- - 1 IQ v3lhv-' 44lwlGf1'MCf"'1w- "' - vnmalilvnw 'W' ffm- fi " Qdfsuo., ' ' ' ' A . nr' 1339 'S L 'fait s rx. 5 . 3 5, ,- ,M 1. 4 3 , t ,551 ' C ,fit . 9 T' N 5 v 1 1 v MUSIC 12 y,f,VM's 'l 5 . ' l 7 C r P' 4 Paul I. Willwerth, Mus.M. Assistant Projlfssor of Music, 3 Chairman of Division that golden trumpet tone . . . L perfectionist . . . army interlude . . . reserved but friendly . . . church choir. l H W 5 Professor Willwerth goes over a 5 Diran Dohanian, B.F.A., A.M. in T. lnstruttur in Art aesthetic appreciation . . . lined . . .canvases and brushes.. . painstaking explanations . bowties. Frank E. Harvey, A.B. .4s.vistuut lustrurtor in Voice "Comfort ye my people" . . . student turned prof. . . . friendly air . . . literary . . . veteran first tenor. Q94-4? I8 difiicult passage with the trumpet l section during a rehearsal of the college concert band. Barclay F. Wood Instructor of Organ organist par excellence . . . the cultural approach . . . organ ar- chitect . . . humorous expressions. Patricia G. Foley, Mus. B. Instructor in Music conservatory trips . . . keyboar virtuoso . . . classical tastes . . poised . . . pleasant smile . . . wet ding bells. l i I me i h A lift W 7 tt," ..- V x j i", A , 1 y and Fl E ARTS Edith F. Cove, Mus.M. Professor of Music Effervescent testimonies . . . , bustling. . . '-the joy ofthe Lord" ' ...infectious optimism . . . "Ma" . "my trip to Europe." Ream- me I, '9 gs .4 . 1-X 'xi 1 al Q-rf-. This year has been an especially important one for the Division of Mu- X sic and Fine Arts as well as for the entire college. On October 23, 1956, C' A ' the Board of Collegiate Authority of the Commonwealth of Massa- chusetts voted to grant E. N. C. the authority to confer the degree of Bachelor of Music. Through our courses in this division our professors have taught us to differentiate between Gothic and Romanesque architecture. We have been introduced to the versatile genius of Leonardo da Vinci and the Cubism of Picasso. We have learned to relate the classical, romantic, and naturalistic tempers in music, art, and letters. We have experimented with acoustics, practiced our "Hindemath" for Solfeggio, and written our triads, inversions, and sixteenth century counterpoint. We have enjoyed listening to recordings of Bachis chorale preludes or Debussy's La Mer and attending a rehearsal of The Messiah at Bos- ton Symphony I-Iall. We have studied the most effective means of con- ducting choirs, teaching pianoforte, and presenting recitals. We have grown in artistic appreciation and skills, and have acquired the professional theory and practice to make us more effective educa- tors, churchmen, and laymen. Olive B. Marple, A.B., Mus.B. Assistant Professor of Music Warm personality . . . gentility ...soft voice . . .devoted wife and mother . . . accomplished pianist. ,N r-A .--'Ui v -X 1 'Q D . I. L , r t 0+ I Eli Q xxx h si -I X in ,X , X 'Q ' L l Esther D. Williamson Patricia Connor, B.F.A., .l. Gregory l arkin, X H Assaciulc' PI'Uf2'.S'.YIII' of Voice' MHA. in Mug. Ed' 'lhrllu fuueglgh Thi!! mellningful Smile . . . mel- .-1s.ti.s'Iar1t Professor zJ'AIu.sit' lll.Xfl'llt'lUl' in .llmir low alto voice . . .sense of humor Commuting by plane . . . con- Chortil director intl iii in c - - ' "HC Hidelh My Soul." ccrts in Europe . . . chic cosmo- ...intense . . . person ililx politan . . . gracious charm. tlitisiastic Cliristitin iukt 19 cnlixcnctl rclicgirsuls -. '-fy a Louise A. Dygoski, A.M. MUYY K- Hf1f1'iS, A-M' Associate Professor ofSpeech Kent Goodnow, A.M. P"0f2'S-wr' 0f'Frc'f1f'l1 f1l1l1'SPf1l1f3'l1 "Speak the speech I pray you" Professor of German and Spanish Pffffv l7"Ufi'3S4'lll' . . . illustra- . . . Sunday School classes . . . keen sense of humor . . . cour- UOUS ff0m WC - - - gentle . . . smil- feminine . . . teacup collector . . . teous . . .collector of model trains intl. CYCS - . - ClUi01 C0Ul'21g6- earnest Christian. . . . language scholar . . . precise. 1 I Alice Spangenberg, A.M. Professor of Englislz missionaries, manuscripts and music . . . genuine interest in her students . . . S O S-Camera, Greenbook and Nautilus. MN! xt ...:.- ' 1' 3 .l LETTERS Our professors in English, Speech, and Foreign Languages have taught us skills and poise and understanding which we will need throughout life. They have pointed the way to more effective communication in speech and writing. They have led us to appreciate the language and the literature of other nations. Not only have we become familiar with Homeric similes and ob- jective correlatives, but we have also learned to write news leads and letters of application for a given position. We have become familiar with Greek mythology and Moby Dick, and we have glimpsed the infinite variety and scope of human imag- ination, thought, and emotions. We have come to reverence human dignity and freedom of choice. We have studied the anatomy and physiology of the voice and enun- ciation, but our speech courses have also given us practice in introduc- ing speakers, preparing after dinner speeches, and outlining sermons. We have learned to translate Spanish and to read German. We have even read Moliere and Don Quixote in their original languages. We have grown in understanding and appreciation of our heritage and ofthe culture of other nations of the world. 20 N--,-Q Ikv X ' 'ma ww r Ii' r-1 Aix . N Q ' 4. .,V . 1 as , ,A '. . , .N 1 I ' --' ' ' r 1 . 2 P" ' 1 f o rv ' ' 4 I r-'Q N 1 M G L L . I 'qi , 4 -. x .g. 5 , 'X n, -..'iJm., :4x1a'!-1 . ,A - " 3 -l7.l ...i PHILCDSQPHY and RELIGICD Our professors have held the development of clear think- ing and the acquisition of knowledge of Christian truths before us as our objectives this year in our study of phi- losophy and religion. We have sought to develop that Christian philosophy of life which is essential to the well-integrated personality. We have studied Biblical and church history. We have read from St. Augustine, St. Thomas. and Schleier- macher. We have compared Luther, Calvin, and Wesley. We have written papers to probe the nature of revelation and to think out the problem of evil. We have discussed details of pastoral responsibility and techniques of ser- mon preparation. We have attended class seminars, or- ganized informal student debates, and "supplied" in local pulpits. We have become familiar with philosophical terms and have learned to discuss such men as Kant and Descartes, and ideas such as subjective monism or dualism. We have attended lectures on ethics, logic, aesthetics. metaphysics and mysticism. We have enjoyed Dr. Culbertson's great lectures, our Th.B. courses, and our fellowship together with our pro- fessors. We have been preparing ourselves to serve God and mankind with all our heart and soul and mind. Mel Thomas Rothwell, Ph.D. Profesror 0fPl1il0s0phy philosopher . . . evangelist . . . my son Paul" . . . resonant voice practical illustrations . . . ser- monettes in class. Wllhur H Mullen Ph D Harvey J. S. Blaney, A.B., S.T.M. Pmjplgor gf Rgllglon Associare Professor of Biblical quiet idealism diy humor Lffffafllff praghoal theglogy Clear Bible scholar . . . down to earth evplahglhohg thought pro chapel messages . . . preaching the yoklhg glasses true hearted word . . . time out for a Th.D. l -x,., I 4 ':i,Q.jtf ii' M? , 3 . V' ' 1 .' vi A t Alvin H. Kauhiman, Ph.D. Assismnr Dean of the Professor 0fPl1il0s0pl1,1', V Chairman of lhe Division " efficiency expert . standing . . . illustrated chapel talks . . . sincere . . . selor . . . Nauzilus problem-solver. Dr. Kauffman uses a explain a philosophical concept to a group of students. M., College, . . under- able coun- ffrk.. M fi 355. ., A... -I,.,5,. diagram to ww!! -I-51 we , W., 7 J. Glenn Gould, A.M., DD. Cicorgc .l. Dclp, All., S.T.M. Pr0H'ssor of Tlreology .'l.x'.xoz'1'r1le l'mft'r.w1' ul' Ri'li,uiu11 the idcul pastor . . . intcrcst in ctymologist . . . ulwlc counsc thc individual . . .voluminous vo- . . .jokes in class , . . scrious cabulury . . . spontaneous humor IUCAIHOF . . . rich tcnor mice . . . . truc scholar. 71 uniquc Ilminkcr. 1 Marlin B. Kreider, Ph.D. Assislant Prokssor 0fBiol0gy government research . . . spieli- ologist . . . original exams . . . friendly . . . scientific method . . obliging. 1 'x t . . ir' ' v 4 4 1 Nr ,tl .f, . ' Jr, 1 ' ' ', 1 '-V 'ff' 5 ,. ',,- ,v V 'wr , ,.,,,' ,. ,., , P. Calvin Maybury, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry reserved . . . research projects ... N.F.M.S. president . . . boyish smile . . . "Well, that's easy" . . . genuine. Advanced chemistry students look on as Dr. Maybury demonstrates a new process in his research on boron hydrides. ,r William J. V. Babcock, A.M. Associate Professor of Biology Jasper R. Naylor, B.S., A.M. the philosophy of biology . . . Professor of Mathematics community minded-from Boy mathematics made meaningful Scouts to Cancer Drive . . . cam- . . . famous file of jokes . . . sym- pus beautifier . . . didactic di- pathetic listener . . . capable . . . gressions. firm convictions. I l T .F sf' .9 ' '.,1x I 1 I .X i'1-da' 1 -cm a ' - B . 1 1. , Our studies have taught us the discipline of the scientific method. We have learned to observe accurately, to record in detail, and to think clearly without prejudice. We have prepared for careers in engineering, nursing, medical tech- nology, chemistry and biology. We have looked at the moon through the telescope and the amoebas through the microscope. We have dis- sected frogs and bisected angles. We have worked with nitriles and amines in organic chemistryg we have made butyl bromide by distilla- tion. We have battled with sines and cosines in trigonometryg we have standardized sodium hydroxide by titration in the chem. lab. We have developed a greater appreciation for the order, beauty and design of the universe. Our Christian faith has been strengthened by our study of the laws which govern Godis creation. Our intellects have been broadened by the investigation and observations in the classroom and in the laboratory. 4 t James H. Shrader, Ph.D. Professor of C hemistry, Chairman of the Division science and religion . . . gentle- manly . . . "Sprechen Sie up child" . . . perfection plus . . . jovial. 9' N' '43 9 J' J SCIE CE and MATHEMATICS 1 VE 1 1 Q 1' Q ...- ff? ,fri G? ' Gwendolyn E. Mann, M.S. Grace E. Jessop, A.M. Instructor in Education In.vr1'uftm' in Soviulnyy full time teacherpgpart time extensive travels . . . "my car" prof. . .examples from experience . . . hearty laughter . . . purposeful . . . well-dressed . . . gracious. life for Christ . . . anthropological studies. 26 , , ,J 5 .afc?jff4 - .j"fFH:?'xtf5.. Charles W. Akers, Ph.D. Professor of Hisrary, Chairman of the Division nonchalance . . . zealous debate coach . . . thought provoking comments . . . in- formal classes . . . "Christianit thought-through." Historiography students dis- cuss their theories of the de- velopment of history with Dr. Akers during seminar class. Carroll P. Bradley, M.Ed. A.v,s'i.v!ar1r Pnyifssor QfEd11c'a!iim casual air . . . husband and wife duets . . . "CoQi" . . . family man . . . athletics with a purpose. SCDCIAL SCIENCE In our Social Science courses we have learned about the contrasts in the social behavior ofthe Trobriand Islanders and the dwellers in the United States. We tried to understand the role of associations in American democratic society, practiced teaching of reading with fellow students, studied the psychological problems of adolescence, considered results of a national bank in establishing a countryfs economy. Economics students remember struggling with problems in account- ing lab, history majors recall their amazement with Alexis de Tocque- ville's critical observation of American democratic societyg elementary education majors remember their classmates acting like second graders for practice teaching exercises. In the various areas of study, history, government, psychology, educa- tion, economies, and sociology, we not only memorized dates, govern- ing agencies, various psyehoses, methods ofteaching, facts about money and banking, and the diiferences between a church and a sect, but we also learned a little historical background. By considering past and present social problems, we were aided in learning how to interpret current events. By understanding of human nature we learned how to better adjust ourselves to new situations and to other people. Q1 mi, f, Rolland W. Parsons, M.S. Associate Pn1fe.r.s'ar l1f'ElfllC'llffl7ll "Back in Wisconsin" . . . genial bookstore proprietor . . . proud grandfather . . . sports fan . . . future teachers' guide. 4-nun Y r fi' -,x A' . 4 X Joseph H. Knowles, A.B., B.D. James R. Cameron, A.M. l-'mink XX. liery, ,lr,, Nl.lt.-x, Assistant Prnfifsmr of P,v'i'cl1nlug-i' A.i'.t'i.i'l11r1I l'r'ula'.v.wr' ol'l1ivfflljl' lmtltml l'mf.wt.n ttf I 1 . If,-nm, classroom anecdotes . . . psy- authoritative manner. . .care- t1l1.!llnx1f.'twt pltlfn,-n1Nr.i.1w.in Chological humor . . . true-false ful lecture preparation . . . polit- l'ennsyIt.tni4t ixx.tng,. tlivuglit- tests . . . pastoral psychology . . . ical scientist . . . energetic scliolttr ful classiooin punt-is . . . gtmtl- students' confidante. . . . world view. inttuictl . , . tinassuinitig liieinl- lliicss . . .lltomllgli-goiiig lcttulcs 27 i Y i P' J l 1' ii-4 :L 4-.,, William A. Taylor, A.B. Instructor, School ofPruc'tic'a.' Arts and Letters Quincy pastorate . . . executive ability . . . brisk walk . . . gifted speaker . . . accommodating . . . spiritual zeal. Irving S. Jones, A.B. Instrlzttur, School 0fPrat'tic'al Arts and Letters prayers in chapel . . . busy Nor- wood pastor . . . friendliness . . humble attitude. PRACTICAL ARTS and LETTERS Our two-year PAL course, directed by Prof. Jasper Nay- lor, has taught us skills helpful in earning a livelihoodg it has taught us to be more effective in our Christian service and in our civic relations. We have had the privilege of studying in the atmos- phere of a Christian college, with its advantages of cul- tural and spiritual emphasis. We have studied the Old and New Testament, learned to speak and write elTectively, considered installment buying. We have thought about the race problem, stud- ied the place of our country in world affairs, learned typing and shorthand. Our knowledge has increasedg our horizons have ex- pandedg our faith has been strengthened by our study at Eastern Nazarene College. Alice M. Whiting, B.S. lnstruvtor, School ofPractiCal Arts and Letters Vermont . . . hashes of humor . . . double-duty secretary and teacher genial . .. choir regular. A .4 Mary Lechner, A.M. Gerald Lashley Instructor, School ufPrar'tit'al Assistant Instructor, School af Arts and Letters Practical Arts and Letters good cook . . . "my son Joseph" student and teacher . . . all-star . . . versatile intelligence. . . a two- basketball ..."my family". ..quiet 28 prof. family . . . musical talents. obser-vations . . . unpretentious me xd- Stephen Nease, A.B Th B Executive Field Secreraf 1 E. N. C.'s ambassador of good will . . . upholding the family tradition of service . consistent Christian , me -tue I ,5 l f ' req .' x- 2' INISTRATIVE EXEC TIVES NJ Laura D Pope Dorothy A. King. Acting Dean of Women Uf'I'1Il'iHf1 151 Sgmgrfgr pclilc dynamo . lou: drum 1 conscientious tender llml NWC I0 H0 U W hearted down to earth help Iirm . . . llllllSNUll1lll fulness Munro Hall problem UM WfNlCfI1CI'. 53' in UR - 5 3 fb Jean Bloye, A.B., M.S., A,S'.S'I,8'lCll1f Libraricm Mary P. Rankin, A.B., Collector of Srrrclvnr ,44'c'am1rs William Williams, fllrlilzrellurwc' EllAL,'flIC'Fl' Delores Crouse, Sn'ilc'lzbnurfl Opurarur .4.s'.x'i.rrm1l Dewi lIf1MC'lI ADMINISTRATIVE Robert W. Harding, Food Servic'e Manager 'H-Q... Harold F. Potter, A10lIIft'IlCllIC'? Forwnun W . 5. xx ' .f Harley E. Bye, A.B., AAI! J ..l til I 1 I Y. 'ffl Hill! Cui Ill' . ' wr n ,F - y V . Elizabeth Young, P' X Secretary to flze President Secretary I0 the Executue F1eldSec1cfary Assmranr to the Execufnc FmldSc'c1e1ary of -.. 4 Ilene Ackcrson, SL'C'I'UIl1l"1' to the Bus HWS A ' If ull I HI IH Ruflxllrll I .'Q"'5l"l'1v CD!-X6cDIfI?'HIUG the CDASCER In recreational class activi- ties, outings, parties, and committee meetings, we try to "Magnify the Master" by our sportsmanship, our enthu- siastic participation, and our Christian behavior. In weekly class prayer meetings, fresh- men, sophomores, iuniors, and seniors congregate in in- dividual groups' to "Magnify the Master" with prayer and praise. In contacts with our classmates we try to demon- strate friendly interest and Christian concern. wmv., W A.. wx wv.-A-1 W... wmv. f-MP4 " 41: .I ,, . .laik 'ngfy -' ' 'Q'Q.y,f ' . '4' 'fggviff' 4, J 5 f'r'X:i4fffL 4 5'5" new .. f?.:V"1f'? ' ' 4 fq-L53 Q - af. i4,YW.y,:i E. QQMLA ., ,"'f.T- ,, , . V 1...' ., ,'.:.?'-1-N, - 1' N: . V1 Q 15, . f, !,'.','.x??1' .6 A, 5 our Class s A winter outing at Woodbound Inn in New Hampshire was the recreational highlight for E. N. C. Seniors this year. A Christmas party complete with mistletoe at Dr. Akers' home and semester outings were special senior fun, too. The final joy of achievement was especially real as we first marched down the aisle in our mortar boards and gowns Junior-Senior Day. And that evening the social whirl of our student days was climaxed by a formal ban- quet with the Juniors. With memories of the spiritual inspiration we re- ceived in our weekly class prayer meeting, and with our undergraduate preparation for service completed, we accepted our diplomas as keys to Christian stewardship. i '--N Scand Clyde Hais 5 C. Represenfariva' JoAnn Deem, Secrarary,' Ginger lnsco, V. Prrsiduzt Ronild Mickel Tuasmu Weston Ch imbers, Chaplainq Fred Wenger, President, Sfamlingx Professor Akers Adusor 34 X1 SE IORMACT IEICAT i Senior Sketches by Dean Bertha Munro CLASS MOTTO: HMAGNIFYING THE MASTER" GEORGE AUBREY A.B. SPEECH Tlieme: Deliberate. Orerfiircx Restless overtones. "Which star make mine?" Crc'sc'emlo.' WENC4Shakespeare-poetry. Spreading interests. Roving critic. Finale: Radio-Television M.C. 'X' Plattsburg State Teachers College. Zeta 2, 3, 4. Psychology Club 2. Literature- K A Speech Club 3. Audio-Visual Aids Club 3, Treasurer 3. Evangelistic Association 2. Student Ministerial Association 3. Band 3. Baseball 2, 3, 4. Campus Camera 3. WENC 4, Program Director 4. DORIS BIGGS A.B. MATHEMATICS Tlzemvs Dependable. Overr1ire.' Steady harmony. All-round girl. Capable. Seeing eye, ready hands. "Fair and wise, fairness and wit." CI'F.S't'L'IItlll.' Math expert-gym teachervbasketball coach. Fiflelix sparkplugf Naiiriliis second brain. Tosses oh' casually jobs well done. Finale: "Blessed are the right hands of God." Sigma I, 2. 3, 4. Psychology Club 2, 4. Spanish Club 4. Literature-Speech Club 4. Future Teachers of America 3. Evangelistic Association I, 2, 3. 4. Prospectixe Mis- sionary Society 2. 3, 4. Basketball l, 2, 3, 4. Volleyball l, 2, 3, 4. "N" Club 2, 3. 4, Secretary 3, 4. Girls' All-Star Basketball I, 2, 3, 4. Girls' Co-ordinator iSigmal 4. Greenbook l, Business Manager. Nc11iIil1i.t4. Canipim Cunivru 2. Sophomore Class Vice President. Junior Class Treasurer. Honor Society l, 3. DORIS BROXVN B.S. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Tliemex Even. Ovw'lm'i'.' Likable. Bird xoicc. "A singing face." fll'C'X'l'l'lllltl.' Dining hall friend. Popular secretary-Ircasurcr. Plenty ol' lun. "Why Q' should the devil have all the good tunes?" lfinulv: "A sunshine in a shady place." Sigma I, 2. 3,-1. Secretary 4. l-'uture Teachers ol' America -1. Spanish Club 2. lxxan- gclistic Association I, 2. 3. Prospcclixe Missionary Society l. A Cappella Choir I, 2, 3, Secrctary-Treasurer 2. Trio 2. Volleyball 2. llousc Council 2, 3. Sccrctaip ol' Junior Class. Sccretary-Treasurer N.Y.P.S. 4. PAUL BURKHART A.B. THEOLOGY ,L Tlzeme 5 Perseve ri ng. mf Oi'w'rnre: Quiet tones. Married freshman. Eyes on goal. Mild appearance iron will. 9 I Finale: Ministry. y,,.nf CAROL BYE A.B. ENGLISH Tlirfmei Gracious. 0i'w'rurv: Keen mind and quick conscience. "The music of her face." Cl'C'.X'C'l'l1lltI.' Harley, McGill. and a parish. Handsome daughter. Memorial Hall lady. "Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard are sweeter." Finale' Triple honors: journalist executive, lit critic, parsonage queen-and then? Kappa I, 2, 3, 4. Literature Speech Club 2, 3, 4. Biology Club I. Future Teachers ot' America 2, 3. Evangelistic Association l, 2. Greenbook I. Nautilus' 2, 3. Lit- erary Editor 2. Cunipux C'unu'ra 2, 3, 4, Editor-in-Chief 3, Feature Editor 4. Fresh- man Scholarship, Faculty Scholarship 2. Honor Society I, 2. WESTON CHAMBERS A.B. PHILOSOPHY Theme: Steady. CI't'.S't'C'lIllll.' No detours. Paterfamilies. "A wife well-willed." Church builder .YQN W6 V' "c"P' Orermrc'.' Forte. "Wes." "Sun-crowned." Preacher-to-be. Athlete. Crv.s't'cm!u.' Married senior. Junior guide. Big Brother. "II thine eye be singIe.', Chapel and class prayers. Finale: "Salt of the earth." Sigma I, 2, 3, 4, Sigma Co-ordinator l, Sigma President 2, Sigma Treasurer 3, Sigma Student Council Representative 4. Spanish Club I, 2. Philosophy Club 3, 4. Evangelistic Association I, 2, 3. Student Ministerial Association 2, 3, 4. N.Y.P.S. Secretary-Treasurer 2. Hi-Y Sponsor 4. Basketball 2, 3. Football I, 2, 3. Baseball l, 2, 3, 4. "N" Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, President 3. Junior Class President. Senior Class Chaplain. THOMAS CHRISTENSEN A.B. MATHEMATICS Timm" Straightforward. Urerfin-if: Laughing eyes. Sports. "Tom." "Much study is a weariness of the flesh." f'I't'Vt't'll!fU.' "Though he be merry, yet withal he's honest." Trumpet sound. I-'iiialfn' Math teachervathletic coach. "He's nothing common did or mean." Zeta I. 2, 3, 4, Zeta President 3. Psychology Club I, 2. Future Teachers of America 3, 4. Quartet and Trumpet Trio 2, 3. Basketball l, 2, 3, 4. "N" Club 3, 4. Green- book l. "Her infinite variety." ROBERT CLARK B.S. MUSIC Tlicfmex Courteous. Ol'?l'flll'C'.' Music. Solt-spoken. Voluntary attendance! "How angel-like he sings." Cre.s'c'wnln.' "He that Iindeth a wife lindeth a good thing." Degree by degrees. Pas- toral interlude. Ambassador. Quartet steady. Finale: "Many people read a song who will not read a sermon." Delta I, 2. 3. 4, President 3. Speech Club I, Z. Evangelistic Association I, 2. Stu- dent Ministerial Association 3. A Cappella Choir 2. Meistersingers l. Orchestra and Band I, 2, 3. Basketball I, 2, 3. Football I, 2, 3. Baseball l, 2, 3. WENC 2. Crusader Male Quartet I. Viking Male Quartet 2. Wesleyan Four 3. Ambassador Male Quartet 4. SARAH CLECKNER A,B. SOCIAL SCIENCE Tlwnzex Symmetry and Strength. H 0 Ol't'l'lllI't'.' Competence. Balanced life. Top-notch varsity debater--V.P. special. JJ Nj' CHARLES CROFFORD B.S. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Theme: Industrious. 0I'Fl'fllI'f'.' Ambitious for good. Lovely wife. Western background. Crescemlo: Delighted Dad-sturdy son. "Keep on pitching!" Unlickable. Not a chink in his schedule. Even tenor. Ci'v.vcemlo.' Spiritual insight. Campus lifter. Social arbiter. Dynamic Force for good. Romans 8:28. Sell' lost in a cause. Finale: "Her work continucth greater than her knowing." Sigma l, 2, 3. Spanish Club I, 3. Vice President 3. Literature-Speech Club 2, 3. Chemistry Club 2. Psychology Club 2. Philosophy Club 3. Evangelistic Association l. Prospective Missionary Society 2. Basketball l. Volleyball I, 2, 3. Greenbook l. Nautilus 3. Canzpux Cunzcra I, 2, 3. House Council 2. DeFord Memorial Scholar- ship l, 2. Freshman Scholarship I. Akron District Scholarship 3. Vice President ol' Sophomore Class 2. Vice President ol' N.Y.P.S. 2. Vice President of Student Council. Debate I, 2, 3. Lk- Finale: Christian business practice. V Northwest Nazarene College. Sigma 2, 3, 4. Church Choir 2, 3. Danker Scholar- ship 4. I .. X X .agus NICYIN CRUISE A.ll. SOCIAL SCIIINLXI- 7'llt'H1t'.' Responsible. Ui'w'f1n't'.'Social conscience. Into the liiglixxays .intl ltcdgcs. Xision lot llic ling cities. "Cine mc licsl good .tn ttttdcistgtnding v.il.c." C'1'r'xtt'f1tloJ Boston Cliapcl. Nkattn smile, Wake ol cltccr. ltlttng, cticotltagiiig. "I he common touch." llllulth l.il'c itixcstctl. not ltogtttlctl. Sigma I, 2, 3, 4. lxgtitgcltstic iXssot'i.tlton l, I, 3, Nice-lhesitlcnt 2, Ihospcttitt- Missionary Society I. 2. Student Nlittistciial 'Xssoctation I. 3. 3, 4, Ptcsitlcnt 3. JOANN DEEM B.S. SECONDARY EDUCATION Theme: Quiet Excellence. Overrure: Popular redhead. "The sweet magic ofa cheerful facef' C're.w-amla: Class and club othces. Senior recording angel. Finale: Junior High? Sunny days made sunny years. Zeta I, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, Vice President 3. Spanish Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3. :lb Future Teachers of America l, 4. Evangelistic Association 1, 2, 3, 4. Nautilus 4. Scholarship 4. Senior Class Secretary 4. Yf'1"t1'r ISABELL DUVALL Theme: Inseparable I. B.S. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Overture: Forthright. Can when she will. I Crest-enrla-"Long, long thoughts." "The hours I spend with thee, dear heart Finale: Schoolroom? Temporary. BEN ERLX FOUNTAIN B.S. EDUCATION Tlrema: Sunshine. Orarlurtf: Blonde beauty. Clear eyes and clear voice. Sincere spirit. Outdoor girl. Cra.s'wmla: Magnet? "The April's in her eyes: it is love's spring." Finale: "Allegiance and true faith of heart." Oneonta, New York State Teachers College. Sigma 2, 3, 4. Future Teachers of America 4. Evangelistic Association 4. Psychology Club 2, 4. A Cappella Choir 3. Basketball 3, 4. Volleyball 2, 3, 4. "N" Club 3, 4. All Star Basketball 3. f,,Q?" HAZEL GOODWIN A.B. CHEMISTRY Growing in grace. "Miss Hazel." N.Y.P.S. Scholarship 4. Debate 3. 38 Kappa I, 2, 3, 4. Future Teachers of America 1, 4. Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4. Overture: Study, her meat and drink, parties, her cross. Handwriting, her profs ggf despair! Discipline. Pre-med-missionary. Crew-erzda.' Veni, vidi, vici every held. Glories in exams, knows all the answers Finale: "Let me be as a tune-swept fiddlestring That feels the Master Melody Zeta l, 2, 3, 4. Spanish Club 1. Literature-Speech Club 2. Chemistry Club 3 4 Evangelistic Association l, 2, 3, 4. Student Missionary Society 1, 2, 3, 4 Repie sentative-at-large 2. Basketball l. House Council 4. Freshman Scholarship l Neal Johnson Scholarship 2. Susan N. Fitkin Scholarship 3. New England District I 'W GEORGE GRESSETT A.B. MATHEMATICS Thenie: Good Cheer. Orertme. Honour and clean mirth. Strength in reserve. Friendly smile. Crescendo: "Blanche the Duchessef' Careful ol' his q.p.'s. "Temperate as the morn." Finale: One ol' these Math experts. Sigma I, 2, 3, 4, 5. Chemistry Club I, 2. Evangelistic Association l, 2. Basketball CLYDE HAAS B.S. MATHEMATICS Overturcff Comes for a try-out, stays for love. Wholesome. Strong for sports. Crescefzdog Quartet in the blood. Runs gamut of offices. "In the ink of our sweat we will find it yet, The song that is fit for men." Q Finale: "Strong and of good courage." Math prof of distinction. Y---4' Sigma I, 2, 3, 4, Co-ordinator 2, Treasurer 3, President 4. Future Teachers of ' America 4. Quartet 3, 4, Basketball I, 2. 3, 4. Football l, 2, 3, 4. Baseball l, 2, 3, 4. "N" Club 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4. Student Council 4, Senior Class Representative 4, Sophomore Council Representative 2, Treasurer 4. RICHARD HAUCK B.S. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Theme: Inseparable II. Orert1n'e.' Faith-ful in much-plus works. Orthodox. "Tangled in affection." Creseemlo: Spelling scorned. "I did hold it in a baseness to write fair." Amar I'l'lIC'If omnia. Deeds, not words. . Finale: "Were I joined with her ,... Power in this dark world to lighten it." Zeta l, 2, 3, 4. Visual-Aids Club 3. Evangelistic Association 3. Football 3. Baseball BARBARA HEIVIMINGS A.B. LITERATURE . Tlienica' Versatile. Or0,.,m.l,,- Ten talents to be steered. Journalist hereditary. "Theres language in 4 her eye." Crz'vc'wnlo: Independent thinking-4lightning answers, The last word and the 'ii first. Handy supplement to f.iIlt'VIt',Uf7t't,lll Hrimrinim. "Int'orniation, please." llasls' loyalty. "FuI wel she song the service tlivynef' Finale: Deepening stream. Kappa I, 2, 3, 4, 5. Psychology Club I. I iterature-Speech Club 2, 3,-1, 5. l,l'UIll'-llll Chairman 4, President 5. Future Teachers ot' America I, 2, 5, Ifxaiigelistre -Xsso- ciation l, 2, 5. Meistersingers I, 2. Band 3. liaslsctlktll I. X olleyball I, tireenhook I, Assistant Editor, Nuulilus' 5, Literary Iidttor. f'tlllIf'llS f'tIlIIt'l'tl 2, I. -1, 5. UIVIN' SPOrts Editor 2, Assistant Editor 3. Ifdttor-in-I'hiet' Al. VH Nl' 2. I'reshin.rn Schol- arship I, New York District -, 4, 5. -Xlunini 3. Honor Society f. 3 . I S' JOHN HODGRISS A.l3. CHEMISTRY 7114 mt. Staunch. SAMUEL HENCK A.B. DIVISIONAL SCIENCE fConcentration in Chemistryl Tlienie: Honest. Ol'C'I'fIII'0.' A good name and a good face. "Nothing is impossible to a willing heart." C'l'U.Yl'E'IIIflI.' Worth doing? Then worth doing well. Organic Chemistry-City Hos- pital lab exile. "The year I met with a Rose!" Finale: Overseas doctor. "God could not make Antonio Stradivari's violins With- out Antonio." Zeta I, 2, 3, 4, 5, Chaplain 3. Biology Association 4. Evangelistic Association I, 2, 3, 4, 5, Vice President 3, Treasurer 5. Meistersingers 2, 3. A Cappella 4. Wash- ington-Philadelphia District Scholarship 3. Elizabeth Herrschaft Scholarship 5. 0i't'rr1n't': Wrestle with Chemistry. Silken voice-spirit of steel. One purpose. "No supcrlluous leisure." C'I't'.S'l'l'Il!lU.' Reaching the top. No subtle overtones. "Find the right woman and if do what shc says. PS-:xv lfiizulvx A work for God. Med school and after. Kappa I, 2, 3, 4. Evangelistic Association I. Chemistry Club I, 2, 3, 4. Astronomy Club I, 2. Meistersingers 3. ug. 535 .-nik' Swat' RAMONA HODGKISS A.B. LITERATURE Tlienzei Direct. Ol'UI'lNI'U.' Love ofthe genuine. Thoughtful of others. CI'L'.Sl'C'IltlI1.' "Lit," "John." Earnest. Front-seat regular. Prayers that count. Finale: "Honesty and constancy written on your brow." Kappa I, 2, 3. 4. Speech Club l. Literature Club 2, 3, 4. Evangelistic Association I, 2. Prospective Missionary Society I, 2. Meistersingers I, 2. Greenbook I. p-.. WENC I. JAINICE IINSCO B.S. MUSIC Tlianiex Obliging. Oi'w'r1n'e.' "Ginger," "How her lingers went when they moved by note O'er the yielding plank ofthe ivory Hoof." Cf'e.stw1tl0.' Poetry ol' sound. "Douglas, Douglas, tender and trew." Accompanist. V. P.--class and life. Finale: Church music and church school education. Delta I, 2, 3, 4. Future Teachers of America 4. Evangelistic Association I, 2. N.Y.P.S. Council-Pianist 2, 3. A Cappella Choir 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3. Meistersingers I. Singspirations 3, 4. Chapel Organist 3. Basketball I, 2. Volley- ball I. 2. WIENC I, 2. Senior Class Vice President. 40 RICHARD JARVIS A.B. HISTORY Tliwne: Logical. Ortfrmrer Spectator-Thinker. "Sober, healthful, and with his wits about him." Ci'e.s'c'eritlu.' Philosophy ol' education. "My song-it shall be witty and it won't be long." History for use. Finale: "So much one man can do that does both act and know." Zeta l, 2, 3. 4. Philosophy Club 3. Evangelistic Association l, 2, 3, 4. Prospective x Missionary Society I. 2. Student Ministerial Association 2, 3. Football 2, 3. Base- ball I. 2. 3. LOIS JONES B.S. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Tlzenie: Friendly. Overture: Black eyes and fair cheeks. Good worker. 'rx laugh." Sings. Finale: Undisclosed. Teaching by example. Scholarship. KENNETH KEIM A.B. PHILOSOPHY Tlzenief Radiant. Overture: Mantling smile. Patience-good will-transparent spirit. Conqueror. Cl'6,YC'Cl16l0.' Victory in his face. "He hath a daily beauty in his life." Christian phi- Iosophy. Finale: "In His Steps." Zeta I, 2, 3, 4, Chaplain 4. Bowne Philosophical Society 2, 3, 4, President 4. Evan- 'X 3 Crescenflox "She is a woman, and therefore-." "Gladdens with a wholesome Delta I, 2, 3, 4. Spanish Club 2. Psychology 4. Future Teachers ol' America l, 2, 3, 4. Evangelistic Association l. A Cappella Choir I, 2, 3. Pittsburgh District gelistic Association I, 2, 3, 4. Prospectixe Missionary Society I, 2, 3. 4, Treasurer 2. Student Ministerial Association 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3. Chaplain ol' Sopho- more Class 2. N.Y.P.S. Scholarship 2, 3, 4. GREGORX ROI IIS B.S. lil.I-'Ml-QN'l'ARY lflJllC1XTlON v llivnitf, Piaclicgil. X.:-lb why ai wIiercl'ore." lmult. lublie school K liiistian ctlueatui. Sliaping nien .intl xxoincn, . . . , . , President 4. if T 0i't'rllm',' Alaska Ci.I. Determined. Quiet grin. Questioning lui good. "I iii ettix l'ri'ttwiiln, HJ wx Iiiislmml. Religion taken sciititislx, .-X N tlieil tsxtlioloex ixersity ol Alaska. Della L. 3, 4. Spanish L lub 3. I utuie leatlieis nl Xincii i GLORIA LANTZ B.S. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Tlit'me.' Good Nature. Ovtfrrurcz "Good to be merry and wise." "Care's an enemy to life." Crext-eritln: Dugout right hand. "Serving the Lord." "A cheerful smile, like an Irish mile, Goes a long, long way." Finale: Walking in light. Letter X. Kappa I, 2, 3, 4. History Club I. Spanish Club 2, 3. Literature-Speech Club 2, 4. Future Teachers of America 4. w--ff-rv ELLEN LAUDERMILK B.S. SECONDARY EDUCATION Tlivnith' Energetic. O1't'rrm'e: "No other but a woman's reason: . . . because-I" "Flashing eyes and smile." Ci'vs'cwnlu.' Baby-sitting problemA-and Poetry! "His bright. particular star." Finale: "The heart of her husband doth safely trust in her." Sigma I, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 3. Chemistry Club I. Biology Club 2. Future Teachers of America I. Evangelistic Association I, 2, 3. Basketball 2, 3. Volleyball I, 2, 3. Cheerleading I, 2, 3. NG GERALD LASHLEY B.S. MATHEMATICS Tlicme: Hearty. 0vermrc'.' Sports-wise. Brainy brawn and brawny brain. Crvsccritm- Math-Physics star. "The World around Us." Patience with lit. Man of family. "Three branches: to act, to do, and to perform." Finale: "And gladly teche." Zeta I, 2, 3, 4. Basketball I, 2, 3, 4. Football 2, 3, 4. Baseball Z, 3, 4. "N" Club 3, 4. Pittsburgh District Scholarship. Herrschaft Scholarship. DOUGLAS LAURIE A.B. LITERATURE Theme: Eager. Enthusiastic. Ot'erlnre.' Pocket books. "People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading. "Vicarious experience." Ci'escw1flt1.' Lit load-history ballast. "The spondee, dactyl, trochee, anapaest, D0 not inflame my passions in the least." Keeper of the records tpoetryl. "Busy here and there." Finale: Finding and sharing the best. Delta I, 2, 3, 4. WENC I, 2. Astronomy Club I. Literature-Speech Club 2, 3,-1. Secretary-Treasurer 4. Audio-Visual Aids Club 3. Evangelistic Association I. 42 RICHARD LEHTO A.B. PHILOSOPHY Tlieme: Trustworthy. 0I't'l'lllI'L',' "A workman that needeth not to be ashamed." A good conscience. Cll'CA'Cc'lItlU.' Treasurer-business manager extraordinaire. "He coudc songes niakel" "He should, he could, he would, he did the best." Finale: 'tHe made a thousand friends: Yes-fand he kept them!" Delta I, 2, 3, 4, 5, Treasurer 3, Student Council Representative 4. Spanish Club I, 2. Evangelistic Association I, 2. A Cappella Choir 2, 3, 5, Treasurer 5. Meister- singers I, 2, 3. Gospelaires Quartet 3. Greenbook l. Nautilus' I, Z, 5, Business Manager 5. Canipiis- Camera 4, Business Manager 4. Men's Glee Club 5. Sopho- more Treasurer. DON LITTLEFIELD A.B. HISTORY Theme: Optimist. Overture: Open face. No dodging. Crescendo: Boyish. "Benediek, the married man." "He was a gode felawef' "Mighty hunter" ofthe deer. "'ll""" Finale: Aiming straight and pulling the trigger. Delta 1, 2, 3, 4. Ministerial Association 1, 2, 3, 4. ROBERT LYNCH A.B. BIOLOGY Tlicfmz' Serious. Orcrtima' Appealing oxerall smile. Unspoiled. Whole-souled. Crc.s'c-cfmlox Vet aspirations. Biology addict. "She was al his cheref' Correlation at long range. Finale: "Truth is truth to the end of reckoning." t' Delta I, 2, 3, 4, 5, Chaplain 3. Biology Club I, 2, 3, 4, President 3. Spanish Club 2. Exangelistic Association I, 2, 3, -1. Prospectixe Missionary Society l,2,3,-1. Bas- ketball l, 2, 3, 4, Football l, 2, 3, -1. "N" Club 3, 4. Canipm Czlnivrrl 3, -1, VVENC' RONALD MICHEL x A.B. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY Tliwrith' Quality. OI'l'l'flIl't'.' "A golden mind." The best lor Ciod. I-'amily pioneer. "And still the iv R wonder grew, That one small head could carry all he knew," X Crt'.tt'c'mlu.' Knowledge worn lightly. llistory tutorial Philosophy substitute in- structor'--Student Council steady-Ilonor Society regular. World conliercnce. Top-ranker with friends. lfinultn' Minister with philosophical background. Achicxcntent with honor. Zeta I, 2, 3, -1, Student Council Represcntalixe 4. l'inc Arts Club l, lltstoi ical -Xs sociation I, 2, 3, 4, Student Ministerial Association 3, -1, College Mission its So eiety I, 2, 3, 4. Meistersingers l, .N'uulilitt -1. thnipio f'tlHlt'l'tI -1. llusincss NI.Il1.IIlL'l 4. Zeta Scholarship l. Washington-I'hiladelphia Scholarship l. 3. lacults Schol- arship 2. Student Council Secretary 3, -1. .ltinior Class Student t ouncil Rtpit sentative. Senior Class Treasurer. Debate 3, Ilonor Society 2. 3, 4. i, ,ff I 4 RUSSELL MYATT A.B. RELIGION Titania: Sturdy. Ovrfrfzn-tn' Character hereditary. Ministerial poise. C'rc.wwuln.' In the right pew. "A Iveryl little nonsense now and then." Christian fellowship. Finale: "Not disobedient to the heavenly vision." Roberts Wesleyan, Delta 3, 4. Bowne Philosophical Society 3, 4. Audio-Visual Aids Club 3. Evangelistic Association 3, 4. Student Ministerial Association 3, 4. Greenbook I. Cunipnx Caniaru 2, 3, Feature Editor 2. House Council 4. Sopho- PATRICIA NORTH I3.S. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Tliume: Actixe. ,9- 'Nl Ui-w'rin'u.' Clever tongue and pen. Ouill-Scroll alumna. P.K. "Pat," J C'rrawt'i11lu: "I eeper" column. 'Kitchen to Camera to a cappella to library. Song of the Brooks. Live wire. I-'mules "The blinded boy that shootes so trim-." Sigma I, 2, 3, 4. Psychology Club 4. Future Teachers ol' America I, 2, 3, 4, Li- brarian 3. Evangelistic Association Z. A Cappella Choir 2, 3. Meistersingers I. more Class Treasurer A ! W 'il' JANICE PRATT A.B. LITERATURE Tlzvnwf Modest. Oi'vi'rili'r',' "A face like a benedictionf' Speaking eyes. Good sense for lit. Cr't'.w'w1flog "This flour of vvytly paciencef' "True as the dial to the sun." Seeing life Christ-lit. Finaltfx Blending literature with history with cookery, FRANCIS PRATT A.B. HISTORY Tlzcnie' Executive. 0l'C'l'fllI'6.' Solid worth, resolute performance. Keen, dark eye. Air-force instructor. "Sober as a judge." C'rvscemla: "The eternal Iitness of things." Strong-minded. Hater of cant. "Fast married." Finale: "Philosophy teaching by examplesufa true history teacher. Midwestern University. Kappa 2, 3, 4. History Club I. Philosophy Club 2, Sec- retary 2. Future Teachers of America 3, Treasurer 3. Evangelistic Association I, 2. Missionary Society I, 2, Secretary 2. Student Ministerial Association I, 2. De- bate 2. Elsi- Delta I, 2, 3, 4, 5. Spanish Club I, 2. Literature-Speech Club 3, 4, 5, Program Chairman 5. Evangelistic Association I, 2, 3, 4. Prospective Missionary Society 4. Meistersingers l, 2, 3. 4. Campus Camera 2. 3. House Council, 3, Secretary. 44 MURIEL PYNE A.B. BIOLOGY Theme: Independence. Overture: Excellence unparaded. Still waters. Keeps her own counsel. Surprise features. Cre.s'c-emla: Sports outgrown. Artist ofthe concise. "My heart is not here." A's in biology or lit with equal ease. "Speak less than thou knowestf' Finale: Top secret. Delta I, 2, 3, 4. Biology Association 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3. Psychology Club 3, 4. Evangelistic Association I. Meistersingers I. Basketball I. 2. Volleyball ,wx I, 2, 3. Greenbook l. Nautilus 3. Campus Camera 3, 4. . , in 4187's i -1 BRADFORD ROBINSON A.B. LITERATURE Theme: Gentleman. Overture: Cheerful poise. G.I. interruption for good! "The late Mr. R." Creseemla: N. Y. Times book reviewer-lit correlator. "Twenty bokes, clad in blak or red." "Had I my book of Songs and Sonnets here!" "Wagner's music is better than it sounds." Finale: A chair of English-special held, Chaucer. Kappa I, 2, 3, 4. Music Club 1, President I. Literature Club 3. Meistersingers I. 2. Band I, 2. Basketball l. Greenbook l. Campus Camera l, 2, 3. JANET SHINAULT B.S. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Theme: Sincere. Overture: "Tace et lac" tBe silent and actj. "Continual comfort in a face, The lineaments of Gospel books." "Janie." Crescemlu: "German" "She bears a gentle mind." Steady, quiet work. "A woman will or won't, depend on't." Finale: "She is gentil that doeth gentil dedis." Delta I, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4. Spanish Club 2. Future Teachers of America -1, Vice President 4. Evangelistic Association I, 2, 4, Secretary 2. Prospective Mis- sionary Society I, 2. Basketball 3. Volleyball I, 2, 3, 4. House Council 2, 3, Vice President 3. Q 'WI coNs'rANcE skiiiiisrzs A.l3 cuemisism' 7lIC'lHl'.' Trusted. 'AF-ag Sway N 0i't'rlui'r'.' Mona Lisa Iltcc. Lighting smilc. "Aye kccp sonictliuig t.tc yctsol Nc'II I. .-' scarccly tcll lac ony." vf' C"rw.uw14ln: Quiet at lIIll0N'.' Yztciitioti llihlc School. llci dorm, Iici' tc.iui. Iici column, lICI' xxritcups, hcl labs. "NN itli l'inult': Chemistry carcci' uomziu. Kappa I, 2, 3, -1. I hcmistiy L lub 2, 3, -1, Sccrct.iry 3, X :cc Picsitlcut 4. luttiic . W ' L 'Icaclicrs ol' .'XIIICl'Ic.l 4. I's.ingclistic .fkssociatioii I, 2, 3. -1. llask tlmll I, i, 41, Yollctlvtll I 3, 3, -1 Klub 3 3 4. Ciiils' .-Xll Stat ll.INl'sL'll".Ill: I 41 kllllwl L tx-uitliiigittwi, ,Ntiuliliis 41, Spoits l tlilot 51. llotisc L otiucil 3. 4, llLNlklklll -1. Oitirmt Auburn curls P tmily tradition Charm ol' not saying everything. Citittmlf Thinking strught Soft is the music that would charm forever." Song rut but sweet Dear human books." lx ippx I 7 3 4 Literature Speech Club 3 4. Future Teachers of America 4. Evan- gelistic Association I 7 Meistersingers I 2, 3. Campus Camera. Oitiruit Obedience to the unenforceable." Preacher girl. Moderate. Cfuttmlu .ludicrous selection ol activities. Seeking God's best-and finding. JOAN STETSON A.B. LITERATURE Theme: Faithful. The Real. Ovw'mre.' Punctual. "Dares do right in scorn of consequence." Musical-athletic Sliterary. "What does it 1r1c'an'?" Crest-erzzla.' Unfailing production. "Do it now." The Crew4"Thou away, the very birds are mute." Consistent. Happiness a by-product. Finale: "ln His will our peace." Kappa l, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2. Fine Arts Club I. Literature-Speech Club 3, 4. Future Teachers of America 4. Evangelistic Association l, 2, 3. Meistersingers I, 2. Bas- ketball l, 2, 3, 4. Volleyball l, 2, 3, 4. "N" Club 2, 3, 4. All Star Girls Basketball 2, 3, 4. Greenbook l. Naurilzri' 4. New England District Scholarship-N.Y.P.S. 2, 4. Sophomore Secretary. Junior Vice President. Hnulr Holiness unto the Lord Here am I-send me." Zeta I 7 3 4 Philosophy Club l Biology Club 2. Literature-Speech Club 3, 4. Future Teachers ol America 4 Evangelistic Association I, 2, 3, 4. Spanish Club ' 3 Psychology Club l Mcistcrsingeis 7 3 Volleyball 3, 4. Greenbook l. House DALE WANNER A.B. RELIGION Tlzeme: Intense. Ol'l'l'IllI'L'.' A man so various. Fighter with himself. Minister malgre lui. "Appre- hended of Christ." Crescemla: "Not the Hower of courtesy, but I'll warrant him as gentle asa lamb. Music and business. Voice. Rare smile. Finale: L'The love of Christ constrainethf' Sigma l, 2, 3, 4. Spanish Club 2. Philosophy Club 3. Evangelistic Association l, 2. 3. Student Ministerial Association 2, 3. A Cappella Choir l, 2, 3, 4. Business Man- ager 4. Quartet 3. Scholarships 3. Freshman Class Chaplain. 46 1" FRED WENGER A.B. PHILOSOPHY Thtvric: Fruitful. 0l'c'I'llII't'.'WOI'KCI'fDhliOSODhCI'-CV21DgCilSl. A spice of wit. "A sure sign work goes on merrily when folks sing at it." Crt'.rt'emla.'Adolescent-Psychology authority. Kitchen pacifist. Treasurer-to- president cycles. Senior cares worn well, "The indispensable man." "On his shuldres winges hadde he two." Finale: Smiling evangelist. Youth worker. Delta I, 2, 3, 4, 5. Philosophy Club 4, 5, Treasurer 4. Evangelistic Association l, 2, 3, 4, 5, Treasurer 2, President 3. Student Ministerial Association 3, 4, 5. Volley- ball 3. Baseball l, 2. Missionary Society 3, 4, 5. Christian Service Scholarship 4. Washington-Philadelphia District Scholarship 5. President of Senior Class. Honor Society 4. WILLIAM WEST A.B. PHILOSOPHY Theme: Discriminating. Overture: Canada accent. "A certain aim he took." Crescendo: "Aristotle and his philosophyef' Bible testimonies. "Richest the treasures he found in his mind." Recommends marriage. Finale: "My soul hath elbow room." Ambassador extraordinary for Christ. Kappa I, 2, 3, 4. Philosophy Club 3, 4. Evangelistic Association l, 2. Ministerial Association 3. District Scholarships l, 2. McRonald Scholarship 3. WILLIAM WHITEHEAD A.B. CHEMISTRY Theme: Insight. in-I """-4' 'S--...ff i. Qiff' ii NORMA WILSON B.S. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Tlieniex Quiet Fun. Ovar1urt'.' The maple leaf. Amused twinkle, Reliable. CI'l'.X'l'i'IIC!4J.' "Alceste"f-by mistake. liehind-the-counter serxiec. Cape Cod sum- mers. "The good are always the merry." Finale: Her students will love her. Zeta l. 2, 3. 4. Literature-Speech Club 4, Ifuture Teachers ol' America 2, 3, 4. Evangelistic Association l, 2. A Cappella Choir 3. Meistersingers l. 3. NUllU5l'1'll 3. Maritime District Scholarship 4. O1'ertm'e: Ready lor a challenge. Good for the long run. "To blow is not to play on the Huteg you must move the fingers." Ci'e.s't'vrirla.' From laboratory assistant to Tufts Medical. Dante-Faust discovery. "The kind of man who can humanize the scientist and simonize the humanist." Finale: Physician plus. Kappa l, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4. Chemistry Association I, 2, 3, 4. President 3. Liter- ature-Speech Club 4. Representative-at-large N.Y.P.S. Council 2. A Cappella Choir 3. Meistersingers l. Ouartet 2. Band l. fv'u111i'lu.v -1. Freshman Scholarship. Hanson Scholarship 3. President Sophomore Class. Freshman Class Student Council Representative. BEATRICE WYCOFF A.B. MODERN LANGUAGES Theme: Tranquil-firm. Overture: Hereditary gentleness. "Gets along with anybody." Unrulfled. Con- victions with a smile. Cre.x'eenu'o.' Spanish-American. Headwaitress with equilibrium. m Finale: Unwavering. A missionary wherever. Sigma I, 2, 3, 4. Spanish Club I, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 2, Vice President 3, Secretary 4. Future Teachers of America 4. Evangelistic Association l, 2, 3, 4, 0, Secretary 3. Prospective Missionary Society l, 2, 4. Meistersingers 2. Pittsburgh M.-.--5 District Scholarship I. Angell Scholarship 2. Kauffman Scholarship 3. 'ui' THOMAS YOUNG M Bs MATHEMATICS if Theme: Constant. A Overture: No second-hand thoughts. "Gentleman born." "Giants in the earth." "Not good that man should be alone." Creseemlv: "Can wisely tell what hour o'the day The clock does strike, by algebra." V "Lovelier than a sonnet, you made rhyme, And I memorized you unaware." "Q, Finale: "A meeting at the summit." "Not in the roll of common men." Ohio University. Zeta 2, 3, 4. Basketball 2, 3, 4. Football 2, 3, 4. Volleyball 2. Baseball 2, 3, 4. GLADYS ZIEGLER A.B. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION Theme: Spontaneous. Overture: Loyal to right. Simple faith. Silvery laugh-close to tears. Sports- friends-prayers. Crescendo: Overtlowing testimony. Joy of the Lord. Concern for others. "The hneness which a hymn or Psalm affords Is when the soul unto the lines accords." Finale: A singing life. Christ firstwthen all. Zeta I, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 4, Girls' Co-ordinator 4. Psychology Club 4, Future Teachers of America 4. Evangelistic Association l, 2, 3, 4. Prospective Missionary Society l, 2. Meistersingers 3. Basketball l, 2, 3, 4. Volleyball I, 2, 3, 4. "N" Club 2, 3, 4. Girls' All Star Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. Nautilus 4. Campus Camera 4. WILLIAM KELVINGTON EDWARD MANN A.B. PHILOSOPHY A.B. MATHEMATICS Theme: Missionary-Minded. Theme Loyalty. Overture: "Ever precise in promise-keeping." "Fervent in spirit." Overture Brown eyes. Grin. Math and music heritage. Ideal basketball Crest-emlu.' "First he wroghte, and afterwards he taughtef' center. Of those "whose summits touch the sky." Flr1ulc'."'ThC place that the MBSISV Ch0S6." Crescendo "Deliberate speed." Common sense, with a grain of poetry ZCIH 1, 3. 3, 4- Pl'CSidCUl 4- Silldem COUNCU ReDI'CSCnl21liVC 2- Bowne Phil' tunacknowledgedl. Exploring Far West. Returned tourist-Massachussetts osophical Club 3. 4. Evangelistic Association 1, 2. 3, 4. Prospective Mis- magnet, Catehing up with himgelfgand bn, sionary Society I, 2, 3, 4, Vice President 2. Student Ministerial Association Fingltq- Presidential timber, 2. 3, 4. Band 2. 3, 4. Football 2, 3, 4. Mission Group Leader 2, 3. Student Sigma 1, 2, 3, 5, A Cappella Chbir 2, 3, Qtitirtetg I, 2, Basketball I, 2, 3, 4, 5. Foreign Mission Fellowship 3. Vice President 3. Chaplain Junior Class. Football 2, "N" Club 3, 5. Transfer to Pasadena College 4. 1 MDC 1 We E U .hi C ' U 51 51 51 H M U u 51 V H 1 li b' To Cl Q 51 B HB1 bl E q' - 51 '51 U nl M1 51 r1 .sf vi 51 lv 51 51 51 51 51 L51 lv' , ll , l1 Q ml' m -' Q lr' rrrccfffpt tffiftcr K X 7 l 1 1 2 1 q I Q 1 Q U Y ' l Q I Q I Q I X I S I K I K I X I t S I X : I '7 K. hoglllho lAT'l0liL,S Dlkll - uuwAn+fcni1 Ultlvf iwlllli 1 1 1: v ta- Ln . ,J Q' '9 Eastern Nazarene College presents ten of her students to WHO'S WHO AMONG STU-, DENTS lN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. Election to this nationally recognized and distinctive organization is based 'upon character, scholarship, extra-curricular activities, service to the school, and potentiality for future usefulness in business and society. The honored students are presented with a certificate of recognition and are privileged to wear the official key-a symbol of the most ,distinctive achievement in college. A biography of leach student-elect is included in the current volume of Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges, a book which serves as a guide for personnel managers who are seeking capable college-graduates. Eastern Nazarene College congratulates and honors her most versatile students. May their ,future life be as successful and useful as their college life has been. ' 1 'iv 4 . 1 1 I Q 1 n A K X I v , ' 1 41.7.4 4.11- 4 . K 2-N :- Y: '1- -1,- if 'gr -mfzfsf? V Y V ,-.mi -:f"5f"I -. , ?'?'f'31Z'a'Lfl'7 .ax f,Qg,J!AJ3L1ff:Q,iL .,'., 1 - 1 A ,ggvljivl V, - .wf ' , '5:,J4.. ffiggghjf , I Vw .Aff Y , . uf, I. f .V ,WAI u I 5 nf - uf Q - v 1 1 1 T- - Y, Y- fr 1 1 1 1 1 K nf 45:-1, ,y, ' 1 aa ,Q ,111 Q '. 1 1 . 1 ., ' 1 ' 1 - . . 1.1f'faf".'z:f.' .- M' -' . 4 A 1 ' . K, 11 V 1 ' V . 14 , 1 ' 1. - 1 1 ' Q 41. A .,,v'l1 Y ',., -1 gp. r .1 .1 1 1 ,. - :5:,::1,u'.'r,1 91.51141 1 I , '. 1 - 4 . .ur-1-. 1 ,f f .'f-.".-1-114,11 , .3 4, 1 +4 4,,.,,K,.,A,51.5" N, N, . 3 rg,,' . ' ,1 -,M . ,f , .. 1: ,V Q c1k,,y,,.fK' .. ' ,, .R 1, M , . . K ' 4 13 , if -, 44' , .. v. . .f',11'f' , fl" Y ,, , x"' . , 1, f , S, Qian' vs' F, r . I ' f - ? 4' 'Q Q Q 'f If i' 41 11 . Ist . ' A nf I .ir , 1 1 if Q -, Y 1 1 R1 f???hv4'5' '1 W 1, '51 1' ue .1 f VM' 5 WW Q. I 2 an W 1,-v 1 1 - 5 if :tif-' 'f 1 " 1 -1 15 ?'iff'f' 21 1 1 5" '11 X, .fj1,1f f5xff - -arf., ig-Q. g r 1 -A, ,ei W, 1... -, 1.1.18 1 55111. sjiieiby q 'Z' -N354 'QW A' 1' ' "i',f'1',-1gffQ"'z1',1'1Sk ,gf ' '. Q ' 1, Q? 'af -f Sfvkxagff I ",,1 '5-1:-tg "ffm ELA. ' . .'5,a3,51 :K-' J '1- 1 1: 15.-, '37-11: ,vw 2115.4 'ff' 1 fi iiizi' 1 '-5641531 13?-LQJK1 fi ' +3-Q:31,1.: -v P L' ' ,Q ,.- . 1, 1,1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' 1 ...,,-1. . ....1, 1 , .X 9, . 'hit - Vi -vi . x . 4 ' .1"ggg' 1.5- . . X n . , - gg - ."-'fr' '.: , 3 Q .. 4 f .,--1: , A. I . , .A-yin., 5 .A . f-A . ' -, N--.'u4':1 1 ' ' . -' 4 " ' -- -'gf-'T-,'.'.1 . 5: . f -,y , , A. Q-V .' : is ' " S y .Vx . 1 ' -- -V3 .Q . .V k ,U A.:. ,, , bl X U- I' T' : -Q1 Z' '. - -' , yj r .. . -gun -.ML vip- . V Qwas- Ax x - A vi V' . x wi . , , 1. -'Wag ,Zi-, ' x ' 5,1 'L' ak ' .-lv ,N 5 . .Q ,v 0 NA 1 - ., , ' "- -.Iv In X 1 1 T'fR'::'.1'-1, . N 1' '.-:1::"J':x, - Q- . f K' 'f:.",k - y- - li . 1 A 5 . f ,Lk W . 0 AVL, flux 'ax-s 1 I lx., . + 1 , , 'ft "4 , . f ', f r -9 Q , ",. ': 4. A ,n1zh"r,"4S'.:,H ',1Q'S 'fvfe " K ' ' 'X . ,. .4 .. IV-, ,l U1 1 ., . , I g,.l M. auf" ...H 4 . ,,,,vX4f ., . L. sw '4 ' x ' r . . '- u ' . -' A1 zu- ,K -.-X, , .t g :mix Q 2 ' , 5.1 'q . ' 'x'evW'-. 4: , ' Q 1-' . , ,fg NJ .' HJ p., r 'Q 41, .' : .gf j, ,vp ,4!fL,!4l v .'.g' , . .., ., ,U -L ..f. ,N rm. ., f.. H' ' H.: 1 .,".j:--- Q .1 x X . -1-, ,- 1 1.--1 n .- ,- S ,wi .-. H4 . 4, . , I nl, Fisk!! da 34411 W rm-'gb ,,. - . 21:5 'J-f'-'fl,p,? , 1, , ikyatl' . 1 J ,V vin nd.-K 5 X M' P , W ffl X 5 4.1: ., 1 , , QQ . N' 1 5375, 4 f.5--x:1,-'lifJ.'.t2,w , .MA .K ,, 1531 ww-Q-,ii . -UQU.-., 4-.', 1, .- 1 ,Pj , '15, 'lffA1'33g ' " -,,, .-4 Q01 5.-Mgx,-j5"'.2Z:.: . -.r--". Q . 13-vi-. -1 E.'bQ.'.1"' - N p 1- ,--A-Ll.-. f .-1.1 , ,. ,L . , . A xl fq ,, J,-j - . 3. .zlkgqfqg ,,- I , 'lf 3 ,' wail'-.1 mwx ' ,-1-gwf '::g".',:131 ' Q , T. . ' "QA Qi. '.j,.1-.fff 'E - w , I , .., jx 'QV'-i'H4."xx -2.2 .':':"c. '- H'.y:r-.IA jf' ,X .. f.Q:V,',:3ff 'fl-T - 'X 4 ?'fg9:.'f'Q?'5-3'f'f' "-.L , ff af',""f"1,1'-tl'33a.'t'T ,QQ 1.50123 ,. i fmpg 'ff-:A QQ.. .L , g.,,, 5 3 . 5 f- ily? 1 J V. , L Nrif' I '. ,V 1- .', - .-f .--H sb' - f- :Y -' a,- .a-QSV1 vga 1g5.f,5,-1 1, ,SX 'I Yflfs ...N 1 5 . '- :f,, i. f 4,1 ar -, J. 1'.'Y'ri- M f' 1"-:pigs 1 'f a xmlivil-gf if .V Q -51'-Jwiwji, Lal' ."":. ""' 47 ' "1 A- 1? Niki 1 T Tiff Affg-'-I 1,',0.!i?i5' .H 2. Silqff - "'s- 'fd' a ' nr p,:."' T, ,:,.,., ,-D:-'K 1 .,. pf' 5, ., -I . 'Q i F11-. , 'V ' ' -fini -' ' YQ. 'L :"v.3.. V . 1 ' wx , - 1 r , x x X x X ' . s Q 5 Y , w w ,- A A Q 1 1 x x x -..i ,,'.H.., X , .. ,, A. ..x.,4,111',. 1 ,tn f J. 14. W fiffff ...7...4u-H.. 77' k . , W, s x 5 wa 77' . 'Hs ,iffy ' ny, s, N Q 4- -. I. ' ..,,,-J Lf..-.21 " , gixxuk 5 -A 'U Q -x Xl HN- .' Niw 2 , 5 K xl fl . , . A.. : .5 0 . ,x 1. a-A I ,. ,4U V 6 N Jil, ' v YQ LP , , , f 4 .. -1 1-. Q QV ,. , ..--".1-v -.. . X A x 'Yv X vu 4- 'vw "'v-Iwi' N. 1lQ,,iRm Jvhvrvlg- ...- Nwkd qo- -0 I' 1 ,g .Q f A 5 " ff" f ff" s -,X 'Hy , l' , l , A V ,- . . . 1 . A I H W I mf... p h I . , .t 4' . 1- - A W -,N V- - ' . I -5- . .N 1 Q 2 .1 V -A -.W -I , ., N: . , , 4. A- emi- 3 Q ". ., 'v ' x 1, ' ' ' .su f "' fr . X "- 1 .A,, Ar- - ..., . ' . 1 ' 1 4. , .1 ' . V. , n N. . N"' V .:' ,' X. 'ur-' ' 4 - ' Q H ' N M, I . ,vff 9.51,-,, A . . . v. -1 f , i ..--- . xx X, , - - J 1 ." ' , yv. --V " - '- " ' I vi vw' . . ' 'J .,' ,, ' , af - . V N A . A, . , ' J Y ,4 ' 9 1' ,. fi- -Y-xg: 4 .74 ' 5, ' , ' . I' f if . ' ' :f'd"', , It J V V X 1' l b . . , , , , . 1 'L ' "- - 1 xxx n xx I w L 1 . Q. mfr -If -x.. 1' Q .J ., Nc, vi Fr ,:. I X P , Hue' , . 2. -, f '1 sl' - gf S 'MA 4-.-A ..' 4 JF. I V . -'fin .sg ., ni. l 5-pq-1-nx,,,l--1 4-v-- -.-, ff' .1 '- ' '- ' ,'-..f1, ,M W , .,. ,ff f 5, 1 1 fn 1 I W, .f. f Xu , fv . , .., r .,, 'S 7"-vw -. f , - 1 Q 'fx - f 1 ' up L x. , ,A S 1. .5 ,. 3 fy -W. , A --M , -Mn , .f we . , ,'f'2.g,:.rw, . ff' 62ff'?t??fM'3'4l'Q.u,. 1 - if -4 -z-.3 's , 4: . P X ' '.. 'fr V gl ,gf 'V A , f .4 'e f' ,i,v -' I ,f I , "f l I .4 I A ff? HARLEX BYE XXILBLR ELLISON JOHN HATHAWAY JOHN CRAMER ALI-EV HALBERG CHARLES WAKEFIELD GRADUATE STUDE TS Th.B. degree or finished pructice teaching to fulfill cer- tihcution requirements, we shared one common purpose gour desire to be better uble to serve God and fellow- man. n l 1 gi 1 'rf 1 X , 'Q W , s , . l N l ist .vlf"' R .r t , t MARGARET BINETTE CEORGE EMERY ANTHONY KOSTY LELIA MAE RULAND JU ioas We found ourselves near the top of our college career in this year's activities. "Great Is The Goodness of God" was the theme of our chapel service commemorating Thanksgiving Day. We packed baskets of food for needy families and realized the thrill of putting our thanks into action. As we lis- tened to our class oiiicers' speeches we found an echo of their words in our own hearts. For our class outing we drove to Uxbridge, Mass. for a delicious home-cooked spaghetti dinner. The food and fun made this evening an unforgettable one. f'Nf'Lr- And we remember the night when, with the Seniors, we planned a progressive party. Supper in the dining hall, volleyball in the gym, films in the lecture hall-all helped to make this party one of the high spots in our year's activities. On Junior-Senior day we felt important as we pressed gowns for the Seniors and planned for a festive evening at the Toll House. But as we watched the Seniors march down the aisle in their caps and gowns we were impressed by their sudden special dignity. Suddenly we realized that next year we would be the Seniors. "'-St' ., ' --. .V nh ANL,-. .A 'T' FIIZYI Row: D. Peoples, Trcr1.vln'r'r,' R. Speakman, Pl'l',slllUllf. .Semml ltuw: R. Calhoun, Clzufilrzmg Plot. Rollixxcll, Azli'is0r,' R. Shubcrt, S. C. Rl'f7l'l'.S't'Illllffl'U,' C. Burgess, lf'it'c'-l'f'c',iizlw1l,' N. Xcccliitmc, St'w't'luri'. xl v., Clinton Bzigshaw Rucbcn Bigelow W-s. ' Carolyn Burgess B v x in v 3 '51 .X 1617494 ' ,' .Y if 'iw f M y K I l l I ' A I V5 M f V' 1 Murxin Buell """b Gerard Benelli David Brumugin Mary Anne Burley .x.V,x. ...I ii QA" gr. if 1 af- W 1 -.ui -n ww 'Ol W Y I , X it Charles Caldwell Ronald Calhoun Howard Cogswell R S X X J I 4:"'77 .XX 2? A l l 1 I. John Croley F 'J 1-"TP Dgnmcl Dulvc Carolyn Ead RE? 4 2. 'H Wayne Edwards Samuel Erbe Barbara Faulkner , ,z ' X'-Q , 5. K .X- ? Rodney Everharl V, ' Hui - 1 " ' 07, .1 ' J if .-.. .... 1, ,k gs-'f:::p-51-:.?',:L 31 iff.-'xLi.,ff'..:,1 ' T Theodore Essclstyn 777 diff Robert Faxon Stewart Fretz 55 'v-ill? '73 Charles Gailey l 'Y I' Ks f f 21" K-J s F-W,,,' Paul German as li, was l', 64 Eleanore Gery John Glass 'Q Donald Green 'Q' fi' . i .-uf . ' ,r N. . ew f QV. "Ai' lv Q ' 9. xx W 4, K., I Ruth Hersh Louisa Hines Angie Hagerup Glen Hornberger Marian Grant if ive.. -qs-J 'sgi wx x Nggxvbg giifxbkwfi- Q. X L .-, 1 'F as-A-"' X. vo Duane Herron Shelxa Joines 'GY -qi if I 65 S' Robert Landers Merilyn Manchester 1- A Hubert Mickel James Latford Myrtle Moore William Laudermilk Merritt Mann Virginia Mastrobuono Arthur Morgan Nancy Mucci 66 Walter Mullen Ronald Phillips ? JN Coleman Rogers 4 -luv? Charles Owens Douglas Peoples Joan Stanford Donald Schnepf Richard Schubert glu- 'L Robert Seyfried QF' James Sheets 'T' I' Edward Sims X K 'R CS 'Iwi ""'-s., 'Quo 'wr , AP, A f Donna Slaughenhaupt June Smith i e :ref ' x 'N X f -'G Luther Starn 'y , w ,iq ws 4, 1 r w, !1 YY. ' Roger Speakman sf 1 ' 'Q . il' Q A M ' f Emma Soulia 'Qi CHQ Helen Steele Joyce Srrang Freida Tysinger ignite TNS, l Q Qw-"'9 T Nancy Vecchione 68 V ,f V.. ,K , .4 1 f, ' - A.. ,U .-r 1 'M I l 1 T J gg f ,-1 I I 1 15 r 1 V f in SI? . ' Q 'K f-----" 55+ xiii' I A hu , 5 x '+ . 1 Y, ,S i Evita Howard White Ronald Whittenberger l l i The girls in an archery class, under the direction Q of Coach Bradley, get ready-aim-shoot ..... l l l l l I 5 Edwin Willwerth Ella Mae Wilson -E . c . A ivy VT. K ' . Q '11 " ,um ' A pn . A , gy! ' A . , , " it AKA T ,,, '. 'X , .. U . me . ,ha . . . . . and then rclricvc thc arrows. 69 SCDPHCDMCDRES We returned this year with a new enthusiasm. We told ourselves we'd humble the Frosh just as we had been put in our places last year during initiation. We welcomed the Frosh to E. N. C. in the traditional lively manner and ended Freshman Day with a Freshman-Sophomore prayer meeting. On our class outing early in October we drove to Faxon Park in Quincy where the boys played football, fthe girls tried tool climbed rocks, hiked, sang choruses and, of course, ate outdoors in the crisp Autumn air. The informal Freshman-Sophomore banquet held in the college dining hall gave us a chance to get acquainted with the Frosh in a new way. But we had new duties to perform as a class this year. We decorated the dining hall for the Thanksgiving Day dinner, and some of us volunteered to usher at the special programs throughout the year. Our first two years at college have been full of excite- ment and fun, but we anticipated an even better two years as we take our position as upperclassmen. Seated: E. Mellinger, Vivc'-Presider1r,' B. Bedell, Secretary. Standing: Prof. Naylor, Advisorp L. Hall, Presidenrf C. Poole, Trea.rm'er,' M. Milbury, Clzaplainq E. Speakman, S. C. Represenmrive. ti I I I I i It I I I I t I I I I I I I I I , 'haul' V' A ,vw iid Barbara Clingerman Richard Clifford John Chavier Marjorie Chapman . ' X P ' N ,-fiwf Q Nancy Borden Edward Cairns Larry Burns Amy Brown V . - s Q' F I gf s kffi xigsgffff I Donald Bernecker H David Blachly 1 Dale Blackwell , N. 1 M Dean Boshart Marion Boardman Fred Boden Kenneth Alcorn Joyce Anderson Adrianne Anthony Elizabeth Bedell H O 1 2, f -5 I +A ' William Briggs James Bricker if 'nr sa ,i. 71 Wi-fa, ,Q 'A fe t n wif try - mf fi tiff! l -.QQ fir Colm Daniels Wlllmm Dyment AZ Q 1 K Robert Edwards Merle Fetter is S Aa.. fr W x l 'lu , '-,v- l . 'T " , f- x riff. 'V' --N. Melvln Couchenour Francis Crandall Robert Cuble Fred Culver A 'Q 4 N 1, 5, lla Lowell Hall Donald Hammer A Kenneth Hardy 3 i Betty Harris - If Nancy Haslett Mary Hatcher Frankie Heber David Hutchinson Us M -1-1 fi N... N11 uv! ' n. g. M Q ' S A 'x .- L' 1 -ff ' sf R S-,Mgr 45, ,K -1' 7 Q 1 I 4 vi' any Gerald Hilyard Robert Huck Larry Hybertson Roberta Jarvis nj? il. -1-vm., Q' Qu """'H ' . ' P fs 'Y . 'fl ""' , U -7 A i ' I 5 2 .4 :xi l. :X ,,l"':, ' i'1fi?..12. ' M r 73 "54- N"l'h ,.""F I Q, ,xl ' .Y ring. ji 5 '73 I 'C' Marsha Hunter James Jones Thomas Jones Joan Kchm 1219 wr' 4 S . X w X a "' vs: '34 ...L laxxxrcncc Klnnms Kaye Kunkel Riulialrd I l1l1lllCl'I l llglinc l ax in Davida Lewis Donald Long Daniel Lupton Fred McCormack wt. , 'Yea- .6 H M a --0' 2 Delores McPherson Orville Mason Elaine Mellinger Melvin Mosgrove , an William Merki sggv lub .. Y., 1'4" in wx K X Richard Merriner 1 3 5 Kyiv I gi: 5 13 i Paul Murphy ' Lowell Music L fi 'fe v 4. n ' 'ff' Marvin Milbury fin PM in Ii 5 vii I I wr W g i. hr :Ss - 41 A 1 nu 22" 4' 'I 0 i 'JW' fi' ,, . ,.,.-givinhi' , 2, , Q ,. 3 ., dn , -1 x' .I , . . f . 1 V qty, As ff. t A 5 V ' I mv , . '17 ' Robert Novack Eugene Park Lowell Patterson 'Y ' V: V 5. 'Q X f -Eli' ' 4 - ' "' My-1 2' lf.,- g ,, -Q I, -fd ' , ' '- , i lf, 'a 4 'i 1 X ci f 1 fi I fa 'iv 74 Carlton Pearce Calvin Poole David Poole Robert Poole ' f - , , , X lib- Just. .N . i 1 . J l Q5 4. s ,. Q , s .1 3 V I ,Q J-1 ,f V or Mary Rabideau Barbara Ramstead LoRae Reed Stanley Rice 7.43 1 Nj' J, If 4 A X X E Arlene Snyder Robert Soulia Elwood Speakman Warner Stanford 6 -H1 Jean Scheer Linda Shepard Lorraine Shoemaker John Smith l Ethel Rowe Jane Scheer Richard Schuster Isaac Shahied Everett Richardson Joann Roberts Eldon Rosenberger Robert Scheidly 2 3 K ' l N 12. in 41 75 an , ff-:lt l and v .F I, .- A 35.- -2? 2-. :wb el. W"""' . t, AI' l sa.. f 3' 5 I N 1 l l l il 5 1' 2 vw- --- -4.---W I K l Harold Stetson Dorothy Swartz William Taylor Allen Torsey -3 r L.- , g J f . J JL iffl-,A L J ,Q Ii? df' Manx 5 -fl John Tirrell izae sei -X in El' bthUh' ' Dorothy Van Skiver John Weslow '51 1 4e4s ml - -5. . Mg ,ng ,qw- 1" - ab- 41, '95 """'7E 'fiiiifia If " +1 in , '22 ,,, v Y' " Wg. xxx.-A 1 v x f' 2' , f , , N-nv j in ., L- if J X .fl 33 David Wayman Tom Weaver th 0 MaryLou Wheeler Sandra Whelpley l ,r,-:aff 'mf ..,...-f' R ffl' W? w-rf" X 76 Y! 3? 1 William Webb Priscilla Whitehead Enid Woods Raymond Wooster 7 .f 'ff' I .. gh l'. X f s Q Pi 4. x f X 'Yi '14, if it-aa Q : 1 4 V Q A Arthur Yacubian Bertha Yager Beverly Ziegler Joyce Zurcher FRESHME So this was college life! Some of us were surprised. Some were thrilled. And others of us were still stunned after our first few weeks at E. N. C. We trembled as we stood in line to meet our new profs, but we soon relaxed as we felt the warm handshakes and saw the friendly smiles. We became acquainted with the Sophomores during the bewilderment of initiation. We had to bow to our Sophomore superiors, but we learned that they were our friends who were trying to help us find our place in college. And then we were taken up with English Comp. themes and Western Civ. assignments, and we forgot our problems and disappointments. Some of us had to battle homesickness or the temptation to drop that extra hard course, but gradually we became a real class united through bonds of common experience. We learned to know each other better through our hrst outing at Wey- mouth Park, our class prayer meetings, sharing news in the dorm. Yes, this was our "green" year at college. We smile at the happy and unhappy memories and dream of the three more years ahead of us. VV d 5' I C. Thatcher, l'ici'-l'rc.xitlt'r1l5 R. Mann, 7i't'clXlI!'c'l'. D. P. Wells, .41lvi.wrg B. Roberts. PI'f'Sffff"'fi A- 00 S' ' "KW mf' Mathos, S. C. Rl'f7l't',S't'Ill!lffl'l',' R. Sharpcs. Chaplain. I T' I I I I I I I I I I I I II If I I I 1 I I rf" I xi 1 'fit ' L' ,3 V. B . 2' - ' 'i f? X ' f I f .Q K . D ' if J. Ackerson C. Adams R. Allen J. Anderson '-uni' 2'5- 1 I H. Babcock C. Baldeck R. Bambling J. Bender T. Bergdoll I I . I I I I I r I I I I I I I I W I I , II it.. I I I 'L 'Z f . ' 3 I I jjtji . 4. I J. Brown P. Bryner I I I I II' I Ill I I I II V P. Andree R. Biggs ,- b 1' f 15 - J IC II if ' - g'. . gm: Q. fx A " I F. Butler is 1 . ,, ,B J -Q04 J. Bocanegfa S. Bowman E. Bown P. Brooks X ,,. R. ,93- tn . .Y '. . 1 S Q. ' .Il 4. L I ix" 1 Q 3 . - v 'A . - J. Byers L. Casler Ai 'Q ig,- 4--' i B. Chen J. Cheney R. O. Clark D. Clifton N- Cole 78 'Fl 'Nu- J. Delong M. Devine E. Dodge . L Q '?h4C3ilf lx, .Xl Q 1 4 s , . 5 l . M. Collins R. Coons J. Copeland G. Cosgrove W. Couchenour . ,lf f'- M' , K ,:.. 1 , , R... ., r , . f 5. -l 'j M. J. Dunsworth J. Emerson iff Jliw '2..'!"' Ji' . L ' - 9 tg.-, I . Y J. Enman E. Farrell B. Fink M. Fluharty D. Ford S. Ford S. Fulle V ' 'ash .ff ' ,am . J 4 C 2' 5 ,Y 5 J YW" .- r L. Gehman R. German D. Glusker Q if J q 1 f Y 4-A, W. Gorman S. Hammer S. Hatcher P. Hcckcrl R. Helfrnch 79 T W' -.HW fm .4 pi- in .p me Jw 3 W' XJ' .:.- J 'ffl .".... -f J' . 1 J R R ' v f in , .fr J R. Henck J. Herman W. Hersman S, Hodgking D, Horn fi 'Q be -we We ' 2-in 1 J I 0 an in V' . Av CW: I 1-P' 1 i ,gf ,.. -of y nv -gy X f 'SS M R. Houser R. Hover E. Hunter W. Irons R. Irving ff ,.-x r . fe 1... q KAW-11?Q.' "Nw Y AJ. J I x f ll J. Jackson D. Jardine F. Jarvis S. Jeffery A. Johnston 1 1 11" .44-9 gg rv.-QM fv N1 sq ' 'N-C H I up - - 1 nf' ml! . n H. Keeler J. Keeler B. Keller J, Klumas P, Koury ...fx JM tpgfn A ' E V X ,fe A H.. ski hi qv ' J -"' 'J . ki 'Wh' 'U' Q ---'-v . 1' A, C, K1-ulgmil B. Kunkel D. Lesser J. Lunden D. MacDonnell 80 lj 1471" ' K. 3 -Q . U .14 'ff-'xv 4 J gg 4 Q, - 1. rf 4. I J. MacKay L. McAllaster D. McGrew C. Manchester R, Mann 3 K: V' JA N qs-any :aw . Vai? 'R , M.. ff. .,. .J 'W X A f ws .. . D. Mathos A. Matthews R. Mauritsen S. Merriam E. Miller ,A az... 24 4!k G. Miller J. Milstead R. Mingin E. Murphy J. Musser Ml ., ,gffbfif-, N fr W f f -:ln xr 5 41534 3' vw- KN 3 l x . '4' 14 V lf f ..- ' Y? J' -MQ, --' '79 f ,. 3' :SL G. Myatt R. Newby P. Newlun R. Norman R. North Q K ,, F ! as A A ' " lf r -' ' ,.- J I n C- Novy P. Nyce A. Pzlncurik P. Patch D. Pctcrsun 81 'B 'QU' . 9? Ne' -f-1 :I ' ' .,,-i J,A:xWib,f., S. B. J. Phillips C. Pillsbury F. Pilmore 1. i MA W 'iff 4 --wr I I G. Porter I. Powell 36. FA X ' Q .fl T. Rawlings N. Richmond J. Rines B. Roberts L. Rogers W' 1 gf' 1 A Eififwfx, .,.f . ii X14 'L I' ' Q' A 1 . . ' 'Q Q. J 'ik iii: A Q 5 WA. . ' rv 9 - VV H 1 ,Q-w'N -3 , I U It Nvngb. Q? "N,-rf, 5 'A N.,.,x o' ,fi W", "" nab J M A I Mg, S. Ross S. Rozenia H. St. Clair G. Savage V. Schlough Am ' ' . f' '70-wzw A ur - 'Q' A'--fu 47' "---v .3 PQ-' R. Schwankc J, Shankcl A. Shannon R. Sharpes K. Shene ' 4' Z F ' H ' L, t , :.l' ', W 1--an W' i IJ ' I A 1 Q i . if . FEI: 6 E , ' Ai, 4 ..,. .. Q . 3 ' X 5. 82 L. Singcll J. Sipes D. Smith E- SOmmCl' R- Stahl 1 '9 Y WV iw Q 36 - 6' Vi ' iv:-f ,,..,-9 .- N ff? . i A h .. yi X iv. 'X-23 ' R. Stark E. Stuuffcr R. Swain J, Swartz GZ' -W -Q one 4 '4 YQ-5,9 ix .2151 If, h . .1 i , A ..-9 : 1 fx , + fx? ' i . B. Thompson E. Tollivoro M. Urner T. Vena D. Watkins i 1 . dx 2 . ,J , -A i 'V' 'x if I V Rf- 15' i "1 S. Wayman M. Whipple R. Whiting D. Wiley i i N I E' i iv 1' 1, i '--'79 wi xml' 1- 7135.7 A. Woods V. Worden L. Yugcr C. Younce .l. Zciglcr Camera Sh V Ch. linlniiw W, i"Uh.'y O.C'oi1c XX. H.lNCiIOIl .l.L'uriiimgl1.mi .l. ll Nlmcr R. Vlixwli XX, Swim W. Drcmci' 83 - 3 . . . - 236' , 3 I-f C. Thatcher fa s .K 1 ,gn- -LZ? Yi L. Woodbridge K 1 1 K w N W I ,P wr H M I E NZ ii 1 Y 1 E I R. I. I E E r J 2 r I 5 9 H 5 c ? , E 3 3 E 'r ii e 4 I . f 1 li' w p. 3 E. N I V if ...qu 4 1 S I X 1 4- Q4 I A A 1 'ls . A A f L , D. Ames A. M. Berquist '::r R. Andrews B. Bowman vu Vw ' S. Ashline G. Brown N gy, R ' V . V, ., K J. Bachman Burley uv- """ Hb ue'-2? , 5 luv -Q. m " 0 "II" . S PRACTIC L ARTS 2. D. Cowherd K P. Dancy A J. Davis Ibu- ,Q I P. Bamblxng D. Clingerman B. Dixon Q ' , f N f , Q . 1 t 'O' I 'l 5 l J A. Banco R. Correua J, Dreifort D. Dru mm X D. Erbe . 'N 'JI Dv NEP H T. Fowler affnw , 'O' 'U'-"YQ -J' J. Frederick G. Grant :si and LETTERS 1 li' QA- ..,,..r 9.4-1- if MCMinn R. Smith XR 2. 'D W1 A- GFHY M. Hinkle Y. Moreland E. Sova 'R T' """h-s YY' , '? 4017? R- Gray V. Hinson R. Parry F, Thomas .ni wk lf 3 v S- Hadjian J. Holcomb J. Partridge C. Wagner wr 'Tl . E- Hall D. Johnson R. Ricketts R. Welch 30 ?....gl I aa H ' NJN Q., N-vv-dy, L. Hawes D. MaCNevin R. Scuxcy gj 5. xx hilq 'ra cg 85 CDAGCTZIFHIUG the CDASCECR Rising for Sunday worship services each Sabbath morn- ing sets the atmosphere for "Magnifying the Master" on the sacred day of rest at our Christian college. Observing reverence in wor- ship, participating in praise services, attending chapel with our classmates, and meeting God alone in the .prayer room, we "Magnify the 'Master" lin our worship. 3 ..40""' .f-" 'I 3-W , .1 Q. A Q QN . 542 is 'NMA a M 's w .cl ' ' 1. ' xf, an 5 ,' ,JF VU.. Wa' 'J'-' NN' .0 PASTOR'S MESSAGE My dear Friends: What is an adequate motive for spending four of the best years of one's life in a college such as this, giving one's best effort to study? Some do it because they regard it as the thing to dog it is the approach to life which their set approves. Others do it toiincrease earning power and thus enhance their prospects of what the world calls success. Still others do it for the sheer love of learning. But all of these motives leave something to be desired, however valid within limits they may be. They all leave out of account any reference to the One under whose all-seeing eye all of life is being lived. Indeed, the only adequate motive is stated most succinctly by the great Christian Apostle Paul when he said tin 2 Tim- othy 2:l5J, "Study to shew thyself approved unto God." It may be that St. Paul was not thinking of study in the sense of poring over books or listening to lectures or spending busy hours in a laboratory. In fact, the Apostle's admonition might well be rendered, "Do thine utmost to shew thyself approved unto God." Thus, it refers to the whole business of living. But that includes this work of preparation which we know as study. And the only adequate motive for thus applying oneself is to please and glorify God. Let this be your motive, dear friends, as you pursue an education. It will ht you for living the truly good life, and will guarantee success of the noblest and most worthy sort. Faithfully yours, ,J QW QW! N ,,.4nngha-fs--'MM--' Dr and Mrs Gould obsei ve the progress on their new home in August ........ in November they moved in. 88 CGI ,l .EGF -4' CHURCH The Wollaston Church of the Nazarene provides complete worship facilities for the students at E. N. C. Although it is a community church, many students be- come associate members while they are at E. N. C. A special emphasis on the Sunday School program this year has stimulated attendance surpassing rally day goals. Wednesday evening prayer meetings and revivals as well as Sunday worship serv- ices with pastors Dr. J. Glenn Gould and the Rev. Floyd Flemming, have contributed to the spiritual growth of all E. N. C.-ers. The Church Choir under the direction of Paul I. Willwerth, Choir Director. ------ NYPS ----- The inspirational emphasis of the program of the Naz- arene Young People's Society in the Wollaston Church of the Nazarene provided genuinely spiritual emphasis for E. N. C.-ers this year. A Lamplighter's League serv- ice, with burning candles and the prayer "May I Light the Way For Someonef' presented the challenge of wit- nessing to each young person. Devotion to witnessing and Christian living was stim- ulated by participation in N.Y.P.S. sponsored student prayer cell groups. Program features have included "Devil-Net," a par- ody on "Dragnet," a program presented by faculty members, society specials like ul-Iis Name Shall Be Called," and a program presented by the high school Hi-N.Y. group. Dr. Timothy L. Smith delivered a spe- cial Thanksgiving talk. After-church singspiration programs and the annual Christmas caroling -were Sunday night highlights di- rected by the N.Y.P.S. The Rev. Sammy Sparks was the special speaker at the Spring weekend revival sponsored by the N.Y.P.S. . xg 1 4,1 Scarcfl: Duane Herron, Pl'UVftI4'llI,' Nancy Yccchionc. In-4' l-'rtw- izlwlrj Eunice Bown. Rr'pl't'.w'l1Ir1lii't'-111-fr11Quz',' Doris liruxxn, Sul'- I'l'f0l'.l'-Tl'4'll.N1Il'l'l',' l-'red Bodcn, Sulfur' lf'mlt'1',' SllIlltlfll4L'.' Walter Mullen, Pl'l1'1'L'l' cull lc'urlt'r,' Donald Long, lJ4'p1't'.wf1Ii1l1'i4' ul lflryrw. if l . ODUIIIVIIKL' Cmzrenrimz-Rev. C. D. Tay- lor, Superintendent, Akron District Church of the Nazarene, Sept. I3-16, l956 As we walked along the paths from our classrooms to chapel we were glad for the hour of inspiration and meditation to brighten our busy days. Chapel began with Dr. Mann leading students and fac- ulty in a song of praise. This year during our special chapel services we have appreciated the emphasis on growth in grace by Rev. Taylor, the challenge to effective Christian witnessing of Rev. Gilliland, the psychological im- plications of religion explained by Dr. Culbertson, the vivid war experiences of ex-chaplain Moore, and the profound doctrinal insight of Rev. Logan. '.: 2?fmP.'5.?Q4qCL4:' K 7 ,,5fiQ2f',1. .. ,, ,, ,Ut-. -621 Q11 Fall Rt'l'1'l'lll-YRCV. Mark R. Moore, District Superintendent, Chicago Cen- tral District Church of the Nazarene, , 90 Nov. 25 to Dec. .. -M.. A V' V"'f 'FA V H . , ,I . ,. ,A -:,-.- 2w1g1..yw:1-H . "?mH+" ' . 'ff' '-' , . - - '-'2"'f5,f Ut?" it -.H--f .'?4'f4i'-"K ' X'-wi 'M--' .r1 x!4::w , ,f-3 -,asf .1 ' . , CH PEL Ac ' . 4 'r 5 Q ' 1 l f, f Q' N, 1 ,A , '52 K K . - ni, 'Pe 1' . . '--,r 'Ji f- pt-at 1'l+.,.t., ,. 12 K 1sx4.,,a- , 4 , :-. 4, -' . V .4 t -W'f'4'e.l1v - "E fain. nk S.I7C't'fl1lLC'C'fllI'L',S"-DF. Paul Culbertson, Dean, Pasadena College, Oct. l-5, l956 1' lfllllfflllflll LU4'IlII'CSvRCX'. Ponder Gilli- land, Pastor, First Church of the Naz- arene Little Rock. Ark., Oct. I5-19. I956 Q-' 4 J '-QI fi.w.ft.'lt'..'.'f1tt lick .I-'lm S. l ugnv. l mnggelixt, london, I nglaml, lelr I-1- NI.trt'l13, W5 J 3 1 I r E GELI TIC .L 1 1 V, '14 IV. ' . f "We are fellow helpers to the truth." III John: 8. Tig 'Q , ' This year the members ofthe Evangelistic Association p , have dedicated themselves to 'glearn truth, live truth, ' r i teach truthf' The practical Christian service in which this it group has engaged is dedicated to leading men and wom- , Q , A en, boys and girls to the Person of Truth, Jesus Christ. . Eleven mission groups have held services in five mis- ' ' sions in the city of Boston. Each Saturday and Sunday young laymen get practice in conducting song services, singing duets, trios, and solos and witnessing for Christ. The young men preparing for the ministry receive ample opportunity to preach. However, the purpose of these v services is not primarily to gain experience in Christian service but to win souls for Christ. Sunday afternoons the students form two choirs which visit Quincy City Hospital as well as four nursing homes in the city of Quincy. 5' f "7 'ns i Rik . L. I I 4 JI Seated: S. Fretz, J. Kehm, R. Calhoun. S1ancling.' D. Herron, Prof. Rothwell. lid 3 J 5 U' ? I can 5 J M f - 3 .J f J tl mutant i E KW i nm 'f mmm 51 k .f -A fi v , f-Q l 1 , .. , , . -gi i .ff ' wif- i "li " . , 74f".r'i --Y . ., .f i .A 1?f Y' fx! 0 vu-7-X First Row: E. Rowe, A. Brown, M. Burley, C. Skillings, J. Milstead, J. Keeler, G. Ziegler, P. Dancy, M. Devine, D. Lewis, E. Sommer, L. Reed, S. Fuller, D. Johnson, M. Grant, J. Kchm, J. Frederick, B. Fountain, A. Johnston, J. Bachman, .I. Sipes, L. Gehman, M. Whipple, E. Bass. Second Row: K. Butts, E. Woods, l. Powell, L. Shepherd, D. Glanzel, E. Stauffer, S. Wayman, B. Ellwood, F. Heber, D. Biggs, B. Kunkel, S. Hammer, J. Delong, B. Hemmings, R. Andrews, R. Biggs, N. Sutton, R. Coons, G. Savage, G. Grant, D. McPherson, P. Newlan, M. Rabideau, S. White, Y. Moreland, P. Brooks, B. Dixon, C. Krutenat. D. Ford, L. Gander, R. Mingin. Tl1irdRuw.' M. Manchester, R. 97 Jarvis, M. Hinkle, M. Fluharty, J. Partridge, S. Joines, A. Hagerup, D. Mathos, J. Roberts, S. Ashline, G. Gantert, M F. Tysinger, B. Phillips, J. Cheney, D. Swartz, A. Anthony, B. Wycoff, D. Jardine, J. Ziegler. G. Brown, R. Ricketts, X ASSOCIATIO These choirs bring cheer to the shut-ins by singing familiar gospel songs. Many of the Association's members work in the Boston Nazarene Chapel in the south end of Boston. This year the Chapel averaged ninety in Sunday School. Saturday afternoons the Chapel teachers conducted a full-scale Caravan program. Visitation groups have been active both in the Wollaston area and in South Boston. The groups have rung doorbell after door- bell while canvassing and inviting people to special services. Special projects of the Association this year have been a special offering of S85 for aiding the Chapel in defrayingthe costs of its new building, the obtaining of fifty new books for the hospital choirs, and the buying of a new carry-all. Ronnie Calhoun leads Evangelistic Association Chapel. H- W 1 13 1 ? .sf ,agen e, .log-bl, 1.-,Li 'I' L.. linnn1nuuus1uun '-, 4. i ' , .-. 111113:-in-. Q R iiiiiili jjnnilinacunn-a-uni wx.. -.- R - M ..3 ' 1 'ai on J 'Q If DS 1 ti 32 '- gh . ,. -lift f X -v L. -Auf 'LW R. Gray M. Wheeler B. Bedell, P. Nyce, L. Rogers, N. Vccehionc, M. Collins, D. Slaughenhaiupt. H. St. Clair. l . H nter W. Hersman. fburtli Raw: W. Mullen. B. Kelvington. D. C'lil'ton. tl Noxy, C1 Tlialeher. D. L'lingermgm, ti. ' er T. Jones D. Herron, .l. Cramer, J. Sheets. C. Caldwell. R. Sharpes. R. lloxcr, R. Soulia. D. XX'.i5m.m -' . l . nger R. Helfrich D. Erbc, W. Irons, M. Fettcr, T. lfowler, M. Milbury, W. Merlxi.I-'f'lll1Rmr.' D. llorn. ti. Xlyatt. . hankel D. Ames G. Porter, T. Esselstyn, A. Matthews, Fuller. C1 Poole, R. Welch. R. Selieitily, 'lf Wciixqr, I'. 'artz R. German R. Stark, J. Dreifort, J. Jones, D. Long. R. Qiarlantl, R. Michel, Y. Wurtlcn..S'1x1l1 lJ.m'. .l. Swartz . verhart H. Cogswell, R. Calhoun. D. Bocanegra, S. lirhc, S. I-'ret1..l. Weslow. .l. Smith. ll, t'Iiarnlwrs. R. Sclm- , bert, W. Couchenour, J. Musscr, H. Miekel, D. Hammer, R. Myatt. A. lzxerton, .l. l'lNCl'lIllQlllI'l, D. Kll'CL'll, R. llmxartl, 95 G. Kottis. l L I In If N I i i l I . I l v 1 I ? l r I l E 1 a E I l l E l ll Il I i F l i l l l l l l I STUDE T FQREIC1 MISSIO ARY FELLOWSHIP "Put ye in the sickle for the harvest is ripe. There are multitudes in the valley of decisionf' Joel 3:13 The Student Foreign Missionary Fellowship is endeav- oring to obey this command of the Lord through the many available channels at E. N. C. The Society aims to acquaint each student on the campus with the work of our church's missionaries and to support them in every way possible. Realizing that the greatest need of missionaries is prayer, the missionary society has sponsored the Thurs- day prayer and fasting service as well as the regular so- ciety prayer meeting after dinner. To back these services up they have drawn up individual prayer charts every two weeks and have kept prayer request boxes in the dormi- tory prayer rooms. In the Christmas cards, which they send annually to the missionaries, they enclosed small forms on which the missionaries could send back requests. These have kept the prayer boxes alive. The greatest event of the year is the Missionary Work- shop. Missionaries returned from their fields speak in chapel and take over the classes, relating aspects of their work to the material being taught in the courses. Indi- vidual conferences with missionaries as well as informal contacts in the dining hall, the parlor, or in the Dugout, give each student an opportunity to know what these am- bassadors of Christ are really like. During the year the missionary society has shipped to foreign fields hundreds of pounds of used clothing, clean and in good condition. This is of vital importance to the work on the fields. Several hundred dollars have been taken up in the special services to help support visiting missionaries. Front Row: G. Gantert, J. Zeigler, R. Ricketts, B9Ellwood, D. Ford, S. Joines, M. Dunsworth, M. Wheeler, R. Jarvis, H. St. Clair, D. Peterson. Middle Row: J. Cheney, D. McPherson, M. Rabideau, B. Kunkel, J. Delong, D. Biggs, A Johnston, S. Fuller, M. Hatcher, M. Manchester, J. Bachman, J. Kehm, G. Savage, L. Woodbridge, R. Seavy, B Wycoff, P. Newlan, L. Hawes. Back Raw: J. Dreifort, L. Yager, S. Fretz. D. Blachly, B. Kelvington, H. Chambers, R Scheidly, R. Hover, C. Gailey, D. Clifton, W. Irons, A. Swain, R. Mickel, R. Garland, T. Weaver, T. Esselstyn, Prof Hunting, R. Calhoun, E. Cairns, W. Merki. Seated: J. Fischmann, J. Bocanegra, D. Herron, D. Long, S. Fretz, R. Calhoun, D. Green, R. Everhart. Second Row' K. Keim, W. Merki, E. Richardson, J. Shankel, R. Myatt, D. Littlefield, W. West, A. Everton. Third Row: D. Ames, R. Garland, T. Esselstyn, G. Porter, R. Scheidly, T. Fowler, T. Weaver, A. Matthews, J. Dreifort, D. Horn, M. Milbury, K. Alcorn. Fourth Row: J. Jones, R. Mickel, A. Swain, H. Chambers, R. Poole, C. Daniels, R. Welch, M. Fetter, D. Clifton, D. Brumagin, W. Irons, W. Chambers, W. Kelvington, P. German. Fifilz Row: W. Mullen, R. Soulia, L. Starnes, L. Hybertson, R. Merriner, K. Hardy, J. Cramer, J. Sheets, T. Jones, R. Howard. J. Holcomb, G. Miller, J. Jackson, N. Crouse. STUDE T MINISTERI L ASSGCIATIG The Student Ministerial Association, through its pro- gram, has endeavored to supply fellowship, inspiration. practical knowledge and preaching experience for all students who feel the call of God to proclaim the Gospel. This year the president, Donald Long, and the advisor, Rev. Floyd Flemming, worked together to provide a bal- anced schedule of instruction experience in ministerial duties. Student ministers held revivals and youth week meet- ingsintheNazareneChurchesthroughoutthe BostonZone. At their meetings the future pastors discussed various aspects ofthe minister's duties as well as his responsibil- ities and problems. In the fall. Dr. Paul Culbertson of Pasadena. Nazarene College spoke to the students about the pastor's relationships in the Church and during the second semester, Rev. J.S. Logan from London. England. spoke and shared his experiences with the group. In the spring the Association held their annual banquet followed by a special speech. CDAC5fl2I1:'HIU6 the CDASCECR Like all college students, we E. N. C.-ers enioy good times. With the fun of Christian fel- lowship we find opportunity to "Magnify the Master"-by our behavior when we are with our friends, when we dis- cover' the spiritual thrill of HandeI's Messiah, when we laugh together at a humorous incident. ' From the enrichment we find in an artist's interpreta- tion of Chopin's "Polanaise," to the enthusiasm we share cheeringpourl team to victory, wemay "Magnify Christ'?. in our student life. U r Student i e E Yfl 550161116 1f. . Lines, lines, lines,-E. N. C.-ers catch up on the summer's news as they near the Business Office door. . . 2.74 1711116517 Ike Freshmen display their "signs of inferiority" as the "all powerful" Sophomores supervise. After being roused at 5:30 A.M., Freshmen are served a "backwards breakfast" in the Dining Hall. 'WWW ,A- 1 we 1feCg1k1'e1fed 11511111 . FV65bW6W . . f' 3, 'ww if- Q' f 5' 5'-we 'LA I ,IA ,JSA--W ls 1 'D ' I u Pi , ,A ' ,. ' , Jill' f 44 V :xox W1 -' KTM' wif. QQ 47, , x I .lp 'Q ' E A -,lj ' x 148 W' li mxf A PEP B z 13 ,f aj "1 1 4 The eerie Ghost Walk featured Jack Dreifort as a raging maniac. l l 5 Fall! r 4 i y 10 ocgresfm' . . . , Flowers adorn Jim Sheets as he fills the casket as a "corpse" on the Ghost Walk. Talented musicians at the party, Barbara Fink and Lillie Rodgers A, make the aceordions talk. 5 Bill Webb and Ron North, attended by Barbara Ramstead and Marion Boardman, 1 Lf' " gif? 3 5 as they greet the party guests. The Winners! Bob Cubie and Barbara Farber, David Brumagin and Jo Anne MacKay, Don Schnepf and Janice Byers display the best hats. , V. , . . 'iff .fn P"""' t l X . Z sr' ' E A 9 'I l ll' I l 2' G t i l l l t H Norma Richmond tackles a tongue twister for some good lt laughs. X! . we had az gala Halloween celebmizbn . IO! 3. Ott Tickets please"-Joan Stetson, Carolyn Burgess, Doris Brown, nd Joan Mullen are collecting. "Will You?"-"Let Me Call You Sweetheart" the gals sing to their dates. lihc Street XNht-lc You lite tum lwl Sunnis hearty tip- L N ' we wzmeifed am ye Enthusiastic young Republicans applaud their ekcizbn yemf. The brightly decorated gym featured pictures of Candidates- "Ike" and "Dick" for the October 16th rally. lj'L'1.1ff"fl I' ' ELIOT ' iv Y Q, ,J 'S Q' liffi' 60 Wlfll.. 9?""g mf yx fff: 9. I vars ff g , t Q run suytnnun , X X j h ...n.. Republican Sumner Whittier speaks for "Peace The Young Democrats' Co-Chairman, Luther and Prosperity." Starnes, welcomes Robert Murphy, Candidate . mm' lzlrfenm' I0 61 norm' for Lieutenant-Governor, before his speech on October 23. cancer! pzbmzkz l l T , Mr. Balogh greets two student admirers after his concert. ' ' o Erno Balogh, composer and concert pianist, pre- President Mann, Mr. Balogh and Babe Chambers sented his eleventh annualconcerton November 9. 102 stand in front of the Steinway grand piano pur- chased with Student Council funds. if Vwnier 6 oucgbi ik Cbmimm lemon, Professor and Mrs. Ward Hunting acknowledge their "going away" gift as Sarah Cleckner pre- sents it to them. YN, "Silver Bells" and green trimmings gtxe the dining hall a festiwe touch 61 my Top: Four guys, D. Smith, D. McGrew, R. Jef- freys, and J. Lunden, and a guitar come up with "Rudolph," Near Righrs House Council President, Connie Skillings, on behalf of Munro Hall girls, pre- sents Mrs. Hiller and Mr. Pope a gift. Far Riglzlx "Angels and the Shepherds" was a reading given by J. Milstead. IO3 ,IFP- 61 Cwblfllfflfldvlf Chapel rerwce Greg Larkin and lhe A CHIJPCUH Ch0i1' ODCU The ChfiSfmaS Chapel "Scrooge" Harold Babcock waits for his next line in the Chapel program with "Gloria in Excelsisf' presentation of Dickens' "A Christmas Carol." T f H mow jigbif. . .. .4 , Snowballs, fast and Furious. Larry Hybertson gets one in the neck. With one down, Marian Grant and Connie Skillings attack Jack Lunden. fmfolmcg' Zh Woflafion . -fi 104 Ronnie Calhoun directsg Dr. and Mrs. Gould listen to the E. N. C. Christmas Choir in front of the new parsonage. "Joy to the World" the carolers sing as they make their first stop in Wollaston. 1 I R Q Q3 ilg in vs ul as ' 3 ll? ' 5. , 5. .L r. I ,ji 2 '12 wr 2 .' A . + ww", , 1 ggiftliiii 9 -ff 2:3 i 24 I ' - l lf +fL. I 1"ig2'N X mv X rx' , - 159 J: sw-- ,ffm af, Q A 1 L 'f gg A ' 1 W N 6 ' , u . r . "- I 1 Ng , A'- LJ' 9' LK ' A 1 4.1 'X f I ,s I 'Ui . 1 fvxx 'T--.---.--. f X, 4 E 'fxii vu 5 recom' Jammer began . . . Sleigh bells ring and happy seniors are off on a frosty ride. x The seniors arrive at their destination. .lf.i.l!. -i "Chow's on!" and it tasted so P good in the out-of-doors to the starving seniors. Ike rembiff lqfi "Hold on!" one toboggan as Tom Young prepares to off next. goes take The scene of the retreat-Woodbound Inn, Jaffrey, New Hampshire. 7 .. 3 --ll y . .NC for two do 5 SENIOR TRiP soNG Tune: "l'm Looking Ove We're looking over our trip to Woodbound With memories like these, Skiing and skating, tobogganing too, Hiking and sleighing and playing Rook too-ooh! The food was tremendous, the sleep stupendous Wish l had forty winks more. We're looking over our trip to Woodbound, With memories galore! The ski tow was helpful 'till Mr. Akers Grabbed the emergency flag. Norma was graceful as she hit the gound. George ripped his ski pants the first time around. June tried the skating, and hit the ice. Bill K. had a built in sled. Toboggans were speeding amid the screaming And Don and Doug took a spill. We went a hiking to the Cathedral But Wes and Luine dropped out. Lois just made it-the Haucks lagged behind. Thomas and Beverly were climbers sublime. Sleigh bells were ringing, the kids were singing, 106 r A Four Leaf Clover." But what about Doris and Clyde? Odds, ends and couples and Bill and Sarah, But Janet stayed home and dreamed. Stetson kept eating and Lashly repeating Waitress how about some more? g Seconds were brought us and we almost died When Gressett refused them we couldn't believe our eyes. Gloria so quiet, and Barb a riot, Bea and Irva sacked in late. JoAnn with her cane kept hobbling along And got plenty of help from the boys. Cameras were flashing when Lehto was near Everyone was in the spotlight Except Fred and Hazel who were away from the throng. U I And Doris and Glady were playing ping-pong Connie and Ginger were up to tricks When suitcases came up missing. Whitehead played chess, And Pat you can guess, Just dreamed about Howie Brooks. 1 A, h'.nt. ,yfi ,gy I hui 4 -wif "Noe X M4-,'Z.,,, sau. 1 X Dick Schubert and chorus open the program with the ballad, Dueling knights Luther Starnes and Larry I-Iybertson battle to the "Walk Hand in Hand With Me." death as Queen Sarah Cleekner and King Roger Speakman admire their bravery. l Fanfare announces the arrival of the King and Queen. Worried parents Gladys Zeigler and Chuck Gailey discuss their daughter and her date in the skit, "Couldn't I Kiss You Good' Night"'? In February . . we had az Vazlmlme Formal! Couples enjoy the delicious food and festive atmosphere at the Valentine Formal. 8. X P I CDAC54l2I1f'HIT2G the CDASCEFR This year we have shared the fellowship and responsibility involved in making our organ- izations successful. We have written headlines for the Campus Camera, planned decorations for the Valentine Formal, and rehearsed new numbers with the A Cappella Choir. We have discovered the satisfaction that comes in doing our best, in cooperating with others to achieve a goal. Through A our organizations we have endeavoured to "Magnify the Master." ZZ Z ,M 'W' ,J wffxf, 44 Organi ations ' 1 President Babe Chambers and Vice-President Sarah Cleckner check over the files. Secretary Ronnie Mickel and Treasurer Clyde Haas served the student body this year. ll0 STUDE T The Student Council this year has lived up to its responsibilities as the representative and governing agency of the student body of E. N. C. Under the direction of Howard Chambers, the Council has 5 been active all year. I Early in the year the Council sponsored the organization of a Dem E. N. Cfs girls worked for days concocting original hats for their dates to the Mad Hatter Halloween party. Scary spooks and weird witches added atmosphere to the eerie ghost walk, a feature of the party. A new system of closing hours which emphasized the week nights as times for study and gave more time for recreation and social life on The Council proposed a plan to suspend classes the Friday after Thanksgiving Day, giving the students a long weekend vacation. The also suggested changing the dates of the Christmas vacation in orde to provide more time for pre-holiday work. Both of these plans wer approved and adopted by the Administration. Silver bells tinkled gaily as students and faculty members enjoy the informal Christmas party. A Valentine formal gavethe girls chance to dress up in their daintiest gowns for dinner and a progra at the American Legion Hall in Wollaston. Other projects of the Council have been the formulation of a co of library ethics, the adoption of compulsory class dues and the r vision of the constitution. . J ' '1 Q I HI' IL i Q ng -1 . I. 7 .i i , 1 4 f I .K 1 1 i . 1 . , 4 L i I ,i Q , i O I. 'ff ,ii SQA p At Student Council Chapel in September the student body oiiicers for the new year were introduced. l.-AL ocratic and a Republican party on campus. . the weekends went into effect, sponsored by the Student Council. 3 CQUNCIL 1, sf :N . it 1 , , S Irv Seared: Wes Chambers, Ronald Mickel, Howard Chambers, Sarah Cleckncr, Clyde Haus. SmmImg.' Elwood Speakman, Fred Boden, Richard Schubert, Jim Sheets, Professor Naylor, Adri.wr,' Dorothic Crispcll, Charles Galley. Absent: Dorothy Mathos, Harley Bye. lll if 'C api' A1 .. ...--,., l' 3 ..fA,f"" Charles Galley, Etlimr-in-Cliicjf, writes a letter to the publisher. THE STAEE Editor-in-Chief CHARLES GAILEY Business Manager RICHARD LEHTO Associate Editor DORIS BIGGS Literary Editor BARBARA HEMMINGS Advisor DR. ALVIN H. KAUFFMAN Sporty Bill Webb Editor, Fred Boden, Connie Skillings. Staff' Writers: Elaine Mellinger, Janice Pratt, Nancy Vecchione, Ruth Hersh, Mary Jane Dunsworth, Rich- ard Schubert, Dorothie Crispell. Layout Assistants: Bonnie Thompson, Jim Swartz. 7ilP1'SIS.' Sylvia Way- man Editor, LoRae Reed, Marian Grant, Nancy Has- lett, Priscilla Whitehead, Ruth Andrews, Janet Sipes. P1'0Qf'Rc'ac1'e1'.s'.' Joan Stetson, JoAnn Deem. Photog- rapl1w'.s'.' Charles Novy, Charles Baldeck. Adm1'n1'sIra- live' .4s.s'i.s'ruizr.s'.' Virginia Burgess, Eleanore Gery, Car- olyn Burgess, Betty Bedell, Gladys Ziegler. BllSl.ll6'.S'S Manager .4.s'si.s'Iar1Is.- Merritt Mann, Bill Whitehead, Jack Driefort, Don Smith, Ken Alcorn, Branson Rob- la ,. " . THE In spending four years at E. N. C., students cannot help but acquire many memories that they will cherish after graduation. The l57 Nautilus staff has dedicated its' talents to capturing the best moments of this year at E. N. C., and now presents you with a tangible record of them. It is our hope that this book will serve as a stimulus to help you recall your life at E. N. C. in years to come. After the basic plan for this book was determined early last fall, the staff went to work-and there fol- Crts. Dick Lehto. Bu.vim'.v.v Manager, mails out letters to prospective Doris Biggs, .4twt-init' Eflimr, answers the telephone. T advertisers. Photographer C. Novy shows a photo to Business Assistants M. Mann and W. Whitehead. eared: E. Mellinger. Standing: l xpes, S. Cleckner, N. Haslett F Crispell, M. Grant, N. Vec- tnone. AUTILUS lowed long hours of planning, writing, picture trim- ming, measuring and drawing, days when it seemed as if nothing could emerge from this maze of layout paper, dummy sheets, razor blades, reduction charts, and ad- vertising forms. But always uppermost in the minds of the staff, even above the pressure of approaching deadlines, was the goal of creating a good yearbook. We have tried to produce an interesting, informative yearbook of high standard. We hope you enjoy it. I Stetson and J. Deem, proof- eaders, look over copy. N -v ti l j. f' . 0 S.. - ,. vnu Dr. Alvin H. Kauffman, Advisor. 5..i'-'A' fx. -ees-P' The sports staiT, F. Boden, C. Skillings. B. Webb, plan new layouts L. Reed answers telephone while P. Whitehead, E. Ciery and B. Bedell go through the morning mail. S. Wayman and R. Andrews discuss new yearbook ideas with M. J. Dunsworth. 4ei'e"'e :A CAM US Seated J Strang. Standing: M. Mann, S. Cleckner, R. Schubert, L. Starnes B THE STAFF Editor-in-Chief DOROTHIE CRISPELL Business Manager RONALD MICKEL Advisor PROF. ALICE SPANGENBERG Layout Editor RICHARD LAMBERT Columnists RICHARD SCHUBERT. LUTHER STARNES Heatlline Editors: Joyce Strang, Luther Starnes. Copy Editor: Mary Fluharty. Sports Editor: Merritt Mann. Circulation Manager: Donald Hammer. Advertising Manager: Dave Poole. Photographer: Chuck Novy. Reporters: Sarah Cleckner, Barbara Ellwood, Charles Gailey, Lowell Hall, Nancy Haslett, Elaine Mellinger, Lowell Patterson, Calvin Poole, John Weslow, Nancy Vecchione. Eipists: Lorraine Shoemaker, Janice Byers, Arlene Gray, Marie St. Clair, June Smith, Norma Richmond. ll4 C- J. Bradley, J. Smith, F. Heber, A. Gray, C. Krutenat. "To serve the present age . . . my callingwathe motto ofthe Campus Camera sets the standard of service for all those this student newspaper represents. The Campus Camera seeks to stimulate interest in campus activities, rellect student opinion in keeping with its editorial policy, and provide information about interesting and unusual people and events. Reporting, editing, typing, planning layout, writing headlines, and pasting up the dummy are responsibil- ities which keep an enthusiastic staff creatively occu- pied. Soliciting support of advertisers, promoting cir- culation, and balancing the budget give the business staff practical experience. ' 1 5 w 'X 1 sl Run I LLC. l'oulc,fi.Ciailcy, I . llalI.Si'tm1.1'Rims N. lflaslctt, Nl. l DEBATE Dr. Charles Akers Direclor ofDebaIe Prof. Louise Dygoski GREE BOOK Freshman are given opportunity to dis- play their literary talents in the prepara- tion of their annual publication, The Greenbook. The best themes written for the English composition classes are selected for pub- lication. The Greenbook also includes a popularity poll, news of freshman sports, humor, and other features. This year the theme for the Greenhoolc was "Footsteps" Footsteps to the church, the Ad Building, and the Dugout intro- duced sections of themes dealing with spiritual, scholastic and social aspects of student life. :' f, Air?- - me -r A . fs 'M-,f .A J ff' X Assistant Director of Debate n 1 L. Hall, R. Garland, C. Gailey, M. J. Dunsworth, D. Crispell. J. Milstead, E. Dodge, L. Starnes, L. Hybertson. The debate program at E. N. C. is de- signed to stimulate intellectual activity arising from persuasiveness, use of logic, and adaptation, as well as learning about a topic of current significance such as this year's question dealing with foreign economic aid. All over the eastern seaboard debaters attend tournaments which afford op- portunities to match wits with the finest teams in the country. This year emphasis has been placed on an expanded novice program for begin- ning debaters, as well as on varsity de- bating, which has earned for E. N. C. recognition among the largest schools in New England. u' , " ' ' F v r I I , 1 a , I . 2 , . 1 Richard Schubert and Sarah Cleckner. Q x .4 Y . --' 4 s , I i 'Na+ 4.0 4- ,f 4 4' , . r ' . ' ,I 1 .t ft lviiph ft v. ff v. 'X Y Kneeling: E. Dodge, R. Mann, C. Baldeck, H. Keeler. Firsr Row: J. Shankel. N. Richmond, L Hybertson, C. Mathos. Second Row: M. St. Clair, M. Devine, J. Keeler, C. Krutenat, M. Flu harty, M. J. Dunsworth, J. Byers, E. Tollivoro, A. Shannon, J. Milstead. Third Row: A. Swain, R North, D. Lambert, J. Lunden. ll6 4 l i I l abs ' ' f 5 l iiiag if First Row: N. Borden, E. Tollivoro, R. Mann, D. Wayman, R. Sharpes, R. Lehto, S. Erbe, G. lnsco, L. Shoemaker. Second Row: A. Shannon, R. Schwanke, L. Burns, D. Wanner, F. Stiles. G. Myatt, A. Snyder, R. Andrews. Third Row: B. Keller, S. Wayman, J. Anderson, K. Alcorn, J. Jones, D. Peoples, M. Moore, J. MacKay. Fuiirrlz Row: J. Zurcher, J. Emerson, D. Lewis, J. Bradley, K. Shene, M. J. Dunsworth, J. Roberts, S. White. J. DeLong. A CAPPELLA Thirty-six voices under the direction of Professor Greg Larkin make up E. N. Cfs A Cappella Choir. i This year the schedule of the choir included concerts in various churches and schools of Massa- D chusetts. The proceeds from these appearances helped to pay for the new red and gray choir robes 3 with reversible collars. ll For A Cappella members the high point of the year was their tour during Spring Vacation. For thirteen days the choir gave concerts in churches throughout Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York. i Maryland, and Connecticut. 'Q N4giun 'lg l i , YI fl J J 'J J W C l FF C l l B - 8' 4"'. L Q' P Q F A 5 "5 ' ' 1 ' if 1 .af ,Q "' Newly organized this year, the Men's ng 1 ' ' . ' , Y. , . 1- fq-, Glee Club provided color as vt ell as music .l. -6 . Q 'i ' Q - 1 whenever they made their appearances. , " -- Dressed in white tuxes with plaid acces- f , f sories this versatile group sang at both Church in Boston and at various Na ' First Row: D. MeGrcw, D. Lehto, V. Worden. K. Alcorn, W. Stanford. .l. Drei- l fort. Sammi Row: B. Roberts, .l. Chavier, W. llazelton, R. German, R. Parry, R. Mann. Third Row: C. Caldwell, L. Starnes, R. Calhoun. .l. Bricker, D. Peoples, M. Mann, D. Hutchinson. G. Larkin conducting. l I7 campus political rallies and the Christmas Chapel program. Under the direction of Professor Greg Larkin the Glee Club rep- resented E. N. C. at a city vvide revival in Providence, Rhode Island, Park Street zarene churches in the New England area. ,.,,,,1 l , 1. 3? E ,. l l l L l f l l i 5 09. Q' 'Ni ......-nanny. Kneeling: W. Mullen, L. Hall, R. Mickel, T. Esselstyn. Sflllldllllgf F. Wenger, D. Biggs, Dr. Kauffman, M. Grant, R. Bigelow, H. Mickel. A Welcome Back party in January for Mrs. William- son was the special project of the House Council this year. To maintain discipline and order in the girl's dormito- ries is the main function of the Council. Any complaints or suggestions are brought before the Council. The Open House program was planned by the Council and prizes were awarded for the most orderly and colle- giate rooms. The parlor was made cheery at Christmas with the paintings on the windows. Probably the most impor- tant duty of the council is taking charge of the Sunday After-Dinner Prayer Meet- ings. Singing, testimonies and prayers make these times a highlight in the Sun- day's activities. 'fx I .J r,' fat 1.1, In f Members of the Honor So- ciety are elected in June. Any students who were full mem- bers in previous years are made associate members. The purpose of the Honor Society is to encourage stu- dents to give the best of their time and effort to stud- ies and to maintaining a high scholastic standing. Students eligible for mem- bership must carry no fewer than 12 hours each semester. No grade below B- can be earned. An average of at least 2.3 quality points for each hour of major work is required before a student can become a member. HQUSF COUNCIL l I i . Q' Qui L- Seated: E. Woods, D. Swartz, R. Ricketts, C. Skillings, M. Manchester. Standing: L. Gander, P. North, R. Andrews, R. Schwanke, D. McPherson, E. Gery. Qui Tomorrow's doctors and nurses have founded their own association at E. N. C. this year. The Pre-Medical Association includes all stu- dents who are seriously con- sidering medicine and its re- lated fields as a career pos- sibility. This past year the group viewed films and lis- tened to interns and spe- cialists relate their experi- ences in medicine. They also toured nearby medical in- stitutions. Under the leader- ship of Dr. Calvin Maybury, faculty advisor, and David Blachly, president, the asso- ciation started as a project the assembling of informa- tion on the various medical schools in the country for the use of all students who take pre-medical studies at E. N. C. Kneeling: O. Mason, J. Klumas, W. Gorman, W. Mcrki, G. Kottis, S. Bowman. Smmlirirf: F. Sims, lf. lliitlcr, C. Farrell, R. Phillips, D. Blazon, A. Pancarik, D. Clifton. Seated: W. Stanford, D. Blachly, H. Mickel. Standing: J. Bender, D. Poole, L. Gehman, V. Schlough, J. Delong, PRE-MEDICAL ASSOCIATIG PHYSICAL Cl, LTL RF During the past year the walls of the back room of the Mansion have echoed with the sounds of E. N. C. men straining their muscles to lift pairs of barbells from one place to another. The newly founded organization, the Physical Culture Club, is equipped with basic weight- lifting equipment and plans to purchase more each year. Several inter-school weight- lifting meets were high points in the club's activities. This group helps keep E. N. C. men in top physical condi- tion and relieves thc tensions of a crowded scholastic life. E. N. C.'s literature and speech enthusiasts combined their talents to plan a year of varied activities. Under the guidance of Dean Bertha Munro and Prof. Louise Dy- goski the club council cen- tered their monthly meetings around the interpretation and enjoyment of good liter- ature. Early in the fall the club toured the North Shore in- cluding Hawthorne's House of Seven Gables. Members compared their versions of short story endings with those of various authors at one meeting. Featured this year were the oral interpre- tation of a modern play and trips to Harvard and Boston University to attend literary programs and lectures. A Christmas party with a liter- ary flavor was one of the highlights of the holidays. Seated: D. Laurie, K. Butts, B. Hemmings, J. Pratt, H. Cogswell. Second Raw: M. Hunter, l. Stanford, B. Yager C. Burgess, J. Strang, S. Cleckner, M. Fluharty. J. Sipes, V. Hinson. Third Row: S. Wayman, J. Bradley, D. Biggs, E. Wilson, M. Hatcher, N. Sutton, J. Stetson, N. Wilson. Fourth Row: D. Brumagin, F. Boden, B. Newby, R. Schuster W. Whitehead, L. Hall, W. Stanford. ' LITERATURE A D PEECH CLUB PSYCHDLOGY CLUB A field trip to the Danvers State Hospital highlighted the activities of the Psychol- ogy Club this year. Making these trips were those major- ing in psychology and others who are especially interested in this field. Other activities during the year were interesting films and lectures dealing with the psychological problems of marriage and childhood. At club meetings members also discussed the problems and cases they discovered during their visits to the mental hospitals and clinics. The main objective of the Psychology Club is to stimu- late a live interest in psychol- ogy within the student body at the practical level. Searctl: D. Glanzel, S. White, Prof. Knowles, J. Sheets, D. Swartz, R. Ricketts, C. Krutenat. Second Row: N. Wilson, P. North, J. Cheney, J. Sipes, C. Burgess, R. Jarvis, D. Peterson, D. Slaughenhaupt, S. Cleekner, D. McPherson, M. Rabideau. Third Row: M. Moore, R. Biggs, J. Bradley, D. Biggs, B. Fountain, D. Johnson, M. Grant, J. Sanford, L. Jones, B. Kunkel, M. Corrie. Hfurzli Row: E. Richardson, E. Speakman, F. Boden, K. Alcorn, K. Hardy, G. Hilyard, L. Burns, J. Latford. First Row: J. Brown, G. Savage, M. Corrie, R. Biggs, E. Hunter, D. Slaughenhaupt, D. Peterson, J. Sheer. Second Row: L. Burns, S. Fuller, K. Hardy, K. Alcorn, D. Lupton, W. Merki. BIOLGCTY ASSGCIATIG The Chemistry Association is organized to stimulate in- terest in the broadening hori- zons of Chemistry and tech- nology. Students considering careers in chemistry learned more about the opportunities and developments in all branches of the field at the bi-monthly meetings. Each meeting featured a special speaker or film. Guest lecturers from M. I. T., Boston University, and Tufts presented informative lec- tures at club meetings. Sev- eral interesting films relating to the field of chemistry were shown during the year. Club officers planned visits to the chemical plants and labora- tories ofthe Eastern Gas and Fuel Association, Monsanto Chemical Company, and the Esso Refinery. Members also enjoyed a Christmas party held during the holidays. lfz- .. J The E. N. C. greenhouse was the focal point for the activ- ities ofthe Biology Associa- tion. Under the direction of their advisor Prof. Verner Babcock, this club assumed the responsibility for the care of the campus grounds including all fioral displays. This practical experience complemented the facts and theories learned in the class- room and laboratory. Special project for this year was the planting of a garden containing every plant species adaptable to the soil in this locality. The club program featured fish- ing and camping trips. out- side speakers, and field trips to Boston museums. Stu- dents also worked on their projects for biology classes in conjunction with club ac- tivities. CHEMISTRY ASSGCIATIO lb' x-f- 'li Scalc'zl.' C. Poole, W. Stanford, H. Mickcl, ll. Dodge, R. Mann..S'ut'n11ilRmi'.' l.. Hall, D. Hammer. CI Daniels. lx, -XI- corn, D. Poole, S. Erbc. Tl1irilRnw.- C. Noxy. W. Whitehead, J. LLlll.0I'd, R. Lamlcrs. D. lilaclily. l2l -gf!-Q From all parts of the globe come many students to East- ern Nazarene. Whether they come from homesjust across the border in Canada or half- way around the world in Africa, each student contrib- utes an essential part to the culture at E. N. C. Twenty-eight Canadians are enrolled in courses at the college. Ireland has sent three students to our campus. Other countries represented are: Formosa, Lebanon, Ber- muda, Egypt, Puerto Rico, .. and Africa. These young people who have come from beyond our shores are wel- comed to E. N. C. and en- couraged to participate with us in all our activities. The college's influence extends to many areas of the globe as these students return to places of service. Seated: G. Gantert, D. Cowherd, I. Stanford, J. Enman, C. Burgess. Second Row: N. Wilson, A. Anthony, M. Binette, M. Grant, D. MacNevin, C. Adams, M. Moore, G. Grant, V. Hinson. Third Row: R. Landers, W. West, W. Stanford, W. Mullen, K. Alcorn, K. Hardy, C. Owens, B. Newby, J. Latford, V. Warden, D. Bocanegra, S. Erbe. FOREIGN STUDE T FUTURE TEACHERS Firrr Row: N. Borden, E. Rowe, I. Stanford, J. Sheets, M. Burley, J. Shinault, Prof. Parsons, G. Kottis, V. Mastro- buono, F. Pratt, E. Bass. Second Row: R. Edwards, B. Ziegler, F. Heber, J. Deem, D. McPherson, B. Hemmings, H. St. Clair, P. Whitehead, M. Corrie, R. Coons, S. Hammer, N. Wilson, B. Wycoff, G. Lantz, P. North, A. Brown, S. Rozema, L. Rogers, H. Keeler. Third Row: A. Hagerup, C. Burgess, V. Burgess, J. Roberts, D. Blackwell, N. Mucci, J. Strang, B. Bedell, H. Steele, J. Sheer, M. Collins, N. Vecchione, J. Zurcher, J. Sanford. Fourth Row: J. Fischman, N. Cole, C. Gilchrist, C. Ead, G. Insco, G. Ziegler, L. Reed, B. Fountain, M. Grant, E. Wilson, N. Sutton, L. Jones, N. Wilson. Fiflh Row: L. Burns, R. Speakman, R. Whittenberger, P. German, L. Starnes, L. Hybertson, C. Caldwell, W. Whitehead, L. Patterson, J. Holcomb, E. Simms, T. Christensen, C. Rogers. 122 The purpose of the Future Teachers Association, under the direction of Prof. Rolland Parsons, advisor, is to keep its members informed as to up-to-the-minute methods of and aids to teaching. During the year the club had several outside speakers including Doctor Paul Cul- bertson, psychologist from Olivet Nazarene College and William Heiseer from the Perkins Institute for the Blind. Each year the associ- ation has one special project. This year the project was the presenting of a Friday eve- ning program for the entire school. Besides their other activities, the association members visited several points of historical interest. Seated: S. Cleckner, J. Sipes, B. Kunkel, K. Keim, Dr. Mullen, S. Fretz, J. Cheney, C. Burgess. Second Row: Dr. Roth- well, W. Merki, R. Calhoun, R. Myatt, K. Alcorn, W. West, C. Baldeck, J. Jackson. Third Row: Dr. Kauffman, C. Daniels, D. Welch, R. Mickel, A. Swain, W. Irons, W. Chambers, H. Chambers, R. Seyfried, F. Wenger. Philosophy is an attempt to understand our total experi- ence by means of rigorous. consistent, and coherent thinking. What could be more exciting and practical? Philosophy is an adventure over wide and rough seas, but it makes many new dis- coveries and helps to dissi- pate the fears of the un- known. The purpose ofthe Bowne Philosophical Club is to promote interest in the phil- osophical quest. ln the ful- fillment of this purpose the society used talented speak- ers from our own campus and brought distinguished speakers from Boston Uni- versity and Harvard. An informal evening at the home of their faculty ad- visor, Prof. Wilbur Mullen, proved that fun, philosophy and fellowship are not incom- patible. BOW E PHILCDSOPHIC L From greeting one another with "Buenos Dias" rather than "good morningn to learning how much fun a pinata may make a party, "Las Estrellas" reveal their distinct character. Singing carols "In Es- panol," enjoying Mexican cocoa Ccinnamon spicedj, and conversing in the lan- guage ofthe majority of the southern neighbors of the U. S. are featured activities of Spanish Club enthusiasts. Club members are reminded of the academic value of study. of modern languages in discussions such as one on teaching oflanguages in high school. Seeing films and travelogues broaden their horizons to include knowl- edge of customs and geog- raphy as well as language. LAS ESTRELLAS -Vt. if Smfgllg B, Yagcr' B, Bedellv M, Mann, S, Cleckncr, R. Spcakmzin, B. Wycoll. .l. Chaxicr. S. Joincs, Hodgklns. Second Row: D. Jardine, B. Clingerman, P. Brooks, M. J. Dunsvxorth, C Gilchrist. l . Woodbridge. M. llills'l1CV- D- Biggs, R. Biggs, P. Newlen, J. Deem, S. Ford. E. Murphy, E. Spcakman. Thiril linux' D. l..upton. 17. l30C-llW!'1l- -l- Dreifort, C. Haas, H. Babcock, W. Chambers, R. Phillips, W. Wliitclicatl. R. lclno, W. Kclxmgion, l.. l'.iiicrson. l . Starnes, D. Wanncr. l23 -1:1 First Row: J. Sanford, G. Savage, L. Hawes, D. MacDonnell, J. Rines, C. Ead. B. Thompson, J. Keeler, L. Woodbridge, V. Hinson, B. Dixon, L. Jones, J. MacKay. Scr'mufR1m'.' E. Bass, A. Brown, D. Peterson, D. Slaughenhaupt, E. Murphy, J. Byers, W. Hersman, J. Scheer, V. Ma- strobuono, R. Ricketts, J. Shinault, M. Fluharty, R. Mingin. Third SIGMA DELTA DELTA theme. Deborah MacDonnell and "Delta Dan" get snapped" by Jack Holcomb. Raw: L. Hall, K. Alcorn, D. Bernecker. R. Lehto, J. Lunden, R. Novak K. Hardy. D. Herron, J. Holcomb, D. Wiley, D. Smith, P. Patch, D Clifton, C. Owens. Ffmrrlr Row: J. Bricker, G. Kottis, R. Myatt, D Lupton, R. Landers, C, Poole, L. Singell, W. Webb, M. Laurie, T Esselstyn. S. Erbe, D. Littlefield, G. Porter, V. Worden, E. Simms. s 'T COUNCIL: Bill Webb, Prv.siclw1l,' Cal Poole, TI'Cl1.Ylll'?I',' Fred Boden, Sf. lfvprmwzrarive: Janet Shinault, V. Prv.ria'w1r,' Ruby Ricketts, Sf't'I't'Il1I"l',' Duane Herron, Chaplain. The Sigma Delta Delta Society gained thirty-one new members on Rush Day, using "The Fun House" as a An outstanding event ofthe year was the society out- Prexy Bill Webb ing, featuring a chicken barbecue in the picturesque setting of Eliades farm. The crisp, cold night was high- : lighted by an unusual display of the Northern lights "Preparing for the Harvest" was the theme of N.Y.P.S. program presented by the Deltas. Based on Matthew 6:53, it proved to be of great inspiration. I2 attracted twenty-six freshmen. Flu.. COUNCIL, Kneeling: Nancy Vecchione, V. Presidentg Joyce Strang, Secretary. Standing: Jim Sheets, S.C. Represeizraliveg Larry Hybertson, Chaplaing Bill Whitehead, Treasnrerq Professor Parsons, Advisory Dick Shubert, President. The theme of this year's Kappa Rush Day displ ty was 'ssmooth sailing on the Kappa Mayflower The ship PJ, lws Traditional Kappa-Sigma Rivalry took 1 biek seat to joint entertainment and participation one night at the Whittinsville Y.M.C.A. A spaghetti dinner and a brief vitalized program made the evening a success. The Kappa N.Y.P.S. program centered around the theme of 'fChrist and the Masterpieces." The spirit and loyalty of the society in all activities seemed to bear out the fact that "Once a Kappa, always a Kappa." 1, , 3 7 sl in :- fri 3 I . if . I uf 1 -SQ Q 4 ' V L 7 4 F1rstRon J Strang M Collins, E. Soya, P. Whitehead, M. Moore, Gery, J. Stetson, C. M inchtstti C Skillings N lt t intl t I3 lm. M L Wheeler Scmncl Row: B. Hemmings, R. Gray, L. Shoemaker, D. VanSkiver, D. Cowheid B R imstc ld I Sipts l 1 t t S ozema R Schwanke N. Vecchione, L. Gander, N. Borden, l. Stanford, D. Crispcll, l., Rc l lin JR it Nl N11 tlitstti I N1 XII t ambert R Normin J. Sheets, W. Whitehead, L. Hybcrtson, G. Miller, C1 lfarrcll, CI Th itthti VN li i l url: R o mi in chly C Pillsbury W West, J. Fischman, G. Myatt, R. Stark, R. Bigelow, W. Mullen. D B t nttii I ffl R in l L Schubert E Richardson J. Weslow, A. Everton, D. Gluskcr, P. Swartz, R. German, R. ll J T ll IZ5 51. o 1 -4 'Law' .fi -th ff? il 4 if: SIGMA DELTA SIGMA I , Q . swf- I COUNCIL, Kneeling: Doris Biggs, Girl's Coordinarorp Virginia Burgess, Vice Pre.s'ia'ent,' Doris Brown, Secretary. Sranding: Bill Couchenour, Boy's Coordinator, Wes Chambers, S.C. Repre- senrariveg Bill Williams, Advisory Clyde Haas, President, Howard Chambers, Chaplaing Paul Garron, Treasurer. 5 l'lll I lgllli I I 4' I. i First Row: D. Blackwell, D. Drumm, P. Newland, D. MacPherson, S Hatcher, R. Coons, M. Urner, D. Biggs, M. Grant, B. Fountain, M Hatcher, J. Emerson, D. Johnson, M. Divine, W. Hersman, D. Mac- Nevin, J. Bachman, M. Burley, P. Dancy, A. Shannon, C. Burgess. Second Row: D. Poole, D. McGrew, J. Ziegler, D. Brown, V. Burgess P. North, R. Andrews, A. Snyder, A. Anthony, B. Wycotf, B. J. Phillips B. Kunkel, G. Grant, J. Smith, R. Biggs, C. Adams, F. Heber, J. Brad ley, A. Gray, C. Krutenat, D. Swartz, K. Shene, A. Johnson, J. Jackson P. Koury. Third Row: R. Irving, W. Couchenour, R. Calhoun, D l The prize winning Sigma Rush Day display. On Rush Day 57 enthusiastic freshmenjoined the Sigma Society with the promise of "Showers of fun with Sigmasf, "Faculty Fables" was presented in October to honor professors and administrative officials who have con- tributed years of service to E. N. C. The Fall outing consisted of a spaghetti dinner fol- lowed by swimming and other sports. A devotional em- phasis rounded out a fine evening of fellowship. Glanzel, E. Woods, J. Enman, J. DeLong, J. Partridge, H. Steele, L. Hines, S. Cleckner, E. Bown, S. Joines, I. Powell, P. Nyce, M. Hinkle, N. Cole, L. Rogers, D. Jardin, M. J. Dunsworth, M. St. Clair, N. Rich- mond, A. Woods, D. Mathos, R. Welch, E. Dodge, R. North. Fourth Row: J. Swartz, J. Musser, D. Bocanegra, D. Clingerman, D. Erbe, R. Allen, R. Mann, J. Smith, G. Gressett, L. Starnes, R. Sharpes, P. Gar- ron, R. Whiting, C. Galley, G. Caswell, L. Patterson, H. Chambers, W. Chambers, C. Haas, S. Ross, R. Scheidly, E. Parks, T. Weaver, M. Mann, R. Stahl. Prexy Clyde Haas l Prexy Bill Kelvington. A? -ly First Row: R. Everhart, S. Hodgkins, S. Hammer, S. Ford, E. Sommers B. Fink, T. Bergdoll, J. Scheer, N. Sutton, C. Gilchrist, G. Ziegler, E M. Wilson, S. Fuller, D. Lewis, J. Kehm, E. Soulia, D. Lesser, P Brooks, L. Gehman, M. Whipple, B. Keller, J. Milstead, R. Seavey, A Banco, O. Mason. Second Row: D. Green, N. Wilson, K. Butts, E Tollivoro, V. Schlough, A. Hagerup, B. Yager, J. Brown, J. Cheney, J Hunter, S. White, J. Deem, M Roberts, R. Hersh, E. Stauffer, M. Rabideau, L. Shepherd, D. Ford, S. Ashline, S. Wayman, B. Elwood B. Harris, J. Frederick, B. Bedell, G. Brown, G. Gantert, R. Jarvis, B Chen, E. Rowe, M. Corrie, W. Gorman, F. Thomas. Third Row: D. ll 'fl I 'er-J.: 1 Y 4 4 ..... . .,....,. f,,,,,,,Y f , .'.'::..4.i..:"rn'-'- - i .f:'i:T:..i..L'rf::gr'H, 'Q H 'Q . V . 1 . . ...t g, J 5-it . Q' n- t .I . " ff ' ee "bl vw s"K"l'P' " V Hammer, H. Cogswell, D. Wayman, P. Andree, D. Horn, D. Jarvis, D. Ames, W. Stanford, M. Milbury, P. Bryner, R. Soulia, R. Schuster, A. Pancarik, R. Phillips, S. Merriam, T. Young, T. Jones, D. Blazon, R. Hover, C. Novy, J. Driefort, J. Chavier, S. Fuller, G. Hilyard, G. Aubrey, H. Mickel, C. Daniels, I.. Klumas. Fourth Row: J. Shankel, S. Fretz, R. Newby, R. Garland, T. Fowler, A. Torsey, D. Long, R. Poole, E. Patmore, R. Helfreich, L. Casler, C. Rogers, M. Fetter, R. Mickel, T. Rawlings, R. Mauritsen, C. Baldeck, A. Matthews, P. Murphy, A. Swain, L. Yager, H. Keeler. SIGMA DELT ZET I Y WY z, A Lug- J th l -4 P. COUNCIL: Professor Gery, Advi.vor,' Gladys Zeigler, Vice Pres- idenrp Betty Harris, Serrvraryp Kenneth Keim, Cliaplaing Ronald Mickel, S.C'. Represeriraliixh' Hubert Mickel. Treasurc'r,' Bill Kel- vington, Prr'sirlt:nt. "Jonah and the Whale" set the theme for this year's Zeta Rush Day display, which attracted forty-live new members. The Socicty's activities this year were highlighted by Rush Day displayed a "whale" ofa chance with Zeta. I2 semester outings. Barbecued chicken. straw. and guitar music made Stoneham memorable. Participation in Society prayer meetings and pres- entation of "His Name Shall Be Called" were special spiritual experiences for the green and gold. ODAGCDIFHIUG the CTDASCECR In the Fall we ran, passed, and blocked in the clear, cool air. In the winter we raced down the court to sink a lay- up shot or played a tight zone defense that kept our oppo- nents from scoring. We play- ed hard trying our best to win. But, we played fair and clean and worked together as a team, because, on the court or on the field, we were al- ways striving to "Magnify the Master." L ,.......... C .-41.16 ,--uv Y. w r Sports 1 .J ' ff-Sui ' 1 X t -QN X., 'K I -...I X H,- -,. , i . :nl ,ii al' tri? il i l I X i l i lt if fi !. 'i l .! tl f , I fr f. . if Y ft gf 'ff :- ' ' 'l P1 , . . 'f if K ' Fw fu fi, Q , ni 'J . ' C l I Ji. 1 'J Meg Q ' I ' W Wi i t 1 4 vi I 's '. ' is ,'q', -" ' , " -l 'Z' ,- amid' ' - ' ' ' gif' lf' Q , -. T ' I' f ' I I 7 - , V ll ri "'. f i ii ' I " ,. -1. .fi V " 54-is V T" i N11 1? , vi , Q :Ki is gg. 1. I E Q 3 1, S G: . U - ' ' 4- ' J" ' v- . 4 I ' It ff-ii 1 i 1 v at . 1, I 7 .f I ' 'sf' ' 4E"E'- 1 4. r . 517 f gl 5, X . 1 ur Firsr Row: W. Chambers, H. Chambers, Treasurer: C. Haas, Vice-presidentg J. Sheets, Presidentg D. Biggs, Secre- p tary: M. Mann. Second Row: Prof. Naylor, Advisor, W. Webb, J. Smith, E. Gery, G. Ziegler, M. Corrie, B. Foun- tain, J. Stetson, C. Skillings, J. Chavier, C. Caldwell. 'NM CL UB "NH Club membership is based upon character, schol- arship. leadership, and athletic ability. Students are eligible who have attended E. N. C. for at least three semesters and have excelled in the major society sports: football, volleyball, basketball, and softball. The "NU Club sponsored projects that benefitted the whole school and improved the athletic program. The members had all of the trophies properly engraved and bought a new wall clock for the gymnasium. The duty of the "N" Club is to sell tickets to all so- ciety and college basketball games. The money re- ceived from the ticket sales this year was especially used to help finance the new sweat uniforms of the E. N. C. "Crusaders.', The new members this year were chosen by the pre- vious members of the "N" Club and were announced at a special chapel service. Tickets were sold by the "N" Club at all games. Crusaders' Captain Gerald LHSNCY leads the team out as they display new uniforms that the '30 "N" Club helped purchase. OOTBALL ALL-STARJ The 1956 version ofthe All Star Team is one which packs plenty of speed, power, and skill. This year's team is made up of three Sigmzts, two Deltas, and one Kappa. The All Stars are chosen by the four society coordinators with the aid of Dean Bradley. , W rv , a, I Y A f .. ' -x ...F . I 1' K- .1 lv.. Fred Boden, Quarterback The Delras' hard riumer and sure passer . ! I Wes Chambers, Halfback Versatile Sigma sparkplng QL Bill Couchcnour Hilfback 77'iCky .scat-back of the Sigmas 1, 0, -. - ' U , J' '1- 4 A 5 Babe Chambers, End Bob Jclirics, Center DMC lltil lun t it lnl Gl110fir1,r,'w'0zl Sigma end lfll lift' wrrlwr of flu' llulmt HW- "'l"l'ff "' 7 'I A f 1 First Row: W. Couchenour, E. Speakman, J. Jones, R. Mann, D. Poole, R. North. Second Row: H. Chambers, R. Sharpes, M. Mann, W. Chambers. 51 GMA SIGMA DELTA KAPPA ZETA I OOT1 1 . 1 5 . With Fall comes football season, and the accompanying cheers, and yells penetrating .5 the crisp, frosty air. This season was one of V surprises from the very start. In the first ii game the Sigmas, who were the favored i team, tied with the Kappas 6-6. As the 1 football season progressed, the Sigmas F were at the top and the Deltas, Kappas, 1 and Zetas followed in that order. fi The Sigmas proved their superiority by F winning over the Deltas 20-6 in the rain and the mud. After the Deltas had beaten 1 the Kappas 28-7 the final game between! the Sigmas and the Deltas loomed as thei "big game." L 1 KAPPA SIGMA .6-20 21-34 6- 6 18-26 0-51 0-20 DELTA 20- 6 34-21 7-28 14- 6 8-18 6-20 Y First Row: R. German, J. Weslow, R. Norman, L. Hybertson, J. Sheets, D. Hutchinson, P. German. Second Raw: R. Cubie, D. Schubert, T. Vena, B. Roberts, Prof. Parsons. KAPPA ZETA 6- 6 51- 0 26-18 20- 0 28- 7 18- 8 6-14 20- 6 0- 7 37-14 7- 0 14-37 Y. Kappa German prepares for the tag as Jones and Chambers move - BALL But, to the dismay ofthe Deltas, the Kap- pas were still of some authority and they showed it as they displayed terrific light and spirit by whipping the Deltas 14-6. Thus the Deltas were eliminated and the Sigmas became champions for the second straight year. After the regular season play, something new was added. The Sigmas accepted the challenge of a tri-society All Star Team. The game was tight as the lead changed hands several times, but the Sigma team- work paid off and the Sigmas walked off the field with a 27-24 victory. First Row: J. Lunden, D. Wiley, D. Smith, D. Clifton, K. Alcorn, E. Sims, F. Boden. Second Row B. Webb, B. Briggs, B. Jeffery, J. Holcomb, D. Bernecker, J. Bricker. First Row: S. Merriam, C. Caldwell, J. Lashley, R. Mauritsen, T. Young, P. Bryner. Second Row: D Horn, L. Klumas, F. Thomas, J. Chavier. mtv' 59-Wu Team SIGMA DELTA KAPPA ZETA DEL TA TIE l O I 0 Deltas Wiley, Bricker, and Bernecker come up fast as Zeta Caldwell stretches for a pass. M y K 4, X wx Q FV! 4 , 5 5 px, .1 ' L. be ly ' ' ' I .V -N' A 1 l. " 1 N fi J' O 4' ,S Lx 'A 3 'lv nv-,QW is 1 lg , m 'f' 1:5515 XENA T132 X 3 3V'5fYv"?? K A 0, A 1 Q I .m 'YN xx 1. N X ' " ,.' s. ff-.h 7 ,, ' k,, mn X3 L, 1 3k L If iff - W! 0 ' Kr-I - ' ' ? ,511 ' dl.: Fu-If .Iv . 1.1 in N -fly, Y Q s , I s 1 x XG! Q 4' 1 I5 x X N I,.f' 1' 4 K - ' E4 " ' V ,x , - v lx ' E EX X X . 7 I .' Q 1 It 1 K F I L. v IQ, ,R f s 4 Q 1 ' K ' 1 if X 'a N f b . ,Q Eb f NR Q 2 IL. ' VT!! y- l -,. ky' .bw f' v' s '5 gi hm "L. ur ' M fd' Qi ...Eb 1' M99 ff 4 05 1 1-5-41 I l 1 1 1 l 1 4.-r 14 l i n l I 1 l L i l Z if L Kappa, Dave Hutchinson, tips the ball despite the efforts of Paul Andree and Charlie Caldwell, while Chuck Pills- bury looks on. Clyde Haas hooks a shot over Don Smith in Sigma-Delta game. BOYS, Society basketball began its '57 season with every society having new hopes and new talent to strengthen its attack. On "tip-off night," some aspirations were shattered and some were encouraged. In most cases the new players could not match the experience of the tested vet- erans. In the first game, the Zetas de- feated a fighting Delta squad by the scant margin of 40-39 and in the second game, the Kappas surprised a good Sigma team 54-38. The "tip-off night" games seemed to forecast the general trend of society ZE TA ZETA: Kneeling: L. Klumas, R. Everhart. Standing: Prof. Maybury, P. Andree, A. Pancarik, C. Caldwell, T. Young, G. Lashley, P. Bryner, D. Horn. , - mal CQ: -i gl 424' ,N I K- 5 , A . .- --1 'if 2 i 1 ly 5 ",' ll if- 1-- K .W . ,L P cf A up , , I - - - - , 1 Q I XL...,...... DELTA: First Row: L. Singell, F. Boden, J. Bricker, W. Webb, J. Holcomb. Sec- ond Row: J. Glass, D. Bernecker, D. Clifton, L. Hall, Prof. Cameron. DELTA ?.l BASKETBALL basketball in store for the students for the entire season. The Kappas and the Sigmas were seen as the teams to beat as they both fought off the bids of the Zetas and the Deltas. In their second meeting, the Sigmas evened the standings by defeating the Kappas 44-39. However, in the third game, the Kappas proved to be the better team by winning 56Q47 and taking over undisputed pos- session of first place. Delta, Fred Boden, shoots over the In the Kappa-Zeta game, Tom Young heads of Sigmas, Bill Couchenour and is all alone as Ronnie Norman Don Jim Jones. Horn, and Chuck Pillsbury Wall ex pectantly. KAPPA KAPPA: Kneeling: C. Pillsbury, J. Klumas. Standing: Prof. Parsons, J. Sheets, R. Norman, D. Hutchinson, L. Hybertson, R. German, B. Roberts. SI GMA Q, 6 SIGMA: KlIt'l'lflI!L,'.' R. Bradley, 'tluxmI. I-'inf Roux' J. Jones, J, Smith. D. Ht L1 ncgru, R. Munn, W. Couchcnour, H. C'hnrnbcrs. S!'t'tUIif linux M, Munn rron, R. Shnrpcs, C. Hams, R. North. .gunna Waiting for possible rebound, Dave Hutchinson, Jim Sheets, and Tom Young watch Jerry Lash- ley drive under the basket in Kappa-Zeta game. ,- al fs... ' Jerry Lashley, Charlie Caldwell, and Branson Roberts watch .lim Sheets' shot in Zeta-Kappa game. Half-time star-Billy Clyde Bradley. 112191 i Jack Smith shoots as Deltas, Jack Holcomb and Fred Boden is all alone on shot and Jack Hol- Jim Bricker, and Sigma, .lim Jones, race for pos- comb follows to make sure the ball goes in, in sible rebound. H8 Sigma-Delta game. MA SIGMA J Emerson P Dancy A Gray, D. Jardine, C, Burgess, i I i -kin .kin kt' i i i Fnsr Ron B Harrie S Rozema E. Gery, A. Gray, J. Sipes, L. Nease Maszot Second Ron V Burgess, R. Ricketts, B. Ram- ALL STAR ZFIA M Whipple S Ford L QCi'lI112lD,Ni.HllI1lCI'.C.NYililC. First Raw: C. Krutenat, C. Bur- gess, V. Burgess, D. Biggs, R. Andrews, L. Rogers, J. Zeigler, M. Burley. Sevom! Raw: B. Kun- kel, D. Drumm, K. Kunkel, F. Heber, M. Grant, B. Fountain, R. Biggs, M. Hatcher. ZETA First Row: B. Fink, R. Seavey, M. Hunter, C. Gilchrist, B. Yager, S. Hodgkins, D. Lesser. Sm-arid Raw: B. Sommer, E. Soulia, N. Sutton, E. Wilson, M. Corrie, Cv. Ziegler. J. Cheney. Kappa Joan Stetson tips the ball as Delta Ruby Ricketts awaits to return the shot. Connie Skillings sets up the ball as Nancy Vecchione and LoRae Reed look on. 140 VULLE YBALL This year's volleyball season has featured high society spirit amongall the players. Team work and brilliant playing sparked all the games. The Sigmas combined plenty ofthis spirit and team work to take the cham- pionship. The Zetas were close behind, and the Deltas followed by win- ning a close fight for third place against the Kappas. For added interest and excitement, the three societies challenged the Sigmas to a volleyball game. The tri-society All Stars started oh' well by winning the first game, but the Sigmas began to show their cham- pionship playing as they went on to win the next two games. With the aid of Dean Bradley, the four co-ordinators picked the first girls' all-star volleyball team. The champion Sigmas placed four players on the team, the Zetas contributed three players, and the Deltas com- pleted the team with one player. First Row: V. Hinson, A. Brown, D. Peterson, R. Ricketts, J McKay, J. Scheer. Second Row Mrs. Cameron, J. Shinault, J. Keeler, C. Ead, J. Byers, G. Sav age, B. Thompson. KAPPA First Row: E. Mellinger, E. Hunt er, N. Vecchione, B. Ramstcad Secoml Row: J. Stetson, L. Recd M. Manchester, C. Skillings. - 1 .7 ' 9, X I a "'W"' Sigma Doris Biggs returns the ball as Joan Zeigler and Beverly Kunkel await hopefully. DEL TA .KI 1 T I SIGMA: R. Andrews, R. Biggs, D. Biggs, M. Grant, B. Fountain, M. Hatcher, A. Johnston, B. Kunkel, K. Kunkel, J. Zeigler. GIRLS, The volley net and ball are put away for another year. This means only one thing to the girl athletes at E. N. C.-basket- ball. The addition of promising freshmen to strengthen their teams was anticipated by all four societies and they were not dis- appointed. In the nine game season, the Sigma and Zeta teams proved to be su- perior as they staved off the bids of the Kappas and Deltas. The outstanding players of each society were picked for the girls' all star team, and they had a chance to play against the KAPPA: N. Vecchione, E. Hunter, E. Gery, M. Manchester, C. Skillings, M Wheeler, B. Ramstead. 15' SJ '1- ALL-STAR: First Row: Coach Bradley, B. Fountain, G. Ziegler, S. Fuller, B. -" Thompson, E. Gery, D. Biggs, C. Skillings. Second Row: J. Rines, D. Lesser, K. 147 Kunkel, M. Corrie, R. Andrews, B. Kunkel, R. Biggs. l E D .AA BAJKETBALL tougher competition from other schools and colleges. Coach Bradley's girls played two games with Providence Barrington Bible College and two games with Gordon College. They played single games with Suffolk University, New England Bap- tist Hospital, and the alumnae. The team was composed of six Sigmas, four Zetas, four Kappas, and two Deltas. After suffering the "opening game jit- ters,', the girls did a very effective job of avenging this defeat by P.B.B.C. in their second game. ZETA: B. Yager, B. Fink, D. Ford, B. Sommer, E. Wilson, S. Fuller, G. Ziegler C. Gilchrist, M. Corrie. DELTA: J. Shinault, J. Byers, J. MacKay, B. Thompson, J. Keeler, G. Savage, R. Ricketts. .,.... V? , A A . b , 4 .I ' V, fait Tex! ' ' t time l nfl J X l B ..... fillli 3 ,, ,,.. h'fa 4 H . 4 I l . ll,,,'x ff ' , , ,rg-rf -1 WJ' f I 'N fl. I 5 Donna Lesser shoots Ovcr thc Out- IH li Slgmll ZCIZI LIQUNC. RCN i"OLllllllll'l Two more points no in for thc Kam 1 stretched arms ofa P.B.B.C. defender and Millie Corrie watch as Ruth An- J, Dglmg gm,-,1 SMMC ,mg Al.-U, as Joyce Rincs and Sally Fuller watch drcws scores. KCCICI- Observe Llcanorc Lien tfmg- expectantly. CDAGCUIFHIUG the CDASGECR Students in any college ap- preciate the services provided by their home church and by the business establishments in the- college community. At Eastern i Nazarene we have many daily contacts with busi- ness people in Wollaston and Quincy. ' t In these contacts we have opportunity to "Magnify the Master." By our conduct, we witness to the druggist, to the service station attendant, and to the clerks at the five and dime, and thus have an op- portunity to win others to Christ. A 1 ff, 2 1' Business Contacts ,mi A PROGRAM OE CHRISTIAN EDUCATION EOR EVERY HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE an-an EASTERN N AZARENE COIIEGE Wlollaston Park, Quincy 70, Massachusetts C'0Wg7'6lfLl!6lfZbW.Q Clam of fff THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE EOR CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 146 BEST DRESSED MEN ON CAMPUS Rent their formal wear at Szklfr Freshly cleaned and pressed Tailored to fit you perfectly The accessories are included at a nominal cost Formal Wear for Every Formal Occaszon SlD'S TUXEDO SHOP GR 2-6510 TOLL HOUSE WHITMAN , MASS. TEL. - WHITMAN 100 147 DEWARE BROTHERS South Shore's Most Beautiful HGMES FOR FUNERALS with Home-like Atmosphere Services Conducted From our MEMQRIAL CHAPELS If Desired NON-SECTARIAN SERVICE ANY DISTANCE Donald M. Deware Robert M. Deware Rc2g1kie77.'.7' Ell7!7c7l777c'l61f cum' Hlllt'1'cIl Dzkzmilx Quincy Hinghnnn 576 H aneoc k sf. 179 Lincoln sf. Rc. SA opposite Hingham Police Station Gr. 2-1137 Hi. 6-2698 148 SALLINGERS CLOTHIERS T0 NIEN AND WOMEN Budget accounts f fd f 1446 H Quinc ancock Sire Y, f ENC Mac Gordon Gran HOWARD JOHNSON'S FAMOUS ICE CREAM IN 28 FLAVORS 'I' I I I I I ' . .LAH EIC II I .. I I I .f: Zli' B55 A TYTRUC' I Ig: b:4? I I I I L. I I W, I, II I I GENERAL CONTRACTORS I REAL ESTATE II Lowell, Mass. I I QI -A I I I I I III I 'I ty? "Whatever your hand Hnds to do, do it with your might? i I Eccleszastes 9:10 I I I IQ I I I 150 I l . 19 Q y A Quincy, Mass. GRANITE CITY WULLASTUN ELECTRICAL SUPPLY co. MUSIC 5H0p 19a Beale St. WHOLESALERS Wollaston, Moss. Records, Phonographs, Tlph GR t 26500 Radlos, Mus1c Supphes Termf ZZIEJWEKII your fashion center on the south shore ZW I RING CLEAR I-ICDSIERY Q I Q ll I ll C Y , , , Quincy s Only Hosiery Specialty Store Nlrs. N vlor, Nlg I C g I I KI I I5l T I Clonipliinents ol' THE HARRIS COMPANY PORTLAND, MAINE Ship Clizindlers Marine Hzirdwzire Cienerzil Hardwzirc AND HARRIS OIL COMPANY General Electric - Heating Equipment Cities Service Fuel Oils 7-1294 lelcpliones, Ckpitol 7 - l295 7 - 1354 HICKS 8i HODGES CO. PURVEYORS OF FINE FOODS -15 South Market Street Boston 9, Mass. l52 WHITTEMGRE Associates, Incorporated l6 ASHBURTON PLACE Boston 8, Mass. CA 7-2l50 STAI ED GLASS WI DOWS Exquisite stained glass windows designed and executed to suit the architecture of your building. Prices vary according to the size and intricacy of detail. Imported. antique glass and ex- pert craftsmanship assure unsur- passed beauty. Send for your copy of our brochure, "Stained Glass." CHURCH FURNITURE Our church furniture is distinctive and beautiful. in authentic period designs. Superb hand carving and expert craftsmanship make our communion tables, seats, pulpits and other eccle- siastical furnishings well suited for their high purpose. lVe can plan our arrangements to match your present furnishings. Send for our free cata- logue on church furniture. 'Q' IS3 l 1 l 1 1 Q: L. ANTONELLI of ,i IRON WORKS, INC. 25 Beale St womm BRIDGE RAILINGS 1 STRUCTURAL STEEL LONG SPAN Jolsrs ll 5 1 1 1 1 ' ORNAMENTAL IRON l BUILDING SPECIALTIES l in l l I WHEN IN NEED OE i Hardware G1-HSS 2 Kitchenware XVall Paper V Garden Supplies Packard P21iI1IS 1 i 1 1 THE NEW MODERN STORE ac Luncheon Plates French Frles 1 i "Easy Pfzrlcing' C2111 Gr. 2-0041 1 M FARLAND , E l 1 -I-1 BEST WISHES FROM Prescrlptlon Optlclan L 11 Brook Sfreei' Wollaston, Mass Ffled SCHUOPS F1511 Sucks WGLLASTON FLORIST 679 Hancock St. Corsages - Bouquets - Gifts and Wedding Flowers Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere P. j. GORHAM, PROP. I WO0D'S HARDWARE 81 SUPPLY CO. 673 Hancock Street Wollaston 70, Mass. TEL. MAyflower 9-1770 PLUMBING and ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES BAY STATE PAINT and VARNISHES if 7 l TOOLS-GARDEN SUPPLIES-KITCHENWARE QUINCYS FASHIQN CENTER S8.H GREEN STAMPS Student Supplies Film Service Bus Tickets Bibles l55 COLLEGE BOOKSTDRE C on g TH to K. I tuln the Ins.: of ogy tions Best of Luck Semors THE DUGCUT EXTENDS BEST WISHES T0 THE CLASS OF 1957 CTIur01 wz Earl, Algr. fffri fisANC0W' li 'anson Rooerts brings E.N.C.'s dirty duds. Roger Speakmzm lcsls the chcmic l Tailoring 8: Fur Storage Pickup and Delivery SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO STUDENTS Kg-Y N ,J ..g.3,,. Ja 134' IH :Er Ugg. "cn Ill! sid' fra, i HOUR PLANT SERVICE 624 HANCOCK ST. WOLLASTON, MASS. PR 3-7400 Xmircn Muncie and Branson Rohr-rls IICIP I tl X 1 Il ll l .Il 376 21 I'0 ICS. ' I 1 1 'l Complimentf 1 fl fl N1 :S OF I I 1 ENTERPRISE ' STORES 1 I Quincy, Mass. 4 1 A I 1 K 1 1 , . 1 1 4 KAn1.'s BETSY LEE SHOPPE 11 BEALE ST. WOLLASTON Gr. 2-5032 Where Classmafes Meef Cyl f AUTO BODY REPAIR CO., HACKER 55 HOLLAND INC Q Q 1 i 1 ESTABLISHED 1920 Q INSURANCE APPRAISING I Q 1 ' 23 GREENWOOD AVE. WOLLASTON MASS GRANITE 2-8100 1 P 1 LUMBER COMPANY, Inc. ION p A North Quincy, Mas I GR 8550 ...M QUINTS GREENHoUsEs 1187 Hancock Street Quincy, Mass. "Flowers Wired Anywhere" Compliments of QUIN CY MOTOR CO. South Shore's Oldest and Largest FORD Dealer 85 Quincy Ave. Quincy, Mass. PR 3-6500 0 .Service on all makes of cars O l 1 MEN'S CLOTHING FEATURING GGG suits Hammonton Park suits Hathaway shirts 1 Palm Beach suits Baracuta raincoats jarman shoes Manhattan shirts Knox hats 1538 HANCOCK ST. PR 3-9720 NoRTH QUINCY GARAGE co. Duggan Brothers 131-133 Hancock Street North Quincy, Mass, SEE PETER AT THE MAYELOWER DINER 473 Southern Artery Route 3, Quincy LODGENS MKT. IN C. 32 Cottage Ave., Quincy WHERE YOUR NEIGHBOR TRADES WESTLAND'S SPORTING GOODS EQUIPMENT FOR EVERY SPORT 11 Revere Rd. Quincy PR 3-1133 lA 5tone's lhrou' from Senrsj WEYMOUTH GAZETTE PRESS Prirzters of Campus Camera ED. 7-01-13 18-22 Station Street East XVeymout1i, Mass. "87 YEARS OF DEPENDABLE SERVICE" TRADEMARKED FUELS 0 'blue cool' 0 New England Coke 0 Cities Service Oils HEATING EQUIPMENT 0 General Electric 0 Winkler 0 Delco SHEPPARD CCAL G. 0IL C0 1520 HANCOCK ST. TEL. - PR 3-7200 opp. Remick's 160 M W - xxxxifffjf .Q fff. X, 2 7 SIGMA DELTA DE A C01lgl'dfZlldf1.01lf to lbc' Cl f 37 N ,",. f' sw 3 WX'll "17! Q 3 if 2 N NX 1, N XX sa lp+es ,ff+hf-J r, N Nw i Wf fff , 5 7 1 e P 1 X X. Q XX? Y" " W! ' 2 2 I2 1-TLT' f0'UR' LIQJ-ff' SO SHINE M S XM A 1 I 1 . 1 1 1 1 12 ,'I - 1 1 4 f I 1 ' l f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H I 1 I 1 1 1111 1 I 'Sm-uoLAns :P ' 2 K D ijwgf I ., x 'L 'K 'gixwg E' 5' 5 , ' fy 3 2 2 Q n gg an-eso'evMa.Lg Q '4 1 5' z X v.11JZ11.1-,,,,, 0 m Q MN 'rl n 3 E X, up " II: " 'Nu U' U' 5 NI -I rn U5 al-1 Salutes the Class of '57 162 NEW ENGLAND DISTRICT 0 Congratulates the Class of I957 0 Appreciates the Administration and Faculty 0 Benefits from the Influence of Alumni E22 WE ARE JUSTIFIABLY PROUD OF OUR STUDENTS - DISTRICT GOALS 1 0 IOM, gain in church membership 0 IOCA, giving for world evangelism 0 57,-, giving for home missions U 300 new members in the N.F.M.S. 0 Every S.S. working the achievement program 0 Witnessing for Christ through the N.Y.P.S. 0 Every church starting a new church 163 W0llASTON CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE WOLLASTON MASSACHUSETTS The College Claurelo Our Proposed Church Buzldmg THE STUDENTS' CHURCH HOME AWAY FROM HOME asv J GLENN Goum asv novo o FLEMMING pastor Asszstant Pastor Paul I Wlllwerth, Chou Dzreetor Patrlcla Gibson Foley Orgamst A Dynamzc Holzness Ministry the Year Round I64 Warren H. Becker, S. S. Supt. Howard R. Chandler, , ' f I 1 2: ,f 'Q' 'X Rev. JOHN M. GARDNER, N.Y.P.S. Pres. pogo, Mary P. Fuller, N.F.M.S. Pres. CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 79 Lawrence Street New Haven, Conn. CONGRATULATIONS FIRST CHURCH OF CLASS QF 1957 THE NAZAREN E Spruce and Smith Streets NEW BEDFORD, MASS. Congrcitulates the Class of 7957 "1 iii. 'I-nl l from the Nathan A Adams Jr Minister ' ' " NAZARENE Dwight A. Cunningham, Minister of Music I65 33 Myrtle ST. WALTHAM, MASS. C. l. WILLWERTH,A1ini5fo ii 1 z CAMBRIDGE Q GOD'S BEST f CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1 to the Class of i 234 Franklin Street 1957 Cambridge, Massachusetts S.S. Superintendent John S. Burgess I N.Y.P.S. President Donald D. Arnold N.F.M.S. President Mrs. Mable Randall Our Best Wishes and Prayers Elm Street at Russell to the Class of 1957 near Davis Square West Somerville, Mass. NEIL MC CLAIN, Pastor Crusading For Christ in the "City of Village Charm" Greetings from the CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE "The Friendly Church With the Full Gospel" 466 Main Street fNew property - 236 Main Streetj Manchester, Connecticut C. E. Winslow, Minister - 232 Main Street "Time is Life's Greatest Estate-Share it with God-The Only Lasting Investment" 166 4.41 BEST WISHES FROM . M A l D E C H R C H Back of E.N.C. with Faith and Funds to Publish the Timeless Message in a Timely Manner Church: Minister: Judson Square, Malden, Mass. Anthony B. Sampson Parsonage: Minister of Music: 236 Hawthorne, Malden, Mass. Harold Stetson CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1957 "In The Land Of The Great Northern" FIRST CHURCH OF THE N AZAREN E GREEN AND SHORT STS. MELROSE, MASS. BEST WISHES THE CLASS -WM I! A 'E - 3pgg.r ,HE 9.0 ,. Millinocket, Maine Rev. Leonard Newbert, Pastor F Minister lXlllllI1OCl4Cl, lXl2llHC ROV. -lily BCIQCIAS, PKISNH , 167 Summer Tourists Always Welcome AKRCN DISTRICT CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Advisory Board REV. C. D. TAYLOR REV. CLARENCE HAAS REV. D. D. PALMER MR. L. W. DURKEE MR. HAROLD T. JACKSON . Fugi- L,ff24F5 I ll!l'l I ml I l,:l3llfl V T54 lrllll I ENC Trustees REV. KENNETH PEARSALL REV. C. D. TAYLOR MR. L. W. DURKEE MR. B. DALE POWELL AKRON FIRST CHURCH or THE NAZARENE I W. Tallmodge at N. Howard on Route ii 18 Kenneth H. Pearsall, Pastor n CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF '57 169 CLEVELAND EIRST CHURCH Wholeheartedly Supports ENC in the Cvreat Cause of Christian Education SINCERE CONGRATULATIONS T0 THE CLASS OF 1957 XY, Wm. P. Wilhoyte, Minister Robert Witbeck, Minister of Music FIRST URCII OF THE NAZARENE Hayden Avenue at Claiborne Road East Cleveland, Ohio WHEN IN CLEVELAND - WE INVITE YOU TO WORSHIP WITH US 170 FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE St. Clair and Walnut Streets East Liverpool, Ohio James E. Hunton, Minister CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF '57 BOARD OF TRUSTEES Charles Edwards, Ch. William Greenwood S. S. Bennett Nat McKinnon T. Rice Homer Rutledge B. H. Bucher J. Howard Sloan Harry Greenwood l 71 il FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Il n 'n ASHTABULA, OHIO W Cor. 57th St and Washington Ave. 3 u i 1 I I I H. V. KYER, MINISTER FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Warren, Ohio Clarence Haas, Minister Edmund C. jones, Minister of Education and Music Buckeye af Mulberry ALWAYS A LOYAL SUPPORTER OF E. N. C. BEST WISHES TO THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1957 C. Haas E, C, Jones 172 . . The FIRST CHURCH of the N AZARENE WADSWORTH, OHIO Congfatulates from the Class of 1957 ARLINGTON STREET CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE AKRON, OHIO WILLIAM R. THOMPSON, Pastor Ralph Music Miss Evelyn Claytor Hanford Gunnerson Arza Baker The Church With a War S.S. Superintendent N.F.M.S. President N.Y.P.S. President Church Treasurer m Welcome -Mr.-57--.,.,,,,,v.A 0 Lloyd D. Morgan, Minister 0 Norman Collins, S. S. Supt. 0 Lloyd Shue, N.Y.P.S. Pres. 0 Lola Dawson, N .F .M .S. Pres. Congratulations to the Class of 1957 CHURCH OF THE N AZARENE Liberty ss. at High Painesville, Ohio Clyde B. Wood, Pastor William A. Pritchard, S. S. Supt. Dolores Canfield, N .Y .P.S. Pres. Eltheda Rigden, N.F.M.S. Pres. Congratulations and Sincere Prayers for God's Blessing on our Class of '57 CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE SEBRING, OHIO George O. Cole Pastor You will enjoy the spiritual atmosphere and friendliness A Warm Welcome Always Awaits You of the Sebring Nazarenes. of this Friendly Church ADVISORY BOARD G. Thomas Spiker Henry E. Heckert Dr. Neel J. Price Robert Radcliffe . THE WASHINGTCN Ernest E. Grosse District Superintendent E. N. C. TRUSTEES Ernest E. Grosse james R. Bell Chester M. Williams A. C. McKenzie Chester M. Williams District Secretary Henry E. Heckert District Treasurer Mrs. Nelson H. Henck District N.F.M.S. President james R. Bell District Church School Board Chairman joseph D. Biscoe District Director of junior Society Boyd M. Long District Camp Manager Harold A. Parry District N.Y.P.S. President 1957 CALENDAR District Assembly - May 15 to 17 Boys' Camp - July 8 to 12 Girls' Camp - July 'l5 to I9 Camp Meeting - August 2 to 'll N.Y.P.S. Institute - August 26 to 30 Preachers' Convention and Preachers' Wives' Retreat - November 5 to 7 l74 . PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT Ak I We Are Proud Of Our Students At E. N. C. conenmunmous ro me cuss or 19511 175 lr It r A 1, Ir 1 GOD'S RICH BLESSING FOR THE CLASS OF 1957 21 CONGRATULATIONS IS THE PRAYER OF 1 Q., W 1 r TO THE I. West Grove, Pa. CLASS or 1957 ti h N I. Chvrfh 011 9 alafene Church of the Nazarene Q P' ' 130 PROSPECT AVENUE me and F reedley Streets 1 . . Paul E. Kauffman Minister Pa' i Q ' ll6 Murray Avenue Phone UNderhi1l 9-3841 E CHESTER M. WILLIAMS, PASTOR S.S. Supt. Otis Graybeal 1 f r N'Y,P.S. Pres. Alden Schetmmph Donald V. Retter S.S. Superintendent 11 N-FMDSI Pres. Mrs. Frances Frank Mrs. Edwin K. Bean N.Y.P.S. President ! Mrs. john L. Simmonds N.F.M.S. President 1 Mrs. Clarence H. Keehn Secretary 1 William E. Schubert Treasurer Q Q "When Near Philadelphia . . . View Us" 1 a I ,lr a . 1 1 I .f TWIN BOROUGH CHURCH of the NAZARENE 1 2 i and Washington Streets Royersford, Pennsylvania 1 E 1 Q R. E. Zollinhofer, Minister 5 1 Clair E. Umstead, Minister of Music r ii Graduating from ENC This Year U 1 1 GLADYS ZEIGLER I r DALE WANNER KENNETH KEIM a : 1 EV 1 Freshman This Year 1 1 S I MARIANA umm 1 ' "We are witnesses . . . we ought to obey God." 176 1 I ssllimril tlljltmtwzlsi tilt llltuz 3llilili3,ill'II2lMZ 7 fmt Qlhurnh nf 1112 Hzmwg Penn Hunnun and lotus! Strmzl ELEVENTH AND WYOMING STREETS ALLENTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA lhcltnttl, Ttzttntstgltmmlia Henry R. DeShaw, Pastor CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1957 George L. Wolf, Pastor AND TO ENC Hearty Booster of E.N.C. with the three following students enrolled this year: Ruth Hersh, L 4 Patsy Nyce, Richard Stahl If ff. A I Q -as 'X fl' 5 5 -E ' E .E Ei re ? '- -..-li i Qs. ggi gf- ,A' l?!5ElI'm" Q ' ' l 'O -T' tl TTXQ? Txix xzf- , i 6 p ggi sw glut Uguzcfi of ffzlf JVQZQZEHS Presently located at-4643 NORTH FIFTH STREET, PHILADELPHIA 40, PA. We Salute The Class 'Uv y . 'nv' P. L. LIDDELL CHARLES L. BRODHEAD Min!-Viet' Song Leader Dcdzmled to God and Holmess Devoted zn Mzmshjv to All Humamty 1' Congratulations to the Class of '57 FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE v an l from the W flll ,,,, w I .ma ' I 412 , . ga 1 1 -' 1 L 'fa' ,L Vi ' Liv' wil?-Y YY V ,,,,,,,...,..-..--..,,.., .. ------ "1-' "IN BEAUTIFUL EDMONDSON VILLAGE" BALTIMORE, MARYLAND James R. Bell-Church Pastor N.E. Hightower-Minister of Education CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATING CLASS OF 1957 First Church of the Nazarene 616 Severn Avenue Armapolis, Maryland CHURCH OFFICERS 5.5. Supt. L. Lanie Cleavenger N.Y.P.S. Pres. Mrs. Dorothy Wood W.F.M.S. Pres. Mrs. L. L. Cleavenger FRANK G. KISH, Pastor 178 CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Kiel Avenue Butler, New jersey james L. Collom, Pastor Congratulates the Class of 1957 and salutes our ENC students: JOAN SANFORD WILLIAM BRIGGS RONALD NORMAN WE BELIEVE IN AND SUPPORT EASTERN NAZARENE COLLEGE ,....ln Corlgratulations Class of 1957 dM. - . Boy Long PASTOR Errsr Church ol the Nazarene Wllmlngton, Del. Congratulations ,,.,, V ' fw- , - A from FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Euclid and Hampton Streets TRENTON, NEW JERSEY The Missionary Minded Church J. E. TURNOCK, Pastor A hearty and friend! 3' . 1704 New Road WY 4-3024 welcome awazts you. When In Our Czty, Vzszt Us NAZARENE THEQLOGICAL SEMINARY Kansas City, Mo. Lewis T. Corlett Mendell Taylor President Dean I79 I i Z. 4 . 4 f I , ,Z 'e 1 1 I W w V 1 w 1 X N I I , w W If 2 In fr 's I I . I r Tv ' r 1 rf PITTSBURGH pf REV. R, F. I-IEINLEIN Q W IJ! I ' rut Q Ir 5 W 1 1 L I V w U 1!7 r r O District Program tl msmlcr cAMP - July 4 - 14 rl 1 N.r.M.s. coNv. - July 23 and 24 r r ' mst. ASSEMBLY - July 25 - 26 3 l 5 1 I I Morro --we can If We Will,-"" 180 I J r I DI TRICT DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENT ii 'TPII 556. O Advisory Board O E.N.C. Trustees REV. W. GORDON GRAVES R. F. HEINLEIN REV. R. B. ACHESON JOHN Z. ANDREE MR. MAURICE R. EMERY MAURICE R. EMERY MR. ROBERT M. INGLAND ROBERT M. INGLAND We Can And We Will" VICTORY 181 CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF '57 CHURCH OF THE I NAZARENE 55 No. Bennett Street BRADFORD, PENNSYLVANIA XV. Gordon Graves, Pastor When Touring The Maritirne Provinces Of Canada, Visit The Friendly hurtb uf the gaagarene On Routes 1 and 2 Saint john, N. B. 359 Main St. tlntersection Douglas Ave.y S.S. 10:00 A.M. Worship 11:00 P.M. N.Y.P.S. 6:00 P.M. Evangelistic 7:00 P.M. Centered in CHRIST, the Saviour Rev. Albert H. Lewis, Pastor CHURCH OF THE N AZARENE 74 Snow Street Fitchburg, Massachusetts Rev. Curtis L. Stanley, Pastor 168 Cedar Street Fitchburg, Mass. Congratulations To Lois jones 6. 'Z' our First ENC N K f ra nate 4 ff, G d r C CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Zelienople, Pa. J. Scott Newell, Pastor Boosting E.N.C. CHURCH 0F THE NAZARENE LINCOLN PLACE Pittsburgh, Pa. Serving Christ and the Community for 56 years Rev. Russell E. Lewis, Minister MARITIME DISTRICT HOME MISSIONARY OPPORTUNITY "The helds are white unto harvest" GOD CALLS! MEN ANSWER? GOD BLESS ENC Rod MacNiver, Trustee j. H. MacGregor, District Supt. Box 234, Oxford, Nova Scotia 37: .:'Q' wily- wt 555 Nba, ,,.- E'- - , 4, Urs! ,g,xiwl1Q,.x, 'Nfl -'33 if, ' A 'wi ww fix' 'ww- pg: 4-wmv., up ,S ,NV "VN" T' il -'v '. uf fQj.,4 ' SVA. A v YA Gui f L12 ...f if ,V I . M . V. , ii ,evgjal I x A-. J " ,'-4 ggi.-,, ,V , . 5711-q. '35 f3-2 f "ii Vg CQ 'iv-iv 1: 95' , ., P . , J M ,', Ax - M fl gs .. V -wk A 1 A G 1 if , 1 X v 7' u' E '1- ,J , 9 fy? F 1 1 . Y' A s ' X , is 1 ' ' X f , ' P ? i lv" fs 1 I I '43 Iff! ' 1 1 tl 4 r it 3 -Q N W YG RK DISTRI T 2 vu -I EE FN -l Ili I 'U rn E Z -I rn Z C rn Z -I f f 4 Q20 X X R RbtIGl 27WI Stt B N Yk ,.4Z CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE BEACON, NEW YORK, HELPS SPONSOR NEW VASSAR ROAD CHURCH A A IN POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. I v' ' III urium llI'E"' The New York District and General p ' 5111 x ' ' ' cnnngh funds financed the building .Q Pf08Tam' I I Iii- E , I BCHCOH Church Vassar Rd. Church The Beacon Church provided the majority of the charter members. 'Y' Both pastors are graduates of East- ern Nazarene College and Nazarene Theological Seminary. HPROCLAIMING HOLINESS Rev. and Mrs. A. D, Stiefel T0 DUTCHE55 COUNTY" Rev. and Mrs. Herbert Rogers and Becky Congratulations to the Class of '57 RICHMOND HILL, N. Y. FIRST CHURCH OF THE N AZAREN E we I x gp ,. .fl -J' 1 I Rev. C. L. Arnold, Pastor Telephone Vlrginia 9-5734 108-05 95th AVCIHIC QBorough of Queens, New York Cityj Richmond Hill, N. Y. You can find us listed in the QUEENS YELLOW PAGES under "Churches-Nazarene" 185 FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE OCEAN AVE. EAST ROCKAWAY, N. Y. Donald H. Strong, Minister, Class of '38 124 Garfield Place LY 9-3116 NVE SALUTE . . . OUR DEVOTED FACULTY OUR PURPOSEFUL STUDENTS OUR 1957 NAUTILUS "GOD BLESS ENC" WHEN IN TORONTO VISIT airz cgfzsef gauze of ffia azcmena 363 Main Street Toronto, Ontario, Canada Robert B. Fowler, Pastor Phone, PLymouth 7-1229 CONGRATULATIONS 4 to our College, which has enriched, blessed and trained our youth for vital Christian service vc of t-Le Jvazavene TORONTO 186 CANADA NA Superintendent H. Blair Ward 42 Ellendale Drive Dorset Park Scarborough, Ont. Plymouth 5-5066 Advisory Board Rev. R. F. Tink Rev. C. P. Gleason K. I. Olsen J. R. Cross E.N.C. Trustees Rev. R. F. Mloods Rev. H. B. Ward CE TR L DI TBICT Congratulations to E.N.C., the Class of '57, and Our Students w ,tw Sefretary K f Rev. Roy G. Hall Treasurer Miss Ruth Lewis N.Y.P.S. President Rev. Roland Stanford N.F.M.S. President Mrs. Florence XVootls Clz. Sell. Bd. Chairman Rev. Stanley Rycroft Four of our district students PRAY that God may bless. GIVE that God may work. SEND your men that they may work in this great harvest field. Approximately ONE MILLION square miles of Home Missionary Challenge x WHEN VISITING CANADA'S CAPITAL XVORSHIP AT FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE lF011rtlz Ave.-East of Bank Sty OTTAXVA, ONT. Ross P. Cowherd, Pastor 475 Bay St. Phone CE 5--1227 CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1957 Hi 4 SYYY I ' T A" 'fef l reifiiif XX ff wx. .1 l 14 ,f ' ' ' 5 r T T 'Tvigirigl T -HM IILIIMU mm 3 in an TA: fi , .Q is ml ' ' 3 1 j R Y 'gf ,L fig, egi ,g , 2 If :, l si? - uf 1 ' 'l .. V 'rf f- .Qs ,Af ef as if l f .5 K r - 4 YJ-,yr ff f V ' ',-Kirk 7 f Q M.. lzlingllis 4 t 2922 T- W' . E : .. - K " f-' at . , EEE f . . ' , ,I r1miJ, ,,jLg-41,21-I - v---- S LA. 1Ti"'l- .. 'Liga-f ' - f r A nffi o - 1.22 FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 92 Ottawa Street, North. Hamilton, Ontario REV. R. FLETCHER TINK, Minister l87 CONGRATULATIONS to the Class of '57 From BETHEL CHURCH OE THE NAZARENE 440 Horner Ave., Toronto 14, Ont. "T0ronto's Youngest C11 urelf' Rev. S. Roy G. Hall-Pastor Carl Brander S.S. Superinterzdent INIIS F Sweet N.F.M.S. President Will a n Johnston N.Y.P.S. President ehurch of the Cnazcarene ALIQUIPPA, PA. Glen E. Stover, Postor Congratulations To The Class Of '57 mmvufmef i6AzfLrc!L 0 me , azcwene LANSDALE, PENNSYLVANIA Derstine and Richardson Avenues L G Gordon, Minister Indebted to E.N.C. Forever Sponsored by the N.Y.P.S. Church of the Nazarene Media, Pa. Congratulations And Best Wishes To The Class of '57 D. Ketner Jr., Pastor Harold A. Parry, Minister Washington Avenue and Chestnut Street Ephrata, Pennsylvania ' i u . Church of the Nazarene Congratulates The Class Of 1957 Coliingdale Church oi The Nazarene M Mac:Dacle Boulevard THE CHURCH W'TH A Coilingdaie, Pennsylvania REVERENCE for the Past Rev. F. D. Ketner, Pastor PROGRAM for the present Congratulations Class of 1957 VISION for the Future IX9 Congratulations to the Class of1957 508 OLD TOWN ROAD CUMBERLAND MARYLAND FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE H. E. Heckert, Minister C H U R C H jfnffr o F 1' H E KAJMCA NAzAnENls We Wazcwene MILLVILLE, NEW JERSEY HANOVER, PENNSYLVANIA Middle and Fulton Streets E. Walter Mi er, inis er ll M t John L. Parry, Pastor 190 CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE LOWELI., MASS. 51 First Street "A Welcome to all who attend" ERNEST R. BRADLEY, Pastor 247 Beacon Street :::::::::::I E - -- F F- A ' ' ' 'T '22:::::::::l -' -F! ' ' 9 ' .. ' ' ' j 'lull' we stxwvsn STREET so. PORTLAND, MAINE R. E. HOWARD, Pastor 5 .spliriluaf JE9LIA0lLJl Cm., E., 0 A CHURCH DEDICATED TO THE SAVING OF ITS YOUTH 0 CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1957 0 IVE PLEDGE OUR CONTINUING SUPPORT TO ALL OF E.N.C. Visit Us While In "Vacati0nIand".' R. E. Howard Pastor -mv-,,f Czowcft of me Wazarene g. A. .t tt 'l f l tl tl gr ft tl :naming am, add. REV. ALLAN PFAUTZ, Pastor Robert Poole Congratulations to the class of 1957 Best wishes to our students, F, W' Robert Poole and Allen Torsey Allen Torsey l CONGRATULATIONS FROM :mst CHURCH or THE JEFFERSGN CMG l NAZARENE CHURCH OF Tl-llf I 1 l 1 BATH, N AZARE N lf MAINE fit gr 57 East Satin Street l T. .A ...pi ,..V,, 2,1 . Y R .... 55 1 l l"a 5 T5 15 P 5 ' , RSV- J- LY211 Calhoun, John R. Donley, Mlnlster l pf'-W1 Class of 1953 Q J "e' . --,'e1 l l E.N.C. are letters that challenge .l S.S. Superinterzdent, Eugene B. Dutton our youth along educational and . N.Y.P.S. President, Mrs. Gwennie Dutton Spiritual lines N.F.M.S. President, Mrs. Elizabeth Bartlett A-L I J f-sanding with visianf' ,Qt I 192 4.4! I r,, Q T iliwkx Rev. D. D. Palmer, Pastor Congratulations Seniors of '57 '.', 'Q IIN 'K ', J f -1 OUR STUDENTS Pat Brooks Rodney Everhart Katie Butts Mrs. Everhart KENMORE CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Corner Iona Ave. at N. Twelfth St. AKRON, OHIO Milton L. Bunker -When in Akron Visit with Us - Minister We Congratulate the Class of 1957 and Pledge Continued Support for E.N.C. .E LG JA . J M' ',. .I V 1 li 1 193 fm, VERYL w JENKINS. PAsToR ' ' 244 BELLE AVENUE 'is SYRACUSE 5 NEW YORK . 4 ' rn ".y rl :.- r L 1 I 5 sr N r li -- QS: lflr ff l G HF Rl? ra 'T" ilifTff"i' . 1-J' ll '-5'f"5"" ..-,Mtv-1:-. , . , -,, rr,-hz Mrs. Harriet Smith N.F.M.S. President Stewards Mrs. Evelyn Houghtaling Mrs. Paul Baum, Jr. Mrs. Phillip Martin Mrs. Raymond Clapp, Jr Mr. Ted Bausman Mr. Leonard Coulter Donald Smith, Donald Watkins Charles Ritchie Carol Kurak "WE CONTINUE TO SUPPORT YOU E N C BECAUSE WE BELIEVE IN YOU Congratulations to the Class of 1957 ':""" 0F THE NAZARENE FIRST CHURCH or THE BINGHAMTON. NEW YORK Arthur M Fallon, Minisrer Best Wishes to the Class of 1957 Congratulatiorzs-Class of '57 Church of the Nazarene 622 Boyd Street Watertown, New York Rev. Wylie Rudolph, Pastor Beale Street Pharmacy Russell S, Keene, Pl1.G., Mgr. 649 Hancock, Near Beale St. WOLLASTON, MASS. lfllllta CAMERA CENTER Everything for the photographer including helpful odvice Photo equipment Movie equipment Developing and printing Color films 680 Honcock Street, Wollaston 70, Moss. Your favorite household-brands of food roducts are P packaged on equipment manufactured by PNEUMATIC SCALE CORP., Ltd. Quincy, Mass. RICHARD GORMAN "The Iewelry Store on Beale Sfrr'f'1" WOLLASTON, MASS. DIAMOND ENGAGEMENT RINGS from 60.00 up Hamilton WATCHES Elgin Sheagfer Snorkel Pen STERLING: Wallace, Reed and Barton, Heirloom, Watson gf EE. YOU NEVER OUTGROW YOUR NEED FOR MILK H. P. HOOD Si SONS Qualigf Daz'rjf Product! Since 1846 cR00f7lZggf Hxyffcfzblzzkff' MODERN FORMAL SHOP NORMAN W. PEMBERTON, IHC. TUXEDOS SHEET METAL VVORK - SLATE CUTAWAYS TIN M1 CHAVEL nooF1NC FULL DRESS 141 Newport Ave., WVollaston, Mass. FOR Hmf Office Tel. cmmne 2-5078 1639 Hvnwfk Sf- QUWYI M055 TEL. PR 3-7213 C' PgEf2jfffQTifCffRSS0nS PURITAN Do-NUT Co. Re8dY'MiXEd 141 ou: COLONY PARKWAY Power Shovel Excu .t g, GR 2-7706 Geneva 6-8887 99 Myrtle St. North Quincy, Mass. l96 EJ. EED Y ISHIN PUBLISHlll:4?g Pulllimusfou HOUSE NEEDS Y N You YOUR G .54 I i 95? A Q5-2521555 uf 3' ini? W 1' u :54fg?f'15Q'i+ fm' " fb -JI f f 112- . " fr' ' f' A i b 1 ,png ' A 1.. Rug f ' ' k . iv' 4 Niwm' .Iv .. I rr o., 1 H 1 -,., , 'P N in if? 'gf "f:i11'l'i1'ii 41 2 'U' y . 1 Inf' .W f in mis' I x 1 1 -af? 'A 3 '11 ll 7-'Lg v' N MJ y,vA,ip N i x 1. if ln' -fr + 4 V., .-I. 1 z,.v , Q 4 4 4' r ug 4? 5- I 'Qs I I l2'f'g"' 9 u X f. L vw , 'UN I- . -H- . . mr xr A ,4'., S rl . W v-' ...J "W " 1 2.1-3 fax: 1. ' ,gif I' ,X ix-J., .pa ,J 6 f' "gait, M.. x ' 'lull -' H -nl I ff .f.s,s inf!" J Sqn 3 W hh., l' f' u,, X' x-,N " , A' ,N - ' I 2 , I fs. lj, 1 A l ' , 4. vs 0 5' 'S y f ,lr al' K n xi 'N'-.ix 1- 1 Good religious writings are, first of all, faithful to the Bible. This is the bedrock principle of your Publishing House. Uphold the Word-along with your Publishing House. Nazarene PUBLISHING HOUSE KANSAS CITY PASADENA ,TORONTO 197 THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF EASTERN NAZARENE COLLEGE '71 UNITED AL UZIIZVI MAKES PHILIP TRACY ENC STRONGP' President J RUTH WOOD Vice President ANDREW RAN KIN Treasurer EXECUTIVE COUNCIL President V P . res. Treasurer - Exec. Sec Trustees Directors Assoc Dir. P.c.1. Rep.- A. Philip Tracy Ruth Fader Wood Andrew F. Rankin Stephen W. Nease Wesley C. Angell Warren C. Lahue William C. Allshouse Paul H. Cray Roger W. Mann John B. Nielson Benjamin R. Stahl Audrey M. Ward Elmer H. Kauffman, Jr. Stephen W. Lind Harold Jones Clyde Sumner STEPHEN NEASE Exec. Secretary CLUB PRESIDENTS Akron Baltimore Boston Canada Cent. Cleveland Conn. Valley Kansas City New York City Philadelphia Pittsburgh Providence Washington Youngstown H. Harris P. Basham D. Young C. Gleason A. Woodcook H. Rickey J. Williamson R. Brenner R. Jones D. Brickley J. Earle J. Songer D. Powell WELCOME TO OUR RANKS, CLASS OF 1957 CORDIAL GREETINGS, ALUMNI EVERYWHERE CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1957 ' w w E 5 A 1 L N V 1 Q , y w ,Q A OFFICIAL NAUTILUS PHOTOGRAPH ER xilfbffb 52,0123 j0lf'8lflfL05f pZLOIfC79Vd!9A0l'15 37 Coffage Avenue QUINCY 69, MASSACHUSSETS 199 SPONSORSI-IIPS HUB TOOL MANUFACTURING 8: MACHINE CO. M inut icturers and Designers of Spcc1alD1es igs Fixtures Metal Parts, Assemblies and Nlachines R L Spencer P O Box 978 Reading, Penna. Above All You Need Lzghtmng Rods CLAPP ELECTRIC WARREN LIGHTNING RGD C0 Electrical Contractors 415 Dayton Ave l00 Terry Road, Syracuse 4, N. Y. COLLINCSXNOOD NEW IIQRSEY Raymond H, Clapp COil1IlgSWOOd 5 7000 Raymond D. Clapp WILBUR M. MAUGER Concrete Burial VaultS Philadelphia Pennsylvania Be Sure You Are Prepared When Your Body Needs One NATIONWIDE INSURANCE Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co. Nationwide Mutual Fire Insurance Co Nationwide Life Insurance Co. Home Omce Columbus, Ohio 1 SLATE AND BLUESTONE FOR ALL PURPOSES E. R. BLASDELL SLATE PRODUCTS CO. 43 Prospect St. S0lIl61'Y'I116,AItZSS. ROBERT E. FOY III SPONSORSHIPS Congratulations from NORFOLK FLOWER SHOP SALLY and FRANK ONTHANK 287 Hancock Street Sewing you from Flowers for all occasions THE DOTTIE DUNBAR LUNCH GRanite 2-7100 1054 Hancock Street, Quincy I BARKER BUSINESS MACHINES LINCOLN PHARMACY - - R PA SOLD RENTED E IRED Hancock at Elm sts' One Maple Street W ua M o ston, ass. Quincy, Massachusetts EASTERN SHADE AND GREETING CARD SHOP SCREEN CO' 15 B al S W ll t M 104 Park St. Hyannis, Mass. e e t' 0 as on, ass' l L' f 20 john Street North Quincy, Mass. The Most Comp ete me O PR 3-6339 HY 1395 Greeting Cards on the South Shore Y'M'C'A' Wollaston Do-Nut Shoppe 17 Beale St. Wollaston 61 Washington Street "Homemade Assorted Donuts Quincy, Mass' Dr. Earl Stone, Dentist 7 Elm Ave. Vfollaston Western Auto Associate Store, 31-33 Beale St., Wollaston Auto Parts 1 Sporting Goods 1 Radios Congratulations from the FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE Cedar and Holdridge Streets ELMIRA, NEW YORK A reverence for the past Thomas Younce, Pastor A program for the present 813 South Broadway A vision for the future "THE SINGING CHURCH OF ELMIRA" 20I BOOSTER CLUB Mr. Tennyson R. Anthony Mr. and Mrs. Edison Aubrey Rev. and Mrs. Herbert Bedell Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester F. Brown Mr. Floyd Butler, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. C. Winfield Caswell Mr. and Mrs. Howard Chambers Mrs. Faith E. Clark Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Cone Rev. Collins Cramer Mrs. Carrie Bowman Crouse Mr . and Mrs. E. N. Dunsworth Mr. and Mrs. Harold H. DuVall Mr. and Mrs. Roland Emerson Mr and Mrs. Philip H. Everhart Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Farrell Mr. and Mrs. Leon M. Faxon Mr and Mrs. Dale Fluharty Mrs. Charles C. Gailey Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Gery, Sr. Mr and Mrs. Wesley Glass Mr. and Mrs. O. F. Gray Mr Willard Green Mr Mr Mr. .and Mrs. Lowell H. Hall and Mrs. L. G. Hammer and Mrs. James L. Haslett Rev. H. E. Heckert Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hersh Mrs. Albert Hodgkiss Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Hover, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Hybertson Mr. and Mrs. Martin E. lnsco Mrs. Ruth lrons Mr. and Mrs. Kyle Jarvis, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Charles K. Jones Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Keeler Mr. Ralph R. Kunkle Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Lambert Rev. and Mrs. George E. Lashley Rev. Maurice D. Laurie Mr. and Mrs. Marvin O. Lehto Mrs. Evelyn Lesser Mr. F. G. Littlefield Dr. and Mrs. Edward S. Mann Mr. and Mrs. Orville D. Mason Mrs. Elsie McMinn Rev. and Mrs. Ralph A. Mickel Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Moreland Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Mosgrove Mrs. Harold Mullen Mrs. Mamie F. Nyce Mr. and Mrs. John Pancarik Rev. and Mrs. Edwin A. Patmore Mr. Henry Patnode Rev. and Mrs. N. A. Pearce 202 Mr. and Mrs. Patterson Peoples Mr. Charles W. Rowe Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Rozema Mrs. Doris M. Ryder Mr. and Mrs. Everett Sanford Mr. and Mrs. Abel A. Scheidly Mr. and Mrs. Edward Schwanke Mr. and Mrs. Harry Sheets Mrs. Mary Shinault Mr. Mr Philip W. Smith and Mrs. Clarence Sommer Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Stark Mr. Herbert A. Sutton Mr. and Mrs. Webster Taylor, S Mrs. Marian K. Theus Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Tysinger Mr. Raymond D. Urner Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Watkins Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Wayman Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Weaver Mr. and Mrs. Walton G. Webb Mr. and Mrs. Ernest White Dr. and Mrs. W. B. Whitehead Mr. W. L. Wiley Mr. and Mrs. Chester Yager Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Young Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Zeigler Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Zeigler rig? Q Q X01 47 K Ever been Q snowbound by yearbook problems ? The Keller yearbook team will dig you out fast. Keller's experienced art department is always ready with apt solutions to yearbook problems. Another big reason why so many customers come baclc year after year-and why they seem to get into the habit of winnting top national awards. 7QgeQ5edZer Publishers of Finer Yearbooks 35' Clarence Avenue Bujalo 15, New York elm, ig y -4 . HIS yearbook has created a special set of memories for each member of the staff. Expressing our ideas creatively involved work, planning, and attention to detail. l However, this yearbook became a reality through the combined efforts of many people besides the immediate staff. Our thanks go to those who gave us special help: Ed and .lack Percy of Miller Studios, Ross Farnham and Jewell Gates of Keller Publishers, Dr. Alvin Kauffman, Prof. Alice Spangenberg, and to all advertisers whose assistance made this 1957 Nautilus financially possible. Chuck Gailey, Editor-In-Chief Dick Lehto, Business Manager I . -F ,A .Q .,. X-. oA 1 J'. ll 4, . 1-. P 2- l l STUDE Tl DEX ACKERSON, JAMES 78 216 S.W. 21st Way, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. ADAMS, CATHERINE 78, 122, 126 Box H55, S'Side, P. E. I., Canada ALCORN, KENNETH 71, 95, 117, 120, 121, 122, 123, 127, 133 24 Botsford St., Moncton, N. B., Canada ALLEN, ROBERT 78, 117 242 Allung Rd., Tallmadge, Ohio AMES, DALE 84, 92, 95, 127 Easton, Maine ANDERSON, JOHN 78, 117 391 Palmer St., Quincy, Mass. ANDERSON, JOYCE 71 215 S. Chestnut St., Barnesville, Ohio ANDREE, PAUL 78, 127, 136 905 Penna. Ave., Warren, Pa. ANDREWS, RUTH 84, 92, 113, 117, 118, 126,14o,142,143 Route 1, Shad Point, Salisbury, Md. ANTHONY, ADRIENNE 71, 93, 122, Kennetcook, Hants Co., Nova Scotia ASHLINE, SHIRLEY 84, 92, West Chazy, New York AUBREY, GEORGE 35, 104, Champlain, New York BABCOCK, HAROLD 78, 104, 114 Willet St., Wollaston, Mass. BACHMAN, JANICE 84, 93, 94, 248 Jefferson St., Ravenna, Ohio BAGSHAW, CLINTON . Box 96, Prosser, Washington BALDECK, CHARLES 78, 116, 123, 2281 Dewey Ave., Rochester, New York BAMBLING, PAUL 41 Califave, Quincy, Mass. BAMBLING, RONALD Burke, Virginia BANCO, AMELIA 84, 99, Dudley, Pa. BASS, EVELYN 62, 93, 122, Chestnut St., East Longmeadow, Mass. BEDELL, ELIZABETH 70, 71, 93, 126 127 127 123 126 62 127 84 78 127 127 111 122,123,127 40 Seneca Dr., Brightwaters, New York BENDER, JAMES Route 88, Harrisburg, Pa. BENELLI, GERARD 43 Rodman St., Quincy, Mass. BERGDOLL, THELMA 78, Route 3, Valley Rd., Cumberland, Md. BERGQUIST, ANN 47 Marshall, North Quincy, Mass. BERNECKER, DONALD 71, 127, 133, Route 2, Box 445, Homestead, Fla. BIGELOW, REUBEN 62, 118, Wyman Ave., Monument Beach, Mass. BIGGS, DORIS 35, 50, 92, 94, 112, 120,l23, 126,130,140, 141, 58 Cheriton Rd., Wollaston, Mass. BIGGS, RUTH 78, 93, 120, 123, 140, 58 Cheriton Rd., Wollaston, Mass. BINETTE, MARGARET 60, 122, Long Island Hospital, Boston 69, Mass. 78 62 127 84 136 125 118, 142 126, 142 125 BLACHLY, DAVID 71, 94, 119, 121, Pittsfield, Maine BLACKWELL, DALE 71, 122, 121 Market St., Scottdale, Pa. BLAZON, LEON 119, 387 Beacon St., Lowell, Mass. BOARDMAN, MARION 71, 100, 2211 11th St., Niagara Falls, New York BOCANEGRA, JUAN 78, 92, 95, 122, 126, K. C. No. 16, Apt. B., Cappara Terrace, Puerto Rico BODEN, FRED 71, 78, 89, 99, 111, 113, 125 126 127 115 123, 137 120, 124,131,133,134,136,137,138 74 Queen St., Newmarket, Ontario BONDIO, CAROL 83 34 Thorton St., Quincy, Mass. BORDEN, NANCY 71, 117, 122, 125 Douglas St., Uxbridge, Mass. BOSHART, DEAN 71 516 Julton St., Carthage, New York BOWMAN, BARBARA 84 Box 27, Essex Jct., Vermont BOWMAN, SAMUEL 119 Box 27, Essex Jct., Vermont BOWN, EUNICE 78, 89, 126 1032 S. Bradford St., Dover, Del. BRADLEY, JOYCE 62, 115, 117, 120 126 247 Beacon St., Lowell, Mass. BRICKER, JAMES 71, 117, 124, 133, 134, 136, 138 236 Clay Pike, Irwin, Pa. BRIGGS, WILLIAM 71 133 Fayson L. K. S., New Jersey BROOKS, PATRICIA 78,93 127 1912 4th, Canton, Ohio BROWN, AMY 71, 92, 124, 141 5 Clinton St., Haverhill, Mass. BROWN, DORIS 35, 89, 101 126 Three Springs, Pa. BROWN, GOLDIE 84, 93, 127 New Freedom, Pa. BROWN, JANICE 78, 121, 122 127 26 Burns St., Fairneld, Maine BRUMAGIN, DAVID 62, 95, 100, 120 125 751 Wash. St., Auburn, Mass. BRYNER, PHILIP 78, 127 133 Route 1, Claysville, Pa. BUELL, MARVIN 62 1024 Tennessee St., Lawrence, Kansas BURGESS, CAROLYN 61, 62, 99, 101, 120, 122, 123, 126, 139, 140 1108 Pelissier St., Windsor, Ontario BURGESS, VIRGINIA 62, 99, 122, 126, 139, 140 1 Percy Place, Cambridge, Mass. BURKHART, PAUL 36 1045 Jacoby St., Johnstown, Pa. BURLEY, DAVID 84 State Farm, Leesburg, New Jersey BURLEY, MARY ANNE 62, 92, 122, 126,140 State Farm, Leesburg, New Jersey BURNS, LAWRENCE 71, 117, 120, 121, 122 156 Mystic Valley Pk., Arlington, Mass. BUTLER, FLOYD 78. 119. 135 150 Hindman Lane, Wciston, W. Va. 205 BUTTS, KATHLEEN 63, 92, 120, 127 Route 1, Waynesburg, Ohio BYE, CAROL 36 Route 1, Annan, Ontario BYE, HARLEY 60 Route 1, Annan, Ontario BYERS, JANICE 78, 100, 116, 124, 141, 143 10394 Maplelawn, Detroit, Mich. CAIRNS, EDWARD 27 Strandburn Pk., Belfast, Ireland CALDWELL, CHARLES 63, 93, 117, 122, 130, 133,134, 136, 138 99 Francis Ave., Pawtucket, R. I. CALHOUN, RONALD 61, 63, 92, 94, 95, 71,94 117, 123, 126 Forest Hill, Maryland CASLER, LAWRENCE 78, 127 25 Cedar St., Warren, Pa. CASWELL, GERALD 63, 126 47 Ryder Ave., East Rockaway, New York 110, 135, 137 CHAMBERS, HOWARD 63, 92, 94, 95, l11,123,126,130,131,l32,134, Port Elizabeth, New Jersey CHAMBERS, WESTON 34, 36, 51, 95, 111, 123,126,130, 131,132 Port Elizabeth, New Jersey CHAPMAN, MARJORIE 71 Claremont, N. H. CHAVIER, JOHN 71, 117, 123, 127, 130, 133 117 Grinnell St., New Bedford, Mass. CHEN, BETTY 4 Chung-Chng Road, Jainan, Formosa, China 78, 127 CHENEY, JOYCE 78, 92, 94, 120, 123, 127, 140 14 Tuttle St., Saugus, Mass. CHRISTENSEN, TOM 36, 122 100 Chestnut St., Syracuse, New York CLARK, ROBERT E. 37 116 Phillips St., Wollaston, Mass. CLARK, ROBERT O. 78 5299 Brotherton, Cincinnati, Ohio CLECKNER, SARAH 37, 52, 103, 107, 110. 111, 113, 114, 116, 120, 123, 126 173 N. Richview Ave., Youngstown. Ohio CLIFFORD, RICHARD 71 Depot St., E. Wareham, Mass. CLIFTON, DAVID 78, 92, 94, 95, 119, 124, 133, 136 134 n. No. Union St.. Middletown, Pa. CLINGERMAN, BARBARA 71, 123 26 Blake Wollaston, Mass. CLINGERMAN, DAVID 8-1, 92. 126 Callard Rd., Poland 1-1, Ohio COGSWELL, HOWARD 63. 92, 120, 127 16 Brown St., Ft. Fainticld, Maine COLE, NORMA 73. 133. 1312 2280 Overland Ave., Warren. Ohio COLLINS. MARILYN 79. 93. 133. 115 54 Redland Ave., Rurn1'ord. R. 1. CONE, OLIVE F3 35 Baker S1.,HLl1lSOIl,1N1l1SS. COONS, RUTH fo, 113, 121, 136 51 Phelps Rd., Nlanchcsicr, Conn. COPELAND, JAMES 79 Portsmouth, Va. CORREIA, RICHARD 84 32 Falmouth St., Attleboro, Mass. CORRIE, MILLIE 63, 120, 121, 122,127 130, 140, 142, 143 Broad Top City, Pa. COSGROVE, GLORIA 79 28 Prescott Terrace, Quincy, Mass. COUCHENOUR, MELVIN 72 17 Holmes St., No. Quincy, Mass. COUCHENOUR, WILLIAM 79, 93, 126, 131, 132, 135, 137 Waterford, Pa. COWHERD, DONNA 84, 122, 125 475 Bay St., Ottawa, Ont., Canada CRAMER, JOHN 62, 92, 95 Route 2, Homer City, Pa. CRANDALL, FRANCIS 72 36 Gordon St., No. Quincy, Mass. CRISPELL, DOROTHIE 63, 111, 113, 114, 116, 125 Route 1. Berkshire, N. Y. CROFFORD, CHARLES 37 224 Holly St., Nampa, Idaho CROLEY, JOHN 63 24 Beach St., Wollaston, Mass. CROUSE, NEVIN 37, 95 64 Madison St., Westminster, Md. CUBIE, ROBERT 72, 100, 132 20 Mansfield St., Lynn, Mass. CULVER, FRED 72, 125 205 Boone Ave., Toronto, Ontario, Canada CUNNINGHAM, JOHN 83 31324 Sheridan, Garden City, Mich. CUSSON, ROBERT 83 31 Appleton St., No. Quincy, Mass. DANCY, PHYLLIS 84, 92, 126, 139 l25V2 East Cleveland Ave., Newark, Del. DANIELS, COLIN 72, 95, 121, 123, 127 Pownal, Vermont DAVIS, JAMES 84 Route 1, Kittanning, Pa. DEEM, JO ANN 34, 38, 122, 123, 127 425 Grant St., East Liverpool, Ohio DE LONG, JANET 79, 92, 94, 99, 117, 119, 126 15 Lincoln St., Houlton, Maine DEVINE, MOONYEAN 79, 92, 116, 126 4848 W. 20th St., Erie, Pa. DICKSON, JOHN 61 Safford St., Wollaston, Mass. DIEMER, WILLIAM 83 50 Pawsey St., Quincy, Mass. DIXON, BEVERLY 84, 93, 124 1723 Fifth St., New Brighton, Pa. DODGE, ELWOOD 79, 116, 121, 126 83 Reba Ave., Mansheld, Ohio DREIFORT, JACK 84, 93, 94, 95, 100, 117, 123, 127 1877 Hastings St., E. Cleveland 12, Ohio DRUMM, DORLA 84, 126, 140 Phalanx Stations, Ohio DUBE, DANIEL 63 419 Chestnut St., Williamstown, N. J. DUNSWORTH, MARY JANE 79, 94, 113, 116, 117, 123, 126 Robin Park, Bedford, Ohio DUVALL, ISABELLE 38 Route 2, Columbiana, Ohio DYMENT, WILLIAM 72 24 Buckingham Rd., Norwood, Mass. EAD, CAROLYN 64, 122, 124, 141 121 Willow St., Wollaston, Mass. EDWARDS, ROBERT 72, 122 Port Murray, N. J. EDWARDS, WAYNE 64 84 S. Main St., Danielson, Conn. ELLISON, WILBUR 60 10 Watkins St., Wollaston, Mass. ELLWOOD, BARBARA 72, 92, 94, 127 54 Willow St., Reading, Mass. EMERSON, JANICE 79, 117, 126, 139 9 Willow St., Auburn, Maine EMERY, GEORGE 60 234 East St., North Attleboro, Mass. ENMAN, JOYCE 79, 122, 126 234 Duke St., Sommerside, P. E. I., Canada ERBE, DANIEL 84, 93, 126 Robbinsville, N. J. ERBE, SAMUEL 64, 92, 117, 121, 122, 124 Robbinsville, N. J. ESSELSTYN, THEODORE 64, 92, 94, 95, 118, 124 26 Nourse St., Discovery Ful, S. Africa EVERHART, RODNEY 64, 92, 95, 127 1110-11 St. N.W., Canton 3, Ohio EVERTON, ADELARD 72, 93, 95, 125 150 Smith St., North Attleboro, Mass. FARBER, BARBARA 72, 100, 125 211 Lincoln Ave., Collingdale, Pa. FARRELL, ESTON JR. 79, 119, 125 222 Midvale St., Falls Church, Va. FAULKNER, BARBARA 64 139 Clay St., Wollaston, Mass. FAXON, ROBERT 64 326 Kenoza Ave., Haverhill, Mass. FETTER, MERLE 72, 93, 95, 127 Kylertown, Pa. FINK, BARBARA 79, 100, 127, 140, 143 17 Hersam St., Stoneham, Mass. FISCHMANN, JAMES 72, 93, 95, 122, 125 2425 Romis Rd., Akron 20, Ohio FLUHARTY, MARY 79, 92, 116, 120, 124 191 Samuel St., Beaver Falls, Pa. FOLEY, WILLIAM 83 105 Van Wagenen Ave., Jersey City, N. J. FORD, DOROTHY 79, 93, 94, 127, 143 1040 West 55th St., Ashtabula, Ohio FORD, SANDRA 79, 123, 127 93 Hawthorne St., Malden, Mass. FOUNTAIN, BEVERLY 38, 93, 120, 122, 126, 130, 140, 142, 143 Northville, N. Y. FOWLER, THOMAS 84, 93, 95, 127 76 E. Main St., Brookville, Pa. FREDERICK, JOYCE 84, 93, 127 Route 1, Limestone, N. Y. FRETZ, STEWART 64, 92, 94, 95, 123, 127 Koffels Rd., Route 1, Lansdale, Pa. FRYE, DONNA 72 Hillcrest Farm, Waverly, N. Y. FULLER, SARAH 79, 92, 94, 121, 127, 142, 143 Easton, Maine GAILEY, CHARLES 64, 94, 107, 111, 112, 115, 116, 126 Route 4, Watertown, N. Y. 206 GANDER, LULU 72, 93, 118, 125 Soldiers Grove, Wisconsin GANTERT, GERALDINE 72, 92, 94, 122, 127 Route 1, Springhill, Nova Scotia, Canada GARLAND, ROBERT 72, 93, 94, 95, 116, 127 Eliot, Maine GARRON, PAUL 72, 126, 137 447 So. 2nd St., Millville, N. J. GEHMAN, LA RUE 79, 93, 119, 127, 139 327 W. Walnut St., Kutztown, Pa. GERMAN, PAUL 64, 95, 122, 132 301 Urban Ave., Norwood, Pa. GERMAN, ROBERT 79, 93, 117, 125, 132, 137 301 Urban Ave., Norwood, Pa. GERY, ELEANORE 65, 99, 113, 118, 125, 130, 139, 142, 143 100 N. Sproul Rd., Broomall, Pa. GILCHRIST, CINDA 72, 122, 123, 127, 140, 143 MC 22, Westfield, E. Liverpool, Ohio GLANZEL, DOROTHY 92, 126 1372 Latta Rd., Rochester 12, N. Y. GLASS, JOHN 65, 136 Groveville Park, Beacon, N. Y. GLUSKER, DAVID 79, 125 85 Hurd Ave., Saugus, Mass. GOODWIN, HAZEL 38 64 Oak Rd., Norwood, Mass. GORMAN, WALTER 79, 119, 127 Mountain Ave., Revere, Mass. GRANT, GLENDA 84, 93, 122, 126 764 Waterloo St., London, Ont. Canada GRANT, MARIAN 65, 93, 104, 113, 118, 120, 122, 126, 140, 142 764 Waterloo St., London, Ont., Canada GRAY, ARLENE 85, 115, 126, 139 303 N. Ave. N.E., New Philadelphia, Ohio GRAY, RACHEL 85, 93, 125 Route 2, Warren, Pa. GREEN, DONALD 65, 93, 95, 127 Whiteford, Md. GRESSETT, GEORGE 39, 126 134 Waterston Ave., Wollaston, Mass. GUNSALUS, DONALD 72 422 Lincoln Ave., Ogdensburg, N. Y. HAAS, CLYDE 34, 39, 53, 110, 123, 126, 130, 136, 137 916 Buckeye St., Warren, Ohio HADJIAN, SARKIS 85 136 Georges Picot Beint, Lebanon HAGERUP, ANGIE 65, 92, 122, 127 Route 2, Oakland, Maine HALBERG, ALLEN 60 82 Webster St., No. Quincy, Mass. HALL, LOWELL 70, 73, 115, 116, 118, 120, 121,124,136 2006 Germaine St., Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio HALL, MARGARET 85 Castorland, N. Y. HAMMER, DONALD 73, 93, 121, 122, 127 Alum Bank, Pa. HAMMER, SHARON 79, 92, 127 Alum Bank, Pa. HARDY, KENNETH 73, 95, 120, 121, 122, 124 55 Havelock St., Amhurst, Nova Scotia, Canada ,....lln- HARRIS, BETTY 73, 127, 139 402 South Ave., Bradford, Pa. HASELTON, WALTER 83, 117 Wilmington, N. Y. HASLETT, NANCY 73, 113, 115 999 Big Falls Ave., Akron 10, Ohio HASSELL, MERWYN 204-15-104 Ave., Hollis, N. Y. HATCHER, MARY 73, 94, 123, 126, 140, 142 119 Prather Ave., Jamestown, N. Y. HATCHER, SHARON 79, 126 119 Prather Ave., Jamestown, N. Y. HATHAWAY, JOHN 60 41 Packards Lane, Quincy 69, Mass. HAUCK, RICHARD 39 65 Richmond Hill, New Canaan, Conn. HAWES, LOIS 85, 94, 124 M.C. 56, N. Park Est., Warren, Ohio HEBER, FRANKIE 73, 92, 115, 122, 126, 140 35 San Carlos St., St. Augustine, Fla. HECKERT, PATRICIA 79 510 Oldtown Rd., Cumberland, Md. HELFRICH, ROBERT 79, 93, 127 7th Ave., Lacroft, E. Liverpool, Ohio HEMMINGS, BARBARA 39, 92, 114, 120, 122, 125 122 Oceanview Rd., Lynbrook, N. Y. HENCK, ROBERT 80 Darlington, Md. HENCK, SAMUEL 40 Darlington, Md. HERMAN, JOAN 80 46 Coolidge Ave., S. Portland, Maine HERRON, DUANE 65, 89, 92, 95, 124 54 Wiltwyck Ave., Kingston, N. Y. HERSH, RUTH 65, 127 930 E. Hamilton St., Allentown, Pa. HERSMAN, WILLA 80, 93, 124, 126 Route 1, Polk, Pa. HILYARD, GERALD 73, 120, 127 Clinton, Maine HINES, LOUISA 65, 126 196 Pleasant St., Brockton, Mass. HINKLE, MARTHA 85, 92, 126 347 N. 3rd St., Lehighton, Pa. HINSON, VICTORINE 84, 120, 122, 127, 141 St. John's Rd., Pembroke West, Bermuda HODGKINS, SUSAN 80, 99, 123, 127, 140 499 Nash Rd., New Bedford, Mass. HODGKISS, JOHN 40 92 Franklin Ave., Wollaston 70, Mass. HODGKISS, RAMONA 40 92 Franklin Ave., Wollaston 70, Mass. HOLCOMB, JACK 85, 95, 122, 124, 133, 135, 136, 138 479 Sieber Ave., Akron, Ohio HORN, DONALD 80, 92, 95, 127, 133, 137 Route 2, Charleroi, Pa. HORNBERGER, GLENN 65 88 Taffvail Rd., Quincy, Mass. HOUSER, ROBERT 80, 125, 127 413 W. Palmer St., Morrisville, Pa. HOVER, RICHARD 80, 93, 94, 127 1323 Youll St., Niles, Ohio HUCK, ROBERT 73 North Warren, Pa. HUNTER, ESTHER 80, 93, 121, 125, 141 Route 6, Augusta, Maine HUNTER, MARSHA 73, 120, 127, 139, Box 642, Ausable Forks, New York HUTCHINSON, DAVID 73, 117, 131, 140 132, 135,136,l37,138 76 Willis St., New Bedford, Mass. y HYBERTSON, LARRY 73, 95, 104, 107 l16,122, 125, 132, 137 Madison, So. Dakota INSCO, JANICE 34, 40, 117, 122 111-42-202 St., Hollis 12, N. Y. IRONS, WALTER 80, 93, 94, 95, 123, 125 235 Independence Ave., Trenton, N. J. IRVING, RICHARD 80, 126 8 East Elm St., Yarmouth, Maine JACKSON, JIMMY 80, 95, 123, 126 52 Clapp St., Dorchester, Mass. JARDINE, DONNA 80, 93, 123, 126, 139 Box 30, Mitchell Rd., Cape Elizabeth, Me. JARVIS, FRANCIS 80 16 Labadine St., Wollaston, Mass. JARVIS, RICHARD 41, 127 Route 3, New Philadelphia, Ohio JARVIS, ROBERTA 73, 92, 94, 120, 127 Route 3, New Philadelphia, Ohio JEFFERY, STEPHEN 80, 103, 131, 133 515 Lynn Fells Pky., Melrose, Mass. JOHNSON, DOROTHY 85, 93, 126 Route 3, Box 356, Kent, Ohio JOHNSTON, ANN 80, 93, 94, 126, 142 206 Ritchie Ave., Weirton, W. Va. JOINES, SHELVA 65, 92, 93, 123, 126 Street, Maryland JONES, JAMES 73, 93, 95, 117, 132, 137, 138 Route 1, Bel Air, Md. JONES, LOIS 41, 120, 122, 124 Route 1, Prospect, Pa. JONES, THOMAS 73, 92, 95, 127 Box 127, Allenport, Pa. KEELER, HERBERT 80, 116, 122 88 Essex St., Beverly, Mass. KEELER, JEAN 80, 92, 116, 124, 141, 143 Cherry St., Pennsville, N. J. KEHM, JOAN 73, 92, 93, 94, 127 1574 Collier Ave., Carnegie, Pa. KEIM, KENNETH 41, 54, 95, 123, 127 408 Main St., Royersford, Pa. KELLER, BETTY 80, 117, 127 Box 121, Bangor, Pa. KELVINGTON, WILLIAM 92, 94, 95, 123, 127 2738 Glenmawr Ave., Pittsburgh 4, Pa. KLUMAS, JERRY 80, 119, 125, 137 594 Grand Ave., Lindenhurst, New York KLUMAS, LARRY 73, 127, 133 594 Grand Ave., Lindenhurst, New York KOSTY, ANTHONY 60 New York Ave., Hellertown, Pa. KOTTIS, GREGORY 41, 93, 119, 122, 124 62 Douglas St., Uxbridge, Mass. KOURY, PHILIP 80, 126 895 Quincy Shore Blvd., Quincy, Mass. KRUTENAT, CHRISTINE 80, 93, 115, 116,120, 126,140 7726 Ridge Road, Brockport, New York KUNKEL, BEVERLY 80, 92, 94, 120, 123, 126, 140, 141, 142 Boonsboro, Maryland 207 KUNKEL, KAYE 73, 140, 142 Box 372, Boonsboro, Maryland LAMBERT, RICHARD 73, 116, 125 15762 Stansbury, Detroit, Mich. LANDERS, ROBERT 66, 121, 122 Sandford Yar. Co., N. S. LANTZ, GLORIA 42, 122 58 Wheatland Ave., Dorchester, Mass. LASHLEY, GERALD 42, 130, 133, 134, 135, 138 406 Fairfield Ave., Johnstown, Pa. LATFORD, JAMES 66, 120, 121, 122 80 Teeple St., Woodstock, Ontario LAUDERMILK, ELLEN 42 100 Scotch Pond Place, Quincy, Mass. LAUDERMILK, WILLIAM 66 100 Scotch Pond Place, Quincy, Mass. LAURIE, MAURICE 42, 120, 124 101 W. Clinton At., Dover, New Jersey LAVIN, ELAINE 73 Frostbury, Md. LEHTO, RICHARD 43, 55, 112, 117, 123, 124 924 Valley St., Ashtabula, Ohio LESSER, DONNA 80, 127, 140, 142, 143 North Harwich, Mass. LEWIS, DAVIDA 74, 92, 117, 127 Finleyville, Pa. LITTLEFIELD, DONN 43, 95, 124 167 Ferry St., Malden, Mass. LONG, DONALD 74, 89, 93, 95, 127 57 Wendell Ave., Wollaston 70, Mass. LUNDEN, JOHN 80, 104, 117, 124, 133 728 Madison Ave., Albany, New York LUPTON, DANNY 74, 121, 123, 124 1674 N. E. Ave., Tallmadge, Ohio LYNCH, ROBERT 43 Centenary Drive, Salisbury, Maryland MacDONNELL, DEBORAH 80, 124 154 Granite St., Quincy, Mass. MacKAY, JOANNE 81, 100, 117, 124, 139, 141 2787 Carson Ave., Detroit 9, Mich. MacLEOD, NORMA 44 Common St., Braintree, Mass. MacNEVIN, DOROTHY 85, 122, 126 St. Eleanor's, P. E. I., Canada MANCHESTER, CAROLYN 81, 125 Waterville, Vermont MANCHESTER, MERILYN 66, 92, 94, 118, 125, 141,142 Waterville, Vermont MANN, MERRITT 66, 114, 117, 119, 123,l26,l30,132,134,137 35 W. Elm Ave., Wollaston, Mass. MANN, ROBERT 77, 81, 116, 117. 121, 126, 132, 137 35 W. Elm Ave.. Wollaston. Mass. MASON, ORVILLE 74, 127 24 York St., Springfield, Mass. MASTROBUONO, VIRGINIA 66, 122, 124 Chepochet. Rhode Island, R. F. D. MATHOS, DOROTHY 77, 81,91 116, 126 5909 Fredanna St., Pittsburgh, Pa. MATTHEWS, ALAN 81,91 95, 127 Route 1. Grove City. Pat. MAURITSEN. RICHARD 81.121133 146-28 182 St., Springlicl-.1 Gardens, N. Y. McALLASTER, LARRY 81, 125 224 Dana Ave., Boston, Mass. MCCORMACK, FRED 74 18 Montclair Ave.. No. Quincy, Mass. McGREW, DANIEL 81, 103, 117, 126 227 E. 2nd St., Dover, Ohio l'vlcMINN, CHARLES 85 78 Scotch Pond Place, Quincy, Mass. McPHERSON, DELORES 74, 93, 94, 118, 120, 122, 126 1-D St., Beaver, Pa. MELLINGER, ELAINE 70, 74, 113, 115, 125, 141 Route 4, Lancaster, Pa. MERKI, WILLIAM 74, 93, 94, 95, 119, 121, 123 431 Perkiomen Ave., Lansdale, Pa. MERRIAM, STANLEY 81,127,133 Wolcott, Vermont MERRINER, RICHARD 74,95 871 Clark St., Akron, Ohio MICKEL, HUBERT 66, 93, 118, 119, 121, 127 Alum Bank, Pa. MICKEL, RONALD 34, 43, 56, 93, 94, 95, 111, 115, 118, 123, 127, 139 Alum Bank, Pa. MILBURY, MARVIN 70, 74, 93, 95, 127 Easton, Maine MILLER, ERNEST 81 12 Parnell St., No. Weymouth, Mass. MILLER, GORDON 81, 92, 95, 125 3710 Bunker Hill Rd., Apt. H-6, Brentwood, Maryland MILSTEAD, JESSICA 81, 92,103,1I6,127 Route 1, Box 23, Bryans Road, Md. MINER, JUDITH 83 MINGIN, RUTH 81, 93, 124 Route 1, Box 31, Somers Point Rd., May's Landing, N. J. MOORE, MYRTLE 66, 117,122,125 Box 319, Windsor, Nova Scotia MORELAND, YVONNE 85, 93, 125 Lothian, Maryland MORGAN, ARTHUR 66 59 Hancock St., Braintree, Mass. MOSGROVE, HAROLD 34 Warwick St., Wollaston, Mass. MOSGROVE, MELVIN 74 Tom Center Rd., Willoughby, Ohio MUCCI, NANCY 66,122 Box 42, Lucerne Mines, Pa. MULLEN, WALTER 67, 89, 92, 95, 118, 122, 125 Easton, Digby Co., Nova Scotia, Canada MURPHY, PAUL 74, 127 Hector, New York MUSIC, LOWELL 74 700 Perry Rd., Tallmadge, Ohio MUSSER, JAMES 81, 93, 126 Markey Lane, York, Pa. MYATT, GEORGE 81, 92,117,125 Box 63, Waltersburg, Pa. MYATT, RUSSELL 44, 93, 95, 123, 124 Box 63, Waltersburg, Pa. NEWBY, ROBERT 81, 120, 122, 127 107 Atlas Ave., Toronto, Ont. Canada NEWLEN, PATRICIA 81, 93, 94, 99, 123, 126 1760 Vernon N.W., Ohio NORMAN, RONALD 81, 125, 132, 137 Stony Hill Rd., Butler, New Jersey NORTH, PATRICIA 44, 118, 120, 122, 126 Conowingo Rd., Bel Air, Md. NORTH, RONALD 81,100,116,126, 132, 137 Conowingo Rd., Bel Air, Md. NOVACK, ROBERT 74, 124 266 Southern Artery, Quincy, Mass. NOVY, CHARLES 81, 92, 112, 121, 127 1772 Maywood Rd., South Euclid 21, Ohio NYCE, PATRICIA 81, 93, 126 1103 South Hall St., Allentown, Pa. OLSON, WALTER 23 Appletown St., No. Quincy, Mass. OWENS, CHARLES 67, 122, 124 Hartland, N. B., Canada PANCARIK, ANDREW 81, 119, 127 Route 1, Quakertown, Pa. PARK, EUGENE 74, 126 660 Washington St., Weymouth, Mass. PARRY, RALPH 85, 99, 117 3852 Terrace St., Philadelphia, Pa. PARTRIDGE, JANICE 85, 92, 126 13 Allison St., Concord, N. H. PATCH, PHILBY 81, 124 144 N. Hudson St., Johnson City, N. Y. PATMORE, EDWIN 127 146 Main St., Norwalk, Conn. PATNODE, CLIFFORD Keeseville, N. Y. PATTERSON, LOWELL 74, 122, 126 1279 Ryan Terr., St. Louis, Mo. PEARCE, CARLTON 74 783 Hancock St., Wollaston, Mass. PEOPLES, DOUGLAS 61, 67, 117 Fishkill, N. Y. PETERSON, DOROTHY 81, 94, 120, 121, 124, 141 60 Rockwell St., Malden, Mass. PHILLIPS, BETTY JEAN 82, 92, 126 309 N. College St., Bethany, Ckla. PHILLIPS, RONALD 63. 119, 123, 127 Route 1, Watkins Glen, N. Y. PILLSBURY, CHARLES 82, 125, 136, 137 Route 2, Farmington, Maine PILMORE, FRANK 82 3 Inglewood Rd., Braintree, Mass. POOLE, CALVIN 70, 74, 92, 115, 121, 124 804 Central St., Stoughton, Mass. POOLE, DAVID 74, 119, 121, 126, 132 3110 Idlewood Ave., Youngstown 11, Ohio POOLE, ROBERT 74, 95, 127 20 Beech St., Framingham, Mass. PORTER, GEORGE 82, 92, 95, 124 106 Hillcrest Drive, Munhall, Pa. POWELL, ISABELLE 82, 92, 126 Box 52, Bricks, North Carolina PRATT, FRANCIS 44, 122 18 Greene St., Wollaston, Mass. PRATT, JANICE 44, 120 18 Greene St., Wollaston, Mass. PYNE, MURIEL 45 55 Pilgrim Rd., Melrose, Mass. RABIDEAU, MARY 75, 93, 94, 120, 127 Altona, New York RAMSTEAD, BARBARA 75, 100, 125, 139, 141, 142 113 Marwood Dr., Bridgeville, Pa. 208 RAWLINGS, THOMAS 82, 127 Box 66, Riceville, Pa. REED, LO RAE 75, 92, 113, 122, 140, 141 36 Rector Ct., W. Englewood, New Jersey RICE, STANLEY 75 37 Newton Ave., Wollaston, Mass. RICHARDSON, EVERETT 75, 95, 120,125 36 Gordon St., Wollaston, Mass. RICHMOND, NORMA 82, 101,116,126 Route 8, Box 268, Charlotte, N. C. RICKETTS, RUBY 85, 93, 94, 118, 120, 124, 139, 140, 141,143 679 Kearsarge Way, Portsmouth, N. H. RINES, JOYCE 82, 124, 142, 143 Electric Ave., Lunenburg Dist., Fitchburg, Mass. ROBERTS, BRANSON 77, 82, 117, 125, 132, 135,137,138 502 Market St., Scottdale, Pa. ROBERTS, JOANN 75, 92, 117, 122, 127 502 Market St., Scottdale, Pa. ROBINSON, BRADFORD 45 Vineyard Haven, Mass. ROGERS, COLEMAN 67, 100, 122, 127 12 Day St., So. Portland, Maine ROGERS, LILLIE 82, 93, 122, 126, 140 85 Black Rock Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. ROSENBERGER, ELDON 75 Route 2, Farmington, Maine ROSS, STANLEY 82, 126 Strong, Maine ROWE, ETHEL 75, 92, 122, 127 Vassalboro, Maine ROZEMA, SANDRA 82, 122, 125, 139 9345 S. Justine St., Chicago, III. RULAND, LELIA MAE 60 East Springfield, Pennsylvania ST. CLAIR, HILDA 82, 93, 94, 116,122,126 6003 Parrish Ave., Newport News, Va. SANFORD, JOAN 67, 120, 122, 124 Kiel Ave., Butler, New Jersey SAVAGE, GWENDOLYN 82, 93, 94, 121, 124, 139,141,143 105 N. W. 4th Ave., Homestead, Fla. SCHEER, JANE 75, 121, 122,124,141 Route 6, Mercer, Pa. SCHEER, JEAN 75,127 Route 6, Mercer, Pa. SCHEIDLY, ROBERT 75, 92, 94, 95, 126 73-B Trumbull Ct., Newton Falls, Ohio SCHLOUGH, VIRGINIA 82,119,127 2311 Hay St., Easton, Pa. SCHNEPF, DONALD 67, 100 124 Henry St., Valley Stream, New York SCHUBERT, RICHARD 61, 67, 93, 107, 111, 114, 125, 132 12 Scammell Ave., Trenton, New Jersey SCHUSTER, RICHARD 75,120,127 509 Ritchie St., Hamilton, Missouri SCHWANKE, RUTH 82, 117, 118,125 521 Coleridge Rd., Painesville, Ohio SEAVEY, RUTH 85, 94, 127, 140 44 Sterling Pl., Manchester, Conn. SEYFRIED, ROBERT 67, 123 200-A Marlboro St., Wollaston, Mass. SHAHIED, ISAAC 75 6 Main Port Ave., Port Fonad, Egypt SHANKEL, JACK 82, 92, 95, 116,127 1749 Dee St., Wyandotte, Michigan SHANNON, ARLENE 82, 116, 117,126 Route 1, Box 18, Phalanx Station, Ohio -L.....ll- SHARPES, RAYMOND 77, 82, 93, 117, 126, 132, 134, 137 1141 High Harrisonbury, Virginia SHEETS, JAMES 67, 92, 95, 100, 111, 120, 122,125,130,132,134,135,137,l38 Clarksville, Pa. SHENE, KAREN 82, 117, 126 Route 1, Plattsburgh, New York SHEPARD, LINDA 75, 92, 127 Route 1, Hannibal, New York SHINAULT, JANET 45, 122, 124, 141, 143 35148 Sheffield, Wayne, Mich. SHOEMAKER, LORRAINE 75, 117, 125 Hallstead, Pa. SIMS, EDWARD 68, 101, 119, 122, 124, 133 356 Whiton St., Jersey City, New Jersey SINGELL, LARRY 82, 124, 136 1389 Addison Rd., Cleveland, Ohio SIPES, JANET 82, 93, 113, 120, 123, 125, 139 25 So. Elm Ave., Aldan, Pa. SKILLINGS, CONSTANCE 45, 92, 103, 104,113,118,l25,130,l40,141,142 Steep Falls, Maine SLAUGHENHAUPT, DONNA 68, 93, 120, 121, 124 159 Pacific St., Massapequa Park, N. Y. SMITH, DONALD 82, 103, 125, 133, 136 5216 So. Saline St., Syracuse, New York SMITH, JOHN 75, 92, 126, 130, 134, 137, 138 Ellegood St., Route 5, Salisbury, Md. SMITH, JUNE 68, 115, 126 5 Holmes Run Rd., Falls Church, Va. SMITH, RICHARD 85 Route 2, Miliinburg, Pa. SNOW, WILLIAM 83 15 Fairmount S., Dorchester 24, Mass. SNYDER, ARLENE 75, 117, 126 5827 Shepherd Rd., Ashtabula, Ohio SOMMER, BETH 82, 92, 127, 140, 143 4564 Franklin St., Bellaire, Ohio SOULIA, EMMA 68, 127, 140 133 E. Squantum St., No. Quincy, Mass. SOULIA, ROBERT 75, 93, 95, 127 133 E. Squantum St., No. Quincy, Mass. SOVA, ESTHER 85, 125, 139 5308 Lancaster Ave., Charleston, W. Va. SPEAKMAN, ELWOOD 70, 75, 111, 120, 123, 132 623 W. New York Ave., Sebring, Ohio SPEAKMAN, ROGER 61, 68, 104, 107,122, 135 W. Virg. Ave., Sebring, Ohio 123 STAHL, RICHARD 82, 126 428W N. Fulton, Allentown, Pa. STANFORD, IRVA 46, 120, 122, 125 157 West Munsen Ave., Dover, N. J. STANFORD, WARNER 75, 117, 119, 120, 121, 122, 127 157 West Munsen Ave., Dover, N. J. STARK, RAYMOND 316 Lincoln Ave., Ephrata, Pa. STARNES, LUTHER 68, 95, 102, 107, 114, 116, 117, 123, 126 83, 93, 125 Bethel, Delaware STAUFFER, ELSIE 83, 92, 127 Route 4, Bloomsburg, Pa. STEELE, HELEN 68, 122, 126 Dewey Ave., Barnesville, Ohio STETSON, HAROLD 76 26 East 6th St., Hamilton, Ontario STETSON, JOAN 57, 101, 113, 120, 125, 130, 140, 141 7 Cornell St., Springiield, Mass. STILES, FRED 117 301 Woodland St., Ebensburg, Pa. STRANG, JOYCE 68, 114, 120, 122, 125 9057 S. Damen, Chicago, Ill. SUTTON, JUNE 46, 93, 120, 122, 127, 140 Arbovale, West Virginia SWAIN, ROBERT 83, 94, 95, 123, 127 75 Cottage St., Manchester, Conn. SWARTZ, DOROTHY 76, 92, 118, 120, 126 835 Lyndhurst St., Baltimore, Md. SWARTZ, JAMES 83, 92, 126 1004 Indiana Ave., Glassport, Pa. TAYLOR, WILLIAM 76 21 Fair Ave., Westminster, Maryland THATCHER, CARL 77, 83, 92, 125 8708 Rhode Island Ave., College Park, Md. THOMAS, FRANK 85, 127, 133 THOMPSON, BONNIE 83, 124, 141, 142, 143 1427 Linwood Ave. S.W. Canton, Ohio TIRRELL, JOHN 76, 125 12 Avon Way, Quincy, Mass. TOLLIVORO, EVANGELINE 83, 116, 117, 127 76 Shady Lane, Sommerset, New York TORSEY, ALLEN 76, 127 484 Boston Post Road, Marlboro, Mass. TYSINGER, FREIDA 60, 92 Wiley Ford, West Virginia URNER, MARIANA 83, 126 Oaks, Pa. USHER, ELIZABETH 76 West Baldwin, Maine VanSKIVER, DOROTHY 76, 125, 139 13 Grove St., Sussex, New Jersey VECCHIONE, NANCY 61, 68, 89, 93, 113, l22,125,140,141,142 50 Depot St., E. Douglas, Mass. VENA, TONY 83, 132 Route 3, Meyersdale, Pa. WAGNER, CHARLOTTE 85 East Wilton, Maine WAKEFIELD, CHARLES 60 35 Beach St., Wollaston, Mass. WANNER, DALE 46, 117, 123 116 N. Main St., Spring City, Pa. WATKINS, DONALD 83 "The Glen," Norwell, Mass. WAYMAN, DAVID 76, 93, 117, 127 1208 Elwell St., Pittsburgh 7, Pa. WAYMAN, SYLVIA 83, 92, 113, 117, 127 1208 Elwell St., Pittsburgh 7, Pa. WEAVER, THOMAS 76, 93, 94, 95, 126 331 Para Ave., Akron 5, Ohio WEBB, BILL 76, 100, 104, 113, 124, 130, 133, 134, 135,136 21 16-1 lth St., Cuy. Falls, Ohio WELCH, RICHARD 85, 92, 95, 123, 126 39 Ridgeway Drive, Quincy, Mass. WENGER, FRED 34, 47, 58, 93, 118, 123 12 S. Summit Ave., Pitman, N. J. WESLOW, JOHN 76, 92, 125, 132 Route 2, Box 95, Frostburg, Md. 209 WEST, WILLIAM 47, 95, 122, 123, 125 805 Ossington Ave., Toronto, Canada WHEELER, MARY LOU 76, 93, 94, 125, 142 Route 1, Hardwick, Vermont WHELPY, SANDRA 76 11 Cypress Road, Milton, Mass. WHIPPLE, MARY 83, 93, 127, 139 Route 2, Shippensburg, Pa. WHITE, CAROL SUE 85, 93, 117, 120, 139 Box 138, Kent, Ohio WHITE, HOWARD 69, 127 Millertown, Pa. WHITEHEAD, PRISCILLA 76, 113, 122, 125, 139 2610 Pecan Dr., Fayetteville, N. C. WHITEHEAD, WILLIAM 47, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 125 2610 Pecan Dr., Fayetteville, N. C. WHITING, ROBERT 83, 126 Johnson, Vermont WHITTENBERGER, RONALD 69, 122, 125 24 Beach St., Wollaston 70, Mass. WILEY, DAVID 83, 124, 133 Box 73, Linthicum Heights, Md. WILLIAMS, WILLIAM 126 104 Willow St., Wollaston, Mass. WILLWERTH, EDWIN 69 68 Wescott St., Malden, Mass. WILSON, ELLA MAE 69, 120, 122, 127, 140, 143 6 Fairway Rd., Essex, Baltimore, Md. WILSON, NORMA 47, 120, 122, 127 Albion St., Trenton, Nova Scotia WOODBRIDGE, LEONA 83, 94, 123, 127 Route 2, Ogdensburg, N. Y. WOODS, ANDREA 77, 83, 126 Route 1, Phalanx Station, Ohio WOODS, ENID 76, 92, 118, 126 Route 1, Phalanx Station, Ohio WOOSTER, RAYMOND 76 R. F. D., Fisk St., Chelmsford, Mass. WORDEN, VALLIS 83, 93, 122, 127 Meductic, N. B., Canada WYCOFF, BEATRICE 48, 59, 93, 94, 122, 123, 126 4124 Washington Ave., Erie, Pa. YACUBIAN, ARTHUR 76 235 Beach St., Wollaston, Mass. YAGER, BERTHA 76, 120, 123, 127, 140, 143 Route 1, Littlefield Rd., Camden, N. J. YAGER, LOUIS 83, 94, 127 Route 1, Littlefield Rd., Camden, N. J. YOUNCE, CAROL 83 444 Dennison Ave., Akron 12, Ohio YOUNG, THOMAS 48, 127, 133, 137, 138 29 Reba Ave., Manstield, Ohio ZEIGLER, JOAN 83, 93, 94, 126, 139. 140. 141. 142 527 Chestnut St., Lansdale, Pa. ZIEGLER, BEVERLY 76. 122, 125 Route 4, Broad Rd., Syracuse, New York ZIEGLER, GLADYS 48, 92. 107, 122, 127. 130, 140, 142. 143 Mounted Route, Collegeville, Pa. ZURCHER, JOYCE 76, 117. 122 504A Newton Dr., Newton Falls, Ohio A Cappella Administration Advertising Basketball Business Contacts Campus Camera Chapel Speakers Cheerleaders Christmas Party Church Choir Classes Clubs College Church Contents Debate Dedication Evangelistic Association Faculty Fall Party Football Foreword Freshmen Girls' All Star Basketball Girls' Basketball Girls' Volleyball Glee Club Graduate Students Greenbook Staff Honor Society 117 14-17, 29-31 144-203 134-138 144-210 114,115 90,91 139 103 89 32-85 119-123 88 3 116 4,5 92,93 18-28 100,101 131-133 2 77-83 142 142,143 140,141 117 60 116 118 DEX House Council Index Juniors Leaders Messiah Nautilus "N" Club NYPS Organizations Our Campus PAL Rush Day Seniors Senior Trip Sigma Delta Delta Sigma Delta Kappa Sigma Delta Sigma Sigma Delta Zeta Sophomores Sports Student Council Student Foreign Missionary Fellowship Student Index Student Life Student Ministerial Association Valentine Formal Whois Who Worship The NAUTILUS is a member of THE ASSOCIATED COLLEGIATE PRESS ASSOCIATION THE COLUMBIA SCHOLASTIC PRESS ASSOCIATION 210 118 210 61-69 12-31 105 112,113 130 89 108-127 6-11 84,85 99 34-49 106 124 125 126 127 70-76 128-143 110,111 94 205-209 96-107 95 107 49-59 86-95 AUTCDGRAPI-IS AUTOGRAPHS 212 1 . , I' 'I I' I , . II I I I I , I I I I I I II II' HI ,I III 'I II .I QI I I I I I I I II II I II I I II II II -I Ii: II EI I I I I I I I I I I I I It L I i


Suggestions in the Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) collection:

Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

1954

Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Page 1

1955

Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

1956

Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

1958

Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection, 1959 Edition, Page 1

1959

Eastern Nazarene College - Nautilus Yearbook (Quincy, MA) online yearbook collection, 1960 Edition, Page 1

1960

1985 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1970 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1972 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1965 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals 1983 Edition, online yearbooks, online annuals
FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
Are you trying to find old school friends, old classmates, fellow servicemen or shipmates? Do you want to see past girlfriends or boyfriends? Relive homecoming, prom, graduation, and other moments on campus captured in yearbook pictures. Revisit your fraternity or sorority and see familiar places. See members of old school clubs and relive old times. Start your search today! Looking for old family members and relatives? Do you want to find pictures of parents or grandparents when they were in school? Want to find out what hairstyle was popular in the 1920s? E-Yearbook.com has a wealth of genealogy information spanning over a century for many schools with full text search. Use our online Genealogy Resource to uncover history quickly! Are you planning a reunion and need assistance? E-Yearbook.com can help you with scanning and providing access to yearbook images for promotional materials and activities. We can provide you with an electronic version of your yearbook that can assist you with reunion planning. E-Yearbook.com will also publish the yearbook images online for people to share and enjoy.