Ashbury College - Ashburian Yearbook (Ottawa, Ontario Canada)

 - Class of 1955

Page 1 of 160

 

Ashbury College - Ashburian Yearbook (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1955 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 160 of the 1955 volume:

THE ASHBLTIQIAN W 4t1!U"' -1 , up ASHBYRX' Cf JLLECQE CJ'l"1'AYS' .X VOLUME XXXIX 1955 THE ASHBURIAN ASHBURY COLLEGE INC. ROCKCLIFFE PARK, OTTAWA R VISITOR Field Marshal, The Right Honourable Earl of Tunis THE BOARD OF GOX'ERNORS Executive Committee R. XV. Southam, Esq., B.A., MS., Chairman. .,,................. -Rockcliffe Park J. S. Irvin, Esq., Vice-Chairman .... -- ...................... ....... . .-.Rockeliffe Park C. R. Booth, Esq., B.Sc., P.Eng., P.Ing. ......... .......... R ockcliffe Park D. B. Cruikshank, Esq. ........ ....... . ................... .......... R 0 ckcliffe Park Keith Davidson, Esq .... ................... ...... ROCkCliffC Park VV. R. Eakin jr., Esq., B.A., B.C.L.. ......... .............. ll Tontreal H. R. Hampson, Esq.. ........... .... ............ . ............ IX flontreal H. P. Hill, Esq., Q.C. ........................ - ..... ---Rockcliffe Park A. B. R. Lawrence, Esq. ....... ......................... O ttawa L. C. D. Palmer, Esq ......................... ....... .......... R O Ckcliffe Park E N. Rhodes, Esq ......................... ............. ..................... O t tawa Commodore VV. G. Ross, C.D., R.C.N.. ..,... .......... R Ockcliffe Park Captain G. A. VVoollcombe, R.C.N. ........ ........................................ O ttawa Brigadier R. Rowley, D.S.O., E.D. .................................. - R. H. Perry, Esq., M.A., Headmaster and Secretary ...., Governors .Rockcliffe Park -Rockcliffe Park G. F. Benson, Esq ............. ...................... ........... ll 4 Ontreal Frank D. Bliss, Esq ................ ................. H amilton Colonel D. Fraser, V.D. ,..............................,................................ Ottawa A. R. Macl. aren, Esq. .................................................... Buckingham, Que. Brig. Gen. C. H. Maclaren, C.M.G., D.S.O., V.D. ............. ........... O ttawa r-1 . D. K. Mac Qos. Culley Donald Mcinnes, Esq., B.A., LL.B., Q.C ......... Peter Redpath, Esq.. ,,,,..,.....,.,.,..,..,,.v,,vv,, V. XV. Soul. y, Esq., C.M.A., F.C.A ........ G. T. Sour T iam, Esq.. ..............,...,....,. ,, Taylor Statten, Esq. .... , ....,. ,.,,, ,rrrr . ..,V.r,v..w, , Ex Officio -av1sh, O.B.E., Q.C .,.,. , .....,....,........,,...,............ Rockcliffe Park , Esq., M.A .......... . ........,.,... . ,....,..,.., , ....,.......... Toronto ----------Hal1fax -----------Montreal ----------Hamilton --,----Vancouver --------Toronto H. j. Ronalds, Esq., President Montreal Old Boys' Ass'n..---. ..... Montreal E .JSHH L' Rl.-1 .Y 5 R XY. SOCTHAXI. Ifsq. Chairman of tlmc Board of Cifwcrmnrs. to XYIIUIII this issue of Thc Aslmlmurigm is rcsvccrtlnlly dudicnu v- -vll .. , ff,-11. f QW -1 1.1.3311 fw:-vm. ---v . v,.,,.- I v,,:-1-ga,-. . z, Z Z9 J , Q 7 . X I 4 ,f 4 , 1 Z1 ,H , Y E f' ' . E2s 7 'I3!U57" " ' . ':--4.4-fr' . ,5g3ggag::j24":- 5 z 8 :Wf- --"- 4 5 4 cs' 9 ,fb 1 ,r 1 f ' A fn Q yy' W l ,. , w 'sz f .v ,1 2 g g Z ' ' l s 2, 9 V' fr 21.'.":.'-'sm 1 J. . , ,sul Q , Wig , , V 1 ' V , ,, 1 1 ' '47, 114 , 'f f 49 5 1 3 .-, ,Q 4 3 vw, - 1 -ha? V,, gi. 13 . , f Sz- - I I fx wi wa. M an , 5' .-'f-z:a-5 ' -' -' " Q'- my Cf. ,, WJ? a 4 I I Z . ' 3' 4 A, 15? , 9' .:,:.,:,.. jgsgipsg., , ff A M ,. X f - A ::rfZ'E:!" Tix.: " ., 4.-:.:.:. .I. 'Ii-' --rf" ':' f- -3' + M 3. 5:--55.-. V --gg: Q " ' ' I 4. ,5,1::l:5i:- 75,2 f grrgjg: - 4,- Y bar, I: ::':1: 21,111 Oh THE AsHBU1e1.4N TABLE Board of Governors . The Ashburian Staff . The Staff .... School Ofiicers . Editorial . . School Notes . . Chapel Notes . . . The Choir ..... The Mothers' Guild . The New Laboratory . . . . Senior Science Trip to Kingston The Carleton College Tour . Bermuda Trip ...... The European Tour . . Science Notes ...... Some junior School Activities Sports Review . . Football: First Field Rugby . . Second Field Rugby . . Third and Fourth Field Rugby House Games ..... The Football Dinner . . . Soccer ..... Hockey: First Team Hockey . . . Second Team Hockey . . Third Team Hockey . . Skiing: Senior Ski Team . . OF PAGE . 2 . 6 . 7 . s . Q . 10 . 12 . 13 . 14 . 15 . 16 . 18 . 19 . 19 . 23 . 25 . 27 . 28 . 34 37 . 38 . 39 41 . 46 . 53 . 55 .56 1 CONTENTS 1-.1111-1 junior Ski Team . . 58 lhskctball ..... . 60 The Cross Country Run . . 63 Badminton . . . . 63 Track and lfield . . 64 Rowing . . . . 65 Riding . . 66 Squash . . 66 Swimming . 66 Boxing . 67 Cricket . 69 Tennis . . 72 The School Play . . . . 73 Poetry Reading Contest . . . 75 Public Speaking Contest . . . 75 Debate ...... . 76 Music .... . 77 The Formal Dance . . 78 The Cadet Corps . . 79 Old Boys' Section . . 83 Prefects .... . 89 Among the Graduates . . . 93 Form Pictures and Notes . . 94 Readover ..... . . 106 Sports Day . . . 107 Closing Exercises . . . 111 Valedictory . . . 116 Literary Section . . . 117 Exchanges . . . . 131 School Roll . . . . 132 THE ASHB URIAN THE ASHBURIAN STAFF Editor-irz-Chief A. B. BELCHER, ESQ. Business Manager XV. E. SLATTERY, ESQ. Editor G. VVERHAEGEN Sports Editor M. VVIDDRINGTON Literary Editor C. KAMCKE Photographic Editor T. FINLAY THE ASHBURIAN I TH li STAFF Hct1d111.1xrf.'r R. H. PI-ZRRY, B.A., Toronto, MA., Columbia Aysismnr Hendvlmstw' and liirvuror of Sfllrffw' A. D. BRAIN, BA.. Toronto Exeter College, Oxford Senior .llasrcr I.. H. SIISLICY, B.Sc., McGill M.C.I.C., I".C.S. H 01150 .llnytcry Upper School A. B. BELCHIQR, R.M.C. Kingston Izmiw' School D. I.. POLK, BA. Dartmouth .llnsrers j. A. POXVELL, B.A., Toronto Trinity College, Cambridge J. M. P. Rizizs, B.A., University College, London Landovery College, S. VVales R. G. DEVINE, University of Ottawa CAssistant Housemasterj A. H. N. SNELGROVE, Mt. Allison, Sackville, N.B. Rav. E. G. KETTLEBOROUGH, B. A., McGill, L.Th., Montreal Dio- cesan Theological College CSchOOl Chaplainj Crafts NV. E. SLATTERY N zzrse-.II at1'071 Miss M. BRAY, Reg.N. MRS. J. H. CLARKE, Assistant Matron 1. K. JOBLING, B.A., Dip. Ed., Leeds University, A.I.I.., Ifng. P. FALS'I'RL'P-FISHER, M.A., Trinity College, Cambridge I. H. SPENCER, Riverview College, Sydney, Australia R. J. IXNDERSON. Army P.T. College MRs. E. B. HL'N'I'ER. Ottawa Normal School MRS. H. S. DALTON, Ottawa Normal School .llzzsic Miss IRLNR XVOOORLRN Mus. Bac.. BishOp's, A.R.C.T. Dieticialz Miss D. A. SHORT, O.A.C.. Guelph and St. Luke's Hospital. New York Physicimz C. K. ROXVAX-LIQGG, M.D., McGill, D.C.H., Eng.. F.A.A.P. C 0715111 tant Psy cbinrrist TAYLOR STATTEN, M.D., Toronto Children's Memorial Hospital. Montreal Bursar Miss I. Sxuru S6CI'CI'n'II'y MRS. D. NAUDAIN THE ASHBURIAN 8 SCHOQL OFFICERS Captain of the Scbool A. B. WELLS Captain ofthe Boarders Captain of the Day Boys L. XV. IQILLALY E. N. RHODES, JR. Prefects VV. BAER D. GAAIBLF C. GILL J. IRVIN C. KANICKPi M. LAXVSON C. NOXVAKOXVSKI R. PENNINGTON XYPZRHAPIGEN J. WEDD M. WIDIJRINGTON Honse Captains - IVoollcon1be Connaught Alexander J. XRJEDD A. WELLS M. KILLALY Vice-Captains IVoollcon1be C onnan gbt Alexander M. LAWSON E. RHODES, JR. G. XJERHAEGEN Gaines Captains Football Cricket Hockey C. RIOXVAKOXVSKI W. BARR J. IRVIN Skiing Soccer Basketball C. IQOXVAKOXVSKI W. EASTXVOOD B. MCA'NULTY Vice-Captains Football Cricket Hockey J. IRVIN E. RHODES, JR. J. WEDD Skiing Soccer Basketball C. Gll.I. I. FUNES T. FINLAY CADET CORPS Officer Conrnzanding MAJ. T. FINLAY Second in Connnand CAPT. C. NOWAEOWSKI Adjutant CAPT. A. WELLS Platoon Commanders LT. IC. RIIODI-18 LT. M. KILT..-xl.Y LT. B. MCA'NL'LTY LT. W. BAER Cornpany S'er.qea11t .llajor Cadet QZl4'l7'fL"l'7llL'l.Yf67' Sergeant C.S.M. A. I.,xc3lu-ix' Q.M.S. J. XVI-TDD THE ASHBURIAN 9 EDITGRIAL L'0'l' homines, tot sententiae, as the tiresome old Izlg has it. Never- theless there must be unanimity on some topics. For example, within these walls at least, it is agreed that this year, taking it by and large, has been the most satisfactory year that the School has enjoyed within the memory of its oldest living inhabitants. Not that any of us is in danger of complacency. Heaven knows a rich plenty of perfections still remains to dream about, and perhaps even one or two small middens of dubious fragrance still remain to grouse about. But, in general, it must be evident to the gauziest winged idealist, as to the sourest mouthed cynic, that the year concluded on june 8th, 1955 has been an excellent one-at least in so far as it may be judged by any ponderable criteria. It would seem, for example, that the academic material has been at a higher level than usual-and this regardless of whatever dire picture the Senior Matriculation may evoke. XVin, lose or draw in that particular sweepstake, the preceding statement may be repeated and re-emphasized. It is agreed by those who are in a position to know that we have had a higher ratio of bright forms to dull forms Cwith the dull forms less dull and the bright forms brighterj than we have experienced for-well, for some time. The general tone, too, has been pleasing. The number of undesirable capers perpetrated was conspicuously below average. Apart from the antics of one or two volatile creatures, human relations were generally genial. There have been, of course, a few brushes from time to time, but they were infrequent and any lesser number would have verged on the unwholesome. For accomplishments "in fields afar remote" from the academic and the humanistic, the statistic is to be found upon the inner pages of this magazine-where "he that runs may read". 10 THE ASHBURIAN SCHOOL NOTES Opening Day N the morning of the ninth of September, there was held in the gymnasium an assembly for the Headmaster's annual opening remarks. First, he welcomed all new boys, acquainting them with some of Ashbury's old traditions and impressing on them how proud they should be to don the Ashbury tie. He went on to say that this year Ashbury has had a new record attendance-225 boys. This new total was made possible mainly by the facilities of the new Argyle Building. And with a note of welcome to old and new, he concluded. On the following afternoon, the Chairman of the Board, Mr. E. N. Rhodes, welcomed us back on behalf of the Board of Governors and asked the Headmaster to grant us a half holiday. This year there were many changes and additions made to the staff. XVe were glad to welcome Mr. Rees as the new Senior History master, Reverend E. G. Kettleborough, our new School Chaplain, Mr. Anderson, from jolly olde England, as our P.T. instructor, Mr. Falstrup-Fisher, junior mathematics teacher, and chief instructor of the Cadet Corps, Mr. Spencer, from Australia, as a junior School master, Mrs. Clarke, the new Memorial lVing matron, and Mrs. Dalton as the Form I School Mistress. Evztevftaimllwzt Again this year we were fortunate in having our weekly school movies, and thanks are due to Mr. Sibley, and to Birbeck, our able projectionist. VVe had feature presentations such as, "Call me Madam", "Destination Cfobin, and many other excellent films. The school dances this year have had amazing success, never before have they had such a large and enthusiastic attendance. All this led to a fine formal, which was certainly a highlight of the year. On the last evening of the Fall term, the Christmas Party was held in the gym. Its climax was Santa Claus, who this year must have come from Australia, judging by his broad Australian accent. As usual, he brought presents for young and old, and kept well out of reach of curious junior hands. Again this year, Mr. Sibley arranged numerous science trips, the most important being the one to the National Research Council and the Senior Science Trip to Kingston. Dietetics The food this year has been well up to usual standard, or even better Qwe even sometimes get soft-boiled eggs on Sundavj and much THE .4SHBURl.4N Il credit is due to Nliss Short, our dietician, Xlr. Ring, our chef, and to the whole kitchen staff. Hc'a11Il7 This Year, nobody died from any disease, and the health remained verv good, thanks to Dr. li. Rowan-Legg and to ,Xliss Bray and their eliicacious remedies. A rbletics It seems lit to include a little note on sports, for in this respect, we have had an unusually successful season. We produced an undefeated football team, a very strong hockey team, a ski team, which won the Quebec lnterprovincial Ski Nleet at Xlont Tremblant, competing against ten other schools, and a very line cricket team. Gifts Uie wish to express grateful thanks to the following friends and Old Boys who have made gifts to the School: Xlr. Robert Cartwright, for a substantial gift of books, Nlr. bl. ll. Cooney, for two clocks and binoculars as gifts for prize-giving, The. I lon. Cl. Drew, for a Senior English Prize, Mrs. M. Fauquier, for an Athletic trophy, Nlr. J. S. Irvin, for a hockey trophy, Col. XY. Nl. KlcA'Nulty, for a trophy to the most valuable basketball player, Mr. UI. Barry O'Brien, for a trophy to the Second Football team, Group Capt. K. R. Patrick, for a T.V. antenna, the Prefeets and Graduating Class for an oil painting by Arthur Lismer, Mr. E. N. Rhodes, for a Bible, Klr. XY. F. Nl. XYother- spoon, for a carpenters lathe, and Mr. A. B. wells. for a mechanical saw. To others also, who have in the past presented prizes and trophies for annual competition, we extend our warmest thanks for their con- tinued interest. "Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scar." 12 THE ASHBURIAN CHAPEL NOTES N the Fall Term we welcomed our new Chaplain, the Rev. E. G. Kettleborough, B.A., L.Th. He has addressed us many times throughout the year, which has been a great help to us all. Daily services have been held as usual, with full Matins and short Evensong on Sundays. Uie have also been pleased to welcome the following visitors to the Chapel: january 30th: Archdeacon C. Anderson, the Clerical Secretary of the Diocese. February 6th: Rev. Roland Bodger, St. Cuthberts' Church, Mont- real. The Headmaster addressed us on September 12th, December 12th, March 27th, and on june Sth. These were excellent sermons and gave us something to ponder. Our Old Boys' Chapel Service was held on October 24th, at which time the two memorial plaques were dedicated, one to Peter Veits, and another to Marcelle Villatoro. A new Lectern Bible was dedicated at this service, being the gift of E. N. Rhodes, Esq. The new Chapel Lights were also dedicated to the memory of Peter Veits. Wie held our annual Prefects' Service on Sunday, February 27th. The address was given by the Captain of the School. The Captain of the Boarders read the service, M. XViddrington read the Lesson, T. Finlay presided at the organ, and Prefects took the Offering. Mr. Brain addressed us on October 2nd, and Mr. Sibley on November 14th. On March 17th, we held our annual Confirmation Service in the Chapel. XVe welcomed at this service the new Lord Bishop of Ottawa, the Rt. Reverend Ernest S. Reed, M.A., D.D. The Bishop's Chaplain was Archdeacon C. Anderson, with Rev. A. T. Carson, Rector of St. Bartholemews' Church, and Rev. john Stewart, Rector of St. Margarefs Church in attendance. The following students received the "laying on of hands"-Alasdair D. Bowen, Peter C. Noel-Bentley, john S. Rowan- Legg, john R. Rockingham, Robert M. Dunn, and Paul D. Tucci. On May 8th, the Lord Bishop returned for a second service of confirmation. At this service Peter H. Ince and Carson XV. Shaw were confirmed. On Thursday, May 19th, on the Feast of the Ascension, we held a Service of Holy Communion for the entire School. Over 100 students received the Sacrament, and this was a great inspiration. XVe were also pleased to welcome many Parents to our Services, particularly the large number who attended the Visitors' Service on May 29th. THE ASHBURIAN ll Throughout the year the Chapel has played a very important part in our life, and we appreciate the efforts of those concerned in this hne work. The Chapel Staff this year has included the Chaplain, with Xlr. Sibley as Organist and Choirmastcr, Xlr. Snelgrovc assisting at the Organ, and R. Kemp, H. Short, and XY. Birbeck as Chapel Clerks. THE CHOIR HE Choir this year has been most successful. The quality of the singing has improved, and the boys have had a good tone quality. We have had Choir Practices as usual every Nlonday afternoon. During the Fall Term, our major efforts were directed for the preparation of the Candlelight Carol Services held on Sunday, December 12th and on Tuesday, December 1-lth. The programme of work sung by the Choir included: "All My Heart this Night Rejoicesu-a 17th century Carol, "Like Silver Lamps in a Distant Shrine"-a 19th century Carol, "When Christ was Born of Mary Free"-a 15th century Carol, "Ou s'en vont ces gais bergers"-an old French Carol, "I Saw Three Ships Come Sailing In"-with descant, "Beside the Cradle Here l Stand"-from Bach's "Christmas Oratoriong and "Shepherds in the Field Abiding"- Solos were creditably sung by Bray,'Bentley, Hilliard, Stuart and Fidler. Lessons were read by Winter and Courey. The Chapel for these services looked particularly line with hundreds of glowing candles and the shining brass. During the Fall Term, the Choir made a trip to the Ninth Line- Fitzroy Harbour Church. This was a Harvest Thanksgiving service conducted by Rev. XY. Belford assisted by our School Chaplain. At all Communion Services, the Choir has sung many new hymns and anthems, which have formed a very Htting background for this Sacra- ment. Cn Friday, May 27th, we held our Annual Choir Party. The boys went swimming and had movies. The Crucifer this year has been XYilliam Birbeck, with Peter Blakeney as Server, and Mr. Sibley as Organist and Choirmaster, ably assisted at all Choir Practices by Nlr. Snelgrove. The Mothers' Guild Committee under Xlrs. S. Fidler, have done yeoman service, and the Sewing Committee under Nlrs. A. Powell have kept the robes in good order, and we are deeply thankful for their efforts. The members of the Choir this year have been: XlacNeil, Bentley. Bray, Fidler, McDonell I, McDonell II, Nlorson, Rowe II, Scully. Souitham II, Eaton, Edwards, Hilliard, Stuart. Thorne. Thornton. Hamilton III, Nloore II, Rivers II, Tyler, Polk I, Paterson l and Pater- son III. 14 THE ASHBURIAN ASHBURY MOTHERS' GUILD-Executive 1955 Sitting, left ro right: Mrs. S. Fidler, Secretary, Mrs. Harold Mulkins, President, Mrs. George Xlloollcombe, Vice-President. Smndizzg, left to right: Mrs. H. A. Sparling, Treasurer, Mrs. Carl Heggtveit, Tea Convenor, Mrs. Allan Powell, Sewing Convenor. .lflijillgi Mrs. Hugh Roger, Telephone Convenor. THE MOTHERS' GUILD oaix our thanks are due to that admirable organization, the Mothers, Guild, which continues to carry on its extremely valuable work on the School's behalf. The members of the Guild have devoted much time, effort, and ingenuity, throughout the year, to the contribution of gifts, prizes and cash which would not otherwise have been available. Among the fruits of this year's labours are: additional attractive curtains to screen the boys from the world and the world from the boys-at appropriate hours, gifts of a handsome oak lectern for the chapel, and of a fine Philips recording machine, prizes for swimming, and for the best kept rooms of the year, also, the sum of 55300.00 for the setting up of bursaries. XYe assure them of our warmest appreciation of their interest and work. t Q .,: :-fy' THE NEW LABCRATORY His year we have a new Laboratory at the school. For many years the old Laboratory had proven to be quite inade- quate for the numbers of students who had to use it. Hence it was decided to redesign the Laboratory with new modern furnishings, and if possible provide more working space for the students. Last year, the Senior Science Klaster was in consultation with School and L'niversity authorities throughout many parts of Untario and Quebec. After many suggestions from Laboratory designers, it was finally decided to take out a small piece of wall, and by so doing, we were able to have two long banks of working benches, with the students working at correct laboratory height. All the furniture is made of stainless steel with hard "Kemrock" tops. There are two aisles on the two sides with a large aisle in the centre. A front platform was built from the better parts of the old laboratory tables. On this platform has been placed a demonstration table, a chemical dispensing table, with chemical cupboard, master's desk and cupboard. One of the more interesting features is the small "cup sinks". These are designed for student use. and save much space. There is one large clean-up sink for major wash up operations with hot and 16 THE ASHBURIAN cold running water. The reagent bench is in the middle of each bank with all plumbing and gas lines easily accessible under it. The assembling was done last summer by a Laboratory designer expert, assisted by our own workmen, and Mr. Sibley. Mr. Snelgrove and Mr. Sibley then prepared and organized all reagents and equipment for use. The result is. that we now have the most modern Laboratory in Canada. The great advantage is that more Laboratory work has been possible with increased efficiency, from Form Remove to Form 6A. SENIOR SCIENCE TRIP T0 KINGSTQN HIS year, the Senior Science Trip went to Kingston. VVe left on VVednesday, the ninth of February, just after the Half-Term tests. IYe arrived in Kingston that evening, and we were put up at the LaSalle Hotel, where we had excellent service. Early next morning, after a copious breakfast, we boarded taxis and left for the Canadian Locomotive Company. After a glimpse at the engineering department, we moved on to the factory where we saw the gradual assembly of steam and diesel engines. VV e also saw the manu- facture of torpedo tubes, mining equipment, and even a "dump tank" for radioactive elements. VVe then had the privilege of riding in one of their new diesel engines-quite a sensation. Finally, we were shown through the pump shop. In this company the machinery is huge and the plant a vast one. VVe then proceeded by taxi to The Royal Military College where we had lunch. After the meal we toured the College, the first part of the tour being handled by Squadron Leader Tony Golab, of Rough Rider fame. This part of the tour included the Library, the swimming pool, the dormitories, the shooting gallery, and other sports facilities. The second part of this tour was handled by Col. Sawyer, the Director of Studies, who gave us a complete sketch of the College, the courses offered, and requirements for entrance. IV e then toured all the Labor- atories seeing also the research projects carried on by the staff. VVe were impressed by the large amount of equipment, and the general smartness of the cadets. Gur own "Brigadier" Sibley was saluted as we journeyed. That evening, Dr. Atack invited us to a dinner. He had with him Dr. Plewes. of Queen's University, Mr. Metcalfe, the Vice-President of the Dye and Chemical VVorks, and his son, Mr. Dan Atack. Dr. Atack spoke at the dinner on the "Choosing of a Career". In his remarks, he stated the importance of finding a career in which we would be happy, stating that we achieve from our work just what we put THE ASHBURIAN I7 into it. He also pleaded fora better knowledge of written lfnglish. .Xfter dinner, we adjourned to the home of Dr. Atack for Television. llis home is the former residence of Sir john A. .XlaclDonald. Next morning. the trip took us to the :Xluminuin Company of Canada. Here Mr. Stabler took charge, and briefed us on the general manufacture and the uses of the metal. after which wc went on an extended tour of this huge plant. XYe saw the alloving. the casting and the rolling of the metal, all at high temperatures. The rolling mills were fascinating-a 9 inch 1700 pound ingot is pressed into a I 2 inch thick strip. The extrusion takes place under a pressure of 3100 tons per square inch. The last department we visited was the tin foil department which makes all kinds of tin foil used in packaging cigarettes and candy bars. It is incredible to think that the company makes tin foil four thousandths of an inch thick. After the completion of this tour, we went over to the Aluminum Company Laboratories, where we saw pilot plants for the manufacture of aluminum, and also a demonstration of Argon welding. Here we also saw research carried on dealing with the corrosion of the metal by sea water, paints and flaws in welding. After lunch we went five miles outside Kingston to visit the Dupont Nylon Plant. This plant makes Nylon from adipic acid, nitrogen and titanium dioxide. Rigorous precautions have to be taken in its manufacture to keep the humidity correct. After an extensive tour, Csome of the halls are l!J4 of a mile longj, we visited the Cafeteria for refreshments. That evening we were the guests of Queen's University at a basketball game against McMaster University. On Saturday morning we journeyed to Queens University. There we met two old Boys, Glen Cook and Lance Bailey. Their new Library is an excellent new building containing over 250,000 volumes. From there we moved on to see the Synchrotron-a fine piece of machinery used to smash atoms. VVe then saw Grant Hall, the Qld Arts Building and finally on to the Mechanical Engineering Building, where Professor Campbell after a short talk, took us on tour. This building is very well equipped with expensive machinery. VVe saw the fuel laboratory, the machine shop, and the internal combustion laboratory. After this tour we went on to the Union for lunch. We toured the Union and saw the reading rooms, the music room, common rooms, and general recrea- tion rooms. It was then time to leave. and off we went to the Bus terminal or the train to complete another Science Trip. Our thanks are due to Xlr. Sibley for arranging the tour and to everyone in Kingston who made it so successful. Those who made the tour this year included: Kamcke. Short, Turcotte, Verhaegen, VVallingford, Boone, Patrick I, Hard. Eschauzier, MacLaren and Rivers. 18 THE ASHBURIAN THE CARLETON COLLEGE TOUR N February Zlst, the two senior forms took their annual trip to Carleton College. This trip is arranged so that the boys who hope to attend that institution may get a rough idea of the university set-up. A week previous to the trip the Registrar of Carleton had come to Ashbury to brief us on what to do, and to get an estimate of how many would attend the different lectures. The morning was broken up into three parts of one hour each-nine to ten, ten to eleven, eleven to twelve, at twelve we were to be given lunch in the auditorium. During two of these three hours, we had the choice of attending any two lectures we wished, during the third hour we were at liberty to wander about and view the plant as we pleased. Most people chose to attend the lectures during the first two hours and relax during the third. After a very good lunch, the President of the College gave us a very interesting speech, he said that he would be glad to oblige with information about colleges and universities, he said that Carleton was pretty cramped right now, but that they were building a new campus. Mr. Perry thanked him for Ashbury, and Mrs. Graham for Elmwood, while Andrew XYells and Sheila McCormick thanked him for the students of the respective schools. Then, in the afternoon, some of us had the opportunity of attending laboratory periods and these too, were of great interest to those of us who were scientifically minded. And so ended our tour of Carleton College, and I am sure that through even this brief introduction we acquired a taste of university life which should prove very valuable in our later academic careers. THE ASHBURI.-IN IQ 'QV' ii " ' 2 ' V Q9 7 EASTER IN BERMUDA Hillary, Funes, Short, J. K. jobling. lfsq.. Kahlc, lfastwood. BERMUDA TRIP Asr Easter a pleasing innovation was introduced in the form of a holiday trip to Bermuda, organized and conducted by Xlr. jobling. Thanks to his associations there, where he had taught school for some time before coming to Canada, Mr. jobling was able to arrange that the party should take temporary possession of Port Island. a small island half a mile off shore in Hamilton Harbour. Here they thoroughly enjoyed the boating. fishing and bathing and were hospitably entertained in Hamilton by Xlr. and Klrs. jones. old friends of Mr. jobling's, at the school where he had formerly taught. They saw, too, several games of rugger and soccer which were being played during "College Week". Among these, was a rugger match between "Harvard" and "Canada". Harm thanks are due to Hr. jobling for this enterprising expedi- tion and we hope that he may be able to work out another such happy plan next year. THE EUROPEAN TQUR Asr summer a group of stalwart Ashbury students along with some L'.T.S. fellows accompanied Prof. B. C. Taylor. Qbettcr known as Berniel on a two month tour of Europe. Those on the trip from Ashbury were: Bill Baer, Alike Lawson, Dave Livingston. Laurie Hart. 20 THE ASI-IBURIAN Dick Kemp, jim VVedd, and Roger Hart. Both groups were united in Quebec city on Tuesday, june 29. The Ashbury contingent arrived at the port in a Hacre. The driver and horse seemed rather dazed at the luggage and the raucous singing of the group. Finally after many goodbyes and good advice by the parents, we boarded the SS Atlantic. Frcm the main deck everybody began the descent into the labyrinth of corridors, and at long last found their cabins in the bowels of the ship. The Ashbury students were placed in a cabin under the direction of jack F raumeni, Bernie's assistant. At first it was almost an impossi- bility for anyone to enter the cabin as there were suit cases and trunks piled to the ceiling. XVe all left the cabin in dismay and made our way to the upper deck for a last look at our fair country. The ship sailed at one o'clock that night. lt is really a miracle how the pilots guide the ship out of the port. We finally retired to bed and amid the rumbling of the engines and the slapping of water, we fell asleep. The trip on board to England was wonderful, and it wasn't long before we were arriving in the port of Southampton. From there we were taken by bus to one of the most famous schools in England, Charterhouse. There we were met by Mr. Leask, the master in charge of scouting and geography. XYe were given the use of the Scouting Headquarters, and while the majority of the boys chose to stay in the main lodge, a small group decided to stay in tents in order to get an early start in the battle against battalions of British bugs that infested the air. XVhile at Charterhouse we were given a talk by Mr. Wilfred Noyce, a master there, who was also a member of the expedition that conquered Mt. Everest. The next day we were shown about the school and then, on Saturday, july 10th, we left for London. VVhile in London we visited some of the great places like VVestminster Abbey, Vlihitehall, No. 10 Downing St., Madame Tussauds, London Tower, and so on. One afternoon we went out to the Arthur Rank Studios, and met the famous English comedian Norman Wisdom. After live wonderful days in London, we headed north to Oxford, and Cambridge in our six cars. VVhat fun it is to drive on the left hand side of the road. There we visited the Universities and saw some of the oldest churches in England. Some of the fellows visited Rhyl, on the coast of XYales. Liverpool was next and we were made very much at home as we stayed in private homes. Then on to Scotland, where our main objective was Nlerchiston Castle School. It is worth mentioning that while staying at the school the Ashbury students played cricket, and proved themselves quite able. Then, one night we were invited to attend a Scottish folk dance, put on by the school, so of course dressed in kilts we attended. Finally we had to leave, and the group headed for Harwich and Parkeston Quay, where the Duke of York ferry was waiting to transport us across the channel to Holland. Unfortunately we were unable to remain any length of time in Holland, but we did THE ASHBURIAN Zl see the colourful mills, and the famous dutch wooden shoes. Then it was on to the German border where we camped out for a night. We then travelled on to Koln, where a great number of us bought some of the famous German cameras. From lioln we drove along the Rhine to the Black Forest. lt wasn't long before we found ourselves climbing mountains in our little Austins. lt should be stated here that jim XYedd was the mechanic on the trip, as he kept all the cars in perfect running condition. From Germany we made our way into Switzerland. The main objective there was Interlaken. We arrived in lnterlaken on the evening of August the lst, which is a Swiss national holiday. Of course there was a big parade and dancing in the streets at night. The Swiss junior Olympic Team CGymJ put on a show, and then there was an exhibition of fire works. The next day we went up the jungfrau. which is one of the largest mountains in Switzerland. The trip up the mountain was quite fascinating, as the train that climbs the mountain is electric and looks like a toy model. But we did Finally reach the height of 13,000 feet. From Switzerland we headed for the Italian border. Our first stop in ltaly was Padova and from there we drove to Venice. Of course just about everyone bought himself one of the gondoliers hats. lYhile in Naples we got our first look at an Italian opera. Faust was playing at the time, so one night all the music lovers went to hear Tagliavini sing. The show was really wonderful, and we were in time to see a minor riot because Tagliavini wouldn't sing an aria a second time. The audience didn't like this and showed their dislike in no uncertain terms. From Naples we visited Pompei and Herculaeum. From these ancient ruins we headed for Florence, where we held a birthday party for everyone. Then it was on to the holy city, Rome. There we of course visited the Vatican, St. Peter's and by a stroke of good fortune we had an audience with the Pope, at his summer home. Castle Gandolfo. Then we went to Sienna, and were in time to see the horse race in the village square. From Sienna it was on to Cap Ferrat and the French Riviera. The weather wasn't what you could ask for as it rained for most of the time. But still, the sun came out long enough for us to catch a glimpse of the fair sex in bikinis. lYhat pictures we were able to get! Then it was on to Paris and the last lap of the trip. Paris. the city of romance and gayety. lYhile staying in Paris we went to see the Follies Bergere and the Moulin Rouge. The Louvre was of course in order. along with Notre-Dame. Sofme of the fellows went to the top of the Eiffel Tower, and took a glimpse around Paris. From the tower we walked over to the Arch of Triumph, and along the Champs Elysees. The trip finally came to an end and with memories of a wonderful summer, we boarded the SS Atlantic at LeHavre. The trip was all too short, and it was not long before we arrived back in Quebec. 5 :fi fa ' 9 425,14 ff'l1,,+wLfQw5'i fig c, f get-5: 4 fm Q' "SIS, ' Sz, gzxig. Q ' Q' ', .V .,., ,z gzyw:-.f, ,,.,, , , -- .. -4 -z - :f.1.v:"w-1' iw . +2 'Qi 3' . ,, "Q-:QQ ,kb , 4 4 ggi , 4 ,, Q f z A. ,. ' ' -. 1: ., '- ff - ,,.,. f .435 ELF' -31 .-', 3 1 v' 5-A A . 532, X : iTFE52E2.3':i3i23Q . ' " -.1 5:1s:Sv-wi I ,., W 8 V K . -- 2, - :fy-'1,-vwgwggq ,Q 4- Lf ,W Q5 .gf .. ,,., ,., ,, A,,. . . N ww w W '52 M xv Xxx asm xx mv! XY WX xx A M xx W N X WN Q, XX-gf? z Q Fx?" 3? X' N 0 va 4 wx x XY, i'1: Sin S: :r: , , -.w siiffb - , ,,,:-:.:.,f-,.5.2:-'f,.-i?'::f:-STAN, 'i ' 5-i Li? 1 14 . Q. gf "'g:, l1 ' .3If5ikfr : 32 Ijjia,-1::g,:f '..::i:5iQ :if il HW 52323 Q 'IA X 12. .-,r,a1Q. .5S:::g:. gi, 5.115 i-.EN THE ASHBURIAN M cdeace Wolea N October 20th, a group from the Upper School went by bus to the Xlontreal Road plant of the National Research Council. Here we were escorted through the lilectronics Branch where we were intrigued with the newer electronic developments. .Xniongst other things, we saw a new electronic organ based solely on vacuum tubes. The pressure on the keys produces the variation in loudness. XYe also saw the newer developments in electronic communicatiiins, including radar, and a new automatic fog horn installation which has been placed on an island off the coast of British Columbia. After this, we were taken through the Building Research Building. Here we saw the research being done on the latest of materials used in building, and were impressed with the "cold" room where materials were tested at very low tempera- tures. VVe then travelled to the Aeronautical Research Building and saw the famous "wind, tunnel where tests are done on new designs for jets and airplane wings. Our next stop was at,the model of the St. Lawrence River Project. Here we saw the new channels and dams which are to be built and the great power development which will soon become a reality. In the Hydraulic Section, we saw the latest work being done on boats and ships of all kinds. Our final stop was at the Chemical Division where we saw research being done on radio-active materials and the great precautions involved in this work. Our next trip was the annual one to the Gatineau Power Company. which once more was most informative. Un the same day, Mr. Snelgrove took a group of the Middle School through the Ottawa Citizen. A short time later, a group from the Senior School paid a fascinating visit through the Montreal Road branch of the Bell Telephone Company. Here we saw the many coils, relays and switches, so necessary for the automatic operation of a dial exchange. The many miles of wire, the methods to ensure efiicient service, and the few people required to operate such complex devices amazed us all. About this time, another trip was arranged for the Nliddle School students through the E. B. Eddy Company. Here the boys saw paper making from the entrance of the pulp logs to the finished paper rolls. On Friday, january Zlst, a group of the Senior School students gathered in the Lecture Room to hear Dr. XY. H. Hatcher, Nl.Sc.. Ph.D., 24 THE ASI-IBURIAN F.R.S.C., the Senior Professor of Chemistry at KlcGill University, Nlontreal. He was introduced by Klr. Snelgrove and thanked by Xlr. Sibley. ln his remarks, he emphasized the importance of the correct attitude towards studies, and the importance of an inquiring mind. He told a series of reminiscences which all had a very pertinent lesson for us. An excellent speaker, he held the interest of his audience with his excellent wit and pertinent remarks. Dr. Hatcher also inspected the newly renovated laboratory and expressed great pleasure in its design and eiiiciency. The trips this year have once more been in the hands of Mr. Sibley, assisted by Mr. Snelgrove, with the willing assistance of Upper School students. THE ASHBURI.-IN s SOME JUNIOR SCHOOL ACTIVITIES CLENXYOOD CLUB In autumn we started to clean up the attic above the woodwork shop. It was a mess! There were old chairs. screens, shovels. old doors, pieces of wood. boxes of nails. some old bicycles without tires. and dust. First we got rid of all the old stuff and kept some things for use. After the attic had been cleared. it had to be swept. and swept it was! Then it was painted a dark red. It was a messy job and everybody had more paint on his hands than on the Hoot by the time it was finished. After it was painted, we started moving furniture in. That was not such a messy job, but a hard one. At last, toward the end of September we had our first meeting. The Club was a great success and every Friday night-Club Night -was eagerly awaited. IYe want to thank Xlr. Slattery for his interest throughout the year. PETER iNOHI.'BliN'l'I.HY, President TRANSITUS TOURS T the beginning of the Autumn Term, Nlr. Polk, our form master, announced that the class would make one tour each term. THE TRIP TO THE SINGER PLANT AT THURSO. P.Q. One October morning about 7.00 a.m. a bus hardly noticed by the boys pulled up to the School. I stress the point that the bus went unnoticed because the rising bell hadn't yet rung. By 7.30 the class was assembled in the bus and ready to leave. He arrived at Thurso about 8.15. Then we went through the Singer Plant, and saw the sewing machines made. It was very interesting to see the wood Cfor the base of the machinesj lifted and cut. About 11.00 we left the plant and boarded the company's own private train which travelled some 60 miles into the woods, where the timber was cut for the machines. This trip took about 25 hours. XVe stayed in the woods about an hour, looking at the operations in wood cutting, stacking and shipping. The trip was our first and it was very interesting and enjoyable. THE TRIP TO CANADA PACKERS PLANT. HULL. P.Q. The whole class was very excited one Wednesday in February. This was the day the class was to make the tour of the Canada Packers Plant in Hull. First we went to the sausage room. where weiners. corn beef. etc. are made and packed. Next we went to the Smoke Houses. where the meats are smoked. After that we went to the lardhouses. Here Canada Packers manufacture their lard. The lard is boxed and packed zlllfO- "Smallfry" matically. Next we went to the slaughter house. Here the pig is killed and hung up on racks for the government inspectors. Each hog is care- fully inspected for disease by order of the "pure food lawn. VVe arrived back at School about 5.00 p.m. after a very enjoyable trip. THE TRIP TO THE COURTHOUSES OF OTTAVVA On XVednesday, April 20th, the class made its tour of the Court- houses of Ottawa. XV e left the School about 9.00 a.m. and we arrived at the Magis- trate's Court on Elgin Street about 9.30. At 10.00, Magistrate Glen Strike entered the court. The trials were mostly minor offences, but there was a case where a man got 3 years in prison for a series of rob- beries. Magistrate Strike talked to our class after the court adjourned. VVe left about 11.30 and went to the Supreme Court of Canada. XYhen we gilt there, we heard some of a patent trial that was going on. lVe then went through the building around the various offices and court rooms and finally looked through the immense Library of the Court House. After lunch we visited the Supreme Court of Ontario. I would, on behalf of the class, like to thank Mr. Polk for taking the class on these very interesting and educational t0llI'S. G. RCIGER-TTd7lSifIIS. x 4 I' U X pvgcz' .A iv' I ' 1 ' " Z , . 'rs 4 at 5 Q t. , , . L In mf! vu -3 :gil . .-A . ,I Y . s 1 '. - - -VW' - Q .-e V wwf.: C , I . , 4 - V s' V,,.,"s-+ . - ,J ..':.' 4 V .. ,v. ' nf.. C V. ew ' . L 1 ay D 1 1 t , , ..I ,V .Sty . nigga pw 1, x w ,Q jg ' L ' -V ,sf-4 f- , - -V V- -V 'V ' K ,A . 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NS, . 5 X 95, -'ff 1.2! A4 P . 4' h ,xj '-- -iam 'SW , X- 'gmt' - : ,QE Q X vw- , Q mf- 28 THE ASI-IBURIAN F O O T B A L L FIRST FIELD RUGBY 1954 saw the lst Football Team come through with the best season in the history of the school. In eight games they were undefeated and scored an amazing total of 150 points as against 34 by the opposi- tion. By virtue of victories over L.C.C. and B.C.S. they won the Little Big Three championship and The Bishop's College Old Boys' Trophy. These victories would not have been possible without the excellent coaching job done by "Tiny" Hermann. I-Ie was an inspiration to all the players as well as to the school, and we all hope to see him around the grounds next year. ASHBURY at CARLETON PLACE SCORE 18-5 -VV ox In our opening encounter, played on Sept. 29, Ashbury proved to be the bigger and better organized team. VVe scored early in the first quarter, with joe Irvin making the major off an end run. Rhodes con- verted. In the next frame Ashbury scored once again, with VViddrington scoring on a long pass from Rhodes, who once again converted. Shortly after the half Carleton Place broke into the scoring column with an unconverted touchdown, providing the only real threat of the game. In the last stanza Rhodes once again hit VViddrington with another touchdown pass which he converted, and thus the game ended with Ashbury out in front by a score of 18-5 . The line played a prominent part in this game, with VVedd and Gchoa standing out in particular. LISGAR at ASHBURY SCORE 19-11-IVON The Senior team's second game of the season was played against Lisgar Collegiate at Ashbury on Uct. 5. It was the only game that was played against a local squad. Ashbury opened up with a furious running attack and within 3 minutes had scored, with Nowakowski going over from the 4 yard line. The convert was missed. A few minutes later Rhodes attempted a field goal which was wide but went over the deadline for a single point. In the second quarter Nowakowski tallied his second major score, which Rhodes converted. Moments later Roll made the score 12-5 with an unconverted major after a brilliant run. Ashbury added another point, by Rhodes, on the kickoff starting the second half. Lisgar climaxed a steady downfield drive with Smith scoring a converted touchdown near the end of the quarter. Ashbury quickly retaliated, with Irvin scoring on an end sweep, and Rhodes THE ASHBURIAN S1 pass to Mike Middrington who went over from 211 yards out. Rhodes converted. The second half saw Ashbury quickly add more to its total and by virtue of two quick field goals by Rhodes the score mounted to 24-0. Ashbury suffered a short relapse in the final stanza and L.C.C. marched down the field for an unconverted touchdown hx' Clegg. Shortly thereafter the game ended and Ashbury had won their fifth straight victory. Final score, Ashbury 24. L.C.C. 5. Outstanding once again in this triumph was the fine play of the line. HILLFIELD at ASHBCRY Scotts 14-0-XYoN On Saturday, Get. 30 the lst team went after it's sixth straight victor when thev engaged Hillfield on our home grounds. Y .s- From the start the visitors looked tough, but within minutes Ashbury broke into the scoring column when XYiddrington lateralled to Irvin after a Rhodes pass. Rhodes added the convert. Following a sustained drive downfield in the second quarter, Nowakowski carried the ball over for a major from 4 yards out, which went unconverted. The scoring was completed in the last period, when Rhodes booted a good Held goal from a difficult angle. Towards the end of the contest Hilllield marched steadily downlield but were halted on the 1 yard line by the brilliant defensive work of the line. who proved themselves once again the major factor in the triumph. The Hnal score. Ashbury 14, Hillfield 0. Tbn... , R. C. Pei ...... gidn, J. M. Grant, R. E.qJlIOR Second row: J. B. VVedd, A. B. VVells, j. S. Irvin, X L. M. Killaly, F. VV. Baer. Front row: R. B. Grogan, M. I. Lawson, C. L. Gill. P. G. Beavers, S. A. Amt.-. Marshall. Absent: M. A. VV. Berridge. scoring the convert. The final quarter went scoreless. and Ashbury ended on the long end of a 19-11 score. Most of the credit for this victory goes to the hard-charging line who never stopped trying. ASHBURY at BISHOP'S SCORE 33-6-XYON On Saturday, Oct. 9 at 10 o'eloek the lst team took the field against our friendly rivals, Bishop's College School in Lennoxville. From the opening kickoff the rivalry was fast and furious. Early in the first qurter Ashbury scored on a touchdown pass from Ned Rhodes to Dave Gamble, who went over from the 15 yard line. Rhodes Ashbury started strong from the opening whistle and never let up. 28 THE ASHBURIAN FOOTBALL FIRST FIELD RUGBY 1954 saw the lst Football Team come through with the best season in the history of the school. In eight games they were undefeated and scored an amazing total of 150 points as against 34 by the opposi- tion. By virtue of victories over L.C.C. and B.C.S. they won the Little Big Three championship and The Bishop's College Old Boys' Trophy. These victories would not have been possible without the excellent coaching job done by "Tiny,' Hermann. He was an inspiration to all the players as well as to the school, and we all hope to see him around the grounds next year. ASHBURY at CARLETON PLACE SCORE 18-5 -WoN In our opening encounter, played on Sept. 29, Ashbury proved to be the bigger and better organized team. VVe scored early in the first quarter, with joe Irvin making the major off an end run. Rhodes con- verted. In the next frame Ashbury scored once again, with VViddrington scoring on a long pass from Rhodes, who once again converted. Shortly after the half Carleton Place broke into the scoring column with an unconverted touchdown, providing the only real threat of the game. ln the last stanza Rhodes once again hit VViddrington with another touchdown pass which he converted, and thus the game ended with Ashbury out in front by a score of 18-5 . The line played a prominent part in this game, with Wedd and Ochoa standing out in particular. riuown LISGAR -ne Ashbury offense bogged down and neither teal.. was able to score. XYhen the final Whistle blew, the score remained Ashbury 16, Bishop's 6. Ashbury won the round 49-12 and for the second consecutive year won the Old Boys' Challenge Trophy. LOXVILR CANADA at ASHBURY Scoius 24-5-XVON Y Saturday, Oct. 23rd saw Ashbury's lst team play host to Lower Canada College before a large turnout of parents and Old Boys. It was a wonderful day for football and the spirit of the team was tops. llarly in thc game Hillary took a pass from Ned Rhodes and galloped some 20 yards for the first score. Rhodes converted. Latef in the quarter joe lrvin, playing another spectacular game romped 40 yards for the next major score. Rhodes once again converted making the score 12-0 in our favour. In the second quarter Rhodes threw ailong THE AsHBU1e1AN 31 pass to Mike XYiddrington who went over from 20 vards out. Rhodes converted. The second half saw Ashbury quickly add more to its total and by virtue of two quick field goals by Rhodes the score mounted to 24-0. Ashbury suffered a short relapse in thc final stanza and L.C.C. marched down the field for an unconvcrted touchdown bv Clegg. Shortly thereafter the game ended and Ashhurv had won their fifth straight victory. Final score, Ashbury 24, L.C.C. 5. Outstanding once again in this triumph was the fine play of the line. HILLFIELD at .-XSIFIBURY SCORE 14-0-XYoN On Saturday, Oct. 30 the lst team went after it's sixth straight victory when they engaged Hillfield on our home grounds. From the start the visitors looked tough, but within minutes Ashbury broke into the scoring column when XYiddrington lateralled to Irvin after a Rhodes pass. Rhodes added the convert. Following a sustained drive downfield in the second quarter, Nowakowski carried the ball over for a major from 4 yards out, which went unconverted. The scoring was completed in the last period, when Rhodes booted a good Held goal from a difficult angle. Towards the end of the contest Hillfield marched steadily downfield but were halted on the 1 yard line by the brilliant defensive work of the line, who proved themselves once again the major factor in the triumph. The final score. Ashbury 14, Hillfield O. ASHBURY at ARNPRIOR HIGH SCHOOL SCORE 14-1-VVON A hard charging line enabled the senior team to score its seventh straight victory without a loss as the team trounced Arnprior High School 14-1 in an exhibition game in Arnprior. The weather was wet and therefore both teams concentrated mostly on a ground attack. Ashbury opened with a first quarter touch- down by Nowakowski, which was unconverted. Shortly thereafter Arnprior picked up their single point on a rouge. Nowakowski added his second major score early in the second frame when he plunged over from the 5 yard line. Rhodes converted. Minutes later Rhodes booted a 25 yard field goal, and the score mounted to 1+-l. The second half went scoreless, although both teams threatened on numerous occasions. Special credit for their good work on the line goes to Killaly. XYedd, Ochoa and Devine, with VVells sparkling on his good defensive work behind the line. Final score, Ashbury 14, Arnprior 1. 4 7 THE ASHBURIAN OLD BOYS at ASHBURY , SCORE 1 2-0-VVON On Saturday, Nov. 13 the lst team closed the season by blanking the Old Boys' 12-0. The game started rather slowly as they were confused by the unorthodox tactics of the opposition. For the Hrst time this season they were unable to score in the first half, and the play centered mainly around centrefield. A Hne running play by joe Irvin in his own end zone robbed the Old Boys of at least a single point, and the score at half-time stood at 0-0. The School seemed to come to life in the third quarter, and before long Rhodes hit Mike XViddrington with a 40 yard pass and he ran the rest of the way unmolested for the touchdown. Rhodes kicked the convert. Early in the fourth quarter jim VVedd blocked one of Brown's kicks and that gave Ashbury possession of the Old Boys' 25 yard line. Andy VVells moved the ball to the 1, and on the next play NVCIH around the end for a major. Rhodes also booted this convert, to complete the scoring. The charging line was once again a prominent factor in the victory. SCORING STATISTICS-lst FOOTBALL 1954 FG s c Tu's Prs. Rhodes 1 .rr,rr.t. 5 2 18 1 40 Irvin .................... 0 0 0 7 35 Nowakowski ..r..rrr 0 0 0 5 25 IViddrington ...,.... 0 0 0 5 25 Baer ....... ..,..,,,.. 0 0 0 2 10 Gamble 1 ....... 0 0 0 1 5 Hillary ..,,... 0 0 0 1 5 VVells .....r.r ...,....,, 0 0 0 5 SCORES OF GAMES Ashbury ............ 18 Carleton Place O- S-XYon Ashbury-- .... ...... 1 9 Lisgar .............,.... 1 1-VV on Ashbury .......... ,- 33 Bishop's ..,.... .... 6 -IVon Ashbury .,.......... 16 Bishop's ....... .... 6 -VVon Ashbury ...........r 25 L.C.C. - ........ .... 5-XVon Ashbury .... , ...... 14 Hillfield ....... .... 0 -VV on Ashbury-, ......,... 14 Arnprior ,.... 1-XVon Ashbury .....r..r... 12 Old Boys ....,..., 0-XVon Total 160 34 Oon LH Lt In andt t fl I I 1. Rlgtgplltltgntliis time. Sh ll go right tl ough. P Whoopsl Should put Call me uncle! F . . so ashes down here! V uvorite pastime-hlo 11 I own. ln an 1 .' ' -3 L2-, lin 42995. pw 4 41 M314 8 -x .Isl . it ,Q - Q .H e: .., , U W, x af. ,. 2 , ,fi -M 0 11 a x N XFX v we as-.DSX . wggi-1 " -'4'3!g.. au- fa.. -..- 771' fi: . x. 'N .f"""' . J -Q .mii- 34 THE ASHBURIAN SECDND FIELD RUGBY HE second team showed a good deal of promise for next year after a fairly successful season in 1954. Although they failed to produce a victory, they tied two and lost two. Making his first appearance at Ashbury in a coaching capacity was Mr. Barry O'Brien to whom the team is much indebted for his skilful and enthusiastic work. VVe hope to have him with us again in 1955. ASHBURY at BISHOP'S SCORE 6-6 On Oct. 9 the second team played their first game of the season against Bishop's at Lennoxville. The game got off to a good start and, due to some good quarter- backing by Lloyd, Ashbury penetrated the strong Bishop's line several times. However, in the first quarter Bishop's scored a rouge and bounced into a 1-0 lead. Early in the second period Draper Caught a Lloyd pass and ran for a touchdown, which he also converted. In the second half Bishop's fought back strongly and retaliated with a quick unconverted touchdown to tie the score. The game remained quite even for the duration of the time, and the final score remained Ashbury 6, Bishop's 6. The outstanding players for Ashbury in this game were: Rockingham, McMillan, Patrick, Seed and Draper. However, everybody on the team tried hard and made it a good game. BISHOP'S at ASHBURY Scorzr: 17-12-Losr On Oct. 16 Ashbury Seconds' played the return match with Bishop's Seconds at Ashbury. The opening kickoff brought the crowd that were watching the realization that Ashbury was really going to have to fight to win this one. Hamilton received the ball and ran through the whole Ashbury team for an unconverted touchdown. Then Ashbury came to their senses and marched down the field. Lloyd carried the ball over for a major which Draper converted. Bishop's tied the game up with a single point moments later. Richardson scored a touchdown late in the second quarter, which Draper again converted. VVith seconds to go in the Hrst half, Bishop's moved back into contention with Ciland scoring the major, which was unconverted. Ashbury weakened considerably in the second half, and Bishop's quickly scored another touchdown, which was converted. This was a damaging blow, as the team fell apart and tried many desperation passes in the last quarter to no avail. The final score stood at 17-12 in favour of Bishops SECOND FOOTBALL TEAM Back rofw: M. YV. Sutherland, S. Barkun, P. D. Guy, D. A. Ross, R. H. Patrick, D. G. MacMillan. i Third row: G. S. M. Woollcombe, R. D. F. Lackev, E. T. Mulkins, H. T. lischauzicr, C. W. G. Gale, F. Heeney, R. M. B. York, M. P. Rees, Esq. Second rofwr G. B. Richardson, G. R. MacLaren, VV. H. B. McA'Nulty, B. C. Speed, Capt., F. D. S. Lloyd, VV. G. Draper, R. M. Rockingham. Front rofw: D. I. C. Cameron, D. F. Rhodes, R. F. Brouse. j. H. Clarke, G. C. Nlayburry, R. A. Oropeza G. lmet: J. B. O'Brien, Esq. Absent: j. R. Southam. ST. PAT'S at ASHBURY SCORE ll-11 On Saturday morning of Oct. 23 the Seconds played their third game of the season, this time the opposition was the St. Pat's College. From the outset it appeared that both teams were quite evenly matched as the ball changed hands frequently. Late in the first quarter St. Pat's scored an unconverted touchdown on a long pass. just before the half Eschauzier came back for Ashburv with a plunge for a major score. The convert was missed. In an exciting second half both teams scored a touchdown with Lloyd carrying the ball over for Ashbury. Draper added the convert, and the game ended in a tie, Ashbury ll, St. Pat's 11. 36 THE ASI-IBURIAN ASHBURY at ARNPRIOR HIGH SCHOOL SCORE 2 1-O-Losr The second team finished it's unusually short season when they lost by a score of 21-0 to the Arnprior Seconds. The game was played on Nov. 4th, The team was obviously not prepared for this game against the well organized team they had to face. From the opening kickoff it was quite apparent what the outcome would be, and by the half Arnprior led 11-O. It was the same situation in the last stanza, as our hosts added two more unconverted touchdowns to win the game going away. ww, ,..., ,,L,f,,.,, , ..,,,. -. Q SOM! THIRD FOOTBALL TEAM Back rms: G. S. VVebster, j. S. Rowan-Legg, R. T. Ross, 1. G. Guthrie, T. T. Ahearn, C. XV. Shaw, Xl. Zilberg. lfsq. Middle row: j. XVrinch, R. B. Bruce, V. B. Rivers CCaptainD, C. VV. Tucker, D. J. Flam. Ifrwzt row: B. P. Hiney, R. WV. Lake, D. M. McLean, R. D. L. Fraser. THE ASHBURI,-IN -1, ,S "Tiny" Hermann lcoachl, Nowakowski. liillaly, Rhodes, I. Irvin, The Headmaster. , r-11 " ' ' TN 1' THF FOO .,.... NTNER . -.. Li. Davis, I. F. XVotherspoon, K. G. Cook, XI. H. he Absent: F. H. Forester, VV. G. Robinson. qchiml THIRD AND FOURTH FIELD FOOTBALL UNIOR Football has enjoyed another fine year of activities this season. All the boys showed a great willingness not only to learn football but to play as a team, and should be commended for their spirit during practices and games. The Thirds played their annual home and home series with Rockcliffe Public School and came out the victors in both matches. The first game was the more thrilling of the two, as Ashbury was forced to come from behind a 2-O half-time score to down their opponents 10-2 in the dying minutes of play. In the away game a much improved squad defeated Rockclilfe by a score of 29-6. The Fourths also played two games with Rockclitfe, faring not quite as well as their bigger brothers. They lost the first contest by 12-0 but bounced back to take the second clash by a 11-U margin. Some of the best football of the season was played in the post season league in which the "Rough Riders" emerged victorious. The school is extremely grateful to Craig liamcke and also Xlr. NI. Zilberg for their fine efforts in coaching these young footballers of the future. l 36 THE ASHBURIAN ASHBURY at ARNPRIOR HIGH SCHOOL SCORE 21-0-Los'r The second team finished it's unusually short season when they lost by a score of 21-0 to the Arnprior Seconds. The game was played on Nov. 4th, The team was obviously not prepared for this .game against the well organized team they had to face. From the opening kickoff it was quite apparent what the outcome would be, and by the half Arnprior led 11-0. It was the same situation in the last stanza, as our hosts added two more unconverted touchdowns to win the game going away. .f""" The underdog XVoollcombe team got off to a fast start early in the game when Mike Lawson picked up a loose ball and scampered 40 yards for a major. VViddrington kicked the convert. Connaught recovered from this blow and quickly tied the game up with a touch- down by VVells and the convert by Rhodes. This completed the scoring for the first half. In the second stanza XVoollcombe seemed to come to life, and marched 70 yards downfield for a touchdown by Nowakowski, going over from the 6. It was unconverted. Later on Connaught, deep in their own end, threw a desperation pass which Beavers intercepted and raced 20 yards, unmolested, for another major. VViddrington added the convert. Connaught now had their backs to the wall and fought back gamely but to no avail, as they fell one touchdown short in the end. Their second tally was scored and converted by Rhodes late in the final frame. Outstanding for XVoollcombe were: Wedd, Nowakowski, Beavers, Hiddrington, Gamble, Gill, Lawson and Baer. Players outstanding for Connaught were: Rhodes, VVells, Irvin, Devine, Ochoa, Grant, llillary and Richardson. The final score XVoollcombe House 17, Connaught House 12. THE AsHBL'1e1,4iv 3, I' ', ':.. ' J xx- ' 5.. A Tiazggu, "Tiny" Hermann lcoachb. Nowaktmski. Killaly, Rhodes. l. Irvin. The Headmaster. THE FCOTBALL DINNER N THE evening of November 26th, 1954. the whole school honoured the unbeaten first football team at the annual football dinner. After several interesting films shown in Rhodes Hall, evervbodv proceeded to the dining hall and sat down to a delicious steak dinner. Following the dinner, Mr. Perry introduced his guests. These were: Mr. Gale, Mr. Cruikshank, Nlr. O'Brien, Xlr. Irvin Cvice-chairman of the boardl, Comdr. Ross. Nlr. Rhodes Cformer Chairman of the Boardl, Mr. Southam, CChairman of the Boardl, Dr. Rowan- Legg, Mr. Davidson, Mr. Palmer, Capt. H oollcombe, Nlr. Lawrence. Mr. Snelling, and Mr. Zilberg. Mr. Perry then introduced Nlr. Belcher. who in his usual humorous fashion proposed a toast to the school. The head-boy, Andy XYells, replied. The next toast was to the team. lt was proposed by Mr. Brain. who referred to the season as one of the most successful in his memory. The captain of the team. Chris Nowakowski, replied. He thanked the team. especially the second stringers, for their co-operation, next he presented. on behalf of the team, a silver tray to "Tiny" Hermann as a token of their gratitude for 40 THE ASI-IBURIAN his fine coaching throughout the season. Coach "Tiny" Hermann then stood up and thanked the team, and indeed the whole school, for its Hne co-operation with him. He said that he really enjoyed coaching such a grand squad. The presentations were then begun when each member of the team received a football badge for the current year. Next, colours were awarded, the following won their colours for their first, second, or third times: C. Nowakowski Ccaptj, j. Irvin Cvice-captainj, XV. Baer, T. Devine, D. Gamble, C. Gill, B. Hillary, M. Killaly, A. Lackey, L. Ochoa, R. Pennington, E. Rhodes, P. Riddell, XVedd, A. VVells, and M. XViddrington. The trophy for the most improved player this year went to L. Ochoa, who played left inside on the first string. The coveted Lee Snelling Trophy presented to the most valuable player, was awarded to quarterback E. Rhodes who piled up forty points although scoring only one touchdown. This year there were four out- standing players to whom Mr. Perry fondly referred, as the Four Horsemen of Ashbury, and each was presented with a cup. These were: C. Nowakowski, J. Irvin, M. Killaly, and E. Rhodes. As an extra prize, each member of the team was awarded a silver statuette, presented by the Chairman of the Board, Mr. R. S. Southam. These were truly worthy of the school's fine season. The second team also had a new trophy, it was the O'Brien Trophy, awarded to the player who showed the most determination, best sportsmanship, and greatest ability. This went to H. Eschauzier. The second team gave a present to B. CVBrien in recognition of his line coaching. The coaches of the second B and third teams, M. Zilberg and Craig Kamcke respectively, also received gifts from their teams. And so ended another football dinner, and everybody left thinking already of next year's football. vqljfx Q f f 2 EQ ,I f VSMW 'AQ I f l gl 1 t ' kj: aaa f' 44 Wg X fat g fi fx C726 ' 1 . fX .fu Q32 J Q5 G 1 ll,90,1llLCll soTB15l'us STQLLCA T 0880 . CMSM l- Front roar: Va QI- SFCOXD SOCCER TIQAXI llfnder lil Back ro-zu: H. R. Hecker, T. E. D. Fauquier, A. Sandqvist, ll. H. Yan der Kaay. j. Ci jobling, Esq., F. A. Reid, -I. Xl. XYallis, K. F. Book. Front row: E. A. Ellenberg, S. C. Hamilton, j. A. F. Arnold tCaptainl, C. XI. C. Calkoen, NV. G. S. NVinter. SOCCER SILDBERGH at ASHBURY SCORE 3-0-XYox Wednesday, Oct. 13 saw the Ashbury First Soccer play their rirst game of the season against Sedbergh at Ashbury. It was Q1 line day for soccer, with the sun shining but not too warm. From the outset it was noticeable that the Sedbergh ICQIIN was lighter and younger than Ashbury. but they kept up Ll determined drive throughout the game. Funes scored 3 goals for Ashbury. which was quite enough for the victory. the iinnl score entletl. Ashbury 3. Sedbergh 0. i O 40 THE ASHBURIAN his fine coaching throughout the season. Coach 'fTiny" Hermann then stood up and thanked the team, and indeed the whole school, for its fine co-operation with him. He said that he really enjoyed coaching such a grand squad. The presentations were then begun when each member of the team received a football badge for the current year. Next, colours were awarded, the following won their colours for their first, second, or third times: C. Nowakowski Ccaptj, Irvin Cvice-captainj, VV. Baer, T. Devine, D. Gamble, C. Gill, B. Hillary, M. Killaly, A. Lackey, L. Uchoa, R. Pennington, Rhodes, P. Riddell, VVedd, A. VVells, and M. XViddrington. The trophy for the most improved player this year went to L. Ochoa, who played left inside on the Hrst string. The coveted Lee Snelling Trophy presented to the most valuable player, was awarded to quarterback E. Rhodes who piled up forty points although scoring only one touchdown. This year there were four out- standing players to whom Mr. Perry fondly referred, as the Four Horsemen of Ashbury, and each was presented with a cup. These were: C. Nowakowski, J. Irvin, M. Killaly, and E. Rhodes. As an extra prize, each member of the team was awarded a silver statuette, presented by the Chairman of the Board, Mr. R. S. Southam. These were truly worthy of the school's fine season. The second team also had a new trophy, it was the O'Brien Trophy, awarded to the player who showed the most determination, best sportsmanship, and greatest ability. This went to H. Eschauzier. The second team gave a present to B. CI'Brien in recognition of his fine coaching. The coaches of the second B and third teams, M. Zilberg and Craig Kamcke respectively, also received gifts from their teams. And so ended another football dinner, and everybody left tl' already of next year's football. fl wan. .V .kingston to play .f1.C. Unfortunately the field was very wet -..ig playing conditions rather treacherous. . as before the cadets held an advantage in size as well as ...vl.C. opened the scoring early in the first half and from then i werelnever behind. Funes tied the score a few minutes later but our hosts quickly retaliated and led at the end of the half by a score of 2-1. In the second half it was all R.M.C. as they added two more goals to their total to win the game 4-1. This defeat suffered by Ashbury marked the first time in over two years that the first soccer team has lost a game. Congratulations are therefore in order for the team who played hard and well throughout the entire season. Special credit goes to Mr. Anderson who guided them so well as coach, and to Eastwood and Funes who showed good qualities of leadership on the field. Vo UC 05- SECOND SUCCICR TIQAXI tlfndcr 151 Back ro-ws H. R. Hecker, T. E. D. Fauquier, A. Sandqvist. LQ. H. Yan der Kanv. j. C jobling, Esq., F. A. Reid, j. Nl. Willis, K. F. Bunk. ' Front rout' E. .-X. Ellenberg, S. C. Hamilton, A. Ll. Arnold lCaptainr, C. Xl, C Calkoen, XY. G. S. XVinter. JUNIOR SOCCICR Back row: R. Powell. C. Cohen, l. G. llwrnc. XY. S. Ciirluril. l.. l. ll. Spt-nuur, VMI 1 ix Y. Fascio. Xl. Hilliard. R. Xl. .XICD1 ncll, C. li. S. ic. Middle row: S. F. York, -I. D. K. lfatun, R. S. lfidlcr. j. .I. Pmwll 'Cnpmin . C. lf. l"l.im C. Bray, l. K. L. Stuart. Front roar: R. A. D. Carr-Harris. Xl. j. Cupclnnd. Xl. B. llhlmup. XV. C. Pattcrsun 44 THE ASHBURIAN SECOND SOCCER TEAM The second soccer team played two very good games against Selwyn House. The first one was played at Ashbury. This was a most exciting engagement and it was only toward the end of the game that goals were scored-one by each team, Perez being the marksman for Ashbury. The return match was played in Montreal. In this contest Selwyn House had a distinct edge on the play, but due to sterling work on the part of our goalie, Hamilton Il, we were able to hold them down to the narrowest of margins, as the game ended with the score Selwyn 1, Ashbury 0. JUNIOR soccER The junior soccer team enjoyed a good season but unfortunately dropped both of their games against Selwyn House and one game to Sedbergh School. The scores of the games were 1-0, 2-0 and 5-0 respectively. However, the team showed a good deal of spirit and once they get used to working with each other they should prove successful. Much of their soccer knowledge was taught to them by Mr. Spencer, who did a Hne job in the coaching department. HOUSE GAMES XVOOLLCOMBE vs CONNAUGHT On Tuesday, Nov. 16, the soccer house games got underway with VVoollcombe playing Connaught. VVoollcombe appeared to have the advantage in this struggle and mid-way through the Hrst half, Eunes opened the scoring for VVooll- combe. A few moments later Mike Lawson widened the margin 2-0, when he scored from close in, but Grant quickly closed the gap when he scored a beautiful goal with about 10 minutes remaining. From then on it was nip and tuck with both sides unable to capitalize on many scoring chances, and the game ended, VVoollcombe 2, Connaught 1. XYOOLLCOMBE vs ALEXANDER Nov. 17 saw Vlloollcombe, by virtue of their victory over Con- naught, play the team representing Alexander. Both teams showed a lot of drive in the first half, with Alexander putting up some good defensive work which resulted in the score being deadlocked 0-0 at half-time. However, in the second frame XVoollcombe came to life with two quick goals. The first one was scored by Eunes, and the other by XViddrington. Alexander tried to get back on their feet but to no avail, as they were stopped time and time again by the Hioollcombe defense and by XYedd, playing in goal. Azubel missed a good chance in the last few minutes when he missed a penalty shot. XYhen the final whistle sounded, the score was XYoollcombe 2, Alexander 0. I 0 ttf! ,Q ,.. law lt 8, 4 . V , , w 75,36 W V et' 3 S M, zu .' gf 3 1' 7 Q 1' is f az 'z :SM 43. ff! rf K, , 46 THE ASHBURIAN H O C K E Y E1RsT TEAM HOCKEY HE 1955 senior hockey team proved to be one of the finest in recent years. It was a well balanced, hard skating squad, with plenty of spirit and coordination. This year the team had to depend upon no one single person as mainstay, for everyone contributed equally. jim XVedd played a standout season in nets, allowing only twenty-three goals in ten games and on many occasions seemed to do the impossible in keeping the puck out. However, his efforts would have been fruitless without the fine job done by the rearguard composed of veterans Killaly, VVells and Pennington, and were joined this year by Devine. The first line com- posed of Irvin, VViddrington and Grant were rightly named the produc- tion line, as they did nearly all the scoring. The second line, Hillary, Richardson and Beavers also did their share of the work, and although they did not score many goals, improved greatly. Drew and Grogan were used as alternates and did a very good job at this task as time went on. This year the school was very fortunate in securing the services of ex-Ottawa Senator Lude Check as coach, and he gave the boys the benefit of many years experience. VVithout Lude's services the team would not have been so successful, and we all hope he will be back with us next year. EASTVIEXV LEGION CAPITALS 6, ASHBURY 1 The Ashbury first hockey team under the guidance of new coach Lude Check made its initial start against Eastview Legion Capitals on Saturday, Dec. 4 at the Minto Skating Rink. Due to insuflicient practice the team bowed to superior opposition by a score of 6-1. Ashburyis best period was the Hrst, as they held Eastview to one goal, but were constantly confined to their own end of the ice. In the second period, after the visitors second tally by Beauregard, joe Irvin notched our only goal on passes from Grant and XVells. Before the period was ended Eastview again scored-this time on a goal by Hand. However, in the third stanza the roof fell in on Ashbury as the visitors pumped three unanswered goals past the unprotected lVedd in the nets and outshot us by the considerable margin of 22-3. The final score once again Eastvieiv 6, Ashbury 1. Shots O71 Goal 1 2 3 Total Donner .s.s. . 5 6 3 14 XYedd .ss.. . 13 13 22 48 THE ASHBURIAN 40 Towards the close of the third frame .lim lYedd looked as if he might register his first shutout, but L.C.C.'s .Xlcliereher ruined this by firing a screened shot into the cage at 19.32. lloweyer, the margin of victory was already sealed and the game ended with the score, Ashbury 2, L.C.C. I. Once again the main factor in this winning cause was XYedd. who turned aside many shots. and the fine work of the defence also stood out. Shots 011 Goal I 2 3 Total Badian -- . . 5 8 T 20 XYedd eeee eeeee.e. 8 -l- Ill 22 TRINITY COLLEGE SCHOOL 4, ASIFIBLRY 3 On Friday, Feb. 18, the first team played hosts to the high-flying visitors from Trinity, marking the first time that Ashbury has played a Trinity team in a long while. From the outset the visitors appeared slightly over-confident and much to their surprise Ashbury scored their first goal before the game was a minute old. This came when IYiddrington took a nice pass from Irvin and fired a screen shot from the blueline. However, this lead was quickly nullified when Campbell tied it up for T.C.S. But at the ten minute mark Ashbury bounced right back into the lead, when Irvin took a pass from NViddrington and pushed the puck past Burns in the visitors goal. just before the period ended Hyland registered for Trinity, leaving the score tied at the end of the first period, 2-2. In a fast moving second frame only one goal was scored, by Long, for T.C.S. Early in the third period VVelIs gave the team some added life when he scored after taking a pass from Richardson. But T.C.S. fought back very strongly and were rewarded when Long fired home his se' 4 'fan' of the Fav to complete the scoring. The margin of victory BCHVCI5, Hag ' ill' N 1 31,17 Front row: j. B. VI edu, U. I ni. Q on, j. S. Irvin ,., .. II. T. Mulkins. AYLMER 3, ASHBURY 2 The senior team's second game of the season showed a marked improvement in play as compared to the first test against Legion. In a fast and furious first period the Ashbury team went like whirl- winds and completely outmanoeuvred the fast skating aces. Lamirands opened the scoring for Aylmer at the five minute mark with a nicely executed backhand shot. Grant quickly retaliated with a goal for Ashbury 20 seconds later, and before Aylmer had time to get organized Pat Beavers added another on a pass from Gord Richardson. As the period ended, Ashbury held a 2-1 edge. In the penalty-packed second period Aylmer showed a surprising reversal of form and out- scored the homesters 2-0 and thus led 3-2 going into the third. In the 46 THE ASHBURIAN H O C K E Y FIRST TEAM HOCKEY HE 1955 senior hockey team proved to be one of the finest in recent years. It was a well balanced, hard skating squad, with plenty of spirit and coordination. This year the team had to depend upon no one single person as mainstay, for everyone contributed equally. jim VVedd played a standout season in nets, allowing only twenty-three goals in ten games and on many occasions seemed to do the impossible in keeping the puck out. However, his efforts would have been fruitless without the Hne job done by the rearguard composed of veterans Killaly, VVells and Pennington, and were joined this year by Devine. The first line com- posed of Irvin, Hfiddrington and Grant were rightly named the produc- tion line, as they did nearly all the scoring. The second line, Hillary, Richardson and Beavers also did their share of the work, and although they did not score many goals, improved greatly. Drew and Grogan were used as alternates and did a very good job at this task as time went on. This year the school was very fortunate in securing the services of ex-Ottawa Senator Lude Check as coach, and he gave the boys the benefit of many years experience. XVithout Lude's services the team would not have been so successful, and we all hope he will be back with us next year. EASTVIEXV LEGION CAPITALS 6, ASHBURY 1 The Ashbury first hockey team under the guidance of new coach Lude Check made its initial start 'Qainst Eastviewvl eoion G'3"i"' Sat' f' W cud ..... fi .......... ..... 1 4 24 19 57 ASHBURY 2, LOXVER CANADA COLLEGE 1 On Saturday, Feb. 5 the first team travelled to Nlontreal to plav their animal game against L.C.C. i The first period was very fast but good goaling at both ends of the rink prevented any score. There were two penalties in that period, one of them to Beavers. llowever, the second period produced a different picture as far as scoring was concerned, as Ashbury pumped home two unanswered goals past Badian in the home ICLUIIQS net. The first of these occurred at 1.57 when Greg Grant took a passout from Nlike XYiddrington and fired a backhand shot past Badian. Then at 6.52 joe Irvin set up lliddrington with a beautiful goalmouth pass which blinked the light for Ashbury once again. T THE ASHBURIAN 49 Towards the close of the third frame .lim XYcdd looked as if hc might register his first shutout, but L.C.C.'s Nlcliercher ruined this by firing a screened shot into the cage at 19.32. llowever. the margin of victory was already sealed and the game ended with the score, Ashbury 2, L.C.C. I. Once again the main factor in this winning cause was XYedd, who turned aside many shots, and the fine work of the defence also stood out. Shots 011 Goa! I 2 3 Total Badian . 5 8 7 20 Tvedd .eeee 8 -l- Ill 22 TRINITY COLLEGIL SCIIOOL -l, ASHBLRY 3 On Friday, Feb. 18, the first team played hosts to the high-flying visitors from Trinity, marking the first time that Ashbury has played a Trinity team in a long while. From the outset the visitors appeared slightly over-confident and much to their surprise Ashbury scored their first goal before the game was a minute old. This came when Vliddrington took a nice pass from Irvin and fired a screen shot from the blueline. However, this lead was quickly nullified when Campbell tied it up for T.C.S. But at the ten minute mark Ashbury bounced right back into the lead, when Irvin took a pass from VViddrington and pushed the puck past Burns in the visitors goal. just before the period ended Hyland registered for Trinity, leaving the score tied at the end of the first period, 2-2. In a fast moving second frame only one goal was scored, by Long, for T.C.S. Early in the third period VVells gave the team some added life when he scored after taking a pass from Richardson. But T.C.S. fought back very strongly and were rewarded when Long fired home his second goal of the day to complete the scoring. The margin of victory might have been more had it not been for the brilliant goaltending of VVedd. The final score: T.C.S. 4, Ashbury 3. Shots on Goal 1 2 3 Total Burns ....... -- 7 5 3 15 TVedd ...................... 7 9 18 34 ASHBURY 4, UNIVERSITY OF OTTAXYA HIGH SCHOOL 0 Ashbury's senior team played it's first game in the Kiwanis Club sponsored hockey tournament, on February 23 at the Nlinto. Alike VViddrington led the Ashbury attack with a what trick", while .lim VVedd scored his first shutout of the year in the nets. A fairly fast first period saw plenty of action but only one goal was scored, when Hiddrington clicked unassisted at the 8.50 mark. Pennington received the penalty of the period for tripping. 50 THE ASI-IBURIAN The second frame followed the same pattern as the first, with Xiiddrington scoring at 14.40, the assist was credited to Pennington. Killalv received the only penalty of this period for boarding. In a faster third period Ashbury tallied twice more. Irvin opened the scoring early, before the period was thirty seconds old, with Hillary and Killaly picking up the assists. VViddington completed the scoring a few minutes later with his third goal of the game. Irvin and Killaly assisted on this last goal. Special credit for the victory goes to the defence, who time and time again broke up the opposition's attack. Shots 011 Goal 1 2 3 Total Ouellet ....... ...... 1 0 5 7 2 Z XVedd ..... ...... 5 4 6 15 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL 2, ASHBURY 1 The annual contest between Ashbury and Bishop's took place on Saturday, February 26th at the Minto and as far as the team was concerned it was the most important game of the year. In many respects this game also turned out to be the most exciting game of the year, as the two teams battled through fifty minutes of scoreless hockey before the roof fell in on the home team in the third period. However, the first two frames showed some good clean hockey and only one penalty was handed out, that being to Beavers of Ashbury. The two netminders Knight and VVedd came up with some spectacular saves as neither team was able to score. At the 11.50 mark of the third stanza, Grogan broke the goose egg when he shoved a defiected shot past Knight for the first goal of the game. But only a few minutes later goals by Hallam and Soward put the opposition ahead to stay, and Ashbury Hnished on the short end of a 2-1 score. Despite the loss Ashbury played their finest game of the vear. Shots 011 Goal 1 2 3 Total Knight .aa..aa ...,.. 6 10 1 1 27 XVedd ...... ...... 8 6 10 24 ASIIBURY 5, EASTVIEVV HIGH SCHOOL 2 Ashbury's second game in the City Invitation Tournament was played at the Auditorium on Saturday morning, March 5, against East- view High School. In the first period Ashbury was not able to get organized, as it seemed every minute the team was shorthanded due to penalties. THE ASHBURIAN 51 Actually, this was not the case, but it did cut down our scoring oppor- tunities. joe Irvin notched our only goal of this period on passes from Grant and NYells. Seguin tallied the lone liastview goal. However, in a penalty free second period Ashbury began to move, and after lfastview had taken a 2-1 lead on a goal by Nlartin, Mike XX'iddrington scored twice and Mac Killaly once to give Ashburv a 4-2 advantage. Andy VVells picked up the assists on the two latter' goals, the first one being unassisted. In the third frame only one goal was scored, that being by Irvin, for his second of the contest, as VX'ells added his fourth assist, thus completing the scoring. TYiddrington received the lone penalty of this period for holding. As usual jim XYedd played a strong game in the nets, although he had a comparatively easy day in stopping ll Llastview shots. Shots 071 Goal 1 2 3 Total Leduc - 6 1 1 5 2 2 TVedd .... 4 2 5 1 1 LAKEFIELD SCHOOL AT ASHBURY SCORE: LPXSHBURY 2, LAKEFIELD SCHOOL 0 The Senior Team's last regular game of the season was played against our familiar arch-rivals from Lakefield, at the Nlinto on Saturday, Mar. 12. From the opening whistle it appeared as if Ashbury was going to display winning form, which was exactly what they did. Despite the scoreless, penalty-free first period, Ashbury outplayed their opponents in every department. The first score came in the second frame when Gord Richardson banged in his first goal of the season at the Hve minute mark, unassisted. With approximately two minutes remaining in the period, Mike XYidrington took joe Irvin's goalmouth pass and whipped it past Ritchie in the visitor's net to complete the scoring. However, the third period produced excitement from a different angle than scoring, as tempers were raised and many bruising bodychecks were handed out, with the majority coming from the strong Ashbury defence. Besides the good work of the defence, jim XYedd once again produced a stellar game in recording his second shutout of the season. Shats 072 Goal 1 2 3 Total VVedd - 5 7 7 19 Ritchie .... .... 1 2 9 8 2 9 , THE ASHBURIAN OLD BOYS at ASHBURY The last game of the current season was played against the Old Boys, at the Klinto Rink on Saturday, March 19. Despite the not too enthusiastic turnout, the game was quite a success. The game turned out to be the best free-scoring contest of the year as the first line collected fifteen scoring points between them. Irvin and Uiddrington led the goals attack with three apiece, while Greg Grant fired two and the singleton was scored by Mac Killaly as the lsts romped to a 9-3 victory. The Old Boys had the assistance of Mulkins, Beavers, Grogan and Drew from the Seniors, as well as coach Lude Check. The school led at the end of the Hrst period 3-0 on markers by Irvin Q25 and Grant QU. In the second frame VViddrington scored the lone goal, to increase the margin to 4-0. The third period saw goals by Hiddrington and Killaly increase the lead to 6-0 before the afore- mentioned Mr. Check scored for the opposition. Two more goals by XViddrington and Irvin made it 8-1, but they were quickly matched by a pair for the Qld Boys off the sticks of Check and Dave Livingston. Grant finished off the scoring with a minute remaining, thus sealing the 9-3 win. There were only three penalties, with the visitors drawing two. lst Team Scoring Statistics-195 4-5 5 Player Games Goals Assists Points Pim' Irvin ....,.,cc.icc., -a c,c. 10 11 9 20 2 Wiiddrington ...,cc 10 12 17 6 Grant 2 ....cc,. 9 4 12 0 NVells .cic,.. 9 1 7 14 Killaly ..... ,,..., 9 2 6 14 Beavers -- .,.c....c 9 2 4 16 Richardson ....c .... a S10 1 3 6 Pennington .... . 9 0 1 10 Hillary .... 7 0 1 2 Grogan cccccccc 6 1 1 0 Devine ..a. 7 0 1 0 Drew ..a.aa, 5 0 1 0 'Penalties in minutes '3 The Scores Ashbury 1, Legion Capitals 6-Lost Ashbury 4- Ottawa U. 0-XYon Ashbury -3 Aylmer Aces 3-Lost Ashbury 1- Bishop's 2-Lost Ashbury 5, Northwood 2-VVon Ashbury 5, Eastview 2-IVon Ashbury 2, L.C.C. 1-XYon Ashbury 2, Lakeheld 0-XVon Ashbury 3, T.C.S. 4-Lost Ashbury 9, Old Boys 3-IYon Total 34-23. THE ASHBURIAN s, and downhill, and as a result lost the entire meet by .6 of one percent. Guy and Nowakowski placed second and third, respectively. in the race for individual combined honours. Following a week of intense training. the team left for Lake Placid under the supervision of Xlr. Falstrup. where they were to engage Northwood School in a meet on the famous New York State mountains. Un Friday the team started off very well by winning the cross country event with Guy once again capturing first place. The slalom event took place on Saturday, and an extremely unfortunate incident occurred when Nowakowskfs ski fitting broke loose in the middle of his run, and we dropped a little behind in the combined total points score. ln the afternoon the downhill was held on the famous Rimrock Nlountain course, and although we won this event, Northwood captured the meet, this time the difference in total points being .2 of one percent. Once again the following week saw renewed vigour on the part of preparation for the annual triangular meet taking place between Ash- bury, L.C.C. and Bishops Following the usual pattern, the team won the downhill event with Guy again taking Hrst place. A strong showing by Nowakowski and Rhodes in the slalom failed to counteract the L.C.C. effort and therefore the big lead gained in the downhill was considerably shortened. However, the deciding factor came in the cross country, where L.C.C. captured the Hrst four places and thus won the Cochand Trophy by .6 of one percent. The team returned home once again nhafp rips.:-W-A wwf .-a-----L-'--- F a 1 -. . ' -1.,.,,,.,,1,.pq HHS Y F V ' ' wagaries of the vi eather, there w as no lack of spirit and .determina u on the junior Hockey Field. The boys displayed at all times not only the will to win but an eagerness to learn and improve themselves. TVe cannot boast a winning team, but we can very dehnitely boast a fighting team. On February 5th Selwyn house brought two teams down from Montreal. The "B" team showed fine form, and it was only due to two late goals by the visitors that saw Ashbury lose 2-0. The "A" team were unfortunately discouraged and awed by the smooth, fast skating Mont- realers and it was not until the third period that they found themselves. By then it was too late to overcome the 10-3 score. On February 16th Ashbury travelled down to Montreal for the return games with the Selwyn House boys. This time the team suffered third period jitters and were downed 5-1 after displaying fine style in the first two frames. The "A" team however came through with a great effort and showed a complete reversal of form. However. Selwyn were a little stronger and emerged victorious on the long end of a -If-3 score. The school is indeed grateful to Craig Kamcke for his enthusiasm in helping these youngsters as coach this year. ,. THE ASHBURIAN ULD BOYS at ASHBURY The last game of the current season was played against the Old Boys, at the Minto Rink on Saturday, March 19. Despite the not too enthusiastic turnout, the game was quite a success. The game turned out to be the best free-scoring contest of the year as the first line collected fifteen scoring points between them. Irvin and 1Yiddrington led the goals attack with three apiece, while Greg Grant fired two and the singleton was scored by Mac Killaly as the lsts romped to a 9-3 victory. The Old Boys had the assistance of Mulkins, Beavers, Grogan and Drew from the Seniors, as well as coach Lude Check. The school led at the end of the First period 3-0 on markers by Irvin Q25 and Grant QU. In the second frame XViddrington scored the lone goal, to increase the margin to 4-0. The third period saw goals by XYiddrington and Killaly increase the lead to 6-O before the afore- mentioned Mr. Check scored for the opposition. Two more goals by lYiddrington and Irvin made it 8-1, but they were quickly matched by a pair for the Old Boys off the sticks of Check and Dave Livingston. Grant Hnished off the scoring with a minute remaining, thus sealing the 9-3 win. There were only three penalties, with the visitors drawing two. 1st Team Scoring Statistics-1954-55 Player Games Goals Assists Points Pim' Irvin -. o..,.....uoeu. .. ..ou 10 11 9 20 2 Widdrington -.. .. ...... 10 12 5 17 6 SENIOR SKI TEAM 9 Back row: j. M. P. Rees, Esq., M. I. Law . R. S h F H Eschauzier, R. H. Perry, Esqb son .l out am, . eeneyv I-I. P From row: P. D. Guy, C. Nowakowski CCaptainl, C. L. Gill, E. N. Rhodes, SENIOR SKI TEAM HE Senior Ski Team this year enjoyed one of the finest seasons in many years, and benehted not only from the excellent weather conditions which prevailed, but also from some fine instruction given them. The unenviable task of ski coach was taken on this year by Bruce Heggtveit. Mr. Heggtveit's services were invaluable, and his interest and enthusiasm helped each member of the team a great deal. N .As is vthercustom, members of the team took part in the local gatintiati Lone races with Peter Guy, Ross Southam and Chris 11W-lsfnistl placing high amongst Gttawas best Junior skiers. On .aturda5, january 23rd, two teams, led bv captain Nowakowski, travelled to Sedbergh for the annual meet. Despite the Hrst place effort shown by Guy in the cross-country the team fell behind in the slalom THE ASHBURIAN y., and downhill, and as a result lost the entire meet bv .6 of one percent. Guy and Nowakowski placed second and third, respectivelv, in the race for individual combined honours. Following a week of intense training. the team left for Lake Placid under the supervision of Xlr. Falstrup, where they were to engage Northwood School in a meet on the famous New York State mountains. On Friday the team started off very well by winning the cross counrrv event with Guy once again capturing first place. The slalom event took place on Saturday, and an extremely unfortunate incident occurred when Nowakowskfs ski fitting broke loose in the middle of his run, and we dropped a little behind in the combined total points score. In the afternoon the downhill was held on the famous Rimrock Xlountain course, and although we won this event. Northwood captured the meet, this time the diHerence in total points being .2 of one percent. Once again the following week saw renewed vigour on the part of preparation for the annual triangular meet taking place between Ash- bury, L.C.C. and Bishop's. Following the usual pattern, the team won the downhill event with Guy again taking first place. A strong showing by Nowakowski and Rhodes in the slalom failed to counteract the L.C.C. effort and therefore the big lead gained in the downhill was considerably shortened. However, the deciding factor came in the cross country, where L.C.C. captured the first four places and thus won the Cochand Trophy by .6 of one percent. The team returned home once again, quite dejected but nevertheless determined to do themselves and the school credit in the one remaining meet on the schedule. This meet took place at Mont Tremblant, Que., with ten schools from Cntario and Quebec competing. The first event was the cross country and despite strong showings by Guy and Nowakowski the team finished third, behind Sedbergh and L.C.C. But the school redeemed itself in the downhill, with Guy and Nowakowski capturing first and second positions respectively. However, Sedbergh remained in strong contention by Hnishing in second spot. So this made it a battle right down to the wire, with the slalom as the last and deciding event. In this race Griffin of Sedbergh, and Nowakowski had identical times. but Ashbury took better positions down the ladder with Rhodes and Guy as the pacers. TVhen the total points were related at the Red Birds banquet that night, it was announced that the winner of the meet was Ashbury. Also, in the individual honours Ashbury was jinxed again with Griffin edging Nowakowski by .6 of one percent. However. the main job had been done, and the school revenged its earlier losses by winning the Fred Urquhart Shield, emblematic of school skiing supremacy. ffff Z" gl 1 'M if g 'Y Q, sang, 1 S ,' ,,,,,,,f .' , , xt' ' f AV ,I MW M. .awww JUNIOR SKI TEAM XV. G. Robinson, j. S. Rowan-Legg, J. R. Southam CCaptainJ, C. VV. G. Gale, -I. VV. Heeney. JUNIQR SKI TEAM This year the junior Ski Team got off to a rousing start as there was an abundance of snow and the temperature at most times was perfect for skiing. Training began after the first snowfall, with cross- country runs in flight-boots, with ski poles, part of the rigorous routine. A type of cross-country trail was made around the exterior of the fields and with some assistance received from Bruce Heggtveit the team was soon in top physical shape. The first and only meet was held at Sedbergh School. lYe entered five skiers, under the charge of Mr. Falstrup-Fischer, with three of these already familiar with the Sedbergh cross-country and downhill courses. However, the hosts got off to a quick start by winning the former quite easily and just edging a victory in the downhill. Ashbury's only triumph came in the slalom. ln this particular event Ross Southam, team captain, did the course in the excellent time of thirty-eight seconds, but despite this Sedbergh took the meet very handily. Special mention is in store for Bruce lleggtveit, Mr. Falstrup. and those members of the senior team who gave up part of their time to encourage and teach the juniors the fundamentals of skiing. 7 ,,,.-nun-in v 1 B as "em firx Q- ff' :fn 'wif' as n 1, 2' 'i f A 2 ,Q , VA ,. 2 f., ,. H J W QTEK .2 ,f.,f,.Z f' v-swf" ' Q .,.. A 4 ,si-I -I ,av "'F"" . ml5"igfa" D I :JL AV ' I ay' ifg' 45: ,'m"A, L' . 4, , ' 3, M ,Z:,.,,,,i!,?g,,,'g,,,q:1,,, 5 , , f3i,, -I , .. . e,,.,:,,mw Ama. 41.0 4. -, -- Q-TX ,, v . If ., ' " ' R, A X, -' ' W.. ,. fp, 5 Q Q K lg ii, EA 2' Y z K 'sw f Lf M, R s, f 'V Aff I ,I ,Z:?1 ,L,- 4 I, , iff V . , . V" """"W' ' f TTT' M n Z '25 3, ' ig .- gf? - . , 51? ""' ' fl I ' ,Q l fr " X V ' Wg.. I -A 1 ,, g . ,f f Fw I9 V I V ef Q ,asii : ' ' -Q ' ,gg . . - "'Z.A- 1 3' rw- . ' 5 ' A ' '-'- - N M A 5,7 , . Q 3 ,nf J o .,.... 4733 -24.11 L' 952835. 5.0, ' J U 'T qx' I, .Wi N. 5 FIRST BASKETBALL TEAM I Back row: A. H. N. Snelgrove, Esq., P. W. Gates, J. A. E. Arnold, F. L. Brown, R. T. Ross, W. H. Eastwood, R. H. Perry, Esq. Middle rofw: I. C. Funes, T. Rozos, W. H. B. McA'Nulty CCaptainJ, T. E. Finlay, S. Barkun. From row: C. A. Courey, R. H. Patrick, G. E. Wallingford, R. D. F. Lackey, W. H. Birbcck. BASKETBALL AsKm'BAL1. at Ashbury has just finished its third season, from a small beginning, when the interest of only a few could be mustered, until now when it has been recognized as a First Team colour sport in the school. In addition to that, this year a junior Team came into being, without any effort. These things are a sure indication that basketball has come to stay. lt must be obvious that the real success of any sport cannot always be measured by the number of games won. To play to win is surely the incentive of any game, but getting the high score is not the only thing gained. Basketball, in its youth at Ashbury, has not had too much success with high scores, but it must certainly has had a real measure of success THE ASHBURIAN 1,1 in interest, in sportsmanship, and in a desire to keep on fighting in spite of seeming failure. It is expected that in addition to these successes that next season it will also add more winning scores. To the boys who have contributed to this worthwhile activity, the school is indeed grateful, but most particularly the school is grateful to Nlr. Snelgrove for his sincere interest in this sport. lst BASKETBALL vs OTTAXYA U HIGII SCHOOL The Senior Team's first game was played against Ottawa U's junior team in their gymnasium. Ashbury displayed a fine defensive game but just could not seem to click on the offensive, and as a result they lost bv a score of 29-12. i i lst BASKETBALL vs KEMPTVILLE AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL In the second game of the season Ashbury played host to K.A.S. in the Rockcliffe gymnasium. The team appeared greatly improved as they were never headed, but a determined drive on the part of the visitors in the last minute of the game produced a final score of 38-38. Peter Gates was the high scorer for Ashbury. lst BASKETBALL vs. LOIYER CANADA COLLEGE Once again the rivalry between Ashbury and L.C.C. was renewed as the Seniors travelled to Montreal on February 5 th to play the Hrst game of a home and home series. They held their own in the first half, trailing by only a few points, but from then on our hosts were in com- mand and came out on top of a 44-29 score. Bob Lackey emerged as high scorer in this game. lst BASKETBALL vs LOXYER CANADA COLLEGE On Saturday, March Sth, the Seniors played host to L.C.C. at the Rockcliffe gym. This proved to be the finest and hardest played game all season. The visitors drew early blood and before Ashbury could entangle themselves they had piled up a 14 point advantage. This turned out to be the difference, as the homesters could never catch up. The score at half time stood at 28-24 in favour of L.C.C. During the second half Ashbury put in a determined bid and threatened to take a com- manding lead but the visitors came back strongly to win 72-59. john Arnold was top scorer. 62 THE ASHBURIAN lst BASKETBALL vs KEMPTVILLE AGRICULTURAL SCHCOL The last game of the season was played in Kemptville on Friday, March 18th. After leading at half time Ashbury seemed to run out of steam and the hosts were victorious by a score of 52-45. The lack of practice proved to be the major factor this time. The two high scorers for Ashbury were Peter Gates with 22 points and Bob Lackey with 18. This year Terry Finlay won the new McA'Nulty trophy for the most valuable player. SECOND BASKETBALL Tl-IAM Iinclc mu: B. P. Hincy, F. A. Reid, C. D. Kilpatrick, A. H. N. Snclgrove, Esq., G. Muir, P. VV. Blackcncy. I"ro1iQ1'r1Ltz:.' G. S. VVebsrcr, R. B. Bruce, A. Sandqvist iCaptainD, D. Xl. McLean, C. VV. uc 'cr. THE ASHBURIAN 67 BGXING His year, under the able coaching of Nlr. R. Anderson, manv boxing enthusiasts were produced, with the best of these coni- peting in the finals on Friday, Nlarch llth. The card for the evening lined up eleven fine bouts, ranging from juniors to seniors. XYhen the final house results had been tabulated, the winners of the inter-house boxing turned out to be Connaught House. Bout No. 1-Saxe II- vs Bowie. Prep-School Flyweight. In the opening fight of the evening both fighters came out full of pep and proceeded to throw plenty of punches. However, Bowie seemed to have the better knowledge of the ring and he won the decision. Bout No. 2-Bray vs Bechard. junior Lightweight. The second bout on the card proved to be very fast, but the swifter and more consistent punching of Bray gave him the decision. Bout No. 3-Uiinter vs Heenan. Intermediate Middleweight. The next fight was between Winter and Heenan, and although Heenan gained many points in his wild, fist-swinging fiurries, Winter walked off with the decision. Bout No. 4-Quesnel vs johannsen. flixhibitionb. This bout was substituted in place of the bout between Alzaga II and Saxe I. It was all very comical and provided some good entertain- ment for the spectators. There was no decision. Bout No. 5-O'Hara vs Southam II. junior Xliddleweight. Southam showed a superior infighting knowledge in the first round but a steady barrage of punches for O'Hara gave him the nod. Bout No. 6-Mulkins vs Lloyd. Intermediate Heavyweight. This was one of the most outstanding fights of the evening as both boys proved to the audience that they had a good right to be in the finals. However Mulkins ability to break through Lloyd's guard proved the major factor and he won the decision. Bout No. 7-XYiddrington vs Nowakowski. Senior Heavyweight. In the seventh contest both boys appeared to be in good physical lundition, but Nowakowski threw many more punches and had Fiddrington in trouble a couple of times in the third round. In the first ind XViddrington's nose was broken by Nowakowskis superior Hfching. The decision went to Nowakowski. 68 THE ASHBURIAN Bout No. 8-Farrugia vs Cook. junior Featherweight. The next contest was fairly close but Cook had a longer reach and this was the deciding factor and gave the fight to Cook. Farrugia won the Rhodes Trophy awarded to the losing finalist showing the greatest courage and fortitude. Bout No. 9-MacMillan vs lYells. Senior Middleweight. The ninth bout saw VVells shower a number of well placed blows to the head of his game but inferior opponent MacMillan, and this pace was kept up during the whole fight thus meriting the decision in favour of XYells. VVells also won the Grant Cup, awarded to the boxer showing the greatest ability and ringcraft. Bout No. 10-Book vs Dunn. Intermediate Lightweight. The semi-windup produced a rather lopsided fight, as Book had it all over his smaller opponent and easily won the decision. Both boys threw a lot of punches but Book's were more wearing and Dunn could not keep up the pace. Bout No. 11-Rockingham vs Bear. Senior Lightweight. The final match of the evening saw two very cautious boxers in action but because of his ability to land more punches in a flurry, Baer won a fairly close decision. Both fighters had done a lot of training and were in excellent condition for the Hght. THE ASHBURIAN TS PUETRY READING CQNTEST His year the competition was held in the chapel, after the service on Sunday, Alay lst. Again Professor G. B. johnston, of the English Faculty at Carleton College was kind enough to come and judge the reading. The entries were more numerous than in previous years, with fifteen entries in the junior category, and five in the Intermediate and Senior. Each competitor had to read a selected piece, a poem of his own choice, and one unseen. The selected pieces were: "Ode to Evening", by Collins, for the Seniors, "Tewkesbury Road", by Nlase- field, for the Intermediates and "Recessional", by Kipling, for the juniors. After the reading of each category was over, Professor Johnston gave a brief individual and general criticism, stressing the point that one should pay more attention to melody than to sense in verse, although both were important. I-Ie also congratulated every one present for his fine effort. fv- ' I I CRIC -. Captain: F. IV. Baer Vice-Captain: E. N. Rhodes I The Mrs. james IYilson Trophies for the Best Averages Batting: E. N. Rhodes I Bowling: VV. H. Eastwood The XI.C.C. Bat for Improvement in Batting C. T. C. Kamcke The A. IV. Darnill Ball for Improvement in Bowling Beavers lst XI Colours: F. IV. Baer C, T, C, Kgmqkg E. N. Rhodes I L. Xl. Killaly IV. I-I. Eastwood E. L. Brown 2nd XI Colours: Sutherland I Barkun Winter Reid I 3rd XI Colours: Powelll Chubb Rogers .Xlolloy 68 THE ASHBURIAN Bout No. 8-Farrugia vs Cook. junior Featherweight. The next contest was fairly close but Cook had a longer reach and this was the deciding factor and gave the fight to Cook. Farrugia won the Rhodes Trophy awarded to the losing finalist showing the greatest courage and fortitude. Bout No. 9-Nlacnlillan vs XYells. Senior Middleweight. The ninth bout saw VK'ells shower a number of well placed blows to the head of his game but inferior opponent MacMillan, and this pace was kept up during the whole fight thus meriting the decision in favour of KYells. Hells also won the Grant Cup, awarded to the boxer showing the greatest ability and ringcraft. Bout No. 10-Book vs Dunn. Intermediate Lightweight. The semi-windup produced a rather lopsided fight, as Book had it all over his smaller opponent and easily won the decision. Both boys threw a lot of punches but Book's were more wearing and Dunn could not keep up the pace. Bout No. 1 UNDER 16 CRICKET XI Back row: M. B. Bishop, C. W. Tucker, D. F. Rhodes, J. S. Rowan-Legg, C. M. C. Calkoen, VV. G. Robinson, R. D. L. Fraser Ifronr row: F. A. Reid, XV. G. S. VVinter, M. VV. Sutherland CCaptainl, S. Barkun, J. N. Darwent. HE season of 1955 has been the best for many years. The weather was favourable, and all three teams enjoyed close competition. There was also much enthusiasm in House Matches and among the junior Fields. The lst Xl played twelve games, won five, drew five, and lost two. Since most of their fixtures are with menls teams of considerable strength, this is a pleasing result. One loss was in an all day game versus New lidinburgh C.C., in which R. Thorns scored the most brilliant century seen on the ground for some time: the other, at home against an extremely fine B.C.S. Xl, whom they had been fortunate enough to defeat at Lennoxville. We have now won seven of the last nine matches with our traditional opponents, and held the cham- pionship for five seasons-three times outright, and in drawn series the last two years. THE ASHBURI.-IN 75 PQETRY READING CQNTEST His year the competition was held in the chapel, after the service on Sunday, Xlay lst. Again Professor Ci. li. johnston, of the English Faculty at Carleton College was kind enough to come and judge the reading. The entries were more numerous than in previous years, with fifteen entries in the junior category, and live in the Intermediate and Senior. Each competitor had to read a selected piece, a poem of his own choice, and one unseen. The selected pieces were: "Ode to Evening", by Collins, for the Seniors, "Tewkesbury Road", by Nlase- field, for the Intermediates and "Recessional", by Kipling, for the juniors. After the reading of each category was over, Professor johnston gave a brief individual and general criticism, stressing the point that one should pay more attention to melody than to sense in verse, although both were important. I-Ie also congratulated every one present for his fine effort. The winners were: Senior-WV. Eastwood. Intermediate-YV. IVinter. junior-Rowe II. PUBLIC SPEAKING CONTEST N the annual Public Speaking Contest, held on May 15th, the follow- ing entered for competition: Beavers, Clarke and XVoollcombe in the senior division, Gale, Hecker, Tucci and Vifinter in the intermediate, while Rowe II was the only entry from the junior School. It was felt by the judges that in one respect at least, the general level of performance had been raised this year. A greater proportion of speakers conveyed an impression of sincerity and spontaneity by speaking with little or no reference to notes. The adjudicators pointed out that a speech which was manifestly read from a complete NLS. held much less likelihood of convincing an audience than would one which appeared to express the immediate convictions of the speaker. This tendency to read the speeches was, fortunately, much less evident in this year's competition. The winners were: Seniors, Clarke, Intermediates, Gale, juniors, Rowe II. 76 THIE ASHBURIAN DEBATE His vear the annual debate was held between Bishop's and Ashbury, with Lower Canada College acting as hosts and adjudicators. The Ashbury team consisted of Finlay I, and Clarke, and their opposition from Bishops were Gordon and XVhite. The topic-"Resolved that the Co-existence of Russia and a free world is impossible", with Ashbury maintaining the positive side of the resolution. This topic proved most stimulating and many good points were brought out on both sides. Of these, perhaps the principal ones for the positive side were: aj that no arms race was ever concluded peaceably, that once the present powerful neutrals, such as China and South-East Asia had swung into one or other of the political orbits, armed conflicts would inevitably result, bj that the Iron Curtain cannot be maintained peaceably, since it divides both racial and national groups, that this curtain will be ultimately split with violence. The Bishops debaters, maintaining the negative, asserted with much cogency that the instinct of self preservation will ensure a desire, on both sides, for peace, that everyone 'wants a peaceful co-existence and that a course which is recognized generally as the desirable one, is the course which will inevitably be pursued. The L.C.C. audience upheld the Ashbury team's contention by a vote of 16-8 and after the ballot had been taken there followed a very interesting discussion led by L.C.C. speakers. Refreshments followed the discussion and the Ashbury debaters remained overnight in the boarders, wing of the College. The hospitality of L.C.C. was much appreciated by our team. The debaters, Messrs. Finlay l and Clarke, wish to thank their coach and sponsor, Mr. Spencer, for all the help and training which he gave them throughout the term. 2 as vi To '2 izat si T' ll' ""'.'S "Bands ci.-ya THE ASHBURIAN 81 The cadets were then broken otf into squads for individual squad training demonstrations. The junior Corps led off with a line display of marching drill under Cadet Lieut. Baer. Following the juniors, the Senior squads took the field, and while the Signals squad sent various messages to the other "Commands" the L.Xl.G., First Aid and Range Discipline squads went through their paces under the scrutiny of the Reviewing Party. . The Gvmnastic Team took over the held and with unusual briskness and co-ordination went through their movements in great style, displaying not only Fine technique but working together as a unit at all times. Mr. P. Anderson is to be congratulated for this excellent display. As is alwavs wise we saved the best for the last, the best of course being the precision drill by the Guard of Honour. The nine guards looked superb with the sun glinting on their highly polished buttons, while the hair of their "Busbies" tossed gently in the breeze. Again congratulations are in order for Cadet Lieut. Beavers who spent so many hours with these boys bringing them up to their high standard. The demonstration completed, the corps was again assembled in a ' to hearmthe address by Major General Rockingham. He -'- -- f...f1,..,. ...---- I -N .... ew.-- -t-.- THE CADET CORPS GADET OFFICERS AND NONfGGMMISSIGNED GFFICERS Back r0'u:: R. A. Oropeza, E. T. Mulkins, H. Kahle, I. C. Funes, L. Ochoa, S!Sgt. VV. H Birbeck, F. L. Brown, T. T. Ahearn, j. G. Guthrie, j. R. Southam, H. Ii. G. Short. R. F. Turcotte. l ' ' . Izddle ro . O. O. Zeitz, R. B. Grogan, G. R. XIacI.aren, G. X erhaegen, KI, I, 14mg-Sim R- E- B- Kemp. Civilian Instructorg R. XI. Rockingham, H. P. Llschauzier, XY. H. Eastwood, ll. A. VV. Berridge, K. R. Patrick, Front row: Q.M.S. B. XVedd, Lt. P. G. Beavers, Lt. XY. H. B. XlcA'Xulty. Lt. F. N. Rl'l0dCS, Capt. C. Nowakowski. Flight-Lt. P. F. Falstrup-Fisher. Xlaior T. Ii. Finlay, Capt. A. B. VVells, Lt. I.. XI. Killaly, Lt. F. XY. Baer. D. Xl. T. XYiddrington. THiE ASHBURIAN 'G H ' hb , ms vear the annual debate was held betNl:CCtH E::zlZ1.SuiSgafZiS. ?g,e with LOWCY Canada College acting as 0813 - d 'dheir 0 POsition Ashburv team consisted of Finlay VL' anqrlgzlaioeiCi?.ReSOjVedPthat the from Bishops were Gordon and White. Q Q P , H j . , hb Co existence of Russia and a free world is 1HlPOSS1blC , Wlfh A5 WY l sitive side of the resolution. - - d oints were This topic proved most stimulating and lm2f1Xnfi?0a1 Sues for the b l t out on both sides. Of these, perhaps t C PU P FUUQ 1 . ded eaceabl - msimc gide WUC. .,j that no arms race was ev er conclu P Yr 5 ' - ' ' . ' and South-East ihat once the present powerful HCUIFHIS, Sud? 95 Chlfm H. bits armed con ICYS . - 1 r other of the olitical or , . , Am had W mg' into one 0 P ' be maintained ' . . ' n cannot would inevitably results bl that the Aron Cuffal . 1 S that this PC,,Cc.,bjV Since it divides both racial and nationa group , curtain will be ultimately split with V1OlCI1Ce- . - - ' . ' h much The Bishop's debaters, maintaining the negativ e, aSSC1'fCd Wlf . . desire on fhir h instinct of self reservation wlll CIISUYC 3 v maintaining t ie po ""'ml?Tif'l.i raft: Si. Gian., U. ienliiiigron, J. 3. lI'VlI1, R. A. Riddell, E. Dr""" Ifrmzr role: C. I.. Gill, G. B. Richardson, j. C. Funes, R. B. Grogan, H. Kahle, H t lfsehauzier. In l"l'UlIfI Cadet I.ieut. P. G. Beavers. THE INSPECTICN Noinuk inspection is now but history, and another year of soldierlng has come to its glorious end. The many months of marching, handling rifles, and squad training, have been Put to the test and have once again brought in a dividend worthy of the effort. Tuesday, May 17, dawned bright and clear and although a few black clouds tried vainly to dampen matters, the sun shone down in all its glory as the reviewing officer, Major General M. Rockingham, C.B., C.B.l4i., D.S.O., CD., entered the west gate between two sentries at the "present". Having been welcomed by the Headmaster, R. H Perry, liscj., Nl.A., the General inspected the Guard of Honour drawn up on the front lawn. The General Salute was the next item on the agenda, followed by an inspection of the Corps by the Reviewing Party which included Alajor General Rockingham, The Headmaster, Cadet Major Findlay, Lieut. ll. li. Dore, Lieut. jeiferies, Aide de Camp to General Rockingham, Lt.-Col. T. G. Bowie, and Flight Lt. P. F lfalstrup-lfischer. U.l7.C. The remainder of the ceremonial portion of the program included the .llarch Past in Column of Route, Advance in Review Order, and Xlarch Off the Flag. THE ASHBURIAN 81 The cadets were then broken otf into squads for individual squad training demonstrations. The junior Corps led off with a fine display of marching drill under Cadet Lieut. Baer. Following the juniors. the Senior squads took the field, and while the Signals squad sent various messages to the other "Commands" the L.Xl.G.. First Aid and Range Discipline squads went through their paces under the scrutiny of the Reviewing Party. . The Gymnastic Team took over the field and with unusual briskness and co-ordination went through their movements in great style. displaying not only fine technique but working together as a unit at all times. Xlr. P. Anderson is to be congratulated for this excellent display. As is always wise we saved the best for the lastg the best of course being the precision drill by the Guard of Honour. The nine guards looked superb with the sun glinting on their highly polished buttons. while the hair of their "Busbies" tossed gently in the breeze. Again congratulations are in order for Cadet Lieut. Beavers who spent so many hours with these boys bringing them up to their high standard. The demonstration completed, the corps was again assembled in a hollow square to hear the address by Major General Rockingham. He spoke on leadership, stressing the fact that cadets must learn to take orders before they can expect to be in a position to give orders. He stated that above all a cadet must learn to dis- cipline himself and by so doing he would soon be able to dis- cipline others. He congratu- lated the corps on its steadiness on parade and said that he felt that the N.C.O.'s had shown great efficiency and skill dur- ing the parade. He congratulat- ed Cadet Xlajor Finlay for his fine performance and present- ed awards to G. Robinson for the best recruit on parade and H. Kahle for the best N.C.O. General Rockingham ended his address with the request for a well deserved half-holiday for the corps. 1 l GYM PYRAMID Back ro-w: T. Rozos, B. K. Hillary, C. Nowakowski, R. A. Gropeza, F. L. Brown, R. J. Anderson, Llsq., F. VV. Baer, R. H. Patrick. lfronr row: M. A. XV. Berridgc, j. G. Marshall, S. A. Azubel. GYXI 'I'lfAAl H.n'lc rms: S. .X. .Xlulu-l. Xl. A. XY. Bcrrialgc, C. Nuwnlcowski, l". L. Brown, A. B. lVcllS lflalprninl, li. li. Ilillnry, bl. Cl. Nlnrslmll. Ifmnr rms: R. ll. Patrick, lf. XV. liner, R. j. Anderson, Esq., R. A. Oropcza, T. Rozos. THE ASHBURIAN LM- """2""" 'FQ 5 . - Q 4- 2, X.. " 153.-2' 0' ff 1 . ,Tb - - kr xr yv r if 7 ' 'iff' 3. 2 1 ' ' c . ' L r ' ..' ', , . "K st ,, A....lq, Q, ,sa-,L-, .L fi? alcjisq N "ai k 'P' ga A J-, ,I , xi X K 3 4. g, mi gil-,-'4 F ' ,, ,' 2 Mi.. --.T-'ll L VANCOUVER OLD BCYS' DINNER August 3rd, 1954 Back row: J. B. Kirkpatrick, Eric Beardmore, jim Nlinnes, Ian Barclay. Front rofw: Gordon Southam, Chris Morrison, R. H. Perry, Headmaster, Barnev Carswell. .iOXV1I1g THCIDDCFS O1 Ll b 3 me Corporation: G. F. Benson, '15 C. R. Booth, '33 E. K. Davidson, '16 Col. D. Fraser, '05 H. P. Hill, Q.C. A. B. R. Lawrence, '40 A. R. MacLaren, '15 joseph McCully L. C. D. Palmer, '16 E. N. Rhodes, '25 Brigadier R. Rowley, '33 G. T. Southam, '29 Taylor Statten R. H. Perry, Headmaster VL . Frank D. Bliss, '19 D. B. Cruikshank XV. R. Eakin, jr., '27 H. R. Hampson, '20 -I. S. Irvin, '28 Brig.-General C. H. Maclaren D. K. MacTavish, Q.C. Donald Mclnnes, Q.C.. '20 Peter Redpath, '20 Commodore YV. G. Ross, '26 V. XV. Scully R. XY. Southam, '30 Capt. G. A. XVoollcombe, '20 H. Ronalds Cex-officioj E I 91---7 GYM PYRAMID , - , , R. . Back row: T. Rozos, B. K. HillarY, C. lNoxV?k0W5k1v R- A' 0'70PeZa' F' L Brown J Anderson, Iisq., F. NV. Baer, R. H. Patrick. . - . 4 b 1. Ifront row: M. A. VS. Berridge, j. G. Marshall, S. A A211 C ll- gentleman, Mr. J. P. McCaffrey, we will have the Grey Cup out here this year . . . " Eric Beardmore is a Director of the Club, and the other strong Ashbury football connection is the one which FRANK BLISS, '19, has with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. ROGER ROIVLEY, '33, sent in addresses for a couple of missing Old Boys and also the information that he will be taking the Second Canadian Infantry Brigade over to Germany next October to relieve thc First Brigade which presently represents Canada's army commitments to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. XYord from our Bishop's correspondent tells us that the Ashbury contingent is distinguishing itself. L. VV. ABBOTT, '53, is the President of Athletics on the Student Executive Council. G. K. JACKSON, '54, is the Coordinator of Publicity for the Council. Pl".TI",R IIARGRIQAVES, '49, played the roll of Macbeth in the Bishop's L'niversity Dramatic Society's major production this year. CIRAI IAM tl.-XCKSON was also in the cast. THE ASHBURIAN 89 'QQ A A Y, .mswf M 2 ' ,io ,-:- :-".:. . 'F T' Mb: A f 3, , V. ' S fq. JQW sb- af, rnkrfi up s, 'iY f!f"f'.-,yfacii ,, N N4 ' ww-" W- .Magi 2. ' f3"'f'1..."'- uv , A dx 1' Q f fy- ,. my -iq,-,fm "' Q A 'R saw- .ve-, .V tx A X"f.,X, I v is N. L-,..,,gi -, ' r-rE-,.f.-21 . -Lil VANCOUVER OLD BOYS' DINNER August 3rd, 195+ Back rofw: J. B. Kirkpatrick, Eric Beardmore, jim Minnes, Ian Barclay. Front row: Gordon Southam, Chris Morrison, R. H. Perry, Headmaster, Barney Carswell. PETER BERRY, '37, is in charge of the RCN NATO Observer School at Dartmouth. The school trains observers for the United Kingdom and Canada. PETER NEXYCOMBE, '-I-1, was elected president of the john Howard Society of Ottawa, an organization which is concerned with the rehabilitation of former prisoners. STUART C. BATE, '13, one of Canada's leading amateur riders, was recently elected president of the Royal Agricultural Winter F air in Toronto. VVord from the PRICE Boys: TONY, '-I-7, has just graduated from the Law School at Laval, HARRY, '45, married last September to Phyllis Ann MacKay in Quebec City, is working in Rimouski for Price Brothers, and SCOTT, '50, is a pilot with T.C.A. GORDON T. SOUTHAM, '29, was recently elected to the Board of Directors of'the Southam Company Ltd. A. B. R. LAXYRENCE, '40, was elected president of the Canadian Club of Ottawa at their annual meeting this spring. 86 THE ASHBURIAN VV. R. EAKIN, jr., '27, has been appointed president of the Dominion Square Corporation of Montreal. R. XY. XV. MacNEIL, '49, has found time apart from his undergraduate work at Carleton and his work with CBO and CBOT, to be active with the Ottawa Little Theatre during its past season. DAVID M. XYOODS, '30, was chosen president of Toronto's Board of Trade, the largest in the British Commonwealth. JOHN FRASER, '52, will take up residence next fall at Merton College, Oxford, as one of Canada's Rhodes Scholars. A. VV. M. A iill IacRAE, '49, was ordained Deacon last May by Bishop Beverley in Toronto. F. BARCLAY ROBINSON, '31, is president of the Mount Royal Cricket Club of Montreal. R. T. BOXV MAN, '28, is to be manager of the new radio station, CKLG, in North Vancouver. Lt.-Cdr. V. -I. VVILGRESS, '39, has been appointed to command the Air VVing on the aircraft carrier Magnificent. Ashbury, 1963, is in the news as the four most recent births reported to us have all been boys. That's the proper spirit! To Mr. and Mrs. W. j. LEE, '52, to Mr. and Mrs. HARRY BROUSE, '50, to Mr. and Mrs. H. S. MacDONALD, '42, to Mr. and Mrs. G. B. FENTON, '33. MARRIAGES CHRISTOPHER HAMPSON, '49, to joan Margaret Cassils Evans in Montreal. This was an Ashbury Wedding as joan Evans is the daughter of A. C. EVANS, '18, and Christopher Hampson is the son of H. R. HAMPSON, '20. C. XV. j. ELIOT, '45, to Dorothy M. P. VVilliamson at Stoke-on-Trent, England. HAROLD PRICE, '45, to Phyllis A. M. Smith in Quebec City. NORMAN CREIGHTON, '47, to Ann E. Sanderson in Montreal. RICHARD SOBIE, '51, to jean Harris in Montreal. GORDON FISCHEL, '48, to Naomi R. VVolfson in Montreal. DOUGLAS MCLEAN, '51, to Carmyl D. Hutt in Ottawa. OBITUARY VVe were saddened to learn of the deaths during the past year of MICIIAICL NICY, '42, H. V. de BURY, '22, GEORGE VON VITZTI IUM, 53, LOCKETT COLEMAN, '18, j. D. SOUTHAM, '26, SIIIRLEY XYOODS, '19, M. T. HENDERSON, '19, and PETER VVILLIAM CURRIE, former master at Ashbury. THE ASHBURIAN H THOSE ATTENDING UNIVLQRSITY THIS Sl-ISSION McGill University: XY. Brownlee, N. Burgoyne, Fraser, C. llart, B Heney, D. Heney, R. Le Moyne, G. XYatson, XY. XYeck, j Younger. University of Toronto: S. Ball, Ferguson, P. Gilbert, l. Scott. Osgoode Hall: Hooper, Nesbitt, R. Thomas. Bishop's University: L. Abbott, P. Baskerville, E. Clarke. P. l largreaves L. Hart, G. jackson, P. McEwen. Carleton College: Baldwin, P. Carver, H. Clark, P. Foulkes, B Genesove, Gill, D. Hanson, Nl. Hogben, D. Livingston, l MacLaren, R. MacNeil, Travers, R. XYarnock. University of New Brunswick: R. Elmer. Cambridge University: D. Burder, Pettigrew, Sebastian Rathbone Simon Rathbone, R. lVest. Royal Military College: R. Cullwick, G. Ross, R. Younger. College Militaire Royal de St. jean: Lawson, H. NlacNeil, G XVharton. University of Montreal: VV. Clark, Hall. Queens University: M. Parsons, D. Irwin, G. Cook, L. Bailey. Dalhousie University: A. Hardy, H. Mclnnes, S. Mclnnes. University of Havana: M. Artola. University of Vermont: A. Bloomstone. University of Pittsburgh: R. Kerr. Norwich University: L. VVells. Royal School of Engineering: P. Tisdall. Qntario Veterinary College: H. Luyken. Laval University: E. Price. Tulane University: 0. Ochoa, N. Zalfaty. University of Florida: H. Bencomo. University of New South Hales: G. Carne. Ontario Agricultural College: G. Barr. Sydney University CAustraliaD: KI. Hicks. Loyola College: D. Scott. University of Buenos Aires: H. Villa Lobos. University of Western Ontario: H. Lovink, R. Sumner. P. Walker. University of Heidelberg: NlacCordick. St. Francis Xavier: A. Holland. THE ASHBURIAN OLD BOY VISITORS 1954-1955 The following is a list of those whose names appear in the Ashbury Old Boys' Register. D. Gardner, '48 L. C. Reinderhoff, '51 Frank XV. Ritchie, '19 F. K. Davidson, '16 XV. E. Slattery, '52 C. A. Billings, '13 L. F. C. Hart, '16 H. N. Blakeney, '15 P. Foulkes, '52 Harry Brouse, '50 J. H. Gill, '52 H. E. Fensom, '30 R. D. Viets, '41 J. L. Fleck, '47 A. McCulloch, '52 G. M. GriH'in, '21 A. R. MacLaren, '15 P. Earnshaw, '38 C. R. Burrows, '41 IV. R. Butterworth, '13 j. B. O'Brien, '26 L. D. Palmer, '16 IV. G. Ross, '26 A. D. Livingston, '54 fl. D. Fripp, '08 XV. R. Bryce, '51 II. D. L. Snelling, '37 3. A. Pritchard, '51 N. N. Creighton, '47 J. D. McLean, '51 A. Rosenberg, '52 f I. -I. Ronalds, '37 R. A. Cullwick, '47 3. j. Gencsove, '51 E. j. Carsley, '26 Richard Elmer, '49 David Knowlton, '54 A. B. R. Lawrence, '40 G. D. Hughson, '41 J. M. Macoun, '14 VV. F. Hadley, '34 E. N. Rhodes, '25 A. I. MacLaren, '52 H. B. Moffatt, '43 P. McCulloch, '5 2 H. M. Hughson, '12 john McBride, '47 R. T. Kenny, '48 David Mathias, '30 R. VV. Southam, '32 J. S. Irvin, '28 K. VV. Heuser, '36 P. B. Smellie, '30 R. R. Drake, '40 C. G. Gale, '34 J. F. Grant, '18 R. G. Ross, '53 Robert Hyndman, 34 M. Grant, '31 L. Cardinal, '5 2 E. L. H. Burpee, '27 XV. A. IVeeks, '51 G. A. TVoollcombe, '20 XV. j. Lee, '12 C. F. Coristine, '30 XY. C. Thackray, '14 Gordon T. Southam, '29 john M. Fraser, '52 PREFECTS CAPTAIN OF THE SCHOOL WELLS, A. B.-"IVhe1z he is best, he is a little uorse than a man, and 'when he is fworst, he is little better than a beast-." Andy is completing his ninth and final year at Ashbury. He has efficiently filled the position of Captain of the School during the past year, and his common sense and good judgment have, at all times, heeu a great credit to Ashbury. Andy is an athlete of no little note. He earned his Brst colours in both football and hockey, is the captain of the newly founded Ashbury College Rowing Club, and holds the distinction of being the school's best gymnast. He also dabbles at that jolly old English game of cricket in his spare time. Andy is the Captain of Connaught House fwhatever that may bel and holds the rank of Captain in the Cadet Corps. Andy is off to Mount Allison University next yea: in pursuit of higher educationg so from one and all of us "Au revoir, Andy, and the very best for the future. CAPTAIN OF THE Boaunnas KILLALY, MAC.-"A sophisticated rhetorieiavz, inebriated with the exzzberanee of his 01311 cerbosityf' Completing his second year in the Prefect Body, as Captain of the Boarders Mac has in no small way made an impression upon the school. He played First Football lcoloursl, Hockey lcoloursl, and we haven't yet received the cricket results. In the Cadet end of school life he ably led a very efficient 2nd Platoon. Much credit is due to Mac for his pecuniary duties during the year, which culminated with a very successful school dance. As captain of Alexander House, Mac has done a great deal towards challenging the older Houses for the much sought after inter- house shield. Completing, successfully we imagine, some of his Senior Matric. subjects, Mac intends to retum next year to get the remainder before heading off to Princeton. However. Mac, we will most probably be seeing you in the better bed in Room 6. CAPTAIN or THE DAY Bovs RHODES, NED-"Ye gods! how he talked, IVhat a torrent of sozmd, his bearer imuded, eneompassld and dT0'LL'7I.d.'., Once again this year Ne-d's eloquent tones were heard resounding throughout the halls, and once again Ned's powerful ami led the undefeated football team to a victorious season. Added to his football feats are his accomplishments on the ski slopes, and his steady batting with the first eleven. Ned ably led the first platoon to battle this fall and proved to all the disbelievers that the quiet approach is far superior to the raucous one, Ned is off to join the bluenoses in the East this fall, and we all wish him the best of luck in his search for higher education at Dalhousie. BAER, BILL-'4There is 710 sin except stupidit-y." Bi1l's elevation to the "Elite" last fall proved to he an excellent choice. Although the smallest of its number, he was by no means the quietest, and rumour had it that the Iunior Cadet Corps shivered at his command. Bill played good football for the undefeated Firsts this fall. and in the winter tenn tumed his talents towards assisting the second team in the "Devine Law of Hockey". This spring he captained Mr. Brain's successful "French in the Spring" cricket eleven. In his eight years at Ashbury, Bill has contributed immensely to all activities at which he has taken part. Bill's plans for the future are still uncertain, so we'll say. "Good luck for the future, Half Quart". GAMBLE, DAVID-"Boot, saddle, to horse, and au'.1y."' Dave roared up in his little "RED BUG" for another successful year at Ashbury last fall. On many occasions his outstretched arms hauled in the oval missiles hurled at him by the capable arms of quarterback Ned on the football field this year. During the cold months dapper Dave kept the slopes of Rockcliffe company. This spring he has spent his very valuable time in constant study sacrificing his social activites in an all out effort to clean up in the exams this Iune. Dave intends to take up academic and other studies at Queen's next fall and we all wish him the best of luck in the future. GILL, CHRIS-"Speech is silverg Silence is golden." Everyone was pleased to see Chris appointed prefect at Christmas, and he has fulfilled his duties like an old hand. Chris was awarded his colours in football and skiing this year as well as being vice-captan of the latter sport. He is also a staunch member of the newly founded Ashbury College Rowing Club. Aside from being prominent on the athletic Held, he also shines in the academic line. There is not much to say about his social lifeg that is pretty well taken for granted. His one bad habit is that he doesn't smoke, and as a result no one can "borrow" cigarettes from him. Chris is off to join his parents in Africa this summer, where he plans to go to university. We all wish you a good trip, Chris, and best of luck in the future. IRV IN, JOE-"I can scarce believe the tale Born to me on every gale!" Nothing but praise comes to Joe after a wonderful year. His natural ability in sports brought him to the captain of hockey and track, and vice-captain of football. Illness prevented him from participating in the Guards, but he is a sergeant-major in the lab Cthat's the new one we boast aboutg why, I dunno, for you can't sleep therej. His studies have gone well and also his social studies. Yes, joe has got right in there and ended up in a bang. Comrade Irvin is Hero No. 1 among the Juniors and sets a prime example?? His contagious smile will be seen around school next year and also perhaps a new car .... Yes, a new carl This summer it is back to Hotel Ahmek for his 11th season. KAMCKE, CRAIG-"In action hofw like an angel! In apprehension hofw like a god!" This spring, Craig "the actor" Kamcke, joined our ranks, and it was with pleasure that we dusted off a chair for him in the cornmon-room. Athletically, although he could play neither football nor hockey because of an iniury, he had a very successful year. In the fall and winter terms he coached the third football and hockey teams, while during the spring term he was the starry wicket-keeper and one of the best bats of the first eleven. Craig is also very sound academically, being most proficient in English and Latin, and spending many of his spares writing poetry fin Englishl, or polishing up his reading of Hamlet for the next English class. Next year, Craig is bound for Toronto University, and although I am sure he does not need it, we wish him every success. LAWSON, MIKE-t'To most people nothing is more troublesome than the effort of thinking." Mike found time off from his social life to join us for another successful year at Ashbury. He played first team football, and became famous for his spectacular touchdown in the House games. He dabbled at skiing and track and field, and ran his usual powerful race in the cross-countx run. It is only fair to mention that Mike's forte is his winning ways wi the fair sex, and it is hard to choose between Nowa and him as to who rules the social circles in Rockcliffe Park. Mike is off to Bishop's next fall for a higher social life, and we wish the girls the best of luck. NOVVAKOXVSKI, CHRIS-"If anything is sacred the hmnan body is sacred." It is quite an assignment to tabulate the interests and accomplishments of Chris in and out of school, and as there is a censor and a limited amount of space we are unable to recount them all to you. Chris, better known as Nowa, was captain of football and skiing. He also was 2 ifc of the Cadet Corps, and a member of the gym team. Made a prefect alter Easter, he soon showed that he was a wise choice. For the past term he has been concentrating on getting his work down pat. His sunnner profession is going to be cutting lawns and from there will be leaving us after a long period of ten years to seek higher education at Qui-en's. THE ASHBURIAN PENNINGTON, BOB--"Nose, nose, nose, nose! And 'who gave thee that jolly red nose?" One of the newest additions to the brass this year is big Bob, and although hailing from the Queen City he has made quite a name for himself in First team football, hockey and cricket, winning his colours in the first two. Despite the fact that he isn't French he has a fond affection for that part of the province of Quebec adjacent to Ottawa. He reached the heights of sergeant recently in the cadets and did well in the honour guard. Bob is undecided as to whether it will be McGill or Ashbury next year, but wherever he goes we all wish him the best of luck. VERHAEGEN, GEORGES-"Whose little body lodged a mighty mindf, Georges returned to us after his triumphs of last year to take up the reins of omce as a member of the Prefect Body, and on many occasions has his voice been raised above the tumult to quell the storm. He has had a fine year athletically, being a marked man on the soccer squad, a pioneer of squash, and captain of the tennis five plus one in their quest for victory. Recently he gave up his social life to devote himself to the books Qthis one includedl, at least that's what he keeps telling Nowa. Georges, should he survive the oncoming exams., plans to retum to his native land somewhere in Europe, where he shall divide his time between inspecting the local beaches, and striving for higher education. WEDD, jlM-"A fat paunch never breeds fi7Z6 thoughts." This is Iimmy's second year as a prefect, a job he performs with a great deal of enthusiasm. He played for the first football team and won his colours. In the hockey world he ww a great asset in the form of goalkeeper and vice-captain. jim is captain of Woollcombe House, and also Q.M.S. in the Cadets. Although not noted for his studies he manages to Cole along quite well in French. The best driver Caccording to himl in the school, he has his auto trained pretty well. He just hops in, starts it, and it drives him straight to Aylmer. He is also noted for his attendance at important functions like spelling, gym, and Chapel. Unfortunately, Jim will not be retuming next year, so we must say good-bye to him and his typewriter. WIDDRINGTON, MIKE-"M y Kingdom for a Horse." Mike, who is completing his fourth year at Ashbury this year. has distinguished himself in several ways. He has won his first team colours in football and hockey, and was on the track team that competed at Hamilton. On t.he scholastic side, Mike is completing his Junior Matric. and writing part of his Senior. Mike is the Sports Editor of the Ashburian and a sergeant in the Cadet Corps. He has upheld the high standard of the Prefect Body, and although it isn't known whether he is retuming or not, we are sure he will continue to set a good example wherever he goes. Best of luck, Mike. '-an au. I THE ASHBURIAN 1 Patrick Beavers Fraser Brown David Graham Richard Kemp Alison Lackey Harold Short Richard Turcotte Graham XVallingford Alfred Wurtele THE ASHBURIAN 93 AMC G THE GRADUATES BEAVERS, PATRICK-Back for his eighth year Pat seems to have put in quite a full time. Not only did he play outstandlingly for the first football, hockey, and cricket teams, but won the badminton championship and worked his way up to the exalted rank of lieutenant in the Cadet Corps. Patrick is notorious for his wonderful impersonations of various well known people, and keeps us all in stitches. He plans to further his education at VVestern next fall and we all wish him tops in luck. BROWN, FRASER-"Bruno", better known as the wit of the English class, returned for his second year this fall. Athletically he has had a very successful year, proving his ability on the soccer Held, the basketball floor, and the cricket pitch. He won his colours with his fine kicking foot in soccer, and his powerful bat this spring. Added to all this, Fraser was a colour-party sergeant in the Cadet Corps. Next year Bruno hopes to go to VVestern, and we bid him farewell and wish him the best of luck in the future. GRAHAM, DAVID-David dropped in early last fall to inform us that he would be among the starters once again this year. He achieved great success on the field of battle during the football season, both by his eagerness and fine spirit. More famous for his financial dealings than for his academic achievements, David has worked well during the year and should come through quite successfully in the future exams. He is at the moment uncertain of his academic propositions for next year, but we are sure that he will do well wherever he goes. KEMP, RICHARD-This is Dick's thirteenth and last year at the school. He is off to Bishop's next fall, where he hopes to further his education among the green hills of the Eastem Townships. Although not an active member of the football team this fall, Dick proved a very valuable manager. During the winter term he could be seen falling head over heals down the ski slopes. At the beginning of the cricket season, the "Gen" was not very confident of his batting, but he has improved with time. He made himself famous by catching out Mr. Powell in the masters' match. Dick retired from the cadet corps this year to become a Civilian Instructor. Best of luck, Dick. LACKEY, ALISON-A1 has achieved great popularity among the students by his stories which keep us amused for forty minutes on end. He was an invaluable member of the First Football Team, and will be remembered for his raucous voice in the Cadet Corps as C.S.M. Al has done quite well at his studies, and we wish him best of luck at Queen's next year. SHORT, HAROLD-Our Harold is definitely the pacemaker in style at Ashbury. Better known as "Bermuda Short", he is responsible for the white-duck trend which has forged to the front this spring. We hear that he has developed into the number one ? Squash player. He was also a steadfast member of the soccer team this year. Harry usually divides his time between Mr. Sibley's lab. and jean Paul Marceau's truck, drinking Pepsi. He joined Mr. Iobling on the "pleasure cruise" to Bermuda at Easter, and rumour has it that he spent most of his time down there in a bathtub at the Princess Hotel. Harry is taking off for McGill next fall, and we wish him lots of success. TURCOTTE, RICHARD-Turkey retumed to us this spring having decided to spare McGill for just one more year. He spared on the soccer eleven this autumn and was one of the pioneers of Squash during the icy months of winter. For the last ten weeks Turk has been bearing down on his studies in an all-out effort to make a killing in the exams this Iune. VVhen he has completed these, he plans to return to sunny South America where things are carried on in a much more liberal manner-according to our Dick. Next fall he will be prancing about the campus of McGill, where we all hope he will have the greatest success. WALLINGFORD, GRAHAM-Graham retumed to us for a second year last fall and we all are happy to see him promoted to the rank of room captain at Easter. He played soccer for the Hrst eleven in the fall, and was a fine guard on the basketball team. He is working away to finish up a good year academically but still Ends time for the odd game of tennis and badminton. XXV: all wish him the best of luck in his quest for higher education at McGill next fall. WURTELE, ALFRED-Came to us from one of the local institutions this autumn and readily estab- lished himself with his quiet humour and easy-going manner. Alfred lent his services to the first football team and proved to be a fine asset to the meaty line. VVe were all glad to see Alfie spinning about in a gleaming new auto this spring for his own safety as well as our own. He is off to Carleton next fall, and we all wish him the best of luck in his quest for higher education. N YI A YI C fr.:-me-L Q. .si Nz' .mi VI -vs q,.4,. RIQXIC DVI' X. -44' g Q --xl 4 6 Jac 1 .,i:eNv- -, ,, ......, ' w . 4.4, ,. ,CH ' 41 .3 ,u 'V M, . , , 1 7 564.53 "X, V, -.nn X w I 4 2 A ., ' .JN . .4'?'l A.. 1-in,-, .- , J .' '.n.. ' A 'gin IV w ,-qv' , t V. , .4 - 2 , ". A A SHILL ! 1 96 THE ASHBURIAN OL UNIOR SOHO J FORM TRANSITUS AHEARN, TONY-held the position of vice-captain of the Third Cricket Team, and is quite popular with all. ALEXANDER, DAVID-while reading his history, read that King Charles I sent messengers flying around England, and Wanted to know how they had aeroplanes then, when planes were only invented in the 20th Century. BISHOP, MICHAEL-is usually called "Bish", and is an excellent student. Mike had bad luck towards the end of the year, as he broke his arm. Cl IUBB, PETER-once held the rank of Form Monitor, for he is liked by all and he has made all major third teams. DAVIS, ERIC-hails from Manor Park and is one of the hardest workers in the class. Eric received his third football colours for a good season's work. DUNN, "Robin Readhead in a Classroom Puts All Masters in a Rage"- Rohin is a member of the Third Eleven, and is almost like Sparling's shadow, as he is always seen with Tim. E.-XSCIO, VICTOR-is a "KILLER" with the pen, and loves to write essays. Yie is honestly an "Air Force Disciplinarian" therefore an excellent student, so let's see vou hack next vear. lflNl,.'XY. BRI.-NN-is a quiet student and was Captain of the junior "li" lloekev Team. THE ASHBURIAN 97 FLAM ll, CHARLES-is this year's Third Hockey Team Captain, and is liked by all. He should get an Xl.L.T.S., and we hope to see him back next year. GAMBLE ll, JOHN-is a good athlete and earned for himself the position of Captain of the Third Football Team. john is a good student and we hope to sec him walk away with an Nl.l..T.S. GIFFORD, BILL-will be shot by the "Cannon" if he doesn't get an M.L.T.S. Bill starred for the Third llockey Team, and got his Colours. GUTHRIE, JOHN-is better known as "Moose" or "Guts", and he will always be found with Ahearn. KNIGHT, DOUGIE-is a good "little" student, and is improving in sports. LAY, DAVID-is known as the mad cackler, and we find it hard to turn him off. MACNEIL, MIKE-is always saying L'Good heavens". Nlichael is improving in his class work, and should graduate into Form Shell. MOLLOY, GlLBERT'S favourite saying is "just call me Molly" and he is very good in sports. PLATE, XVILLIAM-is known for never drinking milk. lYilliam came to Ashbury in the middle of the year and is very popular with everyone, and he can be heard in the early morning coming to school on his motor-bike. ROGER, GREG-is the class worrier. He is a good student, and interested in athletics. ROGERS, ANTHONY-just arrived from England, and is a very good Cricketer. We hope he graduates into Shell. SPARLING, TIMOTHY-is nicknamed "General" or "Titus" and is one of the better students of the class. SUGDEN, TONY-was voted Vice-Captain of Third Football, and has improved in his class work a great deal. SUTHERLAND, JAMES-is usually called the "Egyptian", and has greatly improved in his work and sports. YORK H, STEPHEN-can usually be found with Finlay ll. He is an average student and is fair in sports. MR. POLK, the Form Master of Transitus-is known for his quick maps which he draws on the blackboard. lf you look for it one early winter morning. you will see Mr. Polk wearing his 20 year old Dartmouth toque. - Q8 THE ASHBURIAN FORM IIIA The first on the list is ALZAGA I CMartinJ. "Ali", a much-travelled, lively Argentinian, who speaks four languages fluently, joined us in the Spring. If you should hear a BRAY CCharlesD in the class, it is! After active week-ends boating at the cottage, often with a guest from the Form, he returns refreshed to renew the fight as a Monitor in the Memorial VVing. The "Giggles" in llla come from CAMERON IIC lanj, who is gentle but full of fun. He wants to follow his father into the Army, meanwhile he likes to build model airplanes. COOK Clientj is an Air Force man. At Ashbury for live years, he is a solid citizen, a good athlete, and a keen student. COONEY CPeterJ is from Montreal, otherwise, he is a quiet, popular boy, good at sports, who hopes to become a Doctor. DODGE fjeffreyj canlt be missed. A good worker, he is husky, and enjoys throwing a tackle in football or a joke at the Form Master. if it's travelling, it must be FARRUGIA Cllflichaelb. Never still since his birth in lfgypt a decade ago, he has traversed many lands, some- times alone. He is an eager student, and a welcome guest anywhere. Our top student is FIDLICR Cllichardj. He will be a scientist. His hobby is collecting stamps and coins, and he is good at soccer, too. THE ASHBURIAN 99 HEENAN Olichael josephb is a good "joe" who wants to follow his father to sea. Good at sports and a Corporal in thc junior Cadets, he especially likes swimming and rifle-shooting. LAXVSON Ill C-Iohnj is slow and neat, and has red hair. Nlanv bovs have enjoyed a sojourn at his country estate. Good-natured MacDONL1LL I QRobinD is sometimes heard more than seen, however, we are glad to have him when he isn't in California. MORSON CGeolfreyj likes some people. A bright pupil, with a taste for the unusual, and a Monitor in the Ning, he intends to be a Doctor, but not a horse-doctor. Our New Boy is MURPHY CChrisJ, naturally nicknamed "Spud", who likes sports and model-building, and doesn't mind school. Aussi-born NOEL-BENTLEY CPeterj isn't very tall, yet he is very fast in running and tiinking, and an efficient "boss" of the Wing and the choir. O'HARA CPeterj is long, lean and hungry. Another coin collector, "O'Horror" wants to be a farmer, and is sometimes caught dreaming about this in class. POXVELL I Cjeremyb follows the family tradition in being a good cricketer. An all-round athlete, and an earnest student, is a Well-liked Form Monitor. ROVVE II Cferryj may be hard to find, but he is full of ideas, a good pianist, and likes tinkering with gadgets. VV ith inherent largesse, FERGUSCN Cjohnj helps the Rowing Club run their coaching launch. The class "funny-boy" is SCULLY CRobertD. Although not exactly a scholar, he is very active in school, often advertising Montreal. SOUTHAM II Calso Peterl is a Diplomatic boy, who learned his good manners in Sweden and France, and enjoys a good joke. FGRM IIIB ALZAGA II-came to Ashbury from the Argentine via London fEnglandJ and Rome. Has great trouble with his girl friends- they fight over him! CARR-HARRIS II-is one of the "quiet boys" of the Form. He likes to give the impression that he is working hard, but we wonder. He missed his M.L.T.S. CCHEN I-jonathan wants to be on all the teams, but if it means too much work, he prefers the job of manager and then appoints deputies. - 100 THE ASI-IBURIAN EATON-the artist of the Form. Unfortunately he sometimes wants to draw when he should be doing more arduous things. Ask him about the hockey games! EDVVARD-"Two-ton Tony" to his pals, has made quite an impression during his first year and we look forward to welcoming him back in the fall. EDVVARDS-will insist that he speaks slowly, but if this is so, why does he have to repeat everything he says? That M.L.T.S. was important to him. FLAM III-suggests that we should "ask his brother". It would be much easier if Donald didn't overstay his leave. It saves so much trouble. I GAJDA-is very modest about his success during his first year at the school. One day-soon, we hope-he is going to do something about that writing. HILLIARD-"the best monitor in the junior School" hasn't worked in class as much as he could have, but he is confident of a good result in the final exams. LIQVVIS-doesn't want to "break up stones on the St. Lawrence Seaway" so toward the end of the year he really worked. ls the uncrowned king of the "excuse boys". LIGHTY-thinks about the animals from Wednesday and then talks about the farm from the time he arrives back on Monday morning until he gets ready to worry again on Wednesday. Of course, this is bound to cause trouble. THE ASHBURIAN 101 MCFADDEN-could tell you why Mr. Spencer is expecting to have an operation for ulcers. But Bill takes it in his stride and never hears a grudge. MILLARD-was quite proud of his Nl.L.T.S.. as he has missed so much school since his unfortunate accident. livery boy in the Form was just as pleased as Greg and they all wish him a complete and speedy recovery. PRITCHi'3xRD-iiGLlX'i, just loves an argument . "XYhen l was in England" can usually start one, too, but it is our considered opinion that he wins most of them. SAXE l-worries so much that he is apt to forget that talking when ever the spirit moves him doesn't make him the answer to a school- master's prayer. But Charlie can take it. STUART-is full of plans. We hope that at least some of them come good, otherwise he will be occupied full time next term explaining KC ' 97 XY hy . STOREY-came during the year from the Army of Occupation in Germany and immediately Htted into Form life. "You could do well, Storey, if you stayed awake" seems to sound familiar. THORNE-didn't have much to say about when HE was in England. VVe are all hoping to see Guy back next year in spite of his father's transfer to Toronto. THORNTON-is bound to be Prime Minister one day. He can argue over the simplest answer, hoping, no doubt, that this will Put masters off the track-the work track, of course. XVOTHERSPOON-proud of his move to the back of the Form, is so glad it is the end of the year. "Now, XVotherspoon, you can do better than thatn was becoming rather tiresome. KENNEDY-"But, sir, down in VVest Virginia" could only be answered one way-"Now the Australian boys . . Charles still talks a lot, but he does it so nicely. NIR. SPENCER-Form Masters are dreadful people. 4'Kanga's', funny ways are passed off lightly by the Form and attributed to the fact that Australians are descended from convicts anyway. FORM II APPEL, BARRY, came to Ashbury from Iilmdale Public School. He is a whiz at arithmetic and is generally good at everything else. His ambition is to be a baseball or football player. BECHARD, ALLAN, has been at the school a few years. He likes reading, writing and spelling. His favourite sports are football and soccer. Some day, he hopes, he will be in the Diplomatic Service. 102 THE ASHBURIAN M i , , I BOOTH, JOHN left Elmdale Public School to enter Ashbury. The sports he prefers are skiing and swimming and he hopes to become a champion swimmer. Right now he likes spelling, arithmetic and his Shaffer Snorkel pen. COMAR, DAVID, came to us from Manor Park School. He enjoys swimming and cricket. His best subjects are spelling and French. He wishes to enter the Navy. COPIQLAND, MICHAEL, excels in grammar. He is rarely still in class. The sports he enjoys are cricket and running. He hopes to be a contractor. DANKXVORT, JOHN, is very artistic and all his exercises are very neat. He is Form Monitor. The subjects he prefers are French and writing. For sports he enjoys swimming and football. john wants to be an ambassador like his father. DICXYAR, GORDON, is a book worm, but is also interested in science. IIis favourite sports are shooting and swimming, his ambition, to be an electrician. GABIIQ, CHRISTOPHER, who has been here for four years, likes arithmetic, football and soccer. He wants to study law. GRI'i,I",NSTONE, GIQRRARD, was born in Dublin. His home is in Montreal. He enjoys hockey, soccer and cricket. The subject he prefers is French. He intends to join the Navy. THE ASI-IBURIAN 103 HAMILTON, DEREK's best subject is spelling. Ile Cl1joYS shooting and hopes to have his own gunsmith shop when he is older. HORIYITZ, ROBERT, has been here for four years. lle prefers French and may be a contractor some dav. MCDONNELL, MALCOLM, likes spelling and enjoys playing cricket. He wants to be a private detective. His frequent expression is "Nab it!". MITCHELL, FRED, has had polio and now has had four operations on which he can discourse. He came here from Fairview School. Arithmetic he enjovs and he plans to be a doctor. MOORE, GRANT, came from Hillson Ave. School. His best subjects are spelling and arithmetic, his favourite game is soccer. Some day he will be a car dealer, he hopes. MOORE, TONY, enjoys reading and spelling but not arithmetic. His favourite games are cricket and baseball. He has not decided what he will be when he is grown. MORRISON, BRETT's last school was Rockcliffe Public School. He does well in spelling, arithmetic and soccer. To be a radio mechanic is his ambition. NAUDAIN, RICHARD, who enjoys spelling, swimming and tennis will join the Navy as soon as he is old enough. PATTERSON, BILL, attended Connaught Public School last year. He enjoys reading and writing stories. His favourite sport is high jumping. He intends to live on a farm. POXVELL, ROBIN, finds arithmetic fun. He enjoys running and dis- likes wearing shoes. His ambition is to be a judge in a Civil Court. RIVERS, TIMOTHY, came from Crichton Public School. He likes French and to play cricket. You often hear him exclaim, "Nuts to youw. SHERMAN, ALLAN, enjoys French and baseball. His present ambi- tion is to pass into IIA. STEERS, PADDY, likes oral French, shooting, and running. He aspires to be a scientist. TYLER, JEREMY, enjoys geography and history. His favourite sport is fishing. He hopes to enter the Navy. VVALKER, SANDY, a mathematical wizard, enjoys a game of football. He wants to be a farmer. IVOOD, JOHN, who entered Ashbury after Easter. gets alongjwell with all his classmates. He is a good jumper and electronics is his hobby. . 104 THE ASHBURIAN FGRM I BOOTH, BILLY-Always makes 100 in arithmetic and is the popular conductor of our Rythm Band. BOVVIE, PETER-Class Monitor and a popular member of the cadets. BELL, GRAHAM-Head Monitor and always so helpful. BROVVNING, DAVID-The story writer of Form I. BRADY, JOHN-Class Monitor and a map expert. COHEN II, ERIC-Class Monitor and member of the chapel choir. COMAR II, RICHARD-Youngest member of our Form but not the least enthusiastic. DXVYER, KEVIN-The wit of our form with an infectious smile. FELLER, MICHAEL-Our French expert. Always watches for 4 o'clock. GRANT? ll, CHRISTOPHER-XYe can count on Christopher for our parties. IIIQGGTVEIT, GILBERT-"Gibbie" is our business manager and owner of the turtle. JOIBIANNSIQN, BRIAN-Our boxer and early bird. LANDYNIORIC, RODERICK-Our future representative in "Public Speaking". THE ASHBURIAN 105 O'BRlEN, LARRY-Our skiing expert and movie star. POLK l, MICHAEL-a choir member and a coming cricket enthusiast. POLK ll, DAVID-Our Class artist and David loves the winter. QUESNEL, RICHARD-"Tiger" known for his boxing ability and general popularity. REED II, HARRY-Always ready for a light with Shepherd. SAXE Il, DONALD-"Donnie" is a popular member of Form I-a soccer enthusiast. SHEPHERD, DAVID-The day starts with David arriving late but always with that happy smile. PERON, DOUGLAS-The most particular bov of our class and the "wing". THOMAS, ROY-Our keen cadet -class librarian. Hoxv is Petser? VINEBERG, PETER-Class librarian and a happy go lucky member of our class. VVU, PO CHI-A quiet but friendly and well liked member of our Form. mn THE A51-IBURIAN READOVER His ceremony was held, as usual, on the day before closing at a general assembly in the gymnasuim. Here the headmaster reviewed the highlights of accomplishment in academics, sports, corps? and dramatics and expressed himself as more than satished with the developments in these departments. He spoke, too, of the chapel services, and ventured the hope that those who were leaving the school would not neglect the habits of church- going which they had formed here. He congratulated the staff on their work, and thanked them cord- ially for their services throughout, adding that for the first time during his tenure of office he could look forward to the beginning of another year with no changes in the personnel of the academic staff of the School. The prefects, too, he said, were to be commended for the way in which they had conducted their difficult and important duties. Having added a few words of satisfaction on the general tone of the School, and of congratulation to those who were largely responsible for maintaining a generally high level of physical health throughout, the headmaster proceeded to take leave of those who were graduating. He concluded with the familiar lines: "Push off, and sitting well in order smite The sounding furrowsv. The following colours were awarded for the year: 1. FOOTBALL- faj First Colours:-Nowakowski, Irvin, Rhodes I, Killaly, VVells, Baer, Devine, Gamble I, Gill, Hillary, Lackey I, Ochoa, Pennington, Riddell, Wedd, Widdrington. Cb? Second Colours:-Seed, AIcA'Nulty, Lloyd, Echauzier, lXIacLaren, MacMillan, Rockingham, Ross I, Heeney I, Rivers I. ICJ Third Colours:-Gamble Il, Sugden, Davis, I-Ieeney II, Molloy. 2. SOCCER- I a J First Colours:-Eastwood, Funes, Brown, Calkoen. fbi Second Colours:-Arnold, Hamilton II, Sandqvist. feb Third Colours:-Powell I, Carr-Harris I, Fidler, Hilliard. 3. HOCKEY- fal First Colours:-Irvin, VVedd, Hillary, Pennington, Killaly, Grant, VVells, Widdrington. tbl Second Colours:-Berridge, Cameron I, Draper, Clarke. fel Third Colours:-Flam II, Powell I, Molloy, Chubb, Eaton, Finlay II, Gifford, O'Hara, Sparling. 4. SKIING- Cal First Colours:-Nowakowski, Gill, Guy. fbi Second Colours:-Eschauzier, Heney I, Lawson I, Southam I. lc? Third Colours:-Gale, Heeney II. 'Between the day of Readover and the hour of going to press, word has been received that the Corps has been awarded the VV. O. Finlay Trophy for the best ceremonial inspection in its group. THE ASHBURI.-IN lo' 5. B.-XSKETBAI.I.- fab First Colours:-NIC.-X'Nulty, Barkun, I-'inlay I, Gates. Lackey ll. tbl Second Colours:-Arnold, lfastwood, Ifunes. CCD Third Colours:-Sandqvist, Bruce, XlcI.ean, Tucker. 6. CRICKET- Ial First Colours:-Baer, Rhodes I, lfastwood, Kamcke, Killaly, Brown. tbl Second Colours:-Sutherland I, XYintcr, Barkun, Reid. Icl Third Colours:-Powell I, Rogers, Chubb, Nlolloy. 7. HOUSIL COLOURS- lal Alexander House:- Re-awarded-Killaly, Azubel, I.loyd. Pennington, Short, Yerhaegen. New-Berridge, Calkoen, Guy, Rockingham. tbl Connaught House:- Re-awarded-VVells, Grant I, Irvin, Rhodes I. New-Devine, Drew, Grogan, Hillary, Richardson. ici XYoollcombe House:- Re-awarded-XYedd, Baer, Beavers, Eastwood, Gamble I, Gill, Lawson l. Nowakowski, VViddrington. New-Barkun, Brown, Kamcke, 1lcA'Nulty, Seed. SPORTS DAY HE finals of the Track and Field events were run off on the morning of the CQosing Day, Wednesday, june 8th, and were blessed with glittering, ideal weather-in spite of the gloomy predictions of the forecasters. There was a large number of parents and friends on hand to witness the events, most of which were well contended and followed one another with speed and precision which did much credit to those in charge-in particular to the gym-instructor, Klr. R. bl. Anderson, who organized and M.C.'d the affair. It may be said that the morning presented three outstanding features: Hrst, the breaking of a record of thirty-three years' standing in the throwing of the cricket ball. This record, set in 1922 by B. XY. MacLaren, was broken on june 8th, 1955 by Christopher Nowakowski by a margin of over three yards. The second and third highlights were the shining nimbleness of the mothers in the Mothers' Race-won as usual by Xlrs. Tyler. and the panting determination of the fathers in the Fathers' Race-won by Nlr. Tyler. The majority of points on the day was collected by XYoollcombe House, which was thus enabled to emerge at the year's end in undisput- able supremacy over the rival houses of Connaught and Alexander- Prizes were presented to the winning athletes by Football Coach C. P. CCassiusJ Hermann, assisted by the Headmaster. 4 TRACK AND FIELD NVINNERS Bncle rms: C. Kamcke, K. Book, XV. Winter, S. Barkun, B. Hillary, G. Grant, j. Irvin C. Nowakowski, j. Rowan-Legg, R. Southam, J. Arnold, E. Drew, W. Baer, E Mulkins, D. Rhodes. ,lliddle ro-ut C. Calkoen, j. Heeney, VV. Lawson, F. Lloyd, C. Bray, E. Van der Kaay j. Lauzon, P. O'Hara, D. Flam, Marshall. From rofw: C. Gabie, K. Cook, C. Saxe, P. Bowie, P. Noel-Bentley, P. Rowe, M. Feller j. Tyler, VV. Gifford, M. Farrugia. MORNING PRIZES A. TRACK AND FIELD SPORTS 1. HIGH JUMP: Senior-The Read TrophyYC. Nowakowski-5 ft. 6 in. Intermediate-J. R. Southam junior-J. H. Lawson-4 ft. 2 in. 2. THE MILE OPEN: THE GORDON FISCHEL TROPHY First-B. Hillary-5 min. 155 sec. Second-F. D. S. Lloyd Third-R. Patrick 3. THE CRICKET BALL: Senior-C. Nowakowski-108 yds. l ft. 9 in. IA new school recordl Intermediate-S. Barken-90 yds. 1 ft. 9 in. junior-D. Sutherland-62 yds. 2 ft. 9 in. 4. THF. LONG JUMP: Senior-A. B. NVells-19 ft. 6 in. Intermediate-LI. Rowan-Legg junior-D. Sutherland-14 ft. 5 in. 5. 120 YARD HURDLIQS: Senior-j. S. Irvin-I7 sec. Intermediate-A. j. Sugdcn-183 sec. 6. DISCUS: Senior-IC. Drew-108 ft. IIS in. 7. .lAVlfI.lN1-Senior-IC. Drew-130 ft. Z in. 8. Tlllf 100 YARDS-TIIIC IVAUQUIICR TROPHY: Sv,-nior A C. 'If C. Kamckc-ll sec. llircriiiulinrer C. XI. C. Calkocn-125 sec. junior il. Il. l.ziwson-I3 sec. 9. 'll IIC 60 YARDS L'NDlf.R 10-j. G. A. Tyler THE ASHBURIAN 100 10. THE 220 YARDS: Senior-The Dr. C. K. Rowan-Legg 'I'rophyAC. T. C. lianickc-25 src Intermediate-C. M. C. Calkocn-275 sec. Junior-J. H. Lawson-31 sec. II. THE 75 YARDS UND!-IR 12: YY. C. Patterson- Ill sec. 12. THE 880 YARDS SENIOR-'I'I"IIf BICARDMORV. CUP: First-J. G. Marshall Second-F. D. S. Lloyd Third-B. Hillary THE 880 YARDS-INTERNIICDIATIQ: First-D. J. Flam-2 min. 38 sec. Second-D. F. Rhodes 13. THE -H0 YARDS SENIOR-THE OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION CUP: First-J. S. Irvin-57.4 sec. Second-C. Nowakowski INTERMEDIATE: C. M. C. Calkoen-63 sec. JUNIOR: I-I. Lawson-70 sec. 14. OBSTACLE RACE: Senior-G. S. M. VVoollcombe Junior Cunder 159-J. G. A. Taylor, E. H. van der Kaay. XY. S. Gifford, C. B. Saxc 15. SACK RACE: Under 12-C. R. Gabie 16. BACKVVARDS RACE: Under 12-P. T. Rowe 17. SACK RACE: Under 10-J. G. A. Tyler 18. BACKVVARDS RACE: Under 10-M. Feller 19. INTER-HOUSE RELAY RACE: Senior-VVoollcombe House Junior Cunder 152-VVoollcombe House B. BOXING TROPHIES 1. PREP SCHOOL FLYVVEIGHT-P. G. Bowie 2. PREP SCHOOL BANTAMYVEIGHT-C. B. Saxe 3. JUNIOR FEATHERVVEIGHT The Ashbury College Cup-K. G. Cook 4. JUNIOR LIGHTVVEIGHT The Chester-Master Trophy-C. Bray 5. JUNIOR MIDDLEXVEIGHT The Pattisson Challenge Cup-P. R. O'Hara 6. INTERMEDIATE LIGHTVVEIGHT The Edwards Challenge Cup-K. F. Book 7. INTERMEDIATE MIDDLEXYEIGHT The Ashbury College Challenge Cup-VV. G. S. XYinter 8. INTERMEDIATE HEAYYVVEIGHT The Evans Challenge Cup-E. T. Mulkins 9. THE SENIOR LIGHTVVEIGHT The Ashbury College Cup-F. VV. Baer 10. THE SENIOR MIDDLEXYEIGHT The Fauquier Challenge Cup-A. B. XYells ll. THE SENIOR I-IEAVYXYEIGHT The Fauquier Challenge Cup-C. Nowakowski C. THE CROSS COUNTRY RACES SENIOR-The Roberts Allan Cup-B. Hillary Second-J. M. Grant Third-M. I. Lawson INTERMEDIATE-The Irvine Cup-C. M. C. Calkoen Second-B. P. Hiney JUNIOR-R. J. Noel-Bentley UNDER ll-M. J. Copeland A-. SN -2.7 Devine Prize ,I rl r Ti V 'rs W' 4 THE ASHBURIAN 115 AFTERNOON PRIZICS A. FORM PRIZES roR tai-ixi-taxi, vuoificxii-1xc:x' l C .,..,...A.....,.....e.,,.,., R. Nl. Comar IX' R. lg. Bmw l B ,....... ......,... Y V. tl. Booth Shell I. xl- yynllig I A ------- ---e'--'-A .l - T- Bmdl' V .X. Samlilvist ll B' ---------- ---Q------ A l- l". XlCDoI1cll Remove XY. Cl, 5, lylmcr H A ""'-"' '-'-"-' 'X ' CE' Bcflmrd VI CH 4 J. R. Nl. Rockinglmin Ill B. ....,... ,.,.....,e. -X fl. Galtla YI B eeeeeeee Il. ph lQ,Clml,,gCr' lll A ........... .......... R . S. Fidlcr YI A Yeeee qi. ycrlmcucn Transitus e....e..4.....,..., V. j. F ascio ' B. AWARDS OF MERIT 1 A----..-----....-.---.............f.....f,e,.e Dalton Prize lfor Scripturel-D, C, Polk 1 e------- -......v I Dalton Prize-R. VV. Landymorc 1 ----------4 ------... D alton Prize Kfor Frenchl-R. li, 'I'hom35 ll '-'------ -Q------- H unter Prize-G. Greenstonc ll. --------- -f'.-.--t H unter Prize ffor writingl-l. Dimkworr ll -A-.-A--v. --......v H unter Prize lfor Progressl-D, Nl, Comm UI B -----'----- --.. - .Spencer Prize-R. N. D. Storey Ill Am- -----Af--- - .,.,.,. Falstrup-Fischer Prize-I. R. Cameron Transitus Polk Prize-li. G. Davis IV ..,,...,.,,,,,,,,,,. --,,,,,,- Shell ,... -- V ..... , .,.,.,. Shell. .... O .,.., ,,e,,,.i Remove ,,..,,,,, ,,,,,,,., Rees Prize-R. F. Brouse jobling Prize-R. G. Moore Devine Prize- M. A. VV. Berridge CGeography Proiectl D j Flam Devine Prize 6Geography Prolectl X G Rivers Remove ----------..-........ -.a-..-Snelgrove Prize-R. VV. Blakeney CLOSING CEREMONIES Tgoljl-OWING 3 brief chapel service, the closing exercises were held in luifi Sfjuth Quadrangle. The visitors' platform was set up at the closed end of the "hollow square", under an awning of the school colours, and the general setting of green grass and shady elm was colour- ful and pleasant indeed. The ceremonies were opened by Mr. R. XY. Southam, chairman of the board of Governors, who paid tribute to the former chairman, Klr. E. N. Rhodes, and to the executive committee. He then called upon the Head Boy, Andrew XVells, to deliver the valedictory address-a task which the latter ably performed. The chairman then asked the Head- master to make his report. In complying, Mr. Perry spoke with much gratification of the year that had drawn to a close. The guest speaker, the Rt. Rev. Ernest S. Reed. Anglican Bishop of Ottawa, was then introduced. His lordship spoke on the traditional sanctification of athletic prowess, begun many centuries ago upon the playing fields of Olympia, saying that even in those days competing athletes prayed to their gods for success. He exhorted those who were leaving to go forward with courage and confidence in the future. and parling Receiving Heudnmstefs Cup Verliaegen Receiving the Governor I ' ' junmri General s Medal 1r'4m-sv--- -1-mf -W 7 THE ASHBURIAN AFTERNOON PRI!! S A. FORM PRIZES FOR GICNICRAI. PROIflCIlfINC x IC ......,..,,,A,. R. M. Comar IX' . Remove. C S Um r VI C ,,.7 . R NI Rotlvingliim YI B A ll P lSLllllllI r I B ,,.,,,,, ........,., I N . Booth Shell. ..... j X VK 1 s I A ,,,,,,,,,, T. Brady V III.III,I,II II B .......,.. . lf. McDonell ll A ........ G. Bechard III B. .,..,., T. Gaida III A ,,,,. ,.,.,.,....,......... S . Fidler YI A IIIIIII Transitus ,......,..,, ..,.... X I. Fascio B. AWARDS OF MERIT 1 ,...,..,.,....,,........,..,.........,...,,... 1 .......... 1 .......... II. ...... -. II. .,...... ll ............ ..... Ill B .........., III Az-- ...... Transitus. ...,,..., IV ..,............,. - Shell .......... V .....,....,...,. Shell. ....,.... . Remove ........ Remove ......... VI C. ..., -.-. VI B ........., VI A. .,,,...,...,.,. . VI B ............,,,...,,. ...... , . Middle School Dalton Prize Dalton Prize- Dalton Prize Hunter Prize-G. Greenstone Hunter Prize Hunter Prize Ifor writingl- Danlmort Ifor Progress? D XI Comir Spencer Prize-R. N. D. Storey Falstrup-Fischer Prize-I. R. Cameron Polk Prize-E. G. Davis Rees Prize-R. F. Brouse jobling Prize-R. G. Moore Devine Prize- Devine Prize Devine Prize M. A. W. Berridge CGeography Proiectl D J Flam 4Geography Proiectl X G Rivers VV Bl It Snelgrove Prize-R. . a enev Sibley Prize-T. M. Devine Powell Prize-E. j. Drew Brain Prize-R. F. Turcotte Rees Prize Cfor Spanishb-L P VS ard Chaplain's Prize Cfor interest in Scriptureb C VW G Gale C. THE HONOUR ACADEMIC PRIZES JUNIOR SCHOOL CLASSES The J. H. Cooney Prize for English-V. J. Fascio MIDDLE SCHOOL CLASSES The Snelgrove Prize for Maths and Science-V G Rn ers The Devine Prize for Latin-A. Sandqvist The Jobling Prize for French-W. G. S. Winter The G. K. Harrison Prize for Greek-H. R. Heclver JUNIOR MATRICULATION CLASSES The Belcher Prize for English-G. S. M. Woollcombe The Rees Prize for Modern History-H. P. Eschauzier The Ashbury College Prize for Mathematics-E j Drexx The Brain Prize for Ancient History-G. R. MacLaren The Sibley Prize for Physics-C. M. C. Calkoen The Sibley Prize for Chemistry-H. P. Eschauzier SENIOR MATRICULATION CLASSES The. Hon. George Drew Prize for English-C T C lxamclte The J. M. P. Rees Prize for History-L. M. Killalx The Ashbury College Prize for Mathematics-G X erhaegen The L. H. Sibley Prize for Science-G. Verhaegen The Angus French Prize-G. Verhaegen Ifor Scripture? D C Polk R. YV. Landymorc Ifor French!-R I Thomas H., THE ASHBURIAN The Read Latin Prize-C. T. C. Kamcke The L. H. Sibley Prize for Botany-C. T. C. Kamcke The I.. H. Sibley Prize for Zoology-A. YV. Lackey D. THIS VVOODBURN MUSIC PRIZES Form I-NV. j. Booth Form II-J. Dankwort Form IIIB-I. K. L. Stuart Form IIIA-P. T. Cooney Form Transitus-V. Fascio E. THE CRAFTS PRIZE The W. E. Slattery Prize-A. Sugden F. THE CHOIR PRIZE The L. H. Sibley Prize-M. W. MacNeil G. THE PUBLIC SPEAKING PRIZES The Charles Gale Prize: junior-P. T. Rowe The Ross McMaster Prize: Intermediate-C. VV. G. Gale The Ross McMaster Prize: Senior-J. H. Clarke H. THE POETRY READING PRIZES The C. G. Drayton Prize: junior-P. T. Rowe The C. G. Drayton Prize: Intermediate-IN. G. S. Winter The A. B. Belcher Prize: Senior-W. H. Eastwood l. THE DAVID GARRICK CUP FOR DRAMATIC ART-R. E. B. Kemp J. THE CADET PRIZES The P. Falstrup-Fischer Prize-T. E. Finlay The Best Senior Cadet-H. Kahle The Best Recruit-VV. R. Robinson K. HOUSE PRIZES ' The J. H. Cooney Prize-P. EC. Noel-Bentley lFor the best junior School Boarder! The j. H. Cooney Prize-H. P. Eschauzier CFor the best Room Captainb The Mothers' Guild Prizes-j. A. E. Arnold, D. M. McLean, C. E. Newman, D. A. Ross-QFor the best room in the School Housej L. THE ATHLETIC PRIZES THE TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS junior: The Alwyn Statuette-J. R. Lawson Intermediate: The Stanley Wright Cup-J. Rowan-Legg Senior: The Fleming Cup-j. S. Irvin The Snelling Trophy: For the most Valuable Footballer-E. N. Rhodes The Hermann Trophy: For the most Improved Footballer-L. Ochoa The G. P. Cup: The School vs Old Boys-Football-The School The B.C.S. Old Boys' Football Trophy-The School The Rhodes Trophy: For the most Spirited and Determined Display in Boxing- M. Farrugia The Grant Cup: For Ringcraft-A. B. Wells The Connaught Cup: For Gymnasium-B. K. Hillary The Mothers' Guild Trophies: For Swimming- Senior-P. T. Rozos Intermediate-D. F. Rhodes junior-VV. C. Patterson The Col. j. D. Fraser Trophy: For the most Valuable Contribution to Hockey- j. S. Irvin I'he j. S. Irvin Trophy: For an Outstanding Performance in Hockey-j. B. Wedd The M. VV. XlcA'Nulty Trophy: For the most Valuable Player in Basketball- T. Ii. Finlay THE .'1SHBL'RI.4N 115 The Evan Cvill Trophy: Ifor the most Improved Skit-rAP. D. Guy The Ashbury College Ski Cup: I-'or the Best Skiers in the Stlloolff C. Noxvakowski, P. D. Guy The Fred Urquhart Shield: For the Combined Ski Clmmpionship- C. Nowakowski fCaptainl The Robert G. Devine Trophy: For the Tennis Champion of the School'- G. Verhaegen The Schlemm Badminton Championship-P. G. Beavers The Mrs. james VVilson Cricket Trophies- For Batting-E. N. Rhodes For Bowling-XY. H. Eastwood The XI.C.C. Cricket Bat: I-'or the most Improved Batsman-C. T. C. Kameke The A. VV. Darnill Ball: For Improvement in Bowling-P. Beavers The MacC0rdick Cup: For the Greatest Contribution to School Games- E. N. Rhodes The E. B. Pilgrim Trophy: For Long Distance Running-B. Ii. Hillary The Old Boys Race Tankard-Mr. A. Tyler The Mothers' Race-Mrs. A Tyler The VVils0n Shield: For Inter House Championship-XYocillcombe House NI. SPECIAL AVVARDS The XV00ds junior School Award of Merit-G. A. Molloy The Southam Cup: For the Best Record in Scholarship and Sports-C. Nowakowski The Nelson Shield: For the Best Influence in the School-A. B. Hells N. THE HEADNIASTERS TROPI-IIES junior-T. A. H. Sparling Intermediate-XI. A. XV. Berridge Senior-E. j. Drew O. THE GOVERNOR GENERALS MEDAL-G. Yerhaegen At Parents' Reception A 1,6 THE ASHBURIAN VALEDICTQRY Delivered by A. B. VVELLS Mr. Chairman, Mr. Headmaster, Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen: For a number of years now, it has been my pleasure to be seated where you are, and it never occurred to me that some day I should be up here actually addressing you in terms of farewell. For that is the task of all Valedictorians-to say good-bye on behalf of the leaving class. To begin with, I should like to express my sincere thanks, on behalf of my classmates, to Mr. Perry, Mr. Brain and the entire staff for their unselfish and wholehearted assistance to us in our academic and personal problems throughout our stay at Ashbury. Although burdened with many problems of their own, the staff has never looked upon our troubles as petty, but have been only too eager to join with us in the solutions. I thank you again. I should like now to put into words the various stages we have all gone through here at Ashbury.-The new boy, upon entering the School, invariably finds difficulty in grasping school life as a whole, and looks upon the Staff and the Prefect body as the lowest and greenest Seaman of a great battleship looks upon his officers and leaders. They are merely people whom he sees and respects but does not know or understand. As the years pass, the student finds himself taking an interest in activities which previously had been entirely foreign to him, but which now become part of him and help to mold his character for years to come. As the student becomes more experienced in these activ- ities, positions of responsibility come his way, such as the rank of Sergeant in the Corps, or perchance a Room Captaincy in the house. And now, with responsibility, grows a feeling of belonging, which to my mind is the unique characteristic of this School-a feeling of belong- ing. In a School the size and type of Ashbury, more than ample oppor- tunity for extra curricular activities is provided. Our hours are not from 9 to 4, our week from Monday to Friday, but we function twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. And thus the opportunity for closer relationship between the boy and the school exists. Therefore, the student has now this feeling of belonging to not only a School, or to an institution but to a spirit-a spirit of HHONGUR, COURAGE of GRACE". In conclusion, I should like to say that although some of us have not achieved the ultimate from our academics, all of us have reached and felt that wonderful and maturing spirit that is a part of Ashbury, and from this spirit there stems the knowledge of how to lead an intel- ligent and useful life wherever we may go. THE ASHBURIAN 117 LITERARY SECTIDN THE MYSTERY Ulf THE MISSING TUCK fFictionji "Hey!" "XVhere's our tuck? XYho pinched it? Come on, gang! Own up! There was a complete silence in Room 36. "I said, own up! 'I roared Maclsaren. "None of us would do it," replied Bishop softly. The boys in Room 26, Bishop, QI-Iara, Gifford, Fascio and MacLaren were really angry about a missing box of tuck. It was one hour after lights out, and the boys were complaining about their tuck being missing. Meanwhile, up in Room 25, by a strange coincidence, Sugden, Dodge, F lam and Rock- ingham were enjoying a feed. The next night the 26's had a conference. Suddenly a window curtain waved wildly. Thud! A rock hit the floor. On it was a note. It read: "Dear boys, thanks for the feed last night. Room ZS". "VVhy! The dirty dogs! Come on let's get 'em," growled someone. "Hold it! Come herell' said lVIacLaren. "Now listen. IVe'll go . . . " VVhen he had finished, there was a chorus of approval. XVith murder in their eyes the 26's advanced. Rap! Rap! Rap! "Answer it!" came a sleepy voice. As Sugden opened the door, a fist shot out! "Uof! " he exclaimed. As he doubled up, a huge dictionary descended, once, twice! Sugden collapsed with a gurgle. Once on the floor he was sat on. MacLaren went into action. Crack! Crash! over went a table as Flam's jaw and MacLaren's list came together. Bishop and Gifford slammed into battle! Rockingham was inclined to be a bit vicious, but he calmed down as an ice cold face cloth was slapped on his back. Dodge dived for Fascio who was sitting on Sugden. Fascio was knocked over but Sugden did not escape! As he got to his knees he was knocked over by O'Hara. Over in another part of the room Rockingham whirled, swung, connected and Gifford "went out like a light". After his first charge MacLaren was not in action but now his list thudded against Rockinghanfs jaw knocking him hack- wards. Dodge lunged but dropped in his tracks as Fascio knocked him over with a handy chair. Bishop was really giving Sugden some hard knocks with a heavy book. Finally it was all over. On Roclcinghanfs side, Flam was nursing a black eye, Dodge and Rockingham were being covered with five squirt guns, and Sugden had an awful headache. Of MacLaren's gang, Gilford was only half conscious from Rockingham's blow. "Did you take our tuck?" asked Nlaclsaren of Dodge. Dodge dived for him, but it was all over in three seconds. The first second there was a 118 THE ASHBURIAN crack! The second second Dodge looked surprised, the third second he was out on the floor hearing birds and bells. "Next", grinned NlacLaren. "How much?" asked Flam. "Three dollars!" growled Bishop. "Here!" said Flam. "Hope you had a good feed boys," chuckled MacLaren. "And you get it worse the second timef' warned Bishop. "Good- bvel " lYith that the door closed. I "Here,s a Hrst aid box," groaned Dodge from the Hoor. "You and your bright idea!" snapped Flam. KNIGHT-TR.ANSITUS. THE ST. LAXYRENCE SEAIYAY AND POVVER PROJECT HE St. Lawrence River embodies probably the most widely dis- cussed engineering feat in North America to-day. For many years, to be exact since 1901, men of vision have seen in this river the oppor- tunity to build a super marine highway into the heart of North America. In it they also saw one of the most bountiful sources of electrical power in the world. Draining an area of some 309,500 square miles, the St. Lawrence River system extends some 2,225 miles inland, forming a natural marine highway into the heart of our continent. It is fed from all the Great Lakes, and it's average discharge of water over the last 60 years has been 247,000 cubic feet per second. IVhere else in the world can one find such a steady and enormous supply of water for the use of Hydro Electricity? Ever since the thought of this project came into the heads of men, the unnavigable rapids of the International Section have posed the major problem in the creation of a "Seaway". To permit ocean shipping to overcome this natural obstruction, a deep, integrated network of canals, channels and locks must be constructed. At the same time, it is in this section, situated between the town of Iroquois and the citv of Cornwall, that the river can be made to vield for both Canada and the United States an average of 6 billion, 300 million kilowatt hours per year. If this energy were to be replaced by human work, it would require 28 million men working an 8 hour day for 300 days of the year. From an engineering point of view, the construction of the power phase is immense. It will take from 5 to 6 years to complete. Involved in this is the damming of the great river. Six miles west of Cornwall, Barn- hart Island forces the river to How in two channels. Two dams, one on either side of it, will be built. The largest of these wi.l be the power dam, the other will be a concrete structure to alter the course of the THE ASHBUR1.-IN llv water into the power dam. The immense power dam is to have 36 generating units. It will be 3,500 feet in length, stretching from the Canadian shore to the tip of Barnhart lsland. The second structure will be a crescent shaped spillway dam 3,400 feet in length. lt provides a dual purpose. The first is to FC-I'0LlIC the water into the dam, and the second is to maintain the raised level of the river to allow the necessary depth for the passage of large boats. The raised water level behind these dams will flood shore lines for 35 miles back along the river. To maintain this level, a control dam will be erected at Iroquois. A number of communities along the river are presently located below the intended level of the water. The plan is to build new towns for those being flooded. Of course the question arises, "How are those people affected by the Seaway going to be compensated for their lost property?" That is the question that has been in the back of the minds of those concerned for many years. From a perfectly neutral point of view, why should 6,500 people have to suffer when so many thousands are going to benefit? And so, to sum up this huge project, I think that whatever the out- come of all these minor difficulties, when this magnificent piece of ingenuity and labour is completed, we Canadians will have another thing to look at and think to ourselves, "THIS IS CANADA," and it's all ours. BEAVERS-XYIA. MY XYISH The thing that I would like the IHOSI, If I could have my wayg lYould be a dog, then I could boast To all my friends and say: "He is the finest, cleverest dog I'm sure you will agree. I've trained him many tricks to do And I like him and he likes me." So one day when my wish comes true I'll bring him 'round and show him to you. FIDLER, III-A. 120 THE ASHBURIAN THE PYRAMIDS OF EGYPT uiyr by the Pharaohs to protect their sacred bodies until the day of resurrection, the Pyramids have long since yielded their secrets. The royal mummies with all their rich possessions have been removed and scattered abroad. These massive structures were never intended to be family monuments. Tae larger Pyramids were built for the Pharaohs, while members of their families were buried in lesser adjoining ones. The Pyramids we see today were an elaboration of a type of tomb known as "Alastabas", an Arabic word meaning "Bench", which describes the form of the superstructure. The more primitive ones were of solid masonry with low undecorated walls, and slanted slightly inward with fiat roofs. Down through them, a vertical shaft sank as much as forty feet underground to the burial chamber. As time went on these tombs were made larger and more complex. Several rooms were added, in- cluding richly decorated chapels, or sacred rooms, where the image of the dead man was worshipped. Pyramids came into existence when "Mastabas", in which kings had been buried, were enlarged by heightening and making the walls thicker. The "Step Pyramid" at Sakkara, which was one of the earliest of the larger "Mastabas", attained a height of 197 feet. It had six steps or terraces, each about 6 feet wide and 38 feet high. VVithin the pyramid was a maze of corridors and chambers decorated with glazed tile and painted sculptures. The "Step Pyramids" were the first of the tombs described as pyramids, and were built about 4,800 years ago. Shortly afterwards there seems to have been a rapid change in the conventional shape which is now accepted as the pyramidal form. The Great Pyramid at Gizeh, built for the Pharoah Cheops, is the largest and best example of the final stage of these tombs. This prodigious structure exemplifies a feat of engineering almost unparallelled to this day. Every block of stone used in the project was cut, shipped, hauled and fitted by manpower. Most of the stone was cut into square blocks at the great quarry near Assuan, about 350 miles from Gizeh. These blocks were then shipped down the Nile in barges during the summer and autumn months to be unloaded several hundred yards from the site of the pyramid. The blocks were then hauled on rolling logs by teams of slaves up a sand ramp, which was formed steadily on one side of the structure and became longer and higher as the pyramid grew. Thus each block reached the top and was fitted into place and then secured with a bit of mortar. Its sides were cut and shaped to form the required angle. Unlike the "Step Pyramid" the internal construction of this latter was quite simple. About the middle of this great mass of rock was situated the king's chamber. There, he was left in his sarcophagus with whatever possessions he would need in the next world. The room was richly decorated with paintings of gold suns on a royal blue background. THE ASHBURIAN 121 A passageway, with walls of polished marble, led down from the burial room to the entrance. Along the passage were two hallways, one leading to the "Queen's Chamber" and the other further down, dropping sharply to the lowest of the three chambers excavated deep in the sand. Little is known of the purpose of this lower room because it was never finished. It has been calculated that 4,883,000 tons of solid rock were required to build Cheops' Pyramid. Incredible as it may sound this is enough stone to build a wall around France. Covering an area of more than 13 acres, it reaches a height of -I-81 feet and is 755 feet square at the base. The remarkable feature is, that it was so accurately constructed that the walls are parallel with a mean error along their whole length, of only six-tenths of an inch. Its size is so great, that if it were possible to hollow out the pyramid, Saint Peter's Church in Rome could be placed inside it, and would occupy only about half the ground space. This is only one of the fifty or sixty pyramids still in existence, but the rest all follow the same pattern of construction. Although not as large in area or volume, nearly all of them have endured remarkably well against the forces of nature. An old Arab proverb says, "Time mocks all things, but the pyramids mock time". In support of this proverb pyramids still stand in this Valley of the Nile, the dramatic reminder to us today of the achievements of our oldest civilization. DREXY'-XIIB. A TRIP INTO SPACE A trip into space would be lots of fun, You would see the stars, the moon, and sun. We probably would see queer men on Mars, lVho speed around in fancy cars. Or maybe men who fight and rage, But never act their actual age. Maybe animals big as whales, lVho could fly around in African gales. And maybe a squirrel, a chipmunk or two, XVho'd run away at a sneeze or shoo. Maybe a plant which lives on meat, And does not look or smell so sweet. There may be a fish which swims and flies, Or maybe one' without fins or eyes. or maybe Mars is nothing but sand, Gr maybe water without any land. Girrono, Transitus. 133 THE ASHBURIAN AUTUMN The summer fades into the fall, The flowers lose their bloom, and all The days grow short. The cold wind presses, And the trees lose their lovely dresses. And now the wind grows colder still, And frost shows over the windowsill, The biting winds of bleak November Carry their snows to cold December. Autumn has passed with all its rapture, And winter starts another chapter. NIULKINS, VI-B. THE UNITED NATIONS AS A XYORKING UNIT HE Charter for the United Nations was drawn up at San Francisco in April 1945. This Charter was made because once again, as after the First IVorld War, leaders all over the world felt that there was a great need of some organization, such as the League of Nations, to help to promote peace. To fulHl this idea it was necessary to secure the backing of all the Great Powers which existed after VVorld War II. Again, as in the League, the United States was the greatest impetus behind the scheme. However, the U.N. received the full backing of the U.S., who, at this time realized the importance of dropping their isola- tionist mode of life. Thus with this desirable help of the U.S., the United Nations appears to be producing results. Although the United Nations seems to be getting the desired results from its organization, there is still in evidence the pitfalls that the League was unable to avoid. The greatest danger of all is, of course, the tension and animosity that forms between the Great Powers in the Security Council. Almost before this council came into existance, the hope that it would be able to establish universal peace had begun to fade. Its full effectiveness depends on the continued unity of the Great Powers, and this unity was shattered by the break between Russia and the democracies. The antagonisms of the cold war were reflected in the U.N. when Russian obstruction became the chief obstacle to the con- structive effort of the world organization. Indeed it was only through the accident of Russia's absence when the Korean question broke that enabled the Council to decide on resis- tance to North Korean aggression. There were, too, other matters on which action was thwarted by Russia. She obstructed efforts to settle THE ASHBURIAN 123 peacefully the question of the Greek border, and to provide a governor for the Free Territory of Trieste. She used her veto to exclude states applying for the Ifnited Nations membership unless her own satellites such as Albania and Outer Mongolia were also admitted. The abuse of the veto even to the extent of preventing discussion of matters that Russia did not want discussed threaten to destroy all confidence in the Security Council as an instrument of preserving peace. However, outside the Security Council the veto does not apply, and it is possible to carry on much constructive work in spite of Russian obstruction. The IYorld Health Organization is able to carry on a useful and growing activity. Also the I.'.N. can investigate disputes and seek their solutions: and if it does not always effect a permanent settlement, it did, in the case of Korea, Kashmir, Palestine and Greece, help to bring an end to actual Hghting. Its special bodies undertook, as well, a wide range of constructive tasks, from the protection of human rights to the provision of technical aid to under-developed countries. Thus the U.N. in spite of all its shortcomings is able to play a vital role in the post-war world. In fulfilling this vital role the IIN. has a much better chance to succeed than did the League. For the U.N. has the complete co-opera- tion of the U.S.A., the lack of which was perhaps the greatest drawback of the League. Thus the members were not willing to take bold steps towards a solution. Now, with a world that is more aware of the horrors of modern warfare, and having for the greater part a desire for world peace, the U.N. can, with a bit of luck, succeed. XYELLS-Xvlilx. PRELUDI2 TO XYINTER The chilling wind enfolds the barren trees, As falling leaves seek out their wint'ry rest, ln golden fields where once the tiny seeds VVere strewn in careless rows along earth's crest, The sturdy farmer reaps his harvest out. Before the onslaught of the heavy snow. In streams where once the silv'ry speckled trout Plunged dizzily in vain towards his goal, A lonely beaver builds his earthen home, And as he does he leaves the world to dream Of laden boughs and meadows glist'ning foam. IYhile distant hills echo the falcon's scream. One step-stop now, and feel the icy blast For as I stand the snow has come at last. XXIIIJDRINGTOX, VI-B. 124 THE ASHBURIAN THE LONG TREK N a small hamlet on the border of Germany in 1917, a group of villagers sat around a small cot on which lay a young boy who had fallen from alpartially-bombed building. He had received bad cuts on his wrist and head and was bruised all over. He had lost much blood and wasn't given much time to live. The group, the boy's mother, his brother, a minister and several villagers, among whom was a young boy who was nick-named Flash, were the only ones who survived the bombing of the night before. They had enough food left for a week, but they had no medical supplies. "I could save him if only I had some blood and bandages", said the doctor, "but that is impossible unless-" "Unless what?" the boy's mother broke in. "Unless one of us could go through the German lines to Bigdomen, replied the doctor. "I'd go myself if I didn't have to watch the boy!" "l'll go!" volunteered Flash. "VVe'll need food anyway, and I may as well kill two birds with one stone." That night, after receiving instructions on what to tell the Com- manding Uflicer at Bigdome and what was needed, Flash set out on his long trek. After travelling through the woods for a while, he came to a clearing. He took some dirt and rubbed it on his face and neck, so that he wouldn't be seen as easily. He travelled in the open for several hours and soon came to the forest. It was about quarter way to Bigdome. "I'll reach the town about morningw, he thought to himself. "It's open coun- try from the other side of the woods to Bigdome, I ought to make good time." IVhen he reached the other side of the woods, he saw a patrol. He lay prostrate under a bush and didn't move a muscle. He could hear the voices of the Germans now. Closer they came, closer. They were beside him now. "XVhat if they should catch me? Should I run for it. VVhat'll I do? he said to himself over and over again. 9! The patrol passed by and he breathed more easily. There was nothing in his way now, except time and miles, many miles. He kept going, slowly at times, faster at others. He passed a farm house in front of which was a jeep. Seeing the jeep gave him an idea. He jumped in and pushed the starter. It turned over noisily. just as he stepped on the gas bullets rang out at him! He ducked low and slowly drove off. As soon ps hfe was out of range, he sped up. Now he would get there faster, a ot aster. After several hours of driving he reached Bigdome. He was stopped by a guard at the gate, and, after being searched, he was allowed to enter. He stopped and gave the jeep to another guard and then went to THE ASHBURIAN IIS the Commanding Officers quarters. He waited a while for the CO., and, when he was finally allowed to see him, told him the sad story of the young boy and why he had come. The CO. decided to send the needed supplies in by parachute and congratulated the young man for his courage and skill in breaking through the enemy lines. Flash sat up all that night and part of the next day until he got word that the parachute was successful and that the young boy was safe and would live. Now he could rest, he had accomplished his mission. His long trek to save a life was over! Barca-ll. THE ATHLETE Eric was an athlete. He lived and breathed for sports of almost every type. If he wasn't playing football, it would be hockey, if not hockey, boxing, or skiing, or distance running, or anything else. He was good at them all and he also had a fierce, rugged spirit which added to his natural ability. It happened on a sizzling day in the middle of August. Eric had been playing tennis steadily for six hours. Feeling a bit dizzy he sat down in the shade and was suddenly seized by excruciating agony. "Poliol"-the quiet words of his father beside the hospital bed drummed cruelly inside the athlete's anguish-laden mind. He was dimly aware of figures in white Hoating noislessly around him, but his thoughts were on other things, his scholarship to university, which he'd so long worked for, the offer to try out for the college team in the fall, the times that he, as captain, had led his team to victory, and afterwards being carried off the field on the shoulders of his happy teammates. He remembered how embarrassed he was by the glory heaped on him when he was voted the most valuable player in the high-school hockey league and the time he broke the long-standing record for the hundred-yard dash. Eric's thoughts returned fearfully to the present, and even more fearfully to the future. Then he lapsed into dreary unconsciousness. It was all over. In a flash a happy, jolly family with hardly a care and the brightest hopes for the future, had been transformed into a desperate, desolate, and grief-stricken couple. By a word from the nurse. they had been suddenly robbed of their greatest asset-an only child. The doctors were helpless against this inexorable killer. The next day, the papers carried two articles of interest to the mourning friends of Eric. One was a death notice on the back page telling of the unhappy death of a fine young Canadian, the other was on the front page. The headline read "Salk Vaccine Conquers Polio?" U'ooLr.coxmE-VIA. 126 THE ASHBURIAN HTINY' There is a man, a mighty man, He's tall as any man will grow. A lengthy pace his legs do span, His lumb'ring strides will only show. He came to us from fields afar, To hold our football coaching post. To us he is a tow'ring star- To say the least, he is the most! His aim to build a football squad VVas well accomplished, it would seem. The conversations in the quad Are surely proof of his esteem. This wondrous man is known to us As "Tiny the terror of bygone days" lVho on the field made such a fuss, He caused great havoc by his ways. All the boys in his great pack, Young and old, no matter when, lYouid gladly go to hell and back- just to please our coach and friend! RIDDELL, VI-B. A GREAT MAN PASSES AXVAY HE man who fathered, for better or for worse, this atomic age we live in, passed away quietly in the suburban town of Princeton, New jersey on April 18th, 1955. Albert Einstein was in all probability the greatest genius the world has ever known, but he was more than a man. To us he was the symbol of this awesome age called the twentieth century. Einstein was born in the city of Ulm, in Germany, in the year 1879, of jewish parents. His father was the owner of an electro-technical store. Young Albert showed that he was a precocious child by his work in his father's shop. At the age of twenty-three, he took his Ph.D. degree at the University of Zurich. Soon after he published his first papers con- cerning physical subiects and for his efforts was appointed a professor at Zurich in 1909. Four years later, Einstein's pre-eminence had become so evident that a special position was created for him in Berlin as director of the Kaiser-XYilhelm Physical Institute. Albert l",instein's works were so numerous and important that it would be impossible to enumerate them. XVhen his Theory of Relativity was published with limitations in 1905, the theory was condemned fby I 7 ' 1 THE ASHBURIAN 127 those who could not understand itj as utterly fantastic. ln connection with his Theory Einstein coyly remarked, "If my principles are proved correct, the Germans will call me a great German, and the French will hail me as a citizen of the world. If my principles should be wrong. however, the French will call me a German and the Ciermans will call me a jew." Soon after, his theories were proved and accepted, although an eclipse of the sun was necessary to show the absolute 'infallibilitv of the proof. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921. i Einstein was attracted to England and the United States in the early 1930's due to the persecution of the jewish race in his native country. Had he remained in Germany and lent his genius to the Nazi cause in IYorld XVar II, we might today, all be eating sauerkraut and blackbread. However, in 1933, Einstein accepted the position of professor of mathe- matics at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton-a post which he held up to the time of his death. So to-day, we of the "Einstein Age" mourn the passing of a great man-a man who changed the destiny of the world we live in. IQILLALY-XYI:X. THE MIGHTY FRASER From mountains capped in deepest snows, The mighty Fraser downward flows, Through canyons deep and chasms wide, VVith winding railroads side by side. At Lillooet, with foaming hue, It clashes with the Thompson blue. The tumbling waters roar and boil, As they cleave the barren soil, Through the rumbling Gate of Hell, XVhere many an adventurer's parting knell Has sounded. A surely fatal lure, Is this cataract, white and pure. Now it glides through verdant fields, And to man its power yields. At many a farm it will not stop, But rushes to water a fertile crop. And as it leaves this valley wide, Its salmon fight the eddying tide. At last it leaves Vancouver free, And flows to meet the open sea. Roexixcsuaxi, VIC. 138 THE ASHBURIAN THE DEPARTURE HE huge shape of the ship, hardly distinguishable in the fog, lay there motionless like a great statue of Pride. A little crowd on the docks stood by watching the ship, admiring its strong and beautiful silhouette. For a little more than an hour she would remain motionless and then, departure . . . man's cruelest fate, especially when something has remained glued to his heart. Usually the reasons that a person leaves home are money, bad reputation and, worst of all, that habit of changing places on account of dissatisfaction or, in simple words, bad character. lVhen a man makes up his mind to go, he never thinks of the departure. lt sounds so silly but it is so true that the most bitter moments of your whole life are those when you see before you all the people with whom vou have lived and with whom you have shared your sorrows and hard- ships. They stand there staring at you as they would stare at a guilty prisoner-with a severe expression upon their faces, as if to say, "VVhy should you do this to us? Didn't we take care of you? Didn't we love you?" And then they turn their faces and a secret tear rolls down their cheek, a tear of love and tenderness. There are so many persons that love each one of us. There is the love of a mother that no one can repay, there is the love of a friend, the most valuable of all loves, there is the love of a girl with golden hair and large bright eyes that gives you purpose in life and that makes you promise to yourself that you are going to carry out that purpose at all costs. You have these persons in front of you, and as the time draws near you find their hands clutching at your clothes. You know that it is only the presence of big bitter knots in their throats that keeps them from begging with you and you feel guilty. You feel that you must jump into the cold water and so rid yourself of this aching responsibility, but that same feeling which prompted your departure now holds you from the the cold waters. The whistle goes. A cruel whistle that jolts you and reminds you that the painful moment of escape is upon you. You can feel yourself stiffen. Something inside you paralyzes you, something like fear. You can't cry nor can you talk. A black cloud passes before your eyes spelling out those terrible words "lt's True". You suddenly slip from the hands that are holding you and run towards the board plank leading from the dock to the deck of the ship. Not caring for a thing, your only thought is how to escape. All about you people are crying and kissing each other for the last time but this means little to you. XYho can ever care for the troubles of others when burdened with problems himself? That is why they say that people can get worse than the beasts sometimes. THE ASHBURIAN 129 You will walk to the far side of the boat or lock yourself up in your cabin and try to forget it all. But believe me you can never forget those people who gave you their love without asking for payment. You can never forget the people who. when you need help, would themselves never say, "You made us feel sorrow, now it is our turn". Rozos-IV. SPRING Winter is over and spring is here, And birds are calling on the boughg The round, wide world is full of eheerg Gone is the frown of winter's brow. The flowers raise their drowsy headsg The trees are skeletons no moreg The ground the bite of winter sheds. God has flung wide his golden door. lLAs'1'woon, YIB. 'Q 4 ' 1 W" Aw., , . ,, - ,. 0, , I W 4, i 4 ,,,,Z,,. as-,Y WW - ,ff 9 5 E, 552, . , " ' 2 ..V , , , ,, . V I, Y " 2 Q. if 1. r :- 'Z V W 2513 ' . H ' , f.f-.i.2?'2iW?3f"'i w fini-if . ,115 .V V - -,-'4A,:g,,,.,m'.' 42 - ' ' r .- '4':rz..-..'45':gs-" ' My -b . V .w ' V .4 , -mg: , -. 'rigs -Q." iz " ' U-z"" ,, .' -'E"'-,I-a':'E2FE:2wf1k"7i.' ww ' we-Y-1 5 ,'. 'I ive. iw. . wi-,f,gW.V.,:..1yfay ,I ' ff' ' .7 I . W X ...,, K , ' , 7,11 f .. , ?W .Q 1. f. .. 1. . w c, 1 , use 9' - V. . A , 9, 4" . 55.51Eia.2+i:1g:Z3,w 'f , A . , 0 .f 6 Ms 315 In .,,1ZQ1?'7f .wwf JP K? NN V Q-A ,wp R 59 fi' gi 'A ., , :gas NqQuUD-' THE ASHBURIAN lil EXCHANGES HE Editor acknowledges with thanks receipts of the following and apologizes for any inadvertent omissions. Acta Ridleiana, Ridley College, St. Catharines, Ont. The Malbnrian, Marlborough College, Marlborough, XYilts, lfngland. The Felstedian, Felsted School, Felsted, Essex, England. The Meteor, Rugby School, Rugby, England. South African College School .'llilgi'lZlIlL', Orange St., Capetown. Trinity Univerxitfy Reviefw, Trinity University, Toronto, Ont. The Mitre, Bishop's University, Lennoxville, RQ. Lux Glebana, Glebe Collegiate, Ottawa. The Lofwer Canada College Magazine, Montreal. Hatfield Hall illagazine, Hatfield Hall, Cobourg, Ont. The Grove Chronicle, Lakefield Preparatory School, Lakelield, Ont. The College Tinzes, Upper Canada College, Toronto, Ont. Northwood School Magazine, Northwood School, Lake Placid Club, NX., U.S.A. The Blue and Wfhite, Rothesay Collegiate, Rothesay, N.B. The Bishopiv College School Magazine, B.C.S., Lennoxville, P.Q. The Argus, Sault Ste. Marie Collegiate, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. The Beaver Log, Miss Edgar's and Miss Cramp's School, Inc., Montreal. The Bishop Strachan School Magazine, Bishop Strachan School, Lonsdale Road, Toronto, Ont. F i-Pa-Hi, Fisher Park High School, Ottawa. Lanzpada, Lachute High School, Lachute, P.Q. The School Magazine, Sedbergh School, Montebello, P.Q. The Boar, Hillfield School, Hamilton, Ont. The Spotlight, Trenton High School, Trenton, Ont. The School Magazine, Selwyn House School, Montreal. The Log, Royal Canadian Naval College, Victoria, B.C. The Cranbrooleian, Cranbrook, Kent, England. Per Annos, King's Hall, Compton, P.Q. Appleby Calling, Appleby College, Oakville, Ont. The Voyageztr, Pickering College, Newmarket, Ont. The Trinity Review, Trinity College, U. of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. The Trinity College Magazine, Trinity College, U. of T., Toronto, Ont. Trafalgar Echoes, Trafalgar School, Montreal. The Yardley Courtier, Yardley Court School, Tonbridge, Kent, Eng. The Tonbridgian, Tonbridge School, Tonbridge, Kent, England. St. Andrefufs College Reviefw, St. Andrews College, Aurora, Ont. The Shafwinigan Lake School Magazine, Shawinigan Lake, B.C. Samara, Elmwood School, Rockcliife Park, Ottawa, Ont. The R.M.C. Review, R.M.C., Kingston, Ont. The Record, Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ont. The Queen's Reviefw, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont. The Patrician Herald, St. Patrick's College, Ottawa. Northland Echoes, North Bay Collegiate, North Bay, Ont. The Eagle, St. John's-Ravencourt School, Fort Garry, Klan. The Branksome Slogan, Branksome Hall, Toronto, Ont. The Tvsig, University of Toronto Schools, Toronto, Ont. 1. Not a hair shall be harmed. 2. Do you think so? 3. This ought to work out. 4 4. Talking it up. 5. The Dying Gaul. 6. Surely a man's reach should exceed his gra i 7. Vvhat now? 8. Two gentlemen of Verona. THE ASHBURIAN SCHOOL ROLL 132 .5xlIEARX, PI-HOAIAS TRAvERs 28 Chapleau St., Apt. 4, Ottawa ,-XIJCXANIBIZR, Ross DAVID ..O, .......,..4 A ylmel' ROHCI. Que- Apvl-QL, BARRY JOEL. .,........w 436 Alayfilll' AVC., Ottawa .'XRNOI.D, JOHN :ANTHONY EDNVARD Apt. 592, Caracas, Venezuela, S.A. AzL'DEL, SINION ARMANDO Viamonte 2600, Buenos Aires, Argentina, S.A. BAER, FREDERIC VVM. 900 Cote de Liesse Road, Montreal 9, Que. B.-ARKUN, STANLEY 738 VViseman Ave., Outremont, Montreal, Que. Bmvms, PATRICK G. ,.......,.....,......., Morrisburg. Ont- BECHARD, ALLAN GRAX' .... 572 MacLaren St., Ottawa BELL, GR.AH.AM AIRDRIE 216 Latchford Road, Riverside Terrace, Ottawa BERRIDGE,, NIICHAEL :ALLEN VVM. Hudson Heights, Que. BILLINGS, HUGH BRADDISH P.O. Box NO. 6, Billings Bridge, Ottawa BISHOP, INIICHAEL BRENDON 195 Hartley St., Brockville, Ont. BIRBECR, XNYILLIAIN1 HENRY' Compania Shell de Venezuela, Punto Fijo, Estado Falcon, Venezuela BLARELEY, IVM. E., 200 Hicks St., Brooklyn 2, N.Y. BLARENEY, PETER WHITBY 6-1-3 Grosvenor Ave., Westmount, P.Q. BOOK, KIINI FREDRIK 219 Coltrin Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa BOONE, JOHN CHARLES P.O. Box 579, Buckingham, Que. IALASDAIR DAVID GRIEvE 170 Minto Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa BOOTH, JOHN ROWLEY CID 711 Manor Road, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa BOOTH, WILLIAM JACKSON CIID 711 Manor Road, ROckcliiTe Park, Ottawa BONVIE, PETER, G. B .... .Eardley Road, Aylmer, Que. BRADY, JOHN THEODORE I Farnham Crescent, Que. BR-AY, CHARLES .... .......... . 27 McDonald St., Ottawa BRDUSE, ROBT- F. .............. 298 First Ave, Ottawa 1 BROXVN, FRASER LESLIE Apartado 3306, Caracas, Venezuela BROXVNING, DAN'lD ALEXANDER R. G. 179 Springfield Rd., Ottawa 2 BRUCI1-1, ROBERT BAXTER 888 Eastbourne Ave., Ottawa 2 CALROEN, CHARLES Al.-ARI CORN!-11.15 119 Minto Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa CAMERON, IJoL'GLAs IRVING C. CIJ 291 Park Road, Rockcliffc Park, Ottawa CANIEZRCDN, IAN ROIIT. CIIJ 15 Belvedere Crescent, Ottawa C.fKRR-IIARRIS, IAN RI-:DFORD CID 11 Blackburn Ave., Ottawa 2 BOXVEN, C.ARR-HARRIS, RODERICK ALAN CID 11 Blackburn Ave., Ottawa 2 CHUBB, PETER GER.ALD MCEACHERN Church House, R.R. No. 2, Alymer, Que. CLARKE, JOHN Ashbury College, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa COHEN, JONATHAN CIJ 36 Marlborough Ave., Ottawa 2 COHEN, ERIC CIIJ 36 Marlborough Ave., Ottawa 2 CIOBIAR, DAX'ID AIICHAEL CID 31 Rockcliffe Way, Ottawa 2 COIN'IAR, RICH.ARD Al.-XLCOLAI CIID 31 Rockcliffe Way, Ottawa 2 COOK, KENT ,,,,,,,,,,,,, 170 Sherwood Drive, Ottawa 3 COONEY, PETER 3270 Cedar Ave., Westmount, Montreal 6, Que. COPELAND, MICHAEL 489 Acacia Ave., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa COCREY, CLARENCE A. 983 Cascade Ave., Shawinigan Falls, Que. CUINIBIING, IAN GRAHANI 5 Montcalm St., Hull, Que. DANKWORT, RUDOLPH CID 333 Chapel St., Ottawa 2 DANKWORT, JOHN CID ,,.,.. 333 Chapel St., Ottawa 2 DARVVENT, JOHN Yowago Ave., Pine Orchard, Brantford, Conn., U.S.A. DAVIS, ERIC ............ 813 Eastbourne Ave., Ottawa 2 DEXIINE, TERRANCE 4 Lynwood Ave., Toronto, Ont. DEWAR, GORDON .............. 181 Maple Lane, Ottawa 2 DODGE, ROBERT ...................................... Cardinal, Ont. DRAPER, WILLIAM GEORGE R.R. NO. 1, Ste Therese, Que. DREXK', EDWVARD JOHN ....., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa 2 DUNN, ROBERT 421 VVood Ave., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa IDXVYER, KEX'IN.-..2 Belevedere Crescent, Ottawa 2 DE- JXLZAGA, NIARTIN CID .... 193 Sparks St., Ottawa 4 DE- r5xLZ.-XGA, DIEGO C IIL193 Sparks St., Ottawa 4 EAsTwOoD, WIILLIANII HAROLD Apartado 809, Caracas, Venezuela, S.A. EATON, JOHN DAvID 569 Mariposa Road, Rockcliife Park, Ottawa EDWARD, BRIAN GRANT 108 Daniel St., Amprior, Ont. ICDXVARDS, PETER .......... P.O. Box 136, Cobden, Ont. ELLENBERG, EDUARDO :XLBERTO Apartado 1184, Caracas, Venezuela, S.A. EsCHAt'zIER, HENR1 PIERRE Plein 23, The Hague, Holland FARRCGIA, AIICHAEI. Compania Shell de Venezuela, Punto Fijo, Estado Falcon, Venezuela FAL'OL'IER, VIQINIOTHY. 110 Springfleld Rd., Ottawa 2 THE ASHBURIAN FELLER, MICHAEL ..A... 52 Springtield Rd., Ottawa 2 FERGUSON, JOHN ..... ... ., . .248 Driveway, Ottawa 1 FIDLER, RlCH.ARD STANLEY 105 Springfield Rd., Ottawa 2 FINLAY, TERENCE IEDYVARD 111 23 Nlonkland Ave., Ottawa 1 FINLAY, BRY.AN CID ...a 23 llonkland Ave., Ottawa 1 FLAlN4, IJ.-AVID JON 411 a.,..,..aa,,............,a Chandler, Que. FLAM, CH.ARLES EDXV.-ARD 1117 ,....,,,..., Chandler, Que. FLAXI, DONALD KENNETH QIIIJ ,.--A---f- Chandler, Que. FRASER, RICHARD DOUGLAS 12 Lakeview Terrace, Ottawa 1 FUNES, lS.AAC C., Apartado Aereo NO. 22-31, Cali, Colombia, S.A. FASCIO, VICTOR JOHN 5 Burton Ave., Montreal, Que. GAJDA, ANDREXY' THEADEUS 651 Echo Drive, Ottawa 1 GALE, CH.AS. GORDON 125 Lansdowne Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa GALIBLE, DAVID IAN 344 Manor Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa GAMBLE, JOHN WILSON 344 Manor Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa GATES, PETER VV .t.... ---.320 Clemow Ave., Ottawa 1 GIFFORD, WILLIAX1 .... ---"MOOr1idge", Leonard, Ont. GILL, CHRISTOPHER L. 501 Grand Parade Centre, Castle St., Cape Town, Union of South Africa GABIE, CHRISTOPHER R .,... 78 Viscount Ave., Ottawa GRAHAM, DAVID 193 Lansdowne Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa GRANT, JOHN MACGREGOR 407 Minto Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa GRANT, CHRISTOPHER CARSON CID 152 Minto Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa GREENSTONE, GERRARD 1010 St. Catherine St. East, Montreal, Que. GROGAN, RICHARD BRUCE 5619 Queen Mary Rd., Hampstead, Que. GUTHRIE, JOHN GRANT .... 21 Chapleau St., Ottawa 2 GUY, PETER D.AVlD 290 Buena Vista Rd., Rockcliife Park, Ottawa HAMILTON, HL'GH ALEXANDER 484 Kent St., Ottawa 4 H.A5i1LTON, SEYZNIOUR CHARLES 1111 20 Juliana Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa HAMILTON, DEREK VV. S. 11111 R.R. XO. 1, Aylmer Rd., Hull, Que. HECIQER, HANS RUDOLPH ....... 580 Chapel St., Ottawa HEENAN, JOSEPH AlICH.-REL H. 23-1 Chapel St., Ottawa 2 HEENEY, FREDERICK JOHN 615 224 Buena Vista Rd., Rockcliife Park, Ottawa HEENEX', JOHN VVM. 1111 224 Buena Vista Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa HEGGTVEIT, GILBERT DOANE 652 Rideau St., Ottawa 2 1 l5,s L1lll.l.IARl1, JOHN .XlIc.II-xI.I. 122 Percv St.. Apt. XO. 1. Ottawa 4 l'llI.I,.-KRY, BRIII. KNIGIII 5113 Clemow Ave., Ottawa HINEY, BRLIIIH PI-.TI-.R 1'9 Irving Ax e., Ottawa HOIIAND, ,X1Ic'II,xI1I. A. HAI. 4211 Cloverdale Rd., Roekelitie Park, Ottawa llORXY11iZ, ROIIERI' -115 lYilhrOd St., Ottawa 2 INCE, PH'l'1-IR ll. Bank House, Garrison, St. Michael, Barbados, l3.XY.l. IRVIN, JOSEPH S.. -131 Roxhorough Rd.. Ottawa 2 JOHNSTON, YYNI. JEI-'I-'IFRY 69 Kilharrv Cres.. Ottawa 2 JOHANNSEN, XYM. BRIAN i 522 Xlariposa Cres., Ottawa KENNEDY, CHARI.I1S li. ..,... 33 Lambton Rd., Ottawa K.AHI.E, l"l1-IRNLANN "El Cerrito", Apt. 4, Tapachula, Chis, Xlexico KA51CKE, CHARLES T. 10-1 Soudan Ave., Toronto, Ont. KENIP, RlCH.ARD E. ..L... -101 XYOOd Ave., Ottawa KILLALY, I...-XURENCE Al.-ACID. 300 Sandridge Rd., Rockcliffe Park. Ottawa KlLP.ATRlCK, C.ARL D. "Elmwood School", Rockeliffe Park, Ottawa KING, COLIN D. ...LL....L.LL -1336 Second Ave., Ottawa KNIGHT, DOL'CI..AS C. ' 34 Revelstoke, Box 206, R.R. No. 2, Billings Bridge. Ont. LACREY, :ALLISON VV. 119 225 Harmer Ave., Ottawa L.-ACKEY, ROBERT D. 4111 225 Harmer Ave., Ottawa LAKE, RICHARD XY. 225 Hemlock Rd., Rockclitfe Park. Ottawa LAwSON, AllCH.-AEI. I. 111 5 Rockcliife Hay, Ottawa 2 LAWSON, XAJILLI.-A31 Ni. III? Avlmer Rd., R.R. NO. 1, Hull, Que. LAwsON, JOHN H. fllll Aylmer Rd., R.R. No. 1, Hull. Que. LAY, IJ.-AVID XY. 150 Juliana Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa L.-XNDYBIORE, RODERICIQ XY. Chartwood House, R.R. NO. 1, Avlmer Rd.. Hull, Que. LEXVIS, VVAYNE VV. A A 159 Presland Rd.. Ottawa 2 LICHTY, AlL'RRAY J. 1922 Alta Vista Dr., Ottawa LLOYD, I-'REDERICR D. 16 Hawthorne Ave., Toronto 5, Ont. Al.-ACLAREN, GEORGE R. Inverness House. Buckingham. Que. Al.-KCAl1l.I.AN, D. CTREGER -158 Athlone Ave.. Ottawa Al.-XCNIEII., AllC11AE1. XY. R.C.Xl.P. Barracks. Oliicers' Quarters, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa KlCA'XL'I.TY. BRIAN XY. 212 Rideau Terrace, Ottawa AlClDONNEl.1., ROBIN Nl. 111 1832 Scott St., Ottawa 3 134 AICLIDONNI-ZLL, AIALCOLNI F. CIID 1832 Scott St., Ottawa 3 AICFADDEN, AVILLIANI G. .tt.4tA4......,.t,vt..... NQVSI1, OHI- AICLEAN, DONALD M. 132 Vivian Ave., Town of Mt. Royal, Que. AI.-KRSHALI., JOHN G. 185 Bleecker Ave., Belleville, Ont. Al.-XYBERRY, GRAHANI C. ...Aylmer Road, I-Iull, Que. AIILLARD, GREGORX' S. .-.33 Rockcliffe VVay, Ottawa AIOLLOY, GILBERT A. 10 Sandridge Rd., Manor Park, Ottawa AIOORE, ROBERT G. CID 406 Island Park Drive, Ottawa 3 AIOORE, GRANT J. CIID 406 Island Park Drive, Ottawa 3 AIOORE, ANTHONY P. CIIII .... 32 Range Rd., Ottawa AIORRI-IS, AIICHAEL F ............. 12 Maple Lane, Ottawa AIORRISON, BRETT G ..... 216 Rideau Terrace, Ottawa AIORSON, GEOFFREY' V. 5556 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati 30, Ohio AIUIR, JAMES G ............. 648 Main St., Lachute, Que. AIULKINS, EDXV.-KRD T.. ,...... 103 Acacia Ave., Ottawa IAIURPHY, CHRISTOPHER L ..... 256 Daly Ave., Ottawa AIITCHELL, FRED IV .t.., 300 Somerset St. IV., Ottawa NEXVNI.-KN, CHARLES E. 72 Champlain St., Baie Comeau, Que. NAUDAIN, RICHARD S., JR. 47 Rockcliffe Way, Ottawa NOEL-BENTLEY, PETER C. 22 Rousillon St., Apt. 1, Hull, Que. NOXVAKOXVSK1, CHRIS 16 Lenore Place, Eastview, Ont. O,BRlEN, LARRY 334 Acacia Ave., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa OCHOA, LEO Oficino Urbanizacion, "Alta Florida", El Recreo, Caracas, Venezuela, S.A. O'HARA, PETER R. ,..... 520 Denburv Ave., Ottawa 3 OROPEZA, RICARDO A. Carrera 16, No. 182, Barquisimeto, Venezuela, S.A. PATERSON, PATRICK CHARLES J. CID 61 Park Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa PATERSON, CHRISTOPHER JAMES S. CIIID 61 Park Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa PATRICK, KENNETH R. CID P.O. Box 630, Ville St. Laurent, Montreal, Que. PATRICK, ROBERT HUGH CIID P.O. Box 630, Ville St. Laurent, Montreal, Que. PATTERSON, AAIILLIANI CH.ARLES CIID 219 Melrose Ave., Ottawa 3 PAZ-C.-KSTILLO, I-'ERNANDO ABEL Roxborough Apts. NO. 21, Ottawa 2 PENNINGTON, ROBERT CH.ARI.ES 11 Forest Glen Crescent, Toronto, Ont. PEREZ LUGO, RAIPAEI. RAMON, Carrera 18, NO. 143, Barquisimeto, Venezuela, S.A. THE ASHBURIAN PERON, DOL'GL.AS LEONARD 4043 VVest Hill Ave., Montreal, Que. PLATE, GUILL J. .................. ,211 Stewart St., Ottawa POLK, AIICHAEL STEIENS CID 34 Union St., Ottawa 2 POLK, D.AVID CABIPBELL CIID 34 Union St., Ottawa 2 POwELL, -IERENIY JOHN CID 500 Buena Vista Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa POXVELL, ROBERT ROBIN CIID 500 Buena Vista Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa PRITCHARD, KEVIS JOHN D. 316 Acacia Ave., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa QL'ESNEL, JOSEPH RICHARD ..-P.O. Box 913, Ottawa REED, HENRX' KERR..--109 Springfield Rd., Ottawa 2 REID, FREDERICK :ALLEN 22 Chapleau St., Apt. 2, Ottawa 2 RHODES, EDGAR NELSON CID 103 MacLaren St., Ottawa 4 RHODES, DAVID FORBES CIID 103 MacLaren St., Ottawa 4 RICHARDSON, GORDON D. Roxborough Apts., NO. 26, Laurier Ave. NV., Ottawa RIDDELL, PAUL :ALEXANDER 91 St. Joseph St., Apt. No. 19, Dorval, Que. RIVERS, VICTOR B. CID 228 Rideau Terrace, Ottawa 2 RIvERs, TIAIOTHY CHARLES CIID 228 Rideau Terrace, Ottawa 2 ROBINSON, CHRISTOPHER P. CID 250 Thorold Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa ROBINSON, WALTER G. CIID 250 Thorold Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa ROCKINGHAM, JOHN' ROBERT W. 136 Morleywood Blvd., Camp Petawawa, Ont. ROGER, HUGH G. 68 Wayling Ave., Kingsview Park, Eastview, Ont. ROGERS, :ANTHONY P. 161 Carleton St., Rockcliffe Park, Ont. ROSS, DAS'ID ALEXANDER CID 346 Princess St., Kingston, Ont. Ross, ROBIN ROBERT CIID 74 Stanley Ave., Ottawa 2 Rozos, PANAYOTIS TAKIS 6 Karageorgy Servias St., Athens, Greece RowAN-LEGG, JOHN S. 320 Cloverdale Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa ROwE, GEOFFREX' ALLAN C. CID "Top Acres", Hazeldean, Ont. ROwE, PERN TERRY CIID 36 Farnham Crescent, Ottawa 2 RUDNER, :ALLAN .... 4938 Circle Road, Montreal, Que. SCIILLY, ROBERT VV M. 204 Lazard Ave., Town of Mount Royal, Montreal, Que. SANDQvIsT, :AAGE ,..,.. ..,.... 1 08 Lisgar St., Ottawa 2 l THE ASHBURIAN 135 SAXE, CH.ARl.ES B. ill 'I-YI.l-ZR, JERILMY lit Y A. 457 Island Park Drive, Ottawa 5 T28 Lonsdale Rd., Ottawa 2 SAxE, DON.Al.D H. ill! CIAHORNE, IAN Kiev 29 Delaware St., Ottawa 4 457 Island Park Drivc, Ottawa 5 Tugtgi, PAN, lJ1lL'ul'AS SEED, BRIAN C- aaaaa A a..,........,., .tta Nianiwaki. Que. 6 Wilbur Street. lburelwsrcr 25, Xlass., L'.S.A, SHEPHERD, JOHN D.AVlD .....,,a.t,a,.aa.. Cumberland, Ont. AJAX HER K,v.YY, limit H. SHORT, I'lAR0l.D ELFORD G. 21 Vlestgate Drive, Rusemere. Que. 5261 Coolbrook Ave., Montreal, Que. AJHRII-Xl-11.1-ZX, CII:ORr.I.s SHERMAN, :ALLAN AHCHAEI. ll Rue Dupre, Bruxelles. Belgium 238 Fail-mgm AY-q,, Ottawa 3 YINI-:III-:Rt:, LLOYD PI1'rI1R SOUTH.-KNI, JOHN Ross ill 370 Avondale Ave., Ottawa 3 ' 550 Prospect Rd., Rockcliife Park, Ottawa AY.-Kl.Kl-ZR, JAxIEs AIILNANIIER ' SOUTHANI, PETER LANIBERT D. CII? 98 Ruskin Ave., Ottawa 327 Buena Vista Rd., Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa AAL-Kl.l.lNlil-'ORll, CIR.-KHAKI L. SPARLING, TIMOTHY D. 101 Alain St., Buckingham, Que. 295 RiVCfd21lC AVC-, OIIHWB 1 AAJALLIS, JOHN Xl. ....., 529 Clarence St.. Ottawa 2 STEER5, CONNEU- .JOHN P- AAJOOD., JOHN AV.-ALTER ii Rothwell Heights RR- NU- II Ottawa 404 Laurier Ave. li.. Apt. 420, Ottawa STOREY, RICHARD NEIL D- XVARD. LINDSAY P.. Box 187, R.R. NO. 1, Ottawa ,259 Greensway Ave" E2SfI'ieIIv Om' AA'EBSTE,R, GORDQJN S. . ,..... Hudson Heights, Que. STUART, IAN KENNETH L. u 162 Metcalfe St., Ottawa 4 H YEED, JANIES B.,.L.25 Aladawaska Drive. Ottawa 1 I YELLS, :ANDREXV B. .... 193 Riverdale Ave., Ottawa 1 XVIDDRINGTON, D.AX'llJ AllCH.-XEL T. I SUGDEN, ANTHONY JOHN 17558 Cohasset St., Van Nuys, Calif. 4,0 F ,oth St New York 10 N Y , SUTHERLAND, lAlERVlN WII.LI.A5'I VVNTER VVILUAH 'CZJRDOY ' A ' ' Q Box 91, Mont Laurier, CO. Labelle, Que. ' ' ' A 'RR YO I Hull Que 'OOLLCOXXBE GEORPE STEPHEN SHAW, CARSON YVILSON H R.R No 6 Thamesville Ont ' ' ' ' , SUTHERLAND, DONALD ,JABRES 7 i H, v I Y F 366 Stewart St" Ottawa " 26 Bedford Crescent, Ottawa OTHERSPOONK AN RASER . THOMAS ROY E. 11-1 Klmto Place, Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa l R. No. 1, Hum Club Road VVU, PO CHI .................... 65 Lakeway Drive, Ottawa No. 1 Billings Bridge, Ont. AVYRTELEY ALFREP I THORNTON, PETER DM-,D 120 Buena Vista Rd., Rockcllffe Park, Ottawa 245 Tudor Place, Kingsview Park, YORK, RICHARD M-ACK-W B- H7 Eagtvigw, Qnt, 112 Strathcona Ave., Ottawa l Q TL'cIcER, CAMPBELL WALLACE A'ORK, STEPHEN FRANCIS ill? S1 Kjlbgffyv Crescent, Ottawa 2 ll! Strathcona AVC.. 0U3XX'a l TURCOTTE, RICHARD F. ZEITZ, Orro ORSON Apartado Aereo 3562, Bogota Colombia, S.A. Beauchene Clllb- BCHUCWHC- HQ- 4 -I THE SPOTLIGHT IS ON THE CAMERA WITH E . . . nowan... automatic diaphragm The automatic diaphragm gives the ALPA all focusing .advantages of the twin-reflex camera while maintaining the many exclusive features of the single lens reflex camera. AS ILLUSTRATED NOW AVAILABLE Easy, fast focusing on brilliant groundglass with critical sharpness because of minimum depth of field at full aperture. Absolute picture control without guesswork for accur- ate composition. Very lightweight: 8 ounces AQTUQJE7 CANADA W ,,soOO 1 flI.9 with Automatic diaphragm 5407.50 YJ other models from 5200.00 Unlimited use of all smaller lense stops providing increased depth of field, especially important for colour pictures. Lens couples to individual rangetinder of ALPA 7. Combined release of shutter and automatic diaphragm 'requires very little pressure. WRITE FOR FREE DESCRIPTIVE FOLDER ALPA XENON 50 MM Compliments Of A FRIEND ' C AMP KAWABI A Summer Camp for Boys from 8 to I5 Years THE HALIBURTON HIGHLANDS for folder and irzforvzmtion write to R. H. PERRY, M.A., Director WC E. SLATTERY, Business Manager cfo Ashbury College, Ottawa 2 C omplimerzts of A F R I E N D C omplimerzts of WILLIAM SCULLY LIMITED C orrzplimerzts of E. S. SHERWOCD Real Estate Broker i' l-I0 XVELLINGTON 3-5656 ARMSTRONG 81 RICHARDSON LIMITED Shoe Fitting Specialists 'k 79 SPARKS ST. 3-1222 P. S. ROSS Sz SONS Chartered Accowntmzts MONTREAL TORONTO ST. JOHN, N.B. VANCOUVER OTTAWA Orfaira Residellt Parnzcr CHARLES G. GALE, C.A. 46 ELGIN STREET OTTAXVA, ONTARIO D. KEMP EDWARDS LIMITED LUMBER MANUFACT URERS Dependable Ser-rice O'1"I'AYN'.A Ii A ST V 1 If w Play refreshed a ,lg A 'X ae C EU? 1 Cowlplzmelzts of A FRIEND Wm? pw THE MILDEST BEST-TASTING CIGARETTE I M. Loss LTD. Wiz 010861 fe mfstrlo u to rs N t TOBACCO PRODUCTS CONFIQCTIONI-',RY SUNIJRIIQS GROCERIKS .-XPPl.lAXClfS t 3 OTTAWA PEMBROKE xr -Y NF 44 PFYZSOHUIVY-477 VYVY C Y WV U 'N D E R W O 0 D CQMPLIMENTS . High.. - -- ' Alirks OF A Today . . Higher Pav 1 Tomorrow ' 5 UNDERWOOD LTD. 222 I-AL'mER VVEST t OTTAXVA, ONT. 2-3531 N F. H. T0llER AND CDMPANY 4 General Insurance n "Protection begins with your telephone coll." I 63 SPARKS ST. Pnoxl-i 2-1522 Y i Y i viii .i?iii Aiki i if "88 Years" Unfailing Fuel Service "Vikingized" QDUSTPROOFEDD CUAI. - COKE 1 0 77 " I'I e C o F URNACE FUEL OIL O IRON FIREMAN AUTOMATIC COAL STOKERS and OIL BURNERS IOHN HENEY 81 SUN LIMITED IJIAL 2-945 1 OTTAWA, ONT. "Let Our Combustion Service Solfue Your H eating Problewzsv l H eadqzmrtcrs for Audio-Visual Supplies Projectors, Tape Records-rs Films Sr Equipment Rentals 1 Crawley Films 1 Ltcl. i Equipment Sales Division 1214 XYELLINCTON ST.-PH. 8-3417 "I, FIQISIBY THE Vl'I.IIANlZER GOUDYEAR TRl'CK, BFS and Al'T0 TIRES 290 811111145 Sir. 2-T497 O1'1,xw.x. ON1. A T 0 A S T M A T E R gilligbttv Fine Brendw Alladc by CANADA BREAD LTD. 458 CATHERINE ST. OTTAWA SZHQNDAGA ,sz 75? --1-1-.1--1-,A ,,. 1f- f- :. j'-121'-' -I 'f:f,. ,?1:5sf2'.1'3'fw , ,123 5:1 U, ,gg-1:41, - , . 1:61. ,, For ,:-.1V:,,4 .V....,,.A, illustrated folder and other information write Hadley Armstrong Camp Director Onondaga Port Hope Ontario '-54' ,Q ".'s7mY1i,Z. 1 rt- 4. J 1. .N In The Hrghlonds of H lb t GOWLING, MacTAVISH, OSBORNE 81 HENDERSON Barristers and Solicitors 88 M1c'1'c.u.Frt Srizmir OTTAWA 4, CANADA Colllzselz Leonard XV. Brockington, Q.C., LL.D. E. Gordon Gowling, Q.C., LL.D. Duncan K. MacTavish, Q.C. Robert M. Fowler john C. Osborne Gordon F. Henderson, Q.C. Ronald C. Merriam David VVats0n Charles F. Scott E. Peter Newcombe Adrian T. Hewitt Paul P. Hewitt G. Perley-Robertson R. G. McClenahan WAlTER C. LACKEY 8. C0. General Insurance Adjusters Telephones: BUS.: 8-7750 RES.: PA 2-6186 9 Ricmioxn ROAD OTTAYVA 3, ONT. EVERYONE LIKES MURPHY-GAMBLE QUALITY Mlffinw. mm .AMF-f o T T A w A S Cowzplimcfzts of Smokers' Supplies Novelties Gifts for Every Occasion Bell Telephone Agent Oprlcllall Poser OFFICE 13 Beechwood Phone 4-4075 231 I-fU,lx 4-1527 Complimelzts of A F R I E N D ASBESTOS Boiler and Pipe Covering CORKBOARD INSULATION P R O D U CTS The China Hall of Ottawa for English C bimz OVER 170 OPEN STOCK DINNER PATTERNS Mclntosh 8. 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SHARP FLOORING COMPANY Specializing in: FLOORING, ACOUSTIC TILE and PLASTIC XY.-XLI, TILE 1994 SCOTT STRELLT PHUN F1 P-534'--3 BURTONS BOOK SHOP i Oi2.'lIc'd and operated by VV. I-I. SMITH Sc CO. CCANAD.-X LTDJ K 1 Greeting and Everyday Cards 139 SPARKS STREET E COppoSite Citizen Office! I 6-1 141 Phones 6-2237 Qlwlily Furniture at Compliments of Reasonable Prices G. H. luhnson's Furniture ' G' Limited ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 111 AIURRAY STREET 5-5147 40 XVENDOX'ER 4,9104 i uReal Estate is about the safest irwestmerzt in the world" i -FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT N 1 i 772051 HPI O Help you with your real estate investment i I Insure this investment for you I , H., RHODES 81 RADCLIFF LIMITED Real Estate, Insurance and Mortgage Service Y i Co-op Member, Ottawa Real Estate Board 216 Laurier Avenue Wfest 2-5373 THE LRTEST IN MODERN OFFICE DESKS. ij Fl: SPECIFICHLLY DESIGNED - ron K HHNDSOME HPPERRRNCE HND EFFICIENT OPERATION. Call. No. EI' HGH- ill MODERNIZE WITH STEEL by TI-IE STEEL EQUIPMENT C0. LTD. Sf-ILES CUHICE HT OTTHWH, ONT. FHCTORY HT PEMBROKE, ONT. BISHOP'S UNIVERSITY LENNOXVILLE, QUE. A residential University for men and women. Faculties of Arts and Science and Divinitv. Courses extending over a period of three years are provided for the following, degrees: BACHELOR OF ARTS--B.A. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE-B.Sv. Honours courses in Arts and Science extend over a period of four years from junior Matriculation or its equivalent. Post-Graduate work is provided for the degrees of: MASTER OF ARTS-MA. MASTER OF EDUCATION-NI.Ed. HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS CERTIFICATE VALIQABLE SCHOLARSHIPS. For Calendars, -tzirb i11for111.1ti011 rcgardillg UlIff.'llIL'L' rcqzziruzfzuxzfx. mzirxvx and fees, apply: W2 L. TOMKINS. B.A.. Registrar Bish0p's University. Lennoxville. Que. GEORGE BOURNE Reg'cI. Sporting Goods 151 RIDEAU ST. OTTAWA DIAL 3-8407 OTTAWA IRON WORKS LIMITED Mavmfacrurers of Architectural Iron - Bronze and Aluminum Work - Steel Stairs Fire Escapes - Cates - Grilles Fences - And General Builder's lron Work CEASTVIEWJ OTTAWA, ONT. 256 ARCARTHUR ROAD PHONE 3-7240-4-2923 Hughes Owens Company Limited Artists' and Drawing Materials TELEPHONE 3-8461 527 SUssEx STREET QDTTAXVA, ONT.ARIO "IT PAYS T0 PLAY" Since 1895 BYSHE 8. CO. "THE SPORTS CENTRE" ENGLISH RALEIGH BICYCLES 223 Bank St. Phone 2-2464 W. A. Rankin limited Builders and Home Hd7'dQL'H7'6 410-416 BANK STREET PHONE 6-3621 City and District Delivery Picnic-Treat Maple Leaf Ready To Serve SmokedMeats CANADA PACKERS lTD. EEE I THREE STORES SERVING ,M nf I-f-1 IILJ-'-IE jllllll CHARLES OGILVY LIMITED JOLICOEUR Paint - Home Hppliances - Hardware Telephone 4-2375 27 BEECHXVOOD OTTMVA, ONT. Establzshed 1332 lm'orpor.zre.1' 1011 Compliments of JAMES HOPE 8. SONS, LIMITED Booksellers, Stationers Boolebirzders Q9 Printers 61-63 SPARKS ST. PHONE 2-2493 O'x'r,xwA, CANADA ' " ' 7 " I' Compliments of LP1BU!3lIUE'S DEPARTMENT STORE RIDEAU AT DALHOUSIE . . . the heart of downtown Ottawa H. FINE 81 SONS WHOLESHLE FRUIT VEGETHBLES and GROCERIES PHONE 5-7275 62 MHNN HVENUE OTTHWH. ONTHRIO Covzzpliments of Complimevzts of RIDEAU PLUMBING RIDEAU ALUMINUM 81 HEATING LTD. 81 STEELS LTD. OTTAWA 1320 BANK ST. PHONE 6-7121 E E-, ,,,, ,,,,, I W, O O tt si 1rTf 52 W4 all ' eyes are XJ Pen Name for the Perfect Gift .Rr PEN CU. LTD., TORONTO, CANADA STANLEY LEWIS LIMITED Electrical Contractors L 737 :ALBERT ST., OTTAXVA 6-4268 ompmzezztso F R I T H S C 1' f 1 I OTTAWA FRUIT E s u P P LY LT D. M 23 Nicholas Street 270 BEECHWOOD on TELEPHONE 4-1008 For Quality Sporting J. R. Goods I LIMITED HEGGTVEIT V v Roofin Sheet Metal Sporlhng Goods and gfientilation 131 QUEEN ST- PHONE 2-5656 1 6 SLATER ST., CJTTAXVA 2-1536 V JOHNSGN OUTBOARD MUTORS Boats and Canoes LARGEST SELECTION IN TOXVN BLAIR EQUIPMENT, LTD. 50 FIJ-fl-Tl' ST. PHONE 3-1101 JAMES DAVIDSON'S SONS Everything in Lumber Wellington 6 Rochester Phone 9-5635 I. E. CDPELAND CD. LIMITED General Contractors if AIONTREAL ROAD, CJTTAXVA SH 6-4631 CLEANING MATERIALS AND SANITARY SUPPLIES FLOOR SANDING AND FINISHING DUSTBANE PRODUCTS LTD. 88 METCALFE STREET PHONE 2-5'5l "Branches from Coast to Coast" W W- qi- R ,, 'K 4 xg-J 5 1, 2 'L A 1 'ij?1"roK'1Qx f 4 llvi' . . -Sg r. ll d i? COURSES FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE Arts ' Science ' Commerce journalism ' Public Administration GRADUATE COURSES Public Administration CERTIFICATE COURSES Engineering ' Public Service Studies SINGLE SUBJECTS DAY AND EVENING CLASSES SCHOLARSHIPS ' BURSARIES Ifzformatiovz from the Registrar Carleton College "When it's flowers, say it with ours" Complivzzents 8 SON Patterson Motors ltd. Fl , t 1 Distributors Om CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH Q FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED FARGO I THE WORLD OVER 106 RllJP1.AL'TERR.ACE Pnoxa 3-9303 478 ELGIN ST' PHONE 6-3654 C om pliments 0f BURNS 8. COMPANY, LTD. Pioneer Meat Packers of Canada 83 Boteler sn. 5.6741 A C omplimeizts 0 f 'IIIE IIIIIIIIE CUMPA Y OTTAWA DAIRY DIVISION F. REX'NOLDS, General -Ilazmger Wm. GOLDSTEIN 8. CO. QO1'fc1wc0 LTD. Retail and Ufbolesale Tobacconists Importers of FINE HAVANA CIGARS, EGYPTIAN CIGARETTES, PIPES, TOBACCOS, ETC. 52 SPARKS ST. 2-7306 MAJESTIC CLEANERS and DYERS Quality Cleaning Only Have your clothes waterproofed. They stay clean longer and wear longer. 'lr 'lr 'lr Main Store 11 BEECHXVOOD AVE. TELEPHONE 3-6013 Branch Store 195 RIDEAU STREET TELEPHONE 2-1374 For quick pick up and delivery . . . call 3-6013 FRANK WAHITTLE 8. SON HOBART FOOD MACHINES GLASS WASHING 81 DISH WASHING MACHINES DAYTON COUNTER SCALES STEAKMASTER Complete Kitchen Planning and Equipment Service 2-0036 1014 BANK STREET 2-9826 C onzplinzents of The Eustview Hotel MORRISON and ,ELVIDGE, LTD. TRAVEL AGENCY Complete Travel Planning 8 Arrangements at nO extra cost STEAMSHIP - AIRLINE BUS TICKETS TOURS 81 CRUISES Hotel Accommodations Secured "If You Plan to Travel Consult Us" 228 ELGIN 2-9663 Better Fitting Glasses Mean Better Vision The prescription of your eye physician will be filled accur- ately and at moderate cost Robertson Galleries 103 QUEEN STREET C ontenz po rar y Calzadian by us. P . . to . SUTHERLAND f"" "Ui" 5- PARKINS IN OUR DOLPHIN SHOP QPTICIANS SWEOISH MOOERN l:L'RNlTL'RE T. J. BOYLE CER.n11c:s CRYSNL 137 Sparks sf. 2-0866 1' ARMS Compliments of lc! vm era resfon Andy Prltchard Custom Tailors and Outfitters tt Gentlemen ASHBURY 1951 .'l,QUlI!,V for tlfc l..1lllUIl.V Burlwrry H0fllll'0f0 Top float, Dales l.n'l'cts and Sl.1cl's H3 Svuuts St. Puowis 2-O'Z4 800 BANK ST. PHONE 4-9643 UIVWW C orrzplimerzts of BUILDERS SALES LIMITED Gerzeral Hardfware 531 SUSSEX ST. PHONE 3-5617 RED LINE 50 RADIO DISPATCHED CARS i' PHUNE 315611 Y.M.C.A. CAMP ON-DA-DA-WAKS For Boys 9- 15 Years "0ntario's FIRST Boys' Campy JULY 1-JULY 29 127 METCALFE STREET PHONE 2-2606 IDEAS IN PRINT: May We Serve You? 'A' The Kanye pref! ,fbnitecf P R I N T E R S 124-128 QUEEN STREET if TELEPHONE 2 389 Allan 8 Co A OFFICE SUPPLIES ' OFFICE FURNITURE Ltcl. Izzsurarzce Agents "If It Is Used In An Office ROBERT J. GILL nie Sell hw 260 Cnovrik ST. OTTAWA Q phone 3-4833 V 132 Queen Phone 2-1701 HENRY GATEHOUSE 8. SON INC. Dealers irz and Importers of FISH, SEAFOODS and POULTRY ZER-O-PACK FRUITS and VEGETABLES City IVide Delivery Phone 3-H75 841 BANK STREET OTTAWA, ONT. RITCHIE'S SPORT SHDP "Otta'wa's Most Popular Sports Centre" Exclusive S aldirz Distributors E for Ottawa arm' Dzstrzet Puoxla 2-6278 98 BANK ST., OTTAXVA, ONT. IR EN E W 0 0 ll If U IIN f,-,,,,,,,1,,,,,,,, ,t U, Mus.B... A.R.C.T. Pianist and Teacher C.B.C. SOLOIST D Studio: 56 Strathcona Aw-. Pupils received highcst marks in vnxaim- inations and Ottawa Music Festival. Birks are lJUt'lLi4IIl11l'fCl'S for qzmlity insignia at fa1i'0Ill'4'lI716 prices ..... Origiiml designs gladly SIl17NIifTc.'1f Azsitlnoizt Obligation . . BIRK Ie1:eUer5iUni.SU1fvswHrbs 101 Sparks Street Ottawa AITISTS PHOTO ENSRA ERS ELECYROY FEIS SYEIEOYV . OTTAW n-NK S 0 B Q 70 WAI LINE l' G I P 5 C G Ulf LAY! MAIKRS no "MV FAVORITE MI LIQ RY D Kumi Eff CHOCOLATE SAVS mv OVW' Hpww TV STATION .awe 5... STAINLESS STEEL In the products you buy today ond the ones you plon for tomorrow. FRITH BROWN STEELS LTD. 840 Cote de Lesse Rd. 766 King St. West MONTREAL 9 TORONTO 2B TRAVEL BY BUS TO MONTREAL TORONTO PETERBORO NORTH BAY Deluxe Coaches Available for Charter Trips to all points COLONIAL COACH LINES LTD. 265 ALBERT ST. PHONE 2- 14: 4? , 11 - 15 S I5ARl S. T. T TAW A . -' 'A" ? ' ..,. ' I g -35:90 v 5 s ? ' L" ' ' hl .. ll QQ , .... 'unumul lllllllllu 'Ulm lull" ' ' ff ..,A ,ifgif f Expert And lnd1v1dual 3 3,13 Attentlon Gwen to Each .J l . . - 4. l re . fff' "ff ' I ff Q- Ashbury Student's Partic- l Q, 1- N ' . 2- 4 5 i ular Clothing Require- Qi r HICIIIS. , A I I ef' ff, ixgggf' " ':'.: t Official Outfitters To Ashbury College Students i I Nuiagaapha f l. ,-L-.v . 1 Q, ,nu , E 1. ' w 1 vu 5 A.. Y I -I la N x Jf, 1 K his r A . X. ' V p -4. an s Q A ' RW 1 0 ' "J L f S 1 A , """"f"'7-r1'5""4"",5EQm1' x '-'B ,..'W."'1'i'Q. -ruin-4'x.e"g1Tf3 ' , mil ' BQ3' Al :K Ng.: ,Mfg Might' 1. I -rs. 5.-',.. n' , . . I 1,0 . , 4 . .:, b-'.J',. . A1411 " 1 xr'jg",v:l4lg . 'N V . fff JU li . 1- 5 .1 gm ., 1. rx 'vu-, , P. - 1 . 1, 1 .1 t -1 ' 'xg' J ' 3 -, . S x ,.L..f . '-var, . '.-4 I . . ,V A '. ,F - 'H ,v 1' 1 - ' fa' . Aa' 5-' H 15134. my ,4 ,vi A 4 L' ' -'Qi' ,. .I ,, ,fy fb ' W5 . . .'j',,'fs .'x',.J.,N Q f ff u -4 C, ',-, '. "'.f'r ' . . .V ,AL -1 7 X Q ' , A A . . ,f V, rv .L .. 1 In f I V -, '- 1 ,- 'P J-"4 In uf. 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Suggestions in the Ashbury College - Ashburian Yearbook (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) collection:

Ashbury College - Ashburian Yearbook (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 1

1952

Ashbury College - Ashburian Yearbook (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1953 Edition, Page 1

1953

Ashbury College - Ashburian Yearbook (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1954 Edition, Page 1

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Ashbury College - Ashburian Yearbook (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1956 Edition, Page 1

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Ashbury College - Ashburian Yearbook (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1957 Edition, Page 1

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Ashbury College - Ashburian Yearbook (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) online yearbook collection, 1958 Edition, Page 1

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