Arvida High School - Yearbook (Arvida, Quebec Canada)

 - Class of 1952

Page 1 of 76

 

Arvida High School - Yearbook (Arvida, Quebec Canada) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Cover
Cover



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Text from Pages 1 - 76 of the 1952 volume:

The Arvida High School U DEDICA TED T O T HE AIEAIOR Y OF: Zlaarulh Svtehens ibpe 'His if' um gezlffe, amz' the eleme11 l.r S0 nzzlviz' in bin: ibm' zmture nzzlglai 112111117 zap Ami uw to aff Ibe nforlzf ujwbllf Wil! az 11zm zfD MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR MR. PYE On Friday morning. March 7, The Students' Council held a mem01'iH1 service for the late Mr. Pye, which was attended by Grades One to Eleven. After a short but impressive service. a plaque given by the Students' Council, in memory of our physical training instructor, was unveiled and dedicated by Alex Olyarchuck and Norman Black, Others taking part in the service were Moyna Beresford, Ann Hudson, and Ronald Dyck. In a short talk written by Arthur McLeod, the students were told of Mr, Pye's outstanding term as physical training instructor in Arvida, and how he created such an interest among the pupils for athletics in this school. The service ended by the assembly singing "Lest We Forget", followed by "God Save The Queen". 1 T HL PRINCIPAL l , .. ,,,,,,.,,.. -7 an A ..-A ..,,., --,-,, M.-. ., H11 old H Cfzlffelg B.A.,Il1fl. I am particularly pleased to see the Arvida High School Year Book resume publication. To undertake a project of this kind involves considerable hard Work and shows a commendable spirit of cooperation and the develop- ment of initiative. I congratulate the Year Book Committee. May I take this opportunity of expressing my best Wishes to the Graduating Class. The success of each member in What ever may lie ahead will depend to a large extent on the training in school. In a World Where personal and material gain seems to occupy so large a place in the minds of individuals, I sincerely hope you will not forget the lessons you have been taught of service to others. SCHOOL STAFF Left to right: Front Row: Miss Stangeland, Mrs. Monahan, Miss Hanna, Mr. Calder, Mrs. Bowden Mrs. Wilson, Miss Muncey. Left to right: Second Row: Mr. Balcom, Mrs. Beatteay, Miss L. Woodley, Miss Palaisy, Miss J. Woodley Mr. MacKrith. Several changes took place on the staff during 1951-52. Mrs. Monahan fBetty Brownj replaced Miss Mary McLellan in Grade I. Miss Muncey replaced Mrs. Monahan in Grade II. Miss Stangeland replaced Miss McBain in Grade III. Mrs. Wilson replaced Miss Robertson in Grades IV and V. Miss Laura Woodley replaced Miss Leila Smyth in Grades VI and VII. Mr. Balcom returned to replace Mr. Gerald Johnston as Science Teacher. Mr. MacKrith replaced Miss Doris Kerr as French Specialist. STU DENTS' COUNCIL Left to right: First Row: Miss Woodley fStaff Advisery. Moyna Beresford qSec'y.l, Jean Woodwark fGrade XD, Anne Thomson fPresidentj, Kay Woodwark qTreas.j, June Santoni fGrade VIID, Veronica Boland fGrade IXJ. Second Row: Jimmy Boland fGrade VIIU, Bobby Berdey fGrade VIIIJ, Ed Neff fGrade Xl, Robin Nasmilh qG1'ade VID, Buddy Scott fVice-Pres,j, George Gordon fGrade XI1. Brian Santoni fG1'Z1d6 IXH. 11 EDITORIAL Twenty-five years ago Arvida was not much more than a few streets and a few camps. This was Arvida's birth, with a grand future ahead of her. The Aluminum industry and the large hydro-electric developments, brought more and more people to Arvidag probably your family with you. Many of our parents helped build Arvida into what it is now, and I am sure that we can be proud of it. During these twenty-five years of Arvida's life another important event took place. This was the birth of the Arvida High School. In the beginning it was the little red school house fa construction campy, then, in 1928, Arvida Intermediate School was created here, and just eight years ago it was raised to the status of a High School. Someday the Arvida High School will expand again. I hope this may be seen by some of the pupils in the lower grades during the next few years. Arvida, this year, celebrates its twenty- fifth anniversary. Twenty-five years of effi- cient service have been given to its citizens by the City Councils and Mayors. Any of us must remember how, during these years the city increased and improved its services to- wards its citizens. Since its birth Arvida has won many honourable awards which show how well it has flourished. Arvida High has a very good record. There have been sixty-nine students in Grade XI to date, and only four have failed to obtain High School Leaving Certificates. Many of the for- mer grads of Arvida High have something even better than High School Leaving Certifi- cates - they are graduates of universities and more advanced schools. This year we five in Grade Eleven hope to graduate, taking with us the knowledge and training which our school offered. But we leave with more than just that. We also leave with practice in follow- ing a Canadian democratic way of life, shown to us by our principal and teachers. I have outlined to you just a few points ot the progress in the life of our city and our school. I am proud of them. But I also look forward to a bigger and better Arvida High, and a bigger and better Arvida. My farewell wish to all of you is a bigger and better life. May we graduates of this year, wherever we find ourselves, add worth to the community around us so that it can be said of each of us, "There was his duty to be done, and he did it? ALEX OLYARCHUK, Grade Eleven 12 STUDENTS' COUNCIL CONFERENCE The trip which Miss Woodley, Buddy Scott, and I made to Montreal for the 8th an- nual convention of students' Councils proved to be very interesting, and at the same time educational. We arrived at the Mount Royal High School about 4:00 P.M. in time to register and find the people with whom we were billeted. At 6:00 P.M. there was a supper in the gym given by Henry Birks and Sons, followed by an amu- sing talk by Mr. Ford. After this we went into the auditorium where Mr. Lovell Baker, a ge- mologist from Birks, talked to us about dia- monds and other precious gems. We were also shown a movie on how the diamond came to be used as a gift from men to their sweet- hearts. Following this there was a talent show in which several of the students of Mount Royal took part and later on a dance was held in the gym. Saturday morning we went to the school at 9:30 A.M. where we were broken up into two groups - large and small high school sessions. The three topics under discussion were: 112 What recreational activities can be carried on with and without a gym and on what nights? L23 What should the composition of the Stu- dent Council be, what powers should be given it, and how may sympathy and aid be enlisted from the staff members? 435 How may the Student Council create an interest in academic achievement in the school? For the first topic it was decided that al- most anything such as sports, parties, dances etc. can be carried on with a gym. Those who are less fortunate and who haven't a gym could create an interest in outdoor sports, hikes, sleigh rides and skating parties. Even if you don't have a gym, though, movies, de- bates, tournaments and competitions are a must. Wednesday and Friday nights appealed most to everyone because these two nights seemed to break up the week and give the pupils a change. From the second discussion it was the gen- eral feeling that there should be representa- tives from grades seven to eleven although in some school they had students from as low as grades three and four. It was felt that in this way they were being prepared for the higher grades and by the time that they were in entrance they would be ready to speak and give their ideas and opinions. The Student Council had power over nearly everything that concerns them in any way such as budget, social activities and sports. Everything is brought before the principal for a final okay. For the last topic it was pointed out that to create an interest in academic affairs the student should have something to work for in the way of a small scholarship or reward of some sort. Some schools gave a shield or had an honour roll. Following these talks there was a general assembly in the auditorium where full reports were given on the subjects discussed in each group. After this was over there was a conducted tour of their school which had just been com- pleted last year. The closing banquet was held at one oiclock when we were given the best of wishes from the Mayor of the Town of Mount Royal, the M.P. for that district, several representatives from the School Board, the vice president of the P.A.P.T. and a few other civic heads. Dr.George Kilpatrick talked to us on the qua- lities of leadership and then Bill Meath, presi- dent of the Student Council of Mount Royal High School, declared the convention closed. ANNE THOMSON, President. YEAR BOOK COMMITTEE Left to right: Front row: Ann Hudson, Jean Woodwark. Alex Olyarchuk, Buddy Scott Anne Thomson Veronica Boland. Second row: Mr. MacKrith, Miss Palaisy, Moyna Beresford, Miss Hanna Bobby Berdey Standing: Donald Stewart, Desmond Hudson. The Editorial Staff is as follows: Editor-ineChief: Advisors to Editor: Business Manager: Sports Editor: Activity Section: Literary Editor: French Section: Alex Olyarchuk Mr. Calder Miss Hanna Mr, MacKrith Moyna Beresford Desmond Hudson Jean Woodwark Anne Thomson Ann Hudson Executive of the Saguenay Squeeler Editor-in-Chief: Jean Woodwarkg Sports: Desmond Hudson: Cartoons: Bobby Berdejr: Around the A. H. S. Buddy Scott: Copy Editors: Ken Farmer, Anne Swales, Bob Hamel, Kay Woodwark, Brenda Bauman, Anne Thomson, Veronica Boland, Ann Hudson, Joyce Black. During the year 1951-52, several interesting editions of the Saguenay Squeeler were published. Reports of activities, Sports, Cartoons, Jokesg Literary items, Social news, as well as news of ex-pupils appeared in the papers. In September, the Students' Council started by appointing two students to publish each paper. But as this system did not work too well, an Editor-in-Chief was elected who was responsible for getting each paper out on time, helped by the above staff. 15 VALEDICTORY As this school year, our last, draws to a close, the first lap in our life has been com- pleted. In it we have received a basic training, to prepare us for things to come. We can no longer turn to our teachers or parents, but must fend for ourselves. It will be up to each individual himself to make his own decisions, to form his own opinions - and it might be right to compare us to a moth just grown into a butterfly or a bird just discovering his wings. But to our teachers and parents we owe a debt of gratitude. Without the teacher's steady aid we could not have completed this most important lap, for in it our future was shaped and our ideals established. At the same time to our parents, we can, and must, extend our heartfelt thanks, for without their love, guidance, and hard work we might not have even reached this goal - the pride of saying, "I am a graduate of A.H.S." Quite often, in times of depression and gloominess, we tended to blame the teachers, underrate our parents, and, in general, loathe the school. However, we realize now that it was for our own welfare that rules were applied, wrongdoings correc- ted, and punishment administered. In the next few months we will be entering a new and difficult phase in life. Our high school days are over. What we shall carry with us will be the memories of one of the best times in our life - of friendships and familiarities, of school tasks and homework, and of amusing incidents and exciting experiences. Certainly it will be with a feeling of sadness that we leave this school. In times to come although this is our farewell, we shall remember our school, Arvida High School. What we are going to face will be bigger and need a more accurate judgment. We are green and sorely in need of experience, but let us say, with what we feel to be the truth, that, with the training we have received at this school we feel sure, that in times to come, the burden placed upon us will not be too heavy to bear, Before closing I would like to say this - to all undergraduates we wish the best of luck. May you keep up the standards of our school and be rightfully proud of it, correcting it where past students have erred and improving weak spots. To my fellow classmates, also, I wish the best of luck and good fortune. It is with a tinge of regret, and yet a feeling of gladness that I leave this school, and you, my friends. May God bless you and lead you to a life of happiness and prosperity. And now, before I go, let me reminisce for a minute. Remember our pre-high school days - the days of those cherished autograph books. A little verse in one of mine read, "The future lies before you, Like a field of soft, white snow. Be careful how you tread it, For every mark will show." ANNE THOMSON is Q QKV, VVY, W Q '21 fl11fJ11111te bone!! 111111 truig 4ll1l'1flll'fl7Fl'lll0l'K L1 worker too. " ANNE THOMSON Birthplace: December 28, 1935 in Hamilton, Ontario. Favourite Expression: "Oh! Christmas!" Pastime: Writing letters. Pet Aversion: George. Ambition: To be an interior decorator Probable Destiny: Painting houses pink. Theme Song: "A Kiss To Build A Dream On." Activities: President Students' Council, Year Book, Saguenay Squeeler, Choir, Basketball, Badminton Hobbies: Collecting stamps, Tennis, Baby-Sitting. tI'lIl not 111g111'11g with Yyou. 1,111 fflilllg you." NORMAN BLACK Birthplace: April 25, 1934 in Arvida. Favourite Expression: "Wanna bet?H Pastime: Arguing. Pet Aversion: People who shoot the line Ambition: To be an Electrical Engineer. Probable Destiny: Scrubbing bus bars. Theme Song: "Flamingo" Activities: Curling, Badminton. Hobbies: Golf, Skiing, Swimming. 'She 1.5 51111111 Jbc is wise: Ibfif 41 terror for ber rizef' JEAN WOODWARK Birthplace: January 26, 1936 in Ottawa Ontario. Favourite Expression: "Oh, Stop It." Pastime: Running the Gestetner. Pet Aversion: French Class. Ambition: To get a B. Sc. in Nursing. Probable Destiny: Flirting in Men's Ward. Theme Song: "I Get Ideas" Activities: Editor-in-Chief of the Saguenay Squeeler, Students' Council, Year Book, Choir, Track, Badminton, Basketball. Hobbies: Swimming, Tennis, Baby-Sitting, C. G. I. T. Mufby Jtimfy tozffgi n'lJf'11 ll7l'l'Fif ftill ll 1011101'1'0nf P" ALEX OLYARCHUK Birthplace: September 29, 1935, in Arvida. Favourite Expression: "Censored" Pastime: A certain girl in Kenogami. Pet Aversion: People who flirt with his girl. Ambition: To be an Engineer. Probable Destiny: Goaler for A. H. S. Peewees. Theme Song: "My Blue Heaven" Activities: Hockey, Basketball, Year Book, Badminton, Track. Hobbies: Collecting stamps, Rover Scouts. 'Y mnug I .rang I with I could leave" GEORGE GORDON Birthplace: October 28, 1934, in Chute-a-Caron. Favourite Expression: "Oh! my shattered nerves!" Pastime: Chasing Women. Pet Aversion: Trigonometry. Ambition: To be an architect. Probable Destiny: Admiral Gordon. Theme Song: "Sound-Off". Activities: Hockey, badminton, curling, softball Students' Council. IUNIOR RED CROSS PRESIDENTS JUNIOR RED CROSS PRESIDENTS Left to right: Front Row: Edwin Uhlein qGrade IV Sz VJ, Roger Phillips fGrade VI 81 VID, Brian Santoni fGrade VIII 8: IXl, Anne Thomson fGrade X 8: XIJ. Left to right: Back Row: Carolyn Pollock fGrade IJ, Margot Donnelly fGrade Ill, Billy Puxley fGrade IIIJ. is CLASS PROPHECY The red rim along the horizon grew into a deep gold, then green, against the blue back- ground of the sky, sending an unsure hazy light down on Baker Company which was de- ployed and dug in over a sandy hill on one side of a narrow important valley. Down in the valley, near the road where the advanced pla- toon was supporting a six pounder, Pte. Joe Gagnon slept in his fox hole. As he slept he dreamt of steaks, chicken, cool beer, and beautiful girls, but, as most dreams must end, his was shattered by the cracks and the high pitched whines of ricocheting bullets. Usually Joe would have risen to return the fire but somehow he felt different, not scared, but he had a sort of a dreamy feeling, and he began to wonder if this was what it was like when your turn comes. His mind wandered as the din of the battle failed to disturb him, he thought of his childhood and his school days. Yes, he could remember his first date as if it were yesterday. He had decided to take one of the Grade Ten girls to the 1952 Graduation Dance at the Arvida High School. It was a me- morable event which meant much to Joe and shone out like a light on the dark horizon of nis past life. As he thought of the events of the evening the graduates came to his mind, one by one. There were Jean, Anne, Norman, Alex and George. It wasn't a month ago since he had last seen George who was inspecting forward posi- tions with the title of Brigadier Gordon. Al- though George said, "Hello Joe, how are tricks?7' There wasn't time to talk of old times. The way Joe actually got his information on the gang was rather a coincidence. Three weeks ago, after taking a little town back along the line, Joe decided to sample a vil- lager's home brew. When the platoon sergent finally found him, Joe was immediately ship- ped to the closest field hospital to be treated for poisoning. Finally regaining consciousness Joe was confronted by a cute dark haired nurse. He closed his eyes and mumbled, "Am I still dreaming, or is that Jean Woodwark?" But sure enough it was Jean. The next few days Joe spent recovering from his king size hangover and reminiscing on the good old days. It was through Jean that he learnt Anne Thomson was designer for an interior decora- ting firm that furnished the swank apartments in Tutor City. As for Norman, after he gradua- ted as an electrical engineer, he went to work on some very hush hush job for the govern- ment. Whether he was working on guided mis- siles, radar, or maybe even some new inven- tion that will end wars for ever, Joe will never know. Alex turned out as Joe expected. He went to college, graduated as a civil engineer and returned to a good job in Arvida to raise a family. Just as Joe got this far in his thoughts, an extra close ricochet whined over the fox hole and sent a little trickle of drying sand down the wall. Without thinking, yet calmly and methodically, Joe eased his head and shoul- ders over the rim of the fox hole to return the fire. BUDDY SCOTT BOYS SENIOR HOCKEY TEAM Left to right: Front row: Allan Dixon, Arthur McLeod, Alex Olyarchuk, Kenneth Farmer, Donald Stewart. Back row: Bobby Beredey, George Gordon, Buddy Scott, Billy Hurley, David Allan Desmond Hudson, Brian Santoni. Jacques Ducharme. SENIOR BOYS SOFTBALL TEAM Left to right: Front row: Kenneth Farmer, Brian Santoni, Billy Hurley, Jacques Ducharme, Bobby Beredey. Standing: Donald Stewart, Desmond Hudson. Arthur McLeod, Allan Dixon, George Gordon, David Allan, Alex Olyarchuk. 20 Interscholastic A.H.S. Bows to Sf. Paf's in Opening Game. The A.H.S. hockey six met defeat at the hands of the powerful St. Pat's pucksters in their first schedule game at the Arvida Arena on Thursday January 16th, Several new faces appeared on the Arvida High line up, such as Al Dixon, Jim Hustins, Jack Ducharme and Dave Allan. John Vasil put the St. Patls out front in the early minutes of the second period while Boyd Arsenault consolidated this lead in the early minutes of the third period. It was not until the end of the last frame that Art McLeod suc- ceeded in hitting the target for the Arvida High, and thus spoiled goaler Bill Manfred's chance at a shut out. Al Dixon and Ken Farmer were standouts for the locals' while both goalies Olyarchuk and Manfred were exceptionalists. ST. MIKE'S vs A.H.S. In a fast skating hard fought game played at the Arvida Arena on Saturday Feb. 2, the Arvida High team, fighting to get out of the cellar, came through with a three all tie against the classy St. Mikels six. The Arvida pucksters got off to a good start in the first period on goals by Dixon and Gordon, but the Black Xa Whites bounced back shortly before the end of the first period on a lone goal by Stewart Walker. In the second stanza St. Mike's found the target twice to the home team's once. The tallies were notched by Walker and Noel for the visitors, while Art McLeod scored for the home team. The final canto saw much action but both goalies Olyarchuk and Landry suc- ceded in keeping the rubber out of bounds. As a result of this tie, the Arvida High obtain- ed their first point. Hockey Games K.P.H.S. vs A.H.S. On Saturday January 26, the Arvida hockey team met its second defeat in as many starts, as the classy Kenogami six tallied three times to two. Art McLeod opened the scoring in the first period on a pass from Beredy and Dixon. He again flipped the red light in the dying seconds of the game on passes from Dixon and Beredy. The goal getters for the visitors were Roy Condy and Scotty Stewart. Referee J. Dunn handed out penalties to Al Dixon, H. Hicks, R. Conde and S. Stewart. As a result of this loss the Arvida High team slid into fourth position. ST. MIKE'S EDGES OUT A.H.S. The 'Arvida High Hockey team travelled north on Saturday Feb. 23 to meet the light weight 11 Maligne pucksters. The game was played on the open air rink at Riverbend. The first period saw the Arvida High six outplayed as they were unaccustomed to the rink. The paper-city boys led by a score of 3 to 1 at the end of the first period. The lone goal for the Arvidians was scored by Al Dixon. while Michele Gagnon and Stu Walker flipped the light for the home team. The second canto saw the Arvidians more accustomed to the ice and a lone goal was notched by Stu Walker for the paper-makers. During the third frame the Aluminum City boys confined their play for the greater part to their opponents' zone. Donald Stewart flipped the red light in the final minutes of the third period to end the scoring 4 to 2. 21 Interscholastic Hockey Games A.H.S. TROUNCES ST. PAT'S Monday, February 25. Sparked by a three-goal effort by Wing- man Al Dixon and superb goal-tending by veteran Alex Olyarchuk, the A.H. pucksters defeated St. Patrick High School 4-l. Coach Clyde MacLellan's boys displayed an improved brand of hockey and completely outskated the St. Pat's six for the better part of the game. The Joule Street boys gained an early lead, halfway through the first stanza, on a goal by Al Dixon, and maintained it for the rest of the game. During the second period, the Arvida High Squad again proved superior to their ad- versaries. Al Dixon and Art McLeod both notched tallies during this canto, which were the winning points of the game. During the final stanza, the home team settled down to a defensive play. Al Dixon completed his hat trick during the dying mi- nutes on a shot from his own blue line, after Coach Savard had pulled goaler Manfred out. Robert Marinacci spoiled goalie Olyar- chuk's chances of a shutout with only ninety seconds of play left. The contest was fast and skilful, with the A.H.S. showing more speed and passing ef- ficiency most of the way. This rounded out the teamls schedule and left them with one win, one tie, against four losses. D. HUDSON K.P.H.S. OUTCLASSES A.H.S. In their last scheduled game against Keno- gami, the Arvida High met defeat by a score of 4 to 2. Al Dixon was the star of the game for the Arvidians by notching both goals with McLeod and Hurley assisting. Glen Edwards shone for the visitors, obtaining one goal and two assists. The other tallies for the visitors were obtained by Scotty Stewart, Harold Hicks and John Matthews. Referee Percy McLellan dished out penalties to Dixon, Farmer and S. Stewart. A.H.S. LOSES SEMI-FlNAL OPENER The St. Patrick High School made a sensa- tional comeback by delivering the A.H. boys a staggering 5-1 check on Monday, March 3, in the first of two games total points, of the semi-final series. The powerful St. Pat's pucksters had cap- tured a 4-0 lead by midway through the third period on goals by J. Vasil 123, B. Arsenault and L. Deschenes before the J oule Street boys notched their tally on a play set up by Art McLeod and Al Dixon, and tabbed by Ken Farmer. John Vasil completed his hat trick during the last minutes of the third frame, bringing the final count to 5-1 for the Greens. This defeat somewhat deadened the A.H. hopes for the Tremaine Trophy, as only a victory with a difference of five counters would assure the Joulers a position in the A. H. S. ARE ELIMINATED BY ST. PAT'S The Arvida High hockey team was elimi- nated from future Tremaine Cup competition through a 4-0 victory on the part of the St. Pat's pucksters. In the first frame, the St. Pat's boys 'gained a 1-0 lead. Much hard skating was done by both teams and the play swayed from one end of the rink to the other, but neither team scored again till the half marker of the final stanza. Then the St. Pat's knocked the count up to 4-0. This was a well played match, though slightly on the rough side as any semi-final game is apt to be. Referee Ken Brown dished finals. D. HUDSON out penalties to J. Vasil, Al Dixon and to B. Santoni. Hurley, McLeod and Dixon played superb hockey through the game, with B. Santoni showing much improvement. In fact, the whole A.H.S. team played exceptionally well and are to be lauded for their fine efforts and out- standing quality of sportsmanship. Now the Arvida High boys may hang up their skates and wait anxiously for another season and another chance at final victory. Let us hope that the fine quality of hockey and superb show of sportsmanship which dwelt in the A.H. boys throughout this season may last through many seasons. D. HUDSON 22 MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR KING GEORGE VI On Friday, February 15, 1952, a joint me- morial service for His Most Gracious Majesty, the late King George VI, conducted by the Ministerial Fellowship of the Saguenay with Rev. T. J. Matthews, Rev. K. H. Woodwark, and Rev. J. S. Kennedy, was held in Arvida First United Church. The School children with their teachers met at the school at eleven o'clock and then marched quietly to the servi- ce. Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, Wolf Cubs, Brownies, and the 63rd L.A.A. Regiment RCA were also represented. The service opened with the Girl Guides carrying the Union Jack and both the Boy Scouts and the Wolf Cubs carrying their furled troup flags. After hymns, prayers, and scripture reading, the sermon was given by FIL J. S. Neff, who spoke eloquently of Christ as King, and of the late King George VI, who bowed to God every day. He also said that in this day of commemoration, Christians should not mourn, but thank God for his life, "The Last Post" and "Reveille" were sounded by Mr. Jean Back, after which the flags were unfurled, and the congregation sang "God Save The Queen." JEAN WOODWARK PUBLIC SPEAKING CONTEST On Thursday night, February 21, at the Home and School Association meeting, six students who had been chosen to represent the High School took part in a public speaking contest. Each speech, which was between five and ten minutes in length, was on one topic taken from a list made up by the Association. The judges, Mr. Dyck, Mrs, Hogg, and Mr. Harryet, found it extremely difficult to decide on a winner from the six excellent speeches, but they finally chose Norman Black and Brenda Bauman as first and second respecti- vely. Honourable mention was given Bobby Berdey for his splendid delivery. The list of speakers, who were introduced to the audience by the Master of Ceremonies, Ed Neff, are as follows: Norman Black: The Atomic Age Brenda Bauman: Getting The Most Out Of High School Bobby Berdey: Interesting Vocations Desmond Hudson: The Atomic Age Jean Woodwark: An Interesting Character - King George VI Ann Hudson: An Interesting Character King George VI PRESENTATION OF PRIZES FOR PUBLIC SPEAKING At the last assembly before Easter, on Tuesday morning, April 8, prizes were given to the winners of the Public Speaking Contest. Mr. Lewis, President of the Home and School Association, spoke for a few minutes before presenting a S10 cheque to Norman Black and a 356 cheque to Brenda Bauman. He said that the Association would like to have pre- sented each speaker with a small prize in re- cognition of the great effort put in and excel- lent results of the speeches, but this year it was impossible. He hoped that there would be the same endeavour next year, and that the Association would then be able to increase the number of prizes. The school choir, directed by Mrs. Hogg, then sang two selections, "In An Old Dutch Garden" and "Chiapanecas", followed by "God Save The Queen" 23 THE WINNING SPEECH OF i952 THE Arolvuc AGE When I was asked to make a speech I thought of the main factor that gave our age its name - UTHE ATOM.. - The atom as a destroyer of life. The atomic age dates back to the beginning of the nineteen twenties when men began to explain and prove or disprove theories by the discovery of the composition of the atom. The atom is so minute that it is hard to think of it as a potential destroyer of life. It is so small that it would take ten thousand of them placed side by side to make the thickness of a soap bubble. Scientists found that the atom could be broken down to form other materials by bombarding the nucleus and thus splitting the atom. There is a great deal of energy emitted when this process takes place, and both the force and the speed of the particles flying off will split other atoms and thus create a chain reaction that builds up a terri- fic pressure. The energy or pressure of this chain reaction was used as a tremendous des- tructive force during the second World War when the Uranium atom, which is very heavy, was utilized in the Atom Bomb. The Japanese felt the devastating blow of the mighty little atom's strength when they saw more than half of the beautiful city of Hiroshima disap- pear under a blinding flash and a mighty column of smoke. When the atom was split a radiation was evolved which caused very painful sores, and frequently an even more painful death, to humans and animals alike. In these days of armed peace, the thought of the atom bomb being used to fight a bloody war is most disconsoling. However the minute atom, the powerful atom, has also great pros- pects as peaceful servant as well as an enemy of mankind. It may heat our homes and give us health and prosperity. A The Bible is often quoted as saying, "There will be wars and rumours of wars? But the true quotation lies in Matthew 20, verse 7. I quote: "And ye shall hear of wars and ru- mours of wars: see that ye be not troubled: for all these things must come to pass, but the end is not yet." This passage seems to add comfort to the fearful person who thinks an atomic war will destroy the earth and all its inhabitants, and it helps them look forward to the rest of the twentieth century with more hope and peace of mind. THE ATOM BOMB AS A LIFE SAVER Canada is now developing a new type of Atom Bomb, that will not destroy but rather preserve life. The bomb is enclosed in a new machine which treats cancer patients by al- lowing the radiation to escape to the patient's body and there destroy the atoms of the cancer. ' I The new bomb utilizes radiation-saturated cobalt discs. The discs are about the size of a quarter in diameter and about one fiftieth of an inch thick. The radiation of course is caused by the bombardment of the atoms. This machine costs less to buy and operate than the radium machine. One CE'llL7S worth of uranium-activated cobalt can do the work of curing that it requires 51564 worth of radium to do. Recently the president of the Pulp and Paper Committee of Canada announced that it would not be long before the atom will be saving millions of dollars worth of pulp wood each year. The atom would be used to combat bugs and disease that take such a great toll of forests. He said also that the time was not far off when huge mobile units, powered by atomic energy. would move into the forests and take a whole tree and pulverize it on the spot. This would also he of great saving to the wood industry because it would cost less for equipment and more could be made from each tree because the roots, leaves, bark and branches would be used. What I have just said shows that the little uranium atom is a very powerful enemy, as well as an ally, of death. What does it hold in store for us in the rest of the twentieth century? NORMAN BLACK Grade XI Q ,ml , V I , X-I fy :-' ' N Wu - , , li", 'I ' N. W ,- . . A l , .4Ql,WU. W , A 1, V,-,1 1, ' , 7 , 7' ..fffAxf,g ' Va" -. n !'. 1'-ij . My "- , .Q 1,4 kb ' V , X W rm g l 7 I L 0 ,V+ I 1' T all O E A 'wr' 4 A 'D ' 5 n 1 . N-HF 1. 'H 9- . ll-C! "J U 'H ' lr , an-. 1 H. - , 4 . , 4. H , , ' f o "" F , I Xu I A A , . I hm Heal!! E' 13, 1' ' A .l,, , ,.'l.,x. 'M ,QI 5'lv"H J' VN - .' 1 I', I' " ' 'T inf- All H fu Uh. . - .. ' 1, L U , 1-wi f n.. "Yu-1.2. ..I1 r. . .u .4 ..ll. r' In -,- ! .V I ,..' I fr n 'Y n ., N lx-. lp- ' 1. 1' .f I 7 yuh QQ " Q 1 -ff --W -v ' QW: I I1 sf 1' J I - ,., . - ' A , - ,.- fl. , , ,. .J 1 ' .V . -w n 1. 'v',. X i 'qfvjil dh: -i ' ev H"l' . WI ll-"" iz' Ill 'lxr Il I , f ,IM ew-My X , w w :M 'H -lkgimr . ,", .x.g:,,'L!' . bn: A Z4 THE WINNING SPEECH OF l95l CANA A, MY FUTURE What will Canada my country, be like du- ring the next fifty years? I think that Canada has a greater future than any other country in the world. In this talk I am going to con- sider Canada's future from the economic point of view. Canada, since the war, is rapidly deve- loping in industrial expansion. Canada has more hydroelectric power than it knows what to do with. It has a sea route on the east and on the west. There is a plentiful supply of labour. Canada has undeveloped ore bodies whose size no one really knows. With these assets no wonder Canada's industry is growing in leaps and bounds. It is difficult to predict the future of Canada during the next fifty years. The only way to get an idea is to think of the way Canada has progressed in the last fifty years. As an example I will take the Saguenay valley, which is familiar to us all. What was it like fifty years ago? Farming was the only industry. There was no Alumi- num Company, No Shipshaw Power House. No Price Brothers paper mills. The city of Chicoutimi was about lf 10th its Size. There was no such thing as the city of Arvida. There were no large boats coming into Port Alfred with tons and tons of raw material for indus- try. There were no planes roaring into Bagot- ville with mail of the same day. Neither was there a beautiful paved highway with trans- ports speeding along it carrying merchandise from Montreal. There were no freight trains with car after car filled with tons of coke and bauxite for the Aluminum plant. Since the Saguenay valley has advanced this much in the last fifty years, what will it be like during the next fifty years? Will all the sections opening up in Canada expand like this? There is a great future for the mining industry in Quebec. A vein of nickel has just been found in Ungava which may be the richest in Canada. A mountain of titanium, a new metal, has been discovered on the north shore of the St. Lawrence. This deposit of titanium is the largest in the world. It will be processed at Sorel. Near the Quebec-Labrador border great iron deposits have been found. This iron ranks among the top three new industrial develop- ments in the world today. Two hundred million dollars is being in- vested in this iron venture. A 360 mile railroad has been started to connect this mining area with ocean shipping on the St. Lawrence. Within a few years this iron industry will be earning millions of dollars for Canada. About 140 miles from this iron is one of the greatest undeveloped water power sites in the world. The Hamilton River drops 305 feet which is 1 2f 3 times as steep as Niagara Falls. Its possible power is 1 million 250 thousand horse power, which is as great as Shipshaw. Over the past few years there has been a great increase in activity in the oil fields in Alberta. Accordng to the newspapers, this is only the beginning. These oil fields supply a good part of Canada with oil. If production keeps in- creasing'Canada may be able to supply all her own oil. We, in eastern Canada, get this oil very cheaply, This is because an inter-provin- cial pipe line was built from Alberta to Lake Superior. There are not only huge projects beginning in Canada. There are hundreds of small indus- tries springing up all over Canada which all contribute to the country's industrialgrowth. This increase in industries over the past fifty years has resulted in a great increase in Canada's population. Dozens of countries outrank Canada in population but none have excelled it in population growth during the past fifty years. In that time the population has nearly tripled to a present 14,000,000 It is not difficult to imagine that the next fifty years will see an even greater increase. The international crisis may or may not improve, but each day our country grows older and wiser, and its people and industries grow more and more important to the modern world. Looking ahead we can think of the day when Canada will be second to none, and her industries and natural resources will be among the richest and most profitable in the world. BRENDA BAUMAN GIRLS SENIOR SOFTBALL TEAM Left to right: Front row: Ethel Soper. Joyce Black, Helen Gordon. Veronica Boland, Jean Woodwark. Back row Anne Hudson, Norma McLeod, Anne Thomson, Olga Hrycko, Moyna Beresford, SENIOR GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM Left to right: Back rowg Moyna Beresford, Katherine Woodwark, Anne Thomson, Jean Woodwark. Olga Hrycko. Front row, Ethel Soper, Joyce Black, Helen Gordon, Veronica Boland, Anne Hudson. S 1 I BOYS SENIOR BASKETBALL TEAM Left to right: I Front row: Donald Stewart, Bobby Beredy, Arthur McLeod,.Dav1d Allan. Back row: Alex Olyarchuck, Brian Santoni, Edward Neff, Billy Hurley, Bobby Hamel. In the Fall of 1951, the Senior Basketball Team of Arvida High played an exhibition game against Kenogami High School. This game was played in the Memorial Hall. To our sorrow we lost, but after the game we thought that we did very well until Dr. McGeer, the man who refereed the game, started telling us all our faults and mistakes. So, to tell the truth, we really made a mess of the whole game. A few weeks later we asked Dr. McGeer to be our coach, which he very readily accepted. By his patience and knowledge of the game, he made us into a team that could give any other team a good run for the game. Dr. McGeer also arranged during the year many games against a city team. These games were played at the Gym of A.H.S. Now that the basketball season is over the boys all feel that they owe all their knowledge of basketball to a fine coach, and to show their thanks to Dr, McGeer they all got together and gave him a subscription to LIFE magazine. So, for the boys that will be on the basketball next Year, we would advise you to try to get in touch with Dr. McGeer. We are sure he would be very ready to help out in this fine sport basketball. SCHOCL CURLING TEAM Left to right: George Gordon, Norman Black, David Allan, Gordon Eberts, Eric Hahto. BADMINTON WINNERS Left to right: Jimmy Boland, Billy Hurley, Anne Hudson, Bobby Beredy, Kenneth Farmer. GRADE! Absent: Jeffrey Gaunt, Karen Collins GRADE!! GRADE III Absent: Catherine Hogg GRADE IV 6' V Absent: Grade IV Risto Heinoo Grade V Barbara Hogg 37 l W 4 1 w L. GRADE VI C-r VII Absent: Jean Gordon GRADE vm GIIX Absent: Helen Gordon, Rodney Fountain GRADE X Cv XI Absent: George Gordon, Brenda Bauman PHYSICS LABQRATGRY -"1 5 i 31 I DOMEST C SCEENCE N.,.,,,v :eg-s:s:5,:-:::s::,s'1,z..:z:::e-as2:32:12-:1:s:s:s1as:ssfffgf' A x ,1,:.S::f.fM.:2-r,-,.,:,..::1::::,:,:.:,f.:,f:M. . ' MANUAL TRAFN-WC mmm RED CROSS TOYS CRADUATINC CLASS 1952 Left to right: Norman Black, Je-an Woodwavk, Anne Thomson, Alex Olyarchuk Q ,ml , V I , X-I fy :-' ' N Wu - , , li", 'I ' N. W ,- . . A l , .4Ql,WU. W , A 1, V,-,1 1, ' , 7 , 7' ..fffAxf,g ' Va" -. n !'. 1'-ij . My "- , .Q 1,4 kb ' V , X W rm g l 7 I L 0 ,V+ I 1' T all O E A 'wr' 4 A 'D ' 5 n 1 . N-HF 1. 'H 9- . ll-C! "J U 'H ' lr , an-. 1 H. - , 4 . , 4. H , , ' f o "" F , I Xu I A A , . I hm Heal!! E' 13, 1' ' A .l,, , ,.'l.,x. 'M ,QI 5'lv"H J' VN - .' 1 I', I' " ' 'T inf- All H fu Uh. . - .. ' 1, L U , 1-wi f n.. "Yu-1.2. ..I1 r. . .u .4 ..ll. r' In -,- ! .V I ,..' I fr n 'Y n ., N lx-. lp- ' 1. 1' .f I 7 yuh QQ " Q 1 -ff --W -v ' QW: I I1 sf 1' J I - ,., . - ' A , - ,.- fl. , , ,. .J 1 ' .V . -w n 1. 'v',. X i 'qfvjil dh: -i ' ev H"l' . WI ll-"" iz' Ill 'lxr Il I , f ,IM ew-My X , w w :M 'H -lkgimr . ,", .x.g:,,'L!' . bn: A 34 Iiiterarp Section JUNIOR SECTION I would Like to speak to you to-day for a few minutes on the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa, the capital of our country. I have been there several times and each time I go, I see something new. They are built on Parliament Hill and con- sist of the east block, the west block and the main building, all facing on a central square. The tower is famous and is called the Peace Tower. In the tower is a large book called the Book of Remembrance. In it are the names of all the Canadian soldiers who died in the two World Wars. At the top of the tower is a carillon of fifty-three bells. They are played like an organ on special occasions. The clock strikes every quarter hour and can be heard a couple of miles away. The tower is 365 feet high. Behind the main buildings is the library. It has many thousands of books and has a copy of every book and paper that is published in Canada. It is the only building of its kind in the world. It is completely round and you see the very top when you stand on the floor. The floor squeaks when you walk on it because it got soaked when the buildings burned in 1917. The ceiling in the Senate is gilded and the walls are covered with paintings of pictures in the first war. There is a special throne for the Governor-General when he opens Parlia- ment. The ceiling in the House of Commons is made of one big piece of linen made especially in Ireland. There is a press gallery at one end for reporters and a vistors' gallery at the other end. Anyone is allowed to go and listen to the members of Parliament. They keep gold bricks in the basement and my uncle, who works in the Government, has counted them. The Mounties guard the gold and they also stand at all the doors. People like to take their pictures. Visitors usually end their sightseeing with a trip to the top of the tower. You have to go part-way up stone stairs and then two different elevators. At the top is a narrow bal- cony with a high stone railing. You can see for many miles. You can see the clock working and hear the bells strike. Everyone who goes to Ottawa should be sure to visit the Parlia- ment Buildings. DAVID HARTWICK, Grade VI The topic I have chosen today is "What I Would Like to be When I Grow Up." When I grow up I would like to be a doctor because doctors have interesting jobs and they are always busy. I would like to own my own hospital and things like that. To be a surgeon it would be necessary to have had every contagious disease, like scarlet fever, pneumonia, etc. I have always wanted to see inside of a person. I'm also not afraid of blood as some people are. When they see a deep cut they faint. There is another reason why I want to be a doctor. It is that I would have a 1962 con- vertible Cadillac. CLIFFORD BOLAND Grade 6 MODERN CONVENIENCES I chose the topic of "Modern Convenien- cesl' because I think you all should know how lucky we are. For instance, think of the air- plane. Long ago, when people travelled, there were long portages, wild animals to beware of, and Indians were always near. Now we should be thankful for it, but when a plane is delayed for a few minutes, people get angry. Sometime when you hear someone getting angry about that, remind him how long it would take him to get to his destination in the earlier years. But my problem is, will tra- vel ever be faster and more comfortable? HALFORD WILSON Grade VI 35 A SAILOR My brother has always wanted to be a sailor and he is one now. The first company he worked for was the Saguenay Terminals. When he worked for that company he didn't go on very long voyages. He only went to ports in the United States and around Africa. He worked for that company for about a year and then quit because they worked in bauxite and he didn't like that. It wasn't a very clean job but it wasnit bad. When he went to Africa he brought home a stuffed alligator and a big sea shell. He said that the water was full of alligators of about fifteen feet or more all around the boat. After he quit working for that company he started to work for the Atlan- tic Shipping Company in Montreal. The name of the second boat is "S. S. Cliffside." On that boat he started in Montreal and went to Hali- fax. From Halifax he went to France, from France he went to about five ports in Spain. When he left Spain two stowaways got on the boat and hid in it. At the end of three days they showed themselves. When the captain saw them he asked them if they had robbed any banks in Spain and other things. They said that they hadn't. He also asked them if they had killed any people, if they had ever been in prison, and many other questions. They always said that they hadn't done any- thing but the captain did not trust them so he talked on radio to the place in Spain where they had come from and asked if they had done any harm there. The police in Spain and other people said that they hadn't done any harm. The boat was in the Mediterranean Sea now and the captain didn't think it was worth while to take them back to Spain. When- ever they came into a port the captain always put handcuffs on their hands so that they wouldn't run away. Later they didn't handcuff them any more but let them work on the boat just like any other of the men. My brother is on a different boat now but he still writes letters to the stowaways because he was their friendg they always talked together. My bro- ther can write and talk in Spanish so he writes letters to them in Spanish. He can talk fifteen languages or maybe sixteen now so almost every country he goes to he can talk the lan- guage used there. From Spain he went through the Strait of Gibralter through the Mediterranean Sea and to Port Said in Egyptg from Port Said in Egypt he went through the Suez Canal through the Red Sea and to Bomby, India. Before they got off they had to get about fifteen different kinds of vaccination because there are many kinds of diseases in India. And also on the boat they have to eat certain kinds of food all the time. For travelling around in India there would be a man with a little buggy and you would get in it and he'd pull to the place you wanted to go. You'd give the man fifty cents and he would really be glad. My brother went to almost every country and he's got all kinds of money. Most of the people are very poor in India. Some men have fifteen wives if they're rich. If they aren't very rich they have five to ten. In some places you have to walk quite a long way and the people who are poor follow you about two miles if you go that far because they see that you come from Canada or the United States and they know that you must have some money. My brother was walking along a street in India and there was a whole crowd of people following him because they wanted him to give them something. He gave one person his pen, another some pencils, and the rest a few cents just so that tney'd go away. Later another person wanted some- thing and he gave him a button which he had and the person went away really glad. At the end he only had his shoes, pants, and shirt left on him. From India he went to the Philippine Islandsg from the Philippines he went to the Hawaiian Islands. When he was there it was around the month of January here and while it was so cold that we could hardly go outside, he wrote a letter and said that he was going swimming. From the Hawaiian Islands he went to Cartagena and Colombia in South America. He said that they sold fifty pounds of bananas for a quarter there. tTo be continued on page 627 36 TOBY - AN INTERESTING CHARACTER I have a peculiar friend named Toby. He can make a lot of noise in spite of being only a year and half old. His ears are three times the size of mine, his legs are a little over a foot long, but he can jump three feet high without any trouble, and you should see his collar! It's as black as coal He cut his leg once and we had to have Dr. Richter in or else he would have bled to death. The doctor had to take him up to the hospital so my mother gave the doctor a sheet to wrap him up in. She gave him a white sheet but he brought baek a red one although there was a tight tourniquet on his leg. When they got him up there they took him to the operation room. He bit Dr. Richter and also got ether in his eyes. When they brought him home again he had a big bandage on his leg. He had to leave it on for four days but it began to swell so we had to take it off. When the swelling went down he took out all the six clips he had in his cut, and in a month he could run and jump as he used to but there is still a scar a quarter of an inch deep. Who's Toby? Why, that's my dog! BILLY GILLIS, Grade VI SCULPTURING To sculpture you have two razor-sharp chisels and four sculpturing knives, some mo- deling clay, or some plaster of Paris if you can't get modeling clay. When I sculpture I take the first and second chisels and shape the clay roughly resembling what I am going to make. Then I take the biggest knife and shape the clay more like what I am making. Next I take the second knife and make the forehead, etc. Then I take the third knife and make details such as the I eyes, nose, mouth, hair and ears. The last knife I use to smooth the neck and anything with not much details, or else I would smooth them away. I have practised a lot, yet I am not perfect. It will take me many more years of study and practice. . BILLY STARR, Grade VI AN INTERESTING CHARACTER I am about to tell you a little about a very interesting character. I have chosen as my subject Terry Sawchuck, goaler of the Detroit Red Wings. I have always liked hockey and I admire T. S. because he is one of the greatest goalies ever to play hockey. T. S. is only twenty-two years old. He is the big reason why the Red Wings are running away with the National Hockey League Race. He has big hands and fast reflexes and a real gorilla-like crouch. In fifty games this season he has scored ten shutouts and allowed a miserly average of 1.86 goals scored against him per game. Goalie Terry Sawchuck does not believe in guess- workg he has forty stitches in his face to prove it Although I have never had the privilege of seeing Terry Sawchuck play, I look forward to the day and never stop hoping. JOHN EBERTS Grade VI 37 TOM AND THE PAINKILLER Tom was feeling unhappy because Becky Thatcher, his "fiancee" had given him back his andiron knob which Tom had given her as an engagement ring. Aunt Polly had decided to cure Tom with Painkiller. Tom "made on" he liked it and after bothering Aunt Polly so much for it she said, "If you want it so much, take it yourself." So Tom mended the health of a crack in the sitting room floor with it. One day while Tom was in the act of do- sing a crack, Peter the cat came purring up. Tom said, "Don't ask for it if you don't want it? Peter signified that he did want it. So Tom pried his mouth open and poured down the Painkiller. Peter did a couple of side flips, a double somersault, gave a war whoop and tore around the room spreading havoc in his wake. Aunt Polly arrived just in time to see him sail through the open window carrying the remaining flower pots with him. Now would you like to read Mark Twain's "Tom Sawyerw? My apologies to Mark Twain. BOBBY HORWOOD, Grade Seven. GOOD CITIZENSHIP I have divided my speech into four main topics. First, Good Citizenship at school, second. Good Citizenship in the street, third, Good Citizenship in sports, and last of all Good Citizenship at parties. GOOD CITIZENSHIP AT SCHOOL: It's a beautiful summer day. The boys and girls are just waiting for the recess bell to ring. It rings. Out go the boys and girls, each few to their own destination either skipping, softball, or tag. On the way out down go Johnny's orange peels and Jane's chocolate bar wrappers. They don't worry about the appearance of their school ground or any- body's slipping on the rubbish. The recess bell then rings and the fifteen minutes are over. Jack throws down the bat and ball with 'Tm not a sucker"expression on his face. Some class will be minus a softball game at recess in the future. Is that the way boys and girls should carry on at school? GOOD CITIZENSHIP IN THE STREETS: Don't walk four or five abreast on a side- walk. It may be fun for you but how about the other people? Are they going to squeeze in bet- ween you, or jump over you? Use some com- mon sense. They aren't "Super Man" you know. If there is an old lady having trouble to carry her parcels or to cross a busy street, ask her if she would like some help. That won't kill you, will it? GOOD CITIZENSHIP IN SPORTS: In sports you can really determine if a boy or girl is a good citizen. If there is an out- standing player on the opposite team who is different race or creed do not ridicule him. Welcome players from out of town as you would want to be welcomed. In sports you should be a "fair loser" and a "good sport". GOOD CITIZENSHIP AT PARTIES: You may not think there is such a thing as Good Citizenship at parties, but there is. When you are at a party and most likely en- joying yourself as you should, do you ever think about the hostess and her mother? Are they having a good time? Well they aren't but if you would give them a hand they would. Why donit you help pass the cookies around, or bring your glass and some one elses out to the kitchen for a refill, or help by choosing a game or two? Jane will surely run out of games sometime. These kindnesses will also help you overcome shyness. Are you a good citizen? Am I a good citi- zen? Are all the pupils of Arvida High School good citizens? May I quote a little poem which made me think seriously about good citizen- ship? "I know a friendly city, a happy place indeed, Where there are friendly neighbours of every race and creed, And when a lonely stranger walks down its friendly streets, He gets a friendly greeting from every one he meets. Each friendly house of worship has doors that open wide, ..That seem to say, "Please enter, you'll find your friend inside. So isn't it a pity and don't you think it wrong, If such a friendly city lives only in my song." JUNE SAN TONI Grade VIII 38 A THUNDERSTORM It happened at noon one day in the middle of August. The sky was a bright blue with pure clouds drifting aimlessly about. All week it had been very warm but that day it had turned blistering hot. It was just like the saying, "Out of the frying pan into the fire." There was no trace or whisper of a breeze. All was calm and uneventful. Suddenly the bright sky turned to a deep blue, ominous clouds appeared, and a violent wind swirled out of nowhere. A rumble of thunder sounded through the sky. Distant flashes of lightning could be seen, forcing their way through the black sky. A raging storm was approaching. The once-settled birds were now screeching, squawking and flutte- ring about seeking shelter from their bitter enemy, the storm. The forceful wind howled around, picking up dust, twigs, and dried leaves. Unexpectedly people's hats were rolling crazily around with angry pursuers running after them. A THE FASCINATION There always has, and always will be, a perennial mystery in this world-the fascina- tion of the forbidden. To give a person some commonplace object is nothing strange, and will not arouse much attention, since it is not spectacular. He looks at it, thinks about it for a few seconds, then quietly resumes his previous work. But to hint of a secret, show a glimpse of something, or tell of a forbidden place is a sure way to arouse curiosity and interest. No matter whether a 'forbidden' deafening crash of thunder sounded, after which every person and animal raced for shel- ter. Then the rain came down in torrents, cleaning every nook in our little town. Thun- der crashed alternately with the lightning flashes. The clouds seemed to open up and let the rain wash the district. As suddenly as it came up, the storm died down. The wind subsided until there was just a refreshing breeze. The sky took its former appearance, then the sun shone brightly, eager to dry up the sticky wetness. Once again the birds were out, singing gay songs. The drowned grass and trees did their best to perk up again now that they had had their baths. Everyone was upset or worried about the storm except me. Like all the other lucky worms I just crawled around in and out of my many holes enjoying the whole situation. V ERONICA BOLAND, Grade Nine. OF THE FORBIDDEN room holds a dead corpse or still air, an ancient secret or a basket full of papers, it makes no difference to him, the word 'forbidden' is the key, and will lurk in his mind until he yields to the temptation to investigate. He may say that he has given up trying, out of sheer exasperation but in the back of his mind keeps ringing 'who? why? how? where? until the thought becomes an obsession. KAY WOODWARK Grade IX BACK SEAT DRIVERS The pests of life, the cause of accidents and one of the scourges of humanity - back seat drivers. These people can be such agreeable people in every other way. My mother is an exceptionnally good driver herself, that is for a woman, but when she is not driving she is a first class back seat driver. The other day I was driving on a routine shopping tour. When we left the house every- thing started off just fine, not a word said about the way I changed gears. I felt elated-at last mother had confidence in my driving. Then it all began to happen. We were about three hundred feet from a stop light. I was quite aware that there was a stop light there as I've passed by it only about three thousand times, but to assure me of the fact Mother said, "Now slow down, there's a stop light ahead. Watch that car ahead of you. No, no, keep to the centre of the roadf' Well, anyway with my mother's expert coa- ching, I finally stopped, but much to my mo- ther's amazement. After the light changed to green, off we went with our destination Bib- bie's Clothing Store three blocks down the street. Did I hear Mother mentioning some- thing about "a cloud of dust"? Well as you have suspected, according to my mother, I almost ran into three cars and almost ran down four children during the course of that three block drive. During that short cruise, my mother found many faults with my dri- ving along with the usual, "Now watch this car, watch that car, slow down, tI'm going ten miles an hourj. As for the last block I just about rendered the position of driver to my coach. We finally arrived at our destination, without mishap. Even I was surprised. We- were there safe and sound, and it only took us eight minutes, to walk it takes five. ALLAN DIXON Grade X 39 A MISERABLE MOMENT There it stood, tall, sentinel-like and un- nerving - reminding me, always reminding me. Why was it there? I hated it, with its leering look and silly talk. Oh, why had I been so stupid? Why hadnit I stayed in that even- ing? "Oh be quiet you foolish grinning article with your silly phrase, 'did-it-again, did-it- again, did-it-again." I buried my face in my hands and tried to forget, but I couldn't. The thought kept coming back and torturing me. I looked at the little alarm clock on the kitchen shelf. It was ticking away the minutes rhythmically. I wanted to stop it. I wanted to stop time altogether, turn it back to much earlier that evening. How could I face people? It was the fourth time. Each time I had vowed that I wouldn't. but I had done it again. Why? SURE Spring is here at least. The snow has gone - practicallyg the trees are beginning to bud, and it is mild enough out that we can dispense with our winter clothing. Baseball has begun, and already there are several broken windows in token of this fact. Bicycles are appearing by the dozens. The pedestrians are beginning to trample down and mutilate the lawns again. The winter has gone by in record time in some respects, but, according to some of the old timers, we can expect snowstorms right up to the end of June. However, we shall see what we shall see. The little kids are starting to litter the roads with glass in one of their favourite games - hopscotch. From the bottoms of drawers, alleys and marbles have appeared, I turned. There he stood, looking malicious and domineering, "Said-you-wouldn't, did-it-again, said-you- wouldnit, did-it-again." I took a coke from the fridge. It tasted flat and old. I left it and decided to try to get some sleep. As I mounted the stairs I could still hear that Grandfather Clock ticking away, "did-it-again, did-it-again, did-it-again." Oh. why had I gone out instead of staying in and studying for my exams? It would be the fourth time I flunked my final exam to complete my course. 'fDid-it-again, did-it-again. did-it-again." MOYNA BERESFORD Grade 10. SIGNS and we shall be lucky if nobody breaks his neck trying to navigate through the marble tournament vicinities. All the women are starting to spring clean their houses, and one can hardly negotiate through the piles of furniture, Birds are beginning to establish themselves for the summer, and animals are busy repairing the ravages of winter on their homes and themselves. All in all, even though the old-timers insist that this is just an inter- lude, that a blizzard may be excepted any day, I'm not pessimistic - Spring is here! EDWARD NEFF, Grade 10. -10 ATOMIC My speech has to do with Atomic Energy and how it may bring peace to this troubled world. It is a simple narrative of what was done to give man his first control over the energy locked in the atom and the possibi- lities that some day atomic power will bring man to a state of permanent peace. What may come of atomic fission, for good or evil is enough to stagger any imagination, but the atomic bomb itself is no awesome mys- tery. Let us think of the tapping of atomic ener- gy as a detective story. The first meager clues were found about fifty years ago, when a Ger- man scientist discovered the X-Ray and a Frenchman, William Becquerel discovered what we call radioactivity when he found that uranium salts had exposed a photographic plate in the dark. From this point, Pierre and Marie Curie went on to discover radium, the first known radioactive element and always present in uranium. Scientists had believed that this energy could be nothing less than a breaking down of the element, but this was against the "Laws of Physics" which stated that the elements were unchanging and unchangeable. As radium dissipates its energy, it eventually turns to lead, but this natural decay is very, very slow. Dangerous to human flesh as exposure is, a gram of it would be one hun- dred years in giving off enough heat to boil a cup of water. According to "Physics Laws", everything is made up of indivisible particles called atoms, but as early as 1900, Sir J. J. Thompson, a British Physicist had identified the electron, a minute particle of the atom. By 1918, Lord Rutherford had chipped a fragment from an atom and discovered the proton, and in 1932, Sir James Chadwick discovered a third par- ticle which he had called a neutron. All electrons, protons and neutrons are the same, and it is the proportion of protons which makes one element differ from another. Just as detectives make assumptions, to solve mysteries, the scientists, acting as de- tectives now made some major assumptions but there could have been no bomb if these as- sumptions had not been true. The first of these assumptions was rea- soned out in 1905 by Dr. Albert Einstein who announced his conclusion that mass and ener- gy were different forms of the same thing. He declared that all matter was locked up energy and energy was dissipated matter. ENERGY He now made another assumption, that if matter could be converted into energy by the breaking down of the atom, it would pro- duce unbelievable power. Then, Dr. Enrico Fermi, by using a neu- tron as a bullet and by first slowing it down by passing it through hydrogen succeeded in splitting an atom of uranium. A new figure now appears-he is Dr. Niels Bohr, a great atomic physicist. By his calcu- lations, if the atom had been split, the parts should have flown apart like celestial cannon balls. He soon proved this in the laboratory. Meanwhile, it had been discovered that uranium contains three different kinds of atoms. Chemically they are the same, U-238, U-235, U-234. More than 9952 of Uranium is U-238, there is only one part in 140 of U-235 and the barest trace of U-234. It is the less-than-192 of U-235 which was the material out of which an atom bomb might be made. The great problem now was to produce the U-235 in quantity. At this time, Hitler was about to invade Poland bringing on World War II and un- doubtedly,whoever succeeded in producing the U-235 in quantity would win the war. There could be no doubt of' the parali- zing effect, physically and morally, of even one bomb. In the terms of a detective story, the mur- derer now was identified and the case against him completed by the police. But the facts and alleged motives were fantastic beyond the experience of normal people, and a jury remained to be convinced. Ways were found to produce the U-235 from plutonium in sufficient quantities. It was now time to test the bomb. Other exposives can be tested safely in small a- mounts but a small scale atom bomb would be no bomb at all. U-235 is no more automa- tically explosive than so much sand until the quantity reaches a certain size and shape. If, for a given shape there is a critical weight, at which it explodes, how could man postpone the explosion until a desired mo- ment? The obvious way would be to divide the bomb into two or more well separated parts, bringing them together at the chosen moment with gunpowder or some other con- venient force. tConfinued on page 621 41 IMPRESSIONS Since the motion picture industry has im- proved movies so greatly with sound and colour, going to the show has become one of the most popular forms of entertainment. To keep up with this modern trend, most schools now have up-to-date projectors and show films in school hours. An interesting store of films, mostly on subjects dealing with school work, can be ob- tained from the Department of Education li- brary. This novel way of learning is an excel- lcnt supplement to learning from the old, tra- ditional text book. And what school child isn't pleased when he is allowed to miss the old routine of the classroom and teacher to spend the period watching movies? Is the time well spent? Are we educated as well as amused? Arvida High School has film day about once each month, when most of Friday after- noon is spent seeing films, ranging on a wide variety of topics from the National Film Board or Crawley Films. The following is a short account of the movies seen by the pupils on one of these film days. The first, entitled "Newfoundlanders", was a grim story of the sturdy Newfound- landers who live with the ocean at their door, From the time when the sun rises until it sets, men with unconquerable wills toil on the cruel sea for their very existence. When the season comes for the inshore codfishing, it is usually made a family affair with father, sons, and brothers. Before too long, these resolute men have mastered the art of being jack-of-all- trades, including farmer, mechanic, carpenter, and fisherman. Even though these Newfound- landers get along amazingly well, there is a definite need for contact with the outside world. So each year from the time when spring clears the harbour until the freezeup in the fall, steamers visiting the few ports along the coast occasion interest and excitement. Du- ring the winter when most fishing has stop- ped, one of the most interesting and profitable pastimes is hunting for young seals. To the place where birthblood has left a scar of dazzling stain on the white snow, the men head to strip these seals of their valuable fur. After a hard day's work on the bountiful but cruel sea, the misty shores faithfully lit by lighthouses are a symbol of safe return. This old tradition of those who keep the lights along the shores will remain as long as the seas and the centuries roll on. The next film was one of the favourites, "Eye Witnessn, a type of newsreel with five or six subtitles. This one included: "Still Gold on Them Thar Hills", showing new methods of obtaining gold on a large scale, "Canada's New State Residence", in which we were shown through the home at 24 Sussex Street, "Sister Pelagie", which witnessed the swear- ing-in ceremony of the first Eskimo in history to become a member of the Order of the Grey Nuns, "Trapping the Sea Lamprey" which showed an ingenious method of catching the killer who is such a threat to commercial fishing, and "Chic Chicks in Air Force Bluet' in which a few R.C.A.F. models displayed the fashionable new uniform for W. D.'s, proving that women are women wherever they go. The last film, 'Screaming Jets", kept every body watching closely since jets cruising in the air are no novelty over Arvida. Within the last few years, the whole world has begun to listen to the high-pitched siren of jet pro- pulsion, whose birthplace was Switzerland. In order to keep up with the Russian MIG'S, Canadair of Montreal has started to build jets. along with other members of the U.N. This film showed close-ups of many different types of jets, including the F-86 Sabre and very powerful Strato-Jets, which take off "like a homesick angel". Their top engineers who design the plane from the ground up strive for nothing less than supremacy. One of the top-priority orders now, the CF-100, calls for the closest collaboration of everyone involved. The engine presents the biggest problem as it has to be able to stand terrific heat and still maintain precision action. Every essential ins- trument has to be placed perfectly, since no pilot will have time to fumble for an out-of- reach lever while hurtling through the air in peace or war. When most of the headaches of building are over, the aluminum skin is riveted around the fuselage and the plane is ready for jet propulsion to thrust it through the sky. Has this film day been educational? Has it been worthwhile to allow classes to stop for the afternoon to see movies? These questions can be answered by listening to the pupil's comments on them afterwards, proving that they must have learned something from the films. Very seldom would pupils spend their own free time to talk about some chapter in a history book, but discussions showed that they learned more from the films on Newfoundland and jet planes than most pupils would learn in a week from a text book. Arguments arise which can only be settled by further reading on the subjets. Films naturally hold the inte- rest of most children under sixteen as they are not allowed to go to the theatre in the Province of Ouebecg and since Arvida is so far from most large centers, this means of contact broadens their horizons and deepens their interest in many fields. Generally, every- one has profited in some way from these movies, and they look forward eagerly to next month when film dav comes again. JEAN WOODWARK Grade 11 Q2 HIS MAJESTY, THE RIVER High in the vast unknown called the water- shed, little brooks form and start the long journey to the ocean. These brooks gradually unite until the once small rivulets become a raging torrent defying all. Rushing and ra- cing it journeys on, until suddenly it is in the midst of a great quiet body of water, a lake. Slowly journeying through the lake His Majesty becomes impatient to be on his way again. Suddenly he is free and bigger and his pent up fury is released as he dashes off the falls, "showering and springing, turning and twisting, pouring and roaring, moaning and foaming, dividing and gliding and sliding, clattering and battering and shattering, re- coiling, turmoiling and toiling and boiling," until with a rise and a leap it is on its way again. More subjects join His Majesty in the form of brooks, and he rushes along increasing in size until salt water and level country slow him down until he empties into the ocean and enjoys a well-earned rest. His Majesty has ended his reign, but his successors are fol- lowing. "For men may come, and men may go, but I go on forever." GEORGE GORDON Grade 11 EARLY AMBITIONS Many, if not all, children born and brought up in Canada or the United States of America have, at one time or another, wanted to be a cowboy or cowgirl, whichever was the most convenient. I am not an exception to this, as for a period of almost five years I wanted to be a cowboy. I used to eat, drink, think, dream and act as a cowboy. Riding the wide open spaces of the front yard on my mythical black stallion, I would kill outlaws at a rate of ap- proximately ten per minute. Being a cowboy was great fun until I dis- covered the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in various books and comics. I discarded my imaginary cowboy suit and donned my none- the-less imaginary R.C.M.P. uniform. I always got my man, which is nothing strange among the Mounties. When I was old enough to understand that dreaded noun "WAR" I became a soldier and would lie by the corner of the house and shoot at the trees in the forest at the back of my house, as if they were the charging enemy. I was alone. My buddies were all dead. I was wounded in at least twenty-five places. But did I give in? No sir. I kept fighting until supper time. Meals were often interrupted when sud- denly I would leap from my chair, grab my trusty wooden Htommy gun" and shoot an Henemy" who had come too close. One day my career as a soldier came to a sad end. I had run out of ammunition and had gradually sneaked up on a group of 'tGer- mans" who were standing around with loaded guns. You must not forget that these "Ger- mansi' were really trees, I forgot, I was so carried away by my imagination that I leapt into the group and started to swing my "tom- my gun.'QCrack I I That was the last of my weapon. I was so broken-hearted I could hard- ly eat for a day or two. I would not tell my fa- ther I had broken my gun because he would have laughed at the way I had broken it. One day I went for a bus ride with my father. Then my ambition was to be a bus dri- ver. This ambition was quickly abandoned when I was told of several accidents in which buses come out second-best. I went through a phase of wanting to be everything from a street-cleaner to a king in the course of less than a year. My next ambition was to be a cartoonist but that idea was abandoned, but not com- pletely, two or three years ago. I was off to a good start, if I must say so myself, but had no time to continue. At the present I am thinking of making the Royal Canadian Navy my career. GEORGE GORDON Grade 11 Ilaunnur Bull The following list of names of those men and women who served in the armed forces during World War ll appears on the Honour Roll of the Arvida High School. lMissl -2 Q Daniel Aspinall fJames Beresford John Beresford William Beresford iiGordon Black iiGrant Campbell Roy Campbell Gordon Cooper Ethel Dearasaugh Christin Enslev Roy Enslev Jack Exvensen Lindsay Finney Ray Finney James Greene Thomas Heard Nesbitt Hurley Geoffrey Hutchin Eugene Jousse 1TeacherJ John Juras Chester Lambert Leo Lehtonen Mikey Marinacci Emmett McCartin Percy McLellan i' Have made the supreme sacrifice. 1MissJ 1MissJ James McLeod Melvin McLeod Stanley McLeod Albert McNutt Lloyd McNutt Robert Morrison Cecile Riddell Ernest Rodgers Gordon Saunders Peter Schoch Arnold Schoch Grace Smith tTeacherJ William Sproule Douglas Stronghill Frank VanDame Joe VanDame Keith Wake Robert Wake Richard Whitaker William Whitaker Richard Willows Robert Wyber Hughie Young Walter Zawadsky I"Q"" EW1fMMIMWM 2 k g 1951-52 44 TEEN TOWN 1951-52 During the season of 1950-51, a dance sponsored by the Stevens as Teen Town direc- tors caused so much enthusiasm throughout Arvida for a regular Teen Town that an or- ganization following the B.C. rules and regula- tions was set up this year. Mr. and Mrs.Stevens undertook directing it, with the help of the Clements, Cooks and Keilands. Teen Town activities got under way this season with the "Ballot Ball' on November 30. At this first dance, George Gordon was elec- ted as mayor, Anne Thomson as deputy mayor, Buddy Scott as Chief of Police, Desmond Hudson as Town Engineer, Sharron Beatteay as Treasurer, Helen Gordon as Town Clerk, and Norman Black as sixth alderman. The success of this dance was largely due to the Saguenay Inn. It was decided at Teen Town Council to hold a general business meeting once each month. The first of these, on December 14, was preceded by a sleigh ride. A large crowd turned out despite the very cold night. After a wonderful ride everyone came in to warm up with cocoa and cookies. A special Christmas fling, the Snowball Frolic Formal Dance, held in the Saguenay Inn, proved to be a great success. During the evening the dancers were entertained by a floor show featuring the Mistletoe Misses, the Jingle Bell Janglers and others. A toboggan party on January 11 preceded the first business meeting of the New Year. After many bumps and thrilling rides down Flamand's Hill, every one warmed up with toasted marshmallows around a blazing bon- fire on the hilltop, followed by dancing in the school. Many thanks are given to Mr. Stan Rough and Mr. Jimmy Wright for really moving things at the Hard Times Dance on January 25. A group of twenty enthusiastic members showed a few of the rudiments of square dan- cing to the newcomers who afterwards joined in the fun. Cash prizes were won by Anne Swales and Buddy Scott for wearing the best "hard timesl' costumes. At the Theatre Party on February 8, spe- cial colour films showing winter sports in Nor- way were shown. These were followed by a business meeting and dancing until the curfew tolled at eleven. There was no lack of excitement at the Scavenger Hunt on March 14, when everyone was combing Arvida to find diaper pins, sweet potatoes, button hooks, 1928 pennies and the like. After the prizes were given out and a short business meeting held, there was dan- cmg. 1952 being Leap Year, a Sadie Hawkins Dance was held on March 28. Although not too many teenagers turned out, everyone there spent a very enjoyable evening. All the luck seemed to come to Veronica Boland and Bruce Clark, who won most of the games and novel- ty dances, At the Spring Fling on April 25 elections were held which brought the honour of being Teen Town's King and Queen of the year to Norman Black and Sharron Beatteay. Between dances, things were pepped up with many relays and games. Probably nobody will for- get the look on Norman Black's face as he shoved the last piece of pumpkin pie down to win the men's Pie-Eating Contest. Prizes for the evening were kindly donated by La Patisserie Vaudreuil, Marchand's Florist Shop, and H. Lessard 81 Freres. To the Stevens and their helpers the Teen Towners owe gratitude for the enthusiasm they showed and the assistance given during the season. JEAN WOODWARK jremij bastion MON CHIEN J'ai un petit chien. Il s'appelle SKIP. I1 est noir et blanc. Il aime jouer avec une balle. H aime jouer avec moi dans la neige. Il est un bon chien. Janet Balcom, IV e annee MA PETITE SOEUR J'ai une petite soeur. Elle s'ap- pelle Valerie. Elle a cinq ans. Elle a les yeux bruns et les cheveux blonds. Elle va au Kindergarten Le dimanche elle va a l'ecole du dimanche. J'aime bien ma petite soeur. Marilyn Haryett IVE-:me annee. MA POU PEE J'ai une poupee. Elle s'appelle Judy. Elle a les yeux bleus et les cheveux jaunes. Je l'aime beaucoup. Elle a cinq robesg une bleue, une jaune, une grise, une rose et une en velours. Elle a un manteau gris. Je mets ma poupee dans son lit tous les soirs a sept heures et demie. Elle ferme les yeux et elle dort. Faye Tourner, Ve annee. MON PLUS GRAND DESIRE Mon plus grand desire est de devenir pianiste de concert. Je joue du piano depuis huit ans et j'aime bien cela. J'ai joue quelques fois a la radio et j'ai assiste a quelques concerts aussi. Mes musiciens favoris sont: Beethoven, Mozart, Debussy, Chopin et Haydn. Dernierement, Wilfrid Pelle- tier m'a entendu jouer et il m'a dit de continuer mes etudes. Un jour, j'espere apprendre au conservatoire de Montreal. Jean Aspinall, Vlle annee. MON CHAT Mon chat est noir et blanc. J'ai du plaisir avec mon chat. ll s'ap- pelle Lucky. Il aime a jouer avec une balle de laine. Il part de chez moi le soir et il revient le matin. Lucky mange beaucoup. J'aime bien mon chat. David Hartwick, Vle annee. 47 L'lNDUSTRlE L'industrie Aluminum du Canada est une de ses grandes sources de richesse. Cette grande industrie fait deux cent million de dol- lars de commerce par an et elle emploie douze mille personnes. Les usines d'A1uminum son a Arvida, Isle Maligne, Shawinigan Falls, Toronto, Eto- bicoke, Beauharnois, Kingston, et bientot a Kitimat en Colombie Britannique, L'usine d'Arvida est tres large et elle em- ploie six mille personnes. Presque tout le mon- de qui demeure a Arvida travaille dans l'usine. Le grand developpement de Shipshaw four- ALUMINUM nit le pouvoir pour Arvida. Elle est une des plus grandes usines generatrices dans le monde. En Colombie Britannique ils construisent une usine qui sera prete en dix-neuf cent cinquante quatre. Quand elle sera toute finie elle sera plus grande qu'Arvida. A Toronto ils font toutes sortes de choses en aluminum. Toutes les usines niarchent a capacite parce que l'aluminum est tres demande dans tous les pays du monde. BRENDA BAUMAN Xe Annee LES SPORTS FAVORIS DE QUEBEC Comme l'hiver est la plus longue saison dans la Province de Quebec nous devrions suggerer un sport que vous aimerez le plus. Les sports qui sont les plus connus dans la Province de Quebec sont le ski, la luge, le pa- tinage et la raquette. Le ski est un sport tres interessant. C'est aussi un bon sport car c'est bon pour la sante. En faisant du ski nous pouvons rencontrer bien des amis d'autres parties du monde. Le patinage est une autre sorte de sport. Dans la Province de Quebec les plus ages, comme les jeunes, patinent. La luge est un sport que les Francais font plus que les Anglais. Clest aussi plaisant pour les spectateurs et aussi pour celui qui guide la toboggan. La raquette est un sport auquel les Fran- cais sont plus habitues que les Anglais. lls ai- ment beaucoup jouer a ce sport. Durant l'hiver tous les Canadiens aiment lancer des boules de neige mais des fois ils les font trop dur et ils se font mal. Allons-y les grands comme les petits! Choi- sissons un sport. Il y en a un pour tous ceux qui en veulent. JUNE SANTONI Vllle Annee POURQUOI DEVRIONS-NOUS ETRE BILINGUES? Les deux races principales du Canada sont d'origine Francaise et Anglaise. De notre population Canadienne presque un tier est d'origine Francaise. Mais parce que plusieurs Canadiens Francais ne parlent pas l'Anglais et plusieurs Canadiens Anglais ne parlent pas le Francais il y a toujours de la friction et de la mesenten- te entre eux. Comment le Canada peut-il devenir un grand pays uni si les deux groupes principales ne s'entendent pas ? Comment peuvent-ils s'entendre si la langue de leurs Compatriotes n'est pas comprise? C'est surement plus difficile pour une personne Canadienne-Frangaise de partir de la province de Quebec et dlaller dans d'autres parties de l'Amerique du Nord que pour une Anglaise, car s'est vraiment rare pour cette personne francaise de rencontrer quelqu'un qui parle le frangais. Mais il est aussi neces- saire pour une Anglaise de parler le frangais, non seulement qu'elle aura peut-etre une meil- leur position dans la province de Quebec. mais aussi si elle sort du Canada et des Etats- Unis, elle trouvera aussi que le francais est parle dans beaucoup d'autres pays. Alors done, nous autres de la region du Saguenay, qui avons autour de nous bien de chances pour parler le francais, profitons-en bien pour devenir de meilleurs citoyens. ADELE STEWART Vlle Annee 48 LE TOURlSME AU CANADA Depuis les cinquante ans qui viennent de passer, le tourisme au Canada a augmente plusieurs fois. Maintenant le Canada est un des plus populaires centres dans le monde. Et pourquoi? Le Canada d'aujourd'hui a une centaine d'attractions pour le touriste qui veut passer une ou deux se-maines en se reposant ou acti- vement. Le touriste qui veut se reposer peut trou- ver de nombreux rendez-vous comme Banff ou les laurentides. La on peut avoir une vie tranquille et agreable du matin jusqu'au soir. Pour l'homme ou la dame qui aime une vie de sports, il y en a beaucoup. Dans les laurentides de la peche et de la chasse et d'autre part le tennis, la natation et le golf, sont tous des passe-temps qui attirent le tou- riste en ete. En hiver le patinage, le ski, et la lu ge l'attire. En plus de ces attractions bien des tou- ristes viennent voir quelques endroits comme Shipshavv, les chutes Niagara et 1'eglise de St. Anne de Quebec pour les estropies. Il y a aussi des bons chemins et en somme le climat est agreable. Cfest pour ces raisons alors le tourisme au Canada est si populaire qu'il est. ANNE THOMSON Xie Annee ARVIDA Arvida, "Ville d'Aluminum" a ete fondee en 1925 par la compagnie d'Aluminun'1 du Canada. Elle a ete nommee d'apres Arthur Vining Davis, qui est ne au Massachusetts en 1886 et qui demeure maintenant en Pennsyl- vania. La ville d'Arvida est situee au sud de la riviere Saguenay et a au moment meme une population d'environ onze mille. L'usine d'aluminum est une des plus grandes au monde entier et au moment il y a quelques deux mille cuves en operation. Au delas de six mille employes travaillent actuel- lement dans l'usine. La ville d'Arvida et l'usine ont prosperes beaucoup ces derniers vingt ans et l'alumi- num prend presentement sa place comme in- dustrie importante du Canada. La ville meme, pittoresque, propre, nouvelle et bien divisee est une des plus belles villes du Canada. Les rues diArvida sont tres larges et il y a de beaux gazons et fleurs partout. Le terrain de golf est situe a quelques milles seulement du centre de la ville et possede neuf trous. Au Centre de Recreation il y a plusieurs differentes sections mises a la disposition des sports varies. Au centre de la ville il y a aussi plusieurs eglises et un theatre. Il est at remarquer qu'a Arvida il y a une quinzaine d'ecoles. Le Saguenay Inn est ac- tuellement la demeure de plusieurs inge- nieurs, ainsi que la plupart des institutrices et professeurs de notre ecole. La construction du Saguenay Inn est d'apres un des Vieux manoirs de la vieille France, et est un des plus beaux endroits de la ville. ANN HUDSON Xe annee. U Q 49 Class of 1946: Class of 1947: Class of 1948: Class of 1949: Class of 1950: Class of 1951: NEWS OF FORMER GRADE ELEVEN STUDENTS Arthur Black is stationed with the R. C. A. F. at Saskatoon. Philip Carey is stationed with the U. S. A. F. at Houston, Texas. Alice Dubose is living with her parents in Montreal. Hazel Hughes is married to John Jack and now living in Kenogami. Margaret Hurley is a nurse at the Saguenay General Hospital. Ian McDougall was drowned while swimming in the Shipshaw River. Mary McLellan is teaching at Aylmer, Quebec. She will soon be married to Mr. Gerald Johnston. David Shoch is married and now studying Medecine at McGill University. Beau Scott is stationed with the R. C. A. F. at Trenton. Ralph Fountain is working at Canadair. Barbara Gilbert is taking the B. Sc. course in nursing at the University of Toronto. Tommy Hudson is employed by the Aluminium Laboratories in Arvida. Muriel Lemieux is employed by the Aluminum Company in Arvida. Flora Jane Nayler is teaching at the R. C. A. F. Station at Bagotville. Margaret Riddell is teaching in Montreal. Mike Stefano is attending Bishop's University. Mary Stone is doing missionary work in Saskatchewan. Eila Wirtanen is employed by the Aluminum Company in Arvida. Helen Hudson is married to Peter Marshall and now living in Chicoutimi. Jean McLellan is a nurse at the Lachine General Hospital. Mary Berdey is attending Bishop's University. Ernest Black is attending Mcdonald College. Louise Boddy is employed by the Aluminum Company. She will soon be married. Max Hahto is employed by the Aluminum Company. Next year he will return to university. Terry Santoni is attending Bishops University. Mary Stefano is nurse at the Saguenay General Hospital. Eugene Zinniger is attending Bishop's University. Alex Hrycko is attending the University of New Brunswick. Martha Hurley is a nurse at the Saguenay General Hospital. Margaret Rose Nayler is in Isle-Maligne. Clyde McLellan has been attending the University of New Brunswick. Vivien Farmer is teaching in Quebec City. Marjorie Boutilier is attending Acadia University. Ronnie Santoni is attending Bishop's University. Myrle Boddy is attending Macdonald College. Helena Heinoo is married and now living in Arvida. Miriam Maki is married and now living in the States. Lily Savaoja is teaching French at Kilmar, Quebec. Richard Locke is attending Bishop's University. Phyllis Farmer is taking Household Science at Macdonald College. Shirley Coffey is working in Niagara Falls. Harriet Hurley is in training at the Homeopathic Hospital in Montreal. Joye White is at home in Arvida. Claire Hudson is studying at Marianapolis University in Montreal. Harry Williams is attending Sir George Williams College. Barbara Gordon is working at the Teletype Department in the Main Office. Ray Miron is working in Chicoutimi. Pauline Ivanco is attending Macdonald College. Frank Boland is attending Bishopis College. Jimmy Dunn is working at the Shipshaw Powerhouse. CH S I Ni PQ O N QS L 3 LC. ll y a au Canada 174 bureaux de 174 Simpson order offices across commande Simpson's ii votre service Voici quelques avantages de faire vos achats aux comptoirs postaux Livraison rapide Choix varie de marchandise de qualite Echange immediat ou remboursement Commande par telephone Deux grands moyens pratiques de payer. Comptes courants Paiements mensuels Canada for personalized service. Here are some advantages to buy from the order office Fast delivery Large selection of quality merchandise Prompt exchange or refund Telephone service Two convenient Ways to pay Charge accounts Monthly payment plan You Will Enjoy Shopping at SIMPSONCS' Compliments of : Cote Boivin Auto Service, Inc. Chevrolet - Oldsmobile - Cadillac Camions Chevrolet et Maple Leaf 332, RUE RACINE CHICOUTIMI 781, Sl-Dominique Jonquiere Tel.: 2-3931 CAO Npos vendeurs courent A 53QSommestoujuursi1I'heure Service Rapids ! X11 EX LI CO 22c.5iZ.,ffZ.2'ie' iBisbup's Ulflnth ersttp LENNOXVILLE, QUEBEC Founded 1843 - Royal Charter l853 A residential University for men and women. Faculties of Arts and Science, and Divinity. Courses extending over a period ot three years are provided tor the follow- ing degrees: Bachelor of Arts - B. A. Bachelor of Science - B. Sc. Honours Courses in Arts and Science extend over a period ot four years from the School Leaving Certificate tGrade Xlj. Theological Students may qualify for the B. A. with Theological Options in three years. followed by two Years of Theological study for the Title of L. S. 'I'. Post-graduate work is provided for degrees ot: Master of arts M. A. Master of Education M. Ed. High School Teachers Certificate A Summer School for Teachers, of six weeks' duration, is held during July and August. Valuable Scholarships and Exhibitions. For Calendars. with information regarding entrance requirements, courses and fees. apply: THE REGISTRAR, Lennoxvilie, Que. I M - mimi ' K With the Compliments of X xg! if-N. ! t oo john Murdock Cr Co. f n- X gtg 0 T? if M it Original designs for T. fr T. Auto Supply and school il1SlQ1i21 LIMITED suhuiitted without obligation. I T k .5 ,i Distributor: Internationa ruc s iq ui yb B I R K. S Packard Cars J E W E L L E R S I 504 West, Price Street Chicoutimi i . 5 ,- S EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL AND PHOTOGRAPHIC We carry a complete line of electrical appliances - Paint 8g Hardware and Photographic Supplies. PAUL LALINIE 307, DAVIS res... s-3356 ARVIDA Avec les Compliments de EN BAS DE LA COTE TEL.: 4-4431 CHICOUTIMI Compliments of LES LIQUEURS SAGUENAY Pepsi-Cola - Saguenay Dry - Orange Kist Compliments of: The Berkeley Hotel ll88, Sherbrooke St. West Montreal MA: 7351 Best Wishes from R. P. MONTMINY Imprimerie Commerciale de Chicoutimi, Incorporee PRINTERS - LITHOGRAPHERS STATIONERS 86, Racine St. West CHICOUTIMI Compliments of z Garage LaSalle ARVIDA Compliments of : Adrien Lavoie, Enr. 266 Est, Rue Racine CHICOUTIMI Texaco Dealer Compliments of 1 LE. noxmuiun 'Bs L-E,L1S.:c.ANcE Compliments of the La Patisserie Vaudreuil Arvida, Enr. Cakes for all occasions IOQRUERACJNE CHIC0ll MIR , Whith the Compliments of Continental Stores, X LIMITED A4 as 5 - I0 - I5 STORES E 'Sr f p , -If -. 4l0 Mellon ST. Phone 8-3'lll 573.25 WESTIEQIEQTIQIQUSE Food MiXGl' Pharmacie Vaudreuil ENR. I Pyrex Bowls For Mixing E Light and Portable I Juice Extractor I Extra Power Saguienay Electric Company ARVIDA CHICOUTIMI Dr J.-A. Chabot, prop. Prescriptions, remedes brevetes, rafraichissements 205, LaSalle Arvida u 4 5 n . 1 . ww ,41',w.',L: ' ,RJ . '.,. J, , . . X. , , . I 1 I 5 'I A . H W MMV! V ,Q . 1 ' 3 ".g5.g,u'g14 :aff , 1 I ' A' " 'f ' ' ' 11- - 1 - I X .I 1 .' 5,1-I 'H-.1 ' X 1 r 4 , 1 '.,, - . - I ', ' v4f 3, , f ,U-.G I 1 5 v - H, 'f v . 'L-fk v 4 I - v I lv m,x,l I ., I0 L 1 , , 1.-.,,v, 1 . ,. 'n .,. 1 4 I X v I x,,w 'F . 4 ,M,,,jj'x-- , , ui,-N fi X rl b . v ,. , X . , 1 1 , " , . 1 ,4, . . f . 1 X , 3 f . '1,4.,E1i . ,f,. lr .f t.. x 'IQ' W, ., V. , 'sl ,lm : f3ji.,,,-,HL 'H ' ' ,airy - 1.41 A -- ., 5g'fj""'5'x.x :!.' -4 u. L51 , 1'Q,,7r,w ..x N, Q-495.-.lp N J. .+A-v,1,, wgvn v .., . , A J, 1, , 3? Rafi fq.m-,w , 1, A, 1 , , . - a..x.. .. .fn X, W 1 lx-'., 2 'wi I A I :J vhfg' FT7Y"'f . V ' 'w Y 1' .oC' .'-42" ' 1 4: -'f r. Q -I ,ve A ir - 15,33 ' . 'ef5gLf Z2i-'. ' ' . I .W'1w..'l'-N5 ' 5' " 2:5951 Q 'wif9'.-1,"'n5"" J, . Q .1 .,3 , -.1 W . .jug A.,-,7,1.. b T .. wt:':': MN A .L W . , vgm. ,T ,Q . 4 ' ' I I 1 ,Ag 1,1 . vi lv L 9 J 41' ' ' 1 . xml' . it I Z Y I N V' Q4 . m 1 n 1 , rn "jf . r " 4 ,. L Vg 1 . ' ,af-I '. X VS 'nr' l in 4 , . ' ?',v- ' 4, . . 4-I1 . ,- WV rk'l"', A' "inf 'f - .t A ' '.. I n .L ui I . . ., VA- '..' X'-I ' ,n. '. al, my ,N V., .J '-Wfwxmxn . Q , .V ..-,. , w n I f If uf: , , .,,0- . '. .r nu' xg .' .z , f" F: 'J' 1, .ein 5 ,fwilllf , .V vf, if L, 'fi ' s 1 1 9 f V 1- U- 1 "IA 1 J xl, ,lu . E Q - . I . 1 . 1 ,PHYS . g,4,,w,f gifts 1 H, f v 7 w 'I ,ls GRADUATING STUDENTS. . . You are invited to discuss with any of the officers of Sir George Williams Col- lege, your plans for further education and The College fFaculties of Arts, Science Commercey in which you can complete your study for the degree of B. A.. B. Sc., or B. Com. in day or evening clas- ses. The Day Business School for business, stenographic or secretarial training. The Evening Business School where working people may obtain business or technical training. training. They will be pleased to tell you of... The School of Fine and Applied Arts which offers both day and evening clas- ses in commercial art, drawing, painting, designing, modeling and sculpture. And also of the Evening High School - Col- lege preparatory or general course. Information from the Registrar, 1441 Drummond Street MA 8331. SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS COLLEGE And the Sir George Williams Schools of the Montreal Y. M. C. A. With the Compliments of Compliments de: " ""' ,fjifr-at y --ve Niagara Finance Company, Ltd. if 23, Racine Street East KX, y pyp ,O . .Ea . . s CHICOUTIMI 3 XQX I ff U 0 if ' NX -,.,- -.N Gaston Boule Tel.: 4-4468 A.'-. N!! if With the Compliments of loron 5' Cie, Inc. Bois, Charbon, Huile, Chauttage Arvida Chicoutimi Jonquiere Tel. Bureau 4-3446 The Crown Diamond Paint Co. ltd. Crow-Satin - Decoratone - One Coat Satin ARTIST MATERIAL 66 Est, rue Racine Chicoutimi, Que. FORD - MONARCH Legare Automobile de Chicoutimi, Ltee 54 EST, RUE RACINE Tel.: Bureau 4-4401 Compliments of AUTOBUS SAGUENAY ENC. 113, Moruu s'r. cHncouTm1s Compliments de Caron's Dru Store , g H.-W. Fiamand, Ltee Where your prescriptions are General Contractors filled accurately and 1 Hardware Store 73 King George Sl. Kenogami I 4643 Shmme Jonquiefe N Tel.: 2-5475 Tel.: 2-2501 1 li l E I Compliments of: Riverin 6' Fils Limitee ENTREPRENEUR GENERAL PLOMBERIE ET CHAUFFAGE Dufour 6' Frere Mercerie pour hommes Dufour 6' Dufour , Bureau: Telephone 4-3057 Nouveaufes pour Dames Le Rgyaume deg Dameg 1116, BOU!EVal'd Sf-lgl'IaCe C h ' ' ' P . . I0 Est, Rue Racine chscoufima 'co uhm' Q i SPECIALITE L' T bl eo 'em ay Maison RIBAUD, Em. Gerant Laine et Tissus United Auto Parts Saguenay Limitee 24-6 Est, rue Racine - Chicoufimi Te1s.: 4-4478-T9 244, Blvd Lamarche CHICQUTIMI. QUE, Miles Simard, prop. Tel.: 4-4022 3 this could he, ff ff ff, if fr!!! , X ,ff X h NAME R Teilchei' Q . stef- A ' 361. T Y GQOXOQKSV gggmsh Egggmst- Y EQOHOWSQ, Soucnahgi' Potmqii Eduwtox Laws gs Egecukt Q pfoieisfgl goto? ' Hggxorwr "De 4Xeg . TU- ' ' XSL .- Bug 'cyam CO mfycxanzoe- 1 Phwxccyassxcxsl, PUYSX my TSC Lxitguxs ' want, xdabgfai . xomai, bug Se O If you would Eoin the Authm dxgxglatickgtigg-DXLTED CYYX 3 E ranks of the professions of K seee f INVESFEGATE of eeee as SGWACQS ' ' u.N.B. ,ee Q pw'e5swOfta of ' UNIVERSITY GF NEW BRUNSWECK FREDERICTON, N. B. means typewriters. There are more Underwoods in schools because there are more Underwoods in oftices. Good positions await Underwoodmned fypisfst, UNDERWOUD Tels.: 4-3604, 4-3730 Angle Ste Anne et Racine Succursale 4-6105 Angle Riverin et Racine Y IP WVWN WEMBHAY' hee. vENnEuRs Auromses Des Pnoouws NORTHERN En.EcTRlc La Cie de Ferronnerie C-enerale Arficles de Menage, Cadeaux, Peinture, Vernis, Vaisselle Maieriaux de Construciion Tel: 4-3166 Chicoutimi Biiouleries Cyrille Savarcl Ateliers de Reparations des plus modernes 425 Est, Rue Racine160 Est, Rue Racine Lingerie D'Arvida, Inc. Sgsecialiie merchandise A la verge Yard Goods lmporfations Americaines 410, Rue Mellen Arvida, P. Q. Tel.: 8-5686 En face de la Voisin de Laura Station d'au9obus Secord Tel.: 4-3063 Tel.: 4-4672 Tel.: 8-5706 Lalterie G. H. Dairy, Enr. Laii, Creme, Beurre, Oeufs, Lail Chocolat, Creme glacee 263, Rue Mellon Arvida Les Afeliers Emile Couture, Ltee 61 Ouest, Rue Jacques-Cartier CHICOUTiMI, P. Q Tels. Chic. 4-5118 297, Av. Lafonlaine 4-5534 Chicoufimi, P. Q. Arvida 8-3715 A.-E. Gauthier, Ltee Coal, Wood Dealer Fuel Oil HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTORCYCLE i ,9gL if L E0 L 11 v Auroffoafzf BSA Motorcycle C.C.M. Bikes Austin Cars Telephone 4-4702 Arthur-H.Ca ron, Ltee Nouveaufes ef Merceries 416 Est, rue Racine Chicoutimi Tel.: 2-3863 Michaud 6' Perron LIMITEE Ferronnerie et Quincaillerie Tel.: 2-6766 Pharmacia Ste-Familie F. A. Fortin, Prop. GROS ET DETAIL Prescription Specialites: Fournitures de moulins, GFFTS - SUNDRIES forge, et materiaux de construction. I 189, St-Dominique Jonquiere, P.Q. 50' Ste-Famlne Kenugaml Avec les Compliments of the Compliments de , Gauthier Meubles, Enr. Jonuulere Automobile Lnmltee Mellon Street Arvida Tel.: 2-3581 Gagnon Automobile Ltee Distributeur Chrysler - Plymouth - Fargo JONQUIERE, P. Q. Compliments of the Arvida Mix 5' Supply, Company, Limited Ready Mix Concrete 536, St-Dominique Tel.: 2-3846 Tel.: 8-3173 Arvida Tel.: 8-3805 Tel. Mag.: 4-4151 C. P. 263 Buanderie ARVI A Laundry Gilbert G Freres, Ltee REGND. 401 Est, Rue Racine, Chicoutimi ge,-vice 48 hem-es ENTREPRENEURS ELECTRICIENS Distributeurs de fournitures 28, Lasalle St. Arvida et d'Accessoires Electriques Enioy a QQWNEYB Oh Henry - Cocoanut Lunch - Eatmore-Caravan - Nut Milk - Whole Almond They'r Cracker Jacks For a perfect fit and a better service visit our store. Latlamme Cr Co. Ltd. Tailors - Woolens merchants Men's and Ladies Wear 317-321 East Racine Chicoutimi AU COQ D'OR "Restaurant par Excellence" Steaks Huitres Homards Spaghetti Pculet B. B. Q. Rue Racine Chicoutimi Tel.: 4-3934 Cgmpljmentg of Tel: 4-4029 267 Racine East CHICOUTIMI HANDICRAFTS Saguenay Oxigene, Enr. 140 Est, Blvd Lamarche CHICOUTIMI, Que. L'Artisanat Sagueneen Handwoven works Bedspreads, Blankets Tablecloths Luncheon sets, Scarves crocheted and Tressed rugs. Hand knitted socks, Mits. Tels. Jonquiere 2-2646 2-2855 Tel: Montreal LAN. 9591 MARK GILLICK fr FRERES MANUFACTURIERS DE FouRRuREs 209, Rue St-Dominique Jonquiere, P. Q. Gros - Details : Specialites de tous genres de fourrures Mouton de Perse - Rat musque naturel - Seal, etc. Gris ou noir Louttre Pique - Castor - Visons I i But he has The right formula for budget problems. - sfeady saving af xl N HV 70 A Nllll0l! OWAZJMIIX BANK OF MONTREALI, 661-it4d4h70!4f 3:2416 Arvida Branch: J. RODOLPHE LAVOIE, Imanager x f - 5.-3. ,151 If W Zu , W Y Ijwxmg If o ,Q 5 9 ff - Yin q. -gm ff, ,fu WORKING WITH CANADIANS IN EVERY WALK OF LIFE SINCE I817 Compliments of the Aa-vida AtI1Iet'ic and Recreation Association N My .... A ,...,., .,. O O -'iiaiig 1-'ff Q. EsE52?ff2i2f1f1ffi-ff'If" ..:1 . 'H I .g.-I-E32-Z3'g'?'i1:-'-'- ' V U.'Z'I3". . -' 3-2:1 - 1- b- .. 1 f ' 3225225 '.,s.s:1-A'.Q.1:E:EEElE" -5? If--" - 'iff' ' :fE5E5EZ'f:E5:'-. ff-55525531513 ' 1-1-g r. ' . A--,Q-:':i'1"" :5:5:5:55:' .-x ErErIfE'Z-.1- " za- lf ,::1:::f:2f,:sQs:s:s:2:f:f- ' . 1:-gg ,..-1.4.4, I z:g51:::,:--g,,.,, . :- -ff .5:.:5:2:f:5x-.1r:rErfrl'f """ ,:,1::::g:' S ,NNW , M f 5 v' , , -sg: Wx jr gt as gm ,.....,:., W ,1.,, ,,.,.,. : s .V A at 5 GET AIRBORNE NOW! win your wings and fly as a PILOT wiflz fire Royal Canadian Air Force If you are pbyficalbfff, between IS mm' 24 mm' bazvfzmi01'Maf1'Zc1z!afi01z or egzzivfzlezzt-fzppL1f right away f0j'01!l'IZ6fII'E.ff RCAFRefrnifi1zig Unit- or write today to DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL MANNING, RCAF HEADQUARTERS, OTTAWA ' CAF 80M : , , H V E '-4- :hm AVI' -,.- '."-" ,Z N h N I M3 '-,'. i:-:2:2:1.1:f:1 -"'A :::f: ---""'- '-'- , 62 A SAILOR iConfin.ued from page 351 From South America he went to Galveston, Texas. From Galveston he went to Florida. He said that everywhere you'd go in Florida you'd see oranges. From Florida he went to Bremen, Germany. From Germany he went to four different ports in Spain. From Spain he went through the Panama Canal to Van- couver. From Vancouver he went to Florida. From Florida he went to many other places in the United States. The last place he went to was New York. There he got off the boat and went by train to Montreal, where he stayed a few weeks and then he came to Arvida. He stayed in Arvida for two weeks and then went back to Montreal to get another boat. The name of the boat was "S. S. Oceanside." On that boat he started at Montreal and went to the United States. From there he went to Japan, from Japan he went to Vancouver, then to Florida and to Manchester England. From there he went to Bergen in Norway, from there he was going to Mobile, Alabama in the United States. While going there he was caught in a big storm. The waves were so big that the Water came into the boat. The water was higher than my brother's bunk and higher than the ceiling in his room and so he couldn't sleep for three nights. The water carried out his suit case and all the things inside it. It also carried out all the clothes that were in the boat. Luckily they were near Ireland and went there to get some clothes and food because they lost all their food. Then they went to Mobile, Alabama, and from there to Galveston again. From Galveston they went through the Suez Canal and Red Sea and to Bombay, India, again. He stayed in Bombay for eleven days. Now he is on his way from Bombay, India, to Baltimore, Maryland, in the United States. JOHN HRYCKO Grade Six ATOMIC ENERGY lCon1'inued from page 407 The atom bomb was now possible, all ma- jor difficulties having been solved. The first atom bomb was soon built and tested on July 16, 1945 in the New Mexican Desert. The jury was convinced. The tremendous endeavour which pro- duced the atom bomb was now completed, the bomb was soon to be used against the enemy. On August 16, 1945 Hiroshima was annihi-- lated and three days later a second bomb fell on a second Japanese city. Four days afterward the formal Japanese surrender was signed. The bomb was bringing peace to the world and offered unbelievable possibilities. Two dozen men, TWO DOZEN, who suf- fered no scratch, had killed or injured THREE HUNDRED THOUSAND JAPANESE. In contrast. in two and a half months our forces were driving the Germans' from. Nor- mandy beaches to their own frontier, H1tler's forces lost only two hundred thousand men in dead and wounded. Battles as deadly as the Somme or Ypres of World War I, both drawn out 'for' months were won in seconds with the tripping of a lever. This awesome force has brought one War to an end and may prevent future wars also. If we can build up a sufficient stock of atomic weapons. and make any possible aggressor realize that it would be folly to attack us, then we may obtain peace. But we must also. make other nations realize that we do not intend to use them other than for the purpose of self-defense. All people in our country do not agree with this theory. But one premise is certain, to keep peace, men must honestly recognize and eliminate the things they do and that nations do which cumulate in blood- shed. Each of us must examine his own con- science. Meanwhile, science is working on ways to employ the atoms energy for man's benefit, ways that might even in time utterly over- shadow the first destructive application. We must face the fact that this is the be- ginning of the Atomic Age. It is an age when sufficient fuel to carry a steamship around the world can be carried in a fountain pen. Submarines, cars, planes, and other modern machines now powered by electricity or internal combustion engines will soon be using the power locked in the atom. It is even being used, as depicted in a re- cent issue of Macleans Magazine, for cures for illnesses for which formerly there were no cures. Since the announcement of atomic power many people feared that a dark end would eventually befall them. Some demanded that the bomb be outlawed, others simply gave up hope. But peace has never been made by out- lawing a given weapon. This is the Atomic Age-an unknown age with a new way of life. We must face it. As for those who have lost hope I can merely offer these wise words taken from a Christmas address by His Majesty, the Late King George VI - - - UGO out into the dark and put your hand into the hand of God and that shall be to you better than light and safer than the known way." DESMOND HUDSON. Grade X Information on atomic energy from "Science Digestf' 63 A Aluminum Company of Canada ,,,v,7, Adrien Lavoie, Enr. ..W,,.,,,w7,7,,,..,,,,,,,v,,,,,,,,,,7,,,7 ,,,,,,, . Arthur H. Caron, Ltee ,,,w,....,,,,,,,,,,.,ww,777777777,,,,,7,77,,77,, Arvida Athletic and Recreation Association ,,,,,,,,o, Arvida Laundry ,w,w,,,,,,,,.,..,i,,,,,,,77,,777,777777,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,,i. Arvida Ready Mix .,7. i,,,77.. Au Coq d'Or ,,777,,,,,,,,,7,,777,77,7777 Autobus Saguenay, Inc. c,,,, C B Bank of Montreal ....,.,. Berkeley Hotel 7c,.,.,., Birks' .,...s.,..,..,........7......, Bishop's University ,,,,7,77 C Caron's Drug Store .,s,,,s, Chez Gosselin ......,Vv...,Y Chez Marshall ......,.,..Y,..,,.s,ss,.,,ss Continental Store, Ltd ,,,,,,,s,s,,,,s,, C6te Boivin Auto Service, Inc. Crown Diamond Paint Co. Ltd Cyrille Savard ,,,,,,,,77,,.,,,, ,Y,,,,,, ,Y,,,, D Dufour Sz Dufour e,,e, E F G Gagnon Automobile, Ltee ..,,,, Gagnon Freres r7,,7l7777.r,....,..., Garage LaSalle .ii.,,,i..,,7,7,,,. Gauthier Meubles, Enr. eee,. . G.-H. Dairy, Enr. .,,,,Y,,.,,,,7 . Gilbert Sz Freres, Ltee ..ee, Grave1's Drug Store 7u,e,, H H. Lessard Sz Freres, Ltee ueu, e,eee,r Hudson Electrical Works Reg'd ,,ee, Imprimerie Commerciale de Chic. J John Murdock Sz Co. ............... . Jonquiere Automobile, Ltee ..... Joron Sz Cie, Inc. ................... . J. R. Labbe ........................,... J. W. Flamand, Ltee ..... K Inc. ..., .. ..... List of Advertisers L Lalime Paul .,,......,. , .............,,..,..,.., . La Cie de Ferronnerie Generale .,,, Laflamme Sz Co. Limited ,,,,,,,, , ,, ,, La Librairie Commerciale, Ltee ....,,,, L'Artisanat Sagueneen e.ee.e ......e.e..e Lasalle Coke 1A. E. Gauthierj .7,,, Legare Automobile de Chicoutimi, Leo Automobile, Ltee ,,,,,..,,,,,,. , ,,,,,., , Ltee 52 , ,, 57 , 59 50 59 Les Ateliers Emile Couture, Ltee .... .,,,,, Les Liqueurs Saguenay ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Lessard Sz Freres ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Lingerie d'Arvida, Inc. ....,, , Lowney's ,..,., ,..........,.., .,,.r. M Maison Ribaud, Enr. ...,,. , Mark Gillick Sz Freres .e,,,,, Michaud Sz Perron, Ltee Montreal Book Room. Ltd ,,,, , Magasin E-M Store ,.,, ,..,.. N Neilson's Chocolates ,,,,,,,,,e,,,,,,,,,ee,,,,, Niagara Finance Company, Ltd ,,c, O P Patisserie Vaudreuil Arvida, Enr. Pharmacie Ste-Famille ..,.,..,.,.,,,,.. Pharmacie Vaudreuil, Enr. r,,,, 7 Potvin Sz Tremblay, Ltee , ,, Q R R. C. A. F. ,,.,..,.,..,.,..,.,.... . Riverin Sz Fils, Ltee ,,,,,,,., Royal Bank of Canada .,.,,., S Saguenay Electric Company ..,,, . Saguenay Inn ....,..,.,,...........,,..., , .. . Saguenay Oxygene, Enr. ,,,,,,,., , Simpson's ,, ................... .... . .. .. H Sir George Williams College Steinberg's ........i...........,.V.... T T. Ka T. Auto Supply, Limited ...c,. U Underwood ..... ..... .... ....... .................... United Auto Parts, Saguenay Ltee University of New Brunswick ..l.l... V Vogue Cleaners ...,.. 57 54 57 ,. 57 52 53 57 , 59 55 59 ,, ,58 4 2 Back Cover , 54 53 . ,, 58 53 56 6l 55 3 ,, ,, 53 4 59 , , 50 54 ,, 2 51 56 55 ,, 56 2 XE! X THIS IS MY TOWN... AND YOURS TOO! . . . I was born here . . . so were you probably . . . Your father and mine helped to build it. It is our home. TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO .... . . . There was iust farm land . . . Then one day came men of vision, of enterprise . .. They saw a great future in the Saguenay and its swift river . . . The farm land become a city - Arvida - a symbol of tree enter- prise, under which system, vision, initiative and work are rewarded. OUR TO WN .... . . . has grown tremendously in twenty-five years . . . it is still growing. We all have our part to play in its life . . . Let's play that part together. ALCAN T and its affiliates in the Saguenay , ARVIDA - CHICOUTIMI - ISLE MALIGNE - PORT ALFRED CHUTE-A-LA-SAVANNE - CHUTE-DU-DIABLE - SHIPSHAW AUTGGRAPHS 94 E EWQXRSQSE cflooo . .5 gmwwmg Q' N35 Q10iWf9f1P, 4 Q 6,9 69 T Neilsnds MALTED WMILKW THE CDHHERCIIAL PRES OF CHICOUTHI I. INC. u 4 5 n . 1 . ww ,41',w.',L: ' ,RJ . '.,. J, , . . X. , , . I 1 I 5 'I A . H W MMV! 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""1", 1' ,' .. 1.1, .-, 2 Graciously :- Gracieusetez- MACASIN E-M STORE C.-E. TREMBLAY, Chicoutimi C.-E. TREMBLAY, Kenoami, Ionquiere Dry Goods Stores - Nouveautes C.-E. TREMBLAY, prop. r- 5333 3395+ STE' N BERG5 Q o Marche f"A"'if'a gay? sims at. carre Davis m tj 0 Located at Davis Square 0l'Vlf,9 lf en . Gravelfs Drug Store el 8-3631 343, Davis Sfreef Where You Shop with Confid ence Nfffayfuns 414, Mellon Sf. Tel. 8-5712 Arvida Beauty preparations: E. Arden, Rubenstein, Yardley, Max Factor, etc. YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD DRUGGIST S. A. ' D CBEANERS 0 ODORLESS CLEANING Genesf, Prop.


Suggestions in the Arvida High School - Yearbook (Arvida, Quebec Canada) collection:

Arvida High School - Yearbook (Arvida, Quebec Canada) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 75

1952, pg 75

Arvida High School - Yearbook (Arvida, Quebec Canada) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 7

1952, pg 7

Arvida High School - Yearbook (Arvida, Quebec Canada) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 7

1952, pg 7

Arvida High School - Yearbook (Arvida, Quebec Canada) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 31

1952, pg 31

Arvida High School - Yearbook (Arvida, Quebec Canada) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 10

1952, pg 10

Arvida High School - Yearbook (Arvida, Quebec Canada) online yearbook collection, 1952 Edition, Page 70

1952, pg 70

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FIND FRIENDS AND CLASMATES GENEALOGY ARCHIVE REUNION PLANNING
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