Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC)

 - Class of 1906

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Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC) online yearbook collection, 1906 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 76 of the 1906 volume:

ASHEVILLE SCHOOL ASHEVILLE, N. C. 1905-1906. YEAR BOOK OF Asheville School ASHEVILLE, N. C. 19 0 5-1906 NEWTON MITCHELL ANDERSON, CHARLES ANDREWS MITCHELL, Principals. YEAR 1905- 1906. September 20, Wednesday, December 20, Wednesday, . January 10, Wednesday, March 30, Friday, April 10, Tuesday, June 13, Wednesday, School year begins. Christmas recess begins. Christmas recess ends. Spring recess begins. Spring recess ends. School year ends. YEAR 1906 - 1907. September 19, Wednesday, December 19, Wednesday, January 9, Wednesday, School year begins. Christmas recess begins. Christmas recess ends. [3] JJrwrijralH. NEWTON MITCHELL ANDERSON, B. S., Physics and Manual Training (Ohio State University.) CHARLES ANDREWS MITCHELL, B. A Greek (Harvard University.) ittatntrtora. ± HENRY CURTIS BEARDSLEE, M.A., Senior Master, Science and Latin (Western Reserve University.) GEORGE JACKSON, B. S Mathematics (University of Cincinnati.) CECIL ALBERT MOORE, M. A., . English (Harvard University.) HOWARD WADSWORTH CHURCH, B. A., . German and French (Yale University.) JAMES RODERICK THOMPSON, B. A., . . . . History (Princeton University.) JAMES ARTHUR REEVES, B. A. Latin (Harvard University.) [4] ELIZABETH WATKIN MITCHELL, ELLA MARIE JONES, . SUSIE ANDERSON BARSTOW, ANNA FORD BEARDSLEE, MARTIN FRANCIS CONNELL, ELIZABETH ARNEY CLOSE, WILLIAM EUGENE MULLER, English Arithmetic Drawing Geography Violin and Mandolin Piano Gymnastics ± FRANK TRYON MERIWETHER, M. D., . Physician ar-d Surgeon MARY JANE THOMSON, . . . Resident Trained Nurse HENRY CLAY HUGILL, . . . Assistant in Carpentry CLAYTON LEE HOLDEN Steward 5 I HE principals of Asheville School, desiring to desired found a school under ideal conditions, have conditions drawn up the following statement of its most important features : 1. The school should be situated in the most healthful region east of the Mississippi River, in a climate giving the largest opportunity for outdoor life. 2. The grounds should contain several hundred acres of land, providing fields for sports, ponds, streams, woods and hills. This land should be selected not only with regard to its usefulness, but also for the beauty of its surroundings. 3. The buildings should be especially adapted to school pur- poses, and should be thoroughly sanitary. 4. The courses of study, though broad, should be consistent, and should give the best preparation to boys who desire to enter any college or technical school or to go into business. 5. The teachers of the upper forms should be college graduates, chosen for their fitness to instruct and care for boys. 6. The boys should be under the constant care and charge of the principals and of their families. 7. The religious teachings of the school should be non-sectarian. [7] 8 A sheville School. location To select the location best fulfilling the conditions mentioned the principals studied carefully the country east of the Mississippi River, and are convinced that the mountain region of Western North Carolina surpasses all others. They chose, therefore, a site near Asheville. climate This region is noted for its climate. Since it has an altitude of twenty-three hundred feet above sea level, its atmosphere is clear and dry, and it has more clear, sunny days than any other locality in the eastern part of the United States. The autumn weather is delightful and continues well into the winter, which, though short, is cold and bracing. Even in winter the air is so dry and the sun so bright as to make outdoor life pleasant at all times. From the first of March to the first of July the weather is mild and invigorating, and during this period there are few hot, sultry days. 3. accessibility Asheville is situated half way between Lake Erie and the Gulf of Mexico, and is reached by the through trains of the Southern Railway from New York via Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington; from Cincin- nati; from Atlanta; from New Orleans, and from Jack- sonville. It is, therefore, easy of access from all parts of the country. MEETING PUPILS To save parents unnecessary journeys and expense, the principals or instructors at the beginning of each term will meet pupils at New York, Philadelphia, Bal- timore, Chicago, Pittsburgh and Cleveland, and con- duct them to Washington or to Cincinnati, and thence Asheville School. 9 to Asheville, in Pullman cars reserved by the school. At the end of each term pupils will be returned to these points, in the same manner. When there is sufficient patronage from localities other than those mentioned similar arrangements will be made for the transporta- tion of pupils. 5. The site chosen contains more than seven hundred site acres and is five miles west of Asheville, with which it is connected by the Southern Railway and an excellent macadamized road. The property is bounded on the east by Hominy Creek, which furnishes excellent canoeing facilities for several miles. Ragsdale Creek flows through the grounds for more than a mile. A dam built across this creek makes a large pond a mile in length used for swimming and boating. This pond is well adapted to boating and all kinds of aquatic sports. The buildings and play grounds are situated one hundred and fifty feet above the level of the creeks. Much of the land is sufficiently level to make fine fields for baseball, football, tennis, golf and other sports, and a large tract is densely wooded. Within two miles, north and south, mountains rise to a height of four thousand feet. On the east is the range of the Black Mountains culminating in Mt. Mitchell, six thousand seven hundred feet in altitude, the highest peak east of the Mississippi River. On the west are the Balsam Mountains and ranges of the Blue Ridge with Mt. Pisgah, five thousand seven hundred feet in altitude. The views in all directions are very beautiful. The heavy floods of last July destroyed this dam, but a more substantial stone dam will be built immediately. The pond will be ready for use during the ensuing school-year. 10 A sh ev ill e School. THE HOUSE THE SCHOOL OTHER BUILDINGS The House is of pleasing architecture, substantial in material and construction, and tasteful in finish. It is heated by steam, lighted by electricity, and equipped with an excellent system of ventilation, and with ample lavatories and bathrooms provided with the best modern plumbing. The School incorporates the best features of the most approved modern school buildings. It contains recitation rooms, library, laboratories, shops, study, auditorium and club rooms for the different school soci- eties, and is heated by steam and lighted by electricity. The dining-room and the engine-house are detached buildings. This arrangement secures immu- nity from danger of fire, since there is no fire in the main buildings. There is also a gymnasium building equipped for use during inclement weather. WATER All the water used in the buildings is brought by pipes from mountain springs which are several hundred feet higher than the school and above all habitations. drainage The system of drainage is perfect. All sewage is carried in drains more than a mile from the buildings and emptied into a swift-flowing stream. 4 A sheville School. 11 The school has its own dairy and gardens, which provide abundance of pure milk and wholesome vegetables. DAIRY AND GARDENS The teachers have been selected with reference to their recognized ability. All the teachers of the upper forms are college graduates who have had successful experience in the instruction and management of boys and have prepared themselves for this special work. The teachers of the lower forms are women who have had thorough training for the education of young boys and a record of successful experience. The prin- cipals believe that women are the best teachers of very young boys. TEACHERS The principals have the especial care and charge of all the boys. Their desire is to know every boy intimately, so that natural aptitudes may be discov- ered, proper encouragement given, and defects of character remedied. Boys known to be vicious or persistently lazy will not be admitted; if unwittingly admitted they will not be retained. The care and training of the body receive particu- lar attention. Asheville has many excellent physicians and surgeons, one of whom is connected with the school. A trained nurse is a member of the school household. CARE OF BOYS The school physician will make an examination each year (or oftener if necessary), that he may find all weaknesses and prescribe proper exercises to remedy them. PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 12 A sheville School. exercise Each pupil is required to exercise every day, out- of-doors when possible, otherwise in the gymnasium. It is the intention not only to encourage the usual school sports, but also to arrange for such pastimes as will develop individual talent and inventiveness. It is the conviction that, while football, baseball and track- athletics are excellent training, they should be supple- mented to a considerable degree by natural play. The neglect of this old-time play for the conventional rou- tine of athletics leaves the boys too dependent upon others and lacking in resources. With the woods, streams, boats, hills, fields, and the shops, there are abundant opportunities for all kinds of play. 9k not A The school is not a sanitarium for sickly boys, but sanitarium rather a place where boys may grow up and develop under the most favorable conditions. Boys having tubercular troubles are not admitted. 5k religious Effort is made to inculcate the essential teachings LIFE of religion. The school is not connected with any par- ticular denomination, but prayers of the Episcopal Service are read at the opening of the school each day ; Church services are held on Sunday mornings; and Bible classes on Sunday evenings. A shew ill e School. 13 The principals have given especial thought to the courses courses of study. Their purpose is to prepare the boys to enter any college or techincal school, and to give a sound education to those who intend to go from school immediately into business life. In the selection and order of studies they have largely followed the recommendations of the Committee on College Entrance Requirements appointed by the National Educational Association to suggest ideal courses of study for secondary schools. During the first four forms, the so-called grammar or intermediate grades, the course of study is nearly the same for all boys. For the upper four forms there are two courses of study, the Classical and the Scientific. The Classical Course prepares boys to enter any college or university. The Scientific Course prepares boys for technical schools, and gives a thorough Eng- lish education to those who go immediately into busi- ness. In each of these courses, although the principle of election is recognized, as for instance, between French and German in the Classical Course, yet a cer- tain number of constants is required. The study of English, Mathematics, History, Science and Manual Training is required of all boys. The study of some foreign language, ancient or modern, is required in the Scientific Course, as necessary to a liberal education. Instruction in Piano, Violin and Mandolin is music provided. 14 A sheville School. library The library, called The Hillyer Holden Library.. was founded by the gift of Mr. R. A. Holden of Cin- cinnati, in memory of his son, Hillyer Holden. It contains well-selected works of reference and general literature and also the best periodicals. requirements Boys to be admitted to the lowest form must be FOR admission not j esg n j ne y ears G f age. They must be pro- ficient in reading and spelling easy English, and must know Arithmetic through long division and the Geogra- phy of the United States. Applicants for advanced standing will pass such examinations as are considered necessary and will be placed in the forms suited to their proficiency. No new students are admitted to the eighth form and no change in the course of study is permitted after a student has begun the work of the eighth form. Every applicant must furnish a record of his previ- ous work and must present a certificate of honorable dismissal from his former school. A set of examination papers showing the work which must be done by a pupil of any form before he is promoted to the next higher form will be sent on application. 5 promotions Promotions are based upon the daily work of the pupils, upon tests, and upon examinations which are held at the end of the first and second terms on the work of these terms and at the end of the school year on the work of the year. A sheville School. 15 A Certificate of Graduation is given to every boy who completes successfully the work of the eighth form. GRADUATION Beginning with the year 1904-1905 honors of two grades will be given. Honors of the first grade will be given to boys who have received no marks lower than satisfactory in deportment, industry and scholarship, and honors of the second grade to boys who have received no marks lower than satisfactory in deport- ment and industry and no marks lower than fair in scholarship. HONORS Each boy should be provided with the usual cloth- ing worn during the fall and winter months and in addition should have rubber coat or mackintosh and rubber boots. The school provides all needed articles except the following, which each boy should bring with him: Bible, prayer-book, hymnal, toilet articles, face- towels, bath towels, wash-cloths, soap. All articles of clothing must be marked plainly with the boy ' s full name. Each boy ' s teeth should receive careful attention, and in case trouble with the eyes is suspected a careful examination by a competent oculist should be made. All mail matter, express packages and freight should be sent in care of Asheville School to secure prompt delivery. GENERAL ANNOUNCE- MENTS 16 A s hevill e School. Large allowances of money are unnecessary and harmful, since there is no occasion for any extraordi- nary expenditure. Parents are, therefore, urged to give small allowances, and are requested to indicate their pleasure concerning the manner of payment and to specify what expenses the allowances should cover. Parents who desire the principals to take charge of the allowance money should make a deposit each half year for that purpose. All payments stop when the deposit is exhausted. Boxes and packages of food are forbidden without special permission of the principals. Boys are forbidden to contract any debts whatso- ever or to run any account without permission of the principals, and they shall not sell or trade personal property of value without the written permission of their parents and the consent of the principals. Damages to school property in rooms or alcoves will be repaired at the cost of the occupant of the room or alcove affected. Boys will not be permi tted to remain away from the building over night unless they are in charge of their parents. The use of tobacco and liquor is absolutely for- bidden. Boys found guilty of indulging in either habit will not be retained. If the influence of any boy is belieyed to be harm- ful to the school, apart from any overt acts of dis- Asheoille School. 17 obedience or insubordination, he may be summarily dismissed. The deportment, industry and scholarship of each boy are made known to his parents or guardian every four weeks. All text books and stationery used may be pur- chased at the school at regular rates. Boys should bring with them the books they studied during the past year. There are no extra or incidental expenses. There- expense fore parents may know in advance what the cost for a school-year will be. The tuition fee covers the living expenses except for clothing, and all school expenses except for books and stationery. This fee is $700, payable $350 at the opening of school in September, and $350 on February first. When arranged for, boys may remain at the school during vacations. No repayment of any part of a semi-annual fee will be made in case of dismissal, withdrawal or absence. A semi-annual assessment is made for the Athletic Association for the use and maintenance of the various school teams— baseball, football, tennis, golf and track athletics. This assessment provides articles used by the school teams which are not personal or individual property, and purchases the trophies awarded. All expense for equipment and maintenance of play- grounds is borne by the school. This semi-annual fee 18 Asheville School. is $7.50 for boys of the upper four forms and $5 for boys of the lower four forms. The fee for instruction in instrumental music is $70, payable $35 at the opening of school in September and -$35 on February first. This fee includes the use of instruments for practice. . a . HE Courses of Study mention the minimum requirements for each form. Pupils of either course are permitted and encouraged to take studies of the other course when additional work can be done profitably. Each pupil must take all studies required for entrance to the college of his choice. Both Physics and Chemistry must be taken by pupils of the Scientific Course, and each pupil of this course must take such languages of the group Latin, German or French, as his chosen college requires for admission. Pupils who intend to offer two years of German and two years of French for admission to college will take German in the fifth and sixth forms and French in the seventh and eighth forms. FIRST FORM. English : Reading of such books as Hawthorne ' s Wonder Book. Spelling. Punctuation. Composition. Letter-writing. Arithmetic: Greatest Common Divisor. Least Common Mul- tiple. Cancellation. Common Fractions (including Sim- ple, Complex and Compound Fractions) completed. Many problems. Geography: North America and South America in detail. Collateral reading. Drawing. [19] 20 Asheville School. SECOND FORM. English: Reading of such books as Stepping Stones to Litera- ture for Fifth and Sixth Grades. Spelling. Punctuation. Composition. Letter- writing. Elements of English Grammar. Arithmetic: Decimal Fractions and Compound Numbers, completed. Many problems. Georgaphy: Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia in detail. Collateral reading. Drawing. THIRD FORM. English: Reading. Study of Parts of Speech and Syntax. Punctuation. Composition. Arithmetic: Percentage, omitting Stocks and Stock Invest- ments. Simple Interest, all cases. History: United States, through period of the Revolution. Collateral reading. Drawing. FOURTH FORM. English: Reading. Grammar, completed. Punctuation. Composition. Arithmetic: Partial Payments. Bank Discount. Longitude and Time. Exchange. Insurance. Duties or Customs. Ratio. Simple and Compound Proportion. Partnership. Involution. Square Root. Metric System. Latin : Paradigms and simple syntax. Marking of quantity of vowels. Easy reading. Written exercises. Reading of Latin aloud. Training in understanding the Latin before translating. History: United States, including Constitution, completed. Collateral reading. Modeling. Ashevill e School. 21 FIFTH FORM— Classical. English: Reading of examples of various styles of narrative and descriptive literature in both prose and verse. Study of words and sentences. Compositions, narrative and descriptive. Latin: Selections from Viri Romae and Nepos. Caesar ' s Gal- lic War, Bk. II. Prose composition based on Caesar. Mathematics: Algebra, through Quadratic Equations. History: Outlines of General History. Carpentry. FIFTH FORM — Scientific. English: Reading of examples of various styles of narrative and descriptive literature in both prose and verse. Study of words and sentences. Compositions, narrative and descriptive. Latin, Selections from Viri Romae and Nepos. Caesar ' s Gallic or War, Bk. II. Prose composition based on Casaer. German I: See page 24 for details. Mathematics: Algebra, through Quadratic Equations. History: Outlines of General History. Carpentry. SIXTH FORM— Classical. English: Reading of such works as Twice-Told Tales, As You Like It, The Idylls of the King. Advanced study of words, sentences, paragraphs. Compositions, narrative and descriptive. Latin: Caesar ' s Gallic War, Bks. I-III-IV. Vergil ' s Aeneid, Bk. I. Caesar and Nepos at sight. Prose Composition based on Caesar. Greek: Paradigms and simple syntax. Xenophon ' s Anabasis (20 to 30 pages). Practice in translation at sight and in writing Greek. Systematic study of Grammar begun. Mathematics: Plane Geometry, completed. History: Greece. 22 A sheville School. SIXTH FORM— Scientific. English: Reading of such works as Twice-Told Tales, As You Like It, The Idylls of the King. Advanced study of words, sentences, paragraphs. Compositions, narrative and descriptive. Latin: Caesar ' s Gallic War, Bks. I-III-IV. Vergil ' s Aeneid, or Bk. I. Caesar and Nepos at sight. Prose composition based on Caesar. German I or II: See page 24 for details. Mathematics: Plane Geometry, completed. History: England. Shopwork: Mechanical Drawing. SEVENTH FORM— Classical. English: Reading and study of books required for preliminary examinations for entrance to college. Elements of Rhet- oric. Compositions, descriptive and argumentative. Latin: Vergil ' s Aeneid, Bks. II— VI, and either the Eclogues or Bks. VII-IX of Aeneid. Prose composition, based on Caesar. Translation of prose Latin at sight. Greek: Xenophon ' s Anabasis, continued, Bks. I-IV, together with other Attic prose. Practice in translation at sight. Systematic study of Grammar and practice in writing Greek, based on study of Bks. I and II of the Anabasis. German I (optional): See page 24 for details. OR French I (optional) : See page 24 for details. Mathematics: Reviews of Elementary Algebra and Plane Geometry. History: Rome. Reviews of Greece and Rome. SEVENTH FORM— Scientific. English : Reading and study of books required for preliminary examinations for entrance to college. Elements of Rhet- oric. Compositions, descriptive and argumentative. A sheville School. 23 German II: See page 24 for details. OR French I: See page 24 for details. Mathematics: Solid Geometry. Plane and Spherical Trig- onometry. Reviews of Elementary Algebra and Plane Geometry. History: United States. Reviews of England and United States. Physics, Including laboratory work. EIGHTH FORM— Classical. English: Reading and study of books required for final exam- inations for entrance to college. Elements of Rhetoric. Compositions, prepared and extempore. Latin: Cicero, six orations. Ovid, 1000 lines. Vergil ' s Aeneid and Cicero at sight. Prose composition based on Cicero and Caesar. Greek: Homer ' s Iliad, Bks. I— III, and other books of Iliad or Odyssey. Thirty to fifty pages of Attic prose, as basis for prose composition. Translation at sight. German, I or II: See page 24 for details. OR French I or II: See page 24 for details. Mathematics: Advanced Algebra, completed. EIGHTH FORM— Scientific. English: Reading and study of books required for final exam- inations for entrance to college. Elements of Rhetoric. Compositions, prepared and extempore. j i 1 German III: See page 24 for details. OR French II: See page 24 for details. Mathematics: Advanced Algebra, completed. Chemistry, Including laboratory work. 24 Asheville School. German I: Elementary Grammar. Reading of at least 200 pages of easy German, such as Storm ' s Immensee and Baumbach ' s Der Schwiegersohn. Prose Composition. Translation at sight. German II : Advanced Grammar. Reading of at least 400 pages of modern prose, including Scientific German, and at least one classic, such as Minna von Barnhelm or Wilhelm Tell. Prose Composition. Translation at sight. German III: Advanced Grammar. Reading of at least 500 pages of standard German, largely from the classics. Prose composition. Translation at sight. French I: Elementary Grammar. Reading of at least 400 pages of easy French (Fiction, History, Science). Prose composition. Translation at sight. French II: Advanced Grammar. Reading of at least 600 pages of standard French. Prose composition. Translation at sight. (graduates. 1901. Day, Stephen Albion University of Michigan Rowe, Basil James Harvard University Schmidlapp, William Horace Cornell University 1902. . . , TT , , _ ■ ( Sheffield Scientific School Alexander, Harold Graham r , T , , T . { of Yale University Narten, Christian Carl Williams College Peebles, Nelson Childs Cincinnati, Ohio Rowe, John Jay Harvard University Schneider, Frederick Cornell University Thomson, Logan Gamble Williams College Van Schaick, Arthur Patton Williams College von Steinwehr, Frederick Charles Cornell University Entered College from Seventh Form. Coit, Robert Howland Cornell University Doepke, Robert Henry Mass. Institute of Technology 1903. Butler, Merrill William Kenyon College Bragg, Caleb Smith Yale University Dwight, Russell Stearns Yale University Hastings, Russell Piatt Leland Stanford, Jr., University Johnson, Ralph William Cornell University Murfey, Gardner Armstrong. . . .Mass. Institute of Technology Stutson, Willis Washington C. H., Ohio [25] 26 A s hevil I e School. 1904. Goodspeed, Charles Barnett Cornell University Housum, Charles Robert Yale University Lyman, Franklin Keith Cleveland, Ohio Osborn, Kenneth Howard Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute ( Sheffield Scientific Rodgers, William Starling Sullivant, Jr . . School of ( Yale University Short, Charles Wilkins, Jr Harvard University Entered College from Seventh Form. Cross, George Bailey Leland Stanford, Jr., University 1905. Erskine, Malcolm Edwin Williams College Fletcher, Charles Barrows Mass. Institute of Technology Fletcher, Matthews Mass. Institute of Technology Harris, James Armstrong, Jr Cornell University Heedy, Henry Glen Youngstown, Ohio Perkins, Ralph Williams College Ren wick, Foster Rood University of Michigan Tilden, George Alfred Cornell University Warner, William Deshler Ohio State University Whittaker, James Moro Yale University Whittlesey, Granville Egbert Cornell University A sheville School. 27 HONORS WERE GIVEN DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR 1904-05 AS FOLLOWS. Honors of the First Grade. James Armstrong Harris, Jr Eighth Form Honors of the Second Grade. Granville Egbert Whittlesey Eighth Form Perry Foote Narten Seventh Form Richard Tunis Sixth Form Thomas Humphrey Cushing Allen Fifth Form Malcolm McNaghten Fifth Form Morris Everett Bumpus Fourth Form Paul Milton Fletcher Fourth Form Herbert Lee Niebel Second Form g t xbmts. EIGHTH FORM. Bernard, Benjamin Franklin, Jr Asheville, N. C. Bulley, Charles Reginald Syracuse, N. Y. French, Bayless Wood Evanston, 111. Gould, Charles French Lake Forest, 111. Hane, Walter Edward Marion, Ohio. Harris, Stewart Brooks Citra, Fla. Hebard, Morgan Thomasville, Ga. Narten, Perry Foote Cleveland, Ohio. Peters, Albert William Cincinnati, Ohio. Robison, Warner Sumner Willoughby, Ohio. SEVENTH FORM. Arbuthnot, Charles, 3rd Pittsburgh, Pa. Bogert, William Benezet, Jr Evanston, 111. Crane, Reuben Holden Cincinnati, Ohio. Deming, Keith Worthington Dubuque, Iowa. Frost, Lewis Livingston Toledo, Ohio. Hambley, Littleton Coleman Fleming Salisbury, N. C. Holden, Reuben Andrus, Jr Cincinnati, Ohio. Horton, Henry Stevens Winona, Minn. Langdon, Perin, Jr Cincinnati, Ohio. Lanman, Henry Augustus Columbus, Ohio. McClain, Edward Lee, Jr Greenfield, Ohio. Nye, Harold Curtis Cleveland, Ohio. Ralston, Robert White Charlotteville, Va. Rowe, Stanley Melville Cincinnati, Ohio. Shinkle, Bradford, Jr Covington, Ky. Starr, John Ford Richmond, Ind. [28] A sheville School. 29 Tunis, Richard Media, Pa. Waters, Richard Baltimore, Md. Wayne, Richard Cincinnati, Ohio. Wright, Clifford Ramsey Cincinnati, Ohio. SIXTH FORM. Allen, Thomas Humphrey Cushing Cincinnati, Ohio. Bailey, Samuel Prentiss Winona, Minn. Dwight, Harold Stearns Wyoming, Ohio. Hayes, Sherman Otis Toledo, Ohio. Hiett, Donald Francis Toledo, Ohio. Huffman, John Mclntyre Dayton, Ohio. Huntsberger, John Paul Los Angeles, Cal. Jerome, Frank Jay Painesville, Ohio. Knight, Glenn Thomas Columbus, Ohio. Lanman, Charles Burnham Columbus, Ohio. Lyman, Ellsworth Asheville, N. C. McNaghten, Malcolm Columbus, Ohio. Pettit, Karl Dravo Allegheny, Pa. Semmes, Raphael Baltimore, Md. Stoddard, John Williams, Jr Dayton, Ohio. Strobridge, John Bruce Cincinnati, Ohio. Wilson, Thomas Sharpe Lafayette, Ind. Wrigley, William Wallace Clearfield, Pa. FIFTH FORM. Alexander, Donald Canton, Ohio. Bumpus, Morris Everett Quincy, Mass. Carnill, Anson Ernest Steubenville, Ohio. Clark, Fred George Cleveland, Ohio. Fletcher, Paul Milton Cleveland, Ohio. Jones, John Douglas Cleveland, Ohio. Lamson, Albert Hartley Toledo, Ohio. Mueller, Carl Herman Cleveland, Ohio. Mueller, Lynn Ernst Cleveland, Ohio. Smyser, Benjamin Harrison Fort Wayne, Ind. Stieff, Frederick Philip, Jr Baltimore, Md. Thomson, Jack Mortimer Port Huron, Mich. Winder, John Cox Columbus, Ohio. 30 A sheville School. FOURTH FORM. Ainslie, Rutherford Oakes Battle, Belknap Lee, William Justice Morton, Donald Ellsworth Scribner, Clarence Keim. . THIRD FORM. Andrews, Donald Shields Cleveland, Ohio. Barrows, Raymond Holden Norfolk, Va. Barstow, Newton Anderson Asheville, N. C. Bonsai, Charles Hay den Columbus, Ohio. Bonsai, Stephen, Jr Columbus, Ohio. Cole, Jules Omer Peru, Ind. Coxe, Tench Francis Asheville, N. C. Foote, George Henry, Jr Cleveland, Ohio. Niebel, Herbert Lee Hudson, Ohio. SECOND FORM. Greene, David Columbus, Ohio. Remy, Curtis Henry, Jr Evanston, 111. FIRST FORM. Crook, William Alfred Syracuse, N. Y. Hascall, Robert George Cleveland, Ohio. Lee, Asbury Wright, Jr Clearfield, Pa. . ...Oak Park, 111. . .Asheville, N. C. Germantown, Pa. Toledo, Ohio. .Cleveland, Ohio. rljonl ©rgantzaitona. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. President B. J. Rowe. First Vice-President C. C. Narten. Second Vice-President A. P. Van Schaick. Secretary-Treasurer C. R. Housum. ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. Executive Committee. C. Arbuthnot, 3rd, P. Langdon, Jr., S. B. Harris, A. W. Peters, Mr. Jackson. [33] KIT KAT DEBATING SOCIETY. . . A. W. Peters. Secretary- Treasurer E. L. McClain, Jr. Sergeant-at-Arms , . P. Langdon, Jr. . . .W. E. Hane. C. Arbuthnot, 3rd, L. C. F. Hambley H. C. Nye, B. F. Bernard, M. Hebard, R. W. Ralston, L. L. Frost, R. A. Holden, R. Tunis, B. W. French, H. S. HORTON, C. R. Wright, C. F. Gould, M. McNaghten, W. W. Wrigley. P. F. Narten, [34] THE REVIEW. Editor-in-Chief P. F. Narten, ' 06. C B. F. Bernard, ' 06. Associate Editors W. E. Hane, ' 06. (a. W. Peters, ' 06. Business Manager S. B. Harris, ' 06. Assistant Business Manager . . C. Arbuthnot, 3rd, ' 07. DRAMATIC SOCIETY. President A. W. Peters. Secretary P. Langdon, Jr. Treasurer E. L. McClain, Jr. C. Arbuthnot, 3rd, F. G. Clark, S. B. Harris, B. F. Bernard, Jr., R. H. Crane, M. Hebard, W. B. Bogert, Jr., B. W. French, P. F. Narten, C. R. Bulley, C. F. Gould, C. R. Wright. W. E. Hane, THE HILLYER HOLDEN LIBRARY BOARD. S. B. Harris, ' 06, Chairman. W. E. Hane, ' 06, P. F. Narten. ' 06, C. Arbuthnot, 3rd, ' 07, R. Tunis, ' 07. C. B. Lanman, ' 08, M. E. Bumpus, ' 09. [35] ? BASEBALL NINE. Season of 1005. Captain. . Manager. . . . .R. Perkins. .J. A. Harris, Jr. C. Arbuthnot, 3rd, C. M. Clark, D. S. Clark, E. T. Georger, C. F. Gould, W. B. Grammer, W. E. Hane, F. G. Harrison, R. R. Moodey, F. H. Peirce, G. A. TlLDEN, C. W. Tunis. FOOTBALL ELEVEN. Season of 1905. Captain P. Langdon, Jr. Manager A. W. Peters. C. Arbuthnot, 3rd, J. P. Huntsberger, R. W. Ralston, L. C. F. Hambley, G. T. Knight. J. A. Reeves, S. O. Hayes, E. L. McClain, Jr., W. S. Robison, D. F. Hiett, D. E. Morton, B. Shinkle, Jr., J. M. Huffman, C. R. Wright. [36] SCHOOL CREW. P. Langdon, Jr Bow C. B. Fletcher (Captain) Two M. A. White Three M. Fletcher Stroke C. F. Gould Coxswain CLUB CREWS. First Crews. blues. whites. H. G. Heedy Bow J. M. Whittaker G. E. Whittlesey Two P. Langdon, Jr. M. E. Erskine Three M.A.White M. Fletcher Stroke C. B. Fletcher C. F. Gould Coxswain C. B. Lanman Second Crews. R.Tunis Bow C. Arbuthnot, 3rd H. P. CONNABLE TWO W. S. ROBISON D. F. Histt Three L. C. F. Hambley B. W. French Stroke S. B. Harris M. McNaghten Coxswain J. H. C. Allen [37] BASKETBALL TEAM. Season of 1905. Captain Manager C. R. BULLEY, H. W. Church, L. C. F. Hambley, H. S. Horton, W. E. Hane. C. Arbuthnot, 3rd. C. B. Lanman, A. W. Peters, K. D. Pettit, C. R. Wright. GUN CLUB— 1904- ' 05. President E. L. McClain, Jr. Secretary-Treasurer M. Hebard. C. Arbuthnot, 3rd, G. F. Hambley, P. Langdon, Jr B. Battle, L. C. F. Hambley, A. W. Peters, M. E. Erskine, F. G. Harrison. Mr. Beardslee, C. B. Fletcher, H. G. Heedy, Mr. Jackson. TENNIS CLUB. Captain M. Hebard. Champion 1904-1905 M. Hebard. Champion Fall 1905 C. R. Wright. B. W. French, School Team -J M. Hebard, C. R. Wright. L38] (By Permission.) Harvard University — Professors LeBaron Russell Briggs, A. M., LL. D., Dean. George Herbert Palmer, A. M. Litt. D. LL. D., Albert Bushnell Hart, Ph. D., LL. D. Morris Hickey Morgan, Ph. D., LL. D. George Lyman Kittredge, A. B., LL. D. Wallace Clement Sabine, A. M. Yale University — Professors Henry Parks Wright, Ph. D., LL. D., Dean. Thomas Day Seymour, Ph. D., LL. D. Bernadotte Perrin, Ph. D., LL. D. Edward Gaylord Bourne, Ph. D. Princeton University — Ex-President Francis La ndey Patton, D. D., LL. D. Professors Samuel Ross Winans, Ph. D. Andrew Fleming West, Ph. D., LL. D., Litt. D. Henry Nevius Van Dyke, A. M., Registrar. Cornell University — Professors Edward Lamington Nichols, B. S., Ph. D. David Fletcher Hoy, M. S., Registrar. University of Michigan — President James Burrill Angell, LL. D. Professors Francis Willey Kelsey, Ph. D. Andrew Cunningham McLaughlin, A. M., LL. B. Johns-Hopkins University — Professor Harry F. Reid, Ph. D. University of Pennsylvania — Professor Josiah Harmar Penniman, Ph. D., Dean. Western Reserve University — President Charles Franklin Thwing, D. D., LL. D. Professors Frank Perkins Whitman, A. M., Dean. Charles Harris, Ph. D. Robert Waller Deering, Ph. D. [39] Ohio State University — Professor Josiah Renick Smith, A. M. Williams College — Professor Samuel Fessenden Clark, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology — Professors Charles R. Cross, S. B. Harry W. Tyler, Ph. D. Case School of Applied Science — President Charles Sumner Howe, Ph. D. Professor Charles Frederic Mabery, S. D. Rose Polytechnic Institute — President Carl Leo Mees, Ph. D. University of Virignia — Professor Albert H. Tuttle, Ph. D. [40] j 3


Suggestions in the Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC) collection:

Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC) online yearbook collection, 1910 Edition, Page 1

1910

Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC) online yearbook collection, 1912 Edition, Page 1

1912

Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC) online yearbook collection, 1913 Edition, Page 1

1913

Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC) online yearbook collection, 1916 Edition, Page 1

1916

Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC) online yearbook collection, 1917 Edition, Page 1

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Asheville School - Blue and White Yearbook (Asheville, NC) online yearbook collection, 1918 Edition, Page 1

1918

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