Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC)

 - Class of 1919

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Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC) online yearbook collection, 1919 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 82 of the 1919 volume:

ASHEVILLE SCHOOL ASHEVILLE, N. C. 1918-1919 YEAR BOOK OF AsHEviLLE School ASHEVILLE, N. C. FOUNDED, 1900 1918-1919 NEWTON MITCHELL ANDERSON, CHARLES ANDREWS MITCHELL A sheville School Calenbar January 8, Wednesday March 19, Wednesday April 2, Wednesday , June 11, Wednesday June 16, Monday June 21, Saturday September 17, Wednesday December 17, Wednesday. 1919 Winter Term begins Winter Term ends Spring Term begins Spring Term ends College Examinations begin College Examinations end Fall Term begins Fall Term ends Asheville School principals; NEWTON MITCHELL ANDERSON, B.S. . . . Physics (Ohio State University; Massachusetts Institute of Technology) CHARLES ANDREWS MITCHELL, B.A. (Harvard University) Languages Askeville School 5 HENRY CURTIS BEARDSLEE, M.A. (Western Reserve University) Senior Master, Science and Mathematics GEORGE JACKSON, B.S Mathematics (University of Cincinnati) EDWIN SILAS WELLS KERR, B.A English (Princeton University) WILLIAM AUGUST LUBTOW, B.A French (Christ ' s College, Cambridge University, England) FRANK RUSSELL SPROAT, C.E. . Mathematics and Science (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) PARKER HARLAND BURT, B.A Latin (Dartmouth College) ORVILLE WATSON MOSHER, JR., Litt. B. . . History (Princeton University) ALPHONSE FRANCIS PIRNIQUE, B.A. German and Spanish (Oberlin College, University of Chicago) THE REV. RAYMOND ANDREWS CHAPMAN, B.A., S.T.B. (Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Andover Theological Seminary) Chaplain, English ROBERT HELTON HAYS, B.A. . . Latin and French (Yale University) HAROLD JONES KENNARD, B.S., C.E. (New York University) Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing CHARLES KENNETH EVES, B.A. . History and English (University of Rochester) RUTH ELIZABETH HALE . . Studies of Lower Forms (Salem Normal College) MARION ELIZABETH MEAD, B.A. Studies of Lower Forms (Smith College) CLARENCE PAUL HERFURTH . . Stringed Instruments (New England Conservatory) MAUDE ALTRUDA BEAUDRY Piano (New England Conservatory) MARGARET ELIZABETH BUTMAN Piano (New England Conservatory, Toronto Conservatory) AUGUSTINE ALPHONSUS COFFEY . . Rowing Coach GEORGE GARRETT ARTHUR . . . Manual Training On leave of absence. 6 A sheville School (Bt )tx cJjool (Off icers; CHASE P. AMBLER, M.D. . . . . . . Physician EUGENE BYRON GLENN, M.D Surgeon SARA K. THOMSON .... Resident Trained Nurse GEORGE GARRETT ARTHUR Bursar EDNA K. REINEKE, B.A Secretary (Goucher College) MRS. BERTHA LANDON RUMSEY .... Matron The following is a statement of its most important important - FEATUBES features : 1 . The school is situated in the most healthful region east of the Mississippi River, in a climate giving the largest opportunity for outdoor life. 2. The grounds contain six hundred acres of land, pro- viding fields for sports, ponds, streams, woods and hills. This land was selected not only with regard to its usefulness, but also for the beauty of its sur- roundings. 3. The buildings were constructed especially for school purposes and are thoroughly sanitary. 4. The courses of study, though broad, are consistent, and give the best preparation to boys who desire to enter any college or technical school or to go into business. 5. The teachers are college graduates, chosen for their fit- ness to instruct and care for boys. 6. The boys are under the constant care and charge of the principals and their families. 7. The religious teachings of the school are non-sectarian. [71 8 Asheville School LOCATION ' Pq select the location best fulfilling the conditions men- tioned, the principals studied carefully the country east of the Mississippi River, and are convinced that the mountain region of Western North Carolina surpasses all others. They chose, therefore, a site near Asheville. CLIMATE This region is noted for its climate. Since it has an altitude of twenty-three hundred feet above sea level, its atmosphere is clear and dry, and it has more clear, sunny days than any other locality in the eastern part of the United States. The autumn weather is delightful and continues well into the winter, which, though short, is cold and brac- ing. Even in winter the air is so dry and the sun so bright as to make outdoor life pleasant at all times. From the first of March to the first of July the weather is mild and invigorating, and during this period there are few hot sultry days. ACCESSIBILITY Asheville is situated half way between Lake Erie and the Gulf of Mexico, and is reached by the through trains of the Southern Railway from New York via Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington; from Cincinnati; from At- lanta; from New Orleans, and from Jacksonville. It is, therefore, easy of access from all parts of the country. MEETiNG Xo save parents unnecessary journeys and expense, the principals or instructors at the beginning of each term will meet pupils at New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Wash- Asheville School 9 ington, Chicago, Cleveland, Atlanta, and conduct them to Asheville in Pullman cars reserved by the school. At the end of each term, pupils will be returned to these points in the same manner. When there is sufficient patronage from localities other than those mentioned, similar arrangements will be made for the transportation of pupils. The site chosen contains about six hundred acres and is five miles west of Asheville, with which it is connected by the Southern Railway and a good asphalt road. The prop- erty is bounded on the east by Hominy Creek, which fur- nishes excellent canoeing facilities for several miles. Rags- dale Creek flows through the grounds for more than a mile. A dam of reinforced concrete, built across this creek, makes a large pond a mile in length, used for swimming and boat- ing and all kinds of aquatic sports. The buildings and play grounds are situated one hundred and fifty feet above the level of the creeks. Much of the land is sufficiently level to make fine fields for baseball, football, tennis, golf and other sports, and a large tract is densely wooded. Within two miles, north and south, mountains rise to a height of four thousand feet. On the east is the range of the Black Mountains culminating in Mt. Mitchell, six thou- sand seven hundred feet in altitude, the highest peak east of the Mississippi River. On the west are the Balsam Mountains and ranges of the Blue Ridge with Mt. Pisgah, five thousand seven hundred feet in altitude. The views in all directions are very beautiful. 10 Asheville School The House, the dormitory for boys of the lower forms, is of pleasing architecture, substantially built of brick and cement, and tasteful in finish. It is heated by steam, lighted by electricity, and equipped with an excellent system of ven- tilation, and with ample lavatories and bathrooms provided with the best modern plumbing. The Senior House is a dormitory for the use of the boys SENIOE. HOUSE of the upper two forms. This building is similar to the House in general appearance and construction, and is fitted with all modern conveniences for the comfort of the pupils. It has been named Percy Lawrence Hall, in memory of Millard Percy Lawrence, a member of the Class of 1906. THE The Gymnasium, a very substantial brick building, con- GYMNASIUM ' - , , . tains five squash courts, four basketball courts which may be used also for indoor baseball or indoor tennis, rowing machines, the usual apparatus, locker rooms, shower baths and a swimming pool twenty feet wide and seventy feet long. It is the gift of generous friends of this School, Mrs. George Tod Perkins and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Beebe Raymond, grandmother and parents of George Perkins Raymond of the Class of 1914. The tablet bears this inscription: THE GEORGE PERKINS RAYMOND GYMNASIUM ERECTED AS A HELP TOM ARDS PERFECT MANHOOD THE HOUSE THE Asheville School 11 The School, built of brick and cement, incorporates the the school best features of the most approved modern school buildings. It contains the recitation rooms, library, laboratories, shops, study, auditorium and club rooms for the different school societies, and is heated by steam and lighted by electricity. The dining room and the boiler house are detached ' buildings buildings. This arrangement secures immunity from dan- ger of fire, since there is no fire in the main buildings. All the water used in the buildings is brought by pipes from mountain springs which are several hundred feet higher than the school and above all habitations. The system of drainage is perfect. All sewage is car- ried in drains more than a mile from the buildings and emptied into a swift-flowing stream. WATER DRAINAGE The school has its own dairy and gardens, which pro- dairy and vide abundance of pure milk and wholesome vegetables. The teachers have been selected with reference to their recognized ability. All the teachers are college graduates who have had successful experience in the instruction and management of boys and have prepared themselves for this special work. GARDENS TEACHERS 12 Asheville School CABE OF BOYS ' j-j g principals have the especial care and charge of all the boys. Their desire is to know every boy intimately, so that natural aptitudes may be discovered, proper encourage- ment given, and defects of character remedied. Boys known to be vicious, objectionable, dull, or persistently lazy will not be admitted; if unwittingly admitted, they will not be retained. Asheville has many excellent physicians and surgeons, two of whom are connected with the school. A trained nurse is a member of the school household. PHYSICAL The school physicians make examinations each year, EXAMINATION . that they may find all weaknesses and prescribe proper exer- cises to remedy them. EXERCISE Each pupil is required to exercise every day, out-of- doors when possible, otherwise in the gymnasium. The masters supervise and control the athletic exercise and games of the boys and coach them in their sports. For the various forms of exercise the school grounds contain three baseball diamonds, football field, quarter mile track, nine tennis courts, a short golf course, gun traps (under the supervision of a master), and a rowing course for the crews, seven-eighths of a mile in length. It is the intention not only to encourage the usual school sports, but also to arrange for such pastimes as will develop individual talent and inventiveness. It is the conviction that, while football, baseball and track athletics are excel- lent training, they should be supplemented to a considerable Asheville School 13 degree by natural play. The neglect of this old-time play for the conventional routine of athletics leaves the boys too dependent upon others and lacking in resources. With the woods, streams, boats, hills, fields, and the shops, there are abundant opportunities for all kinds of play. The pupils are divided into two clubs, known as the Olympians and the Corinthians. These clubs have con- tests in the various athletic sports, to which certain points or credits are assigned. The Club whose members have won the greatest number of points is declared the winner for the year. The school is not a sanatorium for sickly boys, but not a , , , J 1 1 J SANATORIUM rather a place where boys may grow up and develop under the most favorable conditions. Boys having tubercular troubles are not admitted. Effort is made to inculcate the essential teachings of re- religious LIFE ligion. The school is not connected with any particular de- nomination, but prayers of the Episcopal Service are read at the opening of the school each day; Church services are held on Sunday mornings, and Bible classes on Sunday evenings. The principals have given especial thought to the courses courses of study. Their purpose is to prepare the boys to enter any college or technical school, and to give a sound education to those who intend to go from school immediately into business life. 14 Asheville School In the selection and order of studies they have largely followed the recommendations of the Committee on College Entrance Requirements appointed by the National Edu- cational Association to suggest ideal courses of study for secondary schools. During the first two forms, the so- called grammar or intermediate grades, the course of study is nearly the same for all boys. For the upper four forms there are two courses of study, the Classical and the Scien- tific. The Classical Course prepares boys to enter the aca- demical department of any college or university. The Scien- tific Course prepares boys for technical schools, and gives a thorough English education to those who go immediately into business. In each of these courses, although the prin- ciple of election is recognized, as for instance between French and German in the Classical Course, yet a certain number of constants is required. The study of English, Mathematics, History, Science and Manual Training is re- quired of all boys. The study of some foreign language, ancient or modern, is required in the Scientific Course, as necessary to a liberal education. The library, called The Hillyer Holden Library, was founded by the gift of Mr. R. A. Holden, of Cincinnati, in memory of his son, Hillyer Holden. It contains well-selected works of reference and general literature and also the best periodicals. Asheville School 15 Instruction in Piano, Violin and Mandolin is pro- music vided. Boys to be admitted to the lowest form must be proficient bequire- in reading and spelling easy English, and must know admission Arithmetic through decimal fractions, and the Geography of the United States, Europe and Asia. Arrangements may be made, however, for the instruction of boys who show minor deficiencies in any of the elementary studies. Applicants for advanced standing will pass such ex- aminations as are considered necessary, and will be placed in the forms suited to their proficiency. No new students are admitted to the sixth form and no change in the course of study is permitted after the student has begun the work of the sixth form. No new boys will be admitted to the fifth form whose preparation is so irregular or deficient that they may not do satisfactorily the work of the form or may not be prepared adequately for the preliminary examinations for admission to college if they are to enter college at the end of their course. Every applicant must furnish a record of his previous work and must present a certificate of honorable dismissal from his former school. A set of examination papers showing the work which must be done by a pupil of any form before he is promoted to the next higher form will be sent on application. 16 Asheville School PBOMOTIONS Promotions are based upon the daily work of the pupils, ASSIGNMENTS upon tests, and upon examinations which are held at the end of the first and second terms on the work of these terms and at the end of the school year on the work of the year. At the close of the fall term, boys whose work in daily recitations and examinations shows that they are not doing satisfactorily the work of their forms will be dropped into the next lower form. Re-assignments to a higher or lower form are made at any time for adequate reasons. GBADiTATiON A Certificate of Graduation is given to every boy who completes successfully the work of the sixth form. HONORS Honors of two grades are given. Honors of the first grade are given to boys who have received no marks lower than satisfactory in deportment, and 80 in industry and scholarship, and honors of the second grade to boys who have received no marks lower than satisfactory in deport- ment and 80 in industry and no marks lower than 70 in scholarship. EXAMINATIONS The examinations of the College Entrance Examination CEBTiFicATES Board used by all colleges which require examinations for ADMISSION admission are held at the school. Certificates of the school TO COLLEGE accepted by colleges which accept students on certificate. Asheville School 17 Asheville School seeks those boys only whose home life general MENTS has laid the foundation for good character, manly conduct announce and good scholarship. The discipline is not adapted to boys who require severe restrictions and the method of in- struction assumes that the pupils have some power of appli- cation and a will to work. Important letters and telegrams should be addressed to the principals. All requests should be made to the prin- cipals direct and not through the boys. All business deal- ings must be conducted between the parents and the prin- cipals, and cheques should be made payable to Asheville School. The school provides all needed articles except the fol- lowing, which every boy should bring with him: Bible, prayer-book, hymnal, small rug, toilet articles, face-towels, bath towels, wash-cloths, soap. Each boy should be pro- vided with the usual clothing worn during the fall and win- ter months and in addition should have rubber coat or mackintosh and water-proof boots. All articles of clothing must be marked plainly with the boy ' s full name. Each boy ' s teeth should receive careful attention before he comes to us, and in case trouble with the eyes is sus- pected, a careful examination by a competent occulist should be made. All mail matter, express packages, and freight should be sent in care of Asheville School to secure prompt de- livery. Large allowances of money are unnecessary and harm- ful, since there is no occasion for any extraordinary ex- penditure. Parents are, therefore, urged to give small al- lowances and are requested to indicate their pleasure con- 18 Asheville School cerning the manner of payment and to specify what expenses the allowances should cover. Parents who desire the prin- cipals to take charge of the allowance money should make a deposit each half year for that purpose. All payments stop when the deposit is exhausted. Boxes and packages of food are forbidden without special permission of the principals. Damages to school property in rooms or alcoves will be repaired at the cost of the occupant of the room or alcove affected. Boys will not be permitted to remain away from the school over night. Any boy who absents himself from the school at night without permission thereby severs his connection with the school. No explanation or excuse will be accepted regard- ing an infraction of this rule. The use of liquor is absolutely forbidden. Boys found guilty of indulging in this habit, of bringing liquor to the school, or of having liquor in their possession, will not be retained. If the influence of any boy is believed to be harmful to the school, apart from any overt acts of disobedience or in- subordination, he may be summarily dismissed. The deportment, industry and scholarship of each boy are made known to his parents or guardian every four weeks. All text books and stationery used may be purchased at the school at regular rates. Boys should bring with them the books they studied during the past year. Asheville School 19 There are no extra or incidental expenses. Therefore expense parents may know in advance what the cost for a school- year will be. The tuition fee covers the living expenses, except for clothing, and all school expenses except for books and stationery. The fee provides also articles used by the various school teams — crews, baseball, football, basketball, tennis, golf and track athletics — which are not personal or individual property, pays the expenses of the teams and purchases the trophies awarded. This fee is $975, payable $500 at the opening of school in September, and $475 on February first. No repayment of any part of a semi-annual fee will be made in case of dismissal, withdrawal or absence. The fee for instruction in instrumental music is $100, payable $50 at the opening of school in September and $50 on February first. This fee includes the use of instruments for practice. €onvM of tubp THE Courses of Study mention the minimum require- ments for each form. Pupils of either course are permitted and encouraged to take studies of the other course when additional work can be done profitably. Each pupil must take all studies required for entrance to the col- lege of his choice. Both Physics and Chemistry must be taken by pupils of the Scientific Course, and each pupil of this course must take such languages — Latin, German, French or Spanish — as his chosen college requires for ad- mission. Pupils who intend to offer two years of German and two years of French for admission to college will take German in the third and fourth forms and French in the fifth and sixth forms. FIRST FORM English: Reading. Study of parts of speech and syntax. Punc- tuation. Composition. Arithmetic: Percentage, omitting Stocks and Stock Investments. Simple interest, all cases. History: United States, through period of the Revolution. Col- lateral reading. Wood Carving. SECOND FORM English: Reading. Grammar, completed. Punctuation. Compo- sition. Arithmetic: Partial Payments. Bank Discount. Longitude and Time. Exchange. Insurance. Duties or Customs. Ratio. Simple and Compound Proportion. Partnership. Involution. Square Root. Metric System. History: United States, including Constitution, completed. Col- lateral reading. Wood Carving. [21] 22 Asheville School THIRD FORM— Classical English: Reading of examples of various styles of narrative and descriptive literature in both prose and verse. Study of words and sentences. Compositions, narrative and descriptive. Latin: Paradigms and simple syntax. Marking quantities of vowels. Easy reading. Written exercises. Reading of Latin aloud. Training in understanding the Latin before trans- . lating. Preparation for the study of Caesar. Mathematics: Algebra, through Quadratic Equations. History: Outlines of Ancient History. Carpentry. THIRD FORM— Scientific English: Reading of examples of various styles of narrative and descriptive literature in both prose and verse. Study of words and sentences. Compositions, narrative and descriptive. Latin: Paradigms and simple syntax. Marking quantities of vowels. Easy reading. Written exercises. Reading of Latin OR aloud. Training in understanding the Latin before trans- lating. Preparation for the study of Caesar. French I: See page 25 for details. OR German I: See page 25 for details. OR Spanish I : See page 26 for details. Mathematics : Algebra, through Quadratic Equations. History : Outlines of Ancient History. Carpentry. FOURTH FORM— Classical English : Reading of such works as Twice-Told Tales, As You Like It, Two Years Before the Mast. Advanced study of words, sentences and paragraphs. Compositions, narrative and de- scriptive. Asheville School 23 Latin : Caesar ' s Gallic Wars, Books I-IV. Caesar and Nepos at sight. Prose composition based on Caesar. Greek: Paradigms and simple syntax. Xenophon ' s Anabasis (20 to 30 pages). Practice in translation at sight and in writing Greek. Systematic study of grammar begun. Mathematics : Plane Geometry, completed. History: United States, or England. FOURTH FORM— Scientific English : Reading of such works as Twice-Told Tales, As You Like It, Two Years Before the Mast. Advanced study of words, sentences, paragraphs. Compositions, narrative and de- scriptive. Latin: Caesar ' s Gallic Wars, Books I-IV. Caesar and Nepos at OR sight. Prose composition based on Caesar. French I or II: See page 25 for details. OR German I or II : See page 25 for details. OR Spanish I or II: See page 26 for details. Mathematics: Plane Geometry, completed. History: United States, or England. Shopwork: Mechanical Drawing. FIFTH FORM— Classical English: Reading and study of books required for preliminary ex- aminations for entrance to college. Elements of rhetoric. Compositions, descriptive and argumentative. Latin: Cicero, six orations. Cicero at sight. Prose composition based on Cicero and Caesar. Greek: Xenophon ' s Anaibasis, continued. Books I-IV, together with other Attic prose. Practice in translation at sight. Systematic study of grammar and practice in writing Greek, based on study of Books I and II of the Anabasis. 24 Asheville School French I (optional) : See page 25 for details. OR German I (optional) : See page 25 for details. OR Spanish I (optional) : See page 26 for details. Mathematics: Reviews of Elementary Algebra and Plane Geo- metry. History: Reviews. FIFTH FORM— Scientific English: Reading and study of books required for preliminary ex- aminations for entrance to college. Elements of rhetoric. Compositions, descriptive and argumentative. French II: See page 25 for details. OR German II: See page 25 for details. OR Spanish II: See page 26 for details. Mathematics: Solid Geometry. Plane Trigonometry. Reviews of Elementary Algebra and Plane Geometry. History : Reviev s. Physics : Including laboratory work. SIXTH FORM— Classical English: Reading and study of books required for final examina- tions for entrance to college. Elements of rhetoric. Composi- tions, prepared and extempore. Latin: Vergil ' s Aeneid, Books I-IV, and either the Eclogues or Books VII-IX of the Aeneid. Prose composition, based on Caesar and Cicero. Translation of prose Latin at sight. Greek: Homer ' s Iliad, Books I-III, and other books of the Iliad or the Odyssey. Thirty to fifty pages of Attic prose, as basis for prose composition. Translation at sight. Asheville School 25 French I or II : See below for details. OR German I or II : See below for details. OR Spanish I or II : See page 26 for details. Mathematics: Advanced Algebra, completed. SIXTH FORM— Scientific English: Reading and study of books required for final examina- tions for entrance to college. Elements of rhetoric. Composi- tions, prepared and extempore. French III : See below for details. OR German III : See page 26 for details. OR Spanish I or II: Mathematics: Advanced Algebra, completed. Chemistry: Including laboratory work. French, Spanish, or German may be substituted for Greek in all forms of the Classical Course. French I: Elementary grammar. Reading of at least 400 pages of easy French (fiction, history, science). Prose composition. Translation at sight. French II: Advanced grammar. Reading of at least 600 pages of standard French. Prose composition. Translation at sight. French III: Advanced grammar and advanced prose composition. Reading of at least 600 pages of French classics. Translation at sight. German I: Elementary grammar. Reading of at least 200 pages of easy German, such as Storm ' s Immensee and Baumbach ' s Der Schwiegersohn. Prose composition. Translation at sight. German II: Advanced grammar. Reading of at least 400 pages of modern prose, including scientific German, and at least one classic, such as Minna von Bamhelm or Wilhelm Tell. Prose composition. Translation at sight. 26 Asheville School German III: Advanced grammar. Reading of at least 500 pages of standard German, largely from the classics. Prose composi- tion. Translation at sight. Spanish I: Elementary Spanish. Continuous practice in composi- tion and reading, with especial attention to the spoken lan- guage. Spanish II: Advanced grammar and ccanposition. Classic and commercial Spanish. Conversation. As heville School 27 Williams College 42 Cornell University 39 Yale University 35 Princeton University 32 University of Michigan 16 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 14 University of Wisconsin 13 Harvard University 9 University of Pennsylvania 9 Case School of Applied Science 7 Amherst College 6 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 6 University of Virginia 5 Dartmouth College 4 Leland Stanford, Jr., University 4 University of North Carolina 4 Lehigh University 3 United States Military Academy 3 University of Chicago 3 University of Cincinnati 3 Denison University 2 Haverford College 2 Kenyon College 2 Ohio State University 2 Stevens Institute of Technology 2 University of Pittsburgh 2 Brown University Georgia School of Technology. Lafayette College Purdue University United States Naval Academ} ' University of Illinois University of Louisville Wesleyan University 28 A she vill e School HONORS WERE GIVEN DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR 1917-1918 AS FOLLOWS: Honors of First Grade Beatty, Henry Mcintosh Sixth Form Gottfried, Carl Manfred, Jr Sixth Form Rutter, David Ryerson Sixth Form Anderson, George Yeatman, Jr Fourth Form Cotton, Edwin Morgan Fourth Form Thacker, Eliam Barney Fourth Form Honors of Second Grade Bamaby, Howard Prather Sixth Form Cooper, Charles Augustus, Jr Sixth Form Field, Francis Eugene Sixth Form Johnson, Hibbard Fisk Sixth Form Smith, Wilson Woodbury Sixth Form Bailey, Francis Prentiss Fifth Form Butt, Charles Howard Fifth Form Dilworth, Harrison Parry, Jr Fifth Form Dyer, George Turnley, Jr Fifth Form Vercoe, Fred, Jr Fifth Form Webb, Robert Stanford Fifth Form Dunn, William LeRoy, Jr Fourth Form Fetzer, Wade Melville Fourth Form Coxe, William Fotteral Potter Third Form Kennedy, King, Jr Third Form Cook, Daniel Howard Shell Form Jackson, William Randolph Shell Form Sinks, Allen Thurman Shell Form Asheville School 29 tubentsi Aldrich, Charles Schuyler Pensacola, N. C. Anderson, George Yeatman, Jr Cleveland, O. Anderson, Samuel Waller Knoxville, Tenn. Andrews, David Key Chattanooga, Tenn. Andrews, Gamett, Jr Chattanooga, Tenn. Bailey, Francis Prentiss Winona, Minn. Barnes, John Edwards Evanston, 111. Beal, James Lacey Evanston, 111. Bosler, Richard Grayson Dayton, O. Brown, John Fuller Asheville, N. C. Bryan, John Baird Miami, Fla. Caskin, Langdon, Jr Jacksonville, Fla. Caswell, Daniel Orvis Cleveland, O. Caswell, John Long Cleveland, O. Chase, Charles Wayne Cleveland, O. Cheesborough, John Cheesborough Asheville, N. C. Cheesborough, Thomas Patton, Jr Asheville, N. C. Clark, Samuel Harris Wilmette, 111. Colburn, Bumham Standish, Jr Detroit, Mich. Colburn, William Cullen Detroit, Mich. Coleman, Edward Crawford Asheville, N. C. Coleman, James Sloan, Jr Asheville, N. C. Cotton, Edwin Morgan Cleveland, O. Coxe, William Fotteral Potter Asheville, N. C. Cramer, George Bennett Charlotte, N. C. Crouse, George William, Jr Akron, O. Dalton, Charles Martin Racine, Wis. DeWeese, Lowes Emerson Dayton, O. Dickman, Franklin Joseph Chicago, 111. Dodge, Clarence Phelps, Jr Colorado Springs, Colo. 30 Asheville School Dugan, Joseph Urton Hinsdale, 111. Dunham, Charles Little Evanston, 111. Dunn, Thomas Mansfield Asheville, N. C. Dunn, William LeRoy, Jr Asheville, N. C. Duringer, William Hovey Fort Worth, Tex. Dyer, George Turnley, Jr Chicago, 111. Fetzer, John Clark Hinsdale, 111. Fetzer, Wade Melville Hinsdale, 111. Field, Marcus Rose Asheville, N. C. Gardner, Martin Milton Toledo, O. George, Robert Bamett East Palestine, O. Gifford, Warren C Toledo, O. Gill, William Ambos Cleveland, O. Greene, John McMynn Milwaukee, Wis. Hammond, Henry Elsworth Racine, Wis. Hardenbergh, Raymond Waite, Jr Winnetka, 111. Hardy, Edward Keasbey, Jr Evanston, 111. Harrington, Stephen Harris Highland Park, 111. Harrison, Lewis Wardlaw Raleigh, N. C. Hayes, Birchard Piatt Asheville, N. C. Healey, James Burke Kansas City, Mo. Hefter, Harold Chicago, 111. Helmle, Edward Herbert Brooklyn, N. Y. Henson, George Norris Chattanooga, Tenn. Hines, John Leonard, Jr Cincinnati, O. Hinsch, Charles Arthur, Jr Cincinnati, O. Hoagland, Henry Veghte Colorado Springs, Colo. Hodgman, Daniel Holmes St. Louis, Mo. Howard, Hampton Warren Atlanta, Ga. Howard, George Troup, Jr Atlanta, Ga. Howell, David Harris Evanston, 111. Howell, Andrew Allen Cleveland, O. Hutchinson, Gene Creech Lakewood, O. Ashe vi lie School 31 lies, Arthur Jordan Indianapolis, Ind. Inman, Samuel Martin Atlanta, Ga. Jackson, William Randolph Asheville, N. C. James, William Rees Cleveland, O. Jerrems, Alexander Nicoll, Jr Chicago, 111. Johnson, Edward Saunders Columbus, O. Jones, Francis Ford Warren, Pa. Jones, William Henry, Jr Warren, Pa. Kennedy, King, Jr Kokomo, Ind. Kiser, Marion Columbus Atlanta, Ga. Kroehler, Delmar Leroy Naperville, 111. Lesher, Ralph Howard St. Petersburg, Fla. Maclean, Francis David Chicago, 111. McKeman, Francis Marshall Louisville, Ky. Meloy, John Young, Jr Chicago, 111. Merrick, Thompson Evanston, 111. Miller, Herbert Allison Huntingdon, Pa. Moerlein, Jacob William Cincinnati, O. Moff ett, Langston New York, N. Y. Morehouse, Merritt Button Evanston, 111. Morton, Benjamin Andrew, Jr Knoxville, Tenn. Morton, Julian Gore Knoxville, Tenn. Nagel, William George, Jr Toledo, O. Noyes, William Hamilton Chicago, 111. Otterbein, Clemence Henry Cincinnati, O. Otterbein, Andries Nielen Cincinnati, O. Patten, Zeboim Cartter, Jr Flintstone, Ga. Patterson, James McCready, Jr Putney, Ga. Patterson, John Watson Putney, Ga. Payne, Lawrence Wesley Rushville, Ind. 32 Asheville School Pennock, Robert Haines Cleveland, O. Piatt, James Delaney, II Portland, Ore. Pletcher, Stewart Francis Chicago, 111. Ranney, Hamlin Cross Century, Fla. Reed, Richard Pittsburgh, Pa. Richmond, William Boardman Providence, R.I. Robertson, Reuben Buck Asheville, N. C. Roeser, William Theodore Kansas City, Mo. Rogers, Edward Samuel, Jr Cleveland, O. Ross, William Cary, Jr Knoxville, Tenn. Ross, Walter Willard, Jr Evanston, 111. Rumsey, John Landon Asheville, N. C. Russell, William Marler Asheville, N. C. Rutherford, Roe James Akron, O. Scott, Winfield, Jr Fort Worth, Tex. Screven, Thomas Proctor Savannah, Ga. Shober, Anthony Morris Philadelphia, Pa. Siegel, Richard Beard Erie, Pa. Simmons, Howard Lyle, Jr Oak Park, 111. Sinks, Allen Thurman Columbus, O. Slaughter, Henry Winston Evanston, 111. Smith, Richard Seth Cleveland, O. Smith, Wilbur Alan Columbus, O. Smith, William Stewart, Jr Appleton, Wis. Smith, Wilson Woodbury Evanston, 111. Stovall, Joseph Ganahl Berne, Switzerland. Strietmann, George Harte Cincinnati, O. Tanner, Jesse Spencer Charlotte, N. C. Thacker, Eliam Barney Dayton, O. Warren, Sterling Armsted Washington, D. C. Wasser, George Seaton Cleveland, O. Webb, Robert Stanford Asheville, N. C. Woodcock, Julian Augustus, Jr Asheville, N. C. Wright, William Polk Knoxville, Tenn. Asheville School 33 KIT-KAT President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer Sergeant-at-Arms Bailey, F. P. Beal, J. L. Chase, C. W. Cheesborough, J. C. Clark, S. H. colburn, w. c. Coleman, J. S., Jr. DUGAN, J. U. Dyer, G. T., Jr. Fetzer, J. C. Field, M. R. Hayes, B. P Johnson, E. S. Jones, W. H., Jr. Meloy, J. Y., Jr. Merrick, T. Payne, L. W. Platt, J. D., II. Ranney, H. C. Payne, L. W. Stovall, J. G. Chase, C. W. Dyer, G.T., Jr. RUMSEY, J. L. Smith, W. A. Smith, W. S., Jr. Smith, W. W. Stovall, J. G. Walter, J. L. Webb, R. S. Mr. Beardslee Mr. Kerr REVIEW BOARD Editor-in-Chief Associate Editors Business Manager Webb, R. S. I Chase, C. W. [Dugan, J. U. iHoagland, H. V. (Lesher, R. H. IMeloy, J. Y., Jr. ' Ross, W. C. 1 Stovall, J. G. Wright, W. P. LIBRARY BOARD President .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Bailey, F. P. Anderson, G. Y., Jr. Maclean, F. D. Chase, C. W. Meloy, J. Y., Jr. Coleman, J. S., Jr. Stovall, J. G. 34 Asheville School ASHEVILLE TECH. President Vice-President Secretary Anderson, G. Y., Jr. Chase, C. W. Clark, S. H. COLBURN, W. C. Coleman, J. S., Jr. DeWeese, L. E. Dyer, G. T., Jr. Hayes, B. P. Dyer, G. T., Jr. Chase, C. W. Payne, L. W. Merrick, T. Payne, L. W. Platt, J. D., II. Rumsey, J. L. Stovall, J. G. Thacker, E. B. Mr. Beardslee THE BLUE AND WHITE Editor-in-Chief Associate Editors Art Editor Assistant Art Editor Business Manager Advertising Manager Chase, C. W. Beal, J. L. Fetzer, W. M. Johnson, E. S. Lesher, R. H. Platt, J. D., II. Meloy, J. Y., Jr. Dyer, G. T., Jr. Bailey, F. P. Clark, S. H. President Secretary Treasurer DRAMATIC SOCIETY Bahey, F. p. DUGAN, J. U. Iles, a. J. Bahey, F. p. DeWeese, L. E. DUGAN, J. U. HODGMAN, D. H. Iles, A. J. Ranney, H. C. Smith, W. W. Stovall, J. G. Walter, J. L. Mr. Beardslee Mr. Jackson Mr. Sproat Asheville School 35 ifWujSical Clubs; President .. .. .. .. .. .. Colburn, W. C. Vice-President .. .. .. .. .. .. Fetzer, J. C. Librarian .. .. .. .. .. .. Dyer, G, T„ Jr. Director .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Mr. Herfurth MANDOLIN ORCHESTRA Mandolin Bailey, F. P. Chase, C. W. Clark, S. H. Dyer, G. T., Jr. Helmle, E. H. Maclean, F. D. Bass Walter, J. L. Saxophone Fetzer, W. M. Drums Iles, a. J. Xylophone and Bells Fetzer. W. M. Violin Caskin, L., Jr. Colburn, W. C. CoxE, W. F. P. Dunham, C. L. Fetzer, J. C. Russell, W. M. Strietmann, G. H. Mr. Herfurth Mr. Mosher ' Cello Mr. Arthur Piano Miss Beaudry Miss Butman GLEE CLUB First Tenor Cotton, E. M. Dunham, C. L. Georgi, R. B. Merrick, T. Mr. Coffey First Bass Clark, S. H. DUGAN, J. U. Fetzer, W. M. Mr. Sproat Second Tenor Caswell, J. L. DeWeese, L. E. Dyer, G. T., Jr. McKernan, F. M. Mr. Herftoth Second Bass Fetzer, J. C. Jones, W. H., Jr. Walter, J. L. Mr. Arthur 36 Asheville School Executive Committee Bailey, F. P. Stovall, J. G. Caswell, J. L. Mr. Jackson Crouse, G. W., Jr. Mr. Mitchell Dyer, G. T., Jr. SCHOOL CREW Season of 1918 Bow Two Three Stroke Coxswain Merrick, T. Payne, L. W. Platt, J. D., II. Seneff, T. E. Fowler, A. G. French, T. D. Platt, J. D., II. (Captain) McLain, R. P. L. CLUB CREWS First Crews CORINTHIAN OLYMPIAN Dugan, J. U. Bow Seneff, T. E. Crouse, G. W., Jr. Two Fowler, A. G. Smith, W. S., Jr. Three French, T. D. Darlington, A. N. Stroke Platt, J. D., II. Chase, C. W. Coxswain McLain, R. P. L. Second Crews York, G. F. Bow Barnaby, H. P. Patten, Z. C, Jr Two Booth, H. S. Field, F. E. Three Rumsey, J. L. Still well, J. B. Stroke Payne, L. W. Dunn, W. L., Jr Coxswain Dickman, F. J. Third Crews Fetzer, J. C. Bo v Anderson, G. Y., Jr. Dyer, G. T., Jr Two Barnes, J. E. DeWeese, L. E. Three Hough, J. D. Smith, W. A. Stroke Caswell, J. L. Coleman, J. S., Jr. Coxswain Cotton, E. M. Asheville School 37 Captain Manager BOSLER, R. G. Caswell, J. L. colburn, w. c. Cramer, G. B. FOOTBALL TEAM Season of 1918 Dyer, G. T., Jr. George, R. B. Howard, G. T., Jr. Lesher, R. H. Ml Dyer, G.T., Payne, L. INlERRICK, T. Smith, W. A. Walter, J. L. Wright, W. P. Jr. w. Captain Manager Ashby, F. a. Caswell, J. L. Clark, G. S. Clark, S. H. BASEBALL TEAM Season of 1918 Dyer, G.T., Jr. Harris, H. H. Johnson, H. F. :Merrick, T. Vercoe, J. M. Clark, S. H. Rutter, D. R. INTilltkin, D. L. Rutter, D. R. Slaughter, H. W. Smith, W. A. Captain Manager Beal, J. L. BoSLER, R. G. Caswell, T. L. BASKETBALL TEAM Season of 1919 Clark, S. H. Dyer, G. T., Jr. George, R. B. Caswell, J. L. Chase, C. W. Maclean, F. D. TvTerrick, T. RIoffett, L. Captain Beatty, H. M. Beal, J. L. Black, R. B. TRACK TEAM Season of 1918 Fetzer, J. C. Johnson, H. F. Jones, W. H., Jr. Liggett, J., III. Beatty, H. M. Slaughter, H. W. Walter, J. L. Wright, W. P. President .. Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer Cheesborough, J. colburn, w. c. Coleman, E. C. GUN CLUB Dalton, C. M. Fetzer, W. M. Hodgman, D. H. ] Ieloy, J. Y., Jr. Pennock, R. H. COLBURN, W, Rumsey, J. Cheesborough, J. Platt, J. D., II. Ranney, H. C. RuiiISEY , J. L. 38 Asheville School cgool Clubs; Captain Corinthians .. .. .. .. .. Stovall, J. G. Captain Olympians .. .. .. .. .. Caswell, J. L. Club Scores (1917-1918) CORINTHIANS OLYMPIANS 10 0 Football S 5 Basketball (First Team) 0 5 Basketball (Second Team) 0 3 Basketball (Third Team) , 1 0 Golf 0 5 5 0 Trap Shoot 0 5 5 0 Tennis (Doubles) , 0 3 Cross Country 0 5 10 0 0 20 Rowing (Second Crew) 10 0 0 5 20 0 3 0 69 56 Gup Winners Field Meet (Senior) First .. .. .. .. .. .. Walter, J. L. Second .. .. .. .. .. .. Beatty, H. M. Third .. .. .. .. .. .. Liggett, J., III. Field Meet (Junior) First .. .. .. .. .. .. Cramer, G. B. Second .. .. .. .. .. .. Fetzer, W. M. Golf .. .. .. .. .. ' .. ., MiLLIKIN, D. L. Tennis .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Dyer, G. T., Jr. Water Sports .. .. .. .. .. .. Walter, J. L. Platt, J. D., II. T,. , . ; French, T. D. First Olympian Crew | p ' Seneff, T. E. McLain, R. p. L. Cross Country .. .. .. .. .. .. Wright, W. P. Kit-Kat Debate .. .. .. .. .. .. Rutter, D.R.


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