Burbank Junior High School - Wizard Yearbook (Berkeley, CA)

 - Class of 1940

Page 17 of 52

 

Burbank Junior High School - Wizard Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1940 Edition, Page 17 of 52
Page 17 of 52



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Page 17 text:

ORIAL GREAT AMBITIONS MBITION is one of the most wonderful things in this world of ours. Many of our greatest men and women were handicapped seriously, but they were ambitious enough not to become discouraged. We can do almost anything if we have the ambit- ion to do it. Our school, Burbank, could be“the best in the west”, if we had the ambition to make it so. If every one would co-operate in making our school a school of good citizens, of care- ful students, it could be very easily done. It is a great task but not imposs- ible for ambitious, co-operative boys and girls. — Marie Lueder WE LEARN BY DOING r-w HAT DID I hear you say, you yV wished to find some informa- tion? Inventors? Why, yes, we have much in formation on inventors. Would you like to step into the Bur- cank Library, the library of 2800 books? Ah - and who is this, you think to yourself, as you see a girl advancing toward you. She is your friendly library assistant who will be saying, “And what may I do for you?” You reply “Well, I — er, I want seme in- formation about inventors.” Inven- tors, well, now let me see. You find the information in 608-L54 — Peaks in Invention, or 926-G35 — Great Inventors. ' on want a brief outline? Here are our encyclopedias. Or if you still cannot find your information we have files in the back of the room. Within a few minutes you are busy at work getting the desired information. While you are working, you may look up — you see the assistant busily checking in books or sorting, filing, and clearing overdue books These, and many more are the duties of the library assistant. — Marie Roby DEMOCRACY AT WORK UR SCHOOL is a democratic school. Our part is to keep it that way. One cannot expect a school full of ruffians to preserve that title. So we must strive to find the unde- sirable things about Burbank and try to correct them There are many races in our school. This provides us with a. fine opportunity to practice our ideas of democratic living. One should not attempt to show 7 superiority and try to rule the others without their consent. Burbank pupils may learn much of the democratic system if they submit plans for improvement to their representatives on the Student Coun- cil where all school problems are con- sidered. — Ronald Schafer I F A SCHOOL is a modern stucco building with weeds growing up around it and paper all over the playground it isn’t much of a school. Our school, Burbank Junior High, has a nice appearance. It has a nice lawn, flowers and trees. But on the playground papers are scattered around. That shows that there are some untidy children in our school. Each child should throw his papers in proper containers and should re- mind other children to do so. If this is done Burbank can be re- garded as one of the most attractive buildings in our community. — Josephine Di Rienzo SCHOOL LOYALITY W E DESPISE the person who is disloyal to his family. The sam e goes for people who are not loyal to their school. They should “stick up” for their city, state and nation, as well as their school. It is not “sissy-like” to be true. It shows strength and courage to be able to stand firmly when a few snear and ridicule. — Ray Hollenbeck



Page 18 text:

OUR LIBRARY |N OUR LIBRARY many inter- testing; people are sitting on a library shelf waiting to introduce themselves to you when you open the door. Famous men and women like Washing- ton and Lincoln will tell you about their experiences and just what made their names so well known. Cinemas are taken from books. Many of these books are in our own library. Learn to know little fiction characters such as Pinocchio. After reading this story you feel as if Pinoc- chio lived around the corner from you. Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn are a couple of others which are well known. Both of them live and talk as other real boys do. Do you enjoy a good movie? Of course you do. Would- n‘t it be fun to read books which are later made into movies? — Josephine Burklund BOOKS [IJJ TALK! WHAT MAKES A GOOD SCHOOL CITIZEN A GOOD SCHOOL citizen is one who works quietly, quickly, dili- gently, and conscienciously. One who helps the class and is willing to coop- erate in all ways is a good citizen. When a student does not prepare the assigned work or disturbs instead of paying attention to his teacher, he is considered a poor citizen. A good school citizen is always willing to participate in school pro- grams, serveon traffic, inthelibrary or any of the extra things required to do in the democratic organization of a modern school. — Tommy Kundsen PATRIOTISM NE INTERESTING activity vJ ' sponsored in Burbank this term was the talk on Abraham Lincoln, given by Mrs. Carrie Hoyt, member of the Berkeley Cicy Council. Mrs. Hoyt was well prepared to talk on Lincoln as she was reared in Salem Illinois, where Lincoln had Us first job as clerk in a store. Mrs. Hoyt told about the early life of Lincoln. She showed her interested audience a wooden wormeaten gavel which was made from the wood of a house in which Lincoln had once lived. The gavel is nowin the possession of Mrs. Hoyt and she regards it as one of her finest treasures. The program was closed with the class saying Lincoln ' s Gettysburg Address for memory. — Barbara Barnett CLASS LOYALTY LASS LOYALTY and cooper- V ation is very important. Boys and girls who live day after day with others in the same class and who do not learn to appreciate fine quality in each other must be very selfish and self-centered. A loyal classmate likes to see others succeed. He contri- butes to every class activity even if it means extra effort and time. He likes to see his class do all that is required. A loyal school child be- comes a loyal citizen. Pupils learn loyalty through intel- ligent practice A pupil who wishes to be loyal must know what loyalty is and practice it. It is as important to have practice in loyalty, as it is to have practice in the multiplication tables. One cannot be a loyal citizen if he is not loyal to his family and his friends. The school offers an opportunity for such practice and pupils should take advantage of this fact. —Betty Ann Hale

Suggestions in the Burbank Junior High School - Wizard Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) collection:

Burbank Junior High School - Wizard Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1937 Edition, Page 1

1937

Burbank Junior High School - Wizard Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1938 Edition, Page 1

1938

Burbank Junior High School - Wizard Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1939 Edition, Page 1

1939

Burbank Junior High School - Wizard Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1941 Edition, Page 1

1941

Burbank Junior High School - Wizard Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1947 Edition, Page 1

1947

Burbank Junior High School - Wizard Yearbook (Berkeley, CA) online yearbook collection, 1950 Edition, Page 1

1950

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